WorldWideScience

Sample records for reactor pressure-vessel wall

  1. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction. (Auth.)

  2. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  3. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention applies to a pressure vessel for nuclear reactors whose shell, made of cast metal segments, has a steel liner. This liner must be constructed to withstand all operational stresses and to be easily repairable. The invention solves this problem by installing the liner at a certain distance from the inner wall of the pressure vessel shell and by filling this clearance with supporting concrete. Both the concrete and the steel liner must have a lower prestress than the pressure vessel shell. In order to avoid damage to the liner when prestressing the pressure vessel shell, special connecting elements are provided which consist of welded-on fastening elements projecting into recesses in the cast metal segments of the pressure vessel. Their design is described in detail. (TK) [de

  4. Reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use

  5. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  6. Remote through-wall sampling of the Trawsfynydd reactor pressure vessel: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curry, A.; Clayton, R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarises the application of robotic equipment for gaining access to and removing through-wall samples from welds of the reactor pressure vessel at Trawsfynydd power station. The environment, which presents hazards due to ionising radiation, radioactive contamination and asbestos bearing materials is described. The means of access, by use of remote vehicles complete with robotic manipulators supported by additional vehicles, is reviewed. The use of Abrasive Water Jet Cutting for sample removal is introduced. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed. (Author)

  7. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Within the framework of the IAEA extrabudgetary programme on the Safety of WWER-440/230 NPPs, a list of safety issues requiring broad studies of generic interest have been agreed upon by an Advisory Group who met in Vienna in September 1990. The list was later revised in the light of the programme findings. The information on the status of the issues, and on the amount of work already completed and under way in the various countries, needs to be compiled. Moreover, an evaluation of what further work is required to resolve each one of the issues is also necessary. In view of this, the IAEA has started the preparation of a series of status reports on the various issues. This report on the generic safety issue ''Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement'' presents a comprehensive survey of technical information available in the field and identifies those aspects which require further investigation. 39 refs, 21 figs, 4 tabs

  8. Reactor pressure vessel failure probability following through-wall cracks due to pressurized thermal shock events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, F.A.; Garnich, M.R.; Simonen, E.P.; Bian, S.H.; Nomura, K.K.; Anderson, W.E.; Pedersen, L.T.

    1986-04-01

    A fracture mechanics model was developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to predict the behavior of a reactor pressure vessel following a through-wall crack that occurs during a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event. This study, which contributed to a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) program to study PTS risk, was coordinated with the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The PNL fracture mechanics model uses the critical transients and probabilities of through-wall cracks from the IPTS Program. The PNL model predicts the arrest, reinitiation, and direction of crack growth for a postulated through-wall crack and thereby predicts the mode of vessel failure. A Monte-Carlo type of computer code was written to predict the probabilities of the alternative failure modes. This code treats the fracture mechanics properties of the various welds and plates of a vessel as random variables. Plant-specific calculations were performed for the Oconee-1, Calvert Cliffs-1, and H.B. Robinson-2 reactor pressure vessels for the conditions of postulated transients. The model predicted that 50% or more of the through-wall axial cracks will turn to follow a circumferential weld. The predicted failure mode is a complete circumferential fracture of the vessel, which results in a potential vertically directed missile consisting of the upper head assembly. Missile arrest calculations for the three nuclear plants predict that such vertical missiles, as well as all potential horizontally directed fragmentation type missiles, will be confined to the vessel enclosre cavity. The PNL failure mode model is recommended for use in future evaluations of other plants, to determine the failure modes that are most probable for postulated PTS events

  9. Power reactor pressure vessel benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the current status of experimental and calculational benchmarks for use in understanding the radiation embrittlement effects in the pressure vessels of operating light water power reactors. The requirements of such benchmarks for application to pressure vessel dosimetry are stated. Recent developments in active and passive neutron detectors sensitive in the ranges of importance to embrittlement studies are summarized and recommendations for improvements in the benchmark are made. (author)

  10. Head spray nozzle in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Shun-ichi.

    1990-01-01

    In a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor, a head spray nozzle is used for cooling the head of the pressure vessel and, in view of the thermal stresses, it is desirable that cooling is applied as uniformly as possible. A conventional head spray is constituted by combining full cone type nozzles. Since the sprayed water is flown down upon water spraying and the sprayed water in the vertical direction is overlapped, the flow rate distribution has a high sharpness to form a shape as having a maximum value near the center and it is difficult to obtain a uniform flow rate distribution in the circumferential direction. Then, in the present invention, flat nozzles each having a spray water cross section of laterally long shape, having less sharpness in the circumferential distribution upon spraying water to the inner wall of the pressure vessel and having a wide angle of water spray are combined, to make the flow rate distribution of spray water uniform in the inner wall of the pressure vessel. Accordingly, the pressure vessel can be cooled uniformly and thermal stresses upon cooling can be decreased. (N.H.)

  11. Transient temperature and stress distributions in the pressure vessel's wall of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, G.A. da

    1979-01-01

    In order to calculate the temperature distribution in a reactor vessel wall which is under the effect of gamma radiation originated in the reactor core, a numerical solution is proposed. This problem may arise from a reactor cooling pump failure .The thermal stresses are also calculated. (Author) [pt

  12. Reactor pressure vessel status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Wichman, K.; Elliot, B.

    1994-12-01

    This report gives a brief description of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), followed by a discussion of the radiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials and the two indicators for measuring embrittlement, the end-of-license (EOL) reference temperature and the EOL upper-shelf energy. It also summarizes the GL 92-01 effort and presents, for all 37 boiling water reactor plants and 74 pressurized water reactor plants in the United States, the current status of compliance with regulatory requirements related to ensuring RPV integrity. The staff has evaluated the material data needed to predict neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline materials. These data will be stored in a computer database entitled the reactor vessel integrity database (RVID). This database will be updated annually to reflect the changes made by the licensees in future submittals and will be used by the NRC staff to assess the issues related to vessel structural integrity

  13. Heat treatment device for extending the life of a pressure vessel, particularly a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, P.; Mueller, E.; Poerner, H.; Weber, R.

    1979-01-01

    A support body in the form of an insulating cylinder is tightly sealed by connected surfaces at its outer circumference to the inner wall of the pressure vessel. It forms an annular heating space. The heat treatment or tempering of the pressure vessel takes place with the reactor space empty and screened from the outside by ceiling bolts. Heating gas or an induction winding can be used as the means of heating. (DG) [de

  14. Ultrasound periodic inspections of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haniger, L.

    1980-01-01

    Two versions are described of ultrasonic equipment for periodic inspections of reactor pressure vessels. One uses the principle of exchangeable programmators with solid-state logic while the other uses programmable logic with semiconductor memories. The equipment is to be used for inspections of welded joints on the upper part of the V-1 reactor pressure vessel. (L.O.)

  15. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  16. Reactor pressure vessel. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, B.J.; Hackett, E.M.; Lee, A.D.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the issues raised as a result of the staffs review of Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, Revision 1, responses and plant-specific reactor pressure vessel (RPV) assessments and the actions taken or work in progress to address these issues. In addition, the report describes actions taken by the staff and the nuclear industry to develop a thermal annealing process for use at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This process is intended to be used as a means of mitigating the effects of neutron radiation on the fracture toughness of RPV materials. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements and licensee commitments regarding RPV integrity. GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, was issued as a result of generic issues that were raised in the NRC staff's reviews of licensee responses to GL 92-01, Revision 1, and plant-specific RPV evaluations. In particular, an integrated review of all data submitted in response to GL 92-01, Revision 1, indicated that licensees may not have considered all relevant data in their RPV assessments. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1996. An update of this report will be issued at a later date

  17. 1-Dimensional simulation of thermal annealing in a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel wall section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.; Acton, R.U.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this work was to provide experimental heat transfer boundary condition and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section thermal response data that can be used to benchmark computer codes that simulate thermal annealing of RPVS. This specific protect was designed to provide the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with experimental data that could be used to support the development of a thermal annealing model. A secondary benefit is to provide additional experimental data (e.g., thermal response of concrete reactor cavity wall) that could be of use in an annealing demonstration project. The setup comprised a heater assembly, a 1.2 in x 1.2 m x 17.1 cm thick [4 ft x 4 ft x 6.75 in] section of an RPV (A533B ferritic steel with stainless steel cladding), a mockup of the open-quotes mirrorclose quotes insulation between the RPV and the concrete reactor cavity wall, and a 25.4 cm [10 in] thick concrete wall, 2.1 in x 2.1 in [10 ft x 10 ft] square. Experiments were performed at temperature heat-up/cooldown rates of 7, 14, and 28 degrees C/hr [12.5, 25, and 50 degrees F/hr] as measured on the heated face. A peak temperature of 454 degrees C [850 degrees F] was maintained on the heated face until the concrete wall temperature reached equilibrium. Results are most representative of those RPV locations where the heat transfer would be 1-dimensional. Temperature was measured at multiple locations on the heated and unheated faces of the RPV section and the concrete wall. Incident heat flux was measured on the heated face, and absorbed heat flux estimates were generated from temperature measurements and an inverse heat conduction code. Through-wall temperature differences, concrete wall temperature response, heat flux absorbed into the RPV surface and incident on the surface are presented. All of these data are useful to modelers developing codes to simulate RPV annealing

  18. Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This component will be larger than any nuclear reactor pressure vessel presently in service in the United States. The RPV will be taller, larger in diameter, thicker walled, heavier and most likely fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site of multiple subcomponent pieces. The pressure vessel steel can either be a conventional materials already used in the nuclear industry such as listed within ASME A508/A533 specifications or it will be fabricated from newer pressure vessel materials never before used for a nuclear reactor in the US. Each of these characteristics will present a

  19. Reactor pressure vessel thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    The steel plates and/or forgings and welds in the beltline region of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are subject to embrittlement from neutron irradiation. This embrittlement causes the fracture toughness of the beltline materials to be less than the fracture toughness of the unirradiated material. Material properties of RPVs that have been irradiated and embrittled are recoverable through thermal annealing of the vessel. The amount of recovery primarily depends on the level of the irradiation embrittlement, the chemical composition of the steel, and the annealing temperature and time. Since annealing is an option for extending the service lives of RPVs or establishing less restrictive pressure-temperature (P-T) limits; the industry, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have assisted in efforts to determine the viability of thermal annealing for embrittlement recovery. General guidance for in-service annealing is provided in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard E 509-86. In addition, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N-557 addresses annealing conditions (temperature and duration), temperature monitoring, evaluation of loadings, and non-destructive examination techniques. The NRC thermal annealing rule (10 CFR 50.66) was approved by the Commission and published in the Federal Register on December 19, 1995. The Regulatory Guide on thermal annealing (RG 1.162) was processed in parallel with the rule package and was published on February 15, 1996. RG 1.162 contains a listing of issues that need to be addressed for thermal annealing of an RPV. The RG also provides alternatives for predicting re-embrittlement trends after the thermal anneal has been completed. This paper gives an overview of methodology and recent technical references that are associated with thermal annealing. Results from the DOE annealing prototype demonstration project, as well as NRC activities related to the

  20. Some aspects of reactor pressure vessel integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korosec, D.; Vojvodic, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Reactor pressure vessel of the pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant is the subject of extreme interest due to the fact that presents the pressure boundary of the reactor coolant system, which is under extreme thermal, mechanical and irradiation effects. Reactor pressure vessel by itself prevents the release of fission products to the environment. Design, construction and in-service inspection of such component is governed by strict ASME rules and other forms of administrative control. The reactor pressure vessel in nuclear power plant Kriko is designed and constructed in accordance with related ASME rules. The in-service inspection program includes all requests presented in ASME Code section XI. In the present article all major requests for the periodic inspections of reactor pressure vessel and fracture mechanics analysis are discussed. Detailed and strict fulfillment of all prescribed provisions guarantee the appropriate level of nuclear safety. (author)

  1. Computerized reactor pressure vessel materials information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Monserrate, C.; Kenworthy, L.D.; Tether, C.D.

    1980-10-01

    A computerized information system for storage and retrieval of reactor pressure vessel materials data was established, as part of Task Action Plan A-11, Reactor Vessel Materials Toughness. Data stored in the system are necessary for evaluating the resistance of reactor pressure vessels to flaw-induced fracture. This report includes (1) a description of the information system; (2) guidance on accessing the system; and (3) a user's manual for the system

  2. Neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel wall - a comparison of French and German procedures and strategies in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricot, N.; Jendrich, U.

    2003-01-01

    While the neutrons within the core may take part in the chain reaction, those neutrons emitted from the core are basically lost for the energy production. This 'neutron leakage' represents a loss of fuel efficiency and causes neutron embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall. The latter raises safety concerns, needs to be monitored closely and may necessitate mitigating measures. There are different strategies to deal with these two undesirable effects: The neutron emission may be reduced to some extent all around the core or just at the 'hot spots' of RPV embrittlement by tailored core loading patterns. A higher absorption rate of neutrons may also be achieved by a larger water gap between the core and the RPV. In this paper the inter-relations between the distribution of neutron flux, core geometry, core loading strategy, RPV embrittlement and its surveillance are discussed at first. Then the different strategies followed by the German and French operators are described. Finally the conclusions will highlight the communalities and differences between these strategies as different approaches to the same problem of safety as well as economy. (authors)

  3. How to replace a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, R.

    1996-01-01

    A potential life extending procedure for a nuclear reactor after, say, 40 years of service life, might in some circumstances be the replacement of the reactor pressure vessel. Neutron induced degradation of the vessel might make replacement by one of a different material composition desirable, for example. Although the replacement of heavy components, such as steam generators, has been possible for many years, the pressure vessel presents a much more demanding task if only because it is highly irradiated. Some preliminary feasibility studies by Siemens are reported for the two removal strategies that might be considered. These are removal of the entire pressure vessel in one piece and dismantling it into sections. (UK)

  4. Results of reactor pressure vessels ISI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepcek, S.

    1994-01-01

    To find out the possible influence of the annealing process to reactor pressure vessel integrity, a large in-service inspection programme has been implemented as an associated activity to reactor pressure vessel annealing. In this paper the approach to the RPV in-service inspection is shown. Also, the main results and conclusions following in-service inspection are presented. (author). 3 refs, 1 fig

  5. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactor plant consisting of several pre-stressed cast pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmann, E.

    1984-01-01

    Several cylindrical pressure vessel components made of pressure castings are arranged on a sector of a circle around the cylindrical cast pressure vessel for accommodating the helium cooled HTR. Each component pressure vessel is connected to the reactor vessel by a horizontal gas duct. The contact surfaces between reactor and component pressure vessel are in one plane. In the spaces between the individual component pressure vessels, there are supporting blocks made of cast iron, which are hollow and also have flat surfaces. With the reactor vessel and the component pressure vessels they form a disc-shaped connecting part below and above the gas ducts. (orig./PW)

  6. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Kugeler, K.; Kugeler, M.; Petersen, K.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1983-01-01

    This construction of a container, which is pressure-relieved by axial-central tensioning cables or reinforcing cables distributed over the circumference, makes a reduction of the wall thickness for the floor and roof, which was previously 2.5 metres by about 40% possible, and thus reduce manufacturing and cost problems. This is achieved by an appreciable increase of the prestressing exerted by the tensioning cables as this is taken up, not by the elasticity of the roof and floor, but instead by an intermediate part of pressure-resisting material. Such a container consists of a vertical cylindrical jacket of, for example, 20 metres diameter and 18 metres height, of a roof and floor of, for example, 1.50 metres thickness each and the intermediate part, which keeps the spacing of floor and roof as a central piece. This intermediate part which is taken through seals through the container can be imagined as a double tube of outside tube diameter of, for example, 4 metres and inside tube diameter of 2 metres with both tubes having thick walls. 4 tensioning cables displaced vertically by 900 run in the cylindrical annulus between the outer and inner tubes which are brought to the required pretension, e.g. 80,000 tonnes by nuts situated on the outside. The inner tube projects through the floor and roof. Its openings act as manholes and for the introduction of pipelines. These can, for example, carry a cooling medium for a reactor core via further ducts into the inside of the container. Container wall, floor and roof and the intermediate part in the form of a double tube are made up of cast steel segments or sectors in several layers. (RW)

  7. Reactor water spontaneous circulation structure in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The gap between the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor and a reactor core shroud forms a down comer in which reactor water flows downwardly. A feedwater jacket to which feedwater at low temperature is supplied is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure vessel just below a gas/water separator. The reactor water at the outer circumferential portion just below the air/water separator is cooled by the feedwater jacket, and the feedwater after cooling is supplied to the feedwater entrance disposed below the feedwater jacket by way of a feedwater introduction line to supply the feedwater to the lower portion of the down comer. This can cool the reactor water in the down comer to increase the reactor water density in the down comer thereby forming strong downward flows and promote the recycling of the reactor water as a whole. With such procedures, the reactor water can be recycled stably only by the difference of the specific gravity of the reactor water without using an internal pump. In addition, the increase of the height of the pressure vessel can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  8. Pressure vessel for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the retention of low temperature water and also prevent the thermal fatigue of the pressure vessel by making large the curvature radius of a pressure vessel of a feed water sparger fitting portion and accelerating the mixing of low-temperature water at the feed water sparger base and in-pile hot water. Constitution: The curvature radius of the corner of the feed water sparger fitting portion in a pressure vessel is formed largely. In-pile circulating water infiltrates up to the base portion of the feed water sparger to carry outside low-temperature water at the base part, which is mixed with in-pile hot water. Accordingly, low temperature water does not stay at the base portion of the feed water sparger and generation of thermal fatigue in the pressure vessel can be prevented and the safety of the BWR type reactor can be improved. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Integrity of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flewitt, P.E.J.; Williams, G.H.; Wright, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    The background to the safety assessment of the steel reactor pressure vessels for Magnox power stations is reviewed. The evolved philosophy adopted for the 1991 safety cases prepared for the continued operation of four Magnox power stations operated by Nuclear Electric plc is described, together with different aspects of the multi-legged integrity argument. The main revisions to the materials mechanical property data are addressed together with the assessment methodology adopted and their implications for the overall integrity argument formulated for the continued safe operation of these reactor pressure vessels. (author)

  10. Light Water Reactor-Pressure Vessel Surveillance project computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    A dedicated process control computer has been implemented for regulating the metallurgical Pressure Vessel Wall Benchmark Facility (PSF) at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The purpose of the PSF is to provide reliable standards and methods by which to judge the radiation damage to reactor pressure vessel specimens. Benchmark data gathered from the PSF will be used to improve and standardize procedures for assessing the remaining safe operating lifetime of aging reactors. The computer system controls the pressure vessel specimen environment in the presence of gamma heating so that in-vessel conditions are simulated. Instrumented irradiation capsules, in which the specimens are housed, contain temperature sensors and electrical heaters. The computer system regulates the amount of power delivered to the electrical heaters based on the temperature distribution within the capsules. Time-temperature profiles are recorded along with reactor conditions for later correlation with specimen metallurgical changes

  11. Examination of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matokovic, A.; Picek, E.; Markulin, K.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing demand of a higher level of safety in the operation of the nuclear power plants requires the utilisation of more precise automated equipment to perform in-service inspections. That has been achieved by technological advances in computer technology, in robotics, in examination probe technology with the development of the advanced inspection technique and has also been due to the considerable and varied experience gained in the performance of such inspections. In-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel, especially Russian-designed WWER-1000 presents one of the most important and extensive examination of nuclear power plants primary circuit components. Such examination demand high standards of inspection technology, quality and continual innovation in the field of non-destructive testing advanced technology. A remote underwater contact ultrasonic technique is employed for the examination of the base metal of vessel and reactor welds, whence eddy current method is applied for clad surface examinations. Visual testing is used for examination of the vessel interior. The movement of inspection probes and data positioning are assured by using new reactor pressure vessel tool concept that is fully integrated with inspection systems. The successful performance of reactor pressure vessel is attributed thorough pre-outage planning, training and successful performance demonstration qualification of chosen non-destructive techniques on the specimens with artificial and/or real defects. Furthermore, use of advanced approach of inspection through implementation the state-of-the-art examination equipment significantly reduced the inspection time, radiation exposure to examination personnel, shortening nuclear power plant outage and cutting the total inspection costs. This paper presents advanced approach in the reactor pressure vessel in-service inspections and it is especially developed for WWER-1000 nuclear power plants.(author)

  12. Analysis of nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A.N. de; Augusto, O.B.

    1985-01-01

    This work proposes a methodology for the structural analysis of high diameter nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges. In the analysis the vessel is divided into shell-of-revolution elements, the flanges are represented by rigid rings, and the bolts are treated as beams. The flexibility method is used for solving the problem, and the results are compared with results obtained by the finite element method. (Author) [pt

  13. Dismantling id the reactor pressure vessel insulation and dissecting of the MZFR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, Andreas; Stanke, Dieter; Thoma, Markus; Eisenmann, Beata; Prechtl, Erwin; Dehnke, Burckhard

    2008-01-01

    The MZFR reactor was decommissioned in 1984. The authors describe the dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel insulation that consists of asbestos containing mineral fiber wool. The appropriate remote handling and cutting tools had to be adapted with respect to the restrained space in the containment. The dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel has been completed, the dissected parts have been packaged into 200 containers for the final repository Konrad. During the total project time no reportable events and no damage to persons occurred.

  14. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1985-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (orig./PW)

  15. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (DG) [de

  16. Heat insulation device for reactor pressure vessel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Heiichiro; Tanaka, Yoshimi.

    1993-01-01

    Outer walls of a reactor pressure vessel are covered with water-tight walls made of metals. A heat insulation metal material is disposed between them. The water tight walls are joined by welding and flanges. A supply pipeline for filling gases and a discharge pipeline are in communication with the inside of the water tight walls. Further, a water detector is disposed in the midway of the gas discharge pipeline. With such a constitution, the following advantages can be attained. (1) Heat transfer from the reactor pressure vessel to water of a reactor container can be suppressed by filled gases and heat insulation metal material. (2) Since the pressure at the inside of the water tight walls can be equalized with the pressure of the inside of the reactor container, the thickness of the water-tight walls can be reduced. (3) Since intrusion of water to the inside of the walls due to rupture of the water tight walls is detected by the water detector, reactor scram can be conducted rapidly. (4) The sealing property of the flange joint portion is sufficient and detaching operation thereof is easy. (I.S.)

  17. Reliability analysis of reactor pressure vessel intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liangang; Lu Yongbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper performs the reliability analysis of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) with ANSYS. The analysis method include direct Monte Carlo Simulation method, Latin Hypercube Sampling, central composite design and Box-Behnken Matrix design. The RPV integrity reliability under given input condition is proposed. The result shows that the effects on the RPV base material reliability are internal press, allowable basic stress and elasticity modulus of base material in descending order, and the effects on the bolt reliability are allowable basic stress of bolt material, preload of bolt and internal press in descending order. (authors)

  18. Leak detector for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Mikio.

    1991-01-01

    A branched pipe is disposed to a leak off pipeline led from a flange surface which connects the main body and the upper lid of a reactor pressure vessel. An exhaust pump is disposed to the branched pipe and a moisture gage is disposed on the side of the exhaustion and a dry air supplier is connected to the branched pipe. Upon conducting a pressure-proof leak test for the reactor pressure vessel, the exhaust pump is operated and an electromagnet valve disposed at the upstream of the dry air supplier is opened and closed repeatedly. The humidity of air sucked by the exhaust pump is detected by the moisture gage. If leaks should be caused in the joining surface of the flange, leaked water is diffused as steams. Accordingly, occurrence of leak can be detected instantly based on the comparison with the moisture level of the dry air as a standard. In this way, a leak test can be conducted reliably in a short period of time with no change of for the reactor pressure container itself. (I.N.)

  19. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT NDT ) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties

  20. Reactor pressure vessel stud management automation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biach, W.L.; Hill, R.; Hung, K.

    1992-01-01

    The adoption of hydraulic tensioner technology as the standard for bolting and unbolting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head 35 yr ago represented an incredible commitment to new technology, but the existing technology was so primitive as to be clearly unacceptable. Today, a variety of approaches for improvement make the decision more difficult. Automation in existing installations must meet complex physical, logistic, and financial parameters while addressing the demands of reduced exposure, reduced critical path, and extended plant life. There are two generic approaches to providing automated RPV stud engagement and disengagement: the multiple stud tensioner and automated individual tools. A variation of the latter would include the handling system. Each has its benefits and liabilities

  1. Seal analysis technology for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liangang; Zhang Liping; Yang Yu; Zang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    There is the coolant with radiation, high temperature and high pressure in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). It is closely correlated to RPV sealing capability whether the whole nuclear system work well or not. The aim of this paper is to study the seal analysis method and technology, such as the pre-tensioning of the bolt, elastoplastic contact and coupled technology of thermal and structure. The 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method really and generally consider the loads and model the contact problem with friction between the contact plates. This method is easier than the specialized seal program and used widely. And it is more really than the 2 D seal analysis method. This 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method has been successfully used in the design and analysis of RPV. (authors)

  2. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue

  3. Prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactors - 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This standard deals with the design, construction, inspection and testing of prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactors. Such pressure vessels serve the dual purpose of shielding and containing gas cooled nuclear reactors and are a form of civil engineering structure requiring particularly high integrity, and ensured leak tightness. (Metric)

  4. Midland reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    The results of laboratory nondestructive examination (NDE), and destructive cross-sectioning of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor pressure vessel were analyzed per a previously developed methodology in order to develop a flaw distribution. The flaw distributions developed from the NDE results obtained by two different ultrasonic test (UT) inspections (Electric Power Research Institute NDE Center and Pacific Northwest Laboratories) were not statistically significantly different. However, the distribution developed from the NDE Center's (destructive) cross-sectioning-based data was found to be significantly different than those obtained through the UT inspections. A fracture mechanics-based comparison of the flaw distributions showed that the cross-sectioning-based data, conservatively interpreted (all defects considered as flaws), gave a significantly lower vessel failure probability when compared with the failure probability values obtained using the UT-based distributions. Given that the cross-sectioning data were reportedly biased toward larger, more significant-appearing (by UT) indications, it is concluded that the nondestructive examinations produced definitively conservative results. In addition to the Midland vessel inspection-related analyses, a set of twenty-seven numerical simulations, designed to provide a preliminary quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the flaw distribution method used here, were conducted. The calculations showed that, in more than half the cases, the analysis produced reasonably accurate predictions

  5. Inductive testing of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, H.

    1987-01-01

    In Service Inspection of Reactor Pressure Vessels is mostly done with ultrasonics. Using special 2 crystal-probes good detectability is achieved for near surface defects. The problem is to detect closely spaced cracks, to decide if the defects are surface braking and, if not, to decide the remaining ligament. The purpose of this study is to investigate to what extent Eddy Current can solve these problems. Detecting surfacebreaking cracks and fields of cracks can be done using conventional Eddy Current techniques. Mapping of closely spaced cracks requires a small probe and a high frequency. Measurement of depths a larger probe, a lower frequency and knowledge of the crackfield since 2 closely spaced shallow cracks might be mistaken for one deep crack. Depths of singel cracks can be measured down to 7-8 mm. In closely spaced crackfields the depths can not be measured. The measurement is mostly based on amplitude. For not surface breaking defects the problem is to decide the ligament, i.e. the distance between surface and cracktip. To achieve good penetration a large probe, low frequency and high energy or pulsed energy is used. Ligament up to 4 mm can be measured with good accuracy. The measurements is mostly based on phase. Noise, which originates from rough surface, varied material structure and lift off, can be reduced using multi frequency mix, probe design and scanning pattern. (author)

  6. Prestressed concrete pressure vessels for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.

    1979-12-01

    Following a general description of the Scandinavian cooperative project on prestressed concrete pressure vessels for boiling water reactors, detailed discussion is given in four appendices of the following aspects: the verification programme of tests and studies, the development and testing of a liner venting system, a preliminary safety philosophy and comparative assessment of cold and hot liners. Vessel failure probability is briefly discussed and some figures presented. The pressure gradients in the vessel wall resulting from various stipulated linear cracks, with a liner venting system are presented graphically. (JIW)

  7. Pressure thermal shock analysis for nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galik, G.; Kutis, V.; Jakubec, J.; Paulech, J.; Murin, J.

    2015-01-01

    The appearance of structural weaknesses within the reactor pressure vessel or its structural failure caused by crack formation during pressure thermal shock processes pose as a severe environmental hazard. Coolant mixing during ECC cold water injection was simulated in a detailed CFD analysis. The temperature distribution acting on the pipe wall internal surface was calculated. Although, the results show the formation of high temperature differences and intense gradients, an additional structural analysis is required to determine the possibility of structural damage from PTS. Such an analysis will be the subject of follow-up research. (authors)

  8. Basic conceptions for reactor pressure vessel manipulators and their evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, P.

    1987-01-01

    The study deals with application fields and basic design conceptions of manipulators in reactor pressure vessels as well as their evaluation. It is shown that manipulators supported at the reactor flange have essential advantages

  9. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  10. Minimum weight design of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boes, R.

    1975-01-01

    A method of non-linear programming for the minimization of the volume of rotationally symmetric prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels is presented. It is assumed that the inner shape, the loads and the degree of prestressing are prescribed, whereas the outer shape is to be detemined. Prestressing includes rotational and vertical tension. The objective function minimizes the weight of the PCRV. The constrained minimization problem is converted into an unconstrained problem by the addition of interior penalty functions to the objective function. The minimum is determined by the variable metric method (Davidson-Fletcher-Powell), using both values and derivatives of the modified objective function. The one-dimensional search is approximated by a method of Kund. Optimization variables are scaled. The method is applied to a pressure vessel like for THTR. It is found that the thickness of the cylindrical wall may be reduced considerably for the load cases considered in the optimization. The thickness of the cover is reduced slightly. The largest reduction in wall thickness occurs at the junction of wall and cover. (Auth.)

  11. Surveillance of irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najzer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Surveillance of irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels is briefly discussed. The experimental techniques and computer programs available for this work at the J. Stefan Institute are described. (author)

  12. Adjustable guide for a testing system for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, W.

    1980-01-01

    The device consisting of a guide rail and a manipulator is introduced into the gap between pressure vessel wall and biological shield by means of suspending wire drums and manipulator drums. For adjustment of the device an elbow telescope is used. The guide rail is fixed to the pressure vessel wall by means of electromagnets. The movements of the manipulator with respect to the guide rail are performed with the aid of a motor. (DG) [de

  13. Pressurized water reactor with a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1979-01-01

    The core barrel is suspended from a flange by means of a grid. The coolant enters the barrel from below through the grid. In order to get a uniform flow over the reactor core there is provided for a guiding device below the grid. It consists of a cylindrical shell with borings uniformly distributed around the shell as well as fins on the inner surface of the shell and slots at the bottom facing the pressure vessel. (GL) [de

  14. Nuclear reactor installation with outer shell enclosing a primary pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The high temperature nuclear reactor installation described includes a fluid cooled nuclear heat source, a primary pressure vessel containing the heat source, an outer shell enclosing the primary pressure vessel and acting as a secondary means of containment for this vessel against outside projectiles. Multiple auxiliary equipment points are arranged outside the outer shell which comprises a part of a lower wall around the primary pressure vessel, an annular part integrated in the lower wall and extending outwards as from this wall and an upper part integrated in the annular part and extending above this annular part and above the primary pressure vessel. The annular part and the primary pressure vessel are formed with vertical penetrations which can be closed communicating respectively with the auxiliary equipment points and with inside the pressure vessel whilst handling gear is provided in the upper part for vertically raising reactor components through these penetrations and for transporting them over the annular part and over the primary pressure vessel [fr

  15. Light-water reactor pressure vessel surveillance standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life. Some of these are existing American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are newly proposed ASTM standards. The current (1) scope, (2) areas of application, (3) interrelationships, and (4) status and time table of development, improvement, validation, and calibration for a series of 16 ASTM standards are defined. The standard also includes a discussion of LWR pressure vessel surveillance - justification, requirements, and status of work

  16. In-service ultrasonic inspection of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prepechal, J.; Sulc, J.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrasonic tests of pressure vessels for WWER 440 reactors, type 213 V, are carried out partly manually and partly by test equipment. The inner surface of the pressure vessel is tested using device REACTORTEST TRC which is fully mobile. The outer surface of the cylindrical parts and bottoms of the body is tested using handling equipment permanently in-built under the pressure vessel and dismountable testing heads. A set of these heads may be used for two reactor units. The testing equipment REACTORTEST TRC is equipped with a TRC 800 ultrasound device. The equipment for testing the outer surface of the vessel operates with the UDAR 16 ultrasound apparatus to which may be simultaneously connected 10 ultrasound probes and six probes for acoustic feedback. The whole system of ultrasonic tests makes possible a first-rate and reliable volume control of the whole pressure vessel and all points where cracks may originate and grow. (Z.M.)

  17. Dismantling method for reactor pressure vessel and system therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto; Enomoto, Kunio; Kurosawa, Koichi; Saito, Hideyo.

    1994-01-01

    Upon dismantling of a reactor pressure vessel, a containment building made of concretes is disposed underground and a spent pressure vessel is contained therein, and incore structures are contained in the spent pressure vessel. Further, a plasma-welder and a pressing machine are disposed to a pool for provisionally placing reactor equipments in the reactor building for devoluming the incore structures by welding and compression. An overhead-running crane and rails therefor are disposed on the roof and the outer side of the reactor building for transporting the pressure vessel from the reactor building to the containment building. They may be contained in the containment building after incorporation of the incore structures into the pressure vessel at the outside of the reactor building. For the devoluming treatment, a combination of cutting, welding, pressing and the like are optically conducted. A nuclear power plant can be installed by using a newly manufactured nuclear reactor, with no requirement for a new site and it is unnecessary to provide a new radioactive waste containing facility. (N.H.)

  18. Nuclear reactor installation with outer shell enclosing a primary pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The high temperature nuclear reactor installation described includes a fluid cooled nuclear heat source, a primary pressure vessel and outer shell around the primary pressure vessel and acting as a protection for it against outside projectiles. A floor is provided internally dividing the outside shell into two upper and lower sections and an inside wall dividing the lower section into one part containing the primary pressure vessel and a second part, both made pressure tight with respect to each other and with the outside shell and forming with the latter a secondary means of containment [fr

  19. Leak detection device for nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Jun.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To test the leakage of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel during stopping for a short period of time with no change to the pressure vessel itself. Constitution: The device of the present invention comprises two O-rings disposed on the flange surface that connects a pressure vessel main body and an upper cover, a leak-off pipeway derived from the gap of the O-rings at the flange surface to the outside of the pressure vessel, a pressure detection means connected to the end of the pipeway, a humidity detection means disposed to the lead-off pipeway, a humidity detection means disposed to the lead-off pipeway, and gas supply means and gas suction means disposed each by way of a check valve to a side pipe branched from the pipeway. After stopping the operation of the nuclear reactor and pressurizing the pressure vessel by filling water, gases supplied to the gap between the O-rings at the flange surface by opening the check valve. In a case where water in the pressure vessel should leak to the flange surface, when gas suction is applied by properly opening the check valve, increase in the humidity due to the steams of leaked water diffused into the gas is detected to recognize the occurrence of leakage. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Radiation embrittlement of Spanish nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, J.; Ballesteros, A.; Lopez, A.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants contain a series of pressure vessel steel surveillance capsules as the principal means of monitoring radiation effects on the pressure vessel. Changes in fracture toughness are more severe in surveillance capsules than in reactor vessel materials because of their proximity of the reactor core. Therefore, it is possible to predict changes in fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials. This paper describes the status of the reactor vessel surveillance program relating to Spanish nuclear power plants. To date, twelve capsules have been removed and analyzed from seven of the nine Spanish reactors in operation. The results obtained from the analysis of these capsules are compared with the predictions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, by means of measured and expected increase of the nil-ductility transition reference temperature (RT NDT ). The comparison is made considering the different variables normally included in the studies of radiation response of reactor pressure vessel materials, such as copper content of steel, level of neutron fluence above 1 MeV, base metal or weld metal, and so forth. The surveillance data have been used for determining the adjusted reference temperatures and upper shelf energies at any time. The results have shown that the seven pressure vessels are in excellent condition to continue operating with safety against brittle fracture beyond the design life, without the need to recuperate the degraded properties of the materials by annealing of the vessel

  1. TORT application in reactor pressure vessel neutron flux calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, S.I.; Ilieva, K.D.; Antonov, S.Y.

    1994-01-01

    The neutron flux values onto reactor pressure vessel for WWER-1000 and WWER-440 reactors, at the places important for metal embrittlement surveillance have been calculated by 3 dimensional code TORT and synthesis method. The comparison of the results received by both methods confirms their good consistency. (authors). 13 refs., 4 tabs

  2. Thermal annealing of an embrittled reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mager, T.R.; Dragunov, Y.G.; Leitz, C.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. Chapter 11 deals with thermal annealing of an embrittled reactor pressure vessel. Anneal procedures for vessels from both the US and the former USSR are mentioned schematically, wet anneals at lower temperature and dry anneals above RPV design temperatures are investigated. It is shown that heat treatment is a means of recovering mechanical properties which were degraded by neutron radiation exposure, thus assuring reactor pressure vessel compliance with regulatory requirements

  3. Assessment of the integrity of WWER type reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1995-01-01

    Procedures are given for the assessment of the residual lifetime of reactor pressure vessels with respect to a sudden failure, the lifetime of vessels with defects disclosed during in-service inspections, and the fatigue or corrosion-mechanical lifetime. Also outlined are the ways of assessing the effects of major degradation mechanisms, i.e. radiation embrittlement, thermal aging, and fatigue damage, including the use of calculated values and experimental examination, by means of surveillance specimens in particular. All results of assessment performed so far indicate that the life of reactor pressure vessels at the Dukovany, Jaslovske Bohunice, and Temelin nuclear power plants is well secured. 7 figs., 3 refs

  4. Microstructural evolution in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, C.A.; Phythian, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. The microstructural evolution in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels is described. The damage mechanisms are elaborated and techniques for examining the microstructure are suggested. The importance of the initial damage event is analysed, and the microstructural evolution in RPV steels is examined

  5. Manipulator for testing a top-opened reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.; Kastl, H.

    1991-01-01

    The design is described of a manipulator to be inserted into the inside of reactor pressure vessels opened at the top. The main components of the manipulator include a fixed column protruding into the pressure vessel and a support which is slidable on the column and carries the bearing component for the measuring, testing, inspection and repair instruments. The device includes a driving equipment for the support as well as the power supply for the sets accommodated on the support, with the aim to reduce the failure rate of the manipulator as a whole, shorten the time necessary for its assembling and thus the time of staying in the reactor pressure vessel and, at the same time, make its maintenance and operation easier. (Z.S.). 13 figs

  6. Innovative inspection system for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, K.; Trautmann, H.

    1999-01-01

    The versatile, compact and modern underwater systems described, the DELPHIN manipulators and MIDAS submarines, are innovative systems enabling RPV inspections at considerably reduced efforts and time, thus reducing the total time required for ISI of reactors. (orig./CB) [de

  7. Radiation embrittlement in pressure vessels of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, Rodolfo; Fortis, Ana M.

    2007-01-01

    It is presented the project to study the effect of lead factors on the mechanical behavior of Reactor Pressure Vessel steels. It is described the facility designed to irradiate Charpy specimens with V notch of SA-508 type 3 steel at power reactor temperature, installed in the RA-1 reactor. The objective is to obtain the fracture behavior of irradiated specimens with different lead factors and to know their dependence with the diffusion of alloy elements. (author) [es

  8. Investigation of the failure of a reactor pressure vessel by plastic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmer, H.; Ritter, B.

    1994-01-01

    A possible consequence of a core meltdown accident in a pressurized water reactor is the failure of the reactor pressure vessel under high internal pressure. With the aid of the finite element program ABAQUS and using a material model of the thermo-plasticity for large deformation, the failure of the reactor pressure vessel due to plastic instability was examined. It was apparent from the finite element calculations that solely due to reduction in strength of the material, even for internal wall temperatures clearly below the core melt; of about 2000 C, the critical internal pressure can fall to values which are lower than the working pressure. With the aid of simplified geometry, a lower limit for the pressure at failure of the reactor pressure vessel can be calculated. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Welding in repair of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilous, V.; Kovarik, R.

    1987-01-01

    Specific welding conditions are described in repair of the pressure vessels of nuclear reactors in operation and the effect is pointed out to of neutrons on changes in steel properties. Some of the special regulations are discussed to be observed in welding jobs. The welding methods are briefly described; the half-bead method is most frequently used. It is stressed that the defect must first be identified using a nondestructive method and the stages must be defined of the welding repair of the pressure vessel. (J.B.). 4 figs., 1 tab., 16 refs

  10. Design optimization of a thin walled pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, S.

    2001-01-01

    Design evaluation of a pressure vessel is not only to build confidence on its integrity but also to reduce structural weight and enhance the performance of the structure. Pressure vessel, e.g., a rocket motor not only has to withstand the high operating temperatures but it must also be able to survive the internal pressures and external aerodynamic forces and bending stresses during its operation in flight. A research program was devised to study the stresses, which are generated in a thin walled pressure vessel during actual operation and its simulation with cold testing technique, i.e., by means of hydrostatic testing employing electrical resistance strain gauges on the external surface of the cylinder. The objective of the research was to uphold the performance of the vessel by reducing its thickness from 6.09 to 5.5 mm (which of course reduces the safety factor margin from 1.8 to 1.5); thereby curtailing the overall structural weight and maintaining the efficiency of the vessel itself during its live operation. The techniques employed were hydrostatic testing, data acquisition system for obtaining data on strains from the electrical resistance strain gauges and later employing V on Mises yield criterion empirical relation to computer the stresses in hoop and longitudinal directions. (author)

  11. New paradigm for prediction of radiation life-time of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotrechko, S.A.; Meshkov, Yu.Ya.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Revka, V.N.

    2011-01-01

    New paradigm for prediction of radiation life-time of reactor pressure vessel is presented. Equation for limiting state of reactor pressure vessel wall with crack-like defect is obtained. It is exhibited that the value of critical fluence Φ c may be determined not by shift of critical temperature of fracture of surveillance specimen, which is indirect characteristic, but by direct method, namely, by the condition of initiation of brittle fracture of irradiated metal ahead of a crack in RPV wall. Within the framework of engineering version of LA to fracture the technique for Φ c ascertainment is developed. Prediction of Φ c for WWER pressure vessels demonstrates potentialities of this technique.

  12. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  13. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Basin, S.L.

    1991-12-01

    Previous attempts to develop flaw distributions for probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels have aimed at the estimation of a ''generic'' distribution applicable to all PWR vessels. In contrast, this report describes (1) a new flaw distribution development analytic methodology that can be applied to the analysis of vessel-specific inservice inspection (ISI) data, and (2) results of the application of the methodology to the analysis of flaw data for each vessel case (ISI data on three PWR vessels and laboratory inspection data on sections of the Midland reactor vessel). Results of this study show significant variation among the flaw distributions derived from the various data sets analyzed, strongly suggesting than a vessel-specific flaw distribution (for vessel integrity prediction under pressurized thermal shock) is preferred over a ''generic'' distribution. In addition, quantitative inspection system flaw sizing accuracy requirements have been identified for developing a flaw distribution from vessel ISI data. The new flaw data analysis methodology also permits quantifying the reliability of the flaw distribution estimate. Included in the report are identified needs for further development of several aspects of ISI data acquisition and vessel integrity prediction practice

  14. Problems in manufacturing and transport of pressure vessels of integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralovec, J.

    1997-01-01

    Integral water-cooled reactors are typical with eliminating large-diameter primary pipes and placing primary components, i.e. steam generators and pressurizers in reactor vessels. This arrangement leads to reactor pressure vessels of large dimensions: diameters, heights and thick walls and subsequently to great weights. Thus, even medium power units have pressure vessels which are on the very limit of present manufacturing capabilities. Principal manufacturing and inspection operations as well as pertinent equipment are concerned: welding, cladding, heat treatment, machining, shop-handling, non-destructive testing, hydraulic pressure tests etc. Tile transport of such a large and heavy component makes a problem which effects its design as well as the selection of the plant site. Railway, road and ship are possible ways of transport each of them having its advantages and limitations. Specific features and limits of the manufacture and transport of large pressure vessels are discussed in the paper. (author)

  15. Advanced Approach of Reactor Pressure Vessel In-service Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matokovic, A.; Picek, E.; Pajnic, M.

    2006-01-01

    The most important task of every utility operating a nuclear power plant is the continuously keeping of the desired safety and reliability level. This is achieved by the performance of numerous inspections of the components, equipment and system of the nuclear power plant in operation and in particular during the scheduled maintenance periods at re-fueling time. Periodic non-destructive in-service inspections provide most relevant criteria of the integrity of primary circuit pressure components. The task is to reliably detect defects and realistically size and characterize them. One of most important and the most extensive examination is a reactor pressure vessel in-service inspection. That inspection demand high standards of technology and quality and continual innovation in the field of non-destructive testing (NDT) advanced technology as well as regarding reactor pressure vessel tool and control systems. A remote underwater contact ultrasonic technique is employed for the examination of the defined sections (reactor welds), whence eddy current method is applied for clad surface examinations. Visual inspection is used for examination of the vessel inner surface. The movement of probes and data positioning are assured by using new reactor pressure vessel tool concept that is fully integrated with NDT systems. The successful performance is attributed thorough pre-outage planning, training and successful performance demonstration qualification of chosen NDT techniques on the specimens with artificial and/or real defects. Furthermore, use of advanced approach of inspection through implementation the state of the art examination equipment significantly reduced the inspection time, radiation exposure to examination personnel, shortening nuclear power plant outage and cutting the total inspection costs. The advanced approach as presented in this paper offer more flexibility of application (non-destructive tests, local grinding action as well as taking of boat samples

  16. Welding of the A1 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becka, J.

    1975-01-01

    As concerns welding, the A-1 reactor pressure vessel represents a geometrically complex unit containing 1492 welded joints. The length of welded sections varies between 10 and 620 mm. At an operating temperature of 120 degC and a pressure of 650 N/cm 2 the welded joints in the reactor core are exposed to an integral dose of 3x10 18 n/cm 2 . The chemical composition is shown for pressure vessel steel as specified by CSN 413090.9 modified by Ni, Ti and Al additions, and for the welding electrodes used. The requirements are also shown for the mechanical properties of the base and the weld metals. The technique and conditions of welding are described. No defects were found in ultrasonic testing of welded joints. (J.B.)

  17. Allowable minimum upper shelf toughness for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.

    1988-05-01

    The paper develops methodology and procedure for determining the allowable minimum upper shelf toughness for continued safe operation of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis method based on the J-integral tearing modulus (J/T) approach is used. Closed from expressions for the applied J and tearing modulus are presented for finite length, part-throughwall axial flaw with aspect ratio of 1/6. Solutions are then presented for Section III, Appendix G flaw. A simple flaw evaluation procedure that can be applied quickly by utility engineers is presented. An attractive feature of the simple procedure is that tearing modulus calculations are not required by the user, and a solution for the slope of the applied J/T line is provided. Results for the allowable minimum upper shelf toughness are presented for a range of reactor pressure vessel thickness and heatup/cooldown rates.

  18. The coolability limits of a reactor pressure vessel lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Syri, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Configuration II of the ULPU experimental facility is described, and from a comprehensive set of experiments are provided. The facility affords full-scale simulations of the boiling crisis phenomenon on the hemispherical lower head of a reactor pressure vessel submerged in water, and heated internally. Whereas Configuration I experiments (published previously) established the lower limits of coolability under low submergence, pool-boiling conditions, with Configuration II we investigate coolability under conditions more appropriate to practical interest in severe accident management; that is, heat flux shapes (as functions of angular position) representative of a core melt contained by the lower head, full submergence of the reactor pressure vessel, and natural circulation. Critical heat fluxes as a function of the angular position on the lower head are reported and related the observed two-phase flow regimes.

  19. Allowable minimum upper shelf toughness for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.

    1988-01-01

    The paper develops methodology and procedure for determining the allowable minimum upper shelf toughness for continued safe operation of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis method based on the J-integral tearing modulus (J/T) approach is used. Closed from expressions for the applied J and tearing modulus are presented for finite length, part-throughwall axial flaw with aspect ratio of 1/6. Solutions are then presented for Section III, Appendix G flaw. A simple flaw evaluation procedure that can be applied quickly by utility engineers is presented. An attractive feature of the simple procedure is that tearing modulus calculations are not required by the user, and a solution for the slope of the applied J/T line is provided. Results for the allowable minimum upper shelf toughness are presented for a range of reactor pressure vessel thickness and heatup/cooldown rates. (orig.)

  20. Rupture tests with reactor pressure vessel head models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talja, H.; Keinaenen, H.; Hosio, E.; Pankakoski, P.H.; Rahka, K.

    2003-01-01

    In the LISSAC project (LImit Strains in Severe ACcidents), partly funded by the EC Nuclear Fission and Safety Programme within the 5th Framework programme, an extensive experimental and computational research programme is conducted to study the stress state and size dependence of ultimate failure strains. The results are aimed especially to make the assessment of severe accident cases more realistic. For the experiments in the LISSAC project a block of material of the German Biblis C reactor pressure vessel was available. As part of the project, eight reactor pressure vessel head models from this material (22 NiMoCr 3 7) were tested up to rupture at VTT. The specimens were provided by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK). These tests were performed under quasistatic pressure load at room temperature. Two specimens sizes were tested and in half of the tests the specimens contain holes describing the control rod penetrations of an actual reactor pressure vessel head. These specimens were equipped with an aluminium liner. All six tests with the smaller specimen size were conducted successfully. In the test with the large specimen with holes, the behaviour of the aluminium liner material proved to differ from those of the smaller ones. As a consequence the experiment ended at the failure of the liner. The specimen without holes yielded results that were in very good agreement with those from the small specimens. (author)

  1. Reliability aspects of radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel mterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1985-01-01

    The service life estimate is a major factor in the evaluation of the operating reliability and safety of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The evaluation of the service life of the pressure vessel is based on a comparison of fracture toughness values with stress intensity factors. Notch toughness curves are used for the indirect determination of fracture toughness. The dominant degradation effect is radiation embrittlement. Factors having the greatest effect on the result are the properties of the starting material of the vessel and the impurity content, mainly the Cu and P content. The design life is affected by the evaluation of residual lifetime which is made by periodical nondestructive inspections and using surveillance samples. (M.D.)

