WorldWideScience

Sample records for reactor nuclear safety

  1. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  2. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  3. Nuclear reactors safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Francois; Seiler, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Since the seventies, economic incentives have led the utilities to drive a permanent evolution of the light water reactor (LWR). The evolution deals with the reactor designs as well as the way to operate them in a more flexible manner. It is for instance related to the fuel technologies and management. On the one hand, the technologies are in continuous evolution, such as the fuel pellets (MOX, Gd fuel, or Cr doped fuels..) as well as advanced cladding materials (M5 TM , MDA or ZIRLO). On the other hand, the fuel management is also subject to continuous evolution in particular in terms of increasing the level of burn-up, the reactor (core) power, the enrichment, as well as the duration of reactor cycles. For instance, in a few years in France, the burn-up has raised beyond the value of 39 GWj/t, initially authorized up to 52 GWj/t for the UO 2 fuel. In the near future, utilities foreseen to reach fuel burn-up of 60 GWj/t for MOX fuel and 70 GWj/t for UO 2 fuel. Furthermore, the future reactor of fourth generation will use new fuels of advanced conception. Furthermore with the objective of improving the safety margins, methods and calculation tools used by the utilities in the elaboration of their safety demonstrations submitted to the Safety Authority, are in movement. The margin evaluation methodologies often consist of a calculation chain of best-estimate multi-field simulations (e.g. various codes being coupled to simulate in a realistic way the evolution of the thermohydraulic, neutronic and mechanic state of the reactor). The statistical methods are more and more sophisticated and the computer codes are integrating ever-complex physical models (e.g. three-dimensional at fine scale). Following this evolution, the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), whose one of the roles is to examine the safety records and to rend a technical expertise, considers the necessity of reevaluating the safety issues for advanced

  4. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  5. Nuclear power reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon, G.A.

    1976-10-01

    This report is based on the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited submission to the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning on the safety of CANDU reactors. It discusses normal operating conditions, postulated accident conditions, and safety systems. The release of radioactivity under normal and accident conditions is compared to the limits set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. (author)

  6. Space nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damon, D.; Temme, M.; Brown, N.

    1990-01-01

    Definition of safety requirements and design features of the SP-100 space reactor power system has been guided by a mission risk analysis. The analysis quantifies risk from accidental radiological consequences for a reference mission. Results show that the radiological risk from a space reactor can be made very low. The total mission risk from radiological consequences for a shuttle-launched, earth orbit SP-100 mission is estimated to be 0.05 Person-REM (expected values) based on a 1 mREM/yr de Minimus dose. Results are given for each mission phase. The safety benefits of specific design features are evaluated through risk sensitivity analyses

  7. Safety device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquelin, Roland.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a safety device for a nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid metal (generally sodium) cooled fast reactor. This safety device includes an absorbing element with a support head connected by a disconnectable connector formed by the armature of an electromagnet at the end of an axially mobile vertical control rod. This connection is so designed that in the event of it becoming disconnected, the absorbing element gravity slides in a passage through the reactor core into an open container [fr

  8. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To allow sufficient removal of radioactive substance released in the reactor containment shell upon loss of coolants accidents thus to sufficiently decrease the exposure dose to human body. Constitution: A clean-up system is provided downstream of a heat exchanger and it is branched into a pipeway to be connected to a spray nozzle and further connected by way of a valve to a reactor container. After the end of sudden transient changes upon loss of coolants accidents, the pool water stored in the pressure suppression chamber is purified in the clean-up system and then sprayed in the dry-well by way of a spray nozzle. The sprayed water dissolves to remove water soluble radioactive substances floating in the dry-well and then returns to the pressure suppression chamber. Since radioactive substances in the dry-well can thus removed rapidly and effectively and the pool water can be reused, public hazard can also be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Dr. Buhl feels that nuclear-energy issues are too complex to be understood as single topics, and can only be understood in relationship to broader issues. In fact, goals and risks associated with all energy options must be seen as interrelated with other broad issues, and it should be understood that there are presently no clearcut criteria to ensure that the best decisions are made. The technical community is responsible for helping the public to understand the basic incompatibility of hard and soft technologies and that there is no risk-free energy source. Four principles are outlined for assessing the risks of various energy technologies: (1) take a holistic view; (2) compare the risk with the unit energy output; (3) compare the risk with those of everyday activities; and (4) identify unusual risks associated with a particular option. Dr. Buhl refers to the study conducted by Dr. Inhaber of Canada who used this approach and concluded that nuclear power and natural gas have the lowest overall risk

  10. Selecting of key safety parameters in reactor nuclear safety supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Fan; Yu Hong

    2014-01-01

    The safety parameters indicate the operational states and safety of research reactor are the basis of nuclear safety supervision institution to carry out effective supervision to nuclear facilities. In this paper, the selecting of key safety parameters presented by the research reactor operating unit to National Nuclear Safety Administration that can express the research reactor operational states and safety when operational occurrence or nuclear accident happens, and the interrelationship between them are discussed. Analysis shows that, the key parameters to nuclear safety supervision of research reactor including design limits, operational limits and conditions, safety system settings, safety limits, acceptable limits and emergency action level etc. (authors)

  11. Nuclear reactor safety research in Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeile, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed information about the performance of nuclear reactor systems, and especially about the nuclear fuel, is vital in determining the consequences of a reactor accident. Fission products released from the fuel during accidents are the ultimate safety concern to the general public living in the vicinity of a nuclear reactor plant. Safety research conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has provided the NRC with detailed data relating to most of the postulated nuclear reactor accidents. Engineers and scientists at the INEL are now in the process of gathering data related to the most severe nuclear reactor accident - the core melt accident. This paper describes the focus of the nuclear reactor safety research at the INEL. The key results expected from the severe core damage safety research program are discussed

  12. Comments on nuclear reactor safety in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The Chalk River Technicians and Technologists Union representing 500 technical employees at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of AECL submit comments on nuclear reactor safety to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review. Issues identified by the Review Commissioner are addressed from the perspective of both a labour organization and experience in the nuclear R and D field. In general, Local 1568 believes Ontario's CANDU nuclear reactors are not only safe but also essential to the continued economic prosperity of the province

  13. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shal'nov, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    Proceedings of the 9. Topical Meeting 'Problems of nuclear reactor safety' are presented. Papers include results of studies and developments associated with methods of calculation and complex computerized simulation for stationary and transient processes in nuclear power plants. Main problems of reactor safety are discussed as well as rector accidents on operating NPP's are analyzed

  14. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    Theses of proceedings of the 9 Topical Meeting on problems of nuclear power plant safety are presented. Reports include results of neutron-physical experiments carried out for reactor safety justification. Concepts of advanced reactors with improved safety are considered. Results of researches on fuel cycles are given too

  15. Nuclear reactor core safety device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    The danger of a steam explosion from a nuclear reactor core melt-down can be greatly reduced by adding a gasifying agent to the fuel that releases a large amount of gas at a predetermined pre-melt-down temperature that ruptures the bottom end of the fuel rod and blows the finely divided fuel into a residual coolant bath at the bottom of the reactor. This residual bath should be equipped with a secondary cooling loop

  16. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 14, Safety protection measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Nuclear reactor accidents can be caused by three type of errors: failure of reactor components including (1) control and measuring instrumentation, (2) errors in operation procedure, (3) natural disasters. Safety during reactor operation are secured during its design and construction and later during operation. Both construction and administrative procedures are applied to attain safe operation. Technical safety features include fission product barriers, fuel elements cladding, primary reactor components (reactor vessel, primary cooling pipes, heat exchanger in the pump), reactor building. Safety system is the system for safe reactor shutdown and auxiliary safety system. RA reactor operating regulations and instructions are administrative acts applied to avoid possible human error caused accidents [sr

  17. Nuclear reactor safety protection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okido, Fumiyasu; Noguchi, Atomi; Matsumiya, Shoichi; Furusato, Ken-ichiro; Arita, Setsuo.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention extremely reduces a probability of causing unnecessary scram of a nuclear reactor. That is, four control devices receive signals from each of four sensors and output four trip signals respectively in a quardruplicated control device. Each of the trip signals and each of trip signals via a delay circuit are inputted to a logical sum element. The output of the logical sum circuit is inputted to a decision of majority circuit. The decision of majority circuit controls a scram pilot valve which conducts scram of the reactor by way of a solenoid coils. With such procedures, even if surge noises of a short pulse width are mixed to the sensor signals and short trip signals are outputted, there is no worry that the scram pilot valve is actuated. Accordingly, factors of lowering nuclear plant operation efficiency due to erroneous reactor scram can be reduced. (I.S.)

  18. Aspects of nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardt, P. von der; Rottger, H.

    1980-01-01

    The Colloquium on 'Irradiation Tests for Reactor Safety Programmes' has been organised by JRC Petten in order to determine the present state of technology in the field. The role of research and test reactors for studies of structural material and fuel elements under transient and off-normal conditions was to be explained. The Colloquium has been attended by 110 participants from outside and inside Europe. 27 papers were presented covering the major ongoing projects in Japan, the United States, and in Europe, and elaborating in particular: - design rationale and layout of safety irradiation experiments; - design, manufacture, and performance of irradiation equipment with particular attention to generation and control of transient conditions, fast response in-pile instrumentation and its out-of-pile data retrieval; - post-irradiation evaluation; - results and analytical support

  19. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor

  20. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards

  1. Nuclear reactor safety in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear reactor safety in the USA has emphasized a defense-in-depth approach to protecting the public from reactor accidents. This approach was severely tested by the Three Mile Island accident and was found to be effective in safeguarding the public health and safety. However, the economic impact of the TMI accident was very large. Consequently, more attention is now being given to plant protection as well as public-health protection in reactor-safety studies. Sophisticated computer simulations at Los Alamos are making major contributions in this area. In terms of public risk, nuclear power plants compare favorably with other large-scale alternatives to electricity generation. Unfortunately, there is a large gulf between the real risks of nuclear power and the present public perception of these risks

  2. Some views on nuclear reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanguy, P.Y. [Electricite de France, Paris (France)

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a speech given by Pierre Y. Tanguy (Electricite de France) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting held in Bethesda, MD in 1994. He describes the EDF nuclear program in broad terms and proceeds to discuss operational safety results with EDF plants. The speaker also outlines actions to enhance safety planned for the future, and he briefly mentions French cooperation with the Chinese on the Daya Bay project.

  3. Independent assessment for new nuclear reactor safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Auria Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous framework for safety assessment is established in all countries where nuclear technology is used for the production of electricity. On the one side, industry, i.e. reactor designers, vendors and utilities perform safety analysis and demonstrate consistency between results of safety analyses and requirements. On the other side, regulatory authorities perform independent assessment of safety and confirm the acceptability of safety of individual reactor units. The process of comparing results from analyses by reactor utilities and regulators is very complex. The process is also highly dependent upon mandatory approaches pursued for the analysis and from very many details which required the knowledge of sensitive proprietary data (e.g. spacer designs. Furthermore, all data available for the design, construction and operation of reactors produced by the nuclear industry are available to regulators. Two areas for improving the process of safety assessment for individual Nuclear Power Plant Units are identified: New details introduced by industry are not always and systematically requested by regulators for the independent assessment; New analytical techniques and capabilities are not necessarily used in the analyses by regulators (and by the industry. The established concept of independent assessment constitutes the way for improving the process of safety assessment. This is possible, or is largely facilitated, by the recent availability of the so-called Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty approach.

  4. Independent assessment for new nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Glaeser, H.; Debrecin, N.

    2017-01-01

    A rigorous framework for safety assessment is established in all countries where nuclear technology is used for the production of electricity. On one side, industry, i.e. reactor designers, vendors and utilities perform safety analysis and demonstrate consistency between results of safety analyses and requirements. On the other side, regulatory authorities perform independent assessment of safety and confirm the acceptability of safety of individual reactor units. The process of comparing results from analyses by reactor utilities and regulators is very complex. The process is also highly dependent upon mandatory approaches pursued for the analysis and from very many details which required the knowledge of sensitive proprietary data (e.g. spacer designs). Furthermore, all data available for the design, construction and operation of reactors produced by the nuclear industry are available to regulators. Two areas for improving the process of safety assessment for individual Nuclear Power Plant Units are identified: New details introduced by industry are not always and systematically requested by regulators for the independent assessment; New analytical techniques and capabilities are not necessarily used in the analyses by regulators (and by the industry). The established concept of independent assessment constitutes the way for improving the process of safety assessment. This is possible, or is largely facilitated, by the recent availability of the so-called Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) approach. (authors)

  5. Safety studies concerning nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, Jean; Pelce, Jacques

    1980-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations poses different technical problems, whether concerning pressurized water reactors or fast reactors. But investigating methods are closely related and concern, on the one hand, the behavior of shields placed between fuel and outside and, on the other, analysis of accidents. The article is therefore in two parts based on the same plan. Concerning light water reactors, the programme of studies undertaken in France accounts for the research carried out in countries where collaboration agreements exist. Concerning fast reactors, France has the initiative of their studies owing to her technical advance, which explains the great importance of the programmes under way [fr

  6. Nuclear safety cooperation for Soviet designed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisman, A.W.; Horak, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 first alerted the West to the significant safety risks of Soviet designed reactors. Five years later, this concern was reaffirmed when the IAEA, as a result of a review by an international team of nuclear safety experts, announced that it did not believe the Kozloduy nuclear power plants in Bulgaria could be operated safely. To address these safety concerns, the G-7 summit in Munich in July 1992 outlined a five point program to address the safety problems of Soviet Designed Reactors: operational safety improvement; near-term technical improvements to plants based on safety assessment; enhancing regulatory regimes; examination of the scope for replacing less safe plants by the development of alternative energy sources and the more efficient use of energy; and upgrading of the plants of more recent design. As of early 1994, over 20 countries and international organizations have pledged hundreds of millions of dollars in financial assistance to improve safety. This paper summarizes these assistance efforts for Soviet designed reactors, draws lessons learned from these activities, and offers some options for better addressing these concerns

  7. The safety of Ontario's nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    A Select Committee of the Legislature of Ontario was established to examine the affairs of Ontario Hydro, the provincial electrical utility. Extensive public hearings were held on several topics including the safety of nuclear power reactors operating in Ontario. The Committee found that these reactors are acceptably safe. Many of the 24 recommendations in this report deal with the licensing process and public access to information. (O.T.)

  8. Safety device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhl, H.

    1974-01-01

    The safety device is used to capture fragments of the lid of a pressure vessel when this vessel ruptures. It consists of a catcher structure attached to the concrete vessel, which is open at the top, and surrounding the pressure vessel. The catcher structure in this case may be designed as a ring installed very close to the concrete vessel, as a closure plate or may be made of transverse beams arranged parallel to each other. It is anchored either rigidly or elastically to the concrete vessel by means of springs or to the foundation by means of steel stretching members. (DG) [de

  9. Nuclear power reactors: reactor safety and military and civil defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hvinden, T.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of fission products and plutonium in reactors is briefly described, followed by a short general discussion of reactor safety. The interaction of reactor safety and radioactive release considerations with military and civil defence is thereafter discussed. Reactors and other nuclear plants are factors which must be taken into account in the defence of the district around the site, and as potential targets of both conventional and guerilla attacks and sabotage, requiring special defence. The radiological hazards arising from serious damage to a power reactor by conventional weapons are briefly discussed, and the benefits of underground siting evaluated. Finally the author discusses the significance of the IAEA safeguards work as a preventive factor. (JIW)

  10. Fire safety requirements for electrical cables towards nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Electrical power supply forms a very important part of any nuclear reactor. Power supplies have been categorized in to class I, II, III and IV from reliability point. The safety related equipment are provided with highly reliable power supply to achieve the safety of very high order. Vast network of cables in a nuclear reactor are grouped and segregated to ensure availability of power to at least one group under all anticipated occurrences. Since fire can result in failures leading to unavailability of power caused by common cause, both passive and active fire protection methods are adopted in addition to fire detection system. The paper describes the requirement for passive fire protection to electrical cables viz. fire barrier and fire breaks. The paper gives an account of the tests required to standardize the products. Fire safety implementation for cables in research reactors is described

  11. Guidelines for nuclear reactor equipments safety-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The safety analysis in approving the applications for nuclear reactor constructions (or alterations) is performed by the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety in accordance with various guidelines prescribed by the Atomic Energy Commission. In addition, the above Committee set forth its own regulations for the safety analysis on common problems among various types of nuclear reactors. This book has collected and edited those guidelines and regulations. It has two parts: Part I includes the guidelines issued to date by the Atomic Energy Commission: and Part II - regulations of the Committee. Part I has collected 8 categories of guidelines which relate to following matters: nuclear reactor sites analysis guidelines and standards for their applications; standard exposure dose of plutonium; nuclear ship operation guidelines; safety design analysis guidelines for light-water type, electricity generating nuclear reactor equipments; safety evaluation guidelines for emergency reactor core cooling system of light-water type power reactors; guidelines for exposure dose target values around light-water type electricity generating nuclear reactor equipments, and guidelines for evaluation of above target values; and meteorological guidelines for the safety analysis of electricity generating nuclear reactor equipments. Part II includes regulations of the Committee concerning - the fuel assembly used in boiling-water type and in pressurized-water type reactors; techniques of reactor core heat designs, etc. in boiling-water reactors; and others

  12. Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Current space nuclear power reactor safety issues are discussed with respect to the unique characteristics of these reactors. An approach to achieving adequate safety and a perception of safety is outlined. This approach calls for a carefully conceived safety program which makes uses of lessons learned from previous terrestrial power reactor development programs. This approach includes use of risk analyses, passive safety design features, and analyses/experiments to understand and control off-design conditions. The point is made that some recent accidents concerning terrestrial power reactors do not imply that space power reactors cannot be operated safety

  13. Nuclear safety. Concerns about the nuclear power reactors in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Jim; Aloise, Gene; Flaherty, Thomas J.; Fitzgerald, Duane; Zavala, Mario; Hayward, Mary Alice

    1992-09-01

    the atmosphere, contains defective welds. Another said that reactor operator trainees have received training on inadequate reactor simulators. In contrast, a representative of the Cuban government told us that Cuba wants to build its reactor in accordance with safety standards. Also, according to information provided to us by a representative of the Russian government, Cuba's reactor has been constructed according to safety rules that take into account, among other things, the possible impacts of an earthquake. State Department, NRC, and DOE officials have expressed a number of concerns about the construction and operation of Cuba's nuclear power reactors. According to State Department officials, the United States maintains a comprehensive embargo on any U.S. transactions with Cuba and discourages other countries from providing assistance, except for safety purposes, to Cuba's nuclear power program. The United States would prefer that the construction of the reactors never be completed and wants Cuba to sign the Non-Proliferation Treaty or the Treaty of Tlatelolco, both of which bind signatories to blanket nonproliferation commitments for their entire nuclear program, before the United States considers reversing its policy of discouraging other countries from assisting Cuba with the construction of the reactors. The United States has asked Russia to cease providing any nuclear assistance until Cuba has signed either treaty. NRC officials are aware of, but could not verify, the Cuban emigres' allegations of safety deficiencies because available information was limited. They said, however, that if the allegations were true, the cited deficiencies could affect the safety of the reactors operation. In addition, they expressed concern about the ability of Cuba's industrial infrastructure to support the nuclear power reactors, the lack of a regulatory structure, the adequacy of training for reactor operators, the quality of the civil construction, and the design of the

  14. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  15. Reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned reactor safety research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The reactor safety research program, sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, is described in terms of its program objectives, current status, and future plans. Elements of safety research work applicable to water reactors, fast reactors, and gas cooled reactors are presented together with brief descriptions of current and planned test facilities. (U.S.)

  16. Considerations on nuclear reactor passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having indicated some passive safety systems present in electronuclear reactors (control bars, safety injection system accumulators, reactor cooling after stoppage, hydrogen recombination systems), this report recalls the main characteristics of passive safety systems, and discusses the main issues associated with the assessment of new passive systems (notably to face a sustained loss of electric supply systems or of cold water source) and research axis to be developed in this respect. More precisely, the report comments the classification of safety passive systems as it is proposed by the IAEA, outlines and comments specific aspects of these systems regarding their operation and performance. The next part discusses the safety approach, the control of performance of safety passive systems, issues related to their reliability, and the expected contribution of R and D (for example: understanding of physical phenomena which have an influence of these systems, capacities of simulation of these phenomena, needs of experimentations to validate simulation codes)

  17. Chernobyl and the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report assesses the possible bearing of the Chernobyl accident on the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries. It discusses analyses of the accident performed in several countries as well as improvements to the safety of RBMK reactors announced by the USSR. Several remaining questions are identified. The report compares RBMK safety features with those of commercial reactors in OECD countries and evaluates a number of issues raised by the Chernobyl accident

  18. Safety program considerations for space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cropp, L.O.

    1984-08-01

    This report discusses the necessity for in-depth safety program planning for space nuclear reactor systems. The objectives of the safety program and a proposed task structure is presented for meeting those objectives. A proposed working relationship between the design and independent safety groups is suggested. Examples of safety-related design philosophies are given

  19. Nuclear reactor safety: physics and engineering aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinchin, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    In order to carry out the sort of probabilistic analysis referred to by Farmer (Contemp. Phys.; 22:349(1981)), it is necessary to have a good understanding of the processes involved in both normal and accident conditions in a nuclear reactor. Some of these processes, for a variety of different reactor systems, are considered in sections dealing with the neutron chain reaction, the removal of heat from the reactor, material problems, reliability of protective systems and a number of specific topics of particular interest from the point of view of physics or engineering. (author)

  20. Safety of light water reactors. Risks of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann; Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen; Kessler, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    The book on the safety of light-water reactors includes the following chapters: Part I: Physical and technical safety concept of actual German and future European light-water reactors: (1) Worldwide operated nuclear power plants in 2011, (2) Some reactor physical fundamentals. (3) Nuclear power plants in Germany. (4) Radioactive exposure due to nuclear power plants. (5) Safety concept of light-water reactors. (6) Probabilistic analyses and risk studies. (7) Design of light-water reactors against external incidents. (8) Risk comparison of nuclear power plants and other energy systems. (9) Evaluation of risk studies using the improved (new) safety concept for LWR. (19) The severe reactor accidents of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. Part II: Safety of German LWR in case of a postulated aircraft impact. (11) Literature. (12) Review of requirements and actual design. (13) Incident scenarios. (14) Load approach for aircraft impact. (15) Demonstration of the structural behavior in case of aircraft impact. (16) Special considerations. (17) Evaluation of the safety state of German and foreign nuclear power plants. Part III: ROSOS as example for a computer-based decision making support system for the severe accident management. (19) Literature. (20) Radiological fundamentals, accident management, modeling of the radiological situation. (21) The decision making support system RODOS. (22) RODOS and the Fukushima accident. (23) Recent developments in the radiological emergency management in the European frame.