  2. Repairing method for shroud in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yusuke.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of repairing a shroud disposed in a pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a baffle plate is disposed on the outer surface of the lower portion of the shroud supported by a shroud support of the pressure vessel. The baffle plate is connected with a lug for securing a shroud head bolt disposed on the outer surface of an upper portion of the shroud by reinforcing members. With such a constitution, when crackings are caused in the shroud, the development of the crackings can be prevented without losing the function of securing the shroud head bolt. Further, if a material having thermal expansion coefficient lower than that of austenite stainless steel is used for the material of the reinforcing member, clamping load to be applied upon attaching the auxiliary member can be reduced. As a result, operation for the attachment is facilitated. (I.S.)

  3. Computing radiation dose to reactor pressure vessel and internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Within the next twenty years many of the nuclear reactors currently in service will reach their design lifetime. One of the key factors affecting decisions on license extensions will be the ability to confidently predict the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel and core structural components which have been subjected to many years of cumulative radiation exposure. This report gives an overview of the most recent scientific literature and current methodologies for computational dosimetry in the OECD/NEA Member countries. Discussion is extended to consider some related issues of materials science, such as the metals, and limitations of the models in current use. Proposals are made for further work. (author)

  4. Modeling irradiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 10, numerical modeling of irradiation embrittlement in reactor vessel steels are introduced. Physically-based models are developed and their role in advancing the state-of-the-art of predicting irradiation embrittlement of RPV steels is stressed

  5. Pressure test method for reactor pressure vessel in construction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Masakado; Ushiroda, Koichi; Miyahara, Ryohei; Takano, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Tadashi; Sato, Keiya.

    1998-01-01

    Plant constitutional parts as targets of both of a primary pressure test and a secondary pressure test are disposed in communication with a reactor pressure vessel, and a pressure of the primary pressure test is applied to the targets of both tests, so that the primary pressure test and the second pressure test are conducted together. Since the number of pressure tests can be reduced to promote construction, and the number of workers can also be reduced. A pressure exceeding the maximum pressure upon use is applied to the pressure vessel after disposing the incore structures, to continuously conduct the primary pressure test and the secondary pressure test joined together and an incore flowing test while closing the upper lid of the pressure vessel as it is in the construction field. The number of opening/closing of the upper lid upon conducting every test can be reduced, and since the pressure resistance test is conducted after arranging circumference conditions for the incore flowing test, the tests can be conducted collectively also in view of time. (N.H.)

  6. East/west steels for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M.; Kryukov, A.; Nikolaev, Y.; English, C.

    1997-01-01

    The report consist of three parts dealing with comparison of the irradiation behaviour of 'Eastern' and 'Western' steels, mechanisms of irradiation embrittlement and the role of compositional variations on the irradiation sensitivity of pressure vessels. Nickel, copper and phosphorus are the elements rendering the most essential influence on behaviour of pressure vessel steels under irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing. For WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels in which nickel content does nor exceed 0.3% the main affecting factors are phosphorous and copper. For WWER-1000 RPV welds in which nickel content generally exceed 1.5% the role of nickel in radiation embrittlement is decisive. In 'Western' type steels main influencing elements are nickel and copper. The secondary role of phosphorus in radiation embrittlement of 'Western' steels is caused by lower relative content compared to 'Eastern' steels. The process of how copper, phosphorus and nickel contents affect the irradiation sensitivity of both types of steel seem to be similar. Some distinctions between the observed radiation effects is apparently caused by differences in the irradiation conditions and ratios of the contents of above mentioned elements in both types of steel. For 'Eastern' RPV steels the dependence of the recovery degree of irradiated steels due to postirradiation thermal annealing id obviously dependent on phosphorus contents and the influence of nickel contents on this process is detectable

  7. Marine reactor pressure vessels dumped in the Kara Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1965 and 1988, 16 marine reactors from seven Russian submarines and the icebreaker Lenin, each of which suffered some form of reactor accident, were dumped in a variety of containments, using a number of sealing methods, at five sites in the Kara Sea. All reactors were dumped at sites that varied in depth from 12 to 300 m and six contained their spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This paper examines the breakdown of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) barriers due to corrosion, with specific emphasis on those RPVs containing SNF. Included are discussions of the structural aspects of the steam generating installations and their associated RPVs, a summary of the disposal operations, assumptions on corrosion rates of structural and filler materials, and an estimate of the structural integrity of the RPVs at the present time (1996) and in the year 2015

  8. Fracture risk assessment for the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel under pressurized thermal shock events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Hsoung-Wei; Huang, Chin-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • The PTS loading conditions consistent with the USNRC's new PTS rule are applied as the loading condition for a Taiwan domestic PWR. • The state-of-the-art PFM technique is employed to analyze a reactor pressure vessel. • Novel flaw model and embrittlement correlation are considered in the study. • The RT-based regression formula of NUREG-1874 was also utilized to evaluate the failure risks of RPV. • For slightly embrittled RPV, the SO-1 type PTSs play more important role than other types of PTS. - Abstract: The fracture risk of the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel of a Taiwan domestic nuclear power plant has been evaluated according to the technical basis of the U.S.NRC's new pressurized thermal shock (PTS) screening criteria. The ORNL's FAVOR code and the PNNL's flaw models were employed to perform the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis associated with plant specific parameters of the domestic reactor pressure vessel. Meanwhile, the PTS thermal hydraulic and probabilistic risk assessment data analyzed from a similar nuclear power plant in the United States for establishing the new PTS rule were applied as the loading conditions. Besides, an RT-based regression formula derived by the U.S.NRC was also utilized to verify the through-wall cracking frequencies. It is found that the through-wall cracking of the analyzed reactor pressure vessel only occurs during the PTS events resulted from the stuck-open primary safety relief valves that later reclose, but with only an insignificant failure risk. The results indicate that the Taiwan domestic PWR pressure vessel has sufficient structural margin for the PTS attack until either the current license expiration dates or during the proposed extended operation periods.

  9. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement: Insights from neural network modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Parfitt, D.; Wilford, K.; Riddle, N.; Alamaniotis, M.; Chroneos, A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2018-04-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of steel pressure vessels is an important consideration for the operation of current and future light water nuclear reactors. In this study we employ an ensemble of artificial neural networks in order to provide predictions of the embrittlement using two literature datasets, one based on US surveillance data and the second from the IVAR experiment. We use these networks to examine trends with input variables and to assess various literature models including compositional effects and the role of flux and temperature. Overall, the networks agree with the existing literature models and we comment on their more general use in predicting irradiation embrittlement.

  10. Annealing of the BR3 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Motte, F.; Stiennon, G.; Debrue, J.; Gubel, P.; Van de Velde, J.; Minsart, G.; Van Asbroeck, P.

    1985-01-01

    The pressure vessel of the Belgian BR-3 plant, a small (11 MWe) PWR presently used for fuel testing programs and operated since 1962, was annealed during March, 1984. The anneal was performed under wet conditions for 168 hours at 650 0 F with core removal and within plant design margins justification for the anneal, summary of plant characteristics, description of materials sampling, summary of reactor physics and dosimetry, development of embrittlement trend curves, hypothesized pressurized and overcooling thermal shock accidents, and conclusions are provided in detail

  11. Automated ultrasonic shop inspection of reactor pressure vessel forgings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, J.M.; Dikstra, B.J.; Hanstock, D.J.; Pople, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Automated ultrasonic shop inspection utilizing a computer-controlled system is being applied to each of the forgings for the reactor pressure vessel of the proposed Sizewell B PWR power station. Procedures which utilize a combination of high sensitivity shear wave pulse echo, 0 degrees and 70 degrees angled longitudinal waves, tandem and through-thickness arrays have been developed to provide comprehensive coverage and an overall reliability of inspection comparable to the best achieved in UKAEA defect detection trials and in PISC II. This paper describes the ultrasonic techniques, the automated system (its design, commissioning and testing), validation and the progress of the inspections

  12. Completely integrated prestressed-concrete reactor pressure vessel, type 'Star'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neunert, B.; Jueptner, G.; Kumpf, H.

    1975-01-01

    The star support vessel is suitable for the connection to all primary circuit systems consisting of a main vessel and a number of satellite vessels around and connected to it, i.e. for LWR, HTR and process reactor. It must be made clear, however, that the PWR in particular with its components does not appear to be suited for the optimum incorporation in a prestressed-concrete pressure vessel system, no matter what kind. There are clear concepts about modifications which, however, require considerable development expenditure. (orig./LH) [de

  13. Optimization of reactor pressure vessel internals segmentation in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung-Sik [Dankook Univ., Chungnam (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-11-15

    One of the most challenging tasks during plant decommissioning is the removal of highly radioactive internal components from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). For RPV internals dismantling, it is essential that all activities are thoroughly planned and discussed in the early stage of the decommissioning project. One of the key activities in the detailed planning is to prepare the segmentation and packaging plan that describes the sequential steps required to segment, separate, and package each individual component of RPV, based on an activation analysis and component characterization study.

  14. Pressure Tube and Pressure Vessel Reactors; certain comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margen, P H; Ahlstroem, P E; Pershagen, B

    1961-04-15

    In a comparison between pressure tube and pressure vessel type reactors for pressurized D{sub 2}O coolant and natural uranium, one can say that reactors of these two types having the same net electrical output, overall thermal efficiency, reflected core volume and fuel lattice have roughly the same capital cost. In these circumstances, the fuel burn-up obtainable has a significant influence on the relative economics. Comparisons of burn-up values made on this basis are presented in this report and the influence on the results of certain design assumptions are discussed. One of the comparisons included is based on the dimensions and ratings proposed for CANDU. Moderator temperature coefficients are compared and differences in kinetic behaviour which generally result in different design philosophies for the two types are mentioned, A comparison of different methods of obtaining flux flattening is presented. The influence of slight enrichment and other coolants, (boiling D{sub 2}O and gases) on the comparison between pressure tube and pressure vessel designs is discussed and illustrated with comparative designs for 400 MW electrical output. This paper was presented at the EAES Enlarged Symposium on Heterogeneous Heavy Water Power Reactors, Mallorca, October 10 - 14, 1960.

  15. Stresses in reactor pressure vessel nozzles -- Calculations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Polachova, H.

    1995-01-01

    Reactor pressure vessel nozzles are characterized by a high stress concentration which is critical in their low-cycle fatigue assessment. Program of experimental verification of stress/strain field distribution during elastic-plastic loading of a reactor pressure vessel WWER-1000 primary nozzle model in scale 1:3 is presented. While primary nozzle has an ID equal to 850 mm, the model nozzle has ID equal to 280 mm, and was made from 15Kh2NMFA type of steel. Calculation using analytical methods was performed. Comparison of results using different analytical methods -- Neuber's, Hardrath-Ohman's as well as equivalent energy ones, used in different reactor Codes -- is shown. Experimental verification was carried out on model nozzles loaded statically as well as by repeated loading, both in elastic-plastic region. Strain fields were measured using high-strain gauges, which were located in different distances from center of nozzle radius, thus different stress concentration values were reached. Comparison of calculated and experimental data are shown and compared

  16. In-place thermal annealing of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.

    1985-04-01

    Radiation embrittlement of ferritic pressure vessel steels increases the ductile-brittle transition temperature and decreases the upper shelf level of toughness as measured by Charpy impact tests. A thermal anneal cycle well above the normal operating temperature of the vessel can restore most of the original Charpy V-notch energy properties. The Amry SM-1A test reactor vessel was wet annealed in 1967 at less than 343 0 C (650 0 F), and wet annealing of the Belgian BR-3 reactor vessel at 343 0 C (650 0 F) has recently taken place. An industry survey indicates that dry annealing a reactor vessel in-place at temperatures as high as 454 0 C (850 0 F) is feasible, but solvable engineering problems do exist. Economic considerations have not been totally evaluated in assessing the cost-effectiveness of in-place annealing of commercial nuclear vessels. An American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) task group is upgrading and revising guide ASTM E 509-74 with emphasis on the materials and surveillance aspects of annealing rather than system engineering problems. System safety issues are the province of organizations other than ASTM (e.g., the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code body)

  17. Pressure Tube and Pressure Vessel Reactors; certain comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margen, P.H.; Ahlstroem, P.E.; Pershagen, B.

    1961-04-01

    In a comparison between pressure tube and pressure vessel type reactors for pressurized D 2 O coolant and natural uranium, one can say that reactors of these two types having the same net electrical output, overall thermal efficiency, reflected core volume and fuel lattice have roughly the same capital cost. In these circumstances, the fuel burn-up obtainable has a significant influence on the relative economics. Comparisons of burn-up values made on this basis are presented in this report and the influence on the results of certain design assumptions are discussed. One of the comparisons included is based on the dimensions and ratings proposed for CANDU. Moderator temperature coefficients are compared and differences in kinetic behaviour which generally result in different design philosophies for the two types are mentioned, A comparison of different methods of obtaining flux flattening is presented. The influence of slight enrichment and other coolants, (boiling D 2 O and gases) on the comparison between pressure tube and pressure vessel designs is discussed and illustrated with comparative designs for 400 MW electrical output. This paper was presented at the EAES Enlarged Symposium on Heterogeneous Heavy Water Power Reactors, Mallorca, October 10 - 14, 1960

  18. Pressure vessels for reactors made from structural steel with limited tensile strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machatti, H.

    1973-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel is prestressed in several directions with prestressing elements fabricated of steel with a high yielding point. This design allows a substantial reduction of wall thickness or an increase of the inner diameter at equal wall thickness. The prestress of the prestressing elements is designed to achieve a maximum stress release of the vessel walls at normal operating conditions and to fully utilize the maximum load of the vessel walls. For safety reasons the cross section of the prestressing elements is constructed in a way that strain is always 20 % lower the yield point. (P.K.)

  19. Pressure vessel codes: Their application to nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    A survey has been made by the International Atomic Energy Agency of how the problems of applying national pressure vessel codes to nuclear reactor systems have been treated in those Member States that had pressurized reactors in operation or under construction at the beginning of 1963. Fifteen answers received to an official inquiry form the basis of this report, which also takes into account some recently published material. Although the answers to the inquiry in some cases data back to 1963 and also reflect the difficulty of describing local situations in answer to standard questions, it is hoped that the report will be of interest to reactor engineers. 21 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program. PSF Blind Test workshop minutes. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, G.L.; Lippincott, E.P.; McGarry, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    A ''Blind Test'' workshop was held on April 9-11, 1984, at the Holiday Inn in Richland, WA. At the workshop, participant groups compared ''Blind'' calculations with existing data which was unavailable to them at the time the calculations were made. The purpose of the exercise was to allow each participant group to test the group's ability to predict ''in-wall'' mechanical property degradation for a simulated nuclear reactor pressure vessel irradiation

  1. Remote controlled stud bolt handling device for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Takenori; Shigehiro, Katsuya; Ito, Morio; Okada, Kenji

    1988-01-01

    In nuclear power stations, at the time of regular inspection, the works of opening and fixing the upper covers of reactor pressure vessels are carried out for inspecting the inside of reactor pressure vessels and exchanging fuel rods. These upper covers are fastened with many stud bolts, therefore, the works of opening and fixing require a large amount of labor, and are done under the restricted condition of wearing protective clothings and masks. Babcock Hitachi K.K. has completed the development of a remotely controlled automatic bolt tightenig device for this purpose, therefore, its outline is reported. The conventional method of these works and the problems in it are described. The design of the new device aimed at the parallel execution of cleaning screw threads, loosening and tightening nuts, and taking off and putting on nuts and washers, thus contributing to the shortening of regular inspection period, the reduction of the radiation exposure of workers, and the decrease of the number of workers. The function, reliability and endurance of the new device were confirmed by the verifying test using a device made for trial. The device is composed of a stand, a rail and four stations each with a cleaning unit, a stud tensioner and a nut handling unit. (K.I.)

  2. Microstructure and embrittlement of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennion, A.

    1999-03-01

    27 VVER 440 pressurised water reactors operate in former Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe. The pressure vessel, is made of Cr-Mo-V steel. It contains a circumferential arc weld in front of the nuclear core. This weld undergoes a high neutron flux and contains large amounts of copper and phosphorus, elements well known for their embrittlement potency under irradiation. The embrittlement kinetic of the steel is accelerated, reducing the lifetime of the reactor. In order to get informations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these steels, base metals, HAZ, and weld metals have been characterized. The high amount of phosphorus in weld metals promotes the reverse temper embrittlement that occurs during post-weld heat treatment. The radiation damage structure has been identified by small angle neutron scattering, atomic probe, and transmission electron microscopy. Nanometer-sized clusters of solute atoms, rich in copper with almost the same characteristics as in western pressure vessels steels, and an evolution of the size distribution of vanadium carbides, which are present on dislocation structure, are observed. These defects disappear during post-irradiation tempering. As in western steels, the embrittlement is due to both hardening and reduction of interphase cohesion. The radiation damage specificity of VVER steels arises from their high amount of phosphorus and from their significant density of fine vanadium carbides. (author)

  3. Needs for evaluated covariance data for reactor pressure vessel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerker, R.E.; Broadhead, B.L.; Wagschal, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses new methodology for quantifying and then reducing uncertainties in the calculated pressure vessel fluences of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The technique involves combining the integral results of the calculated and measured PWR surveillance dosimetry activities with the differential data used in the calculations, along with covariances of all the quantities, into a generalized linear least-squares adjustment procedure. Based on analysis of both PWRs and test reactor benchmarks, substantial evidence now exists to support the conclusion that, of all the nuclear as well as non-nuclear differential data considered, ENDF/B-VI values of the total inelastic iron cross sections and their covariances are the most important data controlling the outcome of the adjustment procedure. Predicted adjustments in these cross sections provided the stimulus for new measurements, the results of which impacted the ENDF/B-VI evaluation of iron 56

  4. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Suleyman Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  5. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  6. ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

    1999-01-01

    The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation

  7. Microstructural evolution in reactor pressure vessel steel under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Katsumi; Fukuya, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Understanding microstructural changes in reactor pressure vessel steels is important in order to evaluate radiation-induced embrittlement, one of the major aging phenomena affecting the extension of plant life. In this study, actual surveillance test specimens and samples of rector vessel low-alloy steel (A533B steel) irradiated in a research reactor were examined using state-of-the-art techniques to clarify the neutron flux effect on the microstructural changes. These techniques included small angle neutron scattering and atom probes. Microstructural changes which are considered to be the main factors affecting embrittlement, including the production of copper-rich precipitates and the segregation of impurity elements, were confirmed by the results of the study. In addition, the mechanical properties were predicted based on the obtained quantitative data such as the diameters of precipitates. Consequently, the hardening due to irradiation was almost simulated. (author)

  8. A structure for the protection of nuclear-reactor pressurized-vessels against rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcellin, J.-P.; Aubert, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a structure for the protection of nuclear-reactor pressurized-vessels against rupture. Said structure comprises a pre-stressed concrete tank adapted to surround the tank side-wall and bottom, said tank being higher than said vessel, said tank being provided with ports for passing cooling fluid ducts therethrough, and a crown adapted to rest along the periphery of the reactor-cover and made integral therewith. This can be applied to reactors of the PWR type [fr

  9. Cylindrical reinforced-concrete pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaessen, F.

    1975-01-01

    The cylindrical pressure vessel has got a wall and an isolating layer composed of blocks of heat-resistant concrete or of ceramic material. The side of the isolating layer facing the interior of the presssure vessel is coated by a liner made of metallic material. In cold state and without internal pressure, the radius of this liner is smaller by a differential amount than that of the isolating layer. By means of radially displaceable fixing elements consisting of an anchoring tube and a holding tube inserted in it, the liner can be made to rest against the isolating layer. This occurs if the pressure vessel is brought to operational temperature. The anchoring tube is attached to the isolating layer whereas the displaceable holding tube is connected with the liner. The possible relative travelling distance of these two elements is equal to the difference of length of the two radii. In addition, the liner may consist of single parts connected with each other through compensating flanges. There may also be additional springs arranged between the isolating layer and the liner. (DG/PB) [de

  10. Reactor Pressure Vessel P-T Limit Curve Round Robin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, C.H.; Moon, H.R.; Jeong, I.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This report is the summary of the analysis results for the P-T Limit Curve construction which have been subjected to the round robin analysis. The purpose of the round robin is to compare the procedure and method used in various organizations to construct P-T limit curve to prevent brittle fracture of reactor pressure vessel of nuclear power plants. Each Participant used its own approach to construct the P-T limit curve and submitted the results, By analyzing the results, the reference procedure for the P-T limit curve could be established. This report include the results of the comparison of the procedure and method used by the participants, and sensitivity study of the key parameters. (author) 23 refs, 88 figs, 17 tabs.

  11. Ductile fracture estimation of reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Sakai, Shinsuke; Okamura, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new scheme for the estimation of unstable ductile fracture of a reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock conditions. First, it is shown that the bending moment applied to the cracked section can be evaluated by considering the plastic deformation of the cracked section and the thermal deformation of the shell. As the contribution of the local thermal stress to the J-value is negligible, the J-value under thermal shock can be easily evaluated by using fully plastic solutions for the cracked part. Next, the phenomena of ductile fracture under thermal shock are expressed on the load-versus-displacement diagram which enables us to grasp the transient phenomena visually. In addition, several parametrical surveys are performed on the above diagram concerning the variation of (1) thermal shock conditions, (2) initial crack length, and (3) J-resistance curve (i.e. embrittlement by neutron irradiation). (author)

  12. Preparation of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel shipping package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannitell, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project is the removal and shipment the Reactor Pressure Vessel (PRV) and its associated Neutron Shield Tank (NST) to the government owned Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. Engineering studies considered the alternatives for removal and shipment of the RPV/NST. These included segmentation for subsequent truck shipments, and one-piece removal with barge or rail shipment. Although the analysis indicated that current technology could be utilized to accomplish either alternative, one-piece removal of the RPV was selected as the safest, most cost effective method. When compared to segmentation, it was estimated that one-piece removal would reduce the duration of the Project by 1 year, reduce cost by $4 M, and result in a savings of radiation exposure of 150 man-Rem. Rail transportation of an integral RPV/NST package is not feasible due to the physical size of the package. 5 refs., 1 fig

  13. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  14. Nonlinear analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Loeseth, S.; Holand, I.

    1977-01-01

    A computational model for circular symmetric reinforced concrete shell problems is described. The model is based on the Finite Element Method. Non-linear stress-strain constitutive relations are used for the concrete, the reinforcement and for the liner. The reinforcement layers may be of different steel qualities. Each layer may be given a specified prestressing. This can be done at the beginning of the computations or the specific reinforcement layer can be considered inactive until a specified level of loading is reached. Thus, the prestressing procedure may also be analyzed in detail. Bond-slip effects are not accounted for. However, no bond may be assumed for prestressing cables by inserting special reinforcement elements. Several models of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels which have been tested up to rupture have been analysed. Analytical (numerical) models for reinforced concrete are also discussed on a more general basis. (Auth.)

  15. Computer system for International Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Database support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunjan, R.; Kabalevsky, S.; Kiselev, V.; Serov, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents description of the computer tools for support of International Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Database developed at IAEA. Work was focused on raw, qualified, processed materials data, search, retrieval, analysis, presentation and export possibilities of data. Developed software has the following main functions: provides software tools for querying and search of any type of data in the database; provides the capability to update the existing information in the database; provides the capability to present and print selected data; provides the possibility of export on yearly basis the run-time IRPVMDB with raw, qualified and processed materials data to Database members; provides the capability to export any selected sets of raw, qualified, processed materials data

  16. Consequence evaluation of hypothetical reactor pressure vessel support failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Holman, G.S.; Lambert, H.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. The structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports and that the SG supports and the RCP supports have sufficient design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas for further investigation and concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns. (author)

  17. Structural integrity evaluation of PWR nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Julio R.B.; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is the most important structural component of a PWR nuclear power plant. It contains the reactor core and is the main component of the primary system pressure boundary, the system responsible for removing the heat generated by the nuclear reactions. It is considered not replaceable and, therefore, its lifetime is a key element to define the plant life as a whole. Three critical issues related to the reliability of the RPV structural integrity come out by reason of the radiation damage imposed to the vessel material during operation. These issues concern the definition of pressure versus temperature limits for reactor heatup and cooldown, pressurized thermal shock evaluation and assessment of reactor vessels with low upper shelf Charpy impact energy levels. This work aims to present the major aspects related to these topics. The requirements for preventing fracture of the RPV are reviewed as well as the available technology for assessing the safety margins. For each mentioned problem, the several steps for structural integrity evaluation are described and the analysis methods are discussed. (author)

  18. Performance demonstration experience for reactor pressure vessel shell ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zado, V.

    1998-01-01

    The most ultrasonic testing techniques used by many vendors for pressurized water reactor (PWR) examinations were based on American Society of Mechanical Engineers 'Boiler and Pressurized Vessel Code' (ASME B and PV Code) Sections XI and V. The Addenda of ASME B and PV Code Section XI, Edition 1989 introduced Appendix VIII - 'Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems'. In an effort to increase confidence in performance of ultrasonic testing of the operating nuclear power plants in United States, the ultrasonic testing performance demonstration examination of reactor vessel welds is performed in accordance with Performance Demonstration Initiative (PDI) program which is based on ASME Code Section XI, Appendix VIII requirements. This article provides information regarding extensive qualification preparation works performed prior EPRI guided performance demonstration exam of reactor vessel shell welds accomplished in January 1997 for the scope of Appendix VIII, Supplements IV and VI. Additionally, an overview of the procedures based on requirements of ASME Code Section XI and V in comparison to procedure prepared for Appendix VIII examination is given and discussed. The samples of ultrasonic signals obtained from artificial flaws implanted in vessel material are presented and results of ultrasonic testing are compared to actual flaw sizes. (author)

  19. Analysis of aging mechanism and management for HTR-PM reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yunxue; Shao Jin

    2015-01-01

    Reactor pressure vessel is an important part of the reactor pressure boundary, its important degree ranks high in ageing management and life assessment of nuclear power plant. Carrying out systematic aging management to ensure reactor pressure vessel keeping enough safety margins and executing design functions is one of the key factors to guarantee security and stability operation for nuclear power plant during the whole lifetime and prolong life. This paper briefly introduces the structure and aging mechanism of reactor pressure vessel in pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant, and introduces the design principle and structure characteristics of HTR-PM. At the same time, this paper carries out preliminary analysis and exploration. and discusses aging management of HTR-PM reactor pressure vessel. Finally, the advice of carring out aging management for HTR-PM reactor pressure vessel is proposed. (authors)

  20. The inclusion of weld residual stress in fracture margin assessments of embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Analyses were performed to determine the impact of weld residual stresses in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) on (1) the generation of pressure temperature (P-T) curves required for maintaining specified fracture prevention margins during nuclear plant startup and shutdown, and (2) the conditional probability of vessel failure due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) loading. The through wall residual stress distribution in an axially oriented weld was derived using measurements taken from a shell segment of a canceled RPV and finite element thermal stress analyses. The P-T curve derived from the best estimate load analysis and a t / 8 deep flaw, based on K Ic , was less limiting than the one derived from the current methodology prescribed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The inclusion of the weld residual stresses increased the conditional probability of cleavage fracture due to PTS loading by a factor ranging from 2 to 4

  1. Design study on steam generator integration into the VVER reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hort, J.; Matal, O.

    2004-01-01

    The primary circuit of VVER (PWR) units is arranged into loops where the heat generated by the reactor is removed by means of main circulating pumps, loop pipelines and steam generators, all located outside the reactor pressure vessel. If the primary circuit and reactor core were integrated into one pressure vessel, as proposed, e.g., within the IRIS project (WEC), a LOCA situation would be limited by the reactor pressure vessel integrity only. The aim of this design study regarding the integration of the steam generator into the reactor pressure vessel was to identify the feasibility limits and some issues. Fuel elements and the reactor pressure vessel as used in the Temelin NPP were considered for the analysis. From among the variants analyzed, the variant with steam generators located above the core and vertically oriented circulating pumps at the RPV lower bottom seems to be very promising for future applications

  2. Study on Material Selection of Reactor Pressure Vessel of SCWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuli; Luo, Ying; Yin, Qinwei; Li, Changxiang; Xie, Guofu

    This paper first analyzes the feasibility of SA-508 Grade 3 Class 1 Steel as an alternative material for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This kind of steel is limited to be applied in SCWR RPV due to its quenching property, though large forging could be accomplished by domestic manufacturers in forging aspect. Therefore, steels with higher strength and better quenching property are needed for SWCR RPV. The chemical component of SA-508 Gr.3 Cl.2 steel is similar to that of SA-508 Gr.3 Cl.1 steel, and more appropriate matching of strength and toughness could be achieved by the adjusting the elements contents, as well as proper control of tempering temperature and time. In light of the fact that Cl.2 steel has been successfully applied to steam generator, it could be an alternative material for SWCR RPV. SA-508 Gr.4N steel with high strength and good toughness is another alternative material for SCWR RPV. But large amount of research work before application is still needed for the lack of data on welding and irradiation etc.

  3. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    The reliability of nuclear power plants depends on the proper functioning of complex components over the whole life on the plant. Particular concern for reliability is directed to the primary pressure boundary. This report focuses on the portion of the primary system exposed to and significantly affected by neutron radiation. Experimental evidence from research programmes and from reactor surveillance programmes has indicated radiation embrittlement of a magnitude sufficient to raise doubts about reactor pressure vessel integrity. The crucial nature of the primary vessel function heightens the need to be alert to this problem, to which, fortunately, there are positive aspects: for example, steels have been developed which are relatively immune to radiation embrittlement. Further, awareness of such embrittlement has led to designs which can accomodate this factor. The nature of nuclear reactors, of the steels used in their construction, and of the procedures for interpreting embrittlement and minimizing the effects are reviewed with reference to the reactors that are expected to play a major role in electric power production from now to about the turn of the century. The report is intended as a manual or guidebook; the aim has been to make each chapter or major sub-division sufficiently comprehensive and self-contained for it to be understood and read independently of the rest of the book. At the same time, it is hoped that the whole is unified enough to make a complete reading useful and interesting to the several classes of reader that are involved with only specific aspects of the topic

  4. Strength-toughness requirements for thick walled high pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The strength and toughness requirements of materials for use in high pressure vessels has been the subject of some discussion in the meetings of the Materials Task Group of the Special Working Group High Pressure Vessels. A fracture mechanics analysis has been performed to theoretically establish the required toughness for a high pressure vessel. This paper reports that the analysis performed is based on the validity requirement for plane strain fracture of fracture toughness test specimens. This is that at the fracture event, the crack length, uncracked ligament, and vessel length must each be greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone size for brittle fracture to occur. For high pressure piping applications, the limiting physical dimension is the uncracked ligament, as it can be assumed that the other dimensions are always greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone. To perform the fracture mechanics analysis several parameters must be known: these include vessel dimensions, material strength, degree of autofrettage, and design pressure. Results of the analysis show, remarkably, that the effects of radius ratio, pressure and degree of autofrettage can be ignored when establishing strength and toughness requirements for code purposes. The only parameters that enter into the calculation are yield strength, toughness and vessel thickness. The final results can easily be represented as a graph of yield strength against toughness on which several curves, one for each vessel thickness, are plotted

  5. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Development of automatic ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Kee Ok; Park, Dae Yung; Park, Moon Hoh; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Kwang Heui; Kang, Sang Sin; Bang, Heui Song; Noh, Heui Choong; Kong, Woon Sik

    1994-08-01

    The selected weld areas of reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by remote mechanized ultrasonic testing(MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, we have performed 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections. However, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly as the problems which results from the old age of equipment and the frequent movement to plant site to site have occurred frequently. Therefore, the 3-axis control system hardware in occurring many problems among the equipments of mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) was designed and developed to cover the examination areas of nozzle-shell weld as specified in ASME Code Section XI and to improve the examination reliability. The new 3-axis control system hardware with the performance of this project was developed to be compatible with the old one and it was used as dual system or spare parts of the old system. Furthermore, the established technologies are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plant. 17 figs, 2 pix, 2 tabs, 10 refs. (Author)

  7. Development of automatic Ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kor R.; Kim, Jae H.; Lee, Jae C.

    1996-06-01

    The selected weld areas of a reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by the remote mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections are performed with this MUT equipment. However due to the old age of the equipment and frequent movements to plant sites, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly and it is very difficult to keep spare parts. In order to resolve these problems and to meet the strong request from plant sites, we intend to develop a new 3-axis control system including hardware and software. With this control system, we expect more efficient and reliable examination of the nozzle to shell weld areas, which is specified in ASME Code Section XI. The new 3-axis control system hardware and software were designed and development of our own control system, the advanced technologies of computer control mechanism were established and examination reliability of the nozzle to shell weld area was improved. With the development of our 3-axis control system for PaR ISI-2 computer control system, the reliability of nozzle to shell weld area examination has been improved. The established technologies from the development and detailed analysis of existing control system, are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plants. (author). 12 refs., 4 tabs., 33 figs

  8. Development of automatic Ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kor R.; Kim, Jae H.; Lee, Jae C.

    1996-06-01

    The selected weld areas of a reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by the remote mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections are performed with this MUT equipment. However due to the old age of the equipment and frequent movements to plant sites, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly and it is very difficult to keep spare parts. In order to resolve these problems and to meet the strong request from plant sites, we intend to develop a new 3-axis control system including hardware and software. With this control system, we expect more efficient and reliable examination of the nozzle to shell weld areas, which is specified in ASME Code Section XI. The new 3-axis control system hardware and software were designed and development of our own control system, the advanced technologies of computer control mechanism were established and examination reliability of the nozzle to shell weld area was improved. With the development of our 3-axis control system for PaR ISI-2 computer control system, the reliability of nozzle to shell weld area examination has been improved. The established technologies from the development and detailed analysis of existing control system, are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plants. (author). 12 refs., 4 tabs., 33 figs.

  9. Updated embrittlement trend curve for reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.; Santos, C.; Eason, E.; Wright, J.; Odette, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessels of commercial nuclear power plants are subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high energy neutrons from the core. Irradiation embrittlement of RPV belt-line materials is currently evaluated using US Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (RG 1.99 Rev 2), which presents methods for estimating the Charpy transition temperature shift (ΔT30) at 30 ft-lb (41 J) and the drop in Charpy upper shelf energy (ΔUSE). A more recent embrittlement model, based on a broader database and more recent research results, is presented in NUREG/CR-6551. The objective of this paper is to describe the most recent update to the embrittlement model in NUREG/CR-6551, based upon additional data and increased understanding of embrittlement mechanisms. The updated ΔT30 and USE models include fluence, copper, nickel, phosphorous content, and product form; the ΔT30 model also includes coolant temperature, irradiation time (or flux), and a long-time term. The models were developed using multi-variable surface fitting techniques, understanding of the ΔT30 mechanisms, and engineering judgment. The updated ΔT30 model reduces scatter significantly relative to RG 1.99 Rev 2 on the currently available database for plates, forgings, and welds. This updated embrittlement trend curve will form the basis of revision 3 to Regulatory Guide 1.99. (author)

  10. Development of automatic ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kee Ok; Park, Dae Yung; Park, Moon Hoh; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Kwang Heui; Kang, Sang Sin; Bang, Heui Song; Noh, Heui Choong; Kong, Woon Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-01

    The selected weld areas of reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by remote mechanized ultrasonic testing(MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, we have performed 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections. However, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly as the problems which results from the old age of equipment and the frequent movement to plant site to site have occurred frequently. Therefore, the 3-axis control system hardware in occurring many problems among the equipments of mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) was designed and developed to cover the examination areas of nozzle-shell weld as specified in ASME Code Section XI and to improve the examination reliability. The new 3-axis control system hardware with the performance of this project was developed to be compatible with the old one and it was used as dual system or spare parts of the old system. Furthermore, the established technologies are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plant. 17 figs, 2 pix, 2 tabs, 10 refs. (Author).

  11. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1998-01-01

    The irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 41 J (30 ft-lb) Charpy transition temperature (TT) and Charpy upper shelf energy (USE) due to annealing. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Models were developed based on a combination of statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, and the current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and a surrogate hardness data base. This work demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes. (orig.)

  12. Shallow-crack toughness results for reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Shum, D.K.M.; Rolfe, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. To complete this investigation, techniques were developed to determine the fracture toughness from shallow-crack specimens. A total of 38 deep and shallow-crack tests have been performed on beam specimens about 100 mm deep loaded in 3-point bending. Two crack depths (a ∼ 50 and 9 mm) and three beam thicknesses (B ∼ 50, 100, and 150 mm) have been tested. Techniques were developed to estimate the toughness in terms of both the J-integral and crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). Analytical J-integral results were consistent with experimental J-integral results, confirming the validity of the J-estimation schemes used and the effect of flaw depth on fracture toughness. Test results indicate a significant increase in the fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens in the lower transition region compared to the deep-crack fracture toughness. There is, however, little or no difference in toughness on the lower shelf where linear-elastic conditions exist for specimens with either deep or shallow flaws. The increase in shallow-flaw toughness compared with deep-flaw results appears to be well characterized by a temperature shift of 35 degree C

  13. Different approaches to estimation of reactor pressure vessel material embrittlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Revka

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The surveillance test data for the nuclear power plant which is under operation in Ukraine have been used to estimate WWER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV material embrittlement. The beltline materials (base and weld metal were characterized using Charpy impact and fracture toughness test methods. The fracture toughness test data were analyzed according to the standard ASTM 1921-05. The pre-cracked Charpy specimens were tested to estimate a shift of reference temperature T0 due to neutron irradiation. The maximum shift of reference temperature T0 is 84 °C. A radiation embrittlement rate AF for the RPV material was estimated using fracture toughness test data. In addition the AF factor based on the Charpy curve shift (ΔTF has been evaluated. A comparison of the AF values estimated according to different approaches has shown there is a good agreement between the radiation shift of Charpy impact and fracture toughness curves for weld metal with high nickel content (1,88 % wt. Therefore Charpy impact test data can be successfully applied to estimate the fracture toughness curve shift and therefore embrittlement rate. Furthermore it was revealed that radiation embrittlement rate for weld metal is higher than predicted by a design relationship. The enhanced embrittlement is most probably related to simultaneously high nickel and high manganese content in weld metal.

  14. Revisiting the reactor pressure vessel for long-time operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Diego, G. de; Hernandez Mayoral, M.

    2013-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the key components of nuclear power plants, especially for long time operation. It is a non-replaceable component, at least with current technology. the structural integrity of the vessel is evaluated within called monitoring programs where the degradation of the mechanical properties due to neutron irradiation is determined. From the first designs of the RPVs and monitoring programs in the years 60-70 currently still in force, there have been major advances in the understanding of radiation damage and methods of evaluation. Thus, it is recommended the use of forgings instead of plates in the construction of the RPVs in order to reduce the number of welds, more sensitive to neutron irradiation, and using starting materials with less content of impurities, particularly copper. To evaluate the embrittlement of RPVs the Master Curve methodology is currently used, through the testing of the charpy specimens from the surveillance capsules, to determine the fracture toughness. This article summarizes the last activities of CIEMAT into the European research projects LONGIIFE and PERFORM60, about the knowledge of radiation damage in materials with low copper content, traditionally considered less sensitive to irradiation, and the use of the Master Curve in advanced surveillance programs. The activities related to the problems associated with the use of large forging, such as the appearance of hydrogen flakes in the vessel of Doel 3, and its implications, are also presented. (Author)

  15. Residual stresses in weld-clad reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, W.

    1975-01-01

    Cladding of low alloy nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel with austenitic stainless steel introduces in heavy section components high residual stresses which may cause microcrack formation in stress relief heat treatment. In this investigation an attempt is made to contribute to the solution of the stress relief cracking problem by determining quantitatively the magnitude and distribution of the residual stresses after cladding and after subsequent stress relief heat treatment. The distribution of residual stresses was determined on the basis of a combined experimental-mathematical procedure. Heavy section plate specimens of low alloy steel as base material were given an austenitic monolayer-cladding using the techniques of strip electrode and plasma hot wire cladding, respectively. A number of plates was stress relief heat treated. Starting from the cladded surface the thickness of the plates was reduced by subsequent removal of layers of material. The elastic strain reaction to the removal of each layer was measured by strain gauges. From the data obtained the biaxial residual stress distribution was computed as a function of thickness using relations which are derived for this particular case. In summary, lower residual stresses are caused by reduced thickness of the components. As the heat input, is decreased at identical base material thickness, the residual stresses are lowered also. The height of the tensile residual stress peak, however, remains approximataly constant. In stress relief annealed condition the residual stresses in the cladding are in tension; in the base material the residual stresses are negligibly small

  16. Miniaturized Charpy test for reactor pressure vessel embrittlement characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, M.P. Sr. [MPM Research and Consulting, Lemont, PA (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Modifications were made to a conventional Charpy machine to accommodate the miniaturized Charpy V-Notch (MCVN) specimens which were fabricated from an archived reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Over 100 dynamic MCVN tests were performed and compared to the results from conventional Charpy V-Notch (CVN) tests to demonstrate the efficacy of the miniature specimen test. The optimized sidegrooved MCVN specimens exhibit transitional fracture behavior over essentially the same temperature range as the CVN specimens which indicates that the stress fields in the MCVN specimens reasonably simulate those of the CVN specimens and this fact has been observed in finite element calculations. This result demonstrates a significant breakthrough since it is now possible to measure the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) using miniature specimens with only small correction factors, and for some materials as in the present study, without the need for any correction factor at all. This development simplifies data interpretation and will facilitate future regulatory acceptance. The non-sidegrooved specimens yield energy-temperature data which is significantly shifted downward in temperature (non-conservative) as a result of the loss of constraint which accompanies size reduction.

  17. Recent development for inservice inspection of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.; Engl, G.; Rathgeb, W.; Heumueller, R.

    1991-01-01

    The German Nuclear Code (KTA-rules) requires a full scope inservice inspection (ISI) of reactor pressure vessels within a period of four years. This has a remarkable influence on plant operation and economy. Therefore, the development of advanced inspection equipment and techniques is directed not only to the enhancement of defect detectability and flaw sizing capabilities but also to reducing inspection times. A new manipulator system for PWR vessels together with fast data processing reduces the time for ISI of modern RPVs to 7 days. A new multichannel UT-system based on ALOK principle offers increased ultrasonic information with comfortable and rapid evaluation and presentation of results together with enhanced sizing capabilities. For specific inspection problems characterized by geometrical complexity the application of phased array probes in connection with UT-tomography provides improved ultrasonic information together with a streamlined manipulator principle and simplification of set up and tear down at the component which results in considerable reduction of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  18. Method for the construction of a nuclear reactor with a prestressed concrete pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Schwiers, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    Method for the construction of nuclear reactors with prestressed concrete pressure vessel, providing during the initial stage of construction of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel a support structure around the liner. This enables an early mounting of core components in clean conditions as well as load reductions for final concreting in layers of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel. By applying the support structure, the overall assembly time of these nuclear power plant is considerably reduced without extra cost. (orig.) [de

  19. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1996-01-01

    Embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. Although such an annealing process has not been applied to any commercial plants in the United States, one US Army reactor, the BR3 plant in Belgium, and several plants in eastern Europe have been successfully annealed. All available Charpy annealing data were collected and analyzed in this project to develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy over a range of potential annealing conditions. Pattern recognition, transformation analysis, residual studies, and the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in the annealing process were used to guide the selection of the most sensitive variables and correlating parameters and to determine the optimal functional forms for fitting the data. The resulting models were fitted by nonlinear least squares. The use of advanced tools, the larger data base now available, and insight from surrogate hardness data produced improved models for quantitative evaluation of the effects of annealing. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and the surrogate hardness data base. The standard errors of the resulting recovery models relative to calibration data are comparable to the uncertainty in unirradiated Charpy data. This work also demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for transition temperature shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes

  20. Renovation of the sealing planes of WWER-400 reactors pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonicky, P.; Pilat, P.

    2007-01-01

    An article describes technical solution for renovation of the sealing planes of WWER-440 reactor's pressure vessel. Four nickel sealing rings placed in four concentric grooves are providing hermetic sealing between the vessel and the lid of this type of the reactor. Impeccable seal of the reactor's pressure vessel, where the fission reaction takes place, represents a basic security factor for safe electric energy production. Principle of renovation of the reactor's pressure vessel and lid sealing planes is based on mechanical enlargement of defective grooves and following cladding of the new material by TIG welding. Final step for renovation includes machining of new grooves according to geometrical and surface quality requirements (Authors)

  1. Light-water-reactor pressure-vessel surveillance dosimetry using solid-state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1983-07-01

    The accumulation of neutron dose by the pressure vessel of an operating nuclear power plant results in damage in the form of steel embrittlement. In order to ascertain the safe operating lifetime of the reactor pressure vessel, dosimetric measurements must be made to evaluate the neutron dose to the pressure vessel and relate this dose to the cumulative radiation damage. Advanced dosimetry techniques are being evaluated for surveillance of operating reactors. Solid-state track recorder (SSTR) techniques are included among these advanced dosimetry techniques. Described herein are low neutron fluence calibration and standardization measurements that are being carried out in pressure vessel mockup benchmark neutron fields in the USA, Belgium, and England. In addition, high fluence SSTR dosimetry capsules have been irradiated with metallurgical specimens in a pressure vessel mockup facility. The design and deployment of advances SSTR dosimetry capsules in operating power reactors are also described

  2. Guiding device for a manipulator mast for internal inspection of a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, W.; Schlueter, H.

    1977-01-01

    A remote-controlled supporting device centering a manipulator mast is described which is mounted and operated above a reactor pressure vessel under water in such a way that rotations and vertical movements necessary for the internal inspection of the pressure vessel remain possible. (RW) [de

  3. Reactor pressure vessel integrity of Genkai Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamuta, Y.; Nozaki, G.; Saruwatari, T.; Watanabe, S.; Yamashita, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan has to be confirmed for the continuing operation according to the Japanese technical standards, JEAC4206-2007 and JEAC4201-2007, which specify the procedures to evaluate the structural integrity of RPVs and the embrittlement of RPV materials, respectively. The structural integrity analysis of Genkai Unit 1 RPV was performed based on the 4. surveillance data. Even though the ΔRT(NDT) obtained for the base metal was larger than the prediction of the current embrittlement correlation method of JEAC4201-2007, the structural integrity of the RPV during PTS event was confirmed with a sufficient margin. The reason of the large ΔRT(NDT) in the base metal was investigated thoroughly in terms of the microstructural changes caused by the neutron irradiation. The study showed that the microstructural changes are all as expected for this class of material, no grain boundary fracture occurred, the material is homogeneous in terms of chemical composition, and the chemical compositions which are important for the evaluation of embrittlement are correct. All these results suggested room for improvement of the current embrittlement correlation method in JEAC4201-2007. Using Genkai Unit 1 data as well as other recent surveillance data, the embrittlement correlation method has been modified so that the recent high fluence data can be predicted with higher accuracy, and was issued as JEAC4201-2007, 2013 addendum. It has been demonstrated that the RPV materials of the Genkai Unit 1 meet the requirements of JEAC4206-2007 and can be used for the continuing safe operation up to 60 years

  4. The behavior of shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolfe, S.T.

    1991-11-01

    Both analytical and experimental studies have shown that the effect of crack length, a, on the elastic-plastic toughness of structural steels is significant. The objective of this report is to recommend those research investigations that are necessary to understand the phenomenon of shallow behavior as it affects fracture toughness so that the results can be used properly in the structural margin assessment of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) with flaws. Preliminary test results of A 533 B steel show an elevated crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) toughness similar to that observed for structural steels tested at the University of Kansas. Thus, the inherent resistance to fracture initiation of A 533 B steel with shallow flaws appears to be higher than that used in the current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) design curves based on testing fracture mechanics specimens with deep flaws. If this higher toughness of laboratory specimens with shallow flaws can be transferred to a higher resistance to failure in RPV design or analysis, then the actual margin of safety in nuclear vessels with shallow flaws would be greater than is currently assumed on the basis of deep-flaw test results. This elevation in toughness and greater resistance to fracture would be a very desirable situation, particularly for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) analysis in which shallow flaws are assumed to exist. Before any advantage can be taken of this possible increase in initiation toughness, numerous factors must be analyzed to ensure the transferability of the data. This report reviews those factors and makes recommendations of studies that are needed to assess the transferability of shallow-flaw toughness test results to the structural margin assessment of RPV with shallow flaws. 14 refs., 8 figs

  5. Use of superheated steam to anneal the reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porowski, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal annealing of an embrittled Reactor Pressure Shell is the only recognized means for recovering material properties lost due to long-term exposure of the reactor walls to radiation. Reduced toughness of the material during operation is a major concern in evaluations of structural integrity of older reactors. Extensive studies performed within programs related to life extension of nuclear plants have confirmed that the thermal treatment of 850 degrees F for 168 hours on irradiated material essentially recovers material properties lost due to neutron exposure. Dry and wet annealing methods have been considered. Wet annealing involves operating the reactor at near design temperatures and pressures. Since the temperature of wet annealing must be limited to vessel design temperature of 650 degrees F, only partial recovery of the lost properties is achieved. Thus dry annealing was selected as an alternative for future development and industrial implementation to extend the safe life of reactors

  6. Status of reactor pressure vessel embrittlement study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasajima, H.

    1997-01-01

    Since the construction of Japanese first commercial nuclear power plant in 1966, 52 nuclear power plants have been commissioned in Japan to commercial operation. Japanese first nuclear power plant has now been service for 30 years and the aging of nuclear power plants is steadily progressing in general. Under these circumstances, the Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) is executing, under consignment by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), the development and verification test programs for plant integrity evaluation technology by which nuclear power plant aging can be appropriately handled. This paper shows the outline of study dealing with embrittlement of RPV caused by neutron irradiation, as one of the activity of JAPEIC. The embrittlement of RPV caused by neutron irradiation is manifested as a shift of transition temperature and as a reduction in Upper Shelf Energy (USE). In JAPEIC, the study dealing with a shift of transition temperature was conducted in the ''Reactor Pressure Vessel Pressurized Thermal Shock Test Project (the PTS Project)'', and the study dealing with a reduction in USE has been conducted in the ''Nuclear Power Plant Life Management Technology (the PLIM Project)''. And the reconstitution technology of surveillance test specimen has been conducted in PLIM Project as one of the measures to improve monitoring above material characteristic changes. The integrity evaluation under the Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) events including the effect of neutron irradiation embrittlement was initiated in 1983 FY as the PTS Project and was completed in the 1991 FY. The study verified that plant integrity could be assured at not only the end of design life, but also an extended service life even when the severest PTS events were postulated. The PLIM Project, designed to develop and verify the integrity evaluation technology dealing with reduction of USE by neutron irradiation, was started in the 1996 FY as a 10

  7. On the domestically-made heavy forging for reactor pressure vessels of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xiren; Zhang Chen.

    1988-01-01

    The present situation of the foreign heavy forgings for nuclear reactor pressure vessels and the heavy forgings condition which is used for the Qinshan 300MWe nuclear power plant are described. Some opinions of domestic products is proposed

  8. More recent developments for the ultrasonic testing of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiger, H.; Engl, G.

    1976-01-01

    The development of an ultrasonic testing method for the inspection from the outside of the areas close to the cladding of the spherical fields of holes of light water reactor pressure vessels is described

  9. Strain measurement in and analysis for hydraulic test of CPR1000 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dan; Zhuang Dongzhen

    2013-01-01

    The strain measurement in hydraulic test of CPR1000 reactor pressure vessel performed in Dongfang Heavy Machinery Co., Ltd. is introduced. The detail test scheme and method was introduced and the measurement results of strain and stress was given. Meanwhile the finite element analysis was performed for the pressure vessel, which was generally matched with the measurement results. The reliability of strain measurement was verified and the high strength margin of vessel was shown, which would give a good reference value for the follow-up hydraulic tests and strength analysis of reactor pressure vessel. (authors)

  10. Remote controlled ultrasonic pre-service and in-service inspections of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.

    1990-01-01

    The first mechanised in-service inspection of the reactor pressure vessel on unit one of Eskom's Koeberg nuclear power station has been carried out. Since 1968 a whole range of manipulators to carry out remote controlled ultrasonic inspections of nuclear power station equipment has been developed. The inspection of a reactor pressure vessel using a central mast manipulator is described. 3 figs., 1 ill

  11. Probabilistic approach to the analysis of reactor pressure vessel integrity during a pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamec, P.

    2000-12-01

    Following a general summary of the issue, an overview of international experience (USA; Belgium, France, Germany, Russia, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands, and the UK; and probabilistic PTS assessment for the reactor pressure vessel at Loviisa-1, Finland) is presented, and the applicable computer codes (VISA-II, OCA-P, FAVOR, ZERBERUS) are highlighted and their applicability to VVER type reactor pressure vessels is outlined. (P.A.)

  12. Aspects of the design and structural analysis of the prestressed cast iron nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.

    1978-09-01

    The development of the prestressed cast iron nuclear reactor pressure vessel up to the present time is reviewed, and the current status is outlined of the techniques used for its structural analysis. Details of the manufacturing processes involved in the production of the castings, and problems of inspecting them to the standards required for a nuclear application are discussed. A method for the detailed modelling of the cast iron segments is proposed, using the finite element technique with plate bending elements, and criteria for obtaining accurate results are derived. The application of the technique to the analysis of a single cast segment situated in the wall of a PCIPV has enabled an accurate determination of the stress field to be made. Account is taken of the effect of the vessel displacements on the tendon stresses at normal vault pressure and at high overpressure. Studies by this method of several different casting designs have identified favourable features, which have been incorporated into an optimised design. The sensitivity of the structure to a machining error in a casting and to the failure or removal of circumferential and axial tendons is examined, making use of axisymmetric and three-dimensional global finite element solutions to provide boundary conditions for detailed local analyses. Some aspects of the economics of the cast iron reactor pressure vessel are discussed, and recommendations are made for further research in areas relevant to the assessment of the reliability of the vessel. (author)

  13. Device for the burst protection of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daublebsky, P.

    1976-01-01

    The burst protection device has a hood over top and bottom of the pressure vessel with superimposed hinged supports lying in their turn against supporting rings which are connected with each other by vertical bracing. It is proposed to place an intermediate layer between hoods and vertical bracing absorbing thermal stresses, i.e. deforming plastically with gradually increasing pressure, but behaving like a rigid body in the case of shock loads. As a material lead e.g. is proposed. (UWI) [de

  14. Probabilistic study of PWR reactor pressure vessel fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.; Lucia, A.C.; Grandemange, J.; Pellissier-Tanon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Different methods are used to evaluate the rupture probability of a nuclear pressure vessel. On of them extrapolates to nuclear pressure vessels, data of failure found in conventional pressure vessels. The disadvantage of such an approach is that the effects of systematic changes in key parameters cannot be taken into account. For example, the influence of irradiation and the use of quality assurance programs encompassing design, fabrication and materials cannot be considered. But the most important disadvantage of this method is the limited size of the representative population and consequently the high value of the upper bound failure rate corresponding to a requested confidence level. The method used in the present work involves the development of physical models based on an understanding of the failure modes and expressing the conventional concepts of fracture mechanics in a probabilistic form; the fatigue crack growth rate, calculated for conditions of cyclic loading, the initiation of unstable crack propagation, and the possibility of crack arrest. The analysis therefore requires the statistical expression of the factors and parameters which appear in the expressions of the law of crack growth and of toughness, and also those which are used in the calculation of the stress intensity factor K 1 . All input data are entered in COVASTOL code in histogram form. This code takes into account the degree of correlation between the flaw size and the Paris' law coefficients. It computes the propagation of a given defect in a given position, and the corresponding failure probability during accidental loading

  15. Prototype fast reactor steam generator unit pressure vessel repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, B.D.; Green, D.; Henderson, J.D.C.

    1993-01-01

    The prototype fast reactor at Dounreay has experienced a number of unscheduled shutdowns due to leaking reheater and superheater shell welds. There was a need to determine the cracking mechanism and to design a general repair technique simultaneously. Detailed investigations revealed that the crack locations correlated with the positions of rectification welds made at the time of vessel manufacture. A creep crack growth mechanism was identified; this requires through wall residual stress for through cracks to develop. A repair technique has been devised and successfully applied to the sites of a number of leaks. (author)

  16. Sampling of reactor pressure vessel and core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberhaeuser, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plants is a growing business as a huge number of plants built in the 1970's have now reached their lifetime. It is well known that dismantling a nuclear power plant means an extraordinary expense for the owner respectively operator. Beside the dismantling works for itself, the disposal of activated components and other nuclear waste is very expensive. What comes next is the fact that final disposal facilities are not available yet in most countries meaning a need for interim storage on-site in specially built facilities. It can be concluded that a special attention is paid on producing a minimal radioactive waste volume. For this, optimized dismantling and packaging concepts have to be developed. AREVA is proud of versatile experience in successfully dismantling nuclear components like core internals and reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The basis of a well-founded and optimized dismantling and packaging concept must always be the detailed knowledge of the radiological condition of the component to be and in the best case a 3D activation- model. For keeping the necessary sampling effort as small as possible, but simultaneously as efficient as possible, representative sampling positions are defined in advance by theoretical radiological examinations. For this, a detailed 3D-CAD-model of the components to be dismantled has proven very helpful and effective. Under these aspects a sampling of RPV and its components is necessary to verify the theoretically calculated radiological data. The obtained results of activation and contamination are taken into account for the optimized dismantling and packaging strategy. The precise 3D-activation-model will reduce the necessary number and type of final disposal containers as security factors are minimized leading to a lower shielding effort, too. Besides, components or even parts of components may be subject of release measurement. In the end, costs can be reduced. In this context

  17. A prestressed concrete pressure vessel for helium high temperature reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, R.M.W.; Hodzic, A.

    1976-01-01

    A novel prestressed concrete pressure vessel has been developed to provide the primary containment for a fully integrated system comprising a high temperature nuclear reactor, three horizontally mounted helium turbines, associated heat exchangers and inter-connecting ducts. The design and analysis of the pressure vessel is described. Factors affecting the final choice of layout are discussed, and earlier development work seeking to resolve the conflicting requirements of the structural, mechanical, and system engineers outlined. Proposals to increase the present output of about 1000 MW of electrical power to over 3000 MW, by incorporating four turbines in a single pressure vessel are presented. (author)

  18. Topic 1. Steels for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Brynda, J.; Kepka, M.; Barackova, L.; Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Cukr, B.; Protiva, K.; Petrman, I.; Tvrdy, M.; Hyspecka, L.; Mazanec, K.; Kupca, L.; Brezina, M.

    1980-01-01

    Part 1 of the Proceedings consists of papers on the criteria for the selection and comparison of the properties of steel for pressure vessels and on the metallurgy of the said steels, the selection of suitable material for internal tubing systems, the manufacture of high-alloy steels for WWER components, the mechanical and metallurgical properties of steel 22K for WWER 440 pressure components, and of steel 10MnNi2Mo for the WWER primary coolant circuit, and the metallographic assessment of steel 0Kh18N10T. (J.P.)

  19. Apparative developments for inservice inspections of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, H.; Ruthrof, K.; Barbian, O.A.; Kappes, W.; Neumann, R.; Stanger, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    Emphasizing PWR pressure vessel (RPV) inspections, recent developments of new generations of automated and mechanized ultrasonic inspection equipment are presented. Starting from general equipment design and inservice implenentation criteria, specific examples are given. Main attention is directed to equipment realization of phased array and ALOK inspection techniques, especially in their combination. Refined aspects of subsequent computer processing and evaluation of defect detection data are described. Analytical features and potential for further developments become evident. Remote controlled RPV inspections are stressed by describing a new generation of central mast manipulators, forming an integral part of total inservice inspection system. (orig./HP)

  20. Electrode for welding steel for WWER-1000 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos, L.

    Of two types of electrodes, ie., with an alloyed core and with an unalloyed core, an electrode was chosen consisting of a basic coat and an unalloyed core. Fluctuations are shown of shear strength, tensile strenght and contraction with the welding mode and annealing temperature. It was found that pre-heating to 250 and 350 degC, respectively, was most suitable for welding a pressure vessel manufactured from material designated SKODA A3/II. Annealing aimed at removing stress was chosen at 650 to 700 degC. (H.S.)

  1. Improvement of methods to evaluate brittle failure resistance of the WWER reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, A A; Parshutin, E V [Engineering Center of Nuclear Equipment Strength, Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rogov, M F; Dragunov, U G [Experimenter` s and Designer` s Office ` ` Hydropress` ` (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    At the next 10 years a number of Russian WWER nuclear power plants will complete its design lifetime. Normative methods to evaluate brittle failure resistance of the reactor pressure vessels used in Russia have been intended for design stage. The evaluation of reactor pressure vessel lifetime in operation stage demands to create new methods of calculation and new methods for experimental evaluation of brittle failure resistance degradation. The main objective of the study in this type of reactor is weldment number 4. In this report an analysis is made of methods to determine critical temperature of reactor materials including the results of instrumented Charpy testing. 12 figs.

  2. Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, U.A.

    Research on automatic welding processes for the fabrication of thick-walled pressure vessels continued. A literature review on the subject was completed. A laboratory study of criteria for judging acceptable root parameters continued. Equipment for a demonstration facility to test the components and processes of the automated welding system has been specified and is being obtained

  3. Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, U A

    1981-01-01

    Research on automatic welding processes for the fabrication of thick-walled pressure vessels continued. A literature review on the subject was completed. A laboratory study of criteria for judging acceptable root parameters continued. Equipment for a demonstration facility to test the components and processes of the automated welding system has been specified and is being obtained. (LCL)

  4. Pressure vessel rupture within a chamber: the pressure history on the chamber wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, M.R.

    1989-04-01

    Generally there is a large number of pressure vessels containing high pressure gas on power stations and chemical plant. In many instances, particularly on power plant, these vessels are within the main building. If a pressure vessel were to fail, the surrounding structures would be exposed to blast loads and the forces resulting from jets of fluid issuing from the breached vessel. In the case where the vessel is in a relatively closed chamber there would also be a general overpressurisation of the chamber. At the design stage it is therefore essential to demonstrate that the plant could be safely shut down in the event of a pressure vessel failure, that is, it must be shown that the chamber will not collapse thus putting the building at risk or hazarding equipment essential for a safe shut down. Such an assessment requires the loads applied to the chamber walls, roof, etc. to be known. (author)

  5. An effective surveillance strategy for reactor pressure vessel assessment in the long term operation perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Gerard, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) irradiation embrittlement is monitored by means of surveillance capsules containing the RPV belt-line materials, inserted inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) before the start of operation. These capsules are placed at location where they receive a higher neutron flux than the vessel wall, by a factor of the order of 2 to 3. They are regularly retrieved and tested to evaluate the RPV irradiation embrittlement according to specific regulatory procedures and standards, in order to guarantee the safe operation of the RPV throughout its lifetime. These procedures are often relying on empirical but conservative concepts. In parallel, material research reactor (MTR) irradiations are often used to support the surveillance data and to develop a better understanding of irradiation effects, not only qualitatively but also quantitatively. Taking advantage of the increased understanding of irradiation effects, analytical tools were developed to improve the evaluation embrittlement and quality assurance of the RPV embrittlement assessment. In this framework, an alternative but complementary surveillance program assessment was developed in Belgium, the so-called enhanced surveillance, in order to benefit from the latest developments in the area of materials science and irradiation effects. The neutron flux and fracture properties of the surveillance materials can be reliably characterized and correlated to each other using physically-based rather than empirical concepts. The enhanced surveillance approach is complementary to the mandatory regulatory procedure and allows quantifying the conservatism of the regulatory approach. The enhanced surveillance approach that uses the reconstitution technology to fabricate additional small size specimens, appropriate modeling tools and microstructural examination when required, makes it possible to rationalize all available information in a physically-based way

  6. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor )LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (H SST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication [with a through-wall dimension of ∼6 mm (∼0.24 in.)] was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications [i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m 2 (72 ft 2 ) of cladding surface]. (author)

  7. Concept of a Prestressed Cast Iron Pressure Vessel for a Modular High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang; Bounin, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature Reactors (HTR) are representing one of the most interesting solutions for the upcoming generation of nuclear technology, especially with view to their inherent safety characteristics. To complete the safety concept of such plants already in the first phase of the technical development, Prestressed Cast Iron Pressure Vessels (PCIV) instead of the established forged steel reactor pressure vessels have been considered under the aspect of safety against bursting. A longterm research and development work, mainly performed in Germany, showed the excellent features of this technical solution. Diverse prototypic vessels were tested and officially proven. Design studies confirmed the feasibility of such a vessel concept also for Light Water Reactor types, too. The main concept elements of such a burst-proof vessel are: Strength and tightness functions are structurally separated. The tensile forces are carried by the prestressing systems consisting of a large number of independent wires. Compressive forces are applied to the vessel walls and heads. These are segmented into blocks of ductile cast iron. All cast iron blocks are prestressed to high levels of compression. The sealing function is assigned to a steel liner fixed to the cast iron blocks. The prestressing system is designed for an ultimate pressure of 2.3 times the design pressure. The prestress of the lids is designed for gapping at a much smaller pressure. Therefore, a drop of pressure will always occur before loss of strength (“leakage before failure”). In addition to these safety features further technical as well as economic aspects generate favorable assessment criteria: high design flexibility, feasibility of large vessel diameters; advantageous conditions for transport, assembly and decommissioning due to the segmented construction; advantage of workshop manufacturing; high-level quality control of components. Nowadays, considering the globally newly standardized safety requirements

  8. Neutron irradiation effects in reactor pressure vessel steels and weldments. Working document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. A separate abstract was prepared for the introduction and for each of the eleven chapters, which are: 1. Reactor Pressure Vessel Design, 2. Reactor Pressure Materials, 3. WWER Pressure Vessels, 4. Determination of Mechanical Properties, 5. Neutron Exposure, 6. Methodology of Irradiation Experiments, 7. Effect of Irradiation on Mechanical Properties, 8. Mechanisms of Irradiation Embrittlement, 9. Modelling of Irradiation Damage, 10. Annealing of Irradiation Damage, 11. Safety Assessment using Surveillance Programmes and Data Bases

  9. The design of lifting attachments for the erection of large diameter and heavy wall pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalffy, Leslie P.; Miller, George A.; Kirkpatrick, Kenneth D.; Rajguru, Anil; Zhu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Lifting attachments for the erection of large diameter and heavy wall pressure vessels require special consideration to ensure that their attachment to their vessel shells or heads do not overstress the vessel during the erection process when lifting these from grade onto their respective foundations. Today, in refinery and petrochemical services, large diameter vessels with diameters ranging up to 15 m and reactors with lifting weights in the range of 700–1400 tons are not uncommon. In today's fabrication market, these vessels may be purchased and fabricated in shops dispersed globally and will require unique equipment for their safe handling, transportation and subsequent erection. The challenge is to design the lifting attachments in such a manner that the attachments provide a safe, cost effective and effective solution based upon the limitations of the job site lift equipment available for erection. Such equipment for the transportation and subsequent lifting of large diameter and heavy wall pressure equipment is usually scarce and quite expensive. Planning ahead, well in advance of the lift date is almost a mandatory requirement. Usually, the specific parameters of the vessel to be lifted and the lifting equipment available at the site will dictate the type of lifting attachments to be designed for the vessel. Once the type of vessel attachment has been chosen, careful consideration must be given to the design of attachments to the pressure vessel in consideration to ensure that the vessel and lifting components are not overstressed during the lifting process. The paper also discusses different types of lifting attachments that may be attached to each end of the vessel either by bolting or welding and discusses the pros and cons of each. The paper also provides an example of a finite element analysis (FEA) of a top nozzle, a FEA of a pair of lifting trunnions and a FEA of welded on lifting lugs for buried pipe. The purpose of the paper is to outline the

  10. Mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel steels studied by static and dynamic torsion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, A.; Maamouri, M.; Schaller, R.; Mercier, O.

    1993-01-01

    Internal friction measurements and torsional plastic deformation tests have been performed in reactor pressure vessel steels (unirradiated, irradiated and irradiated/annealed specimens). The results of these experiments have been interpreted with help of transmission electron microscopy observations (conventional and in situ). It is shown how the interactions between screw dislocations and obstacles (Peierls valleys, impurities and precipitates) could explain the low temperature hardening and the irradiation embrittlement of ferritic steels. In addition, it appears that the nondestructive internal friction technique could be used advantageously to follow the evolution of the material properties under irradiation, as for instance the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steels. (orig.)

  11. Use of Master Curve technology for assessing shallow flaws in a reactor pressure vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, Bennett Richard; Taylor, Nigel

    2006-01-01

    In the NESC-IV project an experimental/analytical program was performed to develop validated analysis methods for transferring fracture toughness data to shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels subject to biaxial loading in the lower-transition temperature region. Within this scope an extensive range of fracture tests was performed on material removed from a production-quality reactor pressure vessel. The Master Curve analysis of this data is reported and its application to the assessment of the project feature tests on large beam test pieces.

  12. In-service inspection program for the NCS-80 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharge, J.; Wehowsky, P.; Zeibig, H.

    1978-01-01

    The in-service inspection program of reactor pressure vessels is mainly based on the ultra-sonic method, visual checking of inner and outer surfaces as well as pressure and leak tests. The test procedure require a design of the pressure vessel suitable for the test methods and the possibility to remove the pressure vessel internals. For the outside inspection a gap of sufficient width is mandatory. The present status of the ultra-sonic method and of the inner and outer manipulators affords to conduct the in-service inspection program in form of automatic checkings. The in-service inspection program for NCS-80, the Nuclear Container-Ship design of 80,000 shp, is integrated in the refueling periods due to the request for a high availability of the ship and reactor plant

  13. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission HSST and HSSI Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses development on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on reactor pressure vessel steel have shown that local brittle zones do not significantly degrade the material fracture toughness, constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased fracture toughness, and biaxial loading reduces but does not eliminate the shallow-flaw fracture toughness elevation. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch versus temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement and the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties

  14. Acoustic emission monitoring during hydrotest of a thin wall pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, E.; Grugni, G.; Panzani, C.; Pirovano, B.; Possa, G.; Tonolini, F.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of the acoustic emission monitoring during hydrotests of a thin wall steel pressure vessel. Location of acoustic sources was based on longitudinal wave front detection. The careful calibration of the three sensors used for acoustic source location was found to be very useful, and allowed an accurate location error analysis. Acoustic emission in the hydrotests was found to be due mainly to stress release in weld seams

  15. SCF analysis of a pressurized vessel-nozzle intersection with wall thinning damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, M.; Redekop, D.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element analysis is carried out of a pressurized vessel-nozzle intersection (tee joint), with wall thinning damage. A convergence-validation study is first carried out for undamaged intersections, in which comparisons are made with previously published work for the stress concentration factor (SCF), and good agreement is observed. A study is then carried out for specific tee joints to examine the effect on the SCF of varying the extent of the wall thinning damage. Finally, a parametric study is conducted in which the SCF is computed for a wide range of tee joints, initially considered undamaged, and then with wall thinning damage.

  16. Investigation of in service inspection for pressure vessel of the 200 MW nuclear heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shuyan; Yin Ming; Liu Junjie; Chang Huanjian; Zhou Ningning

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear District Heating Reactor (NHR) is a new type of reactor. There are some differences in the arrangement of the primary circuit components and in safety features between NHR and PWR or other reactors. In this paper the safety features of the 200 MW NHR are described. The failure probability, the LBB property and the in-service inspection requirement for the 200 MW NHR pressure vessel are also discussed. (author). 16 refs, 6 figs, 4 tabs

  17. Investigation of in service inspection for pressure vessel of the 200 MW nuclear heating reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuyan, He; Ming, Yin; Junjie, Liu; Huanjian, Chang; Ningning, Zhou [Institute of Nuclear Energy and Technology, Tsingua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1997-09-01

    The Nuclear District Heating Reactor (NHR) is a new type of reactor. There are some differences in the arrangement of the primary circuit components and in safety features between NHR and PWR or other reactors. In this paper the safety features of the 200 MW NHR are described. The failure probability, the LBB property and the in-service inspection requirement for the 200 MW NHR pressure vessel are also discussed. (author). 16 refs, 6 figs, 4 tabs.

  18. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE's Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute's Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454 degrees C [850'F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about ±5% (23.6 degrees C [42.5 degrees F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes

  19. Positron annihilation and Moessbauer studies of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, G.; Matz, W.; Liszkay, L.; Molnar, B.

    1990-11-01

    Positron annihilation (lifetime, Doppler broadening) and Moessbauer studies on unirradiated, neutron irradiated and neutron irradiated plus annealed reactor pressure vessel steels (Soviet type 15Kh2NMFA) are presented. The role of microstructural properties and the formation of irradiation-induced precipitates is discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Welding electrode for peripheral welds of A-1 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos, L.

    1975-01-01

    The properties are outlined of the VUZ-AC1-52 welding electrode used in welding the Bohunice A-1 reactor pressure vessel. The mechanical properties of welded joints after the final thermal treatment are summed up. (J.K.)

  1. Safety of light-water reactor pressure vessels against brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1979-01-01

    The results are surveyed of research by SKODA Trust into brittle failure resistance of materials for WWER type reactor pressure vessels and into pressure vessel operating safety. Conditions are discussed in detail decisive for initiation, propagation and arrest of brittle fracture. The tests on the Cr-Mo-V type steel showed high resistance of the steel to the formation and the propagation of brittle fracture. They also confirmed the high operating reliability and the required service life of the steel. (B.S.)

  2. Programmable - logic equipment for ultrasound periodic inspections of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haniger, L.

    1980-01-01

    Two alternatives are presented of programmable logic corresponding to the 2nd generation of the apparatus for performing periodic ultrasonic inspections of power reactor pressure vessels and a solution is outlined of inspecting the circumferential weld on the pressure vessel head. The apparatus will allow using any measuring head taken into consideration for operational inspection. Command words are taken from a punched type reader. Czechoslovak made RAM memories are used. The algorithm of instrument function is supposed to be controlled by a microprocessor as soon as necessary preconditions for this technology are created in Czechoslovakia

  3. Pressurized thermal shock. Thermo-hydraulic conditions in the CNA-I reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, Mirta A.; Rosso, Ricardo D.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we analyze several reports issued by the Utility (Nucleo Electrica S.A.) and related to Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) phenomena in the CNA-I Nuclear Power Plant. These analyses are aimed at obtaining conclusions and establishing criteria ensuring the RPV integrity. Special attention was given to the effects ECCS cold-water injection at the RPV down-comer leading to pressurized thermal shock scenarios. The results deal with hypothetical primary system pipe breaks of different sizes, the inadvertent opening of the pressurizer safety valve, the double guillotine break of a live steam line in the containment and the inadvertent actuation pressurizer heaters. Modeling conditions were setup to represent experiments performed at the UPTF, under the hypothesis that they are representative of those that, hypothetically, may occur at the CNA-I. No system scaling analysis was performed, so this assertion and the inferred conclusions are no fully justified, at least in principle. The above mentioned studies, indicate that the RPV internal wall surface temperature will be nearly 40 degree. It was concluded that they allowed a better approximation of PTS phenomena in the RPV of the CNA-I. Special emphasis was made on the influence of the ECCS systems on the attained RPV wall temperature, particularly the low-pressure TJ water injection system. Some conservative hypothesis made, are discussed in this report. (author)

  4. Reactors with pressure vessel in pre-stressed concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Christian; Lafore, Pierre

    1964-12-01

    After having proposed a general description of the evolution of the general design of reactors with a vessel in pre-stressed concrete, this report outlines the interest of this technical solution of a vessel in pre-stressed concrete with integrated exchangers, which is to replace steel vessel. This solution is presented as much safer. The authors discuss the various issues related to protection: inner and outer biological protection of the vessel, material protection (against heating, steel irradiation, Wigner effect, and moderator radiolytic corrosion). They report the application of calculation methods: calculation of vessel concrete heating, study of the intermediate zone in integrated reactors, neutron spectrum and flows in the core of a graphite pile

  5. On-line fatigue monitoring system for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, K.; Sakai, A.; Aoki, T.; Ranganath, S.; Stevens, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    A workstation-based, on-line fatigue monitoring system for tracking fatigue usage applied to an operating boiling water reactor (BWR), Tsuruga Unit-1, is described. The system uses the influence function approach and determines component stresses using temperature, pressure, and flow rate data that are made available via signal taps from previously existing plant sensors. Using plant unique influence functions developed specifically for the feedwater nozzle location, the system calculates stresses as a function of time and computed fatigue usage. The analysis method used to compute fatigue usage complies with MITI Code Notification No.501. Fatigue usage results for an entire fuel cycle are presented and compared to assumed design basis events to confirm that actual plant thermal duty is significantly less severe than originally estimated in the design basis stress report. As a result, the system provides the technical basis to more accurately evaluate actual reactor conditions as well as the justification for plant life extension. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel surveillance capsule examinations. Application of American Society for Testing and Materials Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    A series of pressure vessel surveillance capsules is installed in each commercial nuclear power plant in the United States. A capsule typically contains neutron dose meters, thermal monitors, tensile specimens, and Charpy V-notch impact specimens. In order to determine property changes of the pressure vessel resulting from irradiation, surveillance capsules are periodically removed during the life of a reactor and examined. There are numerous standards, regulations, and codes governing US pressure vessel surveillance capsule programmes. These are put out by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). A majority of the pertinent ASTM standards are under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee E-10 on Nuclear Applications and Measurements of Radiation Effects. The standards, regulations, and codes pertaining to pressure vessel surveillance play an important role in ensuring reliability of the nuclear pressure vessels. ASTM E 185-73 is the Standard Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactors. This standard recommends procedures for both the irradiation and subsequent testing of surveillance capsules. ASTM E 185-73 references many additional specialized ASTM standards to be followed in specific areas of a surveillance capsule examination. A key element of surveillance capsule programmes is the Charpy V-notch impact test, used to define curves of fracture behaviour over a range of temperatures. The data from these tests are used to define the adjusted reference temperature used in determining pressure-temperature operating curves for a nuclear power plant. (author)

  7. Inspection and repair of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohmann, W.; Poetz, F.; Nicolai, M.

    1996-01-01

    The past 10 years of operation of light water reactors were characterized by intensive inspection- and repair work on vital components. For boiling water reactors (BWR) it was typical to totally replace the piping system and for pressurized water reactors (PWR) it was the step to complete steam generator (SG) replacement - besides the development of increasingly diligent inspection and repair methods for SG tubes. It can be expected that in the 10 years to come the development of inspection- and repair methods will be aimed mainly at the core internals of BWR's as well as PWR's. Our prediction is that before the end of this decade a first complete replacement of these components will be performed. Already to date a broad range of techniques are available which enable the utilities to carry out inspections and repair of components of core internals in a relatively short time and acceptable expenses. Using examples such as Fuel Alignment Pin Inspection and Replacement, Baffle Former Bolt Inspection and Replacement, Core Barrel Former Bolt Inspection which are typical for PWR's we will in the following describe the existing methods, their development and - last but not least - their successful utilization. What is going to happen in the future? Ageing of the operating plants will continue, thus requesting the plant operators as well as the service companies to work on advanced technologies to fulfill the needs of the industry. (author)

  8. Effect of radiation damage on operating safety of steel pressure vessels of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Stoces, B.; Brumovsky, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects are assessed of the environment upon mechanical properties of steel used generally for pressure vessels of light water nuclear reactors. Changes caused by radiation affect the reliability of vessels. Deterioration of steel properties is mainly due to neutron radiation. The article deals with factors bearing upon damage and with methods allowing to evaluate the reliability of vessels and predict their service life. Operating reliability of vessels is very unfavourably affected by planned and accidental reactor transients. (author)

  9. Testing of VVER reactor pressure vessels by TOFD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skala, Z.; Vit, J.

    2002-01-01

    The Time of Flight Diffraction Method (TOFD) - one of the new testing methods capable to obtain the real dimensions of flaws - is presented in the paper.The laboratory experiments on samples with artificial flaws and samples with artificially prepared cracks confirmed the high accuracy of flaw through wall extent sizing by TOFD. This accuracy was confirmed by qualification of methods and systems used by Skoda JS for the in-service inspections of WWER 440 vessel circumferential weld. The qualification also confirmed the ability of TOFD to detect reliably flaws, which can are not reliably detected by standard pulse echo testing. Based on the result of experiments and qualification, the TOFD method shall be used routinely by Skoda JS for the inspection of vessel circumferential welds root area and for sizing of flaws exceeding the acceptance level

  10. Manufacturing and material properties of forgings for reactor pressure vessel of high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, I.; Suzuki, K.

    1994-01-01

    For the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) which has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel is used first in the world. Material confirmation test has been carried out to demonstrate good applicability of forged low Si 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel to the RPV of HTTR. Recently, JSW has succeeded in the manufacturing of large size ring forgings and large size forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for stand pipe for the RPV. This paper describes the results of the material confirmation test as well as the manufacturing and material properties of the large forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for stand pipe. (orig.)

  11. Thermodynamic Alloy Design of High Strength and Toughness in 300 mm Thick Pressure Vessel Wall of 1.25Cr-0.5Mo Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-sung Na

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century, there is an increasing need for high-capacity, high-efficiency, and environmentally friendly power generation systems. The environmentally friendly integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC technology has received particular attention. IGCC pressure vessels require a high-temperature strength and creep strength exceeding those of existing pressure vessels because the operating temperature of the reactor is increased for improved capacity and efficiency. Therefore, high-pressure vessels with thicker walls than those in existing pressure vessels (≤200 mm must be designed. The primary focus of this research is the development of an IGCC pressure vessel with a fully bainitic structure in the middle portion of the 300 mm thick Cr-Mo steel walls. For this purpose, the effects of the alloy content and cooling rates on the ferrite precipitation and phase transformation behaviors were investigated using JMatPro modeling and thermodynamic calculation; the results were then optimized. Candidate alloys from the simulated results were tested experimentally.

  12. Residual stress analysis in reactor pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Pont, D.

    1991-08-01

    Residual stresses in cladding and welded attachments could contribute to the problem of stress-corrosion cracking in boiling-water reactors (BWR). As part of a larger program aimed at quantifying residual stress in BWR components, models that would be applicable for predicting residual stress in BWR components are reviewed and documented. The review includes simple methods of estimating residual stresses as well as advanced finite-element software. In general, simple methods are capable of predicting peak magnitudes of residual stresses but are incapable of adequately characterizing the distribution of residual stresses. Ten groups of researchers using finite-element software are reviewed in detail. For each group, the assumptions of the model, possible simplifications, material property data, and specific applications are discussed. The most accurate results are obtained when a metallurgical simulation is performed, transformation plasticity effects are included, and the heating and cooling parts of the welding thermal cycle are simulated. Two models are identified which can provide these features. The present state of these models and the material property data available in the literature are adequate to quantify residual stress in BWR components

  13. Nonlinear analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    The numerical procedures for predicting the nonlinear behavior of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel over its design life are discussed. The numerical models are constructed by combining three-dimensional isoparametric finite elements which simulate the concrete, thin shell elements which simulate steel linear plates, and layers of reinforcement steel, and axial elements for discrete prestressing cables. Nonlinearity under compressive stress, multi-dimensional cracking, shrinkage and stress/temperature induced creep of concrete are considered in addition to the elasti-plastic behavior of the liner and reinforcing steel. Various failure theories for concrete have been proposed recently. Also, there are alternative strategies for solving the discrete system equations over the design life, accounting for test loads, pressure and temperature operational loads, creep unloading and abnormal loads. The proposed methods are reviewed, and a new formulation developed by the authors is described. A number of comparisons with experimental tests results and other numerical schemes are presented. These examples demonstrate the validity of the formulation and also provide valuable information concerning the cost and accuracy of the various solution strategies i.e., total vs. incremental loading and initial vs. tangent stiffness. Finally, the analysis of an actual PCRV is described. Stress contours and cracking patterns in the region of cutouts corresponding to operational pressure and temperature loads are illustrated. The effects of creep, unloading, and creep recovery are then shown. Lastly, a strategy for assessing the performance over its design life is discussed

  14. Simulation of coolant mixing in pressure vessel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.

    2003-06-01

    The work was aimed at the experimental investigation and numerical simulation of coolant mixing in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWRs. Generally, the coolant mixing is of relevance for two classes of accident scenarios - boron dilution and cold water transients. For the investigation of the relevant mixing phenomena, the Rossendorf test facility ROCOM has been designed. ROCOM is a 1:5 scaled Plexiglas trademark model of the PWR Konvoi allowing conductivity measurements by wire mesh sensors and velocity measurements by the LDA technique. The CFD calculations were carried out with the CFD-code CFX-4. For the design of the facility, calculations were performed to analyze the scaling of the model. It was found, that the scaling of 1:5 to the prototype meets both: physical and economical demands. Flow measurements and the corresponding CFD calculations in the ROCOM downcomer under steady state conditions showed a Re number independency at nominal flow rates. The flow field is dominated by recirculation areas below the inlet nozzles. Transient flow measurements with high performance LDA-technique showed in agreement with CFX-4 results, that in the case of the start up of a pump after a laminar stage large vortices dominate the flow. In the case of stationary mixing, the maximum value of the averaged mixing scalar at the core inlet was found in the sector below the inlet nozzle, where the tracer was injected. At the start-up case of one pump due to a strong impulse driven flow at the inlet nozzle the horizontal part of the flow dominates in the downcomer. The injection is distributed into two main jets, the maximum of the tracer concentration at the core inlet appears at the opposite part of the loop where the tracer was injected. Additionally, the stationary three-dimensional flow distribution in the downcomer and the lower plenum of a VVER-440/V-230 reactor was calculated with CFX-4. The comparison with experimental data and an analytical mixing model showed a

  15. Feasibility study for CPR1000 incore measurement instrumentation educed from the reactor pressure vessel upper head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guang Jianwei; Liu Qian; Li Wenhong; Duan Yuangang

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses about the feasibility of in-core measurement instrumentation educed from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) upper head. Incore instrumentation educed from the reactor pressure vessel upper head is one of advanced technology in the third generation nuclear power plant. This technology can reduce the manufacture problem of RPV; decrease the manufacture time effectively. Furthermore, this technology can get rid of the trouble for loss of water caused by many penetrations in the RPV bottom head, can increase security of nuclear power plant. By the description of structure analysis, comparison, maturity for four type incore instrumentation detectors, the incore instrumentation can be educed from RPV upper head, which can increase reactor's security, reduce the manufacture time, decrease group dose in refueling period. The core design ability can be enhanced through this study. (authors)

  16. Preventive protection device and method for bottom of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Eisaku; Kurosawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Morinaka, Ren; Enomoto, Kunio; Otaka, Masahiro; Yoshikubo, Fujio; Chiba, Noboru; Sato, Kazunori.

    1995-01-01

    In a preventive protection device for improving stresses in reactor structural components by jetting highly pressurized water with cavitation bubbles from a jetting nozzle toward structural components in a reactor pressure vessel, a fixed structure to a CRD housing is provided with a rotational body attached to the structure, a multi joint arm and a jetting nozzle supported to the multi joint arm. The jetting nozzle is disposed at a position where the center of the jetting deviates from the center of the CRD housing. In addition, a monitoring camera is disposed for displaying the target for preventive protection. The state of stresses on a plurality of targets for preventive protection can be improved by the preventive protection device at a fixed position in the bottom of a reactor pressure vessel where housings stand densely, thereby enabling to attain the preventive protection operation easily and rapidly. (N.H.)

  17. A model for structural analysis of nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A. de.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the recent Brazilian advances in the nuclear technology area, it has been necessary the development of design and analysis methods for pressurized water reactor components, also as other components of a nuclear plant. This work proposes a methodology for the structural analysis of large diameter nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges. In the analysis the vessel is divided into shell-of-revolution elements, the flanges are represented by rigid rings, and the bolts are treated as beams. The flexibility method is used for solving the problem. A computer program is shown, and the given results (displacements and stresses) are compared with results obtained by the finite element method. Although developed for nuclear reactor pressure vessel calculations, the program is more general, being possible its use for the analysis of any structure composed by shells of revolution. (author)

  18. Multiple shell pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described of fabricating a pressure vessel comprising the steps of: attaching a first inner pressure vessel having means defining inlet and outlet openings to a top flange, placing a second inner pressure vessel, having means defining inlet and outlet opening, concentric with and spaced about the first inner pressure vessel and attaching the second inner pressure vessel to the top flange, placing an outer pressure vessel, having inlet and outlet openings, concentric with and spaced apart about the second inner pressure vessel and attaching the outer pressure vessel to the top flange, attaching a generally cylindrical inner inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical inner outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet openings in the first inner pressure vessel, attaching a generally cylindrical outer inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical outer outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet opening in the second inner pressure vessel, heating the assembled pressure vessel to a temperature above the melting point of a material selected from the group, lead, tin, antimony, bismuth, potassium, sodium, boron and mixtures thereof, filling the space between the first inner pressure vessel and the second inner pressure vessel with material selected from the group, filling the space between the second inner pressure vessel and the outer pressure vessel with material selected from the group, and pressurizing the material filling the spaces between the pressure vessels to a predetermined pressure, the step comprising: pressurizing the spaces to a pressure whereby the wall of the first inner pressure vessel is maintained in compression during steady state operation of the pressure vessel

  19. Transient thermal creep of nuclear reactor pressure vessel type concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The immediate aim of the research was to study the transient thermal strain behaviour of four AGR type nuclear reactor concretes during first time heating in an unsealed condition to 600 deg. C. The work being also relevant to applications of fire exposed concrete structures. The programme was, however, expanded to serve a second more theoretical purpose, namely the further investigation of the strain development of unsealed concrete under constant, transient and cyclic thermal states in particular and the effect of elevated temperatures on concrete in general. The range of materials investigated included seven different concretes and three types of cement paste. Limestone, basalt, gravel and lightweight aggregates were employed as well as OPC and SRC cements. Cement replacements included pfa and slag. Test variables comprised two rates of heating (0.2 and 1 deg. C/minute), three initial moisture contents (moist as cast, air-dry and oven dry at 105 deg. C), two curing regimes (bulk of tests represented mass cured concrete), five stress levels (0, 10, 20, 30 and a few tests at 60% of the cold strength), two thermal cycles and levels of test temperature up to 720 deg. C. Supplementary, dilatometry, TGA and DTA tests were performed at CERL on individual samples of aggregate and cement paste which helped towards explaining the observed trends in the concretes. A simple formula was developed which relates the elastic thermal stresses generated from radial temperature gradients to the solution obtained from the transient heat conduction equation. Thermal stresses can, therefore, be minimized by reductions in the radius of the specimen and the rate of heating The results were confirmed by finite element analysis which indicate( tensile stresses in the central region and compressive stresses near the surf ace during heating which are reversed during cooling. It is shown that the temperature gradients, pore pressures and tensile thermal stresses during both heating and

  20. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT NDT values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ''primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary

  1. Deformation Characteristics and Sealing Performance of Metallic O-rings for a Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Shen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a reference to determine the seal performance of metallic O-rings for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV. A nonlinear elastic-plastic model of an O-ring was constructed by the finite element method to analyze its intrinsic properties. It is also validated by experiments on scaled samples. The effects of the compression ratio, the geometrical parameters of the O-ring, and the structure parameters of the groove on the flange are discussed in detail. The results showed that the numerical analysis of the O-ring agrees well with the experimental data, the compression ratio has an important role in the distribution and magnitude of contact stress, and a suitable gap between the sidewall and groove can improve the sealing capability of the O-ring. After the optimization of the sealing structure, some key parameters of the O-ring (i.e., compression ratio, cross-section diameter, wall thickness, sidewall gap have been recommended for application in megakilowatt class nuclear power plants. Furthermore, air tightness and thermal cycling tests were performed to verify the rationality of the finite element method and to reliably evaluate the sealing performance of a RPV.

  2. Deformation characteristics and sealing performance of metallic-O-ring for a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ming Xue; Peng, Xudong; Xie, Linjun; Meng, Xiang Kai [Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Its Remanufacture, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China); Li, Xing Gen [Ningbo Tiansheng Sealing Packing Co., Ltd., Ningbo (China)

    2016-04-15

    This paper provides a reference to determine the seal performance of metallic O-rings for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). A nonlinear elastic-plastic model of an O-ring was constructed by the finite element method to analyze its intrinsic properties. It is also validated by experiments on scaled samples. The effects of the compression ratio, the geometrical parameters of the O-ring, and the structure parameters of the groove on the flange are discussed in detail. The results showed that the numerical analysis of the O-ring agrees well with the experimental data, the compression ratio has an important role in the distribution and magnitude of contact stress, and a suitable gap between the sidewall and groove can improve the sealing capability of the O-ring. After the optimization of the sealing structure, some key parameters of the O-ring (i.e., compression ratio, cross-section diameter, wall thickness, sidewall gap) have been recommended for application in megakilowatt class nuclear power plants. Furthermore, air tightness and thermal cycling tests were performed to verify the rationality of the finite element method and to reliably evaluate the sealing performance of a RPV.

  3. Gamma dose rate estimation and operation management suggestions for decommissioning the reactor pressure vessel of HTR-PM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Fang; Hong Li; Jianzhu Cao; Wenqian Li; Feng Xie; Jiejuan Tong [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua, University, Beijing (China)

    2013-07-01

    China is now designing and constructing a high temperature gas cooled reactor-pebble bed module (HTR-PM). In order to investigate the future decommissioning approach and evaluate possible radiation dose, gamma dose rate near the reactor pressure vessel was calculated for different cooling durations using QAD-CGA program. The source term of this calculation was provided by KORIGEN program. Based on the calculated results, the spatial distribution and temporal changes of gamma dose rate near reactor pressure vessel was systematically analyzed. A suggestion on planning decommissioning operation of reactor pressure vessel of HTRPM was given based on calculated dose rate and the Chinese Standard GB18871-2002. (authors)

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring during hydrotests of a thin wall pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, E.; Grugni, G.; Panzani, C.; Pirovano, B.; Possa, G.; Tonolini, F.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of an acoustic emission monitoring performed during hydrotests of a thin wall steel pressure vessel. The location of acoustic sources was based on longitudinal wave front detection. The careful calibration of the three sensors instrumentation system used for acoustic source location was found to be useful, and alllowed an accurate location error analysis. Acoustic emission in the hydrotests was found to be mainly due to stress release in weld seams. (Fontana, E.; Grugni, G.; Panzani, C.; Pirovano, B.; Possa, G.; Tonolini, F.)

  5. INETEC new system for inspection of PWR reactor pressure vessel head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadinic, B.; Postruzin, Z.

    2004-01-01

    INETEC Institute for Nuclear Technology developed new equipment for inspection of PWR and VVER reactor pressure vessel head. The new advances in inspection technology are presented in this article, as the following: New advance manipulator for inspection of RPVH with high speed of inspection possibilities and total automated work; New sophisticated software for manipulator driving which includes 3D virtual presentation of manipulator movement and collision detection possibilities; New multi axis controller MAC-8; New end effector system for inspection of penetration tube and G weld; New eddy current and ultrasonic probes for inspection of G weld and penetration tube; New Eddy One Raster scan software for analysis of eddy current data with mant advanced features which allows easy and quick data analysis. Also the results of laboratory testing and laboratory qualification are presented on reactor pressure vessel head mock, as well as obtained speed of inspection and quality of collected data.(author)

  6. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel [nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)]. This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected

  7. Reactor pressure vessel steels ASTM A533B and A508 Cl.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelli, R.; Kemppainen, M.; Toerroenen, K.

    1979-11-01

    This report presents the tensile test results of steels ASTM A533B and A508 Cl.2 obtained in connection with a programme initiated to gather and create information needed for the assessment of the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessels. The tensile properties were studied between -196 and 300 degC varying austenitizing and tempering temperatures and having two different carbon contents for the heats of A533B. (author)

  8. Computational evaluation of the constraint loss on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano Garcia, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Master Curve approach is included on the ASME Code through some Code Cases to assess the reactor pressure vessel integrity. However, the margin definition to be added is not defined as is the margin to be added when the Master Curve reference temperature T 0 is obtained by testing pre-cracked Charpy specimens. The reason is that the T 0 value obtained with this specimen geometry is less conservative than the value obtained by testing compact tension specimens possible due to a loss of constraint. The two parameter fracture mechanics, considered as an extension of the classical fracture mechanics, coupled to a micromechanical fracture models is a valuable tool to assess the effect of constraint loss on fracture toughness. The definition of a parameter able to connect the fracture toughens value to the constraint level on the crack tip will allow to quantify margin to be added to the T 0 value when this value is obtained testing the pre-cracked Charpy specimens included in the surveillance capsule of the reactor pressure vessel. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) define on the To value obtained by testing compact tension specimens and ben specimens (as pre-cracked Charpy are) bias. the NRC do not approved any of the direct applications of the Master Curve the reactor pressure vessel integrity assessment until this bias will be quantified in a reliable way. the inclusion of the bias on the integrity assessment is done through a margin to be added. In this thesis the bias is demonstrated an quantified empirical and numerically and a generic value is suggested for reactor pressure vessel materials, so that it can be used as a margin to be added to the T 0 value obtained by testing the Charpy specimens included in the surveillance capsules. (Author) 111 ref

  9. Reactor pressure vessel steels[1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-07-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use.

  10. Nuclear power station with a water-cooled reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, R.; Brunner, G.; Jost, N.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear radiation produces radiolysis gases, which are undesirable for corrosion and oxyhydrogen gas reasons. To limit the proportion of this radiolysis gas, the invention provides that catalytic surfaces should be introduced into the primary circuit, to produce recombination of hydrogen and oxygen. These surfaces can be accommodated in the upper part of the reactor pressure vessel. The live steam screen can also have a catalytic surface. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Assessment of the TRINO reactor pressure vessel integrity: theoretical analysis and NDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milella, P P; Pini, A [ENEA, Rome (Italy)

    1988-12-31

    This document presents the method used for the capability assessment of the Trino reactor pressure vessel. The vessel integrity assessment is divided into the following parts: transients evaluation and selection, fluence estimate for the projected end of life of the vessel, characterization of unirradiated and irradiated materials, thermal and stress analysis, fracture mechanics analysis and eventually fracture input to Non Destructive Examination (NDE). For each part, results are provided. (TEC).

  12. A methodology for determining fabrication flaws in a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, G.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Simonen, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a program with the major objective of estimating the rate of occurrence of fabrication flaws in US light-water reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). In this study, RPV mate4rial was examined using the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique for Ultrasonic Testing (SAFT-UT) to detect and characterize flaws created during fabrication. The inspection data obtained in this program has been analyzed to address the rates of flaw occurrence

  13. Ultrasonic inspection of the Calder Hall and Chaplecross reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennick, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the ultrasonic inspection surveys that have recently been carried out on the Calder Hall and Chapelcross Magnox steel reactor pressure vessels. The development of the inspection system, which is based on the Rediman manipulator and uses the Sonomatic Zipscan equipment and Time-of-Flight diffraction techniques is discussed. The inspection results are presented and compared with the original inspection findings and limiting crack sizes. (author)

  14. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement of NPP borssele: Design lifetime and lifetime extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel of the Borssele nuclear power plant has been investigated taking account of the design lifetime of 40 years and considering 20 years subsequent lifetime extension. The paper presents the current licensing status based on considerations of material test data and of US nuclear regulatory standards. Embrittlement status is also evaluated against German and French nuclear safety standards. Results from previous fracture toughness and Charpy tests are investigated by means of the Master curve toughness transition approach. Finally, state of the art insights are investigated by means of literature research. Regarding the embrittlement status of the reactor pressure vessel of Borssele nuclear power plant it is concluded that there is a profound basis for the current license up to the original end of the design life in 2013. The embrittlement temperature changes only slightly with respect to the acceptance criterion adopted postulating further operation up to 2033. Continued safe operation and further lifetime extension are therefore not restricted by reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

  15. Numerical analysis of coolant mixing in the pressure vessel of WWER-440 type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boros, I.; Aszodi, A.