  1. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  2. Progress report concerning safety research for nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Examination and evaluation of safety research results for nuclear reactor facilities have been performed, as more than a year has elapsed since the plan had been initiated in April, 1976, by the special sub-committee for the safety of nuclear reactor facilities. The research is carried out by being divided roughly into 7 items, and seems to be steadily proceeding, though it does not yet reach the target. The above 7 items include researches for (1) criticality accident, (2) loss of coolant accident, (3) safety for light water reactor fuel, (4) construction safety for reactor facilities, (5) reduction of release of radioactive material, (6) safety evaluation based on the probability theory for reactor facilities, and (7) aseismatic measures for reactor facilities. With discussions on the progress and the results of the research this time, research on the behaviour on fuel in abnormal transients including in-core and out-core experiments has been added to the third item, deleting the power-cooling mismatch experiment in Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of JAERI. Also it has been decided to add two research to the seventh item, namely measured data collection, classification and analysis, and probability assessment of failures due to an earthquake. For these 7 items, the report describes the concrete contents of research to be performed in fiscal years of 1977 and 1978, by discussing on most rational and suitable contents conceivable at present. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Design and safety aspects of nuclear district heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogli, R.; Mathews, D.; Pelloni, S.

    1989-01-01

    Extensive studies on the rationale, the potential and the technology of nuclear district heating have been performed in Switzerland. Beside economics the safety aspects were of primary importance. Due to the high costs to transport heat the heating reactor tend to be small and therefore, minimally staffed and located close to population centers. Stringed safety rules are therefore applying. Gas cooled reactors are well suited as district heating reactors since they have due to their characteristics several inherent features, significant safety margins and a remarkable radioactivity retention potential. Some ways to mitigate the effects of water ingress and graphite corrosion are under investigation. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs

  4. Improving nuclear safety at international research reactors: The Integrated Research Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (IRRSEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David; Newton, Douglas; Connery, Joyce

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear energy continues to play a major role in the world's energy economy. Research and test reactors are an important component of a nation's nuclear power infrastructure as they provide training, experiments and operating experience vital to developing and sustaining the industry. Indeed, nations with aspirations for nuclear power development usually begin their programs with a research reactor program. Research reactors also are vital to international science and technology development. It is important to keep them safe from both accident and sabotage, not only because of our obligation to prevent human and environmental consequence but also to prevent corresponding damage to science and industry. For example, an incident at a research reactor could cause a political and public backlash that would do irreparable harm to national nuclear programs. Following the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, considerable efforts and resources were committed to improving the safety posture of the world's nuclear power plants. Unsafe operation of research reactors will have an amplifying effect throughout a country or region's entire nuclear programs due to political, economic and nuclear infrastructure consequences. (author)

  5. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 4, Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    RA research reactor is thermal heavy water moderated and cooled reactor. Metal uranium 2% enriched fuel elements were used at the beginning of its operation. Since 1976, 80% enriched uranium oxide dispersed in aluminium fuel elements were gradually introduced into the core and are the only ones presently used. Reactor core is cylindrical, having diameter 40 cm and 123 cm high. Reaktor core is made up of 82 fuel elements in aluminium channels, lattice is square, lattice pitch 13 cm. Reactor vessel is cylindrical made of 8 mm thick aluminium, inside diameter 140 cm and 5.5 m high surrounded with neutron reflector and biological shield. There is no containment, the reactor building is playing the shielding role. Three pumps enable circulation of heavy water in the primary cooling circuit. Degradation of heavy water is prevented by helium cover gas. Control rods with cadmium regulate the reactor operation. There are eleven absorption rods, seven are used for long term reactivity compensation, two for automatic power regulation and two for safety shutdown. Total anti reactivity of the rods amounts to 24%. RA reactor is equipped with a number of experimental channels, 45 vertical (9 in the core), 34 in the graphite reflector and two in the water biological shield; and six horizontal channels regularly distributed in the core. This volume include detailed description of systems and components of the RA reactor, reactor core parameters, thermal hydraulics of the core, fuel elements, fuel elements handling equipment, fuel management, and experimental devices [sr

  6. Advanced nuclear reactor safety issues and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    On 18-20 February 2002, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organised, with the co-sponsorship of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and in collaboration with the European Commission (EC), a Workshop on Advanced Nuclear Reactor Safety Issues and Research Needs. Currently, advanced nuclear reactor projects range from the development of evolutionary and advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs to initial work to develop even further advanced designs which go beyond LWR technology (e.g. high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and liquid metal-cooled reactors). These advanced designs include a greater use of advanced technology and safety features than those employed in currently operating plants or approved designs. The objectives of the workshop were to: - facilitate early identification and resolution of safety issues by developing a consensus among participating countries on the identification of safety issues, the scope of research needed to address these issues and a potential approach to their resolution; - promote the preservation of knowledge and expertise on advanced reactor technology; - provide input to the Generation IV International Forum Technology Road-map. In addition, the workshop tried to link advancement of knowledge and understanding of advanced designs to the regulatory process, with emphasis on building public confidence. It also helped to document current views on advanced reactor safety and technology, thereby contributing to preserving knowledge and expertise before it is lost. (author)

  7. New reactor technology: safety improvements in nuclear power systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, M L

    2007-11-01

    Almost 450 nuclear power plants are currently operating throughout the world and supplying about 17% of the world's electricity. These plants perform safely, reliably, and have no free-release of byproducts to the environment. Given the current rate of growth in electricity demand and the ever growing concerns for the environment, nuclear power can only satisfy the need for electricity and other energy-intensive products if it can demonstrate (1) enhanced safety and system reliability, (2) minimal environmental impact via sustainable system designs, and (3) competitive economics. The U.S. Department of Energy with the international community has begun research on the next generation of nuclear energy systems that can be made available to the market by 2030 or earlier, and that can offer significant advances toward these challenging goals; in particular, six candidate reactor system designs have been identified. These future nuclear power systems will require advances in materials, reactor physics, as well as thermal-hydraulics to realize their full potential. However, all of these designs must demonstrate enhanced safety above and beyond current light water reactor systems if the next generation of nuclear power plants is to grow in number far beyond the current population. This paper reviews the advanced Generation-IV reactor systems and the key safety phenomena that must be considered to guarantee that enhanced safety can be assured in future nuclear reactor systems.

  8. EDF's nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction-had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's 'with book' on nuclear safety. (author)

  9. EDF'S nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction - had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's white book on nuclear safety

  10. Small nuclear reactor safety design requirements for autonomous operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozier, K.S.; Kupca, S.

    1997-01-01

    Small nuclear power reactors offer compelling safety advantages in terms of the limited consequences that can arise from major accident events and the enhanced ability to use reliable, passive means to eliminate their occurrence by design. Accordingly, for some small reactor designs featuring a high degree of safety autonomy, it may be-possible to delineate a ''safety envelope'' for a given set of reactor circumstances within which safe reactor operation can be guaranteed without outside intervention for time periods of practical significance (i.e., days or weeks). The capability to operate a small reactor without the need for highly skilled technical staff permanently present, but with continuous remote monitoring, would aid the economic case for small reactors, simplify their use in remote regions and enhance safety by limiting the potential for accidents initiated by inappropriate operator action. This paper considers some of the technical design options and issues associated with the use of small power reactors in an autonomous mode for limited periods. The focus is on systems that are suitable for a variety of applications, producing steam for electricity generation, district heating, water desalination and/or marine propulsion. Near-term prospects at low power levels favour the use of pressurized, light-water-cooled reactor designs, among which those having an integral core arrangement appear to offer cost and passive-safety advantages. Small integral pressurized water reactors have been studied in many countries, including the test operation of prototype systems. (author)

  11. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Format and Contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This is a new complete version of the safety report of nuclear reactor RA is made according to the recommendations of the IAEA. Report includes all the relevant data needed for evaluation of safe operation of this nuclear facility. Each of seven volumes of this report cover separate topics as follows: (1) introduction; (2) Site characteristics; (3) description of the reactor building and installations; (4) description of the reactor; (5) description of the coolant system; (6) description of the regulation and safety instrumentation; (7) description of the power supply system; (8) description of the auxiliary systems; (9) radiation protection issues; (10) radioactive waste management (11) reactor operation; (12) accident analysis during previous operation; (13) analysis of possible accident causes; (14) safety analysis and preventive actions: (15) analysis of significant accidents; (16) analysis of maximum possible accident; (17) environmental impact analysis in case of accident [sr

  12. Nuclear power reactor safety research activities in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Shendi; Huang Yucai; Xu Hanming; Zhang Zhongyue

    1994-01-01

    The power reactor safety research activities in CIAE are briefly reviewed. The research work performed in 1980's and 1990's is mainly emphasised, which is closely related to the design, construction and licensing review of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant and the safety review of Guangdong Nuclear Power Station. Major achievements in the area of thermohydraulics, nuclear fuel, probabilistic safety assessment and severe accident researches are summarized. The foreseeable research plan for the near future, relating to the design and construction of 600 MWe PWR NPP at Qinshan Site (phase II development) is outlined

  13. Molten salt reactor as asymptotic safety nuclear system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.M.; Ignatyev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Safety is becoming the main and priority problem of the nuclear power development. An increase of the active safety measures could hardly be considered as the proper way to achieve the asymptotically high level of nuclear safety. It seem that the more realistic way to achieve such a goal is to minimize risk factors and to maximize the use of inherent and passive safety properties. The passive inherent safety features of the liquid fuel molten salt reactor (MSR) technology are making it attractive for future energy generation. The achievement of the asymptotic safety in MSR is being connected with the minimization of such risk factors as a reactivity excess, radioactivity stored, decay heat, non nuclear energy stored in core. In this paper safety peculiarities of the different MSR concepts are discussed

  14. Nuclear safety requirements for operation licensing of Egyptian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    From the view of responsibility for health and nuclear safety, this work creates a framework for the application of nuclear regulatory rules to ensure safe operation for the sake of obtaining or maintaining operation licensing for nuclear research reactors. It has been performed according to the recommendations of the IAEA for research reactor safety regulations which clearly states that the scope of the application should include all research reactors being designed, constructed, commissioned, operated, modified or decommissioned. From that concept, the present work establishes a model structure and a computer logic program for a regulatory licensing system (RLS code). It applies both the regulatory inspection and enforcement regulatory rules on the different licensing process stages. The present established RLS code is then applied to the Egyptian Research Reactors, namely; the first ET-RR-1, which was constructed and still operating since 1961, and the second MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2) which is now in the preliminary operation stage. The results showed that for the ET-RR-1 reactor, all operational activities, including maintenance, in-service inspection, renewal, modification and experiments should meet the appropriate regulatory compliance action program. Also, the results showed that for the new MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2), all commissioning and operational stages should also meet the regulatory inspection and enforcement action program of the operational licensing safety requirements. (author)

  15. N reactor individual risk comparison to quantitative nuclear safety goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, O.S.; Rainey, T.E.; Zentner, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    A full-scope level III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been completed for N reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided the technical leadership for this work, using the state-of-the-art NUREG-1150 methodology developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The main objectives of this effort were to assess the risks to the public and to the on-site workers posed by the operation of N reactor, to identify changes to the plant that could reduce the overall risk, and to compare those risks to the proposed NRC and DOE quantitative safety goals. This paper presents the methodology adopted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and SNL for individual health risk evaluation, its results, and a comparison to the NRC safety objectives and the DOE nuclear safety guidelines. The N reactor results, are also compared with the five NUREG-1150 nuclear plants. Only internal events are compared here because external events are not yet reported in the current draft NUREG-1150. This is the first full-scope level III PRA study with a detailed quantitative safety goal comparison performed for DOE production reactors

  16. 1986 international meeting of nuclear reactor safety committees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    During the week of Oct. 20-23, 1986, nuclear power-plant safety representatives from the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), France, Japan, and the US assembled to discuss subjects of mutual interest. The meeting, the first of its kind, was organized under the leadership and direction of David A. Ward, Chairman, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and held at the Wingspread Conference Center of the Johnson Foundation in Racine, Wis. Approximately 40 representatives of the several countries attended. Discussions were candid and provided the participants an opportunity to share thoughts and information on nuclear safety concerns and solutions

  17. Software reliability and safety in nuclear reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    Planning the development, use and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor protection systems in such a way as to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Computer Safety and Reliability Group, Lawrence Livermore that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor National Laboratory, that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor protection systems. There are two central themes in the report, First, software considerations cannot be fully understood in isolation from computer hardware and application considerations. Second, the process of engineering reliability and safety into a computer system requires activities to be carried out throughout the software life cycle. The report discusses the many activities that can be carried out during the software life cycle to improve the safety and reliability of the resulting product. The viewpoint is primarily that of the assessor, or auditor

  18. Software reliability and safety in nuclear reactor protection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Planning the development, use and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor protection systems in such a way as to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Computer Safety and Reliability Group, Lawrence Livermore that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor National Laboratory, that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor protection systems. There are two central themes in the report, First, software considerations cannot be fully understood in isolation from computer hardware and application considerations. Second, the process of engineering reliability and safety into a computer system requires activities to be carried out throughout the software life cycle. The report discusses the many activities that can be carried out during the software life cycle to improve the safety and reliability of the resulting product. The viewpoint is primarily that of the assessor, or auditor.

  19. The nuclear safety case for the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, A.; Garea, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the safety case being used in the licensing of Australia's Replacement Research Reactor. The reactor is a 20 MW pool-type research reactor and is being constructed at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre in Sydney's south. It will be owned and operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and will take over the duties currently performed by HIFAR, a DIDO-type reactor currently operating at the site. The safety case for the RRR considers all aspects of normal operation and anticipated occurrences and will be subject to periodic review and updated in line with evolving methodologies and modifications to plant and procedures. Its scope and degree of detail ensure that the risk posed to members of the public, operators and environment are all adequately low and well in the regulatory limits

  20. Contributions to safety studies for new concepts of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdu, F.

    2003-12-01

    The complete study of molten salt reactors, designed for a massive and durable nuclear energy production, must include neutronics, hydraulics and thermal effects. This coupled study, using the MCNP and Trio U codes, is undertaken in the case of the MSRE (molten salt reactor experiment) prototype. The obtained results fit very well the experiment. Their extrapolation suggests ways of improving the safety coefficients of power molten salt reactors. A second part is devoted to accelerator driven subcritical reactors, developed to incinerate radioactive waste.We propose a method to measure the prompt reactivity from the decay following a neutron pulse. It relies only on the distribution of times between generations, which is a characteristic of the reactor. This method is implemented on the results of the MUSE 4 experiment, and the obtained reactivity is accurate within 5%. (author)

  1. Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarno, Kevin; Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth; Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

  2. Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

    2010-02-01

    This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

  3. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning nuclear reactors at multiple-reactor stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittenbrock, N.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWR) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors (BWR) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services

  4. Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    To develop a strategy for incorporating and demonstrating safety, it is necessary to enumerate the unique aspects of space power reactor systems from a safety standpoint. These features must be differentiated from terrestrial nuclear power plants so that our experience can be applied properly. Some ideas can then be developed on how safe designs can be achieved so that they are safe and perceived to be safe by the public. These ideas include operating only after achieving a stable orbit, developing an inherently safe design, ''designing'' in safety from the start and managing the system development (design) so that it is perceived safe. These and other ideas are explored further in this paper

  5. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. This Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants and Technical Committee meetings. It supersedes former Safety Series publications Nos 52, 74 and 105

  6. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. This Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants and Technical Committee meetings. It supersedes former Safety Series publications Nos 52, 74 and 105

  7. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. This Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants and Technical Committee meetings. It supersedes former Safety Series publications Nos 52, 74 and 105

  8. Thermal hydraulic tests for reactor safety system -Research on the improvement of nuclear safety-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Park, Chun Kyeong; Yang, Seon Kyu; Chung, Chang Hwan; Chun, Shee Yeong; Song, Cheol Hwa; Chun, Hyeong Gil; Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yeon; Cho, Yeong Ro; Kim, Bok Deuk; Min, Kyeong Ho

    1994-07-01

    The present research aims at the development of the thermal hydraulic verification test technology for the reactor safety system of the conventional and advanced nuclear power plant and the development of the advanced thermal hydraulic measuring techniques. (Author)

  9. Bearings with a key role in nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.

    1981-01-01

    The most critical period during the operation of heavy-duty pumps occurs at run-up, when sudden high loads coincide with below normal oil pressure. When those pumps are a key component of a nuclear reactor safety-system, reliability takes on a special meaning. Electricite de France recently invited a British company, Michell Bearings, to find a solution to these 'black-start' problems, the details of which are described in the following article

  10. Advanced nuclear reactor safety design technology research in NPIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.

    2014-01-01

    After the Fukushima accident happen, Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) construction has been suspended in China for a time. Now the new regulatory rule has been proposed that the most advanced safety standard must be adopted for the new NPPs and practical elimination of large fission product release by design during the next five plans period. So the advanced reactor research is developing in China. NPIC is engaging on the ACP1000 and ACP100 (Small Module Reactor) design. The main design character will be introduced in this paper. The Passive Combined with Active (PCWA) design was adopted during the ACP1000 design to reduce the core damage frequency (CDF); the Cavity Injection System (CIS) is design to mitigation the consequence of the severe accident. Advance passive safety system was designed to ensure the long term residual heat removal during the Small Module Reactor (SMR). The SMR will be utilized to be the floating reactors, district heating reactor and so on. Besides, the Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory (LRSDT) also engaged on the fundamental thermal-hydraulic characteristic research in support of the system validation. (author)

  11. Ventilation safety of facilities comprising nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guirlet, J.

    1982-01-01

    The reliability of the ventilation is one of the most important aspects in the prevention of the nuisances that a nuclear installation can provide, since the ventilation is located at the last barrier. A certain number of essential points have been recalled here. But it is necessary to bear in mind other requirements such as the limitation in the number of crossovers, the answers to be found should the system fail, the need to show that ventilation systems do not in themselves bring other nuisances such as noise, irradiation or contamination hazards, likelyhood of recycling the contamination, vibrations, fire. Finally, it is absolutely essential, right from the project stage, that the design ensures that very good accessibility, very easy dismantling and handling, as well as all the facilities needed to make sure of the initial and periodic tests, are guaranteed [fr

  12. Safety device for nuclear fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownlee, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A plurality of radially arranged and neutron absorbing baffles are stacked in vertical sets under the fuel core assemblies, and the whole enclosed in a bottle shaped containment vessel. The radially arranged baffles of each set extend vertically, and each set has double the number of baffles as the set above it in the stack. A melt-down of a fuel core assembly drops the fissioning nuclear fuel into the stacked sets of baffles, there, as it passes through, to be progressively divided, redivided and dispersed in smaller and smaller masses between the doubling number of baffles in safe fuel pellet size. Neutron absorbing containment prevents contamination of the environment and together with cooling means stops fissioning of fuel

  13. Fatigue check of nuclear safety class 1 reactor coolant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qing; Fang Yonggang; Chu Qibao; Xu Yu; Li Hailong

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue and thermal ratcheting analyses of nuclear safety Class 1 reactor coolant pipe in a nuclear power plant were independently carried out in this paper. The software used for calculation is ROCOCO, which is based on RCC-M code. The difference of nuclear safety Class 1 pipe fatigue evaluation between RCC-M code and ASME code was compared. The main aspects of comparison include the calculation scoping of fatigue design, the calculation method of primary plus secondary stress intensity, the elastic-plastic correction coefficient calculation, and the dynamic load combination method etc. By correcting inconsistent algorithm of ASME code within ROCOCO, the fatigue usage factor and thermal ratcheting design margin of 65 mm and 55 mm wall thickness of the pipe were obtained. The results show that the minimum wall thickness of the pipe must exceed 55 mm and the design value of the thermal ratcheting of 55 mm wall thickness reaches 95% of the allowable value. (authors)

  14. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Agostinho Angelo Sordi, Gian Maria; Moralles, Mauricio; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64.

  15. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, V. M.; Sordi, G. M. A. A.; Moralles, M.; Filho, T. M.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64. (authors)

  16. 10 CFR 73.58 - Safety/security interface requirements for nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements for nuclear power reactors. (a) Each operating nuclear power reactor licensee with a license... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety/security interface requirements for nuclear power reactors. 73.58 Section 73.58 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF...

  17. Lessons from Fukushima for Improving the Safety of Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Edwin

    2012-02-01

    The March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has revealed serious vulnerabilities in the design, operation and regulation of nuclear power plants. While some aspects of the accident were plant- and site-specific, others have implications that are broadly applicable to the current generation of nuclear plants in operation around the world. Although many of the details of the accident progression and public health consequences are still unclear, there are a number of lessons that can already be drawn. The accident demonstrated the need at nuclear plants for robust, highly reliable backup power sources capable of functioning for many days in the event of a complete loss of primary off-site and on-site electrical power. It highlighted the importance of detailed planning for severe accident management that realistically evaluates the capabilities of personnel to carry out mitigation operations under extremely hazardous conditions. It showed how emergency plans rooted in the assumption that only one reactor at a multi-unit site would be likely to experience a crisis fail miserably in the event of an accident affecting multiple reactor units simultaneously. It revealed that alternate water injection following a severe accident could be needed for weeks or months, generating large volumes of contaminated water that must be contained. And it reinforced the grim lesson of Chernobyl: that a nuclear reactor accident could lead to widespread radioactive contamination with profound implications for public health, the economy and the environment. While many nations have re-examined their policies regarding nuclear power safety in the months following the accident, it remains to be seen to what extent the world will take the lessons of Fukushima seriously and make meaningful changes in time to avert another, and potentially even worse, nuclear catastrophe.

  18. Proceedings of the seminar on nuclear safety research and the workshop on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    The seminar on the nuclear safety research was held on November 20, 2000 according to the start of new five year safety research plan (FY2001-2005: established by Nuclear Safety Commission) with 79 participants. In the seminar, Commissioner Dr. Kanagawa gave the outline of the next five year safety research plan. Following this presentation, progresses and future scopes of safety researches in the fields of reactor facility, fuel cycle facility, radioactive waste and environmental impact on radiation at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) were reported. After the seminar, the workshop on reactor safety research was held on November 21-22, 2000 with 141 participants. In the workshop, four sessions titled safety of efficient and economic utilization of nuclear fuel, safety related to long-term utilization of power reactors, research on common safety-related issues and toward further improvement of nuclear safety were organized and, outcomes and future perspectives in these wide research R and D in the related area at other organizations including NUPEC, JAPEIC and Kansai Electric Power Co. was presented in each session. This report compiles outlines of the presentations and used materials in the seminar and the workshop to form the proceedings for the both meetings. (author)

  19. Application of CFD Codes in Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Höhne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD is increasingly being used in nuclear reactor safety (NRS analyses as a tool that enables safety relevant phenomena occurring in the reactor coolant system to be described in more detail. Numerical investigations on single phase coolant mixing in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR have been performed at the FZD for almost a decade. The work is aimed at describing the mixing phenomena relevant for both safety analysis, particularly in steam line break and boron dilution scenarios, and mixing phenomena of interest for economical operation and the structural integrity. For the experimental investigation of horizontal two phase flows, different non pressurized channels and the TOPFLOW Hot Leg model in a pressure chamber was build and simulated with ANSYS CFX. In a common project between the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Görlitz and FZD the behaviour of insulation material released by a LOCA released into the containment and might compromise the long term emergency cooling systems is investigated. Moreover, the actual capability of CFD is shown to contribute to fuel rod bundle design with a good CHF performance.