    2003-01-01

    The precise description of the coolant mixing processes taking place in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of pressurized water nuclear reactors has an essential importance during power operation, as well as in case of incidental or accidental conditions. In this paper the detailed CFD model of the pressure vessel of a WWER-440 type reactor and calculations performed with this RPV model are presented. The CFD model of the pressure vessel contains all the important internal structural elements of the RPV. Sensitivity study on the effect of these elements was also carried out. Both steady-state and transient calculation were performed using the CFD code CFX-5.5.1. The results of the steady-state calculations give the so called mixing factors, i.e. the effect of each single primary loop at the core inlet. The mixing factors can be given for nominal circumstances (i.e. all main coolant pumps are working) or in case of less than six working MCPs. In order to validate the model the calculated mixing factors are compared with the values measured in the Paks NPP (Authors)

  16. Influence of gamma irradiation on the deterioration of reactor pressure vessel materials and on reactor dosimetry measurements. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, B.; Konheiser, J.; Kumpf, H.; Noack, K.; Vladimirov, P.

    2002-10-01

    Radiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steel in mixed neutron-gamma fields is mostly determined by neutrons, but in some cases also by gamma-radiation. Depending on the reactor type, gamma radiation can influence evaluations of lead factors of surveillance specimens, effect the interpretation of results of irradiation experiments and finally, it can result in changed pressure vessel lifetime evaluations. The project aimed at the evaluation of the importance of gamma radiation for RPV steel damage for several types of light-water reactors. Absolute neutron and gamma fluence rate spectra had been calculated for the Russian PWR types VVER-440 and two core loading variants of VVER-1000, for a German 1300 MW PWR and a German 900 MW BWR. Based on the calculated spectra several flux integrals and radiation damage parameters were derived for the region of the azimuthal flux maxima in the mid-planes for different radial positions between core and biological shield, especially, at the inner and outer surfaces of the PV walls, at the (1/4)-PV-thickness and at the surveillance positions. Fissionable materials are often used as activation detectors for neutron fluence measurements. To get the real value the analysis demands to take into account the gamma induced fissions. Therefore, the part of these fissions in the total number of fissions was estimated for the detector reactions 237 Np(n,f) and 238 U(n,f) in the calculated neutron/gamma fields. It has been found that considerable corrections of the neutron fluence measurements can be necessary, especially in case of 238 U(n,f). Most of the calculations were performed using a three-dimensional synthesis of 2D/1D-flux distributions obtained by the S N -code DORT with the BUGLE-96T group cross-section library. (orig.) [de

  17. Coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis for boiling water reactor pressure vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Walter; Tran, Chi-Thanh; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We consider a severe accident in a BWR with melt pool formation in the lower head. ► We study the influence of pool depth on vessel failure mode with creep analysis. ► There are two modes of failure; ballooning of vessel bottom and a localized creep. ► External vessel cooling can suppress creep and subsequently prevent vessel failure. - Abstract: In this paper we consider a hypothetical severe accident in a Nordic-type boiling water reactor (BWR) at the stage of relocation of molten core materials to the lower head and subsequent debris bed and then melt pool formation. Nordic BWRs rely on reactor cavity flooding as a means for ex-vessel melt coolability and ultimate termination of the accident progression. However, different modes of vessel failure may result in different regimes of melt release from the vessel, which determine initial conditions for melt coolant interaction and eventually coolability of the debris bed. The goal of this study is to define if retention of decay-heated melt inside the reactor pressure vessel is possible and investigate modes of the vessel wall failure otherwise. The mode of failure is contingent upon the ultimate mechanical strength of the vessel structures under given mechanical and thermal loads and applied cooling measures. The influence of pool depth and respective transient thermal loads on the reactor vessel failure mode is studied with coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis. Efficacy of control rod guide tube (CRGT) cooling and external vessel wall cooling as potential severe accident management measures is investigated. First, only CRGT cooling is considered in simulations revealing two different modes of vessel failure: (i) a ‘ballooning’ of the vessel bottom and (ii) a ‘localized creep’ concentrated within the vicinity of the top surface of the melt pool. Second, possibility of in-vessel retention with CRGT and external vessel cooling is investigated. We found that the external vessel

  18. Review of in-service thermal annealing of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation embrittlement of ferritic pressure vessel steels increases the ductile-brittle transition temperature and decreases the upper-shelf level of toughness as measured by Charpy impact tests. A thermal anneal cycle well above the normal operating temperature of the vessel can restore most of the original Charpy V-notch energy properties. A test reactor pressure vessel has been wet annealed at less than 343 0 C (650 0 F), and annealing of the Belgian BR-3 reactor vessel has recently taken place. An industry survey indicates that dry annealing a reactor vessel in-place is feasible, but solvable engineering problems do exist. The materials with highest radiation sensitivity in the older reactor vessels are submerged-arc weld metals with high copper and nickel concentrations. The limited Charpy V-notch and fracture toughness data available for five such welds were reviewed. The review suggested that significant recovery results from annealing at 454 0 C (850 0 F) for one week. Two of the main concerns with a localized heat treatment at 454 0 C (850 0 F) are the degree of distortion that may occur after the annealing cycle and the extent of residual stresses. A thermal and structural analysis of a reactor vessel for distortions and residual stresses found no problems with the reactor vessel itself but did indicate a rotation at the nozzle region of the vessel that would plastically deform the attached primary piping. Further analytical studies are needed. An American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) task group is upgrading and revising the ASTM Recommended Guide for In-Service Annealing of WaterCooled Nuclear Reactor Vessels (E 509-74) with emphasis on the materials and surveillance aspects of annealing rather than system engineering problems. System safety issues are the province of organizations other than ASTM (for example, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code body)

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels exposed to hot water. Experimental fracture mechanics results are compared with data from the literature and other laboratories. Thus a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge concerning stress corrosion crack growth rates is provided. Several sets of data confirm that 'fast' stress corrosion cracks with growth rates between 10 -8 and 10 -7 m/s and threshold stress intensities around 20 MN m -3/2 can occur under certain conditions. However, it appears possible that specific environmental, mechanical and metallurgical conditions which may prevail in reactors can result in significantly lower stress corrosion crack growth rates. The presently known stress corrosion crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves are discussed with emphasis on their usefulness in establishing safety margins against stress corrosion cracking of components in service. Further substantial research efforts would be helpful to provide a data base which permits well founded predictions as to how stress corrosion cracking in pressure vessels and piping can be reliably excluded or tolerated. It is emphasized, however, that the nucleation of stress corrosion cracks (as opposed to their growth) is difficult and may contribute substantially to the stress corrosion free service behaviour of the overwhelming majority of pressure vessels and pipes. (author)

  20. Void nucleation by the helium atoms during lifetime of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    Void formation and growth has a great influence on the reactor pressure vessel steels during its lifetime and during post-irradiation annealing to increase its life. The present investigation aimed at the fact that if one can prevent void nucleation, accordingly one would not wary about void formation and growth. From that concept a model for helium production by transmutation reaction and corresponding swelling under irradiation conditions for several number of steels have been developed. This was done for recommending a steel type that can oppose such a phenomena. In the same time the present investigation gives a procedure utilizing such phenomena for checking the validity of pressure vessel steel used in the NPP

  1. Seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel or the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, H.J.; Huelsermann, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel, steam boiler vessel, or any other vessel which is desirably sealed against pressure of the type including a housing and a housing closure that present opposed vertical sealing surfaces which define the sides of a channel. The seals of the present invention comprise at least one sealing member disposed in the channel, having at least one stop face, a base portion and two shank portions extending from the base portion to form a groove-like recess. The shank portions are provided with sealing surfaces arranged to mate with the opposed vertical pressure vessel sealing surfaces. A shank-spreading wedge element also disposed in the channel has at least one stop face and is engaged in the groove-like recess with the sealing member and wedge element stop face adjacent to each other

  2. Embrittlement of the nuclear icebreaker Lenin reactor pressure vessel materials reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasikov, E.A.; Nikolaenko, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    Paper deals with the results of the efforts to examine the radiation damage of the Lenin nuclear-powered ice-breaker decommissioned reactor pressure vessel on the basis of which one has determined the peculiar features of the metal radiation embrittlement. Under 10 10 -10 11 s -1 cm -2 low density neutron flux irradiation one notes the most intensive embrittlement of the metal. Then, as the noxious element content in the metal matrix grows smaller the embrittlement reduces up to the change of sign as to the normal curve plotted at the neutron flux density exceeding 10 13 s -1 cm -2 . One assumes that as a result of the low density neutron flux irradiation the reactor pressure vessel edge spaces at some operation stages may be damaged more severely in contrast to these near the reactor core. The neutron irradiation density is the factor affecting the reactor vessel material embrittlement, that is why, it is important to study the damage mechanism of the materials of the power reactor vessels under design characterized by the low radiation load. The mentioned is important, as well, to evaluate the efficiency of the efforts undertaken to mitigate the effect of the neutron radiation on the reactor vessel [ru

  3. Underwater cutting of stainless steel plate and pipe for dismantling reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamasaki, M.; Tateiwa, F.; Kanatani, F.; Yamashita, S.

    1982-01-01

    A consumable electrode water jet cutting technique is described. Satisfactory underwater cutting of 80mm stainless steel plate using a current of 2000A and at a water depth of 200mm has been demonstrated. The electrical requirements for this arc welding method applied to cutting were found to be approximately one third those required for conventional plasma arc cutting for the same thickness plate. An application of this technique might be found in the dismantling of atomic reactor pressure vessels, and parts of commercial atomic reactors. (author)

  4. Progress in Investigation of WWER-440 Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel by Gamma and Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hascik, J.; Slugen, V.; Lipka, J.; Hinca, R.; Toth, I.; Groene, R.; Uvacik, P.; Kupca, L.

    1998-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopic analyse and first experimental results of original irradiated reactor pressure vessel surveillance specimens are discussed in. In 1994, the new ''Extended Surveillance Specimen Program for nuclear Reactor Material Study'' was started in collaboration with the nuclear power plants (NPP) V-2 Bohunice (Slovakia). The first batch of MS samples (after 1 year, which is equivalent to 5 years of loading RPV-steel) was measured and interpreted using the new four components approach with the aim to observe microstructural changes due to thermal and neutron treatment resulting from operating conditions in NPP. The systematic changes in the relative areas of Moessbauer spectra components were observed. (author)

  5. Fast neutron fluence evaluation of the smart reactor pressure vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.Y.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, H.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Zee, S.Q.

    2007-01-01

    In Korea, the design of an advanced integral reactor system called SMART has been developed by KAERI to supply energy for seawater desalination as well as an electricity generation. A fast neutron fluence distribution at the SMART reactor pressure vessel was evaluated to confirm the integrity of the vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code. The GEOSHIELD code was developed by KAERI in order to prepare an input list including a geometry modeling of the DORT code and to process results from the DORT code output list. Results by a GEOSHIELD code processing and by a manual processing of the DORT show a good agreement. (author)

  6. General Description of the Mechanic Design of the Pressure Vessel and the Internal Mechanical Component of the CAREM Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, F.; Horro, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the CAREM reactor pressure vessel and its main internal mechanical components and summarizes the functional requirements and approaches applied for their design, together with a review of the normative applicable in each case

  7. Guidelines for Application of the Master Curve Approach to Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyssakov, V.N.; Kang, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines have been developed under an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) titled ''Surveillance Programme Results Application to Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity Assessment.'' The IAEA has sponsored a series of five CRPs that have led to a focus on measuring the best irradiation fracture parameters using relatively small test specimens for assuring structural integrity of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs)

  8. Safeguarding the nuclear safety of WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels at SKODA Plzen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrbek, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The approach is described of the SKODA enterprise to safety assurance and to providing the reliability of WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels. The philosophy is analyzed of in-service inspection and determination of the residual service life of pressure vessels. This follows up on the so-called conception of basic safety whose main aim is to preclude failures at production stage by the selection of suitable material, namely by optimizing the choice of raw materials, of metallurgical procedures such as will lead to high purity of the pressure vessel material, by introducing multiple inspection in production, reducing the sensitivity of materials to technological operations, and by high-quality welds. The quality of in-service inspections is given by the use of technical diagnostic instruments of peak quality and of modern methods of nondestructive materials testing. The instruments and methods used are described. It is stated that the experience gained with in-service inspection will make it possible to draw up operating regulations and safety criteria for nuclear installations and own inspection regulations, this with regard to technical and economic factors. (Z.M.)

  9. Upper and Lower Bound Limit Loads for Thin-Walled Pressure Vessels Used for Aerosol Cans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen John Hardy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The elastic compensation method proposed by Mackenzie and Boyle is used to estimate the upper and lower bound limit (collapse loads for one-piece aluminium aerosol cans, which are thin-walled pressure vessels subjected to internal pressure loading. Elastic-plastic finite element predictions for yield and collapse pressures are found using axisymmetric models. However, it is shown that predictions for the elastic-plastic buckling of the vessel base require the use of a full three-dimensional model with a small unsymmetrical imperfection introduced. The finite element predictions for the internal pressure to cause complete failure via collapse fall within the upper and lower bounds. Hence the method, which involves only elastic analyses, can be used in place of complex elastic-plastic finite element analyses when upper and lower bound estimates are adequate for design purposes. Similarly, the lower bound value underpredicts the pressure at which first yield occurs.

  10. Isothermal and thermal–mechanical fatigue of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekete, Balazs, E-mail: fekete.mm.bme@gmail.com [College of Dunaujvaros, Tancsics 1A, Dunaujvaros H-2400 (Hungary); Department of Applied Mechanics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Muegyetem 5, Budapest H-1111 (Hungary); Trampus, Peter [College of Dunaujvaros, Tancsics 1A, Dunaujvaros H-2400 (Hungary)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We aimed to determine the thermomechanical behaviour of VVER reactor steels. • Material tests were developed and performed on GLEEBLE 3800 physical simulator. • Coffin–Manson curves and parameters were derived. • High accuracy of the strain energy based evaluation was found. • The observed dislocation evolution correlates with the mechanical behaviour. - Abstract: The fatigue life of the structural materials 15Ch2MFA (CrMoV-alloyed ferritic steel) and 08Ch18N10T (CrNi-alloyed austenitic steel) of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel under completely reserved total strain controlled low cycle fatigue tests were investigated. An advanced test facility was developed for GLEEBLE-3800 physical simulator which was able to perform thermomechanical fatigue experiments under in-service conditions of VVER nuclear reactors. The low cycle fatigue results were evaluated with the plastic strain based Coffin–Manson law, and plastic strain energy based model as well. It was shown that both methods are able to predict the fatigue life of reactor pressure vessel steels accurately. Interrupted fatigue tests were also carried out to investigate the kinetic of the fatigue evolution of the materials. On these samples microstructural evaluation by TEM was performed. The investigated low cycle fatigue behavior can provide reference for remaining life assessment and lifetime extension analysis.

  11. Special servicing equipment for reactor pressurized vessel stud hole and stud accessories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianglian

    1999-01-01

    The author briefly introduces the design and manufacture of nuclear island special servicing equipment of Nuclear Power Institute of China. Maintenance process of reactor pressurized vessel (RPV) stud hold and stud accessories the special servicing equipment include RPV flange dummy, closed-circuit television (CCTV) inspection equipment, RPV stud hole expandable comb, RPV stud hole polisher, RPV stud hold thread lubricating equipment, RPV stud hole thread miller and RPV stud hole camera. It is presented how eight kinds of special servicing equipment perform the maintenance process concerning their function, structure, and characteristics, their practical use on site is also introduced

  12. International workshop on WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and annealing. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Workshop was essentially to discuss the WWER 440 model 230 reactor pressure vessel integrity in terms of the measures already taken, current activities and future plans. The meeting was arranged in two parts, namely, the Scientific programme followed by the consideration, review and revision of the IAEA Consultancy report on RPV Embrittlement and Annealing. This particular report covers the first part of the meeting i.e., the Scientific Programme, in the form of proceedings of the meeting, while the re-drafted Consultancy report will be issued later. The meeting was attended by sixty-six representatives from thirteen countries. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Cutting Technology for Decommissioning of the Reactor Pressure Vessels in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Kim, Geun Ho; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Byung Seon

    2012-01-01

    Lots of nuclear power plants have been decommissioned during the last 2 decades. An essential part of this work is the dismantling of the Reactor Pressure Vessel and its Internals. For this purpose a wide variety of different cutting technologies have been developed, adapted and applied. A detailed introduction to Plasma Arc cutting, Contact Arc Metal cutting and Abrasive Water Suspension Jet cutting is given, as it turned out that these cutting technologies are particularly suitable for these type of segmentation work. A comparison of these technologies including gaseous emissions, cutting power, manipulator requirements as well as selected design approaches are given. Process limits as well as actual limits of application are presented

  14. Comparative study on two different seal surface structure for reactor pressure vessel sealing behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Xiong Guangming; Deng Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    The seal surface structure is very important to reactor pressure vessel (RPV) sealing behavior. In this paper, two 3-D RPV sealing analysis finite models have been established with different seal surface structures, in order to study the influence of two structures. The separation of RPV upper and lower flanges, bolt loads and etc. are obtained, which are used to evaluate the sealing behavior of the RPV. Meanwhile, the comparative analysis of safety margin of two seal surface structural had been done, which provides the theoretical basis for RPV seal structure design optimization. (authors)

  15. A structural evaluation of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport impact conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, M.C.; Chou, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, is being decommissioned and dismantled. This government-leased property will be returned, in a radiologically safe condition, to its owner. All radioactive material is being removed from the Shippingport Station and transported for burial to the DOE Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) will be transported by barge to Hanford. This paper describes an evaluation of the structural response of the RPV to the normal and accident impact test conditions as required by the Code of Federal Regulations. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Users manual data base MATSURV. Reactor pressure vessel material surveillance data management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenworthy, L.D.; Tether, C.D.

    1980-02-01

    This Users Guide to the data management system MATSURV has been prepared to assist the user in all facets of the task of processing data related to reactor pressure vessel materials surveillance; preparation of raw data for input, input of data, modification of existing data, retrieval and display of data, and the creation of data reports. MATSURV is structured upon the System 2000 data base management system which is maintained on the IBM 370/168 computer at National Institutes of Health. An overview of System 2000 is provided

  17. Improvement of remote control system of automatic ultrasonic equipment for inspection of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, H. K.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, K. M.; Hyung, H.; Sim, C. M.; Gong, U. S.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, J. P.; Rhoo, H. C.; Kim, M. S.; Ryoo, S. K.; Choi, C. H.; Oh, K. I.

    1999-12-01

    One of the important issues related to the nuclear safety is in-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel (RPV). A remote controlled automatic ultrasonic method is applied to the inspection. At present the automatic ultrasonic inspection system owned by KAERI is interrupted due to degradation of parts. In order to resume field inspection new remote control system for the equipment was designed and installed to the existing equipment. New ultrasonic sensors and their modules for RPV inspection were designed and fabricated in accordance with the new requirements of the inspection codes. Ultrasonic sensors were verified for the use in the RPV inspection. (author)

  18. Improvement of remote control system of automatic ultrasonic equipment for inspection of reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, H. K.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, K. M.; Hyung, H.; Sim, C. M.; Gong, U. S.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, J. P.; Rhoo, H. C.; Kim, M. S.; Ryoo, S. K.; Choi, C. H.; Oh, K. I

    1999-12-01

    One of the important issues related to the nuclear safety is in-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel (RPV). A remote controlled automatic ultrasonic method is applied to the inspection. At present the automatic ultrasonic inspection system owned by KAERI is interrupted due to degradation of parts. In order to resume field inspection new remote control system for the equipment was designed and installed to the existing equipment. New ultrasonic sensors and their modules for RPV inspection were designed and fabricated in accordance with the new requirements of the inspection codes. Ultrasonic sensors were verified for the use in the RPV inspection. (autho0008.

  19. Evaluation of upper-shelf toughness requirements for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, R.M.; Zahoor, A. (NOVETECH Corp., Rockville, MD (USA)); Hiser, A. (Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (USA)); Ernst, H.A.; Pollitz, E.T. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-04-01

    This work assesses and applies the criteria recommended by the ASME Subgroup on Evaluation Standards for the evaluation of reactor pressure vessel beltline materials having upper shelf Charpy energies less than 50 ft-lbs. The assessment included comparison of the upper shelf energies required by the criteria recommended for Service Level A and B conditions and criteria proposed for evaluation of postulated Service Level C and D events. The criteria recommended for Service Level A and B conditions was used to evaluate Linde 80 weld material. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Evaluation of upper-shelf toughness requirements for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, R.M.; Zahoor, A.; Hiser, A.; Ernst, H.A.; Pollitz, E.T.

    1990-04-01

    This work assesses and applies the criteria recommended by the ASME Subgroup on Evaluation Standards for the evaluation of reactor pressure vessel beltline materials having upper shelf Charpy energies less than 50 ft-lbs. The assessment included comparison of the upper shelf energies required by the criteria recommended for Service Level A and B conditions and criteria proposed for evaluation of postulated Service Level C and D events. The criteria recommended for Service Level A and B conditions was used to evaluate Linde 80 weld material. 9 refs., 4 figs

  1. Prestressed safety enclosure (PSE) with metallic cushion for new or existing reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1991-01-01

    The special technology required to build the conventional types of thickwalled forged nuclear reactor pressure vessels is mastered only by a few large world-class manufactures. In order eventually to make it possible for other less established manufacturers, for example, those in newly industrialized nations, to construct nuclear RPVS or containers with large diameter for high pressures and which can tolerate large thermal gradients, an improved novel concept of a prestressed cast-iron container with multilayer shells and interlayer metallic cushions is being developed and is described in this paper. (author)

  2. Ensuring the nuclear safety of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessels in Skoda, Concern Enterprise, Plzen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrbek, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Various types of routine inspections are described of reactor pressure vessels with the aim of identifying residual lifetime and overall safety. The inspection programme includes: choice of systems and instruments, type of tests, test frequency, safety criteria, measures to be taken in case of unsatisfactory results, documentation. The criteria are given for periodical inspections and requirements listed for instruments and equipment. The main three groups of tests are: visual inspection and dimension tests, surface inspection and volumetric inspection. Briefly described is some of the equipment used. (M.D.)

  3. Behavior of a corium jet in high pressure melt ejection from a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.

    1987-01-01

    This report provides results from analytical and experimental investigations on the behavior of a gas supersaturated molten jet expelled from a pressurized vessel. Aero-hydrodynamic stability of liquid jets in gas, stream degassing of molten metals and gas bubble nucleation in molten metals are relevant problems which are addressed in this work. Models are developed for jet expansion, primary breakup of the jet and secondary fragmentation of melt droplets resulting from violent effervescence of dissolved gas. The jet expansion model is based on a general relation for bubble growth which includes both inertia-controlled and diffusion-controlled growth phases. The jet expansion model is able to predict the jet void fraction, jet radius as a function of axial distance from the pressure vessel, bubble size and bubble pressure. The number density of gas bubbles in the melt, which is a basic parameter in the model, was determined experimentally and is about 10 8 per m 3 of liquid. The primary breakup of the jet produces a spray of droplets, about 2-3 mm in diameter. Parametric calculations for a TMLB' reactor accident sequence show that the corium jet is disrupted within a few initial jet diameters from the reactor vessel and that the radius of corium spray at the level of the reactor cavity floor is in the range of 0.8 to 2.6 m. (orig./HP)

  4. Integrity assessment of TAPS reactor pressure vessel at extended EOL using surveillance test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Shah, Priti Kotak

    2008-05-01

    Integrity assessment of pressure vessels of nuclear reactors (RPV) primarily concentrates on the prevention of brittle failure and conditions are defined under which brittle failure can be excluded. Accordingly, two approaches based on Transition Temperature Concept and Fracture Mechanics Concept were adopted using the impact test results of three credible surveillance data sets obtained from the surveillance specimens of Tarapur Atomic Power Station. RT NDT data towards end of life (EOL) were estimated from the impact test results in accordance with the procedures of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2 and were used as primary input for assessment of the vessel integrity. SA302B (nickel modified) steel cladded with stainless steel is used as the pressure vessel material for the two 210 MWe boiling water reactors of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). The reactors were commissioned during the year 1969. The chemical compositions of SA302B (modified) steel used in fabricating the vessel and the specified tensile property and the Charpy impact property requirements of the steel broadly meet ASME specified requirements. Therefore, the pressure temperature limit curves prescribed by General Electric (G.E.) were compared with those as obtained using procedures of ASME Section XII, Appendix G. The tensile and the Charpy impact properties at 60 EFPY of vessel operation as derived from the surveillance specimens even fulfilled the specified requirements for the virgin material of ASME. Integrity assessment carried out using the two approaches indicated the safety of the vessel for continued operation up to 60 EFPY. (author)

  5. Isothermal and thermal-mechanical fatigue of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Balazs; Trampus, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The fatigue life of the structural materials 15Ch2MFA (CrMoV-alloyed ferritic steel) and 08Ch18N10T (CrNi-alloyed austenitic steel) of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel under completely reserved total strain controlled low cycle fatigue tests were investigated. An advanced test facility was developed for GLEEBLE-3800 physical simulator which was able to perform thermomechanical fatigue experiments under in-service conditions of VVER nuclear reactors. The low cycle fatigue results were evaluated with the plastic strain based Coffin-Manson law, and plastic strain energy based model as well. It was shown that both methods are able to predict the fatigue life of reactor pressure vessel steels accurately. Interrupted fatigue tests were also carried out to investigate the kinetic of the fatigue evolution of the materials. On these samples microstructural evaluation by TEM was performed. The investigated low cycle fatigue behavior can provide reference for remaining life assessment and lifetime extension analysis.

  6. PWR reactor pressure vessel internals license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirian, R.; Robison, G.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications, as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). Pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals designed by all three U.S. PWR nuclear steam supply system vendors have been evaluated relative to the effects of age-related degradation mechanisms; the capability of current design limits; inservice examination, testing, repair, refurbishment, and other programs to manage these effects; and the assurance that these internals can continue to perform their intended safety functions in the license renewal term. This industry report (IR), one of a series of ten, provides a generic technical basis for evaluation of PWR reactor pressure vessel internals for license renewal

  7. Sub-critical crack growth and clad integrity in a PWR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Foreman, A.J.E.; Sharples, J.K.

    1987-10-01

    The possibility of in-service growth of sub-critical defects in a PWR reactor pressure vessel to a critical size which could result in vessel failure was addressed in both the 1976 and 1982 reports of the Light Water Reactor Study Group (LWRSG), under the Chairmanship of Dr W Marshall (now Lord Marshall). An addendum to this report was published by UKAEA in April 1987. The section of the addendum dealing with subcritical crack growth and the related issue of integrity of the stainless steel cladding on the inner vessel surface is reproduced in this report. This section of the LWRSG addendum provides a review of the current status of fatigue crack growth and environmentally assisted cracking research for pressure vessel steels in light water reactor environments, as well as a review of developments in crack growth assessment methods. The review concludes that the alternative assessment procedures now being developed give a more realistic prediction of in service crack growth than the ASME Section XI Appendix A fatigue crack growth curves. (author)

  8. Swedish Work on Brittle-Fracture Problems in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1966-03-01

    After a short review of the part of the Swedish nuclear energy program that is of interest in this context the Swedish reactor pressure vessels and the reasoning behind the choice of materials are surveyed. Problems and desirable aims for future reactors are discussed. Much work is now being done on new types of pressure vessel steels with high strength, low transition temperature and good corrosion resistance. These steels are of the martensitic austenitic type Bofors 2RMO (13 % Cr, 6 % Ni, 1. 5 % Mo) and of the ferritic martensitic austenitic type Avesta 248 SV (16 % Cr, 5 % Ni, 1 % Mo). An applied philosophy for estimating the brittle-fracture tendency of pressure vessels is described. As a criterion of this tendency we use the crack-propagation transition temperature, e. g. as measured by the Robertson isothermal crack-arrest test. An estimate of this transition temperature at the end of the reactor' s lifetime must take increases due to fabrication, welding, geometry, ageing and irradiation into account. The transition temperature vs. stress curve moves towards higher temperatures during the reactor' s lifetime. As long as this curve does not cross the reactor vessel stress vs. temperature curve the vessel is considered safe. The magnitude of the different factors influencing the final transition temperature are discussed and data for the Marviken reactor's pressure vessel are presented. At the end of the reactor's lifetime the estimated transition temperature is 115 deg C, which is below the maximum permissible value. A program for the study of strain ageing has been initiated owing to the uncertainty as to the extent of strain ageing at low strains. A study of a simple crack-arrest test, developed in Sweden, is in progress. An extensive irradiation-effects program on several steels is in progress. Results from tests on the Swedish carbon-manganese steels 2103/R3, SIS 142103 and SIS 142102, the low-alloy steels Degerfors DE-631A, Bofors NO 345 and Fortiweld

  9. Swedish Work on Brittle-Fracture Problems in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M

    1966-03-15

    After a short review of the part of the Swedish nuclear energy program that is of interest in this context the Swedish reactor pressure vessels and the reasoning behind the choice of materials are surveyed. Problems and desirable aims for future reactors are discussed. Much work is now being done on new types of pressure vessel steels with high strength, low transition temperature and good corrosion resistance. These steels are of the martensitic austenitic type Bofors 2RMO (13 % Cr, 6 % Ni, 1. 5 % Mo) and of the ferritic martensitic austenitic type Avesta 248 SV (16 % Cr, 5 % Ni, 1 % Mo). An applied philosophy for estimating the brittle-fracture tendency of pressure vessels is described. As a criterion of this tendency we use the crack-propagation transition temperature, e. g. as measured by the Robertson isothermal crack-arrest test. An estimate of this transition temperature at the end of the reactor' s lifetime must take increases due to fabrication, welding, geometry, ageing and irradiation into account. The transition temperature vs. stress curve moves towards higher temperatures during the reactor' s lifetime. As long as this curve does not cross the reactor vessel stress vs. temperature curve the vessel is considered safe. The magnitude of the different factors influencing the final transition temperature are discussed and data for the Marviken reactor's pressure vessel are presented. At the end of the reactor's lifetime the estimated transition temperature is 115 deg C, which is below the maximum permissible value. A program for the study of strain ageing has been initiated owing to the uncertainty as to the extent of strain ageing at low strains. A study of a simple crack-arrest test, developed in Sweden, is in progress. An extensive irradiation-effects program on several steels is in progress. Results from tests on the Swedish carbon-manganese steels 2103/R3, SIS 142103 and SIS 142102, the low-alloy steels Degerfors DE-631A, Bofors NO 345 and Fortiweld

  10. Post mortem investigations of the NPP Greifswald WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhknecht, Jan; Viehrig, Hans-Werner; Weiss, Frank-Peter; Rindelhardt, Udo [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. for Safety Research; Keller, Werner [Studsvik GmbH und Co. KG, Stutensee (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents first results of the post mortem investigations performed at the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of the Russian WWER-440 type reactors. Trepans were taken from the core weld SN0.1.4 and base metal of the unit 1 RPV. This RPV was annealed after 15 years of operation and operated for two more years. At first the trepan of the core welding seam was investigated by Master Curve (MC) testing. Specimens from 5 locations through the thickness of the welding seam were tested according to ASTM E1921-05. The reference temperature T{sub 0} was calculated with the measured fracture toughness values, K{sub Jc}, at brittle failure of the specimen. Generally the K{sub Jc} values measured on pre-cracked and side-grooved Charpy size SE(B) specimens of the investigated weld metal follow the course of the Master Curve. The K{sub Jc} values show a remarkable scatter. More values than expected lie below the 5% fractile. In addition the MC SINTAP procedure was applied to determine T{sub 0}{sup SINTAP} of the brittle fraction of the data set. There are remarkable differences between T{sub 0} and T{sub 0}{sup SINTAP} indicating macroscopic inhomogeneous weld metal. The highest T{sub 0} was about 50 C at a distance of 22 mm from the inner surface of the weld. It is 40 K higher compared with T{sub 0} at the inner surface. This is important for the assessment of ductile-to-brittle temperatures measured with sub size Charpy specimens made of weld metal from the inner RPV wall. This material may not represent the most conservative condition. The results presented in this paper show that the Master Curve approach as adopted in the test standard ASTM E1921-05 is applicable to the investigated WWER-440 multilayer weld metal. The results are of direct importance for an advanced WWER-440 RPV integrity assessment. On the other hand the data pool is broadened for a general introduction of the MC based RPV integrity assessment in the national codes. Furthermore general experiences in

  11. Post mortem investigations of the NPP Greifswald WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhknecht, Jan; Viehrig, Hans-Werner; Weiss, Frank-Peter; Rindelhardt, Udo

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents first results of the post mortem investigations performed at the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of the Russian WWER-440 type reactors. Trepans were taken from the core weld SN0.1.4 and base metal of the unit 1 RPV. This RPV was annealed after 15 years of operation and operated for two more years. At first the trepan of the core welding seam was investigated by Master Curve (MC) testing. Specimens from 5 locations through the thickness of the welding seam were tested according to ASTM E1921-05. The reference temperature T 0 was calculated with the measured fracture toughness values, K Jc , at brittle failure of the specimen. Generally the K Jc values measured on pre-cracked and side-grooved Charpy size SE(B) specimens of the investigated weld metal follow the course of the Master Curve. The K Jc values show a remarkable scatter. More values than expected lie below the 5% fractile. In addition the MC SINTAP procedure was applied to determine T 0 SINTAP of the brittle fraction of the data set. There are remarkable differences between T 0 and T 0 SINTAP indicating macroscopic inhomogeneous weld metal. The highest T 0 was about 50 C at a distance of 22 mm from the inner surface of the weld. It is 40 K higher compared with T 0 at the inner surface. This is important for the assessment of ductile-to-brittle temperatures measured with sub size Charpy specimens made of weld metal from the inner RPV wall. This material may not represent the most conservative condition. The results presented in this paper show that the Master Curve approach as adopted in the test standard ASTM E1921-05 is applicable to the investigated WWER-440 multilayer weld metal. The results are of direct importance for an advanced WWER-440 RPV integrity assessment. On the other hand the data pool is broadened for a general introduction of the MC based RPV integrity assessment in the national codes. Furthermore general experiences in the cutting of irradiated RPV steels are collected

  12. Stress corrosion cracking studies of reactor pressure vessel steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform a critical review of the information available in open literature on stress corrosion cracking of reactor pressure vessel materials in simulated light-water-reactor (LWR) conditions, develop a test procedure for conducting stress corrosion crack growth experiments in simulated LWR environments, and conduct a test program in an effort to duplicate some of the data available from the literature. The authors concluded that stress corrosion crack growth has been observed in pressure vessel steels under laboratory test conditions. The composition of the water in most cases where growth was observed is outside of the composition specified for operating conditions. Crack growth was observed in the experiments performed in this program, and it was intermittent. The cracking would start and stop for no apparent reason. In most instances, it would not restart without the change of some external variable. In a few instances, it restarted on its own. Crack growth rates as high as 3.6 x 10 -9 m/sec were observed in pressure vessel steels in high-purity water with 8 ppm oxygen. These high crack growth rates were observed for extremely short bursts in crack extension. They could not be sustained for crack growth extensions greater than a few tenths of a millimeter. From the results of this project it appears highly unlikely that stress corrosion cracking will be observed in operating nuclear plants where the coolant composition is maintained within water chemistry guidelines. However, more work is needed to better define the contaminations that cause crack growth. The crack growth rates are so high and the threshold values for crack nucleation are so low that the conditions causing them need to be well defined and avoided

  13. The application of external vibration monitoring to reactors with concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammill, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    The application of external vibration monitoring techniques to advanced gas cooled reactors (AGR) which have concrete pressure vessels is considered. A monitoring system for a particular AGR coolant circuit structure is developed, whose primary objective is to detect impacting of two components, although the detection of forced vibration response is also considered. Experimental results from instrumented components in the reactor and data from rig tests on full size units have been used together with a mathematical model of some elements of the transmission path in order to establish its dynamic characteristics and relate internal component vibration to externally measured signals. The application of external vibration monitoring to the external detection of the forced vibration response of an internal reactor assembly and the remote monitoring of circulator sound output is discussed. (author)

  14. The metrological problems of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodenicharov, S.; Kamenova, Ts.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels increases the T k -values of transition temperature from ductile to brittle fracture. This effect is very important in emergency situations, when the water cooling injection in the reactor results in high thermal gradients. In such cases there is a risk from the appearance of a brittle fracture with catastrophic crack propagation speed at relatively low stresses. That is why the T k -value determination is very important for the safe operation of the reactor systems. Some advanced experimental methods for T k -testing and control have been discussed in the present article and the standards of different countries have been compared. The methods applying subsize specimens and welding-restored specimens have been reviewed. (author)

  15. Influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Bryson, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Recently, it has been shown that, in notched beam testing, shallow cracks tend to exhibit an elevated toughness as a result of a loss of constraint at the crack tip. The loss of constraint takes place when interaction occurs between the elastic-plastic crack-tip stress field and the specimen surface nearest the crack tip. An increased shallow-crack fracture toughness is of interest to the nuclear industry because probabilistic fracture-mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the probability of vessel failure during postulated pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) events. Tests have been performed on beam specimens loaded in 3-point bending using unirradiated reactor pressure vessel material (A533 B). Testing has been conducted using specimens with a constant beam depth (W = 94 mm) and within the lower transition region of the toughness curve for A533 B. Test results indicate a significantly higher fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens compared to the fracture toughness determined using deep-crack (a/W = 0.5) specimens. Test data also show little influence of thickness on the fracture toughness for the current test temperature (-60 degree C). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Assessment of Radiation Embrittlement in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Surrogate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzar, Davor

    2010-10-01

    The radiation-enhanced formation of small (1-2 nm) copper-rich precipitates (CRPs) is critical for the occurrence of embrittlement in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. Small CRPs are coherent with the bcc matrix, which causes local matrix strain and interaction with the dislocation strain fields, thus impeding dislocation mobility. As CRPs grow, there is a critical size at which a phase transformation occurs, whereby the CRPs are no longer coherent with the matrix, and the strain is relieved. Diffraction-line-broadening analysis (DLBA) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to characterize the precipitate formation in surrogate ferritic reactor-pressure vessel steels. The materials were aged for different times at elevated temperature to produce a series of specimens with different degrees of copper precipitation. SANS measurements showed that the precipitate size distribution broadens and shifts toward larger sizes as a function of ageing time. Mechanical hardness showed an increase with ageing time, followed by a decrease, which can be associated with the reduction in the number density as well as the loss of coherency at larger sizes. Inhomogeneous strain correlated with mechanical hardness.

  17. Ultrasonic phased array examination of circumferential weld joint in reactor pressure vessel of BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanekar, Paritosh, E-mail: pnanekar@barc.gov.in [Quality Assurance Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jothilakshmi, N. [Quality Assurance Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Phased array technique developed for weld joint inspection in BWR pressure vessel. • Simulation studies were carried out for conventional and phased array probe. • Conventional ultrasonic test shows in-adequate weld coverage and poor resolution. • Focused sound beam in phased array results in good resolution and sensitivity. • Ultrasonic phased array technique is validated on mock-up with reference defects. - Abstract: The weld joints in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are required to be examined periodically for assurance of structural integrity. Ultrasonic phased array examination technique has been developed in authors’ laboratory for inspection of the top flange to shell circumferential weld joint in RPV of BWRs, which are in operation in India since the late 1960s. The development involved detailed simulation studies for computation of focal laws followed by validation on mock-up. The paper brings out the limitations of the conventional ultrasonic technique and how this can be overcome by the phased array approach for the weld joint under consideration. The phased array technique was successfully employed for field examination of this weld joint in RPV during the re-fuelling outage.

  18. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel 20 MnMoNi55 weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoneim, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical and fracture properties of an 'improved' 20 MnMoNi 55 Pressure Vessel Steel (PVS) weld was investigated. In addition to very low residual element content, especially Cu (0.035 wt.%), and relatively higher Ni content (0.9 wt.%), this steel has higher strength (30% more) than the steels used currently in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The material was irradiated to 3.5x10 19 and 7x10 19 n/cm 2 (E > 1 Mev) at 290 0 C and 2.5x10 19 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV) at 160 0 C in FRJ-1 and FRJ-2 research reactors at KFA, Juelich, F.R.G. Test methods used in the evaluation included instrumented impact testing of standard and precracked Charpy specimens, tensile, and fracture toughness testing. Instrumented impact testing provided load and energy vs. time (deflection) data in addition to energy absorption data. The results indicated that the investigated high strength improved steel is more resistant to irradiation induced embrittlement than conventional PVSs. (orig./IHOE)

  19. On flux effects in a low alloy steel from a Swedish reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boåsen, Magnus, E-mail: boasen@kth.se [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Efsing, Pål [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Ehrnstén, Ulla [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, PO Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2017-02-15

    This study aims to investigate the presence of Unstable Matrix Defects in irradiated pressure vessel steel from weldments of the Swedish PWR Ringhals 4 (R4). Hardness tests have been performed on low flux (surveillance material) and high flux (Halden reactor) irradiated material samples in combination with heat treatments at temperatures of 330, 360 and 390 °C in order to reveal eventual recovery of any hardening features induced by irradiation. The experiments carried out in this study could not reveal any hardness recovery related to Unstable Matrix Defects at relevant temperatures. However, a difference in hardness recovery was found between the low and the high flux samples at heat treatments at higher temperatures than expected for the annihilation of Unstable Matrix Defects–the observed recovery is here attributed to differences of the solute clusters formed by the high and low flux irradiations. - Highlights: • Hardness testing is combined with post irradiation annealing at 330, 360 and 390 °C. • Unstable matrix defects is studied in a reactor pressure vessel steel. • Comparison between surveillance material and accelerated irradiation. • No evidence of unstable matrix defects, i.e. not present in studied material. • Difference in hardness recovery between irradiation conditions found at 390 °C.

  20. Solid-state track recorder neutron dosimetry in light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1984-09-01

    Solid-State Track Recorder (SSTR) measurements of neutron-induced fission rates have been made in several pressure vessel mockup facilities as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (LWR-PV-SDIP). The results of extensive physics-dosimetry measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN are summarized. Included are 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 232 Th fission rates in the PCA 12/13, 8/7, and 4/12 SSC configurations. Additional low power measurements have been made in an engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN-SCK, Mol, Belgium. 237 Np and 238 U fission rates were made at selected locations in the VENUS mockup, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Absolute core power measurements were made at VENUS by exposing solid-state track recorders (SSTRs) to polished fuel pellets within in-core fuel pins. 8 references, 4 figures, 10 tables

  1. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented

  2. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  3. The non-destructive examination of reactor pressure vessel steels by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highton, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The rapid radiation hardening of copper bearing reactor pressure vessel steels has been linked with microvoids that are associated with copper based complexes in the metal lattice. These microvoids are active in the sense that their size appears to be related to the temperature of irradiation, which thus determines their influence on dislocation mobility. These sites appear to grow by vacancy condensation which causes a reduction in the local lattice energy. Thus prolonged exposure to PWR temperatures, even in the absence of a neutron flux, may also cause embrittlement. It has been found that these sites, which represent a local negative charge, act as traps to positrons. The size of each site dictates its positron trapping potential. As the trapping potential increases so too does the probability that the positrons will annihilate with low momentum conduction electrons. The momentum of the annihilating electrons will determine the degree of Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation gamma peak. Thus careful analysis of this peak can yield useful information on the degree of embrittlement caused by these active defect complexes. In this way positron annihilation offers a powerful non-destructive alternative to current methods of assessing the integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. (author)

  4. Acoustic emission during the elastic-plastic deformation of low alloy reactor pressure vessel steels. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.; Goddard, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the acoustic emission behaviour of A533B and C-Mn low alloy reactor pressure vessel steels subjected to uniaxial tensile deformation are described. The effects on the emission activity of the rolling plane orientation and the carbide morphology were examined. Detailed discussions are given of the stress dependence of the emission activity below yield and of its recovery by annealing at the stress relief temperature. It is shown that the dominant emission source is the same in both steels and is associated with inclusions, such as MnS, elongated by the rolling process, the carbide morphology being relatively unimportant. A criterion for the occurrence of an emission is obtained which is directly analogous to the general criterion for yielding. It is also shown that a large fraction, at least, of the emission activity arises from a recoverable process such as localized yielding around inclusions or limited inclusion decohesion and not from inclusion fracture. Low activity in C-Mn steel taken from reactor pressure vessels, previously attributed to spheroidization of carbides, is shown to be due to the limited acoustic recovery of these relatively high sulphur content steels when annealed at the stress relief temperature. It is concluded that the limited amplitudes of these emissions during deformation severely restrict their potential application in practice. (Auth.)

  5. Statistical Analysis of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculation Benchmark Data Using Multiple Regression Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carew, John F.; Finch, Stephen J.; Lois, Lambros

    2003-01-01

    The calculated >1-MeV pressure vessel fluence is used to determine the fracture toughness and integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. It is therefore of the utmost importance to ensure that the fluence prediction is accurate and unbiased. In practice, this assurance is provided by comparing the predictions of the calculational methodology with an extensive set of accurate benchmarks. A benchmarking database is used to provide an estimate of the overall average measurement-to-calculation (M/C) bias in the calculations ( ). This average is used as an ad-hoc multiplicative adjustment to the calculations to correct for the observed calculational bias. However, this average only provides a well-defined and valid adjustment of the fluence if the M/C data are homogeneous; i.e., the data are statistically independent and there is no correlation between subsets of M/C data.Typically, the identification of correlations between the errors in the database M/C values is difficult because the correlation is of the same magnitude as the random errors in the M/C data and varies substantially over the database. In this paper, an evaluation of a reactor dosimetry benchmark database is performed to determine the statistical validity of the adjustment to the calculated pressure vessel fluence. Physical mechanisms that could potentially introduce a correlation between the subsets of M/C ratios are identified and included in a multiple regression analysis of the M/C data. Rigorous statistical criteria are used to evaluate the homogeneity of the M/C data and determine the validity of the adjustment.For the database evaluated, the M/C data are found to be strongly correlated with dosimeter response threshold energy and dosimeter location (e.g., cavity versus in-vessel). It is shown that because of the inhomogeneity in the M/C data, for this database, the benchmark data do not provide a valid basis for adjusting the pressure vessel fluence.The statistical criteria and methods employed in

  6. Modification of OCA-I for application to a reactor pressure vessel with cladding on the inner surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauter, A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Iskander, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    The computer code OCA-I calculates the temperature distribution through the walls of a cylinder during a thermal transient and then performs a two-dimensional linear-elastic fracture-mechanics analysis to obtain stress-intensity factors for long surface flaws, considering both pressure and thermal loads. The code has been particularly useful in evaluating flaw behavior in reactor pressure vessels during overcooling accidents, but it has not previously treated the stainless steel cladding on the inner surface of the vessel as a discrete region. Although the cladding is quite thin compared with the base material, the large difference in thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion between the two materials results in a significant effect of the cladding on stress-intensity factors for surface cracks. Thus, the cladding was recently included as a discrete region in OCA-I

  7. Effect of a new specimen size on fatigue crack growth behavior in thick-walled pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariati, Mahmoud; Mohammadi, Ehsan; Masoudi Nejad, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth in thick-walled pressure vessels is an important factor affecting their fracture. Predicting the path of fatigue crack growth in a pressure vessel is the main issue discussed in fracture mechanics. The objective of this paper is to design a new geometrical specimen in fatigue to define the behavior of semi-elliptical crack growth in thick-walled pressure vessels. In the present work, the importance of the behavior of fatigue crack in test specimen and real conditions in thick-walled pressure vessels is investigated. The results of fatigue loading on the new specimen are compared with the results of fatigue loading in a cylindrical pressure vessel and a standard specimen. Numerical and experimental methods are used to investigate the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the new specimen. For this purpose, a three-dimensional boundary element method is used for fatigue crack growth under stress field. The modified Paris model is used to estimate fatigue crack growth rates. In order to verify the numerical results, fatigue test is carried out on a couple of specimens with a new geometry made of ck45. A comparison between experimental and numerical results has shown good agreement. - Highlights: • This paper provides a new specimen to define the behavior of fatigue crack growth. • We estimate the behavior of fatigue crack growth in specimen and pressure vessel. • A 3D finite element model has been applied to estimate the fatigue life. • We compare the results of fatigue loading for cylindrical vessel and specimens. • Comparison between experimental and numerical results has shown a good agreement.

  8. Radiation Dosimetry of the Pressure Vessel Internals of the High Flux Beam Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Norman E.; Reciniello, Richard N.; Hu, Jih-Perng; Rorer, David C.

    2003-06-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex™ polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rates, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup.

  9. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLDEN, N.E.; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.P.; RORER, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex(trademark) polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup

  10. Regulatory Experience on Structural Integrity Issues of The Oldest Reactor Pressure Vessel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Cho, Doo-Ho; Kim, Jin-Su; Kim, Yong-Beum; Chung, Hae-Dong; Kim, Se-Chang; Choi, Jae-Boong

    2015-01-01

    A reactor pressure vessel plays a crucial role of retaining reactor coolant and core assemblies. The RPV integrity should be evaluated in consideration with the design transient condition and the material deterioration of RPV belt-line region. Especially, the pressurized thermal shock has been considered as one of the most important issues regarding the RPV integrity since Rancho Seco nuclear power plant accident in 1978. In this paper, the structural integrity evaluation of the oldest RPV in Korea was performed by using finite element analysis. PTS conditions like small break loss of coolant accident and Turkey Point steam line break were applied as loading conditions. Neutron fluence data equivalent to 40 years was used to determine the fracture toughness of RPV material. The 3-dimensional finite element model including a circumferential surface flaw was considered for fracture mechanics analysis. The RPV integrity was evaluated according to Japan Electric Association Code. (authors)

  11. Creep crack growth in a reactor pressure vessel steel at 360 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Seitisleam, F.; Sandstroem, R. [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    Plain creep (PC) and creep crack growth (CCG) tests at 360 deg C and post metallography were carried out on a low alloy reactor pressure vessel steel (ASTM A508 class 2) with different microstructures. Lives for the CCG tests were shorter than those for the PC tests and this is more pronounced for simulated heat affected zone microstructure than for the parent metal at longer lives. For the CCG tests, after initiation, the cracks grew constantly and intergranularly before they accelerated to approach rupture. The creep crack growth rate is well described by C*. The relations between reference stress, failure time and steady crack growth rate are presented for the CCG tests. It is demonstrated that the failure stress due to CCG is considerably lower than the yield stress at 360 deg C. Consequently, the CCG will control the static strength of a reactor vessel. (orig.) 17 refs.