  20. Nuclear technology and reactor safety engineering. The situation ten years after the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhofer, A.

    1996-01-01

    Ten years ago, on April 26, 1986 the most serious accident ever in the history of nuclear tgechnology worldwide happened in unit 4 of the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl in the Ukraine, this accident unveiling to the world at large that the Soviet reactor design lines are bearing unthought of safety engineering deficits. The dimensions of this reactor accident on site, and the radioactive fallout spreading far and wide to many countries in Europe, vividly nourished the concern of great parts of the population in the Western world about the safety of nuclear technology, and re-instigated debates about the risks involved and their justification. Now that ten years have elapsed since the accident, it is appropriate to strike a balance and analyse the situation today. The number of nuclear power plants operating worldwide has been growing in the last few years and this trend will continue, primarily due to developments in Asia. The Chernobyl reactor accident has pushed the international dimension of reactor safety to the foreground. Thus the Western world had reason enough to commit itself to enhancing the engineered safety of reactors in East Europe. The article analyses some of the major developments and activities to date and shows future perspectives. (orig.) [de

  1. SAFETY ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY FOR AGED CANDU® 6 NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOLFGANG HARTMANN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Safety Analysis for CANDU® 6 nuclear reactors as affected by main Heat Transport System (HTS aging. Operational and aging related changes of the HTS throughout its lifetime may lead to restrictions in certain safety system settings and hence some restriction in performance under certain conditions. A step in confirming safe reactor operation is the tracking of relevant data and their corresponding interpretation by the use of appropriate thermalhydraulic analytic models. Safety analyses ranging from the assessment of safety limits associated with the prevention of intermittent fuel sheath dryout for a slow Loss of Regulation (LOR analysis and fission gas release after a fuel failure are summarized. Specifically for fission gas release, the thermalhydraulic analysis for a fresh core and an 11 Effective Full Power Years (EFPY aged core was summarized, leading to the most severe stagnation break sizes for the inlet feeder break and the channel failure time. Associated coolant conditions provide the input data for fuel analyses. Based on the thermalhydraulic data, the fission product inventory under normal operating conditions may be calculated for both fresh and aged cores, and the fission gas release may be evaluated during the transient. This analysis plays a major role in determining possible radiation doses to the public after postulated accidents have occurred.

  2. Nuclear reactor safety research since Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynatt, F.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident has resulted in redirection of reactor safety research priorities. The small release to the environment of radioactive iodine-13 to 17 curies in a total radioactivity release of 2.4 million to 13 million curies-has led to a new emphasis on the physical chemistry of fission product behavior in accidents; the fact that the nuclear core was severely damaged but did not melt down has opened a new accident regime-that of the degraded core; the role of the operators in the progression and severity of the accident has shifted emphasis from equipment reliability to human reliability. As research progresses in these areas, the technical base for regulation and risk analysis will change substantially

  3. Nuclear reactor safety research since three mile island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynatt, F R

    1982-04-09

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident has resulted in redirection of reactor safety research priorities. The small release to the environment of radioactive iodine-13 to 17 curies in a total radioactivity release of 2.4 million to 13 million curies-has led to a new emphasis on the physical chemistry of fission product behavior in accidents; the fact that the nuclear core was severely damaged but did not melt down has opened a new accident regime-that of the degraded core; the role of the operators in the progression and severity of the accident has shifted emphasis from equipment reliability to human reliability. As research progresses in these areas, the technical base for regulation and risk analysis will change substantially.

  4. A cost-effective methodology to internalize nuclear safety in nuclear reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, M.; Grinblat, P.; Schlamp, M.

    2003-01-01

    A new methodology to perform nuclear reactor design, balancing safety and economics at the conceptual engineering stage, is presented in this work. The goal of this integral methodology is to take into account safety aspects in an optimization design process where the design variables are balanced in order to obtain a better figure of merit related with reactor economic performance. Design parameter effects on characteristic or critical safety variables, chosen from reactor behavior during accidents (safety performance indicators), are synthesized on Design Maps. These maps allow one to compare the safety indicator with limits, which are determined by design criteria or regulations, and to transfer these restrictions to the design parameters. In this way, reactor dynamic response and other safety aspects are integrated in a global optimization process, by means of additional rules to the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical calculations. An application of the methodology, implemented in Integrated Reactor Evaluation Program 3 (IREP3) code, to optimize safety systems of CAREM prototype is presented. It consists in balancing the designs of the Emergency Injection System (EIS), the Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS), the primary circuit water inventory and the containment height, to cope with loss of coolant and loss of heat sink (LOHS) accidental sequences, taking into account cost and reactor performance. This methodology turns out to be promising to internalize cost-efficiently safety issues. It also allows one to evaluate the incremental costs of implementing higher safety levels

  5. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces.

  6. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces

  7. Nuclear reactor conceptual design: methodology for cost-effective internalisation of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, M.; Grinblat, P.; Schlamp, M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel and promising methodology to perform nuclear reactor design is presented in this work. It achieves to balance efficiently safety and economics at the conceptual engineering stage. The key to this integral approach is to take into account safety aspects in a design optimisation process where the design variables are balanced in order to obtain a better figure of merit related with reactor economic performance. Design parameter effects on characteristic or critical safety variables, chosen from reactor behaviour during accidents and from its probabilistic safety assessment -safety performance indicators-, are synthesised on Safety Design Maps. These maps allow one to compare these indicators with limit values, which are determined by design criteria or regulations, and to transfer these restrictions to the design parameters. In this way, reactor dynamic response and other safety aspects are integrated in a global optimisation process, by means of additional rules to the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical calculations. This methodology turns out to be promising to balance and optimise reactor and safety system design in an early engineering stage, in order to internalise cost-efficiently safety issues. It also allows one to evaluate the incremental costs of implementing higher safety levels. Furthermore, through this methodology, a simplified design can be obtained, compared to the resultant complexity when these concepts are introduced in a later engineering stage. (author)

  8. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.; Hoshi, T.; Ohnishi, N.; Fujishiro, T.; Inabe, T.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental research program, named Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) Program, has been progressing in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using a modified TRIGA-ACPR. This paper is prepared to describe the outline of the NSRR program. The purpose of the NSRR program is to examine the behaviors of fuel rods under various accidental conditions of power reactors so as to establish realistic safety criteria and to develop analytical models for prediction of fuel failures. We expect to contribute finally to the improvement of reactor design and fuel fabrication techniques based on these experimental results. The NSRR experiments will be performed in the large central experimental tube, which is one of the most excellent features of this reactor, using specially designed capsules or loops which can accommodate up to 49 BWR type test fuels. Many types of test fuels in various conditions will be examined by the NSRR program, such as BWR, PWR and FBR type fuels from the beginning of life to the end of life with and without simulated reactor internal structures. The experiments will be continued for more than 10 years divided into three phases. The first phase of the program will be devoted to the experiments pertaining to reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). In these experiments we will make use of the excellent pulsing capability of ACPR, which is expected to generate 100 MW-sec prompt energy release with 1.3 msec of minimum reactor period by 4.7 dollar reactivity insertion and to yield more than 280 cal/g-UO 2 heat deposit even in an approximately 10% enriched BWR type test fuel. (280 cal/g-UO 2 is believed enough heat deposit to cause fuel failure.) In general, heat flow behaviors from fuel meat to clad and from clad to coolant are very complex phenomena, but they are the key point in analyzing transient response of fuels. In the sudden heat transient conditions brought by pulsing, however, it will be possible to examine each phenomenon separately

  9. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, M; Hoshi, T; Ohnishi, N; Fujishiro, T; Inabe, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    1974-07-01

    An experimental research program, named Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) Program, has been progressing in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using a modified TRIGA-ACPR. This paper is prepared to describe the outline of the NSRR program. The purpose of the NSRR program is to examine the behaviors of fuel rods under various accidental conditions of power reactors so as to establish realistic safety criteria and to develop analytical models for prediction of fuel failures. We expect to contribute finally to the improvement of reactor design and fuel fabrication techniques based on these experimental results. The NSRR experiments will be performed in the large central experimental tube, which is one of the most excellent features of this reactor, using specially designed capsules or loops which can accommodate up to 49 BWR type test fuels. Many types of test fuels in various conditions will be examined by the NSRR program, such as BWR, PWR and FBR type fuels from the beginning of life to the end of life with and without simulated reactor internal structures. The experiments will be continued for more than 10 years divided into three phases. The first phase of the program will be devoted to the experiments pertaining to reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). In these experiments we will make use of the excellent pulsing capability of ACPR, which is expected to generate 100 MW-sec prompt energy release with 1.3 msec of minimum reactor period by 4.7 dollar reactivity insertion and to yield more than 280 cal/g-UO{sub 2} heat deposit even in an approximately 10% enriched BWR type test fuel. (280 cal/g-UO{sub 2} is believed enough heat deposit to cause fuel failure.) In general, heat flow behaviors from fuel meat to clad and from clad to coolant are very complex phenomena, but they are the key point in analyzing transient response of fuels. In the sudden heat transient conditions brought by pulsing, however, it will be possible to examine each phenomenon

  10. Studies on environment safety and application of advanced reactor for inland nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, L.; Jie, L.

    2014-01-01

    To study environment safety assessment of inland nuclear power plants (NPPs), the impact of environment safety under the normal operation was researched and the environment risk of serious accidents was analyzed. Moreover, the requirements and relevant provisions of site selection between international nuclear power plant and China's are comparatively studied. The conclusion was that the environment safety assessment of inland and coastal nuclear power plant have no essential difference; the advanced reactor can meet with high criteria of environment safety of inland nuclear power plants. In this way, China is safe and feasible to develop inland nuclear power plant. China's inland nuclear power plants will be as big market for advanced reactor. (author)

  11. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1; Problemy bezopasnosti yaderno-ehnergeticheskikh ustanovok. Tom 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shal` nov, A V [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Proceedings of the 9. Topical Meeting `Problems of nuclear reactor safety` are presented. Papers include results of studies and developments associated with methods of calculation and complex computerized simulation for stationary and transient processes in nuclear power plants. Main problems of reactor safety are discussed as well as rector accidents on operating NPP`s are analyzed.

  12. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  13. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 8, Auxiliary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This volume describes RA reactor auxiliary systems, as follows: special ventilation system, special drainage system, hot cells, systems for internal transport. Ventilation system is considered as part of the reactor safety and protection system. Its role is eliminate possible radioactive particles dispersion in the environment. Special drainage system includes pipes and reservoirs with the safety role, meaning absorption or storage of possible radioactive waste water from the reactor building. Hot cells existing in the RA reactor building are designed for production of sealed radioactive sources, including packaging and transport [sr

  14. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.

    The people of Ontario have begun to receive the benefits of a low cost, assured supply of electrical energy from CANDU nuclear stations. This indigenous energy source also has excellent safety characteristics. Safety has been one of the central themes of the CANDU development program from its very beginning. A great deal of work has been done to establish that public risks are small. However, safety design criteria are now undergoing extensive review, with a real prospect of more stringent requirements being applied in the future. Considering the newness of the technology it is not surprising that a consensus does not yet exist; this makes it imperative to discuss the issues. It is time to examine the policies and practice of reactor safety management in Canada to decide whether or not further restrictions are justified in the light of current knowledge

  15. Development of 3D CFD simulation method in nuclear reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosli Darmawan; Mariah Adam

    2012-01-01

    One of the most prevailing issues in the operation of nuclear reactor is the safety of the system. Worldwide publicity on a few nuclear accidents as well as the notorious Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing have always brought about public fear on anything related to nuclear. Most findings on the nuclear reactor accidents are closely related to the reactor cooling system. Thus, the understanding of the behaviour of reactor cooling system is very important to ensure the development and improvement on safety can be continuously done. Throughout the development of nuclear reactor technology, investigation and analysis on reactor safety have gone through several phases. In the early days, analytical and experimental methods were employed. For the last three decades 1D system level codes were widely used. The continuous development of nuclear reactor technology has brought about more complex system and processes of nuclear reactor operation. More detailed dimensional simulation codes are needed to assess these new reactors. This paper discusses the development of 3D CFD usage in nuclear reactor safety analysis worldwide. A brief review on the usage of CFD at Malaysia's Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI is also presented. (author)

  16. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarride, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The author proposes an overview of methods and concepts used in the nuclear industry, at the design level as well as at the exploitation level, to ensure an acceptable safety level, notably in the case of nuclear reactors. He first addresses the general objectives of nuclear safety and the notion of acceptable risk: definition and organisation of nuclear safety (relationships between safety authorities and operators), notion of acceptable risk, deterministic safety approach and main safety principles (safety functions and confinement barriers, concept of defence in depth). Then, the author addresses the safety approach at the design level: studies of operational situations, studies of internal and external aggressions, safety report, design principles for important-for-safety systems (failure criterion, redundancy, failure prevention, safety classification). The next part addresses safety during exploitation and general exploitation rules: definition of the operation domain and of its limits, periodic controls and tests, management in case of incidents, accidents or aggressions

  17. Nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics safety analysis and thoughts on FUKUSHIMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this article is to show my thoughts on the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is cited from a summary of my lecture talk in Indonesia, in the beginning of the last December, 2011. This talk was based on my previous lecture and seminar talks including those delivered at MIT, June 16, at the ANS Annual Meeting in Hollywood, Florida, June 28 at NURETH-13 in Toronto, September 27, and others. The content is based on the open and latest information available to date in Japan. It may contain some erroneous or uncertain information. I tried to minimize it to my best capability. Also I tried to eliminate any critical issues or opinions that may jeopardize some people who were involved in. The latter half of this article will be excerpts of my recent R and D activities related to the safety-by-design for sodium cooled fast reactors and light water reactors, thermal hydraulics analysis focusing on the simulation-based technology, in particular subchannel analysis and computational fluid dynamics. (J.P.N.)

  18. Nuclear Safety Bureau: safety objectives and principles for the proposed ANSTO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westall, D.

    1993-01-01

    Siting criteria and safety assessment principles were previously promulgated by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC), and have been applied by ANSTO and the Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB). The NSB is revising these criteria and principles to take account of evolving nuclear safety standards and practices. The NSB Safety and Siting Assessment Principles (SSAP) are presented and it is estimated that it will provide a comprehensive basis for the safety assessment of research reactors in Australia, and be applicable to all stages of a reactor project: siting: design and construction; operation; modification; and decommissioning. The SSAP are similar to the principles promulgated by the AAEC, in that probabilistic safety criteria are set for assessment of design, however these criteria are complimentary to a deterministic design basis approach. This is a similar approach to that recently published by the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate 4 . Siting principles are now also included, where they were previously separate, and require a consideration of the consequences of severe accidents which are an extension of accidents catered for by the design of the plant. Criteria for radiation doses due to normal operations and design basis accidents are included in the principles for safety assessment. 9 refs

  19. Safety of evolutionary and innovative nuclear reactors: IAEA activities and world efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, T.; Gasparini, M.

    2004-01-01

    'Defence in Depth' approach constitutes the basis of the IAEA safety standards for nuclear power plants. Lessons learned from the current generation of reactors suggest that, for the next generation of reactor designs, the Defence in Depth philosophy should be retained, and that its implementation should be guided by the probabilistic insights. Recent developments in the area of general safety requirements based on Defence in Depth approach are examined and summarized. Global efforts to harmonize safety requirements for evolutionary nuclear power plants have involved many countries and organizations such as IAEA, US EPRI and European Utility EUR Organization. In recent years, developments of innovative nuclear power plants are also being discussed. The IAEA is currently developing a safety approach specifically for innovative nuclear reactors. This approach will eventually lead to a proposal of safety requirements for innovative reactors. Such activities related to safety requirements of evolutionary and innovative reactors are introduced. Various evolutionary and innovative reactor designs are reported in the world. The safety design features of evolutionary large LWRs, innovative LWRs, Modular High Temperature Gas Reactors and Small Liquid Metal Cooled LMRs are also introduced. Enhanced safety features proposed in such reactors are discussed and summarized according to the levels of Defence in Depth. For future nuclear plants, international cooperation and harmonization, especially in the area of safety, appear to be inevitable. Based on the past experience with many member states, the IAEA believes itself to be the uniquely positioned international organization to play this key role. (authors)

  20. Code on the safety of nuclear research reactors: Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide the essential requirements and recommendations for the safe operation of research reactors, with emphasis on the supervisory and managerial aspects. However, the publication also provides some guidance and information on topics concerning all the organizations involved in operation. These objectives are expressed in terms of requirements and recommendations for the safe operation of research reactors. Emphasis is placed on the safety requirements that shall be met rather than on the ways in which they can be met. The requirements and recommendations may form the foundation necessary for a Member State to develop regulations and safety criteria for its research reactor programme.

  1. Main safety lessons from 5-year operation of the renovated Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anh, T.H.; Lam, P.V.; An, T.K.; Khang, N.P.; Tan, D.Q.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents main safety related characteristics of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR), which was reconstructed in 1982 at the site of the former TRIGA Mark II, while retaining some of its structures. Experience acquired from reactor operation is analysed. The programme of investigations aimed at better ensuring nuclear safety of the reactor, together with some of its results are presented. Finally some propositions to improve the present situation are suggested. (Authors). (2 Tables, 2 fig.)

  2. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 16, Maximum hypothetical accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Fault tree analysis of the maximum hypothetical accident covers the basic elements: accident initiation, phase development phases - scheme of possible accident flow. Cause of the accident initiation is the break of primary cooling pipe, heavy water system. Loss of primary coolant causes loss of pressure in the primary circuit at the coolant input in the reactor vessel. This initiates safety protection system which should automatically shutdown the reactor. Separate chapters are devoted to: after-heat removal, coolant and moderator loss; accident effects on the reactor core, effects in the reactor building, and release of radioactive wastes [sr

  3. Code on the safety of nuclear research reactors: Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of this publication is to provide a safety basis for the design of a research reactor and for the assessment of the design. Another objective is to cover certain aspects related to regulatory supervision, siting and quality assurance, as far as these are related to activities for the design of a research reactor. These objectives are expressed in terms of requirements and recommendations for the design of research reactors. Emphasis is placed on the safety requirements that shall be met rather than on ways in which they can be met. The requirements and recommendations may form the foundation necessary for a Member State to develop specific regulations and safety criteria for its research reactor programme.

  4. The safety feature of hydraulic driving system of control rod for 200 MW nuclear heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Zongbo; Wu Yuanqiang

    1997-01-01

    The hydraulic driving system of control rod is used as control rod drive mechanism in 200 MW nuclear heating reactor. Design of this system is based on passive system, integrating drive and guide of control rod. The author analyzes the inherent safety and the design safety of this system, with mechanism of control rod not ejecting when the pressure of pressure vessel is lost, and calculating result of core not exposing when the amount of coolant is drained by broken pipe. The results indicate that this system has good safety feature, and assures reactor safety under any accident conditions, providing important technology support for 200 MW nuclear heating reactor with inherent safety feature

  5. Safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    One of the first tasks of the NFPQT Committee was to determine which DOE reactors would be assessed. The Committee determined that in view of the limited time available to conduct the assessment, 13 DOE reactors were of such size (physical, power or fission product inventory) to warrant review. This determination was approved by the Under Secretary. A decision was also made in the cases of three weapons material production reactors, C, K and P, to concentrate on the K reactor only, since all three are of the same basic design, have the same operating features, are all at the same site, and are all operated by the same contractor. The assessment was accomplished in the following ways: reviewing the results of assessments conducted by the DOE organizations with reactor safety responsibilities, which were undertaken in compliance with the request of the various program directors; reviewing selected documents that were requested by the Committee and assembled at DOE Headquarters; interviewing DOE Headquarters and Field Office personnel; and conducting on-site reviews of four reactors located at four different sites. The four reactors for on-site reviews were: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); K Production Reactor; High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Specific findings and recommendations from the assessment are presented

  6. Nuclear reactor safety: on the history of the regulatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okrent, D.

    1981-01-01

    This manuscript is derived from a long report which examines the history of the evolution of light water reactor safety. The central portion of the document provides a historical view of the development of siting policy and the major safety issues which interacted strongly with siting policy. A very incomplete selection of the very many important issues and developments in light water reactor safety is also included. Coverage of the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has deliberately been abbreviated to include only a few selected aspects

  7. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed PROMETHEUS Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory

  8. General view about reactor safety nuclear power plants in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparian, A.E.; Silva, D.E.; Salvatore, J.E.L.; Lima, J.M. de

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the principles and goals that have guided, as well as the methods that have been used by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) to set forth measures aiming at providing safety to the Brazilian nuclear power plants. The status of the licensing process of these power plants is shown. The performance and the results obtained so far in relation to the nuclear safety are also described. (author)

  9. On application of CFD codes to problems of nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, Petr

    2005-01-01

    The 'Exploratory Meeting of Experts to Define an Action Plan on the Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Codes to Nuclear Reactor Safety Problems' held in May 2002 at Aix-en-Province, France, recommended formation of writing groups to report the need of guidelines for use and assessment of CFD in single-phase nuclear reactor safety problems, and on recommended extensions to CFD codes to meet the needs of two-phase problems in nuclear reactor safety. This recommendations was supported also by Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents and led to formation oaf three Writing Groups. The first writing Group prepared a summary of existing best practice guidelines for single phase CFD analysis and made a recommendation on the need for nuclear reactor safety specific guidelines. The second Writing Group selected those nuclear reactor safety applications for which understanding requires or is significantly enhanced by single-phase CFD analysis, and proposed a methodology for establishing assesment matrices relevant to nuclear reactor safety applications. The third writing group performed a classification of nuclear reactor safety problems where extension of CFD to two-phase flow may bring real benefit, a classification of different modeling approaches, and specification and analysis of needs in terms of physical and numerical assessments. This presentation provides a review of these activities with the most important conclusions and recommendations (Authors)

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  11. Safety Harmonization of Nuclear Reactors in Europe; La armonizacion de la seguridad de los reactores nucleares en Europa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevan Bolea, M. T.