  12. Creep crack growth in a reactor pressure vessel steel at 360 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Rui; Seitisleam, F; Sandstroem, R [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-31

    Plain creep (PC) and creep crack growth (CCG) tests at 360 deg C and post metallography were carried out on a low alloy reactor pressure vessel steel (ASTM A508 class 2) with different microstructures. Lives for the CCG tests were shorter than those for the PC tests and this is more pronounced for simulated heat affected zone microstructure than for the parent metal at longer lives. For the CCG tests, after initiation, the cracks grew constantly and intergranularly before they accelerated to approach rupture. The creep crack growth rate is well described by C*. The relations between reference stress, failure time and steady crack growth rate are presented for the CCG tests. It is demonstrated that the failure stress due to CCG is considerably lower than the yield stress at 360 deg C. Consequently, the CCG will control the static strength of a reactor vessel. (orig.) 17 refs.

  13. Application of advanced irradiation analysis methods to light water reactor pressure vessel test and surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, R.; Dudey, N.; McElroy, W.; Wullaert, R.; Fabry, A.

    1977-01-01

    Inaccurate characterization and inappropriate application of neutron irradiation exposure variables contribute a substantial amount of uncertainty to embrittlement analysis of light water reactor pressure vessels. Damage analysis involves characterization of the irradiation environment (dosimetry), correlation of test and surveillance metallurgical and dosimetry data, and projection of such data to service conditions. Errors in available test and surveillance dosimetry data are estimated to contribute a factor of approximately 2 to the data scatter. Non-physical (empirical) correlation procedures and the need to extrapolate to the vessel may add further error. Substantial reductions in these uncertainties in future programs can be obtained from a more complete application of available damage analysis tools which have been developed for the fast reactor program. An approach to reducing embrittlement analysis errors is described, and specific examples of potential applications are given. The approach is based on damage analysis techniques validated and calibrated in benchmark environments

  14. Thermal-hydraulics of the Loviisa reactor pressure vessel overcooling transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomisto, Harri.

    1987-06-01

    In the Loviisa reactor pressure vessel safety analyses, the thermal-hydraulics of various overcooling transients has been evaluated to give pertinent initial data for fracture-mechanics calculations. The thermal-hydraulic simulations of the developed overcooling scenarios have been performed using best-estimate thermal-hydraulic computer codes. Experimental programs have been carried out to study phenomena related to natural circulation interruptions in the reactor coolant system. These experiments include buoyancy-induced phenomena such as thermal mixing and stratification of cold high-pressure safety injection water in the cold legs and the downcomer, and oscillations of the single-phase natural circulation. In the probabilistic pressurized thermal shock study, the Loviisa training simulator and the advanced system code RELAP5/MOD2 were utilized to simulate selected sequences. Flow stagnation cases were separately calculated with the REMIX computer program. The methods employed were assessed for these calculations against the plant data and own experiments

  15. International Cooperation for the Dismantling of Chooz A Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenouillet, J.J.; Posivak, E.

    2009-01-01

    Chooz A is the first PWR that is being decommissioned in France. The main issue that is conditioning the success of the project is the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) segmentation. Whereas Chooz A is the first and unique RPV and RVI being dismantled in France, there are many similar experiences available in the world. Thus the project team was eager to cooperate with other teams facing or being faced with the same issue. A cooperation programme was established in two separate ways: - Benefiting from experience feedback from completed RPV and RVI dismantling projects, - Looking for synergy with future RPV dismantling projects for activities such as segmentation tools design, qualification and manufacturing for example. This paper describes the implementation of this programme and how the outcome of the cooperation was used for the implementation of Chooz-A RPV and RVI segmentation project. It shows also the limits of such a cooperation. (authors)

  16. Experiences concerning reactor pressure vessel head penetration inspections; Erfahrungen mit Pruefungen von Reaktordruckbehaelter-Deckeldurchfuehrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debnar, Angelika [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Globally observed damage at the control rod drive mechanism nozzles in PWR-type reactors (Bugey-3, Oconee 1,2,3 and ANO-1, David Besse) have triggered enhanced inspection of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head penetrations. In Germany the regulations require a periodic inspection especially of dissimilar welds. Westinghouse has developed an automated measuring system for RPV heads aimed to inspect welded joints at open nozzles of nozzles with thermosleeves. The testing technology with remote controlled robotics is supposed to perform a weld inspection as complete as possible, restraints result from constructive difficulties for the accessibility. The new gap-scanner DE2008 was qualified at the mock-up and was implemented into the periodic in-service inspection of Neckarwestheim-1.

  17. Ageing Management Review of the reactor pressure vessels in Laguna Verde NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gris Cruz, Magdalena; Arganis, Carlos R.J.; Medina Almazan, A. Liliana

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, for both units of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (LVNPP), the Ageing Management Review of the reactor pressure Vessel was carried out, including the identification of the intended functions, the materials and the environments. The evaluation of the ageing effect/mechanism and the Aging management programs currently implemented were prepared. The most important aging effects/ mechanisms are: loss of fracture toughness due to neutron irradiation embrittlement, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), general corrosion and erosion-corrosion. The neutron irradiation embrittlement is managed by the reactor vessel materials surveillance program. The fatigue is a Time Limited Aging Analysis (TLAA), for which is necessary to calculate some fatigue usage factors. SCC is managed by, the In service inspections (ISI) program, but also by the Water Chemistry program, including, currently, On Line Noble Chem. The water chemistry program also manages General Corrosion and erosion-corrosion. The results were compared with the GALL report. (author)

  18. Effects of irradiation at lower temperature on the microstructure of Cr-Mo-V-alloyed reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, M; Boehmert, J; Gilles, R [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    The microstructural damage process due to neutron irradiation [1] proceeds in two stages: - formation of displacement cascades - evolution of the microstructure by defect reactions. Continuing our systematic investigation about the microstructural changes of Russian reactor pressure vessel steel due to neutron irradiation the microstructure of two laboratory heats of the VVER 440-type reactor pressure vessel steel after irradiation at 60 C was studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). 60 C-irradiation differently changes the irradiation-induced microstructure in comparison with irradiation at reactor operation temperature and can, thus, provide new insights into the mechanisms of the irradiation damage. (orig.)

  19. Current Status of Development of High Nickel Low Alloy Steels for Commercial Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Chul; Lee, B. S.; Park, S. G.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels have been used for nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels up to now. Currently, the design goal of nuclear power plant is focusing at larger capacity and longer lifetime. Requirements of much bigger pressure vessels may cause critical problems in the manufacturing stage as well as for the welding stage. Application of higher strength steel may be required to overcome the technical problems. It is known that a higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels such as SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel could be achieved by increasing the Ni and Cr contents. Therefore, SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel is very attractive as eligible RPV steel for the next generation PWR systems. In this report, we propose the possibility of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for an application of next generation commercial RPV, based on the literature research result about development history of the RPV steels and SA508 specification. In addition, we have surveyed the research result of HSLA(High Strength Low Alloy steel), which has similar chemical compositions with SA508 Gr.4N, to understand the problems and the way of improvement of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel. And also, we have investigated eastern RPV steel(WWER-1000), which has higher Ni contents compared to western RPV steel.

  20. U.S. and French approaches to reactor pressure vessel integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesbach, T.J.; Buchalet, C.; Server, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of radiation embrittlement on the reactor pressure vessel must be considered for continued safe operation of nuclear power plants. The consequences of radiation embrittlement require detailed assessments of the margins of safety against brittle fracture of the vessel. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and U.S. Regulations often use conservative approaches for these assessments which can eventually lead to severe operational hardships for some plants. Taking a look at alternative integrity approaches, such as those demonstrated in France, could ultimately result in improved ASME Code and Regulatory limits. The French studies have shown the significance of performing proper in- service inspections to reliably show that no defects larger than a predetermined size (or class) exist in the inspected region of a vessel. The predetermined size is based upon previous studies on the types of manufacturing defects which can potentially exist in French vessels. Enhanced linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methodologies can be applied to evaluate such defects to assure that brittle fracture will not occur

  1. Detection and sizing of inside-surface cracks in reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Katsuo; Satoh, Kunio; Honma, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    According to the past operational experience of LWRs, most of the defects arising in reactor pressure vessels accompanying operation are cracks occurring in the build up welding of austenitic stainless steel on the internal surfaces. The detection of these cracks has been carried out by ultrasonic flaw detection from outside in BWRs and from inside in PWRs as in-service inspection. However, there are difficulties such as ultrasonic echoes often occur though defects do not exist, and the quantitative evaluation of detected cracks is difficult by this method because of its accuracy. One of the means to reduce the first difficulty is to use eddy current method together to help the judgement, and for overcoming the second, the ultrasonic method catching end peak echo, that catching diffracted waves, eddy current method and electric resistance method were tried and compared. It is desirable to detect cracks in early stage before they reach parent material. The techniques to detect cracks on the internal surfaces of pressure vessels from the inside and to measure the depth are reported in this paper. The methods of flaw detection examined and the instruments used, the experimental method and the results are reported. It was concluded that eddy current method can be used as the backup for ultrasonic remote flaw detection, and the accuracy of depth measurement was the highest in ultrasonic diffraction wave method. (Kako, I.)

  2. Standard Master Matrix for Light-Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Standards, E706(0)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel (PV) and support structure steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life (Fig. 1). Some of these are existing ASTM standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are proposed ASTM standards. General requirements of content and consistency are discussed in Section 6 . More detailed writers' and users' information, justification, and specific requirements for the nine practices, ten guides, and three methods are provided in Sections 3-5. Referenced documents are discussed in Section 2. The summary-type information that is provided in Sections 3 and 4 is essential for establishing proper understanding and communications between the writers and users of this set of matrix standards. It was extracted from the referenced documents, Section 2 and references (1-106) for use by individual writers and users. 1...

  3. Additional Stress And Fracture Mechanics Analyses Of Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  4. Fracture mechanics of thin wall cylindrical pressure vessels: an interim review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, R.J.; Olson, N.J.

    1977-08-01

    The report is a result of activities in the LMFBR Fuel Rod Transient Performance Program sponsored by the LMFBR Branch of the Division of Project Management, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. One of the objectives is to develop predictions relative to the length, direction, and rate of growth of cladding rips subsequent to (or concurrent with) the initial cladding breach during unprotected transients. To provide a basis for evaluation, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories has reviewed most available fracture mechanics assessments relative to thin-wall cylindrical pressure vessels. The purpose of the report is to review the various fracture mechanics models and to describe the pertinent fracture parameters. It is intended to provide a formal basis for assessing future analytical predictions of fracture behavior of materials exposed to transient LMFBR thermal and mechanical loading conditions. In addition, the report is expected to provide reference material for evaluating or developing experimental programs required to properly address the problem of predicting fracture behavior of materials during transient events

  5. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.)

  6. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B. (NOVETECH Corp., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.).

  7. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Backman, Marie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Williams, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, B. Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klasky, Hilda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decision making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.

  8. Master curve approach to monitor fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessels in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-10-01

    A series of coordinated research projects (CRPs) have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop correlative comparisons to test the uniformity of results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. The overall scope of the eighth CRP (CRP-8), Master Curve Approach to Monitor Fracture Toughness of Reactor Pressure Vessels in Nuclear Power Plants, has evolved from previous CRPs which have focused on fracture toughness related issues. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is application to assure structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. The Master Curve approach for assessing the fracture toughness of a sampled irradiated material has been gaining acceptance throughout the world. This direct measurement of fracture toughness approach is technically superior to the correlative and indirect methods used in the past to assess irradiated RPV integrity. Several elements have been identified as focal points for Master Curve use: (i) limits of applicability for the Master Curve at the upper range of the transition region for loading quasi-static to dynamic/impact loading rates; (ii) effects of non-homogeneous material or changes due to environment conditions on the Master Curve, and how heterogeneity can be integrated into a more inclusive Master Curve methodology; (iii) importance of fracture mode differences and changes affect the Master Curve shape. The collected data in this report represent mostly results from non-irradiated testing, although some results from test reactor irradiations and plant surveillance programmes have been included as available. The results presented here should allow utility engineers and scientists to directly measure fracture toughness using small surveillance size specimens and apply the results using the Master Curve approach

  9. Guidelines for prediction of irradiation embrittlement of operating WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This TECDOC has been developed under an International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled Evaluation of Radiation Damage of WWER Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV) using Database on RPV Materials to develop the guidelines for prediction of radiation damage to WWER-440 PRVs. The WWER-440 RPV was designed by OKB Gidropress, Russian Federation, the general designer. Prediction of irradiation embrittlement of RPV materials is usually done in accordance with relevant codes and standards that are based on the large amounts of information from surveillance and research programmes. The existing Russian code (standard for strength calculations of components and piping in NPPs - PNAE G 7-002-86) for the WWER RPV irradiation embrittlement assessment was approved more than twenty years ago and based mostly on the experimental data obtained in research reactors with accelerated irradiation. Nevertheless, it is still in use and generally consistent with new data. The present publication presents the analyses using all available data required for more precise prediction of radiation embrittlement of WWER-440 RPV materials. Based on the fact that it contains a large amount of data from surveillance programmes as well as research programmes, the IAEA International Database on RPV Materials (IDRPVM) is used for the detailed analysis of irradiation embrittlement of WWER RPV materials. Using IDRPVM, the guideline is developed for assessment of irradiation embrittlement of RPV ferritic materials as a result of degradation during operation. Two approaches, i.e. transition temperatures based on Charpy impact notch toughness, as well as based on static fracture toughness tests, are used in RPV integrity evaluation. The objectives of the TECDOC are the analysis of irradiation embrittlement data for WWER- 440 RPV materials using IDRPVM database, evaluation of predictive formulae depending on chemical composition of the material, neutron fluence, flux, and

  10. Methodology for the evaluation of tolerability of defects in WWER-1000/V-320 reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Horacek, L.; Ruscak, M.

    1996-05-01

    The methodology provides guidelines for the assessment of tolerability of defects found during in-service inspection of the base material and overlay of WWER-1000/V-320 type reactor pressure vessels. With regard to the method of calculating the tolerability of defects and rules for the preparation and implementation of repairs, this methodology can also find use in the assessment of tolerability of defects in selected facilities of WWER-1000/V-320 type nuclear power plants provided that adequate input data concerning the materials, manufacturing technology, and operating load regime are available and that the facilities are made of ferrite/bainite type steels. This methodology should serve as a binding document underlying the development of a technical approach to provisions for a further operation of facilities in which intolerable defects have been found by nondestructive testing. (author)

  11. Reactor pressure vessel integrity research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.; Pennell, W.E.; Pace, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the related research programs at ORNL described herein to provide for the development and confirmation of the methods used for: (1) establishing the irradiation exposure conditions within the RPV in the Embrittlement Data Base and Dosimetry Evaluation Program, (2) assessing the effects of irradiation on the RPV materials in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program, and (3) developing overall structural and fracture analyses of RPVs in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program

  12. Integrity evaluation of the pressure vessels of Angra-2 and Angra-3 reactors by stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, E.

    1978-01-01

    The integrity of the reactor pressure vessel of the unit II/III of the Nuclear Power Station at 'Angras do Reis' is evaluated by stress analysis, through the dynamics relaxation method. For the solution of the problem an axisymmetric model is fixed. Initially, the data of the Oak Ridge Vessel V-7 is compared with those obtained by two computer programs used in this study. The methods used in the computer programs are FEM and DEM. A11 the results are compared with the ASME Code Section III 1974 edition. The range deviation is determined to 99% confidence limit, in order to minimize the error probabilities. Finally, the equivalent intensity stress obtained is calculated and compared with the acceptable values of the ASME Code Section III, 1974 edition [pt

  13. The IAEA data base ageing of reactor pressure vessel steels and welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillemot, F.; Ianko, L.; Davies, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes one aspect of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) data base, that is to do with the ageing of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and welds. It describes the background and the need for and the benefits deriving from such an international data base encompassing a greater number of sources than currently incorporated in existing international and national data bases. The paper describes the organization of this data base and the controls necessary for data acquisition and control. The current state of progress is described. Membership of and participation in this project is given and data access is also described. The technical features of the data base are described in terms of the structure of the data base and the hardware and software. New features are proposed such as the inclusion of measured curve data and metallographic data. Technical aspects of data evaluation are also included. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs

  14. Manufacturing and properties of closure head forging integrated with flange for PWR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoharu Sasaki; Iku Kurihara; Etsuo Murai; Yasuhiko Tanaka; Koumei Suzuki

    2003-01-01

    Closure head forging (SA508, Gr.3 Cl.1) integrated with flange for PWR reactor pressure vessel has been developed. This is intended to enhance structural integrity of closure head resulted in elimination of ISI, by eliminating weld joint between closure head and flange in the conventional design. Manufacturing procedures have been established so that homogeneity and isotropy of the material properties can be assured in the closure head forging integrated with flange. Acceptance tensile and impact test specimens are taken and tested regarding the closure head forging integrated with flange as very thick and complex forgings. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies and material properties of the closure head forging integrated with flange. (orig.)

  15. Dosimetry-adjusted reactor physics parameters for pressure vessel neutron exposure assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; Kellogg, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    The ASTM E706 master matrix standard describes a series of 20 American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard practices, guides, and methods for use in the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel (PV) and support structure steels throughout a PV's service life. Some of these are existing ASTM standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are new ASTM standards. These standards are periodically revised to assume their applicability during the 40-yr (32 effective full-power years) design license period for a nuclear power plant. They are now under review by two new ASTM plant life extension task groups: E10.05.11 on physics dosimetry and E10.02.11 on metallurgy. A brief review on the current application of these standards and a discussion of the status of work to verify the accuracy of derived physics-dosimetry parameter values is presented in this paper

  16. Experimental verification of lifetime of bolting joints for WWER reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Polachova, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents results from experimental verification of cyclic lifetime of bolting joints of M 140x6 mm type used for WWER-440 MW reactor pressure vessels. Bolting joints or real dimensions were tested in a special testing equipment ZS 1000 in Skoda Concern. Stud bolts are made from 25Kh1MF or 38KhN3MFA type of steels. Tests were carried out at operating as well as at room temperatures with coefficient of asymmetry equal to 0.1; one tests was realized with given bending moment. Experimental results have been compared with calculated lifetimes according to ASME, Soviet and CMEA Codes. In all cases calculations give conservative assessments. (orig.)

  17. Recent evaluation of 'wet' thermal annealing to resolve reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Biemiller, E.C.

    1993-01-01

    Prior to the decision to close the Yankee Rowe plant in 1992, a great deal of effort was expended in trying to resolve the degree of neutron embrittlement that the reactor pressure vessel had experienced after 30 years of operation. One mitigative measure that was examined in detail was the possibility of performing a relatively low temperature thermal anneal (at approximately 650 deg. F) to partially restore the original design level of mechanical properties of the reactor pressure vessel beltline region which were lost due to the neutron radiation exposure. This low temperature anneal was to involve heating of the primary coolant water using pump heat in a similar manner as that used to anneal the Belgian BR-3 reactor pressure vessel in the early 1980s. This 'wet' anneal was successful in recovering mechanical properties for the BR-3 vessel, but the extent of the recovery, as well as the rate of re-embrittlement after the anneal, were issues that were difficult to quantify since the exact reactor pressure vessel steels were not available for experimental verification. For the case of Yankee Rowe, material was available from past surveillance programs for at least one of the materials in the vessel, as well as materials obtained from various sources which could act as bounding surrogates. An irradiation /annealing/reirradiation program was developed to better quantify the degree of recovery and re-embrittlement for these materials, but this program was halted before significant test results were obtained. Prior to the initiation of the testing program, a review of past annealing data was performed and the data were scrutinized for direct relevance to the annealing response of the Yankee Rowe vessel. This paper discusses the results derived from this review. The results from the critical review of the past annealing data indicated that a 'wet' anneal of the Yankee Rowe vessel may have been successful in reducing the degree of embrittlement to the point that the

  18. Long-term ageing effects in reactor pressure vessel steels investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterling, Maik; Anwand, Wolfgang; Wagner, Andreas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Dresden (Germany); Bergner, Frank; Ulbricht, Andreas; Wagner, Arne [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels leads to the formation of nano-sized defects which can deteriorate the material. An understanding of the microstructural evolution of the material is important for making reliable security assessments about possible future long-term operation of nuclear power plants. So-called late-blooming phases are formed after long-term irradiation and lead to considerable material ageing effects. Encouraging factors for the formation of these phases are a low Cu-content, moderate to high contents of Mn and Ni, low irradiation temperatures and different neutron fluxes. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy which is ideally suited for the detection and characterization of these irradiation-induced defects was applied for different selected materials which fulfill these conditions in order to investigate the occurrence and behavior of these phases.

  19. An integrity evaluation method of the pressure vessel of nuclear reactors under pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Masaaki; Okamura, Hiroyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Present paper proposes a new algorithm of the integrity evaluation of the pressure vessel of nuclear reactors under pressurized thermal shock, PTS. This method enables us to do an effective evaluation by superimposing proposed ''PTS state-transient curves'' and ''toughness transient curves'', and is superior to a conventional one in the following points; (1) easy to get an overall view of the result of PTS event for the variations of several parameters, (2) possible to evaluate a safety margin for irradiation embrittlement, and (3) enable to construct an Expert-friendly evaluation system. In addition, the paper shows that we can execute a safety assurance test by using a flat plate model with the same thickness as that of real plant. (author)

  20. Reactor pressure vessel behaviour with a small crack in the cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Churier-Bossennec, H.; Faidy, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on fracture mechanic analysis of a PWR reactor pressure vessel with a 3.5 mm embedded circumferential crack in the cladding under a small lost of cooling accident transient. Different RTNDT level and effect of irradiation on material properties are considered. The study compares simplified one-dimensional and two-dimensional elastic approach and complete elastoplastic approach using J-parameter. The results show: good correlation between the different elastic approaches, important conservatism of the elastic approach compared to elastoplastic approach, no influence of irradiated material properties. The behavior of a vessel with this type of crack is acceptable for RTNDT less than 135 deg and safety injection temperature of 60 deg

  1. Structural analysis of cellular blocks for a prestressed cast iron reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.; Head, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The cast segments from which the prestressed cast iron nuclear reactor pressure vessel may be constructed are not readily amenable to detailed three-dimensional finite element analysis because their complex internal web structure requires a very large number of elements if reasonable aspect ratios are to be retained. A technique has been developed of modelling these blocks using plate bending elements from the ASKA code. By this means it has been possible to study in detail several designs of casting and to identify favourable features. The results of these studies, and others in which assessments are made of the sensitivity of the structure to prestressing load changes and machining errors, are reported. (orig.)

  2. Warm pre-stress experiments on highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landron, C.; Ait-Bachir, M.; Moinereau, D.; Molinie, E.; Garbay, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the aim to justify in-service integrity of reactor pressure vessel beyond 40 years, experimental warm pre-stress (WPS) tests were performed on irradiated materials representative of RPV steels corresponding to 40 operating years. Different types of WPS loading path have been considered to cover typical postulated accidental transients. These results confirmed the beneficial effect of WPS on the cleavage fracture resistance of the irradiated materials. No fracture occurred during the cooling phase of the loading path and the fracture toughness values are higher than that measured with conventional isothermal tests. The analyses of the experiments, conducted using either simplified engineering models or more refined fracture models based on local approach to cleavage fracture, are in agreement with the experimental results. (authors)

  3. United States Department of Energy projects related to reactor pressure vessel annealing optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Nakos, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Light water reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material properties reduced by long-term exposure to neutron irradiation can be recovered through a thermal annealing treatment. This technique to extend RPV life, discussed in this report, provides a complementary approach to analytical methodologies to evaluate RPV integrity. RPV annealing has been successfully demonstrated in the former Soviet Union and on a limited basis by the US (military applications only). The process of demonstrating the technical feasibility of annealing commercial US RPVs is being pursued through a cooperative effort between the nuclear industry and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program. Presently, two projects are under way through the USDOE PLIM Program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of annealing commercial US RPVS, (1) annealing re-embrittlement data base development and (2) heat transfer boundary condition experiments

  4. Apparent embrittlement saturation and radiation mechanisms of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachur, D.

    1981-01-01

    The irradiation and annealing results of three different reactor pressure vessel steels are reported. Steel A, a basic material according to ASTM A-533 B having 0.15 percent vanadium; and Steel C contained 3.2 percent nickel. The steels were irradiated at 150, 300, and 400 degree C with neutron fluxes of 6 multiplied by 10 11 and 3 multiplied by 10 13 neutrons (n)/cm 2 /s. An apparent saturation-in-irradiation effect was found within certain neutron fluence ranges. During the annealing, various recovery processes occur in different temperature ranges. These are characterized by various activation energies. The individual processes were determined by the different time dependencies at various temperatures. Two causes for the apparent saturation were discovered from the behavior of the annealing curves

  5. Principles of design and construction for the top caps of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, A.N.; Bellwood, G.N.; Paton, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The building of the top cap poses problems because of the number of penetrations to be cast therein. The fuel and control system routes need to be tightly specified and controlled so that during station life misalignments do not occur which interfere with the fuelling and control operations. The paper outlines the route requirements and illustrates how these affect the tolerances and movements which can be allowed at various stages of construction. Development work is discussed to show the necessity of resolving the different priorities of design, programme and overall pressure vessel construction requirements, so that the reactor build is not inhibited by the special demands of the top cap, and the integration of the monitoring and survey systems during the top cap build are explained. (author)

  6. Reactor pressure vessel life cycle management at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshuk, B.W.; Bowman, M.E.; Henry, S.A.; Pavinich, W.A.; Lapides, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Life Cycle Management (LCM) seeks to manage the aging process of important systems, structures, and components during licensed operation. The goal of Baltimore Gas and Electric Company's (BG and E) Life Cycle Management Program is to assure attainment of 40 years of operation and to preserve the option of an additional 20 years of operation for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP). Since the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) has been identified as one of the most critical components with regard to long-term operation of a nuclear power plant, BG and E initiated actions to manage life limiting or aging issues for the CCNPP RPVs. To achieve long-term operation, technical RPV issues must be effectively managed. This paper describes methods BG and E uses for managing RPV age-related degradation. (author)

  7. Statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric method for irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamizawa, Hisashi, E-mail: takamizawa.hisashi@jaea.go.jp; Itoh, Hiroto, E-mail: ito.hiroto@jaea.go.jp; Nishiyama, Yutaka, E-mail: nishiyama.yutaka93@jaea.go.jp

    2016-10-15

    In order to understand neutron irradiation embrittlement in high fluence regions, statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) method was performed for the Japanese surveillance and material test reactor irradiation database. The BNP method is essentially expressed as an infinite summation of normal distributions, with input data being subdivided into clusters with identical statistical parameters, such as mean and standard deviation, for each cluster to estimate shifts in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The clusters typically depend on chemical compositions, irradiation conditions, and the irradiation embrittlement. Specific variables contributing to the irradiation embrittlement include the content of Cu, Ni, P, Si, and Mn in the pressure vessel steels, neutron flux, neutron fluence, and irradiation temperatures. It was found that the measured shifts of DBTT correlated well with the calculated ones. Data associated with the same materials were subdivided into the same clusters even if neutron fluences were increased.

  8. Qualification of non-destructive examination for belgian nuclear reactor pressure vessel inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couplet, D.; Francoise, T.

    2001-01-01

    In Service Inspection (ISI) participates to the assessment of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity. The performance of Non Destructive Examination (NDE) techniques must be demonstrated according to predefined objectives. The qualification process is essential to trust the reliability of the information provided by NDE. In Belgian Nuclear Power Plants, the qualification was conducted through a collaboration between the vendor and a technical group from the Electricity Utility. The important facts of this qualification will be presented: - the detailed definition of the inspection and qualifications objectives, based on a combination of the ASME code and the European Methodology for Qualification; - the systematic verification of the NDE performance and limitations, for each ISI objective, through an adequate combination of tests on blocks and technical justification; - the continuous improvement of the NDE procedure; - the feedback and the lessons learnt from site experience; - the necessary multi-disciplinary approach (NDE, degradation mechanisms, structural integrity)

  9. Development of a shallow-flaw fracture assessment methodology for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Pennell, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Shallow-flaw fracture technology is being developed within the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program for application to the safety assessment of radiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing postulated shallow flaws. Cleavage fracture in shallow-flaw cruciform beam specimens tested under biaxial loading at temperatures in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain-controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture. A probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) model that includes both the properties of the inner-surface stainless-steel cladding and a biaxial shallow-flaw fracture toughness correlation gave a reduction in probability of cleavage initiation of more than two orders of magnitude from an ASME-based reference case

  10. The influence of chemistry concentration on the fracture risk of a reactor pressure vessel subjected to pressurized thermal shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Pin-Chiun [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chou, Hsoung-Wei, E-mail: hwchou@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ferng, Yuh-Ming [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Probabilistic fracture mechanics method was used to analyze a reactor pressure vessel. • Effects of copper and nickel contents on RPV fracture probability under PTS were investigated and discussed. • Representative PTS transients of Beaver Valley nuclear power plant were utilized. • The range of copper and nickel contents of the RPV materials were suggested. • With different embrittlement levels the dominated PTS category is different. - Abstract: The radiation embrittlement behavior of reactor pressure vessel shell is influenced by the chemistry concentration of metal materials. This paper aims to study the effects of copper and nickel content variations on the fracture risk of pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel subjected to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients. The probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) code, FAVOR, which was developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the United States, is employed to perform the analyses. A Taiwan domestic PWR pressure vessel assumed with varied copper and nickel contents of beltline region welds and plates is investigated in the study. Some PTS transients analyzed from Beaver Valley Unit 1 for establishing the U.S. NRC's new PTS rule are applied as the loading condition. It is found that the content variation of copper and nickel will significantly affect the radiation embrittlement and the fracture probability of PWR pressure vessels. The results can be regarded as the risk incremental factors for comparison with the safety regulation requirements on vessel degradation as well as a reference for the operation of PWR plants in Taiwan.

  11. Relationships between Charpy impact shelf energies and upper shelf Ksub(IC) values for reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    Charpy shelf data and lower bound estimates of Ksub(IC) shelf data for the same steels and test temperatures are given. Included are some typical reactor pressure vessel steels as well as some less tough or degraded steels. The data were evaluated with shelf estimates of Ksub(IC) up to and exceeding 550 MPa√m. It is shown that the high shelf fracture toughness representative of tough reactor pressure vessel steels may be obtained from a knowledge of the Charpy shelf energies. The toughness transition may be obtained either by testing small fracture toughness specimens or by Charpy energy indexing. (U.K.)

  12. Experience with the WWER-440 MW reactor pressure vessel in-service inspections and evaluation of their results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Kralovec, J.; Prepechal, J.; Sulc, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Power Machinery Plant of Skoda Works in Plzen carries out in-service inspections of WWER-440 MW reactor pressure vessels by means of remote controlled inspection equipment - the TRC reactor test system, and some other inspections devices. The results of the in-service inspections were evaluated by methods based on the fracture mechanics approach, the knowledge of stress and strain distribution, and the operating history of the pressure vessels. Examples of types of defects found and their analysis are shown. (author). 1 tab

  13. A study on the sealing performance of metallic C-rings in reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Xiaohong, E-mail: jiaxh@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Huaming [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Xinggen [Ningbo Tiansheng Sealing Packing Co., Ltd, Ningbo 315302 (China); Wang, Yuming [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Longke [Eaton Corporation, MN (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • FE analysis on compression–resilience of metallic C-ring is performed and validated by experiments. • Model of RPV sealing system including the C-rings is developed. • Deformation data from factory hydraulic test of the RPV are used to verify the model. • C-rings’ behavior under designing condition is analyzed. • The model provides a reliable evaluation on the sealing performance of RPV. - Abstract: Double metallic C-rings are used in pressure vessel of pressurized water reactor (PWR) to seal the bolt-connected flanges. To evaluate the sealing performance, it is necessary to study both the C-rings’ intrinsic properties and their behavior in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under various loading conditions. The compression–resilience property and linear load are the basic information to evaluate the performance of a well-designed C-ring's. An equivalent model of C-ring is constructed by means of ANSYS to analyze its intrinsic properties, and is also validated by experiments on scaled samples. This model is applied to develop a 2D-axisymmetric FE model of sealing system including RPV and C-rings with the consideration of nonlinear material, contacting problem and multiple coupled effects. The simulation results of RPV deformation under the hydraulic test condition agree well with the data of factory hydraulic test. With the verified model, an analysis under the designing condition is performed to study C-rings’ behavior in the RPV, and then provides a reliable evaluation on the sealing performance of RPV.

  14. Evolution of precipitation in reactor pressure vessel steel welds under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Kristina, E-mail: kristina.lindgren@chalmers.se [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Boåsen, Magnus [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Stiller, Krystyna [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Efsing, Pål [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Vattenfall Ringhals AB, SE-430 22 Väröbacka (Sweden); Thuvander, Mattias [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    Reactor pressure vessel steel welds are affected by irradiation during operation. The irradiation results in nanometre cluster formation, which in turn affects the mechanical properties of the material, e.g. the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is shifted to higher levels. In this study, cluster formation is characterised in high Ni (1.58%) low Cu (0.04%) steel welds identical to Ringhals R4 welds, using atom probe tomography in both surveillance material and in material irradiated at accelerated dose rates. Clusters containing mainly Ni and Mn, but also some Si and Cu were observed in all of the irradiated materials. Their evolution did not change drastically during irradiation; the clusters grew and new clusters were nucleated. Hence, both the cluster number density and the average size increased with irradiation time. Some flux effects were observed when comparing the high flux material and the surveillance material. The surveillance material has a lower cluster number density, but larger clusters. The resulting impact on the mechanical properties of these two effects cancel out, resulting in a measured hardness that seems to be on the same trend as the high flux material. The dispersed barrier hardening model with an obstacle strength factor of 0.15 was found to reproduce the increase in hardness. In the investigated high flux materials, the clusters' Cu content was higher. - Highlights: •Clustering in a low Cu, high Ni reactor pressure vessel steel weld is studied. •The clusters nucleate and grow during irradiation, and consist of Ni, Mn, Si, and Cu. •High flux neutron irradiated material is compared to surveillance material. •High flux was found to result in smaller clusters with a larger number density. •Hardness follows the same dependence on fluence, independent of flux.

  15. Scatter modelling of fracture toughness data for reactor pressure vessel structural integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesoz, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing interest at EDF in developing and applying probabilistic methods for a variety of purposes. In the field of structural integrity and reliability they are used to evaluate the effect of deterioration due to ageing mechanisms, mainly on major passive structural components such as reactor pressure vessel, steam generator and piping in nuclear plants. Such approaches provide an attractive supplement to the more conventional deterministic method, based upon pessimistic assumptions, that give results too far from reality to support effective decisions. In addition to deterministic calculations, a Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics model has been developed in order to analyse the risk of brittle failure of the reactor pressure vessel and to perform sensitivity studies. The material fracture toughness (K IC ) uncertainty appears to be strongly influencing the probability of failure under accidental conditions. Up to now, this parameter is determined from the RCC-M code reference curve, which is the same as the ASME reference curve. But an important issue when performing probabilistic analysis is the correct statistical modelling of input parameters. That's why modelling works have been carried out using results of fracture toughness tests performed for demonstrating the validity of the reference curve. This paper presents the statistical treatments that have been performed to model the scatter of temperature dependent parameter (K IC (T). A specific data base containing a few hundreds of French and US results have been carried and Weibull models have been fitted, based on various master curve equations (K. Wallin (Senior Adviser at the Technical Research Centre of Finland) or RCC-M types). (author)

  16. An assessment of the economic consequences of thermal annealing of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesbach, T.J.; Server, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a thermal heat treatment to recover mechanical properties which were degraded by neutron radiation exposure is a potential method for assuring reactor pressure vessel licensing life and possible license renewal. 'Wet anneals' at temperatures less than 343degC have been conducted on test reactors in Alaska (SM-1A) and Belgium (BR3). The Soviets have also performed 'dry anneals' at higher temperatures near or above 450degC on several commercial reactor vessels. Technical and economic uncertainties have made utilities in the United States reluctant to seriously consider thermal annealing of large commercial reactor vessels except as a last resort option. However, as a utility begins to experience significant radiation embrittlement or considers extending the operating license life of the vessel, thermal annealing can be a viable option depending upon many considerations. These considerations include other possible remedial measures that can be taken (i.e., flux reduction), economic issues with regard to utility finances, and corporate philosophy. A decision analysis model has been developed to analyze the thermal anneal option in comparison to other alternatives for a number of possible combinations and timing. The results for a postulated vessel and embrittlement condition are presented to show that thermal annealing can be a viable management option which should be taken seriously. (author)

  17. Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Sommer, S.C.; Johnson, G.L.; Lambert, H.E.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. By demonstrating that the ASME code requirements governing Level D service limits are satisfied, the structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports. A subsequent design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas of additional safety concerns, but further investigation of the above safety concerns, however, concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns

  18. Evaluation of HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] pressure-vessel integrity considering radiation embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-04-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel has been in service for 20 years, and during this time, radiation damage was monitored with a vessel-material surveillance program. In mid-November 1986, data from this program indicated that the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness was greater than expected. As a result, a reevaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken. Updated methods of fracture-mechanics analysis were applied, and an accelerated irradiations program was conducted using the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Results of these efforts indicate that (1) the vessel life can be extended 10 years if the reactor power level is reduced 15% and if the vessel is subjected to a hydrostatic proof test each year; (2) during the 10-year life extension, significant radiation damage will be limited to a rather small area around the beam tubes; and (3) the greater-than-expected damage rate is the result of the very low neutron flux in the HFIR vessel relative to that in samples of material irradiated in materials-testing reactors (a factor of ∼10 4 less), that is, a rate effect

  19. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  20. Irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels (Heavy-Section Steel Technology program series 4 and 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, J.J.; Nanstad, R.K.; Thoms, K.R.; Menke, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents studies on the irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels. The Fourth Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Irradiation Series, almost completed, was aimed at elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture toughness of low-copper weldments (''current practice welds''). A typical nuclear pressure vessel plate steel was included for statistical purposes. The Fifth HSST Irradiation Series, now in progress, is aimed at determining the shape of the K/sub IR/ curve after significant radiation-induced shift of the transition temperatures. This series includes irradiated test specimens of thicknesses up to 100 mm and weldment compositions typical of early nuclear power reactor pressure vessel welds. 27 refs., 22 figs

  1. High efficiency algorithm for 3D transient thermo-elasto-plastic contact problem in reactor pressure vessel sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Mingyu; Lin Tengjiao; Li Runfang; Du Xuesong; Li Shuian; Yang Yu

    2005-01-01

    There are some complex operating cases such as high temperature and high pressure during the operating process of nuclear reactor pressure vessel. It is necessary to carry out mechanical analysis and experimental investigation for its sealing ability. On the basis of the self-developed program for 3-D transient sealing analysis for nuclear reactor pressure vessel, some specific measures are presented to enhance the calculation efficiency in several aspects such as the non-linear solution of elasto-plastic problem, the mixed solution algorithm for contact problem as well as contract heat transfer problem and linear equation set solver. The 3-D transient sealing analysis program is amended and complemented, with which the sealing analysis result of the pressure vessel model can be obtained. The calculation results have good regularity and the calculation efficiency is twice more than before. (authors)

  2. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, Stephanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-01-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called 'Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, ...) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program

  3. Device for positioning ultrasonic probes and/or television cameras on the outer surface of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipser, R.; Dose, G.F.

    1977-01-01

    The device makes possible periodical in-service inspections of welding seams and material of a reactor pressure vessel without local human presence. A 'support ring' encloses the pressure vessel in a horizontal plane with free space. It is vertically moved up and down in the space between pressure vessel and thermal shield by means of tackles. At a control desk placed in a protected area its movement is controlled and its vertical position is indicated. A 'rotating track' with its own drive is rotating remote-controlled on the 'support ring'. By a combination of the vertical with the rotating movement, an ultrasonic probe placed removably on the 'rotating hack', or a television camera will be brought to any position on the cylindrical circumference of the pressure vessel. Special devices extend the radius of action, in upward direction for inspecting the welding seams of the coolant nozzles, and in downward direction for the inspection of welds on the hemispherical bottom of the pressure vessel or on the outlet pipe nozzle placed there. The device remains installed during reactor operation, but is moved down to the lower horizontal surface of the thermal shield. Parts which are sensible to radiation like probes or television cameras and special devices will then be removed respectively mounted before beginning an inspection compaign. This position may be reached by the lower access in the biological shield and through an opening in the horizontal surface of the thermal shield. (HP) [de

  4. Neutronic calculations for the reactor pressure vessel of Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Ana M.; Madariaga, Marcelo R.

    1999-01-01

    In 1974 a surveillance program for the Atucha I nuclear power plant pressure vessel was initiated which included the construction of different types of specimens, distributed in 30 irradiation capsules located under the core at the lower part of some of the fuel channels. The capsules containing the irradiated specimens were withdrawn in two stages; the first set (SET 1) of 15 specimens in 1980 and the second one (SET 2) of the remaining 15, in 1987. Both fracture mechanic tests and dosimetry analysis were carried out by the designer (KWU) for SET1 and by the owner National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) for SET2. The calculations performed in the case of SET1 showed that there was a significant spectrum difference between the position where the specimens had been and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) - inner surface (IS). It was established that the ratio of thermal flux (E 1 MeV) varied, approximately, from 1000 to 10 from the irradiation position to the RPV- IS. The purpose of this report is to show the calculations recently performed at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, with particular emphasis on the difference in the results generated by the modification to sightly enriched fuel. A simplified 1-D calculations show that there is a slight increase (4% approximately) in the flux along the whole energy range. As it has already been mentioned, this is due, more than to the isotopic composition of the new fuel, to the difference in power density spatial distribution, which is a consequence of a different fuel management, necessary to preserve operational limits below their maximum allowed values with the same total thermal power generated. More detailed calculations are nevertheless foreseen in order to verify these first results. (author)

  5. Inspection accessibility study of the Millstones Unit 1 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calhoun, G.; Kapoor, A.; Davis, J.B.

    1990-07-01

    The need for more extensive ultrasonic examination of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) shell welds at some of the BWR plants is becoming apparent. Recent NRC comments regarding limits on future inspection relief requests and proposed revisions to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 11 have caused BWR plant owners and vendors of inspection services to look at inspection tooling that would allow for the ultrasonic examination of RPV shell welds previously considered inaccessible. One approach to inspection of the RPV shell welds that will allow for greater coverage at some BWR plants is to perform these inspections from inside the vessel. In late 1988, Westinghouse received a contract from Northeast Utilities to examine the flange ligament areas and the shell welds in the upper portion of the Millstone Unit 1 PRV during an outage scheduled to begin in April 1989. This examination was performed with an inspection tool placed inside of the vessel and the UDRPS data acquisition system. The inspection tool was based on tooling used routinely at the Swedish and Finnish BWRs. The object of RP C105-1 was to use the information gathered prior to and during the Millstone Unit 1 examination and to perform an inspection accessibility study and prepare a report covering the lessons learned during the examination that would benefit other BWR utilities considering similar inspections. The final report consists of two volumes. This document, Volume 1, describes a 3D model of the Millstone Unit 1 PRV that was based on information obtained from plant drawings. The model is a useful tool for visualizing areas of limited access from both inside and outside of the RPV. 5 refs., 38 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Design and development of weld inspection manipulator for reactor pressure vessel of TAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, H.; Singh, J.P.; Ranjon, R.; Kulkarni, M.P.; Patel, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of TAPS-1 BWR contains six longitudinal and four circumferential welds. Periodical in-service inspection of these weld joints has been a regulatory issue pending for long. In the 22 nd refuelling outage in July 2012 the inspection of L1-1, L1-2 longitudinal welds as well as their junctions with C1 circumferential weld were proposed to be done using ultrasonic technique. Approaching these welds from OD side of the RPV is a difficult and tedious task. Therefore it was decided to examine these welds from ID side of the RPV by filling the cavity with water and approaching the RPV from top. No technology was locally available to take the probes at a depth of 10-12 m under water. NPCIL approached RTD, BARC to develop an underwater manipulator to accomplish this task. RTD took up this work as a challenge and came out with the design of manipulator. The weld inspection manipulator (WIM) was fabricated on a war foot basis, tested and successfully implemented in the reactor for the first time in TAPS history. The entire activity was completed in three months time. This article gives the details of design, manufacturing, performance testing, qualification trials and implementation of WIM in the reactor. Ultrasonic testing techniques were developed by QAD, BARC which are not covered in this article. (author)

  7. Radiation intensification of the reactor pressure vessels recovery by low temperature heat treatment (wet annealing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikov, E.

    2015-04-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of NPP safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. There are two approaches to annealing. The first one is so-called «dry» high temperature (∼475°C) annealing. It allows obtaining practically complete recovery, but requires the removal of the reactor core and internals. External heat source (furnace) is required to carry out RPV heat treatment. The alternative approach is to anneal RPV at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps while operating within the RPV design limits. This low temperature «wet» annealing, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible.

  8. Radiation intensification of the reactor pressure vessels recovery by low temperature heat treatment (wet annealing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasikov, E

    2015-01-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of NPP safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation.There are two approaches to annealing. The first one is so-called «dry» high temperature (∼475°C) annealing. It allows obtaining practically complete recovery, but requires the removal of the reactor core and internals. External heat source (furnace) is required to carry out RPV heat treatment.The alternative approach is to anneal RPV at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps while operating within the RPV design limits. This low temperature «wet» annealing, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. (paper)

  9. Behavior of a corium jet in high pressure melt ejection from a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.

    1988-04-01

    Discharge of the molten core debris from a pressurized reactor vessel has been recognized as an important accident scenario for pressurized water reactors. Recent high-pressure melt streaming experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories, designed to study cavity and containment events related to melt ejection, have resulted in two important observations: (1) Expansion and breakup of the ejected molten jet. (2) Significant aerosol generation during the ejection process. The expansion and breakup of the jet in the experiments are attributed to rapid evolution of the pressurizing gas (nitrogen or hydrogen) dissolved in the melt. It has been concluded that aerosol particles may be formed by condensation of melt vapor and mechanical breakup of the melt and generation. It was also shown that the above stated phenomena are likely to occur in reactor accidents. This report provides results from analytical and experimental investigations on the behavior of a gas supersaturated molten jet expelled from a pressurized vessel. Aero-hydrodynamic stability of liquid jets in gas, stream degassing of molten metals, and gas bubble nucleation in molten metals are relevant problems that are addressed in this work

  10. Nanostructure evolution of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels: Revised Object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Messina, L. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Olsson, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    This work presents a revised set of parameters to be used in an Object kinetic Monte Carlo model to simulate the microstructure evolution under neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels at the operational temperature of light water reactors (∼300 °C). Within a “grey-alloy” approach, a more physical description than in a previous work is used to translate the effect of Mn and Ni solute atoms on the defect cluster diffusivity reduction. The slowing down of self-interstitial clusters, due to the interaction between solutes and crowdions in Fe is now parameterized using binding energies from the latest DFT calculations and the solute concentration in the matrix from atom-probe experiments. The mobility of vacancy clusters in the presence of Mn and Ni solute atoms was also modified on the basis of recent DFT results, thereby removing some previous approximations. The same set of parameters was seen to predict the correct microstructure evolution for two different types of alloys, under very different irradiation conditions: an Fe-C-MnNi model alloy, neutron irradiated at a relatively high flux, and a high-Mn, high-Ni RPV steel from the Swedish Ringhals reactor surveillance program. In both cases, the predicted self-interstitial loop density matches the experimental solute cluster density, further corroborating the surmise that the MnNi-rich nanofeatures form by solute enrichment of immobilized small interstitial loops, which are invisible to the electron microscope.

  11. Effects of nickel on irradiation embrittlement of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This TECDOC was developed under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled Effects of Nickel on Irradiation Embrittlement of Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels. This CRP is the sixth in a series of CRPs to determine the influence of the mechanism and quantify the influence of nickel content on the deterioration of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels of the Ni-Cr-Mo-V or Mn-Ni-Cr-Mo types. The scientific scope of the programme includes procurement of materials, determination of mechanical properties, irradiation and testing of specimens in power and/or test reactors, and microstructural characterization. Eleven institutes from eight different countries and the European Union participated in this CRP and six institutes conducted the irradiation experiments of the CRP materials. In addition to the irradiation and testing of those materials, irradiation experiments of various national steels were also conducted. Moreover, some institutes performed microstructural investigations of both the CRP materials and national steels. This TECDOC presents and discusses all the results obtained and the analyses performed under the CRP. The results analysed are clear in showing the significantly higher radiation sensitivity of high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%) compared with the lower nickel base metal (1.2 wt%). These results are supported by other similar results in the literature for both WWER-1000 RPV materials, pressurized water reactor (PWR) type materials, and model alloys. Regardless of the increased sensitivity of WWER-1000 high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%), the transition temperature shift for the WWER-1000 RPV design fluence is still below the curve predicted by the Russian code (standard for strength calculations of components and piping in NPPs - PNAE G 7-002-86). For higher fluence, no data were available and the results should not be extrapolated. Although manganese content was not incorporated directly in this CRP

  12. Control Rod Drive Mechanism Installed in the Internal of Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. H.; Choi, S.; Park, J. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, D. O.; Hur, N. S.; Hur, H.; Yu, J. Y

    2008-09-15

    This report describes the review results and important technologies related to the in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism. Generally, most of the CRDMs used in the PWR are attached outside of the reactor pressure vessel, and the pernetration of the vessel head can not avoid. However, in-vessel type CRDMs, which are installed inside the reactor vessel, can eliminate the possibility of rod ejection accidents and the penetration of the vessel head, and provide a compact design of the reactor vessel and containment. There are two kinds of in-vessel type CRDM concerning the driving force-driven by a driving motor and by a hydraulic force. Motor driven CRDMs have been mainly investigated in Japan(MRX, IMR, DRX, next generation BWR etc.), and developed the key components such as a canned motor, an integrated rod position indicator, a separating ball-nut and a ball bearing that can operate under the water conditions of a high temperature and pressure. The concept of hydraulically driven CRDMs have been first reported by KWU and Siemens for KWU 200 reactor, and Argentina(CAREM) and China(NHR-5, NHR-200) have been developed the internal CRDM with the piston and cylinder of slightly different geometries. These systems are driven by the hydraulic force which is produced by pumps outside of the reactor vessel and transmitted through a pipe penetrating the reactor vessel, and needs complicated control and piping systems including pumps, valves and pipes etc.. IRIS has been recently decided the internal CRDMs as the reference design, and an analytical and experimental investigations of the hydraulic drive concept are performed by POLIMI in Italy. Also, a small French company, MP98 has been developed a new type of control rods, called 'liquid control rods', where reactivity is controlled by the movement of a liquid absorber in a manometer type device.