    2006-07-01

    Dialogue and common tasks over the past few years have intensified among high level figures responsible for regulation organizations involved in nuclear installations from European countries as well as others. The best indicator of this is the harmonization of safety levels for european nuclear reactors. The CSN increasingly participates more intensely in three relevant international associations on these matters: INRA, FORO IBEROAMERICANO and WENDA. A detail study has been carried out by a WENRA work group whose results represent a large contribution made toward harmonization at reference levels on reactor safety issues, both from a legal viewpoint, and for their implantation in nuclear power plants. The President of the CSN explains in detail the most relevant aspects of this Final Report from WENRA. (Author)

  12. Performance Monitoring for Nuclear Safety Related Instrumentation at PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Mohd Sabri Minhat

    2015-01-01

    The Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) at Malaysia Nuclear Agency is a TRIGA Mark II type reactor and pool type cooled by natural circulation of light water. This paper describe on performance monitoring for nuclear safety related instrumentation in TRIGA PUSPATI Reactor (RTP) of based on various parameter of reactor safety instrument channel such as log power, linear power, Fuel temperature, coolant temperature will take into consideration. Methodology of performance on estimation and monitoring is to evaluate and analysis of reactor parameters which is important of reactor safety and control. And also to estimate power measurement, differential of log and linear power and fuel temperature during reactor start-up, operation and shutdown .This study also focus on neutron power fluctuation from fission chamber during reactor start-up and operation. This work will present result of performance monitoring from RTP which indicated the safety parameter identification and initiate safety action on crossing the threshold set point trip. Conclude that performance of nuclear safety related instrumentation will improved the reactor control and safety parameter during reactor start-up, operation and shutdown. (author)

  13. The assessment of structural dynamics problems in nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebe, R.

    1978-10-01

    The paper discusses important physical features of structural dynamics problems in reactor safety. First a general characterization is given of the following problems: Containment deformation due to pool-dynamics during BWR-blowdown; behavior of the core internals due to PWR-blowdown loads; dynamic response of a nuclear power plant during an earthquake; fuel element deformation due to local pressure pulses in an LMFBR core. Several criterias are formulated to classify typical problems so that a better choise can be made both of appropriate mathematical/numerical as well as experimental techniques. The degree of physical coupling between structural dynamics and fluid dynamics is discussed in more detail since it requires particular attention when selecting problem-oriented methods of solution. Some examples are given to illustrate the application and to compare advantages and disadvantages of several numerical methods. Then description is given of experimental techniques in structural dynamics and typical problem areas are identified. Finally some results are presented concerning the fuel element deformation problem in LMFBRs and from the general considerations some important conclusions are summarized. (orig.) 891 RW 892 AP [de

  14. Qualification of safety-critical software for digital reactor safety system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee-Choon; Park, Gee-Yong; Kim, Jang-Yeol; Lee, Jang-Soo

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the software qualification activities for the safety-critical software of the digital reactor safety system in nuclear power plants. The main activities of the software qualification processes are the preparation of software planning documentations, verification and validation (V and V) of the software requirements specifications (SRS), software design specifications (SDS) and codes, and the testing of the integrated software and integrated system. Moreover, the software safety analysis and software configuration management are involved in the software qualification processes. The V and V procedure for SRS and SDS contains a technical evaluation, licensing suitability evaluation, inspection and traceability analysis, formal verification, software safety analysis, and an evaluation of the software configuration management. The V and V processes for the code are a traceability analysis, source code inspection, test case and test procedure generation. Testing is the major V and V activity of the software integration and system integration phases. The software safety analysis employs a hazard operability method and software fault tree analysis. The software configuration management in each software life cycle is performed by the use of a nuclear software configuration management tool. Through these activities, we can achieve the functionality, performance, reliability, and safety that are the major V and V objectives of the safety-critical software in nuclear power plants. (author)

  15. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive ''box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs

  16. Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In this short paper it has only been possible to deal in a rather general way with the standards of safety used in the UK nuclear industry. The record of the industry extending over at least twenty years is impressive and, indeed, unique. No other industry has been so painstaking in protection of its workers and in its avoidance of damage to the environment. Headings are: introduction; how a nuclear power station works; radiation and its effects (including reference to ICRP, the UK National Radiological Protection Board, and safety standards); typical radiation doses (natural radiation, therapy, nuclear power programme and other sources); safety of nuclear reactors - design; key questions (matters of concern which arise in the public mind); safety of operators; safety of people in the vicinity of a nuclear power station; safety of the general public; safety bodies. (U.K.)

  17. Evaluation of the Community's nuclear reactor safety research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Goedkoop, J.A.; Jaumotte, A.; Malhouitre, G.; Tomkins, B.; Zorzoli, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes an evaluation of the 1980-85 CEC reactor safety programme prepared, at the invitation of the Commission, by a panel of six independent experts by means of examining the relevant document and by holding hearings with the responsible CEC staff. It contains the recommendations made by the panel on the following topics: the need for the JRC to continue to make its competence in the reactor safety field available to the Community; the importance of continuity in the JRC and shared-cost action programmes; the difficulty of developing reactor safety research programmes which satisfy the needs of users with diverse needs; the monitoring of the utilization of the research results; the maintenance of the JRC computer codes used by the Member States; the spin-off from research results being made available to other industrial sectors; the continued contact between the JRC researchers and the national experts; the coordination of LWR safety research with that of the Member States; and, the JRC work on fast breeders to be planned with regard to the R and D programmes of the Fast Reactor European Consortium

  18. Design of the reactor coolant system and associated systems in nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for establishing safety standards for nuclear power plants. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are established in the Safety Requirements publication, Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1 on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, which it supplements. This Safety Guide describes how the requirements for the design of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and associated systems in nuclear power plants should be met. 1.2. This publication is a revision and combination of two previous Safety Guides, Safety Series No. 50-SG-D6 on Ultimate Heat Sink and Directly Associated Heat Transport Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (1981), and Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13 on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (1986), which are superseded by this new Safety Guide. 1.3. The revision takes account of developments in the design of the RCS and associated systems in nuclear power plants since the earlier Safety Guides were published in 1981 and 1986, respectively. The other objectives of the revision are to ensure consistency with Ref., issued in 2000, and to update the technical content. In addition, an appendix on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) has been included

  19. Reactor safety method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachon, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature

  20. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  1. Efficient algorithms for flow simulation related to nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gornak, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Safety analysis is of ultimate importance for operating Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). The overall modeling and simulation of physical and chemical processes occuring in the course of an accident is an interdisciplinary problem and has origins in fluid dynamics, numerical analysis, reactor technology and computer programming. The aim of the study is therefore to create the foundations of a multi-dimensional non-isothermal fluid model for a NPP containment and software tool based on it. The numerical simulations allow to analyze and predict the behavior of NPP systems under different working and accident conditions, and to develop proper action plans for minimizing the risks of accidents, and/or minimizing the consequences of possible accidents. A very large number of scenarios have to be simulated, and at the same time acceptable accuracy for the critical parameters, such as radioactive pollution, temperature, etc., have to be achieved. The existing software tools are either too slow, or not accurate enough. This thesis deals with developing customized algorithm and software tools for simulation of isothermal and non-isothermal flows in a containment pool of NPP. Requirements to such a software are formulated, and proper algorithms are presented. The goal of the work is to achieve a balance between accuracy and speed of calculation, and to develop customized algorithm for this special case. Different discretization and solution approaches are studied and those which correspond best to the formulated goal are selected, adjusted, and when possible, analysed. Fast directional splitting algorithm for Navier-Stokes equations in complicated geometries, in presence of solid and porous obstacles, is in the core of the algorithm. Developing suitable pre-processor and customized domain decomposition algorithms are essential part of the overall algorithm amd software. Results from numerical simulations in test geometries and in real geometries are presented and discussed.

  2. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This document contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE non-reactor nuclear facilities. Adherence to these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24

  3. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary: main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the objectives and organization of the reactor safety study; the basic concepts of risk; the nature of nuclear power plant accidents; risk assessment methodology; reactor accident risk; and comparison of nuclear risks to other societal risks

  4. Review of light--water reactor safety studies. Volume 3 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Farnaam, M.R.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes and compares important studies of light-water nuclear reactor safety, emphasizing the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Study, work on risk assessment funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Report of the American Physical Society study group on light-water reactor safety. These reports treat risk assessment for nuclear power plants and provide an introduction to the basic issues in reactor safety and the needs of the reactor safety research program. Earlier studies are treated more briefly. The report includes comments on the Reactor Safety Study. The manner in which these studies may be used and alterations which would increase their utility are discussed

  5. Draft report on compilation of generic safety issues for light water reactor nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    A generally accepted approach to characterizing the safety concerns in nuclear power plants is to express them as safety issues which need to be resolved. When such safety issues are applicable to a generation of plants of a particular design or to a family of plants of similar design, they are termed generic safety issues. Examples of generic safety issues are those related to reactor vessel embrittlement, control rod insertion reliability or strainer clogging. The safety issues compiled in this document are based on broad international experience. This compilation is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. Refs.

  6. Draft report on compilation of generic safety issues for light water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    A generally accepted approach to characterizing the safety concerns in nuclear power plants is to express them as safety issues which need to be resolved. When such safety issues are applicable to a generation of plants of a particular design or to a family of plants of similar design, they are termed generic safety issues. Examples of generic safety issues are those related to reactor vessel embrittlement, control rod insertion reliability or strainer clogging. The safety issues compiled in this document are based on broad international experience. This compilation is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. Refs

  7. Learning and nuclear safety: New reactors and US regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, E.; Wildavsky, A.

    1992-01-01

    Gathering and analyzing data from operating reactors has become part of government and industry programs to improve performance in plants already on line and to inform development of future reactors. In the United States, however, early development and certain other factors combined to encourage a bias in learning. Regulation and learning from operational data intersect in ways that limit participation, data collection, and positive response to findings. Past learning has shown the advantage of simpler more standard designs with passive or inherent safety features. However, even designs incorporating these past lessons are apt to face tough regulatory tests and much criticism as operating experience is gathered. Only the operational success of new standardized reactors is apt to help rationalize regulation. (orig.)

  8. Method for optimizing the passive safety of nuclear reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, W.

    1987-01-01

    In order to avoid severe accidents with secondary large-area damage, small nuclear reactor units have to be spatially distributed and placed, if possible, into buried containments which show a staggered arrangement. The opening of each containment has to be tightly closed. The containments can be provided with protective equipment against eruption and explosion which absorb the forces of pressure front effects, e.g. gas-filled bags or cushions which are attached to the side walls of the containment. Such an equipment mostly is only useful for a single pressure front. Additional walls with numerous wall penetrations are also suited for absorbing several not too strong pressure fronts. For the maximum credible accident (MCA) dry sand has to be kept at hand in appropriate containers over the containment so that an uncontrollable nuclear reactor beyond repair can be 'buried' in a few seconds. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Reactor safety: a discussion by officials of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, W.A.; Rusche, B.C.; Stello, V. Jr.; Minogue, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    William A. Anders, Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and several senior officials spoke to the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy on the subject of nuclear safety, improvements in reactor plant safety, and quality assurance. The NRC, during its first year of organization, has developed new initiatives to improve safety and safeguards regulations. Anders stressed that NRC is not stifling internal discussion of opposing views, that it has been honest with the public, and that operating reactors are meeting rigorous safety standards. Other speakers discussed comparative safety of old and new reactors. Backfitting of older plants with new features is done when substantial safety protection can be added, but detuning an integrated system is not done indiscriminately. Officials of NRC do not agree with former General Electric employees, who testified that the regulatory procedure is inadequate. Safety improvements since August 28, 1962 and outlines of the review process are included in the Appendixes

  10. Use of FPGA and CPLD in nuclear reactor safety systems and its regulatory review requirements for reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Suvadip; Biswas, Animesh; Pradhan, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) and Complex Programmable Logic Devices (CPLD) is being used widely in safety critical and safety related systems in nuclear power plans like in trip logic units, Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) actuation decision logic and neutronic signal processing for their reprogrammability feature and compact design. These HDL Programmable devices (HPD) are complex devices consisting of both hardware and software which is used to implement the logic on the FPGA. It is observed that these Programmable devices suffer from various modes of failure and the major failures in these devices are due to Single Event Upset (SEU), where a highly energetic ionizing radiation may lead to device failure which can even occur in radiologically benign environment. Other failures can occur during steps of developing the hardware using software tools like during Synthesis and placement and routing of the desired hardware. Here a study on use of such devices in Nuclear Reactors, study on mode of failures of these devices, way to tackle such failure and development of review guidelines for review of such devices used in safety critical and safety related systems with special emphasis on choice of software tools, way to mitigate effects of SEU and simulation and hardware testing results to be reviewed by regulatory body during design safety review is done. (author)

  11. Nuclear safety. Seguranca nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aveline, A [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1981-01-01

    What is nuclear safety Is there any technical way to reduce risks Is it possible to put them at reasonable levels Are there competitiveness and economic reliability to employ the nuclear energy by means of safety technics Looking for answers to these questions the author describes the sources of potential risks to nuclear reactors and tries to apply the answers to the Brazilian Nuclear Programme. (author).

  12. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  13. Design of reactor containment systems for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. It is a revision of the Safety Guide on Design of the Reactor Containment Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (Safety Series No. 50-Sg-D1) issued in 1985 and supplements the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. The present Safety Guide was prepared on the basis of a systematic review of the relevant publications, including the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, the Safety fundamentals publication on The Safety of Nuclear Installations, Safety Guides, INSAG Reports, a Technical Report and other publications covering the safety of nuclear power plants. 1.2. The confinement of radioactive material in a nuclear plant, including the control of discharges and the minimization of releases, is a fundamental safety function to be ensured in normal operational modes, for anticipated operational occurrences, in design basis accidents and, to the extent practicable, in selected beyond design basis accidents. In accordance with the concept of defence in depth, this fundamental safety function is achieved by means of several barriers and levels of defence. In most designs, the third and fourth levels of defence are achieved mainly by means of a strong structure enveloping the nuclear reactor. This structure is called the 'containment structure' or simply the 'containment'. This definition also applies to double wall containments. 1.3. The containment structure also protects the reactor against external events and provides radiation shielding in operational states and accident conditions. The containment structure and its associated systems with the functions of isolation, energy management, and control of radionuclides and combustible gases are referred to as the containment systems

  14. Design of reactor containment systems for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. It is a revision of the Safety Guide on Design of the Reactor Containment Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (Safety Series No. 50-Sg-D1) issued in 1985 and supplements the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. The present Safety Guide was prepared on the basis of a systematic review of the relevant publications, including the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, the Safety fundamentals publication on The Safety of Nuclear Installations, Safety Guides, INSAG Reports, a Technical Report and other publications covering the safety of nuclear power plants. 1.2. The confinement of radioactive material in a nuclear plant, including the control of discharges and the minimization of releases, is a fundamental safety function to be ensured in normal operational modes, for anticipated operational occurrences, in design basis accidents and, to the extent practicable, in selected beyond design basis accidents. In accordance with the concept of defence in depth, this fundamental safety function is achieved by means of several barriers and levels of defence. In most designs, the third and fourth levels of defence are achieved mainly by means of a strong structure enveloping the nuclear reactor. This structure is called the 'containment structure' or simply the 'containment'. This definition also applies to double wall containments. 1.3. The containment structure also protects the reactor against external events and provides radiation shielding in operational states and accident conditions. The containment structure and its associated systems with the functions of isolation, energy management, and control of radionuclides and combustible gases are referred to as the containment systems

  15. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1990-07-01

    Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs

  16. Safety analysis of an expert reactor protection system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kafas, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the dissertation is to develop real time expert reactor protection system (ERPS) for operational safety of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant. The system is developed to diagnose plant failures and for identification plant transients (with and without scram). For this erps, probabilistic safety analysis techniques are used to check the availability and priority of the recommended safety system in case of plant accidents. The real - time information during transients and accidents can be obtained to assess the operator in his decision - making. Also, the ERPS is able to give advice for the reactor operator to take the appropriate corrective action during abnormal situations. 5-15 figs., 42 refs

  17. PANDA a multi-purpose thermal-hydraulics facility devoted to nuclear reactor containment safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the multi purpose facility PANDA devised for the safety analysis of nuclear reactor containment. The passive safety systems for LWRs have been explained with details about the PAssive Nachzerfallswärmeabfuhr und Druck-Abbau Testanlage (PANDA)

  18. User requirements in the area of safety of innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, B.; Juhn, P.E.; Fukuda, K.; )

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Against the background of already existing IAEA and INSAC publications in the area of safety, in the framework of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) a set of user requirements for the safety of future nuclear installations has been established. Five top-level requirements are expected to apply to any type of innovative design. They should foster an increased level of safety that is transparent to and fully accepted by the general public. The approach to future reactor safety includes two complementary strategies: increased emphasis on inherent safety characteristics and enhancement of defense in depth. As compared to existing plants, the effectiveness of preventing measures should be highly enhanced, resulting in fewer mitigation measures. The targets and possible approaches of each of the five levels of defense developed for innovative reactor designs are outlined in the paper

  19. The risks of nuclear energy technology. Safety concepts of light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Kern- und Energietechnk (IKET); Kessler, Guenter; Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann

    2014-11-01

    Analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. Discusses the security concept of reactors. Analyzes possible crash of air planes on a reactor containment. Presents measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident. Written in engaging style for professionals and policy makers. The book analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. The security concept of reactors is explained. Measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident, accidents of core melting and a possible crash of an air plane on a reactor containment are discussed. The book covers three scientific subjects of the safety concepts of Light Water Reactors: - A first part describes the basic safety design concepts of operating German Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors including accident management measures introduced after the reactor accidents of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. These safety concepts are also compared with the experiences of the Fukushima accidents. In addition, the safety design concepts of the future modern European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) and of the future modern Boiling Water Reactor SWR-1000 (KERENA) are presented. These are based on new safety research results of the past decades. - In a second, part the possible crash of military or heavy commercial air planes on a reactor containment is analyzed. It is shown that reactor containments can be designed to resist to such an airplane crash. - In a third part, an online decision system is presented. It allows to analyze the distribution of radioactivity in the atmosphere and to the environment after a severe reactor accident. It provides data for decisions to be taken by authorities for the minimization of radiobiological effects to the population. This book appeals to readers who have an interest in save living conditions and some understanding for physics or engineering.

  20. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  1. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Safety overview and management function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, M.; Brodsky, R.S.; Frankhouser, W.L.

    1981-02-01

    The Under Secretary of Energy established the Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee in October, 1979, in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident, to assess the adequacy of training of personnel at DOE nuclear facilities. Subsequently, in February, 1980, the charge to this Committee was modified to assess all implications of the Kemeny Commission report on TMI with regard to DOE nuclear reactors, excluding those in the Division of Naval Reactors. The modified charge was also limited, for the time being, to reactor facilities instead of all nuclear facilities. This report describes the portion of the revised assessment activities that was assigned to the Assessment Support Team

  2. Investigation of the possibility of a calculative reactor safety estimation in the licence procedure for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, B.; Kampf, T.

    1975-12-01

    Up to now it is impossible to calculate completely the safety of nuclear reactors. Therefore the authors have collected and employed a number of at a high degree independent safety parameters for mathematical evaluation of the reactor safety. By means of computer programs such parameters from about 400 research reactors have been analysed and the fluctuation ranges of their greatest density were determined. The limits of these fluctuation ranges are quickly available and can be used as recommended values for the layout and for the safety estimation of research reactors. A comparison of the existing layout recommendations and the determined fluctuation ranges in most cases shows a good agreement. In some cases corrections and new layout recommendations have been proposed. The determined fluctuation ranges found their first practical application in the estimation of the Rossendorf Equipment for Critical Experiments (RAKE). (author)

  3. Mechanics of aerosols in nuclear reactor safety: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyalka, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    Although the estimated public risks from nuclear reactors are not high, a significant fraction of these arises from the accident sequences that lead to severe core damage. Calculation of release fractions of the core radioactive inventories for such accidents requires an understanding of the evolution of aerosols in primary coolant systems and reactor containment. The state-of-the-art in the mechanics of a single aerosol particle is reviewed and available work on coagulation of two aerosol particles is discussed. Progress in kinetic theory descriptions and experimental works is described and directions of future work are noted. The General Dynamic Equation for the aerosol distribution is considered, and several forms of this for conditions of interest are noted. Methods of solution that are discussed include analytical techniques, similarity transforms, moments methods and numerical techniques. Computer programs that have been developed in the past few years are also discussed, and their capabilities and limitations are noted. Finally, the comparison of computed results with the available experimental data is discussed, and needs for future research are emphasized. (author)

  4. Perturbative methods for sensitivity calculation in safety problems of nuclear reactors: state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Fernando R.A.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Gandini, Augusto

    1995-01-01

    During the last two decades perturbative methods became an efficient tool to perform sensitivity analysis in nuclear reactor safety problems. In this paper, a comparative study taking into account perturbation formalisms (Diferential and Matricial Mthods and generalized Perturbation Theory - GPT) is considered. Then a few number of applications are described to analyze the sensitivity of some functions relavant to thermal hydraulics designs or safety analysis of nuclear reactor cores and steam generators. The behaviours of the nuclear reactor cores and steam generators are simulated, respectively, by the COBRA-IV-I and GEVAP codes. Results of sensitivity calculations have shown a good agreement when compared to those obtained directly by using the mentioned codes. So, a significative computational time safe can be obtained with perturbative methods performing sensitivity analysis in nuclear power plants. (author). 25 refs., 5 tabs

  5. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs.

  6. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs

  7. The selection of probabilistic safety assessment techniques for non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vail, J.