  13. Thermal and stress analyses of the reactor pressure vessel lower head of the Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Onizawa, K.; Kurihara, R.; Kawasaki, S.; Soda, K.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal and stress analyses were performed using the finite element analysis code ABAQUS to clarify the factors which caused tears in the stainless steel liner of the reactor pressure vessel lower head of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor pressure vessel during the accident on 28 March 1979. The present analyses covered the events which occurred after approximately 20 tons of molten core material were relocated to the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. They showed that the tensile stress was highest in the case where the relocated core material consisting of homogeneous UO 2 debris was assumed to attack the lower head and the debris was then quenched. The peak tensile stress was in the vicinity of the welded zone of the penetration nozzle. This result agrees with the findings from the examination of the TMI-2 reactor pressure vessel that major tears in the stainless steel liner were observed around two penetration nozzles of the lower head. (author)

  14. Workshop on processing of nuclear data for use in power reactor pressure vessel lifetime assessment. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paviotti Corcuera, R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Muir, D.W.

    1999-02-01

    This document summarizes the contents of the workshop on processing of nuclear data for use in power reactor pressure vessel lifetime assessment. A short description of the main topics of the agenda, the list of participants and comments and recommendations are given. (author)

  15. Process for producing curved surface of membrane rings for large containers, particulary for prestressed concrete pressure vessels of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpf, H.

    1977-01-01

    Membrane rings for large pressure vessels, particularly for prestressed-concrete pressure vessels, often have curved surfaces. The invention describes a process of producing these at site, which is particularly advantageous as the forming and installation of the vessel component coincide. According to the invention, the originally flat membrane ring is set in a predetermined position, is then pressed in sections by a forming tool (with a preformed support ring as opposite tool), and shaped. After this, the shaped parts are welded to the ring-shaped wall parts of the large vessel. The manufacture of single and double membrane rings arrangements is described. (HP) [de

  16. 3D modeling of the primary circuit in the reactor pressure vessel of a PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramajo, Damian, E-mail: dramajo@santafe-conicet.gov.ar; Corzo, Santiago; Schiliuk, Nicolas; Nigro, Norberto

    2013-12-15

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) of 745 electrical MW Atucha II nuclear power plant was carried out. A three dimensional (3D) detailed model was employed to simulate coolant circuit considering the upper and lower plenums, the downcomer and the hot and cold legs. Control rods and coolant channel tubes at the upper plenum were included to quantify the mixing flow with more realism. The whole set of 451 coolant channels were modeled by means of a zero dimensional methodology. That is, the effect of each coolant channel was modeled through the introduction of a source point at the upper plenum and a sink point at the lower plenum. For each coupled sink/source points (SSP) the mass, momentum and energy balance were solved considering the local pressure difference and the temperature between the corresponding points where sinks and sources were placed. Based on this strategy, three models with increasingly level of approximation were implemented. For the first model the 451 coolant channels were reduced to only 57 pairs of SSP to represent all the coolant channels, concentrating the effect of several coolant channels in a unique pair of sink and source while taking into account geometric design details. For the second model, 225 pairs of SSP were introduced. Finally, for the third model each one of the 451 coolant channels were modeled by means of one pair of SSP. Depending on the coolant channel location, the radial power distribution and the pressure loss caused by the corresponding flow restrictor present by design were considered. Simulations carried out give insight in the complexity of the flow. As expected, the greater the details of the model the better the accuracy reached in the representation of the RPV behavior. In addition, the flow distributor located at the lower plenum showed to be very efficient since, the mass flow at each channel was found to be fairly

  17. Flux effect on neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A.; Iwasaki, M.; Tsuno, S.; Akiyama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ohta, T.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is of great concern for the long term operation of light water reactors. In particular, the embrittlement of the RPV steels of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) at very high fluences beyond 6*10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, needs to be understood in more depth because materials irradiated in material test reactors (MTRs) to such high fluences show larger shifts than predicted by current embrittlement correlation equations available worldwide. The primary difference between the irradiation conditions of MTRs and surveillance capsules is the neutron flux. The neutron flux of MTR is typically more than one order of magnitude higher than that of surveillance capsule, but it is not necessarily clear if this difference in neutron flux causes difference in mechanical properties of RPV. In this paper, we perform direct comparison, in terms of mechanical property and microstructure, between the materials irradiated in surveillance capsules and MTRs to clarify the effect of flux at very high fluences and fluxes. We irradiate the archive materials of some of the commercial reactors in Japan in the MTR, LVR-15, of NRI Rez, Czech Republic. Charpy impact test results of the MTR-irradiated materials are compared with the data from surveillance tests. The comparison of the results of microstructural analyses by means of atom probe tomography is also described to demonstrate the similarity / differences in surveillance and MTR-irradiated materials in terms of solute atom behavior. It appears that high Cu material irradiated in a MTR presents larger shifts than those of surveillance data, while low Cu materials present similar embrittlement. The microstructural changes caused by MTR irradiation and surveillance irradiation are clearly different

  18. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements in low power light water reactor pressure vessel mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Kellogg, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of extensive SSTR measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been reported previously. Measurements were made at key locations in PCA which is an idealized mockup of the water gap, thermal shield, pressure vessel geometry of a light water reactor. Recently, additional SSTR fission rate measurements have been carried out for 237-Np, 238-U, and 235-U in key locations in the NESTOR Shielding and Dosimetry Improvement Program (NESDIP) mockup facility located at Winfrith, England. NESDIP is a replica of the PCA facility, and comparisons will be made between PCA and NESDIP measurements. The results of measurements made at the engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium will also be reported. Measurements were made at selected radial and azimuthal locations in VENUS, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor. Comparisons of absolute SSTR fission rates with absolute fission rates made with the Mol miniature fission chamber will be reported. Absolute fission rate comparisons have also been made between the NBS fission chamber, radiometric fission foils, and SSTRs, and these results will be summarized

  19. Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or open-quotes recovery,close quotes of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed

  20. Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or open-quotes recovery,close quotes of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed

  1. Life prediction study of reactor pressure vessel as essential technical foundation for plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, H.; Nakajima, N.; Kondo, T.

    1987-01-01

    The life of a LWR plant is determined essentially by the limit of reliable performance of the components which are difficult to replace without high economic and/or safety risks. Typical of such a component is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The engineering life of a RPV of a given quality of steel is considered to be a complex function of factors such as the resistance to fracture, which has deteriorated due to neutron irradiation and thermal aging, and generation of surface flaws by environmental effects such as corrosion and their growth under operational load that varies during steady state operation and transients. In an attempt to evaluate the engineering life of a RPV of a LWR, a preliminary survey was made by applying a set of knowledge accumulated primarily in the field of subcritical crack growth behavior of RPV steels in reactor water environments. The major conclusions drawn are: (1) the life of a RPV is dependent on the quality of steel used, particularly with respect to any minor impurities it contains. (2) The issue of plant life extension in RPV aspect is found to be optimistic for cases where the steels used satisfy a reasonable level of quality control. (3) The importance of providing sound scientific foundation is stressed for the implementation of a practicable life extension scheme: this can be established through intensified studies of flaw growth and fracture behaviours in well defined testings under reasonably simulated service conditions

  2. Assessment of the Zaporizhya NPP unit 1 reactor pressure vessel safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podkopaev, V.; Popov, V.; Zaritsky, N.

    1997-01-01

    This emergency situation had occurred at the ZNPP unit 1 while its being under ''hot shutdown'' in natural coolant circulation mode. The main difference between emergency situation and mode with improper setting of PPPD described in the ''Technical Safety Substantiation (TSS) is that this mode is being considered in the TSS under rated power of reactor with main circulation pumps (MCP) under operation. This difference is a substantial one. For this reason a necessity appeared to asses an integrity of referred reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under given emergency situation to judge whether results obtained meet the ND requirements (safety assessment). Under operation such RPV elements are being mostly affected as upper cooling, lower cowling, weld No. 3 weld No. 4 situated in front of core. These elements materials ageing process is the most intense one. Thus, this work was aimed at investigation of structure material behavior and RPV integrity assessment under thermal shock conditions while PPPD improper setting. At that time the most attention was drawn to above mentioned upper and lower cowlings along with welds No. 3 and 4. 5 refs, figs, 10 tabs

  3. Assessment of the Zaporizhya NPP unit 1 reactor pressure vessel safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podkopaev, V; Popov, V; Zaritsky, N [State Scientific and Technical Centre on Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SSTC NRS), Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-09-01

    This emergency situation had occurred at the ZNPP unit 1 while its being under ``hot shutdown`` in natural coolant circulation mode. The main difference between emergency situation and mode with improper setting of PPPD described in the ``Technical Safety Substantiation (TSS) is that this mode is being considered in the TSS under rated power of reactor with main circulation pumps (MCP) under operation. This difference is a substantial one. For this reason a necessity appeared to asses an integrity of referred reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under given emergency situation to judge whether results obtained meet the ND requirements (safety assessment). Under operation such RPV elements are being mostly affected as upper cooling, lower cowling, weld No. 3 weld No. 4 situated in front of core. These elements materials ageing process is the most intense one. Thus, this work was aimed at investigation of structure material behavior and RPV integrity assessment under thermal shock conditions while PPPD improper setting. At that time the most attention was drawn to above mentioned upper and lower cowlings along with welds No. 3 and 4. 5 refs, figs, 10 tabs.

  4. Boat sampling and inservice inspections of the reactor pressure vessel weld No. 4 at Kozloduy NPP, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvitanovic, M.; Oreb, E.; Mudronja, V.; Zado, V.; Bezlaj, H.; Petkov, M.; Gledatchev, J.; Radomirski, S.; Ribarska, T.; Kroes, B.

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) boat sampling performed at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1, from August to November 1996. Kozloduy NPP, Unit 1 has no reactor vessel material surveillance program. Changes in the material fracture toughness resulting from the fast neutron irradiation which cannot be monitored without removal of the vessel material. Therefore, the main objective of the project was to cut samples from the RPV wall in order to obtain samples of the RPV material for further structural analyses. The most critical area, i.e. weld No. 4 was determined as a location for boat sampling. Replication technique was applied in order to obtain precise determination of the weld geometry necessary for positioning of the cutting tool prior to boat sampling, and determination of divot depth left after boat sampling and grinding of sample sites. Boat sampling was performed by electrical discharge machining (EDM). Grinding of sample sites was implemented to minimize stress concentration effects on sample sites, to eliminate surface irregularities resulting from EDM process, and to eliminate recast layer on the surface of the EDM cut. Ultrasonic, liquid penetrant, magnetic particles, and visual examinations were performed after grinding to establish baseline data in the boat sampling area. The project preparation activities, apart from EDM process, and the site organization lead was entrusted to INETEC. The activities were funded by the PHARE program of the European Commission. (orig.)

  5. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  6. A hybrid source-driven method to compute fast neutron fluence in reactor pressure vessel - 017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren-Tai, Chiang

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid source-driven method is developed to compute fast neutron fluence with neutron energy greater than 1 MeV in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The method determines neutron flux by solving a steady-state neutron transport equation with hybrid neutron sources composed of peripheral fixed fission neutron sources and interior chain-reacted fission neutron sources. The relative rod-by-rod power distribution of the peripheral assemblies in a nuclear reactor obtained from reactor core depletion calculations and subsequent rod-by-rod power reconstruction is employed as the relative rod-by-rod fixed fission neutron source distribution. All fissionable nuclides other than U-238 (such as U-234, U-235, U-236, Pu-239 etc) are replaced with U-238 to avoid counting the fission contribution twice and to preserve fast neutron attenuation for heavy nuclides in the peripheral assemblies. An example is provided to show the feasibility of the method. Since the interior fuels only have a marginal impact on RPV fluence results due to rapid attenuation of interior fast fission neutrons, a generic set or one of several generic sets of interior fuels can be used as the driver and only the neutron sources in the peripheral assemblies will be changed in subsequent hybrid source-driven fluence calculations. Consequently, this hybrid source-driven method can simplify and reduce cost for fast neutron fluence computations. This newly developed hybrid source-driven method should be a useful and simplified tool for computing fast neutron fluence at selected locations of interest in RPV of contemporary nuclear power reactors. (authors)

  7. Irradiation temperature measurement of the reactor pressure vessel surveillance specimen in the programmes of radiation degradation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupca, L.; Stanc, S.; Simor, S.

    2001-01-01

    The information's about the special system of irradiation temperature measurement, used for reactor pressure vessel surveillance specimen, which are placed in reactor thermal shielding canals are presented in the paper. The system was designed and realized in the frame of Extended Surveillance Specimen Programme for NPP V-2 Jaslovske Bohunice and Modern Surveillance Specimen Programme for NPP Mochovce. Base design aspects, technical parameters of realization and results of measurement on the two units in Bohunice and Mochovce NPPs are presented too. (Authors)

  8. Radiological characterization of the pressure vessel internals of the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Norman E; Reciniello, Richard N; Hu, Jih-Perng

    2004-08-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose-rate were performed in the reactor pressure vessel and on vessel internal structures such as the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. Measurements of gamma-ray dose rates were made using Red Perspex polymethyl methacrylate high-dose film, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's RO-7 high-range ion chamber. As a comparison, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup. The gamma-ray dose rate at 8 cm above the center of the Transition Plate was measured to be 160 Gy h (using an RO-7) and 88 Gy h at 8 cm above and about 5 cm lateral to the Transition Plate (using Red Perspex film). This compares with a calculated dose rate of 172 Gy h using Micro-Shield. The gamma-ray dose rate was 16.2 Gy h measured at 76 cm from the reactor core (using the "peanut" ion chamber) and 16.3 Gy h at 87 cm from the core (using Red Perspex film). The similarity of dose rates measured with different instruments indicates that using different methods and instruments is acceptable if the measurement (and calculation) parameters are well defined. Different measurement techniques may be necessary due to constraints such as size restrictions.

  9. Structural mechanisms of the flux effect for VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Zabusov, O.; Frolov, A.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    To justify the lifetime extension of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessels (RPV) up to 60 years and more it is necessary to expand the existing surveillance samples database to beyond design fluence by means of accelerated irradiation in a research reactor. Herewith since the changes in mechanical properties of materials under irradiation are due to occurring structural changes, correct analysis of the data obtained at accelerated irradiation of VVER-1000 RPV materials requires a clear understanding of the structural mechanisms that are responsible for the flux effect in VVER-1000 RPV steels. Two mechanisms are responsible for radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels: the hardening one (radiation hardening due to formation of radiation-induced Ni-based precipitates and radiation defects) and non-hardening one (due to formation of impurities segregations at grain boundaries - reversible temper brittleness). In this context for an adequate interpretation of the mechanical tests results when justifying the lifetime extension of existing units a complex of comparative structural studies (TEM, SEM and AES) of VVER-1000 RPV materials irradiated in different conditions (in research reactor IR-8 and within surveillance samples) was performed. It is shown that the flux effect is observed for materials with high nickel content (weld metals with Ni content > 1.35%) and it is mostly due to the contribution of non-hardening mechanism of radiation embrittlement (the difference in the accumulation kinetics of grain boundary phosphorus segregation) and somewhat contribution of the hardening mechanism (the difference in density of radiation-induced precipitates). Therefore when analyzing the results obtained from the accelerated irradiation of VVER-1000 WM the correction for the flux effect should be made. (authors)

  10. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Pressure vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Kai

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions which has been investigated within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and as coolant, flows as a single phase through the core and can be directly fed to the turbine. Using the technology of coal fired power plants with supercritical steam conditions, the heat-up in the core is done in several steps to achieve the targeted high steam outlet temperature of 500.C without exceeding available cladding material limits. Based on a first design of a fuel assembly cluster for a HPLWR with a single pass core, the surrounding internals and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are dimensioned for the first time, following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Furthermore, this design is extended to the incorporation of core arrangements with two and three passes. The design of the internals and the RPV are verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Additionally, a passive safety component for the feedwater inlet of the RPV of the HPLWR is designed. Its purpose is the reduction of the mass flow rate in case of a LOCA for a feedwater line break until further steps are executed. Starting with a simple vortex diode, several steps are executed to enhance the performance of the diode and adapt it to this application. Then, this first design is further optimized using combined 1D and 3D flow analyses. Parametric studies determine the performance and characteristic for changing mass flow rates for this backflow limiter. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of neutron irradiation embrittlement in the Korean reactor pressure vessel steels (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, J. H.; Lee, B. S.; Chi, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Yoon, J. H.; Kwon, S. C.; Park, D. G.; Kang, Y. H.; Choo, K. N.; Oh, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. K.; Shin, Y. T.; Cho, M. S.; Sohn, J. M.; Kim, D. S.; Choo, Y. S.; Ahn, S. B.; Oh, W. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    Reactor pressure vessel materials, which were produced by a domestic company, Doosan Heavy Industries and construction Co., Ltd., have been evaluated using the neutron irradiation facility HANARO. For this evaluation, instrumented capsules were used for neutron irradiation of various kinds of specimens made of different heats of steels, which are VCD(Y4), VCD+Al(U4), Si+Al(Y5), U4 weld metal, and U4 HAZ, respectively. The fast neutron fluence levels ranged 1 to 5 (x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E>1MeV) depending on the specimens and the irradiation temperature was controlled within 290{+-}10 deg C. The test results showed that, in the ranking of the material properties of the base metals, both before and after neutron irradiation, Y5 is the best, U4 the next and Y4 the last. Y4 showed a substantial change by neutron irradiation as well as the properties was worse than others in the unirradiated state. However, Y5, which showed the best properties in unirradiated state, was also the best in the resistance for irradiation embrittlement and one can hardly detect the property change after irradiation. The weldment showed a reasonably good resistance to irradiation embrittlement while the unirradiated properties were worse than base metals. The RPV steels are all expected to meet the screening criteria of the USNRC codes and regulations during the end of plant life. 39 refs., 42 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  12. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel integrity insurance by crack arrestability evaluation using load from CVN tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.

    1997-01-01

    The present work is undertaken in the framework of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance and aims at revisiting the crack arrest approach to structural integrity insurance. This approach, performed under normal plant operation conditions, can also offer an attractive alternative to the crack initiation philosophy promoted for accidental analysis. To this end, an accidental conservative, cost effective and robust methodology is forwarded and demonstrated: it makes use of the crack arrest information contained in the instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test and/or in the shear fracture appearance of broken samples. Particular attention is paid to the appraisal of uncertainties and the related safety margin. The resulting capability is placed in perspective with the state-of-the-art crack initiation methodology based on the slow bend testing of recracked specimens, presently under standardization world-wide. The investigation leads to highlight three conceptual weaknesses of current enfgineering and regulatory practices. Improved crack arrestability evaluation emerges as an optimal approach to insure safe PWR operation up to design end-of-life and beyond

  13. Effects of Microstructural Inhomogeneity on Charpy Impact Properties for Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seokmin; Song, Jaemin; Kim, Min-Chul; Choi, Kwon-Jae; Lee, Bong-Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels are fabricated by vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD), and then heat treatment of quenching and tempering is conducted after forging. The through-the-thickness variation of microstructure in RPV can occur due to the cooling rate gradient during quenching and inhomogeneous deformation during forging process. The variation of microstructure in RPV affects the mechanical properties, and inhomogeneity in mechanical properties can occur. The evaluation of mechanical properties of RPV is conducted at thickness of 1/4T. In order to evaluate the safety of RPV more correctly, the research about the through-the-thickness variation of microstructure and mechanical properties in RPV is need. 1. The fine low bainite (LB) is the dominant phase at the inner-surface (0T), but coarse upper bainite (UB) is the dominant phase at the center (1/2T). This is because cooling rate gradient from surface to center occurs during quenching. 2. Inter-lath carbides act as fracture initiation site, and it reduces impact toughness. 3. The upper shelf energy is low and the reference temperatures are high at the 1/4T. Impact properties are poor at 1/4T because of the formation of coarse upper bainite structure and coarse inter-lath carbides.

  14. Quantification of the toughness distribution in a heavy section submerged arc multilayer reactor pressure vessel weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerjak, H.; Prader, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a working procedure qualification test weld representing a heavy section circumferential reactor pressure vessel (RPV) weld tested in 1968, lower toughness values were observed in the top layer region compared to those found in the filler region. Gleeble simulation, extensive microscopic evaluation, diligent Charpy V-notch testing and modelling of the bead sequence and distribution of alloying elements was applied to explain this effect. It could be revealed that the microstructure of the weld metal is the most important factor influencing the toughness. When an 'as welded' microstructure is partly or fully reaustenitised by the adjacent multilayer beads, the microstructure transforms and the toughness increases. In the filler region, 85% of the cross-section consists from transformed microstructure, whereas in the top layer only 20% are transformed. It is quite evident that, accidentally, the notch tip of Charpy samples in 1968 were placed in untransformed microstructures. When the top layer on the inner surface of the RPV is weld cladded by austenitic stainless steel, full transformation occurs and the toughness representing the filler region can be taken into account for safety evaluations. (orig.)

  15. Development of internet-based cooperative system for integrity evaluation of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Choon; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Young Hwan

    2004-01-01

    Since early 1950s fracture mechanics has brought significant impact on structural integrity assessment in a wide range of industries such as power, transportation, civil and petrochemical industries, especially in nuclear power plant industries. For the last two decades, significant efforts have been devoted in developing defect assessment procedures, from which various fitness-for-purpose or fitness-for-service codes have been developed. From another aspect, recent advances in IT (Information Technologies) bring rapid changes in various engineering fields. IT enables people to share information through network and thus provides concurrent working environment without limitations of working places. For this reason, a network system based on internet or intranet bas been appeared in various fields of business. Evaluating the integrity of structures is one of the most critical issues in nuclear industry. In order to evaluate the integrity of structures, a complicated and collaborative procedure is required including regular in-service inspection, fracture mechanics analysis, etc. And thus, experts in different fields have to cooperate to resolve the integrity problem. In this paper, an internet-based cooperative system for integrity evaluation system which adapts IT into a structural integrity evaluation procedure for reactor pressure vessel is introduced. The proposed system uses Virtual Reality (VR) technique, Virtual Network Computing (VNC) and agent programs. This system is able to support 3-dimensional virtual reality environment and to provide experts to cooperate by accessing related data through internet

  16. Decision process involved in preparing the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphie, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    The most significant part of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project was the one-piece removal and shipment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Implicit in the RPV transport was the task of qualifying the RPV as a waste package acceptable for shipment. Soon after physical decommissioning began on September 1985, questions regarding the packaging certification and transport of the RPV from Shippingport, Pennsylvania to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Waste Burial Site necessitated reexamination of several planning assumptions. A complete reassessment of the regulatory requirements governing the RPV shipment resulted in a programmatic decision to obtain a type B(U) Certificate of Compliance and abandon the originally planned US Department of Transportation (DOT) low specific activity (LSA) shipment. The decision process resulting in this conclusion was extensive and involved many organizations and agencies. Incidental to this process, several subtle certification issues were identified that required resolution. Some of these issues involved the definition of LSA material for large packages; interpretation and compliance with DOE, DOT and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations for the transport of radioactive material; incorporation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations by the Panama Canal; and DOE policy requiring advance notification to states of radioactive waste shipments. 2 figs

  17. Characterization of the weld HAZ properties of nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joo Hag; Shin, H. S.; Moon, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    This work contains an investigation on the microstructure and toughness in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a quenched and tempered SA 508 Cl. 3 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. In order to evaluate systematically the notch toughness and microstructural alterations, a unit HAZ concept was applied to the multipass weld HAZ of RPV steel. Seven typical positions were selected to evaluate the spatial distribution of notch toughness and microstructure in the unit HAZ. As a result of notch toughness evaluation, three coarse-grained regions and two fine-grained regions of SA 508 Cl. 3 RPV steel HAZ showed relatively good toughness. On the contrary, an intercritically reheated and a subcritically reheated region showed lower toughness than the base metal. The region which first and second peak temperatures are 700 deg C showed the lowest toughness among the low toughness region because of carbide coarsening. Therefore, it was proposed that the notch position in the surveillance HAZ specimen should be placed to the boundary between the HAZ and the base metal. The method, which evaluates the fracture toughness in the transition region of ferritic steel, was effectively applicable to the various HAZ regions of RPV steel. The fracture toughness test results were nearly same as the notch toughness test results. The volume fraction of tempered martensite phase was revealed as the most dominant factor that determines fracture toughness. 59 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs. (Author)

  18. Flange surface detection device for upper lid of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Teruo.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provide a device for detecting a flatness of an O-ring groove formed on a flange surface simply and at a high accuracy in a state where the upper lid of a reactor pressure vessel is removed as it is. Namely, a running truck provided with magnetic wheels is caused to run while being adsorbed along the outer circumferential surface of a downward flange surface and the lower surface of the flange in a state where the upper lid is removed. A sensor attaching stand equipped with spring-biased wheels is mounted to the running truck. The sensor attaching stand is provided with a flange surface sensor for measuring the distance to the lower surface of the flange and a groove sensor for measuring the distance to the bottom surface of an O-ring groove. Relative displacement of the groove sensor is determined by a calculator based on the measured value on the flange surface sensor. A flatness is obtained from the maximum value and the minimum value. In addition, presence of flaws on the bottom surface of the groove is detected based on the relative change of both measured values at the same time. As a result, all of the errors caused by the running are off-set thereby capable of performing a measurement at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  19. The role of point defect clusters in reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced point defect clusters (PDC) are a plausible source of matrix hardening in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels in addition to copper-rich precipitates. These PDCs can be of either interstitial or vacancy type, and could exist in either 2 or 3-D shapes, e.g. small loops, voids, or stacking fault tetrahedra. Formation and evolution of PDCs are primarily determined by displacement damage rate and irradiation temperature. There is experimental evidence that size distributions of these clusters are also influenced by impurities such as copper. A theoretical model has been developed to investigate potential role of PDCs in RPV embrittlement. The model includes a detailed description of interstitial cluster population; vacancy clusters are treated in a more approximate fashion. The model has been used to examine a broad range of irradiation and material parameters. Results indicate that magnitude of hardening increment due to these clusters can be comparable to that attributed to copper precipitates. Both interstitial and vacancy type defects contribute to this hardening, with their relative importance determined by the specific irradiation conditions

  20. Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117

  1. Structural integrity assessment of the reactor pressure vessel under the pressurized thermal shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Mingya; Lu, Feng; Wang, Rongshan; Ren, Ai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The regulation and the code are proved to be conservative in the integrity assessment. • This study is helpful to understand the complex influence of the parameters. • The most dangerous case is given for the reference transient. - Abstract: Fracture mechanics analysis of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) is the key element of the integrity evaluation of the nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). While the regulation of 10 CFR 50.61 and the ASME Code provide the guidance for the structural integrity, the guidance has been prepared under conservative assumptions. In this paper, the effects of conservative assumptions involved in the PTS analysis were investigated. The influence of different parameters, such as crack size, cladding effect and neutron fluence, were reviewed based on 3-D finite element analyses. Also, the sensitivity study of elastic–plastic approach, crack type and cladding thickness were reviewed. It was shown that crack depth, crack type, plastic effect and cladding thickness change the safety margin (SM) significantly, and the SM at the deepest point of the crack is not always smaller than that of the surface point, indicating that both the deepest and surface points of the crack front should be considered. For the reference transient, deeper cracks always give more conservative prediction. So compared to the prescribed analyses of a set of postulated defects with varying depths in the ASME code, it only needs to assess the crack with maximum depth in the code for the reference transient according to the conclusions

  2. Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    The consequences evaluation of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports of nuclear power plants offers a more direct and less controversial approach to the safety concerns addressed by Generic Safety Issue 15(GSI-15) identified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because this approach depends on more conventional methodologies widely accepted by the engineering community. The success of this evaluation may permit a satisfactory resolution to GSI-15 by demonstrating that even under the most unfavorable circumstances, i.e., complete failure of all RPV supports, there is no undue risk to public safety. This evaluation is divided into two phases. Phase 1 is a pilot study on a selected nuclear power plant. Phase 2 is a parametric study undertaken in an attempt to generalize the conclusion of the pilot study to other nuclear power plants. The Trojan nuclear power plant was selected for the pilot study because its RPV supports are located in the high radiation zone and are subject to high tensile stresses. The pilot study comprises a structural evaluation and an effect evaluation and assumes that all four RPV supports have completely lost their load carrying capability. The current paper addresses Phase 1 results and conclusions

  3. Performance of core modifications to reduce the reactor pressure vessel fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiehlmann, H.D.; Lisdat, R.; Sommer, D.

    1997-01-01

    It's often discussed that nuclear power plants (NPP) are designed for an operation of 40 years equivalent to 32 full power years (FPY) assuming a load factor of 0.8. Such fixed plant life times are subjects of US operating licenses but not, as in most other countries, in the Federal Republic of Germany. Here the operating licenses are issued for an indefinite period. However, the German utilities are continuously upgrading their plants to attain a safety level that meets all current requirements. These upgrading measures also include the replacement of bigger components like e.g. the steam generator. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV), however, has a special status. Unlike most other components of a NPP which most likely will be exchanged during its service life a replacement or annealing treatment of the RPV certainly require more efforts to be economically justified. Thus the embrittlement of the RPV has an essential impact on the life time of a NPP. The end-of-life (EOL) RPV material toughness in essential depends on the steel quality and the accumulated neutron fluence. For a given NPP the reduction of the neutron flux at the inner surface of the RPV is the only way to limit its embrittlement. The resulting modifications for the core loadings in combination with the insertion of additional core components like steel elements are described and the impact on core performance and RPV fluence considered. (UK)

  4. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel integrity insurance by crack arrestability evaluation using load from CVN tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, A.

    1997-10-15

    The present work is undertaken in the framework of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance and aims at revisiting the crack arrest approach to structural integrity insurance. This approach, performed under normal plant operation conditions, can also offer an attractive alternative to the crack initiation philosophy promoted for accidental analysis. To this end, an accidental conservative, cost effective and robust methodology is forwarded and demonstrated: it makes use of the crack arrest information contained in the instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test and/or in the shear fracture appearance of broken samples. Particular attention is paid to the appraisal of uncertainties and the related safety margin. The resulting capability is placed in perspective with the state-of-the-art crack initiation methodology based on the slow bend testing of recracked specimens, presently under standardization world-wide. The investigation leads to highlight three conceptual weaknesses of current enfgineering and regulatory practices. Improved crack arrestability evaluation emerges as an optimal approach to insure safe PWR operation up to design end-of-life and beyond.

  5. Postirradiation recovery of a reactor pressure vessel steel investigated by positron annihilation and microhardness measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareja, R.; Diego, N. De; Cruz, R.M. de la; Del Rio, J.

    1993-01-01

    Positron lifetime and microhardness measurements have been performed on untreated, thermal-aged, neutron-irradiated, and postirradiation-annealed samples of reactor pressure vessel steels with the purpose of investigating the mechanisms of irradiation-induced hardening and recovery of the mechanical properties in these materials. The positron lifetime experiments have not revealed any evidence of the formation of a significant concentration of voids or vacancy clusters in samples irradiated at ∼290 C with fluences ≤2.71 x 10 23 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV), but they suggest a dislocation annealing induced by the irradiation. Isochronal annealing experiments with neutron-irradiated samples show a simultaneous recovery in their positron lifetime and microhardness at ∼340 C. From the microhardness measurements, the yield strength of the irradiated material has been estimated. The results appear to be consistent with a model of hardening due to irradiation-induced dissolution of precipitates with formation of small metastable precipitates after postirradiation aging and recovery induced by the disappearance of these metastable precipitates

  6. A perspective on thermal annealing of reactor pressure vessel materials from the viewpoint of experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    It is believed that in the next decade or so, several nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) may exceed the reference temperature limits set by the pressurized thermal shock screening criteria. One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on RPVs is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the annealing response, or ''recovery'' of several irradiated RPV steels. The fracture toughness is one of the important properties used in the evaluation of the integrity of RPVs. Optimally, the fracture toughness is measured directly by fracture toughness specimens, such as compact tension or precracked Charpy specimens, but is often inferred from the results of Charpy V-notch impact specimens. The experimental results are compared to the predictions of models for embrittlement recovery which have been developed by Eason et al. Some of the issues in annealing that still need to be resolved are discussed

  7. Nondestructive characterization of embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels -- A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHenry, H.I.; Alers, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently initiated a study by NIST to assess the feasibility of using physical-property measurements for evaluating radiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Ultrasonic and magnetic measurements provide the most promising approaches for nondestructive characterization of RPV steels because elastic waves and magnetic fields can sense the microstructural changes that embrittle materials. The microstructural changes of particular interest are copper precipitation hardening, which is the likely cause of radiation embrittlement in RPV steels, and the loss of dislocation mobility that is an attribute of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements were made on a 1% copper steel, ASTM grade A710, in the annealed, peak-aged and overaged conditions, and on an RPV steel, ASTM grade A533B. Nonlinear ultrasonic and micromagnetic techniques were the most promising measures of precipitation hardening. Ultrasonic velocity measurements and the magnetic properties associated with hysteresis-loop measurements were not particularly sensitive to either precipitation hardening or the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements of internal friction using trapped ultrasonic resonance modes detected energy losses due to the motion of pinned dislocations; however, the ultrasonic attenuation associated with these measurements was small compared to the attenuation caused by beam spreading that would occur in conventional ultrasonic testing of RPVs

  8. Evolution of manganese–nickel–silicon-dominated phases in highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Peter B.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Miller, Brandon; Milot, Tim; Cole, James; Wu, Yuan; Odette, G. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Formation of a high density of Mn–Ni–Si nanoscale precipitates in irradiated Cu-free and Cu-bearing reactor pressure vessel steels could lead to severe unexpected embrittlement. Models long ago predicted that these precipitates, which are not treated in current embrittlement prediction models, would emerge only at high fluence. However, the mechanisms and variables that control Mn–Ni–Si precipitate formation, and their detailed characteristics, have not been well understood. High flux irradiations of six steels with systematic variations in Cu and Ni contents were carried out at ∼295 °C to high and very high neutron fluences of ∼1.3 × 10 20 and ∼1.1 × 10 21 n cm −2 . Atom probe tomography shows that significant mole fractions of Mn–Ni–Si-dominated precipitates form in the Cu-bearing steels at ∼1.3 × 10 20 n cm −2 , while they are only beginning to develop in Cu-free steels. However, large mole fractions of these precipitates, far in excess of those found in previous studies, are observed at 1.1 × 10 21 n cm −2 at all Cu contents. At the highest fluence, the precipitate mole fractions primarily depend on the alloy Ni, rather than Cu, content. The Mn–Ni–Si precipitates lead to very large increases in measured hardness, corresponding to yield strength elevations of up to almost 700 MPa

  9. FAVOR: A new fracture mechanics code for reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis which is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology endorsed by the NRC for evaluation of the integrity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) pressure vessels subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients. It is anticipated that there will be an increasing need for an improved and validated PTS PFM code which is accepted by the NRC and utilities, as more plants approach the PTS screening criteria and are required to perform plant-specific analyses. The NRC funded Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories is currently developing the FAVOR (Fracture Analysis of Vessels: Oak Ridge) PTS PFM code, which is intended to meet this need. The FAVOR code incorporates the most important features of both OCA-P and VISA-II and contains some new capabilities such as PFM global modeling methodology, the capability to approximate the effects of thermal streaming on circumferential flaws located inside a plume region created by fluid and thermal stratification, a library of stress intensity factor influence coefficients, generated by the NQA-1 certified ABAQUS computer code, for an adequate range of two and three dimensional inside surface flaws, the flexibility to generate a variety of output reports, and user friendliness

  10. Application of micromechanical models of ductile fracture initiation to reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Walle, E. van; Fabry, A.; Velde, J. van de; Meester, P. de

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the current study is the application of local micromechanical models to predict crack initiation in ductile materials. Two reactor pressure vessel materials have been selected for this study: JRQ IAEA monitor base metal (A533B Cl.1) and Doel-IV weld material. Charpy impact tests have been performed in both un-irradiated and irradiated conditions. In addition to standard tensile tests, notched tensile specimens have been tested. The upper shelf energy of the weld material remains almost un-affected by irradiation, whereas a decrease of 20% is detected for the base metal. Accordingly, the tensile properties of the weld material do not reveal a clear irradiation effect on the yield and ultimate stresses, this in contrast to the base material flow properties. The tensile tests have been analyzed in terms of micromechanical models. A good correlation is found between the standard tests and the micromechanical models, that are able to predict the ductile damage evolution in these materials. Additional information on the ductility behavior of these materials is revealed by this micromechanical analysis

  11. Ultrasonic in-service testing of pressure vessel bodies of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obraz, J.

    1978-01-01

    In-service ultrasonic testing of reactor pressure vessels is described using a system of probes for simultaneous testing of material or weld joint thicknesses. The signal is transmitted from a common output via a 30 m long cable to electronic evaluation equipment. The methods are described of ultrasonic detection of fatigue cracks. The static calculation of the dependence of echo amplitudes on crack orientation and the dynamic calculation of the crack orientation effect are described for the indirect reflection technique. In testing, angular probes with gap-type acoustic coupling operating at a frequency of 2 MHz were preferably used. For detecting planar defects of more than 10 mm in size inclined by more than +-10deg probes operating at a frequency of 1 MHz were more advantageous. The direct reflection technique is suitable for detecting defects near the surface (10 to 20 mm) and for cases when the indirect reflection technique cannot be used. For this technique a focusing probe operating at a frequency of 2 MHz is suitable. The strong dependence of the echo amplitude on the crack depth is a disadvantage of the technique. Defects near the surface, i.e., immediately under cladding are best detected by means of a double probe transmitting transversal waves at an angle of 60deg. Experimental measurements were carried out on materials with artificial defects of the type of bores with flat bottom. (J.P.)

  12. Decision process involved in preparing the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphie, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    The most significant part of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project was the one-piece removal and shipment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Implicit in the RPV transport was the task of qualifying the RPV as a waste package acceptable for shipment. Soon after physical decommissioning began on September, 1985, questions regarding the packaging certification and transport of the RPV from Shippingport, Pennsylvania to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford waste burial site necessitated reexamination of several planning assumptions. A complete reassessment of the regulatory requirements governing the RPV shipment resulting in a programmatic decision to obtain a Type B(U) Certification of Compliance and abandon the originally planned U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) low specific activity (LSA) shipment. The decision process resulting in this conclusion was extensive and involved many organizations and agencies. Incidental to this process, several subtle certification issues were identified that required resolution. Some of these issues involved the definition of LSA material for large packages; interpretation and compliance with DOE, DOT and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations for the transport of radioactive material; incorporation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations by the Panama Canal; and DOE policy requiring advance notification to states of radioactive waste shipments

  13. Stress analyses for reactor pressure vessels by the example of a product line '69 boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtchyan, Lilit; Schau, Henry [TUEV SUED Energietechnik GmbH, Mannheim (Germany). Abt. Strukturverhalten; Wolf, Werner; Holzer, Wieland [TUEV SUED Industrie Service GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Abt. Behaelter und Turbosatz; Wernicke, Robert; Trieglaff, Ralf [TUEV NORD SysTec GmbH und Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. Festigkeit und Konstruktion

    2011-08-15

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of boiling water reactors (BWR) belonging to the product line '69 have unusually designed heads. The spherical cap-shaped bottom head of the vessel is welded directly to the support flange of the lower shell course. This unusual construction has led repeatedly to controversial discussions concerning the limits and admissibility of stress intensities arising in the junction of the bottom head to the cylindrical shell. In the present paper, stress analyses for the design conditions are performed with the finite element method in order to determine and categorize the occurring stresses. The procedure of stress classification in accordance with the guidelines of German KTA 3201.2 and Section III of the ASME Code (Subsection NB) is described and subsequently demonstrated by the example of a typical BWR vessel. The accomplished investigations yield allowable stress intensities in the considered area. Additionally, limit load analyses are carried out to verify the obtained results. Complementary studies, performed for a torispherical head, prove that the determined maximum peak stresses in the junction between the bottom head and the cylindrical shell are not unusual also for pressure vessels with regular bottom head constructions. (orig.)

  14. Stress analyses for reactor pressure vessels by the example of a product line '69 boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, Lilit; Schau, Henry; Wolf, Werner; Holzer, Wieland; Wernicke, Robert; Trieglaff, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of boiling water reactors (BWR) belonging to the product line '69 have unusually designed heads. The spherical cap-shaped bottom head of the vessel is welded directly to the support flange of the lower shell course. This unusual construction has led repeatedly to controversial discussions concerning the limits and admissibility of stress intensities arising in the junction of the bottom head to the cylindrical shell. In the present paper, stress analyses for the design conditions are performed with the finite element method in order to determine and categorize the occurring stresses. The procedure of stress classification in accordance with the guidelines of German KTA 3201.2 and Section III of the ASME Code (Subsection NB) is described and subsequently demonstrated by the example of a typical BWR vessel. The accomplished investigations yield allowable stress intensities in the considered area. Additionally, limit load analyses are carried out to verify the obtained results. Complementary studies, performed for a torispherical head, prove that the determined maximum peak stresses in the junction between the bottom head and the cylindrical shell are not unusual also for pressure vessels with regular bottom head constructions. (orig.)

  15. Selected bibliography on pressure vessels for light-water-cooled power reactors (LWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1975-01-01

    Abstracts on LWR pressure vessels are arranged in the following categories: general, design, materials technology, fabrication techniques, inspection and testing, and failures. Author, keyword, and KWIC (keyword-in-content) indices are provided. (U.S.)

  16. UK regulatory aspects of prestressed concrete pressure vessels for gas-cooled reactor nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    Safety assessment principles for nuclear power plants and for nuclear chemical plants demand application of best proven techniques, recognised standards, adequacy margins, inspection and maintenance of all the components including prestressed concrete pressure vessels. In service inspection of prestressed concrete pressure vessels includes: concrete surface examination; anchorage inspection; tendon load check; tendon material examination; foundation settlement and tilt; log-term deformation; vessel temperature excursions; coolant loss; top cap deflection. Hartlepool and Heysham 1 power plants prestress shortfall problem is discussed. Main recommendations can be summarised as follows: at all pressure vessel stations prestress systems should be calibrated in a manner which results in all load bearing components being loaded in a representative manner; at all pressure vessel stations load measurements during calibration should be verified by a redundant and diverse system

  17. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR [pressurized-water-reactor] plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Proof, interpretation and evaluation of radiation-induced microstructural changes in WWER reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmert, J.; Gokhman, A.; Grosse, M.; Ulbricht, A.

    2003-06-01

    Neutron embrittlement is a special issue for the VVER-type reactors. One of the fundamentals for a reliable assessment of the current material state is knowledge of the causes and mechanisms of neutron embrittlement. The aim of the project is to understand and to quantify the microstructural appearances due to neutron radiation in VVER-type reactor pressure vessel steels. The material base is a broad variation of irradiation probes taken from the irradiation programme Rheinsberg, surveillance programmes of Russian, Ukrainian or Hungarian NPPs or irradiation experiments with mockup-alloys. The microstructure was investigated by different methods. The small angle neutron scattering (SANS) proved to be the most suitable method. A procedure was developed to determine mean diameter, size distribution and volume fraction of irradiation-induced microstructure from SANS experiments in a reliable and comparable manner. With this method microstructural parameters were systematically determined and the main factors of influence were identified. Apart from the neutron fluence the volume fraction of radiation defects mainly changes with the copper or nickel content whereas phosphorus is hardly relevant. Annealing remedies the radiation-induced microstructural appearances. The ratio between nuclear and magnetic neutron scattering provides information on the type of radiation defects. This leads to the conclusion that the material composition changes the radiation defects. The change occurs gradually rather than abruptly. The radiation defects detected by SANS correlate with the radiation hardening and embrittlement. Generally, the results suggest a bimodal mechanism due to radiation-enhanced and radiation-induced defect evolution. A kinetic model on base of the rate theory approach was established. (orig.)

  19. Models for embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1995-05-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surrounding the core of a commercial nuclear power plant is subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high energy neutrons. The effects of irradiation embrittlement can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. However, a means of quantitatively assessing the effectiveness of annealing for embrittlement recovery is needed. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data on this issue and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy due to annealing. Data were gathered from the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base and from various annealing reports. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Independent variables considered in the analysis included material chemistries, annealing time and temperature, irradiation time and temperature, fluence, and flux. To identify important variables and functional forms for predicting embrittlement recovery, advanced statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, were applied together with current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. Models were calibrated using multivariable surface-fitting techniques. Several iterations of model calibration, evaluation with respect to mechanistic and statistical considerations, and comparison with the trends in hardness data produced correlation models for estimating Charpy upper shelf energy and transition temperature after irradiation and annealing. This work provides a clear demonstration that (1) microhardness recovery is generally a very good surrogate for shift recovery, and (2) there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes

  20. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended

  1. Characteristics of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel of Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, W. S.; Han, Chang Hee; Yoon, J. H.; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2004-11-15

    Many researches and developments have been progressed for the construction of VHTR by 2020 in Korea. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been receiving attention for the application to the reactor pressure vessel material of VHTR. We collected and analyzed the research data for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in order to understand the characteristics of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. The modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a modified alloy system similar to conventional 9Cr-1Mo grade ferritic steel. Modifications include additions of vanadium, niobium, and nitrogen, as well as lower carbon content. In this report, we summarized the change of microstructure and mechanical properties after tempering, thermal aging, and irradiation. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. But the irradiation embrittlement behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel should be evaluated and the evaluation methodology also should be developed. At the same time, the characteristics of weldment which is the weak part in pressure vessel should be evaluated.

  2. Initial Probabilistic Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture with Grizzly and Raven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hoffman, William [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Sen, Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Grizzly can be used to model the thermal/mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions that would be observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in turn be used to assess whether a fracture would initiate at a pre-existing flaw. These capabilities have been demonstrated previously. A typical RPV is likely to contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. This flaw population is characterized stastistically through probability density functions of the flaw distributions. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation during a transient event. This report documents initial work to perform probabilistic analysis of RPV fracture during a PTS event using a combination of the RAVEN risk analysis code and Grizzly. This work is limited in scope, considering only a single flaw with deterministic geometry, but with uncertainty introduced in the parameters that influence fracture toughness. These results are benchmarked against equivalent models run in the FAVOR code. When fully developed, the RAVEN/Grizzly methodology for modeling probabilistic fracture in RPVs will provide a general capability that can be used to consider a wider variety of vessel and flaw conditions that are difficult to consider with current tools. In addition, this will provide access to advanced probabilistic techniques provided by RAVEN, including adaptive sampling and parallelism, which can dramatically

  3. Effect of tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.W.; Han, L.Z.; Luo, X.M.; Liu, Q.D.; Gu, J.F., E-mail: gujf@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-08-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated after tempering at different temperatures ranging from 580 to 700 °C for 5 h. With increasing tempering temperature, the impact toughness, which is qualified by Charpy V-notch total absorbed energy, initially increases from 142 to 252 J, and then decreases to 47 J, with a maximum value at 650 °C, while the ultimate tensile strength varies in exactly the opposite direction. Comparing the microstructure and fracture surfaces of different specimens, the variations in toughness and strength with the tempering temperature were generally attributed to the softening of the bainitic ferrite, the agminated Fe{sub 3}C carbides that resulted from decomposition of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents, the precipitation of Mo{sub 2}C carbides, and the newly formed M/A constituents at the grain boundaries. Finally, the correlation between the impact toughness and the volume fraction of the M/A constituents was established, and the fracture mechanisms for the different tempering conditions are explained. - Highlights: • The dependence of the deterioration of impact toughness on tempering temperature has been analysed. • The instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test has been employed to study the fracture mechanism. • The influence of M/A constituents on different fracture mechanisms based on the hinge model has been demonstrated. • A correlation between the mechanical properties and the amount of M/A constituents has been established.

  4. Inspection of dissimilar metal welds in reactor pressure vessels in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadea, J.R.; Regidor, J.J.; Pelaez, J.A.; Serrano, P. [Tecnatom, S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    MRP-139 recommendations for inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in PWR vessels were launched in the last years in the USA. Basically, it increases the frequency of the examinations in these type of welds, with major emphasis in the hot loops, adding one intermediate inspection at the ten years interval in outlet nozzles. The spanish nuclear power plants (NPP's) have begun the implementation of this type of inspections on the vessel nozzles DM welds. As this type of inspections could have an impact in the critical path duration of the outage, it is necessary the use of a mechanical equipment able to examine the nozzles DM welds in a short vessel occupation time (VOT) with high quality, qualified techniques and minimum requirements of the refuelling platform. Tecnatom undertook the design and development of a new more advanced equipment, named TENIS-DM, for implementing the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzles examination. This equipment was designed in order to accomplish the stringent requirements and the updated examination techniques; it was used for the inspection of the DM welds of Asco 1 NPP inlet and outlet nozzles in March 2011. Examination techniques and procedures were qualified through the GRUVAL validation program, based on ENIC methodology. Mechanical scanner was equipped with a large number of examination probes, and TV cameras -for visual inspection and also for monitoring the ultrasonic inspections. A remote operated submarine was also used to give support to the operational personnel during the manipulation of the equipment and its movements from one nozzle to the others. During two months before the inspection, tests of the complete inspection system were made on a nozzle mock-up installed in a 4 meters deep well at Tecnatom's facilities; this scenario was also used during the training sessions of the inspection crew. The defined technical and practical objectives were achieved: use of qualified techniques and minimal impact on the

  5. WWER reactor pressure vessel embrittlement knowledge - a way forward for consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Estorff, U.; Brumovsky, M.