    1992-01-01

    Historically, the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology of choice is the well known event tree/fault tree inductive technique. For reactor facilities is has stood the test of time. Some non-reactor nuclear facilities have found inductive methodologies difficult to apply. The stand-alone fault tree deductive technique has been used effectively to analyze risk in nuclear chemical processing facilities and waste handling facilities. The selection between the two choices suggest benefits from use of the deductive method for non-reactor facilities

  8. Reactor Safety Assessment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSAS is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category

  9. Reactor safety assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSA is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category

  10. Reactor limitation system improves the safety and availability of the Angra 2 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Mendes, J.E. de

    1987-01-01

    Beyond the classic Reactor Protection System and Reactor Control System, nuclear plant Angra 2 has a third system called Reactor Limitation System which combines the intelligence features of the control systems with the high reliability of the protection systems. In determined events, which are not controlled by the control system (e.g.: load rejection, failure of one main reactor coolant pump), the Reactor Limitation System actuates automatically in order to lead the plant to a safe operating condition and so it avoids the actuation of the Reactor Protection System and consequently the reactor trip. This increases safety and availability of the plant and reduces component stresses. After the safe operating condition is reached, the process guidance automatically returns to the control systems. (Author) [pt

  11. Overview of nuclear safety activities performed by JRC-IE on Gen IV fast reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsige-Tamirat, H.; Ammirabile, L.; D' Agata, E.; Fuetterer, M.; Ranguelova, V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, Westerduinweg 3, 1755LE Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    The European Strategic Energy Technology (SET) Plan recognizes the need to develop new energy technologies, in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and secure energy supply in Europe. Besides renewable energy and improved energy efficiency, a new generation of nuclear power plants and innovative nuclear power applications can play a significant role to achieve this goal. The JRC Institute for Energy 'Safety of Future Nuclear Reactors' (SFNR) Unit is engaged in experimental research, numerical simulation and modelling, scientific, feasibility and engineering studies on innovative nuclear reactor systems. This also represents a significant EURATOM contribution to the Generation IV International Forum. Its activities deal with, among others, the performance assessment of innovative fuels and materials, development of new reactor core concepts and safety solutions, and knowledge management and preservation. Special attention is given to fast reactor concepts, namely the sodium (SFR) and lead (LFR) cooled reactors. Recognizing the maturity of the SFR technology, the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP) considers a prototype SFR to be built as a next-step towards the deployment of a first-of-a-kind Gen IV SFR. This paper gives an overview of current research preformed at JRC-IE with emphasis on the work performed in the Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP-ESFR) within the European Commission's Seventh Framework Program. (authors)

  12. Overview of nuclear safety activities performed by JRC-IE on Gen IV fast reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsige-Tamirat, H.; Ammirabile, L.; D'Agata, E.; Fuetterer, M.; Ranguelova, V.

    2010-01-01

    The European Strategic Energy Technology (SET) Plan recognizes the need to develop new energy technologies, in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and secure energy supply in Europe. Besides renewable energy and improved energy efficiency, a new generation of nuclear power plants and innovative nuclear power applications can play a significant role to achieve this goal. The JRC Institute for Energy 'Safety of Future Nuclear Reactors' (SFNR) Unit is engaged in experimental research, numerical simulation and modelling, scientific, feasibility and engineering studies on innovative nuclear reactor systems. This also represents a significant EURATOM contribution to the Generation IV International Forum. Its activities deal with, among others, the performance assessment of innovative fuels and materials, development of new reactor core concepts and safety solutions, and knowledge management and preservation. Special attention is given to fast reactor concepts, namely the sodium (SFR) and lead (LFR) cooled reactors. Recognizing the maturity of the SFR technology, the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP) considers a prototype SFR to be built as a next-step towards the deployment of a first-of-a-kind Gen IV SFR. This paper gives an overview of current research preformed at JRC-IE with emphasis on the work performed in the Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP-ESFR) within the European Commission's Seventh Framework Program. (authors)

  13. The design features and safety concepts of the nuclear heating reactor developed in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wenxiang; Wang Dazhong

    1995-01-01

    Based on the specific conditions of the nuclear heat applications and the development objectives of the advanced reactors, the nuclear heating reactor (NHR) exploited in China has adhered to the new safety concepts and been designed with a number of advanced features, including the integrated arrangement, full power natural circulation capacity, self-pressurized performance, dynamically-hydraulic control rod drive and passive safety systems, so that higher standard of safety as well as simplification in the plant systems and improvement in economic viability has been achieved. This paper describes the special consideration in the design as well as the main design features and safety concepts of the NHR. Some experimental and analytical results are also presented to demonstrate the NHR safety features

  14. On the fundamentals of nuclear reactor safety assessment. Inherent threats and their implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyvaerinen, J. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland). Nuclear Safety Dept.

    1996-12-01

    The thesis addresses some fundamental questions related to implementation and assessment of nuclear safety. The safety principles and assessment methods are described, followed by descriptions of selected novel technical challenges to nuclear safety. The novel challenges encompass a wide variety of technical issues, thus providing insights on the limitations of conventional safety assessment methods. Study of the limitations suggests means to improve nuclear reactor design criteria and safety assessment practices. The novel safety challenges discussed are (1) inherent boron dilution in PWRs, (2) metallic insulation performance with respect to total loss of emergency cooling systems in a loss-of-coolant accident, and (3) horizontal steam generator heat transfer performance at natural circulation conditions. (50 refs.).

  15. On the fundamentals of nuclear reactor safety assessment. Inherent threats and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyvaerinen, J.

    1996-12-01

    The thesis addresses some fundamental questions related to implementation and assessment of nuclear safety. The safety principles and assessment methods are described, followed by descriptions of selected novel technical challenges to nuclear safety. The novel challenges encompass a wide variety of technical issues, thus providing insights on the limitations of conventional safety assessment methods. Study of the limitations suggests means to improve nuclear reactor design criteria and safety assessment practices. The novel safety challenges discussed are (1) inherent boron dilution in PWRs, (2) metallic insulation performance with respect to total loss of emergency cooling systems in a loss-of-coolant accident, and (3) horizontal steam generator heat transfer performance at natural circulation conditions. (50 refs.)

  16. Reviewing real-time performance of nuclear reactor safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preckshot, G.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining real-time performance of computer-based safety systems used in nuclear power plants. Three areas of guidance are covered in this report. The first area covers how to determine if, when, and what prototypes should be required of developers to make a convincing demonstration that specific problems have been solved or that performance goals have been met. The second area has recommendations for timing analyses that will prove that the real-time system will meet its safety-imposed deadlines. The third area has description of means for assessing expected or actual real-time performance before, during, and after development is completed. To ensure that the delivered real-time software product meets performance goals, the paper recommends certain types of code-execution and communications scheduling. Technical background is provided in the appendix on methods of timing analysis, scheduling real-time computations, prototyping, real-time software development approaches, modeling and measurement, and real-time operating systems.

  17. Reviewing real-time performance of nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining real-time performance of computer-based safety systems used in nuclear power plants. Three areas of guidance are covered in this report. The first area covers how to determine if, when, and what prototypes should be required of developers to make a convincing demonstration that specific problems have been solved or that performance goals have been met. The second area has recommendations for timing analyses that will prove that the real-time system will meet its safety-imposed deadlines. The third area has description of means for assessing expected or actual real-time performance before, during, and after development is completed. To ensure that the delivered real-time software product meets performance goals, the paper recommends certain types of code-execution and communications scheduling. Technical background is provided in the appendix on methods of timing analysis, scheduling real-time computations, prototyping, real-time software development approaches, modeling and measurement, and real-time operating systems

  18. Operational safety experience at 14 MW research reactor from Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.

    2007-01-01

    The main challenges identified in TRIGA Research Reactor operated in Institute for Nuclear Research in Pitesti, Romania, are in fact similar with challenges of many other research reactors in the world, those are: Ageing of work forces and knowledge management; Maintaining an enhanced technical and scientific competences; Ensuring adequate financial and human resources; Enhancing excellence in management; Ensuring confidence of stakeholders and public; Ageing of equipment and systems.To ensure safety availability of TRIGA Research Reactor in INR Pitesti, the financial resources were secured and a large refurbishment programme and modernization was undertaking by management of institute. This programme concern the modernization of reactor control and safety systems, primary cooling system instrumentation, radiation protection and releases monitoring with new spectrometric computerized abilities, ventilation filtering system and cooling towers. The expected life extension of the reactor will be about 15 years

  19. Safety analysis of an expert reactor protection system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Kafas, A.E.A.E.

    1996-01-01

    the purpose of the dissertation is to develop a real time expert reactor protection system (ERPS) for operational safety of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant. The system is developed to diagnose plant failures and for identification of plant transients (with and without scram). for this ERPS. probabilistic safety analysis techniques are used to check the availability and priority of the recommended safety system in case of plant accidents . the real- time information during transients and accidents can be obtained to asses the operator in his decision - making . Also, the ERPS is able to give advice for the reactor operator to take the appropriate corrective action during abnormal situations. The system model consists of the dynamic differential equations for reactor core, pressurizer, steam generator, turbine and generator, piping and plenums. The system of equations can be solved by appropriate codes also displayed directly from sensors of the plant. All scenarios of transients, accidents and fault tress for plant systems are learned to ERPS

  20. Nuclear safety and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hho Jung

    2000-03-01

    This book contains 12 chapters, which are atom and radiation, nuclear reactor and kinds of nuclear power plant, safeguard actuation system and stability evaluation for rock foundation of nuclear power plant, nuclear safety and principle, safety analysis and classification of incident, probabilistic safety assessment and major incident, nuclear safety regulation, system of nuclear safety regulation, main function and subject of safety regulation in nuclear facilities, regulation of fuel cycle and a nuclear dump site, protection of radiation and, safety supervision and, safety supervision and measurement of environmental radioactivity.

  1. A cost and safety superiority of fusion-fission hybrid reactor in China nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslavtszev, P.E.; Luan Guishi; Xia Chengang

    1994-08-01

    Considering economy and safety, an optimization model of nuclear energy developing scenarios of China was set up. An objective function to optimize was determined. Three prospective developing scenarios of China nuclear energy system including hybrid reactor were calculated and discussed. In the system which has no fissile material exchange with other system, a smooth developing model has a smooth distribution of inventory of Pu, thus the potential danger of whole nuclear energy system will be decreased. This scheme will improve investment effectiveness. Result shows that the optimization is necessary and the significant profit in cost and safety can be obtained. (5 tabs., 8 figs., 12 refs.)

  2. Radiation and Heterogeneous processes and hydrogen safety of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agayev, T.N.; Eyubov, K.T.; Aliyev, S.M.; Faradjzade, I.A.; Imanova, G.T.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the development of the quantitative and probabilistic analysis of safety of atomic power stations, interest in major accidents which can lead to overheating and fusion of an active zone has increased now. One of the major processes from the point of view of assessment of accident consequences with damage of an active zone is process of hydrogen formation. In the real work sources of hydrogen formation at various stages of accident with loss of the coolant of water-to-water power reactors are considered. The role of different processes of hydrogen formation depends on temperature, an amount of water and steam in an active zone and some other parameters. In this regard we have tried to formulate approach to creation of mathematical model of dynamics of hydrogen formation at accident in which the factors mentioned above would be considered. At the first stage of accident which lasted several tens of seconds depressurization of the first contour and loss of pressure took place. Water of the first contour under normal conditions of operation contained radiolytic hydrogen which concentration significantly exceeded its solubility with an atmospheric pressure. Therefore the dissolved hydrogen was emitted in a gas phase at a rupture of the pipeline. The second stage of accident is characterized by water vaporization from the first contour. During this period the amount of water in an active zone is constant and also water temperature in an active zone is constant. At last, at the third stage of accident there is water vaporization from an active zone also a warming up of the heat allocating assembly and constructional materials of an active zone.

  3. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form

  4. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1993-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan

  5. Nuclear safety in Slovak Republic. Safety analysis reports for WWER 440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohar, S.

    1999-01-01

    Implementation of nuclear power program is connected to establishment of regulatory body for safe regulation of siting, construction, operation and decommissioning of nuclear installations. Licensing being one of the most important regulatory surveillance activity is based on independent regulatory review and assessment of information on nuclear safety for particular nuclear facility. Documents required to be submitted to the regulatory body by the licensee in Slovakia for the review and assessment usually named Safety Analysis Report (SAR) are presented in detail in this paper. Current status of Safety Analysis Reports for Bohunice V-1, Bohunice V-2 and Mochovce NPP is shown

  6. Rock siting of nuclear power plants from a reactor safety standpoint. Status report October 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clearify the advantages and disadvantages of an underground nuclear power plant from a reactor safety point of view, compared to a plant above ground. Principles for the technical design of a rock sited BWR nuclear power plant is presented. Also questions of sabotage and closing down the plant at the end of the operational period are treated. (K.K.)

  7. Ensuring the operational safety of nuclear power plants with WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shasharin, G.A.; Veretennikov, G.A.; Abagyan, A.A.; Lesnoj, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    At the start of 1983, 27 nuclear power producing units with reactor facilities of the WWER type were in operation in the Soviet Union and other countries. In 1982 the average load factor for nuclear power plants with WWER reactors was 73 per cent. There was not a single nuclear accident or even damage with any significant radiation consequences in the WWER reactors during the entire period of their operation. The most modern nuclear power plants with WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors meet all present-day international requirements. Safe operation of the plants is achieved by a variety of measures, the most important of which include: procedures for increasing the reliability of plant equipment and systems; ensuring exact compliance with plant operating instructions; ensuring reliable operation of plant safety systems; action directed towards maintaining the skills of plant personnel at a level adequate to ensure the taking of proper action during transient processes and accident situations. The paper discusses concrete steps for ensuring safe nuclear power plant operation along these lines. In particular, measures such as the following are described: the use of a system for collecting and processing information on equipment failures and defects; the development and introduction of methods of early defect diagnosis; the performance of complex testing of safety systems; the training of highly skilled personnel for nuclear power plants at educational combines and at teaching and training centres making use of simulators; arranging accident-prevention training and special instruction for personnel. (author)

  8. Nuclear reactors. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiron, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the 'nuclear reactors' volume of the Engineers Techniques collection. It gives a general presentation of the different articles of the volume which deal with: the physical basis (neutron physics and ionizing radiations-matter interactions, neutron moderation and diffusion), the basic concepts and functioning of nuclear reactors (possible fuel-moderator-coolant-structure combinations, research and materials testing reactors, reactors theory and neutron characteristics, neutron calculations for reactor cores, thermo-hydraulics, fluid-structure interactions and thermomechanical behaviour of fuels in PWRs and fast breeder reactors, thermal and mechanical effects on reactors structure), the industrial reactors (light water, pressurized water, boiling water, graphite moderated, fast breeder, high temperature and heavy water reactors), and the technology of PWRs (conceiving and building rules, nuclear parks and safety, reactor components and site selection). (J.S.)

  9. Safety And Transient Analyses For Full Core Conversion Of The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong Ba Vien; Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem; Nguyen Kien Cuong

    2011-01-01

    Preparing for full core conversion of Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR), safety and transient analyses were carried out to confirm about ability to operate safely of proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) working core. The initial LEU core consisting 92 LEU fuel assemblies and 12 Beryllium rods was analyzed under initiating events of uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod, cooling pump failure, earthquake and fuel cladding fail. Working LEU core response were evaluated under these initial events based on RELAP/Mod3.2 computer code and other supported codes like ORIGEN, MCNP and MACCS2. Obtained results showed that safety of the reactor is maintained for all transients/accidents analyzed. (author)

  10. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy.

  11. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy

  12. General principles of nuclear safety management related to research reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banciu, Ortenzia; Vladescu, Gabriela

    2003-01-01

    The paper contents the general principles applicable to the decommissioning of research reactors to ensure a proper nuclear safety management, during both decommissioning activities and post decommissioning period. The main objective of decommissioning is to ensure the protection of workers, population and environment against all radiological and non-radiological hazards that could result after a reactor shutdown and dismantling. In the same time, it is necessary, by some proper provisions, to limit the effect of decommissioning for the future generation, according to the new Romanian, IAEA and EU Norms and Regulations. Assurance of nuclear safety during decommissioning process involves, in the first step, to establish of some safety principles and requirements to be taken into account during whole process. In the same time, it is necessary to perform a series of analyses to ensure that the whole process is conducted in a planned and safe manner. The general principles proposed for a proper management of safety during research reactor decommissioning are as follows: - Set-up of all operations included in a Decommissioning Plan; - Set-up and qualitative evaluation of safety problems, which could appear during normal decommissioning process, both radiological and nonradiological risks for workers and public; - Set-up of accident list related to decommissioning process the events that could appear both due to some abnormal working conditions and to some on-site and off-site events like fires, explosions, flooding, earthquake, etc.); - Development and qualitative/ quantitative evaluation of scenarios for each incidents; - Development (and evaluation) of safety indicator system. The safety indicators are the most important tools used to assess the level of nuclear safety during decommissioning process, to discover the weak points and to establish safety measures. The paper contains also, a safety case evaluation (description of facility according to the decommissioning

  13. Procedures for conducting probabilistic safety assessment for non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A well performed and adequately documented safety assessment of a nuclear facility will serve as a basis to determine whether the facility complies with the safety objectives, principles and criteria as stipulated by the national regulatory body of the country where the facility is in operation. International experience shows that the practices and methodologies used to perform safety assessments and periodic safety re-assessment for non-reactor nuclear facilities differ significantly from county to country. Most developing countries do not have methods and guidance for safety assessment that are prescribed by the regulatory body. Typically the safety evaluation for the facility is based on a case by case assessment. Whilst conservative deterministic analyses are predominantly used as a licensing basis in many countries, recently probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) techniques have been applied as a useful complementary tool to support safety decision making. The main benefit of PSA is to provide insights into the safety aspects of facility design and operation. PSA points up the potential environmental impacts of postulated accidents, including the dominant risk contributors, and enables safety analysts to compare options for reducing risk. In order to advise on how to apply PSA methodology for the safety assessment of non-reactor nuclear facilities, the IAEA organized several consultants meetings, which led to the preparation of this TECDOC. This document is intended as guidance for the conduct of PSA in non-nuclear facilities. The main emphasis here is on the general procedural steps of a PSA that is specific for a non-reactor nuclear facility, rather than the details of the specific methods. The report is directed at technical staff managing or performing such probabilistic assessments and to promote a standardized framework, terminology and form of documentation for these PSAs. It is understood that the level of detail implied in the tasks presented in this

  14. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  15. Catalogue and classification of technical safety standards, rules and regulations for nuclear power reactors and nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtner, N.; Becker, K.; Bashir, M.

    1977-01-01

    The present report is an up-dated version of the report 'Catalogue and Classification of Technical Safety Rules for Light-water Reactors and Reprocessing Plants' edited under code No EUR 5362e, August 1975. Like the first version of the report, it constitutes a catalogue and classification of standards, rules and regulations on land-based nuclear power reactors and fuel cycle facilities. The reasons for the classification system used are given and discussed

  16. Improvement of pulsing operation performance in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayasi, S.; Ishijima, K.; Tanzawa, S.; Fujishiro, T.; Horiki, O.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) is one of the TRIGA-type research reactors widely used in the world, and has mainly been used for studying reactor fuel behaviour during postulated reactivity-initiated accidents (RIAs). Its limited pulsing operation capability, however, could produce only a power burst from low power level simulating an RIA event from essentially zero power level. A computerized automatic reactor control system was developed and installed in the NSRR to simulate a wide range of abnormal events in nuclear power plants. This digitalized reactor control system requires no manipulation of the control rods by reactor operators during the course of the pulsing operation. Using this fully automated operation system, a variety of power transients such as power ramping, power bursts from high power level, and so on were made possible with excellent stability and safety. The present modification work in the NSRR and its fruitful results indicate new possibilities in the utilization of the TRIGA type research reactor

  17. Defence-in-depth and development of safety requirements for advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.; Gasparini, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper addresses a general approach for the preparation of the design safety requirements using the IAEA Safety Objectives and the strategy of defence-in-depth. It proposes a general method (top-down approach) to prepare safety requirements for a given kind of reactor using the IAEA requirements for nuclear power plants as a starting point through a critical interpretation and application of the strategy of defence-in-depth. The IAEA has recently developed a general methodology for screening the defence-in-depth of nuclear power plants starting from the fundamental safety objectives as proposed in the IAEA Safety Fundamentals. This methodology may provide a useful tool for the preparation of safety requirements for the design and operation of any kind of reactor. Currently the IAEA is preparing the technical basis for the development of safety requirements for Modular High Temperature Gas Reactors, with the aim of showing the viability of the method. A draft TECDOC has been prepared and circulated among several experts for comments. This paper is largely based on the content of the draft TECDOC. (authors)

  18. Application in nuclear engineering: methodology of innovative nuclear reactors: approaches to the safety of future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alramady, A.M.K

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes RELAP5 and MATLAB/SIMULINK computer codes for thermal hydraulic analysis of a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR). The two codes are used to calculate the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the reactor core and the primary loop under steady-state and hypothetical accidents conditions.New designs of nuclear power plants are directed to increase safety by many methods like reducing the dependence on active parts (such as safety pumps, fans, and diesel generators ) and replacing them with passive features such as gravity draining of cooling water from tanks, and natural circulation of water and air. In this work, high and medium pressure injection pumps are replaced by passive injection components. Different break sizes in cold leg pipe are simulated to analyze to what degree the plant is safe (without any operator action) by using only these passive components. The passive design means operators would not need to take immediate action after an accident, with the reactor ,instead, safely shutting down on its own. Different accident scenarios were simulated in this thesis as loss of coolant accidents and station blackout accidents, and complete passive safety systems used to mitigate theses accidents.

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batheja, P.; Huber, R.; Rau, P.

    1985-01-01

    Particularly for nuclear reactors of small output, the reactor pressure vessel contains at least two heat exchangers, which have coolant flowing through them in a circuit through the reactor core. The circuit of at least one heat exchanger is controlled by a slide valve, so that even for low drive forces, particularly in natural circulation, the required even loading of the heat exchanger is possible. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Nuclear data for fission reactor core design and safety analysis: Requirements and status of accuracy of nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The types of nuclear data required for fission reactor design and safety analysis, and the ways in which the data are represented and approximated for use in reactor calculations, are summarised first. The relative importance of different items of nuclear data in the prediction of reactor parameters is described and ways of investigating the accuracy of these data by evaluating related integral measurements are discussed. The use of sensitivity analysis, together with estimates of the uncertainties in nuclear data and relevant integral measurements, in assessing the accuracy of prediction of reactor parameters is described. The inverse procedure for deciding nuclear data requirements from the target accuracies for prediction of reactor parameters follows on from this. The need for assessments of the uncertainties in nuclear data evaluations and the form of the uncertainty information is discussed. The status of the accuracies of predictions and nuclear data requirements are then summarised. The reactor parameters considered include: (a) Criticality conditions, conversion and burn-up effects. (b) Energy production and deposition, decay heating, irradiation damage, dosimetry and induced radioactivity. (c) Kinetics characteristics and control, including temperature, power and coolant density coefficients, delayed neutrons and control absorbers. (author)

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  2. Organisational culture at the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland's department of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, T.; Norros, L.

    2001-03-01

    A case study to investigate the organisational culture of the regulatory authority was conducted at the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland's (STUK) Nuclear Reactor Regulation (YTO) - department. Organisational culture is defined as a pattern of shared basic assumptions, which are basically unconscious. Objectives of the study were to conceptualise and describe the main characteristics of YTO's organisational culture and to carry out a tentative core task analysis of the inspectors' work. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used in the research. YTO's culture was identified as a hierarchy-focused culture with less emphasis on innovation or social support. However, the ideal values of the personnel emphasised also social support and goal setting. Ambiguous goals were felt by some personnel as increased uncertainty about the meaningfulness of one's job. Also a lack of feedback was mentioned. The core task analysis identified the critical functions of the regulatory practice. These functions specify the three roles of the regulatory authority, the expert role, the public role and the authority role. The culture must support the fulfilment of the requirements of all the three roles. Development needs in YTO's culture were identified and recommendations were made. (au)

  3. Problems in the assessment of inherent safety characteristics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garribba, S.F.; Vivante, C.