    2010-01-01

    Many stakeholders, such as Institutes, R and D Organisations, Regulators, Utilities, Governmental Organisations, have recognised the need for collecting, preserving, consolidating (validating), and disseminating nuclear knowledge (documents, competences and data), in order to make it easily accessible to future generations through modern informatics tools and training and education measures. A broad spectrum of components and technologies should be considered, i.e. reactor pressure vessel (RPV), piping, internals, steam generator, etc. regarding knowledge, material data and practices. In the long run, it will also support future decommissioning exercises of nuclear installations as a valuable knowledge source. In addition to the knowledge in each Member State, the IE produced a long standing record of results from its own institutional activities and even more through the participation to a large number of European Network partnership projects. It is important, besides preservation, to consolidate the enormous amount of scientific results produced since. Therefore, the IE has developed a method for consolidation of nuclear knowledge. The method relays on the mobilisation of all identified leading experts in the EU in re-evaluating old knowledge and consolidating what is necessary to create training materials for the new generations. This method was applied for a pilot study for consolidating and preserving WWER RPV safety related knowledge, which is scattered in many countries and in different languages, facing a serious issue in terms of getting lost. This initiative could be the start of a wider Nuclear Knowledge Preservation and Consolidation activity. Experience gained and lessons learnt from the first exercise will be presented in this paper. (authors)

  6. Biaxial loading effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W. Jr.; Pennell, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The preliminary phases of a program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for assessing crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been completed by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Objectives were to investigate effect of biaxial loading on fracture toughness, quantify this effect through existing stress-based, dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations, or propose and verify alternate correlations. A cruciform beam specimen with 2-D, shallow, through-thickness flaw and a special loading fixture was designed and fabricated. Tests were performed using biaxial loading ratios of 0:1 (uniaxial), 0.6:1, and 1:1 (equi-biaxial). Critical fracture-toughness values were calculated for each test. Biaxial loading of 0.6:1 resulted in a reduction in the lower bound fracture toughness of ∼12% as compared to that from the uniaxial tests. The biaxial loading of 1:1 yielded two subsets of toughness values; one agreed well with the uniaxial data, while one was reduced by ∼43% when compared to the uniaxial data. Results were evaluated using J-Q theory and Dodds-Anderson (D-A) micromechanical scaling model. The D-A model predicted no biaxial effect, while the J-Q method gave inconclusive results. When applied to the 1:1 biaxial data, these constraint methodologies failed to predict the observed reduction in fracture toughness obtained in one experiment. A strain-based constraint methodology that considers the relationship between applied biaxial load, the plastic zone width in the crack plane, and fracture toughness was formulated and applied successfully to the data. Evaluation of this dual-parameter strain-based model led to the conclusion that it has the capability of representing fracture behavior of RPV steels in the transition region, including the effects of out-of-plane loading on fracture toughness. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 150

  7. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl.3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Hong, Jun-Hwa; Kuk, Il-Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the unirradiated and irradiated microstructure. Microvickers hardness, indentation, and miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were 2 irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7x10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg. C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Band-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural. state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation(VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by

  8. FAVOR: A new fracture mechanics code for reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology endorsed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for evaluation of the integrity of pressurized water reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients. OCA-P and VISA-II are PTS PFM computer codes that are currently referenced in Regulatory Guide 1.154 as acceptable codes for performing plant-specific analyses. These codes perform PFM analyses to estimate the increase in vessel failure probability as the vessel accumulates radiation damage over the operating life of the vessel. Experience with the application of these codes in the last few years has provided insights into areas where they could be improved. As more plants approach the PTS screening criteria and are required to perform plant-specific analyses, there will be an increasing need for an improved and validated PTS PFM code that is accepted by the NRC and utilities. The NRC funded Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently developing the FAVOR (Fracture Analysis of Vessels: Oak Ridge) code, which is expected to meet this need. The FAVOR code incorporates the most important features of both OCA-P and VISA-II and contains some new capabilities such as (1) a PFM global modeling methodology; (2) the calculation of the axial stress component associated with coolant streaming beneath an inlet nozzle; (3) a library of stress intensity factor influence coefficients, generated by the NQA-1 certified ABAQUS computer code, for an appropriate range of two and three dimensional inner-surface flaws; (4) the flexibility to generate a variety of output reports; and (5) enhanced user friendliness

  9. Application of Master Curve fracture toughness for reactor pressure vessel integrity assessment in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, William; Rosinski, Stan; Lott, Randy; Kim, Charles; Weakland, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The Master Curve fracture toughness approach has been used in the USA for better defining the transition temperature fracture toughness of irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels for end-of-life (EOL) and EOL extension (EOLE) time periods. The first application was for the Kewaunee plant in which the life-limiting material was a circumferential weld metal. Fracture toughness testing of this weld metal corresponding to EOL and beyond EOLE was used to reassess the PTS screening value, RT PTS , and to develop new operating pressure-temperature curves. The NRC has approved this application using a shift-based methodology and higher safety margins than those proposed by the utility and its contractors. Beaver Valley Unit 1, a First Energy nuclear plant, has performed similar fracture toughness testing, but none of the testing has been conducted at EOL or EOLE at this time. Therefore, extrapolation of the life-limiting plate data to higher fluences is necessary, and the projections will be checked in the next decade by Master Curve fracture toughness testing of all of the Beaver Valley Unit 1 beltline materials (three plates and three welds) at fluences near or greater than EOLE. A supplemental surveillance capsule has been installed in the sister plant, Beaver Valley Unit 2, which has the capability of achieving a higher lead factor while operating under essentially the same environment. The Beaver Valley Unit 1 evaluation has been submitted to the NRC. This paper reviews the shift-based approach taken for the Beaver Valley Unit 1 RPV and presents the use of the RT T 0 methodology (which evolved out of the Master Curve testing and endorsed through two ASME Code Cases). The applied margin accounts for uncertainties in the various material parameters. Discussion of a direct measurement of RT T 0 approach, as originally submitted for the Kewaunee case, is also presented

  10. Inspection of dissimilar metal welds in reactor pressure vessels in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadea, J.R.; Regidor, J.J.; Pelaez, J.A.; Serrano, P.

    2011-01-01

    MRP-139 recommendations for inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in PWR vessels were launched in the last years in the USA. Basically, it increases the frequency of the examinations in these type of welds, with major emphasis in the hot loops, adding one intermediate inspection at the ten years interval in outlet nozzles. The spanish nuclear power plants (NPP's) have begun the implementation of this type of inspections on the vessel nozzles DM welds. As this type of inspections could have an impact in the critical path duration of the outage, it is necessary the use of a mechanical equipment able to examine the nozzles DM welds in a short vessel occupation time (VOT) with high quality, qualified techniques and minimum requirements of the refuelling platform. Tecnatom undertook the design and development of a new more advanced equipment, named TENIS-DM, for implementing the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzles examination. This equipment was designed in order to accomplish the stringent requirements and the updated examination techniques; it was used for the inspection of the DM welds of Asco 1 NPP inlet and outlet nozzles in March 2011. Examination techniques and procedures were qualified through the GRUVAL validation program, based on ENIC methodology. Mechanical scanner was equipped with a large number of examination probes, and TV cameras -for visual inspection and also for monitoring the ultrasonic inspections. A remote operated submarine was also used to give support to the operational personnel during the manipulation of the equipment and its movements from one nozzle to the others. During two months before the inspection, tests of the complete inspection system were made on a nozzle mock-up installed in a 4 meters deep well at Tecnatom's facilities; this scenario was also used during the training sessions of the inspection crew. The defined technical and practical objectives were achieved: use of qualified techniques and minimal impact on the critical

  11. Transferability of results of PTS experiments to the integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, E.; Eisele, U.; Stumpfrock, L.

    1997-01-01

    The integrity assessment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is based on the fracture mechanics concept as provided in the code. However this concept covers only the linear-elastic fracture mechanics regime on the basis of the reference temperature RT NDT as derived from charpy impact and drop-weight test. The conservatism of this concept was demonstrated for a variety of different materials covering optimized and lower bound material states with regard to unirradiated and irradiated conditions. For the elastic-plastic regime, methodologies have been developed to describe ductile crack initiation and stable crack growth. The transferability of both, the linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics concept was investigated with the help of large scale specimens focusing on complex loading situations as they result from postulated thermal shock events for the RPV. A series of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) experiments were performed in which the applicability of the fracture mechanics parameters derived from small scale specimen testing could be demonstrated. This includes brittle (static and dynamic) crack initiation and crack arrest in the low charpy energy regime as well as stable crack initiation, stable crack growth and crack arrest in the upper shelf toughness regime. The paper provides the basic material data, the load paths, representative for large complex components as well as experimental and theoretical results of PTS experiments. From these data it can be concluded that the available fracture mechanics concepts can be used to describe the component behavior under transient loading conditions. (author). 26 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab

  12. Estimation of residual stresses in reactor pressure vessel steel specimens clad by stainless steel strip electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmoeller, H.A.; Ruge, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The equations to determine a two-dimensional state of residual stress in flat laminated plates are well known from an earlier work by one of the authors. The derivation of these equations leads to a linear, inhomogeneous system of Volterra's integral equations of the second kind. To ascertain the unknown residual stresses from these equations it is necessary to cut down the thickness of the test plate layer by layer. This results in two-dimensional deformation reactions in the rest of the test plate, which can be measured, e.g. by a strain gauge rosette applied to the opposite side of the plate. The above-mentioned stress analysis has been transferred to 86mm thick reactor pressure vessel steel specimens (Type 22NiMoCr 37, DIN-No. 1.6751, similar to ASTM A508, Class 2) double-run clad by austenitic stainless steel strip electrodes (first layer 24/13 Cr-Ni steel, second layer 21/10 Cr-Ni steel). The overall dimensions of the clad specimens investigated amounted to 200 x 200 x (86+4.5+4.5)mm. At the surface of the austenitic cladding there is a two-dimensional tensile normal stress state of about 200N/mm 2 parallel, and about 300N/mm 2 transverse, to the welding direction. The maximum tensile stress was 8mm below the interface (fusion line, material transition) in the parent material. The stress distributions of the specimens investigated, determined on the basis of the above-mentioned combined experimental mathematical procedure, are presented graphically for the as-welded (as-delivered) and annealed (600 0 C/12hr) conditions. (author)

  13. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl. 3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kuk, Il Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Ban-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by conventional TEM. (author)

  14. Transferability of results of PTS experiments to the integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E; Eisele, U; Stumpfrock, L [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    The integrity assessment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is based on the fracture mechanics concept as provided in the code. However this concept covers only the linear-elastic fracture mechanics regime on the basis of the reference temperature RT{sub NDT} as derived from charpy impact and drop-weight test. The conservatism of this concept was demonstrated for a variety of different materials covering optimized and lower bound material states with regard to unirradiated and irradiated conditions. For the elastic-plastic regime, methodologies have been developed to describe ductile crack initiation and stable crack growth. The transferability of both, the linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics concept was investigated with the help of large scale specimens focusing on complex loading situations as they result from postulated thermal shock events for the RPV. A series of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) experiments were performed in which the applicability of the fracture mechanics parameters derived from small scale specimen testing could be demonstrated. This includes brittle (static and dynamic) crack initiation and crack arrest in the low charpy energy regime as well as stable crack initiation, stable crack growth and crack arrest in the upper shelf toughness regime. The paper provides the basic material data, the load paths, representative for large complex components as well as experimental and theoretical results of PTS experiments. From these data it can be concluded that the available fracture mechanics concepts can be used to describe the component behavior under transient loading conditions. (author). 26 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab.

  15. Ultrasonic test results for the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR. Longitudinal welding line of bottom dome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Naoki; Ohwada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yasushi

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the inspection method, the measured area, etc. of the ultrasonic test of the in-service inspection (ISI) for welding lines of the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR and the inspection results of the longitudinal welding line of the bottom dome. The pre-service inspection (PSI) results for estimation of occurrence and progression of defects to compare the ISI results is described also. (author)

  16. Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Korolev, Y.N.; Nanstad, R.K.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. Even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification of available models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The Working Group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible ), and test two materials of the other. Charpy V-notch (CVN) and tensile specimens were included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing, including static fracture toughness) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPVs, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation, annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program Plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program Weld 73W. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. The ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (>1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (>l MeV). In both cases, irradiations were conducted at ∼290 C and annealing treatments were conducted at ∼454 C. The ORNL and RRC

  17. BBRV post-tensioning systems as applied to reactor containments and prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorpe, W.; Speck, F.E.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear containments and pressure vessels can be post-tensioned by using two basically different methods: tendons and winding. The fundamental differences between the two concepts are shown by introductory examples. A discussion of tendon units, usually lying in the range 4000 to 10,000 kN, is followed by a detailed presentation of the BBRV winding system. After giving a short comment to factors influencing the choice of a post-tensioning system the authors discuss specific aspects of some application groups: cable layout with containments and pressure vessels, conditions for a wrapped design, corrosion protection. (author)

  18. Process and device for measuring the level in a reactor pressure vessel of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walleser, A.

    1987-01-01

    The differential pressure is measured between the lower space filled with liquid and a comparison column which is connected to the upper part space filled with steam. From this measurement and the liquid and steam densities in the pressure vessel and in the comparison column and the effects of flow at the pressure sampling positions, the level is determined in an evaluation unit. To determine the densities of liquids and steam, the reactor pressure or the change of pressure with time for transient processes is measured. The density of the comparison column is determined by temperature measurement. The effects of flow are determined by flow measurements. All the measurements are taken to an evaluation unit. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Application of the master curve approach to fracture mechanics characterisation of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viehrig, Hans-Werner; Zurbuchen, Conrad; Kalkhof, Dietmar

    2010-06-01

    The paper presents results of a research project founded by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate concerning the application of the Master Curve approach in nuclear reactor pressure vessels integrity assessment. The main focus is put on the applicability of pre-cracked 0.4T-SE(B) specimens with short cracks, the verification of transferability of MC reference temperatures T 0 from 0.4T thick specimens to larger specimens, ascertaining the influence of the specimen type and the test temperature on T 0 , investigation of the applicability of specimens with electroerosive notches for the fracture toughness testing, and the quantification of the loading rate and specimen type on T 0 . The test material is a forged ring of steel 22 NiMoCr 3-7 of the uncommissioned German pressurized water reactor Biblis C. SE(B) specimens with different overall sizes (specimen thickness B=0.4T, 0.8T, 1.6T, 3T, fatigue pre-cracked to a/W=0.5 and 20% side-grooved) have comparable T 0 . T 0 varies within the 1σ scatter band. The testing of C(T) specimens results in higher T 0 compared to SE(B) specimens. It can be stated that except for the lowest test temperature allowed by ASTM E1921-09a, the T 0 values evaluated with specimens tested at different test temperatures are consistent. The testing in the temperature range of T 0 ± 20 K is recommended because it gave the highest accuracy. Specimens with a/W=0.3 and a/W=0.5 crack length ratios yield comparable T 0 . The T 0 of EDM notched specimens lie 41 K up to 54 K below the T 0 of fatigue pre-cracked specimens. A significant influence of the loading rate on the MC T 0 was observed. The HSK AN 425 test procedure is a suitable method to evaluate dynamic MC tests. The reference temperature T 0 is eligible to define a reference temperature RT To for the ASME-KIC reference curve as recommended in the ASME Code Case N-629. An additional margin has to be defined for the specific type of transient to be considered in the RPV integrity assessment

  20. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement management through EPRI-Developed material property databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Server, W.L.; Griesbach, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    Uncertainties and variability in U.S. reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material properties have caused the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to request information from all nuclear utilities in order to assess the impact of these data scatter and uncertainties on compliance with existing regulatory criteria. Resolving the vessel material uncertainty issues requires compiling all available data into a single integrated database to develop a better understanding of irradiated material property behavior. EPRI has developed two comprehensive databases for utility implementation to compile and evaluate available material property and surveillance data. RPVDATA is a comprehensive reactor vessel materials database and data management program that combines data from many different sources into one common database. Searches of the data can be easily performed to identify plants with similar materials, sort through measured test results, compare the ''best-estimates'' for reported chemistries with licensing basis values, quantify variability in measured weld qualification and test data, identify relevant surveillance results for characterizing embrittlement trends, and resolve uncertainties in vessel material properties. PREP4 has been developed to assist utilities in evaluating existing unirradiated and irradiated data for plant surveillance materials; PREP4 evaluations can be used to assess the accuracy of new trend curve predictions. In addition, searches of the data can be easily performed to identify available Charpy shift and upper shelf data, review surveillance material chemistry and fabrication information, review general capsule irradiation information, and identify applicable source reference information. In support of utility evaluations to consider thermal annealing as a viable embrittlement management option, EPRI is also developing a database to evaluate material response to thermal annealing. Efforts are underway to develop an irradiation

  1. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  2. Study of cladding toughness in a pressure vessel steel water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulat, P.; Al Mundheri, M.

    1984-12-01

    Toughness of cladding and pressure vessel steel were determined at different temperatures in order to appreciate the participation of cladding resistance against crack propagation. The toughness of cladding is comparable with typical results on austenitic welds. The test on covered CT specimens shows the possibility of having a relatively good prevision of the behaviour of a coated structure

  3. An international survey of in-service inspection experience with prestressed concrete pressure vessels and containments for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    An international survey is presented of experience obtained from the in-service surveillance of prestressed concrete pressure vessels and containments for nuclear reactors. Some information on other prestressed concrete structures is also given. Experience has been gained during the working life of such structures in Western Europe and the USA over the years since 1967. For each country a summary is given of the nuclear programme, national standards and Codes of Practice, and the detailed in-service inspection programme. Reports are then given of the actual experience obtained from the inspection programme and the methods of measurement, examination and reporting employed in each country. A comprehensive bibliography of over 100 references is included. The appendices contain information on nuclear power stations which are operating, under construction or planned worldwide and which employ either prestressed concrete pressure vessels or containments. (U.K.)

  4. On the transition of short cracks into long fatigue cracks in reactor pressure vessel steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rajwinder

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Short fatigue cracks, having dimension less than 1 mm, propagate at much faster rates (da/dN even at lower stress intensity factor range (da/dN as compared to the threshold stress intensity factor range obtained from long fatigue crack growth studies. These short cracks originate at the sub-grain level and some of them ultimately transit into critical long cracks over time. Therefore, designing the components subjected to fatigue loading merely on the long crack growth data and neglecting the short crack growth behavior can overestimate the component’s life. This aspect of short fatigue cracks become even more critical for materials used for safety critical applications such as reactor pressure vessel (RPV steel in nuclear plants. In this work, the transition behaviour of short fatigue crack gowth into long fatigue crack is studied in SA508 Grade 3 Class I low alloy steel used in RPVs. In-situ characterization of initiation, propagation and transition of short fatigue cracks is performed using fatigue stage for Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM in addition to digital microscopes fitted over a servo-hydraulic fatigue machine and correlated with the microtructural information obtained using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD. SA508 steel having an upper bainitic microstructure have several microstructural interfaces such as phase and grain boundaries that play a significant role in controlling the short fatigue crack propagation. Specially designed and prepared short fatigue specimens (eletro-polished with varying initial crack lengths of the order of tens of microns are used in this study. The transition of such short initial cracks into long cracks is then tracked to give detailed insight into the role of each phase and phase/grain boundary with an objective of establishing Kitagawa-Takahashi diagram for the given RPV steel. The behavior of the transited long cracks is then compared with the crack propagation behavior obtained using

  5. Development of a supplemental surveillance program for reactor pressure vessel thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1997-01-01

    The technical decision to thermally anneal a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) depends upon the level of embrittlement in the RPV steels, the amount of recovery of fracture toughness properties expected from the anneal, and the rate of re-embrittlement after the vessel is placed back into service. The recovery of Charpy impact toughness properties after annealing can be estimated initially by using a recovery model developed using experimental measurements of recovery (such as that developed by Eason et al. for U.S. vessel materials). However, actual validation measurements on plant-specific archived vessel materials (hopefully in the existing surveillance program) are needed; otherwise, irradiated surrogate materials, essentially the same as the RPV steels or bounding in expected behavior, must be utilized. The efficient use of any of these materials requires a supplemental surveillance program focused at both recovery and reirradiation embrittlement. Reconstituted Charpy specimens and new surveillance capsules will most likely be needed as part of this supplemental surveillance program. A new version of ASTM E 509 has recently been approved which provides guidance on thermal annealing in general and specifically for the development of an annealing supplemental surveillance program. The post-anneal re-embrittlement properties are crucial for continued plant operation, and the use of a re-embrittlement model, such as the lateral shift approach, may be overly conservative. This paper illustrates the new ASTM E 509 Standard Guide methodology for an annealing supplemental surveillance program. As an example, the proposed program for the Palisades RPV beltline steels is presented which covers the time from annealing to the end of operating license and beyond, if license renewal is pursued. The Palisades nuclear power plant RPV was planned to be annealed in 1998, but that plant is currently being re-evaluated. The proposed anneal was planned to be conducted at a

  6. Long-term irradiation effects on reactor-pressure vessel steels. Investigations on the nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Arne

    2017-06-01

    The exposure of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels to neutron irradiation gives rise to irradiation-enhanced diffusion, a rearrangement of solute atoms and, consequently, a degradation of the mechanical properties. The increasing age of existing nuclear power plants raises new questions specific to long-term operation. Two of them are addressed in this thesis: flux effects and the late-blooming effect. Can low-flux irradiations up to a given fluence be reproduced by more rapid high-flux irradiations up to the same fluence? Can the irradiation response of RPV steels be extrapolated to higher fluences or are there unexpected ''late-blooming'' effects. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom-probe tomography (APT) and Vickers-hardness testing were applied. A novel Monte-Carlo based fitting algorithm for SANS data was implemented in order to derive statistically reliable characteristics of irradiation-induced solute-atom clusters. APT was applied in selected cases to gain additional information on the composition and the shape of clusters. Vickers hardness testing was performed on the SANS samples to link the nanometer-scale changes to irradiation hardening. The investigations on flux effects show that clusters forming upon high-flux irradiation are smaller and tend to have a higher number density compared to low-flux irradiations at a given neutron fluence. The measured flux dependence of the cluster-size distribution is consistent with the framework of deterministic growth (but not with coarsening) in combination with radiation-enhanced diffusion. Since the two effects on cluster-size and volume fraction partly cancel each other out, no significant effect on the hardening is observed. The investigations of a possible late-blooming effect indicate that the very existence (yes or no) of such an effect depends on the irradiation conditions. Irradiations at lower fluxes and a lower temperature (255 C) give rise to a significant increase of the

  7. The probabilistic structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya, E-mail: chenmingya@cgnpc.com.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Lu, Feng; Wang, Rongshan; Yu, Weiwei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Donghui [State Nuclear Power Plant Service Company, 200237 Shanghai (China); Zhang, Guodong; Xue, Fei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The methodology and the case study of the FAVOR software were shown. • The over-conservative parameters in the DFM were shown. • The differences between the PFM and the DFM were discussed. • The limits in the current FAVOR were studied. - Abstract: The pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event poses a potentially significant challenge to the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during the long time operation (LTO). In the USA, the “screening criteria” for maximum allowable embrittlement of RPV material, which forms part of the USA regulations, is based on the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM). The FAVOR software developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is used to establish the regulation. As the technical basis of FAVOR is not the most widely-used and codified methodologies, such as the ASME and RCC-M codes, in most countries (with exception of the USA), proving RPV integrity under the PTS load is still based on the deterministic fracture mechanics (DFM). As the maximum nil-ductility-transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}) of the beltline material for the 54 French RPVs after 40 years operation is higher than the critical values in the IAEA-TECDOC-1627 and European NEA/CSNI/R(99)3 reports (while still obviously lower than the “screening criteria” of the USA), it may conclude that the RPV will not be able to run in the LTO based on the DFM. In the FAVOR, the newest developments of fracture mechanics are applied, such as the warm pre-stress (WPS) effect, more accurate estimation of the flaw information and less conservation of the toughness (such as the three-parameter Weibull distribution of the fracture toughness). In this paper, the FAVOR software is first applied to show both the methodology and the results of the PFM, and then the limits in the current FAVOR software (Version 6.1, which represents the baseline for re-assessing the regulation of 10 CFR 50.61), lack of the impact of the constraint effect

  8. Investigation into a major crack that occurred during fabrication of a thick walled alloy pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, Roger R.

    2002-01-01

    A high pressure thick walled (171 mm+cladding) reactor was under construction when a crack, with a total length of about 2.5 m, occurred at a nozzle. An investigation was conducted to determine how manufacture could safely proceed. This revealed that the primary cause of cracking was the method by which preheat had been applied to the vessel for the welding operation, coupled with the very low impact values achieved by the weld metal in the as-welded condition. Investigation also centred on the use of dehydrogenation heat treatment (DHT) instead of an intermediate stress relief (ISR), and the oxidised nature of the fracture surface. The oxidation could not be satisfactorily explained, and as a result neither the time the fracture occurred nor the significance of applying DHT in place of ISR could be absolutely determined. Nevertheless it was concluded that fracture probably occurred before DHT was applied. It was recommended that the method of preheat be revised and ISR applied without cooling below minimum preheat temperature. Further review of the incident resulted in additional recommendations for prevention of a recurrence in future work. One critical aspect was the lack of response to the poor as-welded toughness properties of the weld deposit

  9. Investigation into a major crack that occurred during fabrication of a thick walled alloy pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Roger R

    2002-08-01

    A high pressure thick walled (171 mm+cladding) reactor was under construction when a crack, with a total length of about 2.5 m, occurred at a nozzle. An investigation was conducted to determine how manufacture could safely proceed. This revealed that the primary cause of cracking was the method by which preheat had been applied to the vessel for the welding operation, coupled with the very low impact values achieved by the weld metal in the as-welded condition. Investigation also centred on the use of dehydrogenation heat treatment (DHT) instead of an intermediate stress relief (ISR), and the oxidised nature of the fracture surface. The oxidation could not be satisfactorily explained, and as a result neither the time the fracture occurred nor the significance of applying DHT in place of ISR could be absolutely determined. Nevertheless it was concluded that fracture probably occurred before DHT was applied. It was recommended that the method of preheat be revised and ISR applied without cooling below minimum preheat temperature. Further review of the incident resulted in additional recommendations for prevention of a recurrence in future work. One critical aspect was the lack of response to the poor as-welded toughness properties of the weld deposit.

  10. The effect of a self-balancing through wall residual stress distribution on the extension of a through-wall crack in a pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1993-01-01

    Leak-before-break arguments for pressurized components involve a comparison of the critical size of crack that will grow unstably under accident loadings and the critical leakage crack size for normal operation loadings. The paper is concerned with the former crack size and particularly with regard to the effect of residual stresses on the critical unstable crack size. Results from an analysis of a simple simulation model are used to provide underpinning for the view, expressed by Green and Knowles at the 1992 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Pressure Vessel and Piping Conference, that self-balancing through-wall residual stresses have little overall effect on the extension of a through-wall crack in a pressure vessel

  11. Modelling the chemical behaviour of tellurium species in the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor cooling system under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Gonzalez, C.

    1991-07-01

    This state of the art report contains information on the behaviour of tellurium and its compounds in the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor coolant system under light water reactor severe accident conditions. To characterise tellurium behaviour, it is necessary the previous knowledge of the species of tellurium released from the core, and simultaneity of its release with that of other materials which can alter the transport, for instance, control rod and structural materials. Release and transport experiments have been reviewed along with the models implemented in the codes which are used in the international community: TRAPMELT, RAFT, VICTORIA and SOPHIE. From the experiments, it can be concluded that other species different to Te 2 , such as tin telluride and cesium telluride, may be released from the fuel. That is why they must be considered in the transport phenomena. There is also experimental evidence of the strong interaction of Te 2 with Inconel 600 and stainless steel of the pipe walls and structures, however this strong interaction is in competition with the interaction of tellurium with aerosols, which under severe accident conditions may represent an area greater than that of the primary system. It is for the absence of significant tellurium species in the transport models, and also for the interaction of tellurium with aerosols, for which some codes show the greatest deficiencies

  12. Advance of investigation of irradiation embrittlement mechanism of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels. History and future of irradiation embrittlement researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is the most important component of LWR plants required to be safe. This paper describes contents of the title consisting of four chapters. The first chapter states the general theory of irradiation effects, irradiation embrittlement and decreasing of toughness, and some kinds of pressure vessel steels. The second chapter explains history of irradiation embrittlement investigations and the advance of research methods for experiments and calculation. The third chapter contains information of inner structure of irradiated materials and development of prediction equations, recent information of embrittlement mechanism and mechanism guided prediction method, USA model and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) model. The fourth chapter states recent problems from viewpoints of experimental and analytical approaches. Comparison of standards of LWR pressure vessel steels between Japan and USA, relation between the density of number of cluster and the copper content, effect of flux on clustering of copper atoms, and CRIEPI's way of approaching the prediction method are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  13. Investigation of the templets cut out of the Kozloduy Unit 2 reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klausnitzer, E; Leitz, C; Rieg, C Y [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Kryukov, A [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Instrumented impact tests were carried out on sub-size specimens of base and weld metal. Using correlation dependencies, values of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature were determined before and after annealing for base and weld metal corresponding to standard specimen tests. The experimental results were compared to a prediction of the extent of radiation-induced embrittlement of Kozloduy Unit 2 pressure vessel materials. It was confirmed that radiation-induced embrittlement of the base metal does not impose any limitation on the radiation-limited lifetime of the pressure vessel. The predicted increase of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of weld metal as a result of irradiation (about 165 C) is practically equal to the experimental result (162 C). The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the weld metal was recovered by no less than 85 %.

  14. Use of automation and mechanization elements in welding and surfacing nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartak, J.; Elckner, J.

    1986-01-01

    The problems are discussed of automation and mechanization of individual operations in the production cycle of pressure vessels whose manufacture cannot for its great exactingness be automated as a whole. Examples are given of workplaces and single-purpose welding facilities with a high level of automation. The present state of the development and implementation of automation of arc welding is described and further development is indicated of the automation of welding processes in the manufacture of nuclear facilities. (J.C.)

  15. Experience of in-service surveillance and monitoring of prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irving, J.; Smith, J.R.; Eadie, D.McD.; Hornby, I.W.

    1976-01-01

    Details are given of the statutory requirements for the inspection of prestressed concrete pressure vessels in the United Kingdom, with particular emphasis on the prestressing system. The results of periodic examinations under the Licencing Conditions of the Oldbury and Wylfa vessels are presented and discussed in relation to design expectations and future requirements. Strain, moisture and temperature records obtained from the Oldbury PCPV's over a 10 year period are compared with prediction and new developments in vessel instrumentation are discussed. (author)

  16. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  17. Fracture assessment of the Oskarshamn 1 reactor pressure vessel under cold over-pressurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, I. [DNV Technical Consulting AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    The major motivation of this study was to develop a methodology for fracture assessment of surface defects in the 01 reactor pressure vessel under cold loading scenarios, particularly the cold over-pressurization event. According to a previous study, the FENIX project, the cold over-pressurization of the O1 reactor is a limiting loading case, as the ductile/brittle transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}) of certain welds in the O1 beltline region may be over 100 deg C at the-end-of-life condition. The FENIX project gave values of the acceptable and critical crack depth to be equal to the thickness of the cladding layer (about 6 mm) under this load case using the ASME K{sub Ic} reference curve methodology. This study is aimed to develop a methodology to give a more precise fracture assessment of the O1 reactor under cold loading scenarios. Some of the main objectives of this study have been as below: To prepare a material which can simulate the mechanical properties and RT{sub NDT} of the O1 reactor at the end-of-life conditions. To conduct a fracture mechanics test program to cover the essential influencing factors, such as crack geometry (shallow and deep cracks) and loading condition (uniaxial and biaxial) on the cleavage fracture toughness. To perform fracture mechanics analyses to identify a suitable methodology for assessment of the experimental results. To study the responses of engineering fracture assessment methods to the experimental results from the clad specimens. To propose a fracture assessment procedure for determination of the acceptable and critical flaw sizes in the 01 reactor under the cold loading events. A test program consisted of experiments on standard SEN(B) specimens and clad beams, containing surface cracks was conducted during the course of this project. A total of nine clad beams and clad cruciform specimens were tested under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The test material is reactor steel of type A 508 Grade B, which is specially heat

  18. Fracture assessment of the Oskarshamn 1 reactor pressure vessel under cold over-pressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari-Far, I.

    2001-03-01

    The major motivation of this study was to develop a methodology for fracture assessment of surface defects in the 01 reactor pressure vessel under cold loading scenarios, particularly the cold over-pressurization event. According to a previous study, the FENIX project, the cold over-pressurization of the O1 reactor is a limiting loading case, as the ductile/brittle transition temperature (RT NDT ) of certain welds in the O1 beltline region may be over 100 deg C at the-end-of-life condition. The FENIX project gave values of the acceptable and critical crack depth to be equal to the thickness of the cladding layer (about 6 mm) under this load case using the ASME K Ic reference curve methodology. This study is aimed to develop a methodology to give a more precise fracture assessment of the O1 reactor under cold loading scenarios. Some of the main objectives of this study have been as below: To prepare a material which can simulate the mechanical properties and RT NDT of the O1 reactor at the end-of-life conditions. To conduct a fracture mechanics test program to cover the essential influencing factors, such as crack geometry (shallow and deep cracks) and loading condition (uniaxial and biaxial) on the cleavage fracture toughness. To perform fracture mechanics analyses to identify a suitable methodology for assessment of the experimental results. To study the responses of engineering fracture assessment methods to the experimental results from the clad specimens. To propose a fracture assessment procedure for determination of the acceptable and critical flaw sizes in the 01 reactor under the cold loading events. A test program consisted of experiments on standard SEN(B) specimens and clad beams, containing surface cracks was conducted during the course of this project. A total of nine clad beams and clad cruciform specimens were tested under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The test material is reactor steel of type A 508 Grade B, which is specially heat-treated to

  19. Development of neutron irradiation embrittlement correlation of reactor pressure vessel materials of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, Naoki; Dohi, Kenji; Nomoto, Akiyoshi; Nishida, Kenji; Ishino, Shiori

    2007-01-01

    A large amount of surveillance data of the RPV embrittlement of the Japanese light water reactors have been compiled since the current Japanese embrittlement correlation has been issued in 1991. Understanding on the mechanisms of the embrittlement has also been greatly improved based on both experimental and theoretical studies. CRIEPI and the Japanese electric power utilities have started research project to develop a new embrittlement correlation method, where extensive study of the microstructural analyses of the surveillance specimens irradiated in the Japanese commercial reactors has been conducted. The new findings obtained from the experimental study are that the formation of solute-atom clusters with little or no copper is responsible for the embrittlement in low-copper materials, and that the flux effect exists especially in high-copper materials and this is supported by the difference in the microstructure of the high-copper materials irradiated at different fluxes. Based on these new findings, a new embrittlement correlation method is formulated using rate equations. The new methods has higher prediction capability than the current Japanese embrittlement correlation in terms of smaller standard deviation as well as smaller mean value of the prediction error. (author)

  20. Steady-state CFD simulations of an EPR™ reactor pressure vessel: A validation study based on the JULIETTE experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puragliesi, R.; Zhou, L.; Zerkak, O.; Pautz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CFD validation of k–ε (RANS model of EPR RPV. • Flat inlet velocity profile is not sufficient to correctly predict the pressure drops. • Swirl is responsible for asymmetric loads at the core barrel. • Parametric study to the turbulent Schmidt number for better predictions of passive-scalar transport. • The optimal turbulent Schmidt number was found to be one order of magnitude smaller than the standard value. - Abstract: Validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models against experimental measurements is a fundamental step towards a broader acceptance of CFD as a tool for reactor safety analysis when best-estimate one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic codes present strong modelling limitations. In the present paper numerical results of steady-state RANS analyses are compared to pressure, volumetric flow rate and concentration distribution measurements in different locations of an Areva EPR™ reactor pressure vessel (RPV) mock-up named JULIETTE. Several flow configurations are considered: Three different total volumetric flow rates, cold leg velocity field with or without swirl, three or four reactor coolant pumps functioning. Investigations on the influence of two types of inlet boundary profiles (i.e. flat or 1/7th power-law) and the turbulent Schmidt number have shown that the first affects sensibly the pressure loads at the core barrel whereas the latter parameter strongly affects the transport and the mixing of the tracer (passive scalar) and consequently its distribution at the core inlet. Furthermore, the introduction of an integral parameter as the swirl number has helped to decrease the large epistemic uncertainty associated with the swirling device. The swirl is found to be the cause of asymmetric loads on the walls of the core barrel and also asymmetries are enhanced for the tracer concentration distribution at the core inlet. The k–ϵ CFD model developed with the commercial code STAR-CCM+ proves to be able to predict

  1. Steady-state CFD simulations of an EPR™ reactor pressure vessel: A validation study based on the JULIETTE experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puragliesi, R., E-mail: riccardo.puragliesi@psi.ch [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Zhou, L. [Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory, NPIC, Chengdu (China); Zerkak, O.; Pautz, A. [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • CFD validation of k–ε (RANS model of EPR RPV. • Flat inlet velocity profile is not sufficient to correctly predict the pressure drops. • Swirl is responsible for asymmetric loads at the core barrel. • Parametric study to the turbulent Schmidt number for better predictions of passive-scalar transport. • The optimal turbulent Schmidt number was found to be one order of magnitude smaller than the standard value. - Abstract: Validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models against experimental measurements is a fundamental step towards a broader acceptance of CFD as a tool for reactor safety analysis when best-estimate one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic codes present strong modelling limitations. In the present paper numerical results of steady-state RANS analyses are compared to pressure, volumetric flow rate and concentration distribution measurements in different locations of an Areva EPR™ reactor pressure vessel (RPV) mock-up named JULIETTE. Several flow configurations are considered: Three different total volumetric flow rates, cold leg velocity field with or without swirl, three or four reactor coolant pumps functioning. Investigations on the influence of two types of inlet boundary profiles (i.e. flat or 1/7th power-law) and the turbulent Schmidt number have shown that the first affects sensibly the pressure loads at the core barrel whereas the latter parameter strongly affects the transport and the mixing of the tracer (passive scalar) and consequently its distribution at the core inlet. Furthermore, the introduction of an integral parameter as the swirl number has helped to decrease the large epistemic uncertainty associated with the swirling device. The swirl is found to be the cause of asymmetric loads on the walls of the core barrel and also asymmetries are enhanced for the tracer concentration distribution at the core inlet. The k–ϵ CFD model developed with the commercial code STAR-CCM+ proves to be able to predict

  2. RPV-1: a first virtual reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, St.

    2005-01-01

    The presented work was aimed at building a first VTR (virtual test reactor) to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels of nuclear reactor. It mainly consisted in: - modeling the formation of the irradiation induced damage in such steels, as well as their plasticity behavior - selecting codes and models to carry out the simulations of the involved mechanisms. Since the main focus was to build a first tool (rather than a perfect tool), it was decided to use, as much as possible, existing codes and models in spite of their imperfections. - developing and parameterizing two missing codes: INCAS and DUPAIR. - proposing an architecture to link the selected codes and models. - constructing and validating the tool. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or transmit data. A user friendly Python interface facilitates the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 relies on many simplifications and approximations and has to be considered as a prototype aimed at clearing the way. According to the functionalities targeted for RPV-1, the main weakness is a bad Ni and Mn sensitivity. However, the tool can already be used for many applications (understanding of experimental results, assessment of effects of material and irradiation conditions,....). (O.M.)

  3. Investigation of the delay in pressure vessel embrittlement specimen analysis for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothrock, J.D.; Hoffman, E.E.; Manthey, G.C.; Sheffey, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of the investigative data pertaining to this incident reveals the following conditions as key findings and probable causes: (1) The contractor failed to properly implement the surveillance program for monitoring reactor pressure vessel embrittlement. (2) Contractor and DOE organizations provided less than adequate oversight and independent overview, especially by not requiring operating organizations to provide documented evidence to substantiate claims that there was ''no problem'' with respect to embrittlement. (3) Although the temperature limitation for reactor pressurization identified in the Technical Specifications was never violated, the basis of this safety limitation was violated. (4) The basis for concluding that there would be no embrittlement of the pressure vessel steel over the expected life of the reactor is questionable. (5) The contractor and DOE failed to make the surveillance program visible by incorporating it in the Technical Specifications. (6) The Accident Analysis/Final Safety Analysis Report was never adequately reviewed and updated subsequent to its initial issuance. (7) Surveillance specimen analysis was incomplete and never transmitted to reactor operating personnel in a usable format prior to November 1986. (8) There was extensive delays (many years) in the testing, analysis, and reporting of surveillance program results

  4. Analysis of the integrity of the pressure vessel of the BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Luna, O.

    1982-01-01

    The presssure vessel of a BWR type reactor was monitored for cracking during alternating events of its in-service life. The monitoring was to determine criticality of fractures catastrophic fractures and the velocity of fracture propagation. Detected cracks were evaluated as specified in ASME code section XI, of a minimum wall thickness of 2.5% crack growths were compared a) of 1/10 of the critical maximum size and b) at in-service inspection intervals according to ASME recommendations to be established at the Laguna Verde nuclear plant. Finally conclusions are made and discussed. (author)

  5. Detailed modeling of KALININ-3 NPP VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel by the coupled system code ATHLET/BIPR-VVER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, S.P.; Velkov, K.; Pautz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the recent developments of a new reactor pressure vessel (RPV) model of VVER-1000 for the coupled system code ATHLET/BIPR-VVER. Based on the previous experience a methodology is worked out for modeling the RPV in a pseudo-3D way with the help of a multiple parallel thermal-hydraulic channel scheme that follows the hexagonal fuel assembly structure from the bottom to the top of the reactor. The results of the first application of the new modeling are discussed on the base of the OECD/NEA coupled code benchmark for Kalinin-3 NPP transient. Coolant mass flow distributions in reactor volume of VVER 1000 reactor are presented and discussed. It is shown that along the core height a mass flow re-distribution of the coolant takes place starting approximately at an axial layer located 1 meter below the core outlet. (author)

  6. Development of an integrity evaluation system on the basis of cooperative virtual reality environment for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.C.; Choi, J.B.; Kim, Y.J.; Choi, Y.H.; Park, Y.W.; Yoshimura, S.

    2004-01-01

    Since early 1950's, the fracture mechanics has brought significant impact on structural integrity assessment in a wide range of industries such as power, transportation, civil and petrochemical industries, especially in nuclear power plant industries. For the last two decades, significant efforts have been devoted in developing defect assessment procedures, and as a result, various fitness-for-purpose or fitness-for-service codes have been developed. From another aspect, recent advances in IT (information technologies) bring rapid changes in various engineering fields. IT enables people to share information through network and thus provides concurrent working environment without limitations of locations. For this reason, a network system based on internet or intranet bas been appeared in various fields of business. Evaluating the integrity of critical components is one of the most critical issues in the nuclear industry. In order to evaluate the integrity of structures, a complicated and collaborative procedure is required including periodical in-service inspection, fracture mechanics analysis, etc. And thus, experts in different fields have to cooperate to resolve the integrity problem. In this paper, an integrity evaluation system on the basis of cooperative virtual reality environment for reactor pressure vessel which adopts IT into a structural integrity evaluation procedure for reactor pressure vessel is introduced. The proposed system uses virtual reality (VR) technique, virtual network computing (VNC) and knowledge based programs. This system is able to support 3-dimensional virtual reality environment and provide experts to co-operate each other by accessing related data through internet. The proposed system is expected to provide a more efficient integrity evaluation for reactor pressure vessel. (orig.)

  7. Applicability of the fracture toughness master curve to irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.; Alexander, D.J.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    The current methodology for determination of fracture toughness of irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is based on the upward temperature shift of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) K Ic curve from either measurement of Charpy impact surveillance specimens or predictive calculations based on a database of Charpy impact tests from RPV surveillance programs. Currently, the provisions for determination of the upward temperature shift of the curve due to irradiation are based on the Charpy V-notch (CVN) 41-J shift, and the shape of the fracture toughness curve is assumed to not change as a consequence or irradiation. The ASME curve is a function of test temperature (T) normalized to a reference nit-ductility temperature, RT NDT , namely, T-RT NDT . That curve was constructed as the lower boundary to the available K Ic database and, therefore, does not consider probability matters. Moreover, to achieve valid fracture toughness data in the temperature range where the rate of fracture toughness increase with temperature is rapidly increasing, very large test specimens were needed to maintain plain-strain, linear-elastic conditions. Such large specimens are impractical for fracture toughness testing of each RPV steel, but the evolution of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics has led to the use of relatively small test specimens to achieve acceptable cleavage fracture toughness measurements, K Jc , in the transition temperature range. Accompanying this evolution is the employment of the Weibull distribution function to model the scatter of fracture toughness values in the transition range. Thus, a probabilistic-based bound for a given data population can be made. Further, it has been demonstrated by Wallin that the probabilistic-based estimates of median fracture toughness of ferritic steels tend to form transition curves of the same shape, the so-called ''master curve'', normalized to one common specimen size, namely the 1T [i.e., 1.0-in

  8. Water level measurement system in reactor pressure vessel of BWR and hydrogen concentration monitoring system for severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Hidehiko; Okazaki, Koki; Shiraishi, Fujio; Kenjyo, Hiroaki; Isoda, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident caused severe accident to lose functions of many instrumentation systems. As a result, many important plant parameters couldn't be monitored. In order to monitor plant parameters in the case of severe accident, new instrumentation systems available in the severe conditions are being developed. Water level in reactor pressure vessel and hydrogen concentration in primary containment vessel are one of the most important parameters. Performance test results about water level measurement sensor and hydrogen sensor in severe environmental conditions are described. (author)

  9. Analysis of the effect of implemented low temperature overpressure regimes on the reactor pressure vessel resistance to damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistora, V.

    1995-12-01

    The temperature and stress fields of the Dukovany WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) were calculated based on a two-dimensional model using the finite element method. Two pressurized thermal shock events occurred at Dukovany in 1992: the temperature in 3 loops dropped rapidly while the primary circuit was fully pressurized. The calculation revealed that the first event was intolerable with respect to the RPV resistance to brittle fracture; had the two events occurred towards the end of the RPV lifetime, both would have been intolerable. (M.D.). 6 tabs., 15 figs., 6 refs

  10. Hot cell examination on the surveillance capsule of SA 533 cl. 1 reactor pressure vessel (1st test report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Jung, Y. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Baik, S. J.; Oh, W. H.; Soong, W. S.; Hong, K. P

    2000-08-01

    The post-irradiated examinations such as impact test, tensile test, composition analysis and etc. were conducted to monitor and to evaluate the radiation-induced changes, so called radiation embrittlement, in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials. Those data should be applied to confirm safety as well as reliability of reactor pressure vessel. The scopes and contents of hot cell examination on the surveillance capsule are as follows; - Capsule transportation, cutting, dismantling and classification - Shim block and Dosimeter cutting and dismantling - Impact test - Tensile test - Composition analysis by EPMA - SEM observation on the fractured surface - Hardness test - Radwaste treatment.

  11. Evaluation of J-groove weld residual stress and crack growth rate of PWSCC in reactor pressure vessel closure head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Hyuk; Ryu, Tae Young; Park, Seung Hyun; Won, Min Gu; Kang, Seok Jun; Kim, Moon Ki; Choi, Jae Boong [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sung Ho [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Over the last decade, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been frequently found in pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Especially, PWSCC has occurred in long-term operated PWRs. As this phenomenon leads to serious accidents, we must be beforehand with the anticipated problems. A typical PWR consists of J-groove welded components such as reactor pressure vessel closure head and nozzles. Reactor pressure vessel closure head is made of SA508 and it is covered by cladding. Alloy 600 is used for nozzles. And J-groove weld is conducted with alloy 82/182. Different material properties of these metals lead to residual stress and PWSCC consequentially. In this study, J-groove weld residual stress was investigated by a three-dimensional finite element analysis with an actual asymmetric J-groove weld model and process of construction. Also crack growth rate of PWSCC was evaluated from cracks applied on the penetration nozzles. Based on these two values, one cannot only improve the structural integrity of PWR, but also explain PWSCC behavior such that high residual stress at the J-groove weld area causes crack initiation and propagation through the surface of nozzles. In addition, crack behavior was predicted at the various points around the nozzle.

  12. Disclosure of the oscillations in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessel steel damage at fast neutron intensity decreasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2017-01-01

    Fast neutron intensity influence on reactor materials radiation damage is a critically important question in the problem of the correct use of the accelerated irradiation tests data for substantiation of the materials workability in real irradiation conditions that is low neutron intensity. Investigations of the fast neutron intensity (flux) influence on radiation damage and experimental data scattering reveal the existence of non-monotonous sections in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) steel damage. Discovery of the oscillations as indicator of the self-organization processes presence give reasons for new ways searching on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel radiation stability increasing and attempt of the self-restoring metal elaboration. Revealing of the wavelike process in the form of non monotonous parts of the kinetics of radiation embrittlement testifies that periodic transformation of the structure take place. This fact actualizes the problem of more precise definition of the RPV materials radiation embrittlement mechanisms and gives reasons for search of the ways to manage the radiation stability (nanostructuring and so on to stimulate the radiation defects annihilation), development of the means for creating of more stableness self recovering smart materials.

  13. Evaluation of J-groove weld residual stress and crack growth rate of PWSCC in reactor pressure vessel closure head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seung Hyuk; Ryu, Tae Young; Park, Seung Hyun; Won, Min Gu; Kang, Seok Jun; Kim, Moon Ki; Choi, Jae Boong; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been frequently found in pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Especially, PWSCC has occurred in long-term operated PWRs. As this phenomenon leads to serious accidents, we must be beforehand with the anticipated problems. A typical PWR consists of J-groove welded components such as reactor pressure vessel closure head and nozzles. Reactor pressure vessel closure head is made of SA508 and it is covered by cladding. Alloy 600 is used for nozzles. And J-groove weld is conducted with alloy 82/182. Different material properties of these metals lead to residual stress and PWSCC consequentially. In this study, J-groove weld residual stress was investigated by a three-dimensional finite element analysis with an actual asymmetric J-groove weld model and process of construction. Also crack growth rate of PWSCC was evaluated from cracks applied on the penetration nozzles. Based on these two values, one cannot only improve the structural integrity of PWR, but also explain PWSCC behavior such that high residual stress at the J-groove weld area causes crack initiation and propagation through the surface of nozzles. In addition, crack behavior was predicted at the various points around the nozzle.

  14. CFD and system analysis code investigations of the multidimensional flow mixing phenomena in the reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceuca, S.C.; Herb, J.; Schoeffel, P.J.; Hollands, T.; Austregesilo, H.; Hristov, H.V.