    1988-01-01

    A number of proposals are being made for an increased RD and D effort on advanced nuclear power reactors that would display outstanding safety performance. A common characteristic of the different reactor concepts would be their limited reliance upon active engineered systems under major accident conditions. However, when submitted to a more close scrutiny reactor concept options may reveal diverging safety behaviors and also development opportunities. In this respect, three issues are explored in this paper. A first question is the meaning of non-active, i.e. inherent and passive safety features. Next, is the ranking of advanced and new reactor concepts from the viewpoint of inherent and passive safety. Multiple correspondence analysis may provide a simple tool, whose use is shown for the case of HTR-500, AP600 and PRISM. Conversely, probabilistic risk assessment would allow quantitative comparisons, although lack of information and data is an obstacle. Finally, is demonstration of safety performances as a step toward market deployment of the new reactor systems

  4. How the nuclear safety team conducts emergency exercises at the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Antonio C.A.; Silva, Davilson G.; Toyoda, Eduardo Y.; Santia, Paulo S.; Conti, Thadeu N.; Semmler, Renato; Carvalho, Ricardo N.

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination designed by the Nuclear Safety Team for better Emergency Exercise coordination. The Nuclear Safety Team was created with the mission of avoiding, preventing and mitigating the causes and effects of accidents at the IEA-R1. The facility where we conduct our work is located in an area of a huge population, what increases the responsibility of our mission: conducting exercises and training are part of our daily activities. During the Emergency Exercise, accidents ranked 0-4 on INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) are simulated and involve: Police Department, Fire Department, workers, people from the community, and others. In the last exercise held in June 2014, the scenario contemplated a terrorist organization action that infiltrated in a group of students who were visiting the IEA-R1, tried to steal fresh fuel element to fabricate a dirty bomb. Emergency procedures and plans, timeline and metrics of the actions were applied to the Emergency Exercise evaluation. The next exercise will be held in November, with the simulation of the piping of the primary cooling circuit rupture, causing the emptying of the pool and the lack of cooling of the fuel elements in the reactor core: this will be the scenario. The skills acquired and the systems improvement have been very important tools for the reactor operation safety and the Nuclear Safety Team is making technical efforts so that these Emergency Exercises may be applied to other nuclear and radiological facilities. Equally important for the process of improving nuclear safety is the emphasis placed on implementing quality improvements to the human factor in the nuclear safety area, a crucial element that is often not considered by those outside the nuclear sector. Surely, the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination application will improve and facilitate the organization, coordination and evaluation tasks. (author)

  5. How the nuclear safety team conducts emergency exercises at the IEA-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, Antonio C.A.; Silva, Davilson G.; Toyoda, Eduardo Y.; Santia, Paulo S.; Conti, Thadeu N.; Semmler, Renato; Carvalho, Ricardo N., E-mail: acavaz@ipen.br, E-mail: dgsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: eytoyoda@ipen.br, E-mail: psantia@ipen.br, E-mail: tnconti@ipen.br, E-mail: rsemmler@ipen.b, E-mail: rncarval@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work introduces the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination designed by the Nuclear Safety Team for better Emergency Exercise coordination. The Nuclear Safety Team was created with the mission of avoiding, preventing and mitigating the causes and effects of accidents at the IEA-R1. The facility where we conduct our work is located in an area of a huge population, what increases the responsibility of our mission: conducting exercises and training are part of our daily activities. During the Emergency Exercise, accidents ranked 0-4 on INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) are simulated and involve: Police Department, Fire Department, workers, people from the community, and others. In the last exercise held in June 2014, the scenario contemplated a terrorist organization action that infiltrated in a group of students who were visiting the IEA-R1, tried to steal fresh fuel element to fabricate a dirty bomb. Emergency procedures and plans, timeline and metrics of the actions were applied to the Emergency Exercise evaluation. The next exercise will be held in November, with the simulation of the piping of the primary cooling circuit rupture, causing the emptying of the pool and the lack of cooling of the fuel elements in the reactor core: this will be the scenario. The skills acquired and the systems improvement have been very important tools for the reactor operation safety and the Nuclear Safety Team is making technical efforts so that these Emergency Exercises may be applied to other nuclear and radiological facilities. Equally important for the process of improving nuclear safety is the emphasis placed on implementing quality improvements to the human factor in the nuclear safety area, a crucial element that is often not considered by those outside the nuclear sector. Surely, the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination application will improve and facilitate the organization, coordination and evaluation tasks. (author)

  6. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 9, Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Instrumentation for Radiation protection existing at the RA reactor is dating mostly from the period 1957-1959 when the reactor has been built. With some minor exception it was produced in USSR. Radiation protection system was constructed based on specific design project, somewhat modified original USSR project which has been indispensable because of some modification of the building design. During the past 27 years no renewal of the instrumentation was done, only maintenance was performed. Instrumentation consists of old electronic devices which caused difficulties and even prevented regular maintenance because of lack of spare parts. Instrumentation for radiation protection at the RA reactor is classified as follows: centralized dosimetry system; stationary dosimetry instrumentation, movable and personal dosimetry systems. Apart from the scheme of dosimetry instrumentation this volume includes description of radiation protection procedures; protection devices; radiation doses and dose limit data; program for environmental radioactivity control; medical control procedures [sr

  7. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -Thermal hydraulic tests for reactor safety system-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Moon Kee; Park, Choon Kyung; Yang, Sun Kyoo; Chun, Se Yung; Song, Chul Hwa; Jun, Hyung Kil; Jung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yun; Cho, Yung Roh; Min, Kyung Hoh; Jung, Jang Hwan; Jang, Suk Kyoo; Kim, Bok Deuk; Kim, Wooi Kyung; Huh, Jin; Kim, Sook Kwan; Moon, Sang Kee; Lee, Sang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-01

    The present research aims at the development of the thermal hydraulic verification test technology for the safety system of the conventional and advanced nuclear power plant and the development of the advanced thermal hydraulic measuring techniques. In this research, test facilities simulating the primary coolant system and safety system are being constructed for the design verification tests of the existing and advanced nuclear power plant. 97 figs, 14 tabs, 65 refs. (Author).

  8. Safety problems of nuclear power plants with channel-type graphite boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanov, I.Ya.; Vasilevskij, V.P.; Volkov, V.P.; Gavrilov, P.A.; Kramerov, A.Ya.; Kuznetsov, S.P.; Kunegin, E.P.; Rybakov, N.Z.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of nuclear power plants in a highly populated region near large industrial centres necessitates to pay a special attention to their nuclear and radiation safety. Safety problems of nuclear reactor operation are discussed, in particular, they are: reliable stoppage of fission chain reaction at any emergency cases; reliable core cooling with failure of various equipment; emergency core cooling with breached pipes of a circulating circuit; and prevention of radioactive coolant release outside the nuclear power plant in amount exceeding the values adopted. Channel-type water boiling reactors incorporate specific features requiring a new approach to safety operation of a reactor and a nuclear power plant. These include primarily a rather large steam volume in the coolant circuit, large amount of accumulated heat, void reactivity coefficient. Channel-type reactors characterized by fair neutron balance and flexible fuel cycle, have a series of advantages alleviating the problem of ensuring their safety. The possibility of reliable control over the state of each channel allows to replace failed fuel elements by the new ones, when operating on-load, to increase the number of circulating loops and reduce the diameter of main pipelines, simplifies significantly the problem of channel emergency cooling and localization of a radioactive coolant release from a breached circuit. The concept of channel-type reactors is based on the solution of three main problems. First, plant safety should be assured in emergency switch off of separate units and, if possible, energy conditions should be maintained, this is of particular importance considering the increase in unit power. Second, the system of safety and emergency cooling should eliminate a great many failures of fuel elements in case of potential breaches of any tube in the circulating circuit. Finally, rugged boxes and localizing devices should be provided to exclude damage of structural elements of the nuclear power

  9. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 12, Accidents during reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This volume includes description and analysis of typical accidents occurred during operation of RA reactor in chronological order, as follows: contamination of primary coolant circuit; leakage of heavy water from the primary coolant loop; contamination of vertical experimental channel; air contamination in the reactor building and loss of circulation of the primary coolant; failures of the vacuum pump and spent fuel packaging device; rupture of the spent fuel element cladding; dethronement's of capsule for irradiation of fuel element; rupture of the vertical experimental channel and contamination of the surroundings; swelling of a fuel element; appearance of deposits on the surface of the fuel elements cladding. The last chapter describes similar accidents occurred on nuclear reactors in the world [sr

  10. Reactor system safety assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattson, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy of reactor safety is that design should follow established and conservative engineering practices, there should be safety margins in all modes of plant operation, special systems should be provided for accidents, and safety systems should have redundant components. This philosophy provides ''defense in depth.'' Additionally, the safety of nuclear power plants relies on ''safety systems'' to assure acceptable response to design basis events. Operating experience has shown the need to study plant response to more frequent upset conditions and to account for the influence of operators and non-safety systems on overall performance. Defense in depth is being supplemented by risk and reliability assessment

  11. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1992-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 83 papers out of the 108 that were presented at the Nineteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 28--30, 1991. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 14 different papers presented by researchers from Canada, Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, Taiwan, and USSR. This document, Volume 3, presents papers on: Structural engineering; Advanced reactor research; Advanced passive reactors; Human factors research; Human factors issues related to advanced passive light water researchers; Thermal Hydraulics; and Earth sciences. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  12. Safety management at nuclear installations with research reactors. A comparison of five European installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troen, H.; Lauridsen, B.

    1997-11-01

    Five European institutions with nuclear research reactors were visited to compare safety management among institutions similar to Risoe. Risoe is a National Laboratory and the main activities are research and development. In 1996 it was decided to look into safety management at Risoe again; the last revision was in 1972. The purpose was to make it more efficient and to emphasise, that the responsibility lies in the operating organisation. Information such as nuclear facilities at the institutions, the safety management organisation, emergency preparedness, and lists of radiation doses to the employees from the years 1995 and 1996 is given in the report. Also international requirements and recommendations are given in short. Furthermore the report contains some reflections on the development in safety management organisations in resent years and the conclusions drawn from the information gathered

  13. Steam explosion - physical foundations and relation to nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, U.

    1982-08-01

    'Steam explosion' means the sudden evaporation of a fluid by heat exchange with a hotter material. Other terms are 'vapour explosion', 'thermal explosion', and 'energetic fuel-coolant interaction (FCI)'. In such an event a large fraction of the thermal energy initially stored in the hot material may possibly be converted into mechanical work. For pressurized water reactors one discusses (e.g. in risk analysis studies) a core melt-down accident during which molten fuel comes into contact with water. In the analysis of the consequences one has to investigate steam explosions. In this report an overview over the state of the knowledge is given. The overview is based on an extensive literature review. The objective of the report is to provide the basic knowledge which is required for understanding of the most important theories on the process of steam explosions. Following topics are treated: overview on steam explosion incidents, work potential, spontaneous nucleation, concept of detonation, results of some typical experiments, hydrodynamic fragmentation of drops, bubbles and jets, coarse mixtures, film-boiling, scenario of a core melt-down accident with possible steam-explosion in a pressurized water reactor. (orig.) [de

  14. Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Office of Reactor Safety. Research plans for the period 1997-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    Office of Reactor Safety research is carried out within the following areas: Safety evaluation, Safety analysis, MTO, Materials and chemistry, Non-Destructive Testing, Strength of materials, Thermohydraulics, Nuclear fuel, Serious accidents and Process control. Research is carried out to fulfill SKIs overall goals in accordance with the directives from the Swedish government and parliament, in particular to be a driving force in safety related work when justified by operating experience, research results and technical progress, towards licensees as well as in international cooperation in safety; to promote the maintenance and development of competence in the safety related work at the SKI as well as the licensees and generally in the country, and as a specific role for the Office of Reactor Safety as designated in the internal routines to take initiative to encourage and carry out research into areas of importance for the Office as well as ensuring that research results are disseminated and used both within SKI and in the general work concerning nuclear safety. Research efforts within the Office of Reactor safety are carried out in the form of separate projects which form part of the priority work plans. Project managers, the necessary personnel resources and the budget for each year are included in the Annual Plan and the work is followed up in the same manner as other efforts. Research is performed in different ways, that can vary from laboratory studies to more consultative efforts, and be organised in many different ways such as examination projects, post-graduate studies, work sponsored at research institutes and companies in Sweden and abroad, collaboration in larger international projects, and participation in conferences which provide an important contribution to keeping SKI personnel informed within their specialist areas

  15. System analysis of nuclear safety of VVER reactor with MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A.D.; Zharkov, V.P.; Suslov, I.R. [Russia, Moscow Malaya Krasnoselskaya St. (Russian Federation); Boyarinov, V.F.; Kevrolev, V.V.; Tchibinyaev, A.V.; Tsibulskiy, V.F. [RRC KI, Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kochurov, B.P. [ITEP, Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation); Giovanni, B. [NFPSC, FRAMATOME (France)

    2005-07-01

    The report presents a short summary of the results achieved in the ISTC (International Science and Technology Center) project 'System analysis of nuclear safety of VVER reactor with MOX fuel' (April 2005). The studies within the project are of a systematic character and include the solutions of 15 tasks. The report gives an overview of the major blocks of these tasks: neutron transport equation solution; calculations of isotopic vectors, analysis of the impact of uncertainties on predicted reactor functionals. The calculation methods, the verification results and the corresponding codes are briefly described. (authors)

  16. Seismic qualification of safety class components in non-reactor nuclear facilities at Hanford site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocoma, E.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methods used during the walkdowns to compile as-built structural information to seismically qualify or verify the seismic adequacy of safety class components in the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex. The Plutonium finishing Plant is a non-reactor nuclear facility built during the 1950's and was designed to the Uniform Building Code criteria for both seismic and wind events. This facility is located at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site near Richland, Washington

  17. Management of the Interface between Nuclear Safety and Security for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide technical guidelines and practical information to assist Member States, operating organizations and regulatory bodies, on the basis of international good practices, and to manage the interface between nuclear safety and security at research reactor facilities in an integrated and coordinated manner. The publication was developed based on input from IAEA technical and consultants' meetings held between 2013 and 2015

  18. Innovative nuclear reactor - Indian approach to meet user requirements for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: For sustainable development of nuclear energy, a number of key issues are to be addressed. It should be economically competitive; it must address the issues related to nuclear safety, proliferation resistance, environmental impact, waste disposal and cross cutting issues like social and infra-structural aspects. To compete successfully in the long term, in the highly competitive energy market and to overcome other challenges, it is necessary to introduce innovative reactor and fuel cycle concepts. Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is one such innovative reactor. To guide the research and development activities related to innovative concepts, user requirements are to be formulated. User requirements covering various aspects of sustainable development are being formulated at both national and international levels. One such international project involved in the formulation of user requirements is the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). This paper deals with INPRO user requirements for safety and Indian approach to meet these requirements through AHWR

  19. Multimegawatt Space Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Multimegawatt (MMW) Space Reactor Project supports the Strategic Defense Initiative Office requirement to provide reliable, safe, cost-effective, electrical power in the MMW range. Specifically, power may be used for neutral particle beams, free electron lasers, electromagnetic launchers, and orbital transfer vehicles. This power plant technology may also apply to the electrical power required for other uses such as deep-space probes and planetary exploration. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Project, the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program, and Centaurus Program all support the Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program and form an important part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) space and defense power systems activities. A major objective of the MMW project is the development of a reference flight system design that provides the desired levels of public safety, health protection, and special nuclear material (SNM) protection when used during its designated missions. The safety requirements for the MMW project are a hierarchy of requirements that consist of safety requirements/regulations, a safety policy, general safety criteria, safety technical specifications, safety design specifications, and the system design. This paper describes the strategy and philosophy behind the development of the safety requirements imposed upon the MMW concept developers. The safety organization, safety policy, generic safety issues, general safety criteria, and the safety technical specifications are discussed

  20. Achievements and future directions in the reactors physics and nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrache, Ion

    2001-01-01

    A historical overlook is presented with respect to inception and development of reactor physics research and on the job training in Romania. First these activities were carried out at the Institute for Atomic Physics and Institute for Power Reactors (IRNE) in Bucharest and afterward at the Institute for Nuclear Technologies, later on transformed in the Institute of Nuclear Research at Pitesti. CYBER Computer installed at Pitesti allowed formation in as early as 1971 reactor specialists who worked out computer programs for neutron physics calculations. These specialists were able to assimilate the characteristic of CANDU 6 type reactor as well as the AECL methodology of simulating processes of CANDU reactor physics. At present four programs are under way. These are: 1. The nuclear reactor physics; 2. The nuclear facility safety; 3. Safety analyses for the transport and radioactive waste disposal; 4. Analyses for radiation shielding and biological protection. There are presented results of the work associated to the CANDU type reactor: 1. Adapting and improving the code system for neutron and thermohydraulic calculation for CANDU type reactor, as supplied by AECL; 2. The IRNE manual for CANDU reactor neutron designing; 3. Final sizing of shim rods of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2; 4. Tests and measurements of reactor physics at the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioning; 5. Simulation and independent analysis of thermosiphoning carried out at Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioning; 6. Static and dynamical response of the detectors in the CANDU reactor core and their time evolution following the burnup in the neutron flux and their ageing effects; 7. PSA studies at Unit 1; 8. Safety analyses for the radioactive waste disposal at Saligny repository. Also, reported are the results of the work associated to the TRIGA reactor, as follows: 1. Flux measurements and neutron computations necessary in the reactor commissioning; 2. Cleaning up controversial issues relating to neutron flux

  1. Organisational culture at the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland's Nuclear Reactor Regulation department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, T.

    2001-01-01

    A case study to investigate the organisational culture of the regulatory authority was conducted at the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland's (STUK) Nuclear Reactor Regulation (YTO) department. Organisational culture is defined as a pattern of shared basic assumptions, which are basically unconscious. Objectives of the study were to conceptualise and describe the main characteristics of YTO's organisational culture and to carry out a tentative core task analysis of the inspectors' work. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used in the research. In the first phase of the research, an organisational culture survey (FOCUS) was administered. It is base on a theory according to which organisations can be categorised into four main culture types, support-, innovation, goal- and rule-culture. It was tailored to better fit this kind of organisation on the basis of document analysis and preliminary interviews. Data was factor analysed and summated scales were formed. YTO's culture was identified as a hierarchy-focused (rule) culture with less emphasis on innovation, support or goals. However, the ideal values of the personnel emphasised also social support and goal setting. Ambiguous goals were felt by some personnel as increased uncertainty about the meaningfulness of one's job. Also a lack of feedback was mentioned as a weakness in YTO's culture. In the second phase of the research, a development workshop was carried out. The themes of the workshop were identified on the basis of the results of the first phase. Main targets for development that were identified in the workshop were human resources, goal setting and knowledge management. The ideal values of the personnel emphasised support and goal cultures. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  3. Design of the reactor coolant system and associated systems in nuclear power plants. Safety guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for establishing safety standards for nuclear power plants. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are established in the Safety Requirements publication, Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1 on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, which it supplements. This Safety Guide describes how the requirements for the design of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and associated systems in nuclear power plants should be met. This publication is a revision and combination of two previous Safety Guides, Safety Series No. 50-SG-D6 on Ultimate Heat Sink and Directly Associated Heat Transport Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (1982), and Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13 on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (1987), which are superseded by this new Safety Guide. The revision takes account of developments in the design of the RCS and associated systems in nuclear power plants since the earlier Safety Guides were published in 1982 and 1987, respectively. The other objectives of the revision are to ensure consistency with Ref., issued in 2004, and to update the technical content. In addition, an appendix on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) has been included.

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  5. Reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    1998-01-01

    Risk assessments of nuclear installations require accurate safety and reliability analyses to estimate the consequences of accidental events and their probability of occurrence. The objective of the work performed in this field at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The four main activities of the research project on reactor safety analysis are: (1) the development of software for the reliable analysis of large systems; (2) the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; (3) the development and the application of a probabilistic reactor-dynamics method, and (4) to participate in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Progress in research during 1997 is described

  6. Evaluating the safety of aging nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Regulatory requirements limit the permissible accumulation of irradiation damage in RPV material such that adequate fracture prevention margins are maintained throughout the licensed operating period of a nuclear plant. Experience with application of those requirements has identified a number of areas where they could be further refined to eliminate excess conservatism. Research is ongoin to provide the data required to support refinement of the regulatory requirements. Research programs are investigating theeffects of local brittle zones, shallow flaws, biaxial loading, and stainless steel cladding. Preliminary results from this research indicate a potential for beneficial changes in the P-T curve and PTS analysis rules

  7. Thermal-hydraulic code for estimating safety limits of nuclear reactors with plate type fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, Duvan A.; Moreira, João L.; Maiorino, Jose R.; Rossi, Pedro R.; Carajilescov, Pedro, E-mail: duvan.castellanos@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joao.moreira@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: pedro.rossi@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: pedro.carajilescov10@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharias, Modelagem e Ciências Sociais Aplicadas

    2017-07-01

    To ensure the normal and safe operation of PWR type nuclear reactors is necessary the knowledge of nuclear and heat transfer properties of the fuel, coolant and structural materials. The thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors yields parameters such as the distribution of fuel and coolant temperatures, and the departure from nucleated boiling ratio. Usually computational codes are used to analyze the safety performance of the core. This research work presents a computer code for performing thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear reactors with plate-type fuel elements operating at low pressure and temperature (research reactors) or high temperature and pressure (naval propulsion or small power reactors). The code uses the sub-channel method based on geometric and thermal-hydraulic conditions. In order to solve the conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy, each sub-channel is divided into control volumes in the axial direction. The mass flow distribution for each fuel element of core is obtained. Analysis of critical heat flux is performed in the hottest channel. The code considers the radial symmetry and the chain or cascade method for two steps in order to facilitate the whole analysis. In the first step, we divide the core into channels with size equivalent to a fuel assembly. >From this analysis, the channel with the largest enthalpy is identified as the hot assembly. In the second step, we divide the hottest fuel assembly into sub-channels with size equivalent to one actual coolant channel. As in the previous step, the sub-channel with largest final enthalpy is identified as the hottest sub-channel. For the code validation, we considered results from the chinese CARR research reactor. The code reproduced well the CARR reactor results, yielding detailed information such as static pressure in the channel, mass flow rate distribution among the fuel channels, coolant, clad and centerline fuel temperatures, quality and local heat and critical heat

  8. Thermal-hydraulic code for estimating safety limits of nuclear reactors with plate type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, Duvan A.; Moreira, João L.; Maiorino, Jose R.; Rossi, Pedro R.; Carajilescov, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    To ensure the normal and safe operation of PWR type nuclear reactors is necessary the knowledge of nuclear and heat transfer properties of the fuel, coolant and structural materials. The thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors yields parameters such as the distribution of fuel and coolant temperatures, and the departure from nucleated boiling ratio. Usually computational codes are used to analyze the safety performance of the core. This research work presents a computer code for performing thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear reactors with plate-type fuel elements operating at low pressure and temperature (research reactors) or high temperature and pressure (naval propulsion or small power reactors). The code uses the sub-channel method based on geometric and thermal-hydraulic conditions. In order to solve the conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy, each sub-channel is divided into control volumes in the axial direction. The mass flow distribution for each fuel element of core is obtained. Analysis of critical heat flux is performed in the hottest channel. The code considers the radial symmetry and the chain or cascade method for two steps in order to facilitate the whole analysis. In the first step, we divide the core into channels with size equivalent to a fuel assembly. >From this analysis, the channel with the largest enthalpy is identified as the hot assembly. In the second step, we divide the hottest fuel assembly into sub-channels with size equivalent to one actual coolant channel. As in the previous step, the sub-channel with largest final enthalpy is identified as the hottest sub-channel. For the code validation, we considered results from the chinese CARR research reactor. The code reproduced well the CARR reactor results, yielding detailed information such as static pressure in the channel, mass flow rate distribution among the fuel channels, coolant, clad and centerline fuel temperatures, quality and local heat and critical heat

  9. Requirements and international co-operation in nuclear safety for evolutionary light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.