    2017-01-01

    The realistic numerical prediction of transient fluid-dynamic scenarios including the complex, three-dimensional flow mixing phenomena occurring in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) both in normal or abnormal operation are an important issue in today's reactor safety assessment studies. Both Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools as well as fluid-dynamic system analysis codes, each with its advantages and drawbacks, are commonly used to model such transients. Simulation results obtained with the open-source CFD tool-box OpenFOAM and the German thermal-hydraulic system code ATHLET (Analysis of THermal-hydraulics of LEaks and Transients), the later developed by Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) for the analysis of the whole spectrum of operational transients, design-basis accidents and beyond design basis accidents anticipated for nuclear energy facilities, are compared against experimental data from the ROssendorf Coolant Mixing (ROCOM) test facility. In the case of the OpenFOAM CFD simulations the influence of various turbulence models and numerical schemes has been assessed while in the case of the system analysis code ATHLET a multidimensional nodalization recommended for real power plant applications has been employed. The simulation results show a good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that both OpenFOAM and ATHLET can capture the key flow features of the mixing processes in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). (author)

  15. Prediction of thermoplastic failure of a reactor pressure vessel under a postulated core melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijvestijn, G.; Birchley, J.; Reichlin, K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the lower head failure calculations performed for a postulated accident scenario in a commercial nuclear power plant. A postulated one inch break in the primary coolant circuit leads to dryout and subsequent meltdown of the core. The reference plant is a pressurized water reactor without penetrations in the reactor vessel lower head. The molten core material accumulates in the lower head, eventually causing failure of the vessel. The analysis investigates flow conditions in the melt pool, temperature evolution in the reactor vessel wall, and structure mechanical evaluation of the vessel under strong thermal loads and a range of internal pressures. The calculations were performed using the ADINA finite element codes. The analysis focusses on the failure processes, time and mode of failure. The most likely mode of failure at low pressure is global rupture due to gradual accumulation of creep strain over a large part of the heated area. In contrast, thermoplasticity becomes important at high pressure or following a pressure spike and can lead to earlier local failure. In situations in which part of the heat load is concentrated over a small area, resulting in a hot spot, local failure occurs, but not until the temperatures are close to the melting point. At low pressure, in particular, the hot spot area remains intact until the structure is molten across more than half of the thickness. (author) 14 figs., 16 refs

  16. Burst protection for reactor pressure vessels using a hinged support bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, E.; Maritsch, F.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with a simplification of the design and manufacture and the way of controlling a hinged support bearing used as burst protection. The pure pressure load of the, e.g., 32 hinged supports distributed along the circumference of the pressure vessel head is achieved in the braced state with little control effort by a pure rotating motion caused pneumatically or hydraulically. The hinged supports are inclined by about 45 0 upwards/outwards in the braced state and with their cap-shaped head and foot are selflocking by pivoted between a supporting structure, firmly connected with the building, and a fishing ring. (TK) [de

  17. Inspection device for external examination of pressure vessels, preferably for ultrasonic testing of reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figlhuber, D.; Gallwas, J.; Weber, R.; Weber, J.

    1978-01-01

    The inspection device is placed in the annular gap between pressure vessel and biological shield of the BWR. In the annulus there is arranged at least one longitudinal rail which has got vertical guideways. Along it there can be moved on testing paths a manipulator with the ultrasonic search unit. The manipulator drive is outside of the inspection annulus. It is coupled to the manipulator by means of a tension member being guided over a reversing unit mounted at the upper end of the longitudinal rail. As a tension member there may be used a drag chain; the drive and the reversing unit are provided with corresponding chain wheels. (DG) [de

  18. Fracture mechanical analysis of relevant transients in the pressure vessel of Atucha I reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saavedra, Fernando M.

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of the applied stress intensity factor K I for 10 relevant transients of the nuclear power station Atucha I obtained from thermohydraulic data is analyzed according to the methodology proposed in Section XI of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Vast knowledge was thus obtained about basic concepts of fracture mechanics and its application to remanent life of nuclear components. Basic knowledge which commands the performance of nuclear power stations was also obtained, especially that related to the Atucha I utility [es

  19. Evaluation of defects induced by neutron radiation in reactor pressure vessels steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.

    1978-01-01

    We have developed a method for calculating the production of neutron induced defects (depleted zone and crowdions) in ferritic pressure vessel steels for different neutron spectra. They have been analysed both the recoil primary atoms produced by elastic and inelastic collisions with fast neutrons and the ones produced by gamma-ray emission by thermal neutron absorption. Theoretical modelling of increasing in the ductile-brittle transition temperature of ferritic steels has been correlated with experimental data at irradiation temperature up to 400 degree centigree (Author) 15 refs

  20. Ultimate load analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels considering a general material law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmelpfennig, K.

    1975-01-01

    A method of analysis is presented, by which progressive fracture processes in axisymmetric prestressed concrete pressure vessels during increasing internal pressure can be evaulated by means of a continuum calculation considering a general material law. Formulations used in the analysis concerning material behaviour are derived on one hand from appropriate results of testing small concrete specimens, and are on the other hand gained by parametric studies in order to solve questions still existing by recalulating fracture tests on concrete bodies with more complex states of stress. Due attention is focussed on investigating the behaviour of construction members subjected to high shear forces (end slabs.). (Auth.)

  1. Environmentally-Assisted Cracking of Low-Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S

    2002-02-01

    The present report summarizes the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels (LAS) in the frame of the RIKORR-project during the period from January 2000 to August 2001. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials is investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels was characterized by slow rising load (SRL) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) and constant load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. These tests revealed the following important interim results: Under low-flow and highly oxidizing (ECP >= 100 mV SHE) conditions, the ASME XI 'wet' reference fatigue crack growth curve could be significantly exceeded by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies (<0.001 Hz), at high and low load-ratios R, and by ripple loading near to DKth fatigue thresholds. The BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with a low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 -250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to dynamic strain ageing (DSA). (author)

  2. FRACTURE MECHANICS UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN THE RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF THE REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL: (2D SUBJECTED TO INTERNAL PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entin Hartini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT FRACTURE MECHANICS UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN THE RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF THE REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL: (2D SUBJECTED TO INTERNAL PRESSURE. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV is a pressure boundary in the PWR type reactor which serves to confine radioactive material during chain reaction process. The integrity of the RPV must be guaranteed either  in a normal operation or accident conditions. In analyzing the integrity of RPV, especially related to the crack behavior which can introduce break to the reactor pressure vessel, a fracture mechanic approach should be taken for this assessment. The uncertainty of input used in the assessment, such as mechanical properties and physical environment, becomes a reason that the assessment is not sufficient if it is perfomed only by deterministic approach. Therefore, the uncertainty approach should be applied. The aim of this study is to analize the uncertainty of fracture mechanics calculations in evaluating the reliability of PWR`s reactor pressure vessel. Random character of input quantity was generated using probabilistic principles and theories. Fracture mechanics analysis is solved by Finite Element Method (FEM with  MSC MARC software, while uncertainty input analysis is done based on probability density function with Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS using python script. The output of MSC MARC is a J-integral value, which is converted into stress intensity factor for evaluating the reliability of RPV’s 2D. From the result of the calculation, it can be concluded that the SIF from  probabilistic method, reached the limit value of  fracture toughness earlier than SIF from  deterministic method.  The SIF generated by the probabilistic method is 105.240 MPa m0.5. Meanwhile, the SIF generated by deterministic method is 100.876 MPa m0.5. Keywords: Uncertainty analysis, fracture mechanics, LHS, FEM, reactor pressure vessels   ABSTRAK ANALISIS KETIDAKPASTIAN FRACTURE MECHANIC PADA EVALUASI KEANDALAN

  3. Low cycle fatigue behavior of a ferritic reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Apu, E-mail: asarkar@barc.gov.in; Kumawat, Bhupendra K.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2015-07-15

    The cyclic stress–strain response and the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 20MnMoNi55 pressure vessel steel were studied. Tensile strength and LCF properties were examined at room temperature (RT) using specimens cut from rolling direction of a rolled block. The fully reversed strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant total strain rate with different axial strain amplitude levels. The cyclic strain–stress relationships and the strain–life relationships were obtained through the test results, and related LCF parameters of the steel were calculated. The studied steel exhibits cyclic softening behavior. Furthermore, analysis of stabilized hysteresis loops showed that the steel exhibits non-Masing behavior. Complementary scanning electron microscopy examinations were also carried out on fracture surfaces to reveal dominant damage mechanisms during crack initiation, propagation and fracture. Multiple crack initiation sites were observed on the fracture surface. The investigated LCF behavior can provide reference for pressure vessel life assessment and fracture mechanisms analysis.

  4. Development of Deterministic and Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis Code PROFAS-RV for Reactor Pressure Vessel - Progress of the Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Bong Sang [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, a deterministic/probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis program for reactor pressure vessel, PROFAS-RV, is developed. This program can evaluate failure probability of RPV using recent radiation embrittlement model of 10CFR50.61a and stress intensity factor calculation method of RCC-MRx code as well as the required basic functions of PFM program. Applications of some new radiation embrittlement model, material database, calculation method of stress intensity factors, and others which can improve fracture mechanics assessment of RPV are introduced. The purpose of this study is to develop a probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis program for RPV considering above modification and application of newly developed models and calculation methods. In this paper, it deals with the development progress of the PFM analysis program for RPV, PROFAS-RV. The PROFAS-RV is being tested with other codes, and it is expected to revise and upgrade by reflecting the latest model and calculation method continuously. These efforts can minimize the uncertainty of the integrity evaluation for the reactor pressure vessel.

  5. The study of the irradiation-induced embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels. Analysis of surveillance test specimens of a commercial nuclear reactor pressure vessel studied by three-dimensional atom probe and positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Toyama, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    The study of embrittlement of nuclear power reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of critical importance for the safety assessment in the nuclear industry. Some origins of embrittlement are attributed to fine Cu precipitates, matrix defects, grain boundary segregation of P and late blooming phase. This review article described nanostructural observation by three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The density and sizes of Cu-rich nanoprecipitates and grain boundary segregation are sensitively detected by 3DAP, and vacancies are probed by PAS. Element analysis around vacancies and fine microstructural Cu precipitates not containing vacancies are successfully observed by a coincidence doppler broadening method. The nanostructural evolution of irradiation-induced Cu-rich nanoprecipitates (CRNPs) and vacancy clusters in surveillance test specimens of commercial nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel welds of Doel-2 in Belgium were revealed by combining 3DAP and PAS. In both medium (0.13 wt%) and high (0.30 wt%) Cu welds, the CRNPs were found to form readily at the very beginning of the reactor lifetime. On the other hand, small vacancy clusters start appearing after the initial Cu precipitates and accumulate steadily with increasing neutron dose. The CRNPs were also observed at very low dose rate of neutrons in the test specimen of Calder Hall Reactor of Japan Atomic Power Company. The significant enhancement of these Cu precipitates results in the embrittlement in practical RPVs. At very high dose of 2.2x10 18 n/cm 2 by JMTR, the Cu precipitates were scarcely observed, and the irradiation-induced embrittlement was primarily caused from vacancy-impurity complexes and dislocation loops. (author)

  6. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Reactor Pressure Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

    2013-01-01

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  7. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels: Considerations for thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, M.G.; Freyer, P.D.; Mager, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, an overview of the irradiation embrittlement phenomenon is presented from a structure-properties viewpoint. Effects of irradiation conditions on embrittlement are first reviewed: irradiation temperature, fluence, flux, and steel or alloy composition. Then, the techniques for identifying/characterizing the irradiation-induced microstructural features are described: TEM/STEM (electron microscopy), small angle neutron scattering, atom probe field-ion microscopy, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Mechanisms of hardening and embrittlement generally consist of a ''precipitation-type'' and a ''damage-type'' component and the potential of annealing treatments for restoring the most of the original pressure vessel material toughness is examined; its conditions and mechanisms involved are discussed. Feasibility and economic evaluation of annealing costs is also carried out. 90 refs., 4 figs

  8. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels: Considerations for thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M G; Freyer, P D; Mager, T R

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, an overview of the irradiation embrittlement phenomenon is presented from a structure-properties viewpoint. Effects of irradiation conditions on embrittlement are first reviewed: irradiation temperature, fluence, flux, and steel or alloy composition. Then, the techniques for identifying/characterizing the irradiation-induced microstructural features are described: TEM/STEM (electron microscopy), small angle neutron scattering, atom probe field-ion microscopy, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Mechanisms of hardening and embrittlement generally consist of a ``precipitation-type`` and a ``damage-type`` component and the potential of annealing treatments for restoring the most of the original pressure vessel material toughness is examined; its conditions and mechanisms involved are discussed. Feasibility and economic evaluation of annealing costs is also carried out. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Experimental analysis of a nuclear reactor prestressed concrete pressure vessels model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallin, C.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensible analysis was made of the performance of each set of sensors used to measure the strain and displacement of a 1/20 scale Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessel (PCPV) model tested at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN). Among the three Kinds of sensors used (strain gage, displacement transducers and load cells) the displacement transducers showed the best behavior. The displacemente transducers data was statistically analysed and a linear behavior of the model was observed during the first pressurizations tests. By means of a linear statistical correlation between experimental and expected theoretical data it was found that the model looses the linearity at a pressure between 110-125 atm. (Author) [pt

  10. Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs

  11. Inelastic Cyclic Deformation Behaviors of Type 316H Stainless Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor at Elevated Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Seokmin; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi; Lee, Bong-Sang; Kim, Young-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Type 316H stainless steel is a primary candidate material for a reactor pressure vessel of a sodium-cooled fast (SFR) reactor which is under development in Korea. The reactor pressure vessel for a SFR is subjected to inelastic deformation induced by cyclic thermal stress. Fully reversed cyclic testing and ratcheting testing at elevated temperatures were performed to characterize the inelastic cyclic deformation behaviors of Type 316H stainless steel at the SFR operating temperature. It was found that cyclic hardening of Type 316H stainless steel was enhanced, and the accumulation of ratcheting deformation of Type 316H stainless steel was retarded at around the SFR operating temperature. The results of the tensile testing and the microstructural investigation for dislocated structures after the inelastic deformation testing showed that dynamic strain aging affected the inelastic cyclic deformation behavior of Type 316 stainless steel at around the SFR operating temperature.

  12. A phenomenological method of mechanical properties definition of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) steels VVER according to the ball indentation diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakirov, M. B.; Potapov, V.V.; Massoud, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This work presents specimen-free methods of a standard uniaxial tension diagram construction and RPV (reactor pressure vessel) steels VVER strength properties definition out of a continuous ball indentation diagram. A similarity phenomenon of uniaxial tension strain curves at a hardening area and an area of a ball indentation constitutes the ground of the methods. The methods are developed on the basis of the uniform graphic representation of elasto-plastic strain processes by indentation and tension and with the reception of the unified yield curve at a hardening area. The calculation results on the phenomenological method conducted for a wide range of RPV steels conditions of nuclear reactors have shown a good precision as far as strain curves construction by the uniaxial tension out of the elasto-plastic indentation diagram is concerned. (authors)

  13. The 1978 first in-service inspection of the reactor pressure vessel of the second unit of the Greifswald nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, D.; Busch, R.; Hildebrandt, E.; Redlich, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel and the primary coolant circuit of the second 440-MW(e) unit of the Greifswald nuclear power plant were subjected to an in-service inspection. Extent of the inspection, development and construction of a reactor inspection container as well as the nondestructive materials testing methods used are described. Further, problems of performing the inspection, such as needs of time and personnel and radiation exposure, are considered. Finally, it is stated that the reactor pressure vessel was in safe operating state. (author)

  14. Thermal-deformation effect of welding on A 1 reactor pressure vessel weld joints properties and state of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becka, J.; Kupka, I.

    1976-01-01

    The methods are compared of electroslag welding and of arc welding with a view to their possible application in welding the Bohunice A-1 reactor pressure vessel. Considered are the thermal deformation effects of welding on the physical properties and the stress present in welded joints. For testing, plates were used having the dimensions of 1100x2300x200 mm and rings with 4820 mm outer diameter, 1800 mm height and 170 mm thickness made of steel CSN 413O30 modified with Ni, Al+Ti. The deformation effect of welding on the residual surface and triaxial stress, the specific stored energy, the initiation temperature of brittle crack and the critical size of the initiation defect corresponding to the thermal deformation effect of welding were determined. It was found that for electroslag welding, there is a low probability of crack formation in the joints, a low level of residual stress and a low level of specific stored energy in a relatively wide joint zone. For arc welding there is a considerable probability of defect formation in the vicinity of the sharp boundary of the joint, a high level of the triaxial state of stress in the tensile region, and a high level of specific stored energy concentrated in the narrow zone of weld joints. The recommended thermal process is given for welding pressure vessels made of the CSN 413030 steel modified with Ni, Al+Ti, and 150 to 200 mm in thickness. (J.P.)

  15. Elastic-plastic stress analysis and ASME code evaluation of a bottomhead penetration in a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganath, S.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear pressure vessel components are designed to meet the requirements of Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Specifically, the design must satisfy the limits on stress range and fatigue usage prescribed in NB-3200, Section III ASME Code for the various design and operating conditions for the component. The Code requirements assure that the component does not experience gross yielding and that in general, elastic shakedown occurs following cyclic loading. When elastic stress analysis is performed this can be shown by meeting the limits in the Code on Primary and Primary plus Secondary (P+Q) stress intensities. However, when the P+Q limits cannot be met and elastic Shakedown cannot be demonstrated, plastic analysis may be performed to meet the requirements of the Code. This paper describes the elastic-plastic stress analysis of a Boiling Water Reactor Vessel bottom head in-core penetration and illustrates how plastic analysis can be used in ASME Code evaluations to show Code compliance. Details of the thermal analysis, elastic-plastic stress analysis and fatigue evaluation are presented and it is shown that the in-core penetration satisfies the code requirements. 6 refs

  16. Model tests for prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, R.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations with models of reactor pressure vessels are used to check results of three dimensional calculation methods and to predict the behaviour of the prototype. Model tests with 1:50 elastic pressure vessel models and with a 1:5 prestressed concrete pressure vessel are described and experimental results are presented. (orig.) [de

  17. Size effects on failure behaviour of reactor pressure vessel steel and their dependence on deformation inhomogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aktaa, J.; Klotz, M.; Schmitt, R.

    2003-01-01

    The investigation of the size dependence of the material behaviour and particularly of the failure strain is the main objective of the European research project LISSAC (Limit Strains for Severe Accident Conditions). Within our activities in LISSAC, tensile test series with specimens of similar geometry and different sizes are performed. The specimens, cut from the wall of a real reactor vessel, are flat with a central hole, flat with a double edge notch as well as round with a circumferential notch in order to obtain inhomogeneous deformation with high strain gradients, which will be higher in the smaller specimens and might be responsible for size effects. An additional variation of the strain gradient is obtained by varying the central hole radius of the flat specimens, with three different hole geometries being considered: round hole, increased round hole and slot. During the tests optical methods are used for measuring local deformations and partly local strain gradients. The results obtained show a size effect neither on the global nor on the local deformation behaviour, whereas the damage and failure behaviour is influenced significantly by the size of the specimen. On the basis of the surface deformation measurements, finite element calculations are performed to estimate the local failure strains as well as the corresponding strain gradients. A clear dependence of local failure strains on strain gradients is obtained. (author)

  18. Modeling for evaluation of debris coolability in lower plenum of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yu; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Nakamura, Hideo; Hirano, Masashi

    2003-01-01

    Effectiveness of debris cooling by water that fills a gap between the debris and the lower head wall was estimated through steady calculations in reactor scale. In those calculations, the maximum coolable debris depth was assessed as a function of gap width with combination of correlations for critical heat flux and turbulent natural convection of a volumetrically heated pool. The results indicated that the gap with a width of 1 to 2 mm was capable of cooling the debris under the conditions of the TMI-2 accident, and that a significantly larger gap width was needed to retain a larger amount of debris within the lower plenum. Transient models on gap growth and water penetration into the gap were developed and incorporated into CAMP code along with turbulent natural convection model developed by Yin, Nagano and Tsuji, categorized in low Reynolds number type two-equation model. The validation of the turbulent model was made with the UCLA experiment on natural convection of a volumetrically heated pool. It was confirmed that CAMP code predicted well the distribution of local heat transfer coefficients along the vessel inner surface. The gap cooling model was validated by analyzing the in-vessel debris coolability experiments at JAERI, where molten Al 2 O 3 was poured into a water-filled hemispherical vessel. The temperature history measured on the vessel outer surface was satisfactorily reproduced by CAMP code. (author)

  19. Comparison of ASME pressure–temperature limits on the fracture probability for a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Hsoung-Wei; Huang, Chin-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • P-T limits based on ASME K_I_a curve, K_I_C curve and RI method are presented. • Probabilistic and deterministic methods are used to evaluate P-T limits on RPV. • The feasibility of substituting P-T curves with more operational is demonstrated. • Warm-prestressing effect is critical in determining the fracture probability. - Abstract: The ASME Code Section XI-Appendix G defines the normal reactor startup (heat-up) and shut-down (cool-down) operation limits according to the fracture toughness requirement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials. This paper investigates the effects of different pressure-temperature limit operations on structural integrity of a Taiwan domestic pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel. Three kinds of pressure-temperature limits based on different fracture toughness requirements – the K_I_a fracture toughness curve of ASME Section XI-Appendix G before 1998 editions, the K_I_C fracture toughness curve of ASME Section XI-Appendix G after 2001 editions, and the risk-informed revision method supplemented in ASME Section XI-Appendix G after 2013 editions, respectively, are established as the loading conditions. A series of probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses for the RPV are conducted employing ORNL’s FAVOR code considering various radiation embrittlement levels under these pressure-temperature limit conditions. It is found that the pressure-temperature operation limits which provide more operational flexibility may lead to higher fracture risks to the RPV. The cladding-induced shallow surface breaking flaws are the most critical and dominate the fracture probability of the RPV under pressure-temperature limit transients. Present study provides a risk-informed reference for the operation safety and regulation viewpoint of PWRs in Taiwan.

  20. Nuclear power plant pressure vessels. Inservice inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The requirements for the planning and reporting of inservice inspections of nuclear power plant pressure vessels are presented. The guide specifically applies to inservice inspections of Safety class 1 and 2 nuclear power plant pressure vessels, piping, pumps and valves plus their supports and reactor pressure vessel internals by non- destructive examination methods (NDE). Inservice inspections according to the Pressure Vessel Degree (549/73) are discussed separately in the guide YVL 3.0. (4 refs.)

  1. Kozloduy NPP WWER-440/230 reactor pressure vessel radiation lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodenicharov, S [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Metaloznanie i Tekhnologiya na Metalite; Kamenova, Tz [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Metaloznanie i Tekhnologiya na Metalite; Tzokov, P; Videnov, A [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria); Pekov, B [Committee on the Use of Atomic Energy for Peaceful Purposes, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    The processes of metal embrittlement induced by neutron irradiation embrittlement (NIE) and neutron re-irradiation embrittlement (NRE) of the rector pressure vessel (RPV) are investigated. Radiation lifetime is calculated using two approaches for re-embrittlement: a conservative law and a lateral shift of the critical transition temperature curve after neutron irradiation. In order to prevent NIE the following measures have been taken at the Kozloduy NPP: loading of dummy elements into core periphery; heating the water for emergency core cooling to 55{sup o} C; fast acting valves in the main steam piping, etc. The critical embrittlement temperature, the residual part of temperature shift and the radiation lifetime have been calculated for units 1 - 4 using the two approaches and updated information on P and Cu impurities content. It is concluded that if the lateral re-embrittlement law is adopted and the P content does not exceed 0.05%, all RPV should reach their design lifetime. The NIE in WWER-440/230 is related to C and P content in the weld 4 and is negligible for the Unit 4 in particular, which has low impurities content. In order to reach the design lifetime of the Units 1 - 3 it is necessary to install MSIV. A verification of chemical composition of the Unit 1 RPV weld 4 metal is recommended. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Kozloduy NPP WWER-440/230 reactor pressure vessel radiation lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodenicharov, S.; Pekov, B.

    1995-01-01

    The processes of metal embrittlement induced by neutron irradiation embrittlement (NIE) and neutron re-irradiation embrittlement (NRE) of the rector pressure vessel (RPV) are investigated. Radiation lifetime is calculated using two approaches for re-embrittlement: a conservative law and a lateral shift of the critical transition temperature curve after neutron irradiation. In order to prevent NIE the following measures have been taken at the Kozloduy NPP: loading of dummy elements into core periphery; heating the water for emergency core cooling to 55 o C; fast acting valves in the main steam piping, etc. The critical embrittlement temperature, the residual part of temperature shift and the radiation lifetime have been calculated for units 1 - 4 using the two approaches and updated information on P and Cu impurities content. It is concluded that if the lateral re-embrittlement law is adopted and the P content does not exceed 0.05%, all RPV should reach their design lifetime. The NIE in WWER-440/230 is related to C and P content in the weld 4 and is negligible for the Unit 4 in particular, which has low impurities content. In order to reach the design lifetime of the Units 1 - 3 it is necessary to install MSIV. A verification of chemical composition of the Unit 1 RPV weld 4 metal is recommended. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Significance of reheat cracks to the integrity of pressure vessels for light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reheat cracks usually manifest themselves as macroscopic defects, which are centimeters long and deep, and are detectable by the usual nondestructive examination (NDE) procedures or as microscopic grain boundary decohesions (GBD) that are beyond the limit of detection by commercial NDE procedures. This report has concentrated on the significance of the microscopic cracks that may go undetected. The probability that GBD exist in the heat-affected zones (HAZ) of weldments of pressure vessel steels is high; particularly in SA 508 Class 2 weldments. A sample of the HAZ from the prolongation-weldment from the Heavy Section Steel Technology program Intermediate Test Vessel (ITV) No. 4 was examined by the Staatliche Materialprufungsanstalt (MPA). They reported GBD 5 mm (0.2 in.) long. This prompted an examination of the HAZ from the ITV vessel that had been tested to failure at 24 0 C (75 0 F). During testing, the region of the weld which contained the flaw that initiated the failure was strained up to 0.5%. A metallographic examination of this region of the weldment revealed GBD, but none of the size reported by the MPA. Further, there was no evidence that the GBD had extended as a consequence of the tests. Fracture toughness tests were made of the HAZ of welds from ITV-4. The electron-beam welding procedure, which permits more accurate siting of the crack, was used. Fracture toughness values in excess of 220 MPa root m (200 ksi root in.) were obtained at -18 0 C

  4. Loads on reactor pressure vessel internals induced by low-pressure waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkert, J.; Mika, C.; Stegemann, D.; Valero, M.

    1978-02-01

    Departing from the conservation theorems for mass and impulse the computer code DRUWE has been developed which allows to calculate loads on the core shell with simplifying assumptions for the first period just after the rupture has opened. It can be supposed that the whole rupture cross section is set free within 15 msec. The calculation progresses in a way that for a core shell the local, timely pressure- and load development, respectively, the total dynamic load as well as the moments acting on the fixing of the core shell, can be calculated. The required input data are merely geometric data on the concept of the pressure vessel and its components as well as the effective subcooling of the fluid. By means of some parameters the programm development can be controlled in a way that the results are available in form of listings or diagrams, respectively, as well as in form of card decks for following investigations, e.g. solidity calculations. (orig./RW) [de

  5. An internal-friction study of reactor-pressure-vessel steel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouytsel, K. van; Fabry, A.; Batist, R. de; Schaller, R.

    1997-01-01

    Within an enhanced commercial surveillance strategy, the nuclear-research institute SCK.CEN in Mol, Belgium is investigating, by means of internal friction, the microstructural processes responsible for embrittlement of pressure-vessel steels. The experiments were carried out using a torsion pendulum at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland. Amplitude-independent internal-friction experiments teach us that neutron irradiation induces defects which interact with mobile dislocations. Thermal ageing of JRQ and Doel-IV steel does not cause major embrittlement effects. Amplitude-dependent internal-friction experiments allow us to determine a critical amplitude which corresponds to the yield stress of the material as obtained from static tensile tests. The results also correspond to a three-component model for the yield strength taking into account both hardening and non-hardening embrittlement. Investigations of Doel-I-II weld material in different conditions reveal that embrittlement due to irradiation or thermal ageing can be interpreted in terms of a fine interplay between long- and short-range phenomena. (author)

  6. Guide to the periodic inspection of nuclear reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    This Guide is intended to provide general information and guidance to reactor owners or operators, inspection authorities, certifying authorities or regulatory bodies who are responsible for establishing inspection procedures for specific reactors or reactor types, and for the preparation of national codes or standards. The recommendations of the Guide apply primarily to water-cooled steel reactor vessels which are at a sufficiently early stage of design so that recommendations to provide accessibility for inspection can be incorporated into the early stages of design and inspection planning. However, much of the contents of the Guide are also applicable in part to vessels for other reactor types, such as gas-cooled, pressure-tube, or liquid-metal-cooled reactors, and also to some existing water-cooled reactors and reactors which are in advanced stage of design or construction. 46 refs, figs, 1 tab

  7. FOREVER Experiments on Thermal and Mechanical Behavior of a Reactor Pressure Vessel during a Severe Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Karbojian, A.; Green, J.A.; Bui, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the FOREVER (Failure Of Reactor Vessel Retention) experimental program, which is currently underway at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS). The objectives of the FOREVER experiments are to obtain data and develop validated models (i) on the melt coolability process inside the vessel, in the presence of water (in particular, on the efficacy of the postulated gap cooling to preclude vessel failure); and (ii) on the lower head failure due to the creep process in the absence of water inside and/or outside the lower head. The facility employs 1/10.-scale carbon steel vessels of 0.4 m diameter, 15 mm thickness and 600 mm height. Up to 20 liters of binary-oxide melts with 100-300 K superheat are employed, as a simulant for the prototypic corium melt, and internal heating is provided by electrical heaters of up to 20 kW power in order to maintain the vessel wall temperatures at 1100-1200 K. Auxiliary systems are designed to provide an overpressure up to 4 MPa in the test vessel. Thus, severe accident scenarios with RCS depressurization are modeled. Creep behavior of the three-dimensional vessel, formation of the gap between the melt pool crust and the creeping vessel, and mechanisms of the gap cooling by water ingression will be the subjects of study and measurements in the FOREVER experimental program. Scaling rationale as well as pre-test analyses of the thermal and mechanical behavior of the FOREVER test vessels are presented. (authors)

  8. Status and Perspectives of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Life Extension up to 60 Years Operation in Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.; Chaouadi, R.; Scibetta, M.; Van Walle, E.

    2009-09-15

    The scope of this report involves a safety evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) against neutron embrittlement, in the most severely irradiation region (belt line) and in the event of a pressurized thermal shock. The irreplaceable RPV is considered to be the most critical component for lifetime considerations of the nuclear power plant. However, an application for operation extension will also depend upon a number of additional considerations, including the technical assessment of other plant components, as well as non-technical arguments (e.g. political, environmental, economical, strategical that are outside the scope this report. In the hypothesis of a request for operation extension, it is the responsibility of the utilities to provide the safety authorities with an exhaustive dossier demonstrating that safe extended operation is guaranteed. The role of the safety authorities is to critically evaluate the safety dossier for eventually granting the operation extension.

  9. Structural evaluation of the Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, L.E.; Chou, C.K.; Lo, T.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    A structural evaluation of Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads under the normal and hypothetical accident conditions of 10 CFR 71 was performed. Component performance criteria for the Shippingport package and the corresponding structural acceptance criteria for these components were developed based on a review of the package geometry, the planned transport environment, and the external radiation standards and dispersal limits of 10 CFR 71. The evaluation was performed using structural analysis methods. A demonstration combining simplified model tests and nonlinear finite element analyses was made to substantiate the structural analysis methods used to evaluate the Shippingport package. The package was analyzed and the results indicate that the package meets external radiation standards and release limits of 10 CFR 71. 13 refs., 50 figs., 19 tabs

  10. On the correlation between irradiation-induced microstructural features and the hardening of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, M.; Meslin, E.; Malerba, L.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.; Bergner, F.; Pareige, P.; Radiguet, B.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-01-01

    A correlation is attempted between microstructural observations by various complementary techniques, which have been implemented within the PERFECT project and the hardening measured by tensile tests of reactor pressure vessel steel and model alloys after irradiation to a dose of ∼7 x 10 19 n cm -2 . This is done, using the simple hardening model embodied by the Orowan equation and applying the most suitable superposition law, as suggested by a parametric study using the DUPAIR line tension code. It is found that loops are very strong obstacles to dislocation motion, but due to their low concentration, they only play a minor role in the hardening itself. For the precipitates, the contrary is found, although they are quite soft (due to their very small sizes and their coherent nature), they still play the dominant role in the hardening. Vacancy clusters are important for the formation of both loops and precipitates, but they will play almost no role in the hardening by themselves.

  11. Stress intensity factors for underclad and through clad defects in a reactor pressure vessel submitted to a pressurised thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Menager, Y.; Chapuliot, S.

    2005-01-01

    CEA has launched important work on the development of a Stress Intensity Factors compendium for cracks in a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) taking into account the cladding. The work is performed by Finite Element analysis with a parametric mesh for two types of defects (under clad defect and through clad defect) and a wide range of geometrical and material parameters. In addition, an analytical stress solution for Pressurised Thermal Shock (PTS) on the RPV is proposed to allow a complete analytical estimation of the stress intensity factor K I for the PTS problem. The results are validated by comparison with a complete 3D finite element calculation performed on a complex and realistic case study

  12. Study of system safety evaluation on LTO of national project. Structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizawa, Kunio; Masaki, Koichi; Katsuyama, Jinya; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Osakabe, Kazuya; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    To assure the structural integrity of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is known as one of the critical issues to maintain the safe long-term operation of a nuclear power plant. In Japan, the assessment methods for RPV integrity, stipulated in the codes and standards, have been endorsed by the regulatory body. Authors have initiated extensive research on the improvement of structural integrity assessment methods of RPVs. In this paper, we describe some research results obtained from the first-year activity. These include the study on revisiting the technical background of the methods, such as loading conditions, postulated crack definition, the other evaluation methods. In addition, studies on probabilistic methods for the applicability to the current rules and the standardization of the probabilistic analysis methods have been presented. (author)

  13. Status and Perspectives of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Life Extension up to 60 Years Operation in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucon, E.; Chaouadi, R.; Scibetta, M.; Van Walle, E.

    2009-01-01

    The scope of this report involves a safety evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) against neutron embrittlement, in the most severely irradiation region (belt line) and in the event of a pressurized thermal shock. The irreplaceable RPV is considered to be the most critical component for lifetime considerations of the nuclear power plant. However, an application for operation extension will also depend upon a number of additional considerations, including the technical assessment of other plant components, as well as non-technical arguments (e.g. political, environmental, economical, strategical that are outside the scope this report. In the hypothesis of a request for operation extension, it is the responsibility of the utilities to provide the safety authorities with an exhaustive dossier demonstrating that safe extended operation is guaranteed. The role of the safety authorities is to critically evaluate the safety dossier for eventually granting the operation extension.

  14. Development of a Weibull model of cleavage fracture toughness for shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Williams, P.T.; McAfee, W.J.; Pugh, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-07-01

    A primary objective of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) -sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is to develop and validate technology applicable to quantitative assessments of fracture prevention margins in nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws and subjected to service-induced material toughness degradation. This paper describes an experimental/analytical program for the development of a Weibull statistical model of cleavage fracture toughness for applications to shallow surface-breaking and embedded flaws in RPV materials subjected to multi-axial loading conditions. The experimental part includes both material characterization testing and larger fracture toughness experiments conducted using a special-purpose cruciform beam specimen developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for applying biaxial loads to shallow cracks. Test materials (pressure vessel steels) included plate product forms (conforming to ASTM A533 Grade B Class 1 specifications) and shell segments procured from a pressurized-water reactor vessel intended for a nuclear power plant. Results from tests performed on cruciform specimens demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower-transition temperature region. A local approach methodology based on a three-parameter Weibull model was developed to correlate these experimentally-observed biaxial effects on fracture toughness. The Weibull model, combined with a new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the Weibull stress integral definition, is shown to provide a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states for 2-dimensional flaws located in the A533-B plate material. The Weibull stress density was introduced as a matrice for identifying regions along a semi-elliptical flaw front that have a higher probability of cleavage initiation. Cumulative

  15. Development of a Weibull model of cleavage fracture toughness for shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Williams, P.T.; McAfee, W.J.; Pugh, C.E.

    2001-01-01

    A primary objective of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) -sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is to develop and validate technology applicable to quantitative assessments of fracture prevention margins in nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws and subjected to service-induced material toughness degradation. This paper describes an experimental/analytical program for the development of a Weibull statistical model of cleavage fracture toughness for applications to shallow surface-breaking and embedded flaws in RPV materials subjected to multi-axial loading conditions. The experimental part includes both material characterization testing and larger fracture toughness experiments conducted using a special-purpose cruciform beam specimen developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for applying biaxial loads to shallow cracks. Test materials (pressure vessel steels) included plate product forms (conforming to ASTM A533 Grade B Class 1 specifications) and shell segments procured from a pressurized-water reactor vessel intended for a nuclear power plant. Results from tests performed on cruciform specimens demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower-transition temperature region. A local approach methodology based on a three-parameter Weibull model was developed to correlate these experimentally-observed biaxial effects on fracture toughness. The Weibull model, combined with a new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the Weibull stress integral definition, is shown to provide a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states for 2-dimensional flaws located in the A533-B plate material. The Weibull stress density was introduced as a matrice for identifying regions along a semi-elliptical flaw front that have a higher probability of cleavage initiation. Cumulative

  16. Finite element analysis of the design and manufacture of thin-walled pressure vessels used as aerosol cans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdussalam, Ragba Mohamed

    Thin-walled cylinders are used extensively in the food packaging and cosmetics industries. The cost of material is a major contributor to the overall cost and so improvements in design and manufacturing processes are always being sought. Shape optimisation provides one method for such improvements. Aluminium aerosol cans are a particular form of thin-walled cylinder with a complex shape consisting of truncated cone top, parallel cylindrical section and inverted dome base. They are manufactured in one piece by a reverse-extrusion process, which produces a vessel with a variable thickness from 0.31 mm in the cylinder up to 1.31 mm in the base for a 53 mm diameter can. During manufacture, packaging and charging, they are subjected to pressure, axial and radial loads and design calculations are generally outside the British and American pressure vessel codes. 'Design-by-test' appears to be the favoured approach. However, a more rigorous approach is needed in order to optimise the designs. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a powerful tool for predicting stress, strain and displacement behaviour of components and structures. FEA is also used extensively to model manufacturing processes. In this study, elastic and elastic-plastic FEA has been used to develop a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of yielding, 'dome reversal' (an inherent safety feature, where the base suffers elastic-plastic buckling at a pressure below the burst pressure) and collapse due to internal pressure loading and how these are affected by geometry. It has also been used to study the buckling behaviour under compressive axial loading. Furthermore, numerical simulations of the extrusion process (in order to investigate the effects of tool geometry, friction coefficient and boundary conditions) have been undertaken. Experimental verification of the buckling and collapse behaviours has also been carried out and there is reasonable agreement between the experimental data and the numerical

  17. Outline of design, manufacturing and installation experience of pressure vessel structure for the prototype heavy water moderated boiling light water cooled reactor 'FUGEN'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibato, Eizo; Oguchi, Isao; Kishi, Toshikazu; Kitagawa, Yuji

    1977-01-01

    After component installation completed in June 1977 and various functional tests to be conducted later, the prototype heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled reactor ''FUGEN'' is scheduled to reach first criticality in March 1978. Since the pressure vessel of ''FUGEN'' is completely different from that of a light water reactor in structure and materials, through research and development work was carried out prior to fabrication and construction. Based on these studies, installation of the actual pressure vessel was completed. Functional tests are now under way. This article describes examples in which our research and development results are reflected on design, manufacture, and installation of the pressure vessel. Also it introduces noteworthy achievements relevant to production techniques in manufacture and installation. (auth.)

  18. Behavior of underclad cracks in reactor pressure vessels - evaluation of mechanical analyses with tests on cladded mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Rousselier, G.; Bethmont, M.

    1993-01-01

    Innocuity of underclad flaws in the reactor pressure vessels must be demonstrated in the French safety analyses, particularly in the case of a severe transient at the end of the pressure vessel lifetime, because of the radiation embrittlement of the vessel material. Safety analyses are usually performed with elastic and elasto-plastic analyses taking into account the effect of the stainless steel cladding. EDF has started a program including experiments on large size cladded specimens and their interpretations. The purpose of this program is to evaluate the different methods of fracture analysis used in safety studies. Several specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C1 3 with stainless steel cladding, containing small artificial defects, are loaded in four-point bending. Experiments are performed at very low temperature to simulate radiation embrittlement and to obtain crack instability by cleavage fracture. Three tests have been performed on mock-ups containing a small underclad crack (with depth about 5 mn) and a fourth test has been performed on one mock-up with a larger crack (depth about 13 mn). In each case, crack instability occurred by cleavage fracture in the base metal, without crack arrest, at a temperature of about - 170 deg C. Each test is interpreted using linear elastic analysis and elastic-plastic analysis by two-dimensional finite element computations. The fracture are conservatively predicted: the stress intensity factors deduced from the computations (K cp or K j ) are always greater than the base metal toughness. The comparison between the elastic analyses (including two plasticity corrections) and the elastic-plastic analyses shows that the elastic analyses are often conservative. The beneficial effect of the cladding in the analyses is also shown : the analyses are too conservative if the cladding effects is not taken into account. (authors). 9 figs., 6 tabs., 10 refs

  19. Application of material databases for improved reliability of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesbach, T.J.; Server, W.L.; Beaudoin, B.F.; Burgos, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    A vital part of reactor vessel Life Cycle Management program must begin with an accurate characterization of the vessel material properties. Uncertainties in vessel material properties or use of bounding values may result in unnecessary conservatisms in vessel integrity calculations. These conservatisms may be eliminated through a better understanding of the material properties in reactor vessels, both in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Reactor vessel material databases are available for quantifying the chemistry and Charpy shift behavior of individual heats of reactor vessel materials. Application of the databases for vessels with embrittlement concerns has proven to be an effective embrittlement management tool. This paper presents details of database development and applications which demonstrate the value of using material databases for improving material chemistry and for maximizing the data from integrated material surveillance programs

  20. Research to sustain cases for Magnox-reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Britain's Magnox Electric plc owns and operates six power stations, each of which has twin gas-cooled reactors of the Magnox-fuel type. The older group of four power stations has steel pressure-circuits. The reactor cores are housed within spherical, steel vessels. This article describes some of the research which is undertaken to sustain the safety cases for these steel vessels which have now been in operation for just over 30 years. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs

  1. Pressure vessel lid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Elter, C.; Becker, G.; Pertiller, S.

    1986-01-01

    The invention concerns a lid for closing openings in reactor pressure vessels containing helium, which is made as a circular casting with hollow spaces and a flat floor and is set on the opening and kept down. It consists of helium-tight metal cast material with sufficient temperature resistance. There are at least two concentric heat resistant seals let into the bottom of the lid. The bottom is in immediate contact with the container atmosphere and has hollow spaces in its inside in the area opposite to the opening. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Tightening unit EZ 250 for VVER 1000 type reactor pressure vessel head flange joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchar, Miloslav; Nadenik, Tomas; Kroj, Ludek

    2010-01-01

    The programme of flange joints tightening by seals made of expanded graphite for VVER 440 and VVER 1000 reactor head flange joints is highlighted, and tightening units of row EZ 650 and EZ 650 TK and KNI for VVER 440 reactor head flange joints and EZ 250 tightening unit for VVER 1000 reactor head flange joints are described in detail. The main advantages of electronically controlled tightening units include: Precise and uniform compression of the gasket during the tightening procedure; Automated solution to the graphite relaxing problem during tightening; Possibility of diagnosis of the thread status of the joints being tightened; Alleviation of operator's tough work; Shorter time of tensioning associated with a lower collective doses; Quick preparation of tightening procedure report from the data measured; Calibration renewal is possible in advance at time of unit storage without the need to place it on a real joint. (P.A.)

  3. Progress toward acoustic emission characterization for continuous monitoring of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Schwenk, E.B.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in an operating reactor vessel using acoustic emission (AE) data. A preliminary AE-flaw growth relationship has been developed encompassing six variables. This model relates AE count and energy to fatigue crack driving force ΔK. Pattern recognition has been examined as a means of distinguishing crack growth AE from other acoustic signals with encouraging results. The program is moving into hardware implementation of relationships for testing and refinement by monitoring tests in heavy section specimens and subscale structures. The hardware system will become a reactor monitor prototype. (orig.) [de

  4. Aging impact on the safety and operability of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation embrittlement causes a loss of reactor vessel material fracture toughness as nuclear plants age. Fracture mechanics based regulatory requirements limit the permissible level of irradiation embrittlement such that essential fracture prevention margins are maintained throughout the plant operating life. This paper reviews the regulatory requirements and the underlying fracture mechanics technology. Issues identified with that technology are identified and research programs implemented to resolve the issues are described. Where possible, an assessment is given of the anticipated impact on the research program output will have on the reactor vessel fracture-margin assessment process

  5. Method for the Calculation of DPA in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of Atucha II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Mascitti

    2011-01-01

    It was determined that the maximum DPA rate in the RPV wall with fresh fuel element (FE is 3.76(3 × 10-12 s-1, it takes place in front of FEs BA42 and BL43, and it is symmetrical about the central channel, LG04, and LH03.

  6. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  7. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocik, J.; Keilova, E.

    1993-01-01

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocik, J; Keilova, E [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding) to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky [NRI Czech (Czech Republic)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  10. Material properties of Bohunice 1 and 2 reactor pressure vessel materials before and after annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Novosad, P.; Vacek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Six types of experimental RPV materials were studied before and after irradiation in host nuclear power and research reactors. Recovery of RPV materials from radiation hardening and embrittlement after annealing was evaluated including a rate of radiation damage after reirradiation used. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  11. Specific Features of Structural-Phase State and Properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel at Elevated Irradiation Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuleshova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers influence of elevated irradiation temperature on structure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA reactor pressure vessel (RPV steel. The steel is investigated after accelerated irradiation at 300°C (operating temperature of VVER-1000-type RPV and 400°C supposed to be the operating temperature of advanced RPVs. Irradiation at 300°C leads to formation of radiation-induced precipitates and radiation defects-dislocation loops, while no carbide phase transformation is observed. Irradiation at a higher temperature (400°C neither causes formation of radiation-induced precipitates nor provides formation of dislocation loops, but it does increase the number density of the main initial hardening phase—of the carbonitrides. Increase of phosphorus concentration in grain boundaries is more pronounced for irradiation at 400°C as compared to irradiation at 300°C due to influence of thermally enhanced diffusion at a higher temperature. The structural-phase changes determine the changes of mechanical properties: at both irradiation temperatures irradiation embrittlement is mainly due to the hardening mechanism with some contribution of the nonhardening one for irradiation at 400°C. Lack of formation of radiation-induced precipitates at T = 400°C provides a small ΔTK shift (17°C. The obtained results demonstrate that the investigated 15Kh2NMFAA steel may be a promising material for advanced reactors with an elevated operating temperature.

  12. Recent results of three-dimensional CFD simulations of coolant mixing in VVER-440/213 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, B.; Boros, I.; Aszodi, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Nuclear Techniques has been working since 2001 on the three-dimensional CFD model of the reactor pressure vessel of the VVER-440 type reactor. During this time period - due to the development of the available computational capacity - a very complex and detailed model of the RPV has been developed. The aim of the construction of the new model is to describe further internal structures of the RPV (e.g. correct modeling of brake tubes, or internals in the upper mixing chamber) and to perform an extensive sensitivity analysis on the different modeling and calculation parameters (e.g. porous region models vs. detailed modeling, or n different turbulence models). The new model can be applied for steady state calculation during normal operational condition and for different transient analyses as well. One interesting application is the participation in a planned benchmark exercise on the start-up of the sixth main coolant pump, which is aimed to compare the capabilities of mixing models of one-dimensional system codes with the results of CFD simulation. (authors)

  13. Evaluation of ductile-brittle transition behavior with neutron irradiation in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels using small punch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. C.; Lee, B. S.; Oh, Y. J.

    2003-01-01

    A Small Punch (SP) test was performed to evaluate the ductile-brittle transition temperature before and after neutron irradiation in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels produced by different manufacturing (refining) processes. The results were compared to the standard transition temperature shifts from the Charpy test and Master Curve fracture toughness test in accordance with the ASTM standard E1921. The samples were taken from 1/4t location of the vessel thickness and machined into a 10x10x0.5mm dimension. Irradiation of the samples was carried out in the research reactor at KAERI (HANARO) at about 290 .deg. C of the different fluence levels respectively. SP tests were performed in the temperature range of RT to -196 .deg. C using a 2.4mm diameter ball. For the materials before and after irradiation, SP transition temperatures (T sp ), which are determined at the middle of the upper and lower SP energies, showed a linear correlation with the Charpy index temperature, T 41J . T sp from the irradiated samples was increased as the fluence level increased and was well within the deviation range of the unirradiated data. The TSP had a correlation with the reference temperature (T 0 ) from the master curve method using a pre-cracked Charpy V-notched (PCVN) specimen

  14. Optimization of the size and shape of the set-in nozzle for a PWR reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, Usman Tariq, E-mail: maniiut@yahoo.com; Javed Hyder, M., E-mail: hyder@pieas.edu.pk

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • The size and shape of the set-in nozzle of the RPV have been optimized. • The optimized nozzle ensure the reduction of the mass around 198 kg per nozzle. • The mass of the RPV should be minimized for better fracture toughness. - Abstract: The objective of this research work is to optimize the size and shape of the set-in nozzle for a typical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of a 300 MW pressurized water reactor. The analysis was performed by optimizing the four design variables which control the size and shape of the nozzle. These variables are inner radius of the nozzle, thickness of the nozzle, taper angle at the nozzle-cylinder intersection, and the point where taper of the nozzle starts from. It is concluded that the optimum design of the nozzle is the one that minimizes the two conflicting state variables, i.e., the stress intensity (Tresca yield criterion) and the mass of the RPV.

  15. General design and main problems of a gas-heavy-water power reactor contained in a