    1999-01-01

    The principles of safety are now well known and implemented world-wide, leading to a situation of harmonisation in accordance with the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Future reactors are expected not only to meet current requirements but to go beyond the safety level presently accepted. To this end, technical safety requirements, as defined by the IAEA document Safety Fundamentals, need be duly considered in the design, the risks to workers and population must be decreased, a stable, transparent and objective regulatory process, including an international harmonisation with respect to licensing of new reactors, must be developed, and the issue of public acceptance must be addressed. Well-performing existing installations are seen as a prerequisite for an improved public acceptability; there should be no major accidents, the results from safety performance indicators must be unquestionable, and compliance with internationally harmonised criteria is essential. Economical competitiveness is another factor that influences the acceptability; the costs for constructing the plant, for its operation and maintenance, for the fuel cycle, and for the final decommissioning are of paramount importance. Plant simplification, longer fuel cycles, life extension are appealing options, but safety will have first priority. The IAEA can play an important role in this field, by providing peer reviews by teams of international experts and assistance to Member States on the use of its safety standards. (author)

  10. Study of different fitness functions with safety restriction for nuclear reactor reload problem using QDPSO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Paulo C. de, E-mail: paulocaixeta@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Lima, Alan M.M. de; Schirru, Roberto, E-mail: alan@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem (NRRP) is a classical problem in Nuclear Engineering that has been studied for more than 40 years, which focuses on the economics and safety of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). This problem consists in searching for the best loading pattern of fuel assemblies (FA) in the core, aiming to determine the permutation of fuel assemblies that optimizes the uranium utilization, with fitness function evaluated according to specific criteria and methods of nuclear reactor physics, such as the maximum mean power peak and the boron concentration. In this article will be presented different methodologies to obtain a representative fitness function for NRRP, where Quantum particle Swarm optimization (QPSO) was used to determine which one gives the best array of fuel assemblies that will make the maximum EFPD (Effective Full Power Days) with the least computational effort. In this approach, as well as others in literature, was not used Burnable Poison in the simulations and the results will be compared in relation of the maximization of the cycle length considering the boron concentration yield by the reactor physics code, to make sure that the configuration is valid from a safety point of view. This paper was based on Angra 1's seventh reload cycle. (author)

  11. Verification of codes used for the nuclear safety assessment of the small space heterogeneous reactors with zirconium hydride moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, E.S.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompaniets, G.V.

    1994-01-01

    Computer codes used for assessment of nuclear safety for space NPP are compared taking as an example small-sized heterogeneous reactor with zirconium hydride moderator of the Topaz-2 facility. The code verifications are made for five different variants

  12. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  13. Comprehensive safety analysis code system for nuclear fusion reactors II: Thermal analysis during plasma disruptions for international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, T.; Maki, K.; Okazaki, T.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal characteristics of a fusion reactor [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Conceptual Design Activity] during plasma disruptions have been analyzed by using a comprehensive safety analysis code for nuclear fusion reactors. The erosion depth due to disruptions for the armor of the first wall depends on the current quench time of disruptions occurring in normal operation. If it is possible to extend the time up to ∼50 ms, the erosion depth is considerably reduced. On the other hand, the erosion depth of the divertor is ∼570 μm for only one disruption, which is determined only by the thermal flux during the thermal quench. This means that the divertor plate should be exchanged after about nine disruptions. Counter-measures are necessary for the divertor to relieve disruption influences. As other scenarios of disruptions, beta-limit disruptions and vertical displacement events were also investigated quantitatively. 13 refs., 5 figs

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) - Proceedings of the workshop on Experiments and CFD Code Application to Nuclear Reactor Safety (XCFD4NRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is to an increasing extent being adopted in nuclear reactor safety analyses as a tool that enables specific safety relevant phenomena occurring in the reactor coolant system to be better described. The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), which is responsible for the activities of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency that support advancing the technical base of the safety of nuclear installations, has in recent years conducted an important activity in the CFD area. This activity has been carried out within the scope of the CSNI working group on the analysis and management of accidents (GAMA), and has mainly focused on the formulation of user guidelines and on the assessment and verification of CFD codes. It is in this GAMA framework that a first workshop CFD4NRS was organized and held in Garching, Germany in 2006. Following the CFD4NRS workshop, this XCFD4NRS Workshop was intended to extend the forum created for numerical analysts and experimentalists to exchange information in the field of Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) related activities relevant to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation, but this time with more emphasis placed on new experimental techniques and two-phase CFD applications. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for numerical analysts and experimentalists to exchange information in the field of NRS-related activities relevant to CFD validation, with the objective of providing input to GAMA CFD experts to create a practical, state-of-the-art, web-based assessment matrix on the use of CFD for NRS applications. The scope of XCFD4NRS includes: - Single-phase and two-phase CFD simulations with an emphasis on validation in areas such as: boiling flows, free-surface flows, direct contact condensation and turbulent mixing. These applications should relate to NRS-relevant issues such as: pressurized thermal shocks, critical heat flux, pool heat exchangers, boron dilution, hydrogen

  15. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data

  16. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  17. Hualong One's nuclear reactor core design and relative safety issues research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H., E-mail: yuhong_xing@126.com [Nuclear Power Inst. of China, Design and Research Sub-Inst., Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2015-07-01

    'Full text:' Hualong One, a third generation 1000MWe-class pressurized water reactor, is developed by China National Nuclear Cooperation (CNNC), based on the self-reliant technologies and experiences from China 40 years designing, construction, operation and maintenance of NPPs. In China, it has been approved to construct at Fuqing 5&6 and Fangchenggang 3&4. The Hualong One adopts advanced design features to dramatically enhance plant safety, economic efficiency and convenience of operation and maintenance. It consists of three loops with nominal thermal power output 3060 MWt and a 60-year design life. Its reactor core has 177 fuel assemblies, 18 month refueling interval (after initial cycle), and more than 15% thermal margin. It adopts low leakage loading pattern which can achieve better economy of the neutron, higher reactivity and lower radiation damage of pressure vessel. For the safety design, incorporating the feedback of Fukushima accident, the Hualong One has a combination of active and passive safety systems, a single station layout, double containment structure, and comprehensive implementation of defence-in-depth design principles. The new design features has been successfully evaluated to ensure that they enhance the performance and safety of Hualong One. Several experimental activates have been conducted, such as cavity injection and cooling system testing, passive containment heat removal system testing, and passive residual heat removal system of secondary side testing. The future improvements of Hualong reactor will focus on better economic core design and more reliable safety system. (author)

  18. Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, Reactor Safety and Nuclear Non-Proliferation in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassen, Lars van; Delalic, Zlatan; Ekblad, Christer; Keyser, Peter; Turner, Roland; Rosengaard, Ulf; German, Olga; Grapengiesser, Sten; Andersson, Sarmite; Sandberg, Viviana; Olsson, Kjell; Stenberg, Tor

    2009-10-01

    The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) is trusted with the task of implementing Sweden's bilateral assistance to Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Belarus and Armenia in the fields of reactor safety, nuclear waste management, nuclear non-proliferation as well as radiation protection and emergency preparedness. In these fields, SSM also participates in various projects financed by the European Union. The purpose of this project-oriented report is to provide the Swedish Government and other funding agencies as well as other interested audiences in Sweden and abroad with an encompassing understanding of our work and in particular the work performed during 2008. the activities are divided into four subfields: Nuclear waste management; Reactor safety; Radiation safety and emergency preparedness; and, Nuclear non-proliferation. SSM implements projects in the field of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management in Russia. The problems in this field also exist in other countries, yet the concentration of nuclear and radioactive materials are nowhere higher than in north-west Russia. And given the fact that most of these materials stem from the Cold War era and remain stored under conditions that vary from 'possibly acceptable' to 'wildly appalling' it is obvious that Sweden's first priority in the field of managing nuclear spent fuel and radioactive waste lies in this part of Russia. The prioritisation and selection of projects in reactor safety are established following thorough discussions with the partners in Russia and Ukraine. For specific guidance on safety and recommended safety improvements at RBMK and VVER reactors, SSM relies on analyses and handbooks established by the IAEA in the 1990s. In 2008, there were 16 projects in reactor safety. SSM implements a large number of projects in the field of radiation protection and emergency preparedness. The activities are at a first glance at some distance from the activities covered and foreseen by for instance the

  19. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment vessel faced internally with a metal liner is provided with thermal insulation for the liner, comprising one or more layers of compressible material such as ceramic fiber, such as would be conventional in an advanced gas-cooled reactor and also a superposed layer of ceramic bricks or tiles in combination with retention means therefor, the retention means (comprising studs projecting from the liner, and bolts or nuts in threaded engagement with the studs) being themselves insulated from the vessel interior so that the coolant temperatures achieved in a High-Temperature Reactor or a Fast Reactor can be tolerated with the vessel. The layer(s) of compressible material is held under a degree of compression either by the ceramic bricks or tiles themselves or by cover plates held on the studs, in which case the bricks or tiles are preferably bedded on a yielding layer (for example of carbon fibers) rather than directly on the cover plates

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary: main report. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the objectives and organization of the reactor safety study; the basic concepts of risk; the nature of nuclear power plant accidents; risk assessment methodology; reactor accident risk; and comparison of nuclear risks to other societal risks.

  2. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This book reviews the accomplishments, operations, and problems faced by the defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. Specifically, it discusses the recommendations that the Safety Board made to improve safety and health conditions at the Department of Energy's defense nuclear facilities, problems the Safety Board has encountered in hiring technical staff, and management problems that could affect the Safety Board's independence and credibility

  3. Development of a computational database for application in Probabilistic Safety Analysis of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Vagner dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the computational database that was developed to store technical information and process data on component operation, failure and maintenance for the nuclear research reactors located at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN), in São Paulo, Brazil. Data extracted from this database may be applied in the Probabilistic Safety Analysis of these research reactors or in less complex quantitative assessments related to safety, reliability, availability and maintainability of these facilities. This database may be accessed by users of the corporate network, named IPEN intranet. Professionals who require the access to the database must be duly registered by the system administrator, so that they will be able to consult and handle the information. The logical model adopted to represent the database structure is an entity-relationship model, which is in accordance with the protocols installed in IPEN intranet. The open-source relational database management system called MySQL, which is based on the Structured Query Language (SQL), was used in the development of this work. The PHP programming language was adopted to allow users to handle the database. Finally, the main result of this work was the creation a web application for the component reliability database named PSADB, specifically developed for the research reactors of IPEN; furthermore, the database management system provides relevant information efficiently. (author)

  4. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and technical review. A submission to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review by Atomic Energy Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This submission comments on the evolution of the Canadian nuclear program, the management of safety, and the reactor design, analysis, operation and research programs that contribute to the safety of the CANDU reactor and provide assurance of safety to the regulatory agency and to the public. The CANDU reactor system has been designed and developed with close cooperation between Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), utilities, manufacturers, and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The AECB has the responsibility, on behalf of the public, for establishing acceptable standards with respect to public risk and for establishing through independent review that these standards are satisfied. The plant designer has responsibility for defining how those standards will be met. The plant operator has responsibility for operating within the framework of those standards. The Canadian approach to safety design is based on the philosophy of defence in depth. Defence in depth is achieved through a high level of equipment quality, system redundancy and fail-safe design; regulating and process systems designed to maintain all process systems within acceptable operating parameters; and, independent safety systems to shut down the reactor, provide long-term cooling, and contain potential release of radioactivity in the event of an accident. The resulting design meets regulatory requirements not only in Canada but also in other countries. Probabilistic safety and risk evaluations show that the CANDU design offers a level of safety and least as good as other commercially available reactor designs

  5. SRP reactor safety evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant reactors have operated for over 100 reactor years without an incident of significant consequence to on or off-site personnel. The reactor safety posture incorporates a conservative, failure-tolerant design; extensive administrative controls carried out through detailed operating and emergency written procedures; and multiple engineered safety systems backed by comprehensive safety analyses, adapting through the years as operating experience, changes in reactor operational modes, equipment modernization, and experience in the nuclear power industry suggested. Independent technical reviews and audits as well as a strong organizational structure also contribute to the defense-in-depth safety posture. A complete review of safety history would discuss all of the above contributors and the interplay of roles. This report, however, is limited to evolution of the engineered safety features and some of the supporting analyses. The discussion of safety history is divided into finite periods of operating history for preservation of historical perspective and ease of understanding by the reader. Programs in progress are also included. The accident at Three Mile Island was assessed for its safety implications to SRP operation. Resulting recommendations and their current status are discussed separately at the end of the report. 16 refs., 3 figs

  6. Indian advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    For sustainable development of nuclear energy, a number of important issues like safety, waste management, economics etc. are to be addressed. To do this, a number of advanced reactor designs as well as fuel cycle technologies are being pursued worldwide. The advanced reactors being developed in India are the AHWR and the CHTR. Both the reactors use thorium based fuel and have many passive features. This paper describes the Indian advanced reactors and gives a brief account of the international initiatives for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor safety, a review of the Rasmussen report (WASH -1400)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, C.P.

    1979-03-01

    The US Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400), often referred to as RSS or the Rasmussen Report, sets out to estimate the risk to which the public is exposed by the possibility of an accident in one of the first 100 nuclear power stations situated in the USA. This review briefly describes the methods used in RSS, and indicates how the results were obtained. It then discusses the nature of these results, and the comparisons which RSS makes between them and other accident statistics. Finally, the criticisms which have been levelled at RSS are assessed, and the conclusions of a very recent US Nuclear Regulatory Commission review are included in appendix. RSS concludes that the risk due to reactor accidents is smaller than that associated with many other aspects of everyday life. While there are shortcomings in RSS, the author has little doubt that the above conclusion is valid

  8. Yellin's review of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Study: comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.

    1976-01-01

    Joel Yellin (Bell J. Economics, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Spr. 1976)) reviewed the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400, or Rasmussen Report) published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and makes several criticisms. Wilson finds that some of these criticisms are much overstated, while others, although valid, are mainly criticisms of presentation. To be useful for public policy, reactor risks--and indeed all nuclear risks--must be compared with other risks society faces. Wilson feels that the Rasmussen Report is weak in these comparisons, primarily because there exist few estimates of risk in other places, but that the comparisons he does make indeed confirm that the risk is smaller than Yellin suggests. 20 references

  9. Safety of VVER-440 reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Slugen, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Safety of VVER-440 Reactors endeavours to promote an increase in the safety of VVER-440 nuclear reactors via the improvement of fission products limitation systems and the implementation of special non-destructive spectroscopic methods for materials testing. All theoretical and experimental studies performed the by author over the last 25 years have been undertaken with the aim of improving VVER-440 defence in depth, which is one of the most important principle for ensuring safety in nuclear power plants. Safety of VVER-440 Reactors is focused on the barrier system through which the safety pri

  10. International Nuclear Safety Center database on thermophysical properties of reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.; Sofu, T.; Ley, H.

    1997-01-01

    The International Nuclear Safety Center (INSC) database has been established at Argonne National Laboratory to provide easily accessible data and information necessary to perform nuclear safety analyses and to promote international collaboration through the exchange of nuclear safety information. The INSC database, located on the World Wide Web at http://www.insc.anl.gov, contains critically assessed recommendations for reactor material properties for normal operating conditions, transients, and severe accidents. The initial focus of the database is on thermodynamic and transport properties of materials for water reactors. Materials that are being included in the database are fuel, absorbers, cladding, structural materials, coolant, and liquid mixtures of combinations of UO 2 , ZrO 2 , Zr, stainless steel, absorber materials, and concrete. For each property, the database includes: (1) a summary of recommended equations with uncertainties; (2) a detailed data assessment giving the basis for the recommendations, comparisons with experimental data and previous recommendations, and uncertainties; (3) graphs showing recommendations, uncertainties, and comparisons with data and other equations; and (4) property values tabulated as a function of temperature

  11. Rock siting of nuclear power plants from a reactor safety standpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    The study has aimed at surveying the advantages and disadvantages of a rock sited nuclear power plant from a reactor safety standpoint. The studies performed are almost entirely concentrated on the BWR alternative. The design of a nuclear power plant in rock judged most appropriate has been studied in greater detail, and a relatively extensive safety analysis has been made. It is found that the presented technical design of the rock sited alternative is sufficiently advanced to form a basis for further projecting treatment. The chosen technical design of the reactor plant demands a cavern with a 45-50 metre span. Caverns without strengthening efforts with such spans are used in mines, but have no previously been used for industrial plants. Studies of the stability of such caverns show that a safety level is attainable corresponding to the safety required for the other parts of the nuclear power plant. The conditions are that the rock is of high quality, that necessary strengthening measures are taken and that careful studies of the rock are made before and during the blasting, and also during operation of the plant. When locating a rock sited nuclear power plant, the same criteria must be considered as for an above ground plant, with additional stronger demands for rock quality. The presented rock sited nuclear power plant has been assessed to cost 20 % more in total construction costs than a corresponding above ground plant. The motivations for rock siting also depend on whether a condensing plant for only electricity production, or a plant for combined power production and district heating, is considered. The latter would under certain circumstances make rock siting look more attractive. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement of the accessibility of that part of a nuclear reactor serving for biological shield is proposed. It is intended to provide within the biological shield, distributed around the circumference of the reactor pressure vessel, several shielding chambers filled with shielding material, which are isolated gastight from the outside by means of glass panes with a given bursting strength. It is advantageous that, on the one hand, inspection and maintenance will be possible without great effort and, on the other, a large relief cross section will be at desposal if required. (UWI) [de

  13. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactor. A scientific and technical review. Report to the Minister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, F.K.

    1988-01-01

    In December 1986 a study of the safety of the design, operating procedures and emergency plans associated with Ontario Hydro's nuclear generating plants was commissioned by the government of the province of Ontario. After receiving briefs from many interested groups and individuals, visiting the power plants, and consulting with nuclear industry and regulatory representatives in Canada and other countries, the commissioner presented this report to the Minister of Energy for Ontario. His major conclusion is that Ontario Hydro reactors are being operated safely and at high standards of technical performance. No significant adverse impact has been detected in either the work force or the public. The risk of accidents serious enough to affect the public adversely can never be zero, but is very remote. Major recommendations are that: Ontario Hydro re-examine its operational organization closely and commission a study of factors affecting human performance; and, that priority be given to finding a solution to pressure tube performance problems and to improving in-reactor monitoring. Sixteen other recommendations are presented relating to research and development, information exchange with other organizations, reactor performance, training, severe accident analysis, the provincial nuclear emergency plan, epidemiological studies, the Atomic Energy Control Board, public hearings, and women in the nuclear industry

  14. Nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F; George, B V; Baglin, C J

    1978-05-10

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given.

  15. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the nuclear reactor availability by enabling to continuously exchange fuels in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region during operation. Constitution: A control rod is withdrawn to the midway of a highly enriched uranium region by means of control rod drives and the highly enriched uranium region is burnt to maintain the nuclear reactor always at a critical state. At the same time, fresh uranium-slightly enriched uranium is continuously supplied gravitationally from a fresh fuel reservoir through fuel reservoir to each of fuel pipes in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region. Then, spent fuels reduced with the reactivity by the burn up are successively taken out from the bottom of each of the fuel pipes through an exit duct and a solenoid valve to the inside of a spent fuel reservoir and the burn up in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region is conducted continuously. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Complementary Safety Assessments for Research Reactors for the French Nuclear Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassiotis, Christophe; Rigaud, Antoine; Evrard, Lydie

    2013-01-01

    The 'Autorite de surete nucleaire' (ASN) requested licensees to undertake stress tests, called complementary safety assessments (CSA), of their installations on May 5th 2011, following the accident that occurred in Japan on March 11th 2011. Their mission consisted in providing feedback on the consequences of potential extreme events. In this process, all the French facilities were divided into three categories of decreasing priority, depending on two main factors: on the one hand, their vulnerability to the various phenomena that led to the Fukushima accident, and on the other hand, the amount of radioactive elements that would be dispersed in the event of a failure of the safety functions. On the 79 high-priority facilities, only five of them are research or experimental reactors (including two currently shutdown or in decommissioning) and their operators (the 'Comissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives' (CEA) and the 'Institut Laue Langevin') submitted their reports to the ASN on September 15 th 2011. Concerning the lower-priority facilities, including three other facilities (two research reactors operated by the CEA and a facility operated by ITER Organization) the deadline was September 15 th 2012. Finally, the remaining facilities were not asked to submit a report yet, but they will have to do it later, mainly on the occasion of their next periodic safety review. The analyses of the cliff-edge effects, that may occur in extreme situations (exceptional scale event, combination of several disasters...), led to the definition of a hardened safety core concept by the 'Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire' (IRSN). This hardened safety core of structures, equipment and organizational measures must ensure the ultimate protection of the concerned facilities in extreme situations : it is designed to prevent severe accidents (or curb their progression), limit large scale releases for extreme accidents, and enables the operating teams to

  18. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, P.; Davidson, D.F.; Thatcher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor of the pool kind is described. It has an intermediate heat exchange module comprising a tube-in-shell heat exchanger and an electromagnetic flow coupler in the base region of the module. Primary coolant is flowed through the heat exchanger being driven by electromagnetic interaction with secondary liquid metal coolant flow effected by a mechanical pump. (author)

  19. BFS, a Legacy to the International Reactor Physics, Criticality Safety, and Nuclear Data Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Tsibulya, Anatoly; Rozhikhin, Yevgeniy

    2012-01-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. Data provided by these two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades The Russian Federation has been a major contributor to both projects with the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) as the major contributor from the Russian Federation. Included in the benchmark specifications from the BFS facilities are 34 critical configurations from BFS-49, 61, 62, 73, 79, 81, 97, 99, and 101; spectral characteristics measurements from BFS-31, 42, 57, 59, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101; reactivity effects measurements from BFS-62-3A; reactivity coefficients and kinetics measurements from BFS-73; and reaction rate measurements from BFS-42, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101.

  20. Evaluating the Cost, Safety, and Proliferation Risks of Small Floating Nuclear Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael J; Abdulla, Ahmed; Morgan, M Granger

    2017-11-01

    It is hard to see how our energy system can be decarbonized if the world abandons nuclear power, but equally hard to introduce the technology in nonnuclear energy states. This is especially true in countries with limited technical, institutional, and regulatory capabilities, where safety and proliferation concerns are acute. Given the need to achieve serious emissions mitigation by mid-century, and the multidecadal effort required to develop robust nuclear governance institutions, we must look to other models that might facilitate nuclear plant deployment while mitigating the technology's risks. One such deployment paradigm is the build-own-operate-return model. Because returning small land-based reactors containing spent fuel is infeasible, we evaluate the cost, safety, and proliferation risks of a system in which small modular reactors are manufactured in a factory, and then deployed to a customer nation on a floating platform. This floating small modular reactor would be owned and operated by a single entity and returned unopened to the developed state for refueling. We developed a decision model that allows for a comparison of floating and land-based alternatives considering key International Atomic Energy Agency plant-siting criteria. Abandoning onsite refueling is beneficial, and floating reactors built in a central facility can potentially reduce the risk of cost overruns and the consequences of accidents. However, if the floating platform must be built to military-grade specifications, then the cost would be much higher than a land-based system. The analysis tool presented is flexible, and can assist planners in determining the scope of risks and uncertainty associated with different deployment options. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Study of essential safety features of a three-loop 1,000 MWe light water reactor (PWR) and a corresponding heavy water reactor (HWR) on the basis of the IAEA nuclear safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    Based on the IAEA Standards, essential safety aspects of a three-loop pressurized water reactor (1,000 MWe) and a corresponding heavy water reactor were studied by the TUeV Baden e.V. in cooperation with the Gabinete de Proteccao e Seguranca Nuclear, a department of the Ministry which is responsible for Nuclear power plants in Portugal. As the fundamental principles of this study the design data for the light water reactor and the heavy water reactor provided in the safety analysis reports (KWU-SSAR for the 1,000 MWe PWR, KWU-PSAR Nuclear Power Plant ATUCHA II) are used. The assessment of the two different reactor types based on the IAEA Nuclear Safety Standards shows that the reactor plants designed according to the data given in the safety analysis reports of the plant manufacturer meet the design requirements laid down in the pertinent IAEA Standards. (orig.) [de

  2. Solution of safety problems for nuclear power plants with WWER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krett, V.; Pernitsa, R.; Pfann, Ya.; Zbeglik, J.

    1982-01-01

    Institute of nuclear research (INR) of Czechoslovakian Atomic Energy Commission isto fulfil the supervision functions within the field of nuclear power research and development. The problems of safe operation ensurance for the nuclear power plants (NPP) with WWER-440 reactors are studied within the frame of sever major issues: code standardization and devolopment of guiding materials for the state supervision; neutronic and thermohydrolic data processing for the accident analysis; operation reliability studies of the safety systems and estimates of separate component failure importance; assessment of the accidents resulting from the equipment misfunctioning and component failures; development of a controlled reliability program; evaluation of the atomic installationsimpact on the environment; ensurence of the reactor vessel reliability and durability under irradiation. The NPP safety analysis incorporates the calculations of transient and accidental regimes for the core, the primary loop and the entire plant. A number of codes has been produced which allow to determine the state of fuel elements during operation just before the accidents assessed, thermohydrolic conditions in the coolant and the temperature distribution within the fuel both for the stationary reactor conditions and for transient regimes. A mathematical model has been deveoloped, including the description of all the primary loop major components. The Soviet code DYNAMIKA has been adopted and adjusted for EC-1040 computer, there by the accident analysis for the entire NPP has been made possible. On the basis of american SAFTE code a faster SAFEDO-2 code has been developed employing the Monte Carlo method for the accident analysis of a complex system described by means of a failure tree. The discussed codes are used at the data assessment for the accident analysis part of the safety reports as well as for the reliability evaluation of the emergency core cooling system [ru

  3. Independent Safety Assessment of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system (Revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Independent Safety Assessment described in this study report was performed to assess the safety of the design and launch plans anticipated by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in 1993 for a Russian-built, U.S.-modified, TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system. Its conclusions, and the bases for them, were intended to provide guidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) management in the event that the DOD requested authorization under section 91b. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, for possession and use (including ground testing and launch) of a nuclear-fueled, modified TOPAZ-II. The scientists and engineers who were engaged to perform this assessment are nationally-known nuclear safety experts in various disciplines. They met with participants in the TOPAZ-II program during the spring and summer of 1993 and produced a report based on their analysis of the proposed TOPAZ-II mission. Their conclusions were confined to the potential impact on public safety and did not include budgetary, reliability, or risk-benefit analyses

  4. Reports and operational engineering: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochman, A.; Washburn, B.W.

    1981-02-01

    The Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee, established via an October 24, 1979 memorandum from the Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary, was instructed to review the ''Kemeny Commission'' recommendations and to identify possible implications for DOE's nuclear facilities. As a result of this review, the Committee recommended that DOE carry out assessments in seven categories. The assessments would address specific topics identified for each category as delineated in the NFPQT ''Guidelines for Assessing the Safe Operation of DOE-Owned Reactors,'' dated May 7, 1980. The Committee recognized that similar assessments had been ongoing in the DOE program and safety overview organizations since the Three Mile Island nuclear accident and it was the Committee's intent to use the results of those ongoing assessments as an input to their evaluations. This information would be supplemented by additional studies consisting of the subject-related documents used at each reactor facility studied, and an on-site review of these reactor facilities by professional personnel within the Department of Energy, its operating contractors and independent consultants. 1 tab

  5. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 13, Causes of possible accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This volume includes the analysis of possible accidents on the RA research reaktor. Any unwanted action causing decrease of integrity of any of the reactor safety barriers is considered to be a reactor accident. Safety barriers are: fuel element cladding, reactor vessel, biogical shield, and reactor building. Reactor accidents can be classified in four categories: (1) accidents caused by reactivity changes; (2) accidents caused by mis function of the cooling system; (3) accidents caused by errors in fuel management and auxiliary systems; (4) accidents caused by natural or other external disasters. The analysis of possible causes of reactor accidents includes the analysis of possible impacts on the reactor itself and the environment [sr

  6. Nuclear law - Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontier, Jean-Marie; Roux, Emmanuel; Leger, Marc; Deguergue, Maryse; Vallar, Christian; Pissaloux, Jean-Luc; Bernie-Boissard, Catherine; Thireau, Veronique; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Spencer, Mary; Zhang, Li; Park, Kyun Sung; Artus, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the contributions presented during a one-day seminar. The authors propose a framework for a legal approach to nuclear safety, a discussion of the 2009/71/EURATOM directive which establishes a European framework for nuclear safety in nuclear installations, a comment on nuclear safety and environmental governance, a discussion of the relationship between citizenship and nuclear, some thoughts about the Nuclear Safety Authority, an overview of the situation regarding the safety in nuclear waste burying, a comment on the Nome law with respect to electricity price and nuclear safety, a comment on the legal consequences of the Fukushima accident on nuclear safety in the Japanese law, a presentation of the USA nuclear regulation, an overview of nuclear safety in China, and a discussion of nuclear safety in the medical sector

  7. Safety inspections to TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byszewski, W.

    1988-01-01

    The operational safety advisory programme was created to provide useful assistance and advice from an international perspective to research reactor operators and regulators on how to enhance operational safety and radiation protection on their reactors. Safety missions cover not only the operational safety of reactors themselves, but also the safety of associated experimental loops, isotope laboratories and other experimental facilities. Safety missions are also performed on request in other Member States which are interested in receiving impartial advice and assistance in order to enhance the safety of research reactors. The results of the inspections have shown that in some countries there are problems with radiation protection practices and nuclear safety. Very often the Safety Analysis Report is not updated, regulatory supervision needs clarification and improvement, maintenance procedures should be more formalised and records and reports are not maintained properly. In many cases population density around the facility has increased affecting the validity of the original safety analysis

  8. Review on the seismic safety of JRR-3 according to the revised regulatory code on seismic design for nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Araki, Masaaki; Ohba, Toshinobu; Torii, Yoshiya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Takeuchi, Masaki [Nuclear Safety Commission (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor No.3) with the thermal power of 20MW is a light water moderated and cooled, swimming pool type research reactor. JRR-3 has been operated without major troubles. This paper presents about review on the seismic safety of JRR-3 according to the revised regulatory code on seismic design for nuclear reactors. In addition, some topics concerning damages in JRR-3 due to the Great East Japan Earthquake are presented. (author)

  9. Nuclear reactors. Use of the protection system for non-safety purposes (International Electrotechnical Commission Standard Publication 639:1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    1996-01-01

    This standard applies to the protection system of a nuclear reactor and, more especially, to all interconnections between a reactor protection system (as defined and explained in International Electrotechnical Commission Publication 231 A, first supplement to Publication 231, General Principles of Nuclear Reactor Instrumentation) and all other systems and equipment not part of the protection system, except: a) the physical connection between sensors of the protection system and the physical variables that they monitor, such as for example, thermo wells, moderating medium for neutron sensors, etc.; b) the electrical connection between the protection system and the reactor control rods or other safety mechanism; c) the electrical and pneumatic connections to the power distribution system (mains) and pneumatic supplies that supply power to the protection system. Although many clauses relate to all reactor protection systems, this standard applies mainly to protection systems in nuclear power reactors

  10. Use of molybdenum as a structural material of fuel elements for improving nuclear reactors safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmelev, Anatoly N.; Kulikov, Gennady G.; Kozhahmet, Bauyrzhan K.; Kulikov, Evgeny G.; Apse, Vladimir A. [National Research Nuclear Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI)

    2016-12-15

    Main purpose of the study is justifying the use of molybdenum as a structural material of fuel elements for improving the safety of nuclear reactors. Particularity of the used molybdenum is that its isotopic composition corresponds to molybdenum, which is obtained as tailing during operation of the separation cascade for producing a material for medical diagnostics of cancer. The following results were obtained: A method for reducing the thermal constant of fuel elements for light water and fast reactors by using dispersion fuel in cylindrical fuel rods containing, for example, granules of metallic U-Mo-alloy into Mo-matrix was proposed; the necessity of molybdenum enrichment by weakly absorbing isotopes was shown; total use of isotopic molybdenum will be more than 50 %.

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  12. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  13. Evaluation of reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-04-15

    Although the operation of nuclear reactors has a remarkably good record of safety, the prevention of possible reactor accidents is one of the major factors that atomic planners have to contend with. At the same time, excessive caution may breed an attitude that hampers progress, either by resisting new development or by demanding unnecessarily elaborate and expensive precautions out of proportion to the actual hazards involved. The best course obviously is to determine the possible dangers and adopt adequate measures for their prevention, providing of course, for a reasonable margin of error in judging the hazards and the effectiveness of the measures. The greater the expert understanding and thoroughness with which this is done, the narrower need the margin be. This is the basic idea behind the evaluation of reactor safety

  14. Topics to be covered in safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors or boiling water reactors in the F.R.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    This manual aims at defining the standards to be used in Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants with Pressurized Water Reactors or Boiling Water Reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. The topics to be covered are: Information about the site (geographic situation, settlement, industrial and military facilities, transport and communications, meteorological conditions, geological, hydrological and seismic conditions, radiological background), description of the power plant (building structures, safety vessel, reactor core, cooling system, ventilation systems, steam power plant, electrical facilities, systems for measurement and control), indication of operation (commissioning, operation, safety measures, radiation monitoring, organization), incident analysis (reactivity incidents, loss-of-coolant incidents, external impacts). (HP) [de

  15. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  17. Perspectives on reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  18. Perspectives on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskin, F.E.

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course

  19. Procedures to relate the NII safety assessment principles for nuclear reactors to risk

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N; Hemming, C R

    1985-01-01

    Within the framework of the Public Inquiry into the proposed pressurised water reactor (PWR) at Sizewell, estimates were made of the levels of individual and societal risk from a PWR designed in a manner which would conform to the safety assessment principles formulated by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). The procedures used to derive these levels of risk are described in this report. The opportunity has also been taken to revise the risk estimates made at the time of the Inquiry by taking account of additional data which were not then available, and to provide further quantification of the likely range of uncertainty in the predictions. This re-analysis has led to small changes in the levels of risk previously evaluated, but these are not sufficient to affect the broad conclusions reached before. For a reactor just conforming to the NII safety assessment principles a maximum individual risk of fatal cancer of about 10 sup - sup 6 per year of reactor operation has been estimated; the societal ris...

  20. Development of a tool of probabilistic safety analysis for advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo H, F.E.; Fran N, P.

    2007-01-01

    It is developing a tool to explain in a simple way in that it consists the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (APS) and at the same time to facilitate the comparison among the different designs of advanced nuclear reactors starting from their safety systems. This tool for teaching contemplates all the workspaces in an APS, but it is deepened only in what is the development of accident sequences and systems models. At the moment its have incorporated three types of advanced reactors, ABWR, ESBWR, and the HTGR and they are compared among if and with a BWR like that of Laguna Verde. This tool is carried out in Visual Basic code because it is a platform that can be used in any Windows atmosphere and for their easy programming. The system includes a tree of events developed for this purpose for a research HTGR built in Japan (HTTR) to have a point of comparison of the same one with other reactors of previous generations. It is that in the fourth generation reactors the measure of frequency of core damage doesn't make the same sense that for reactors of previous generations, which is due to its passive safety systems and its design type of the fuel, that which makes indispensable the development of another type of risk measure. The tree of events is presented for the initiator event 'the rupture of the main pipe' that causes the depressurization of the HTTR reactor. In this article it was concluded that it is necessary to evaluate the accident until reaching to the liberation of fission products that one knows in APS like an APS study level 1 and level 2 together. The final states developed starting from the possible phenomena that happen in these scenarios are presented. For this, its are considered flaws of all the mitigation systems that intervene in this accident. The tree of events developed for this work and the definition of the final states contributes to the development of as carrying out an APS for fourth generation reactors, with the purpose of developing an APS

  1. Nordic studies in reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, N.

    1993-01-01

    The Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Programme SIK programme in reactor safety is part of a major joint Nordic research effort in nuclear safety. The report summarizes the achievements of the SIK programme, which was carried out during 1990-1993 in collaboration between Nordic nuclear utilities, safety authorities, and research institutes. Three main projects were successfully completed dealing with: 1) development and application of a living PSA concept for monitoring the risk of core damage, and of safety indicators for early warning of possible safety problems; 2) review and intercomparison of severe accident codes, case studies of potential core melt accidents in nordic reactors, development of chemical models for the MAAP code, and outline of a system for computerized accident management support; 3) compilation of information about design and safety features of neighbouring reactors in Germany, Lithuania and Russia, and for naval reactors and nuclear submarines. The report reviews the state-of-the-art in each subject matter as an introduction to the individual project summaries. The main findings of each project are highlighted. The report also contains an overview of reactor safety research in the Nordic countries and a summary of fundamental reactor safety principles. (au) (69 refs.)

  2. Incidents in nuclear research reactor examined by deterministic probability and probabilistic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the potential risks submitted by the incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, were used, the Incident Report System for Research Reactor and Research Reactor Data Base. For this type of assessment was used the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA), within a confidence level of 90% and the Deterministic Probability Analysis (DPA). To obtain the results of calculations of probabilities for PSA, were used the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC - 636. The development of the calculations of probabilities for PSA was used the program Scilab version 5.1.1, free access, executable on Windows and Linux platforms. A specific program to get the results of probability was developed within the main program Scilab 5.1.1., for two distributions Fischer and Chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90%. Using the Sordi equations and Origin 6.0 program, were obtained the maximum admissible doses related to satisfy the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP, and were also obtained these maximum doses graphically (figure 1) resulting from the calculations of probabilities x maximum admissible doses. It was found that the reliability of the results of probability is related to the operational experience (reactor x year and fractions) and that the larger it is, greater the confidence in the outcome. Finally, a suggested list of future work to complement this paper was gathered. (author)

  3. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1992-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 83 papers out of the 108 that were presented at the Nineteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 28--30, 1991. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 14 different papers presented by researchers from Canada, Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, Taiwan, and USSR. This document, Volume 2, presents papers on: Severe accident research; Severe accident and policy implementation; and Accident management. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  5. Experiments with preirradiated fuel rods in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiki, O.; Kobayashi, S.; Takariko, I.; Ishijima, K.

    1992-01-01

    In the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) owned and operated by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), extensive experimental studies on the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions have been continued since the start of the test program in 1975. Accumulated experimental data were used as the fundamental data base of the Japanese safety evaluation guideline for reactivity initiated events in light water cooled nuclear power plants established by the nuclear safety commission in 1984. All of the data used to establish the guideline were, however, limited to those derived from the tests with fresh fuel rods as test samples because of the lack of experimental facility to handle highly radioactive materials.The guideline, therefore, introduces the peak fuel enthalpy of 85 cal/g which was adopted from the SPERT-CDC data as a provisional failure threshold of preirradiated fuel rod and, says that this value should be revised based on the NSRR experiments in the future. According to the above requirement, new NSRR experimental program with the preirradiated fuel rods as test samples was started in 1989. Test fuel rods are prepared by refabrication of the long-sized fuel rods preirradiated in commercial PWRs and BWRs into short segments and by preirradiation of short-sized test fuel rods in the Japan Material Testing Reactor(JMTR). For the tests with preirradiated fuel rods as test samples, the special experimental capsules, the automatic instrumentation fitting device, the automatic capsule assembling device and the capsule loading device were newly developed. In addition, the existing hot cave was modified to mount the capsule assembling device and the other inspection tools and, a new small iron cell was established adjacent to the cave to store the instrumentation fitting device. (author)

  6. Introductory user's manual for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Reactor Safety Research Data Bank. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, H.A.; Laats, E.T.

    1985-03-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has established the NRC/Division of Accident Evaluation (DAE) Data Bank Program to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. Local direction of the program is provided by EG and G Idaho, Inc., prime contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The NRC/DAE Data Bank Program provides a central computer storage mechanism and access software for data to be used by code development and assessment groups in meeting the code correlation needs of the nuclear industry. The administrative portion of the program provides data entry, documentation, training, and advisory services to users and the USNRC. The NRC/DAE Data Bank and the capabilities of the data access software are described in this document

  7. Nuclear reactor safety program in US department of energy and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.T.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes policy, issues orders, and assures compliance with requirements. The contractors who design, construct, modify, operate, maintain and decommission DOE reactors, set forth the assessment of the safety of cognizant reactors and implement DOE orders. Teams of experts in the Department, through scheduled and unscheduled review programs, reassess the safety of reactors in every phases of their lives. As new technology develops, the safety programs are reevaluated and policies are modified to accommodate these new technologies. The diagnostic capabilities of the computer using multiple alarms to enhance detection of defects and control of a reactor have been greatly utilized in reactor operating systems. The Application of artificial intelligence technologies for diagnostic and even for the decision making process in the event of reactor accidents would be one of the future trends in reactor safety programs

  8. Nuclear reactor safety program in U.S. Department of Energy and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.T.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) establishes policy, issues orders, and assures compliance with requirements. The contractors who design, construct, modify, operate, maintain and decommission DOE reactors, set forth the assessment of the safety of cognizant reactors and impliment DOE orders. Teams of experts in the Depatment, through scheduled and unscheduled review programs, reassess the safety of reactors in every phases of their lives. As new technology develops, the safety programs are reevaluated and policies are modified to accommodate these new technologies. The diagnostic capabilities of the computer using multiple alarms to enhance detection of defects and control of a reactor have been greatly utilized in reactor operating systems. The application of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for diagnostic and even for the decision making process in the event of reactor accidents would be one of the future trends in reactor safety programs. (author)

  9. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor has an upper and a lower grid plate. Protrusions project from the upper grid plate. Fuel assemblies having end fittings fit between the grid plates. An arrangement is provided for accepting axial forces generated during the operation of the nuclear reactor by the flow of the cooling medium and thermal expansion and irradiation-induced growth of the fuel assembly, which comprises rods. Each fuel assembly rests on the lower grid plate and its upper end is elastically supported against the upper grid plate by the above-mentioned arrangement. The arrangement comprises four (for example) torsion springs each having a torsion tube and a torsion bar nested within the torsion tube and connected at one end thereto. The other end of the torsion bar is connected to an associated one of four lever arms. The torsion tube is rigidly connected to the other end fitting and the springs are disposed such that the lever arms are biassed against the protrusions. (author)

  11. Exploration of High-Dimensional Scalar Function for Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer; Michael Pernice; Robert Nourgaliev

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of methodologies for nuclear reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) explicitly accounts for the time element in modeling the probabilistic system evolution and uses numerical simulation tools to account for possible dependencies between failure events. The Monte-Carlo (MC) and the Dynamic Event Tree (DET) approaches belong to this new class of dynamic PRA methodologies. A challenge of dynamic PRA algorithms is the large amount of data they produce which may be difficult to visualize and analyze in order to extract useful information. We present a software tool that is designed to address these goals. We model a large-scale nuclear simulation dataset as a high-dimensional scalar function defined over a discrete sample of the domain. First, we provide structural analysis of such a function at multiple scales and provide insight into the relationship between the input parameters and the output. Second, we enable exploratory analysis for users, where we help the users to differentiate features from noise through multi-scale analysis on an interactive platform, based on domain knowledge and data characterization. Our analysis is performed by exploiting the topological and geometric properties of the domain, building statistical models based on its topological segmentations and providing interactive visual interfaces to facilitate such explorations. We provide a user’s guide to our software tool by highlighting its analysis and visualization capabilities, along with a use case involving dataset from a nuclear reactor safety simulation.

  12. Project of SVBR-75/100 reactor plant with improved safety for nuclear sources of small and medium power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragunov, Yu. G.; Stepanov, V. S.; Klimov, N. N.; Dedul, A. V.; Bolvanchikov, S. N.; Zrodnikov, A. V.; Tolhinsky, G. I.; Komlev, O. G.

    2004-01-01

    As a result of the joint work performed recently by FSUE OKB Gidropress, SNC RF-IPPE and other organizations the technical feasibility is shown for creation and usage in nuclear power engineering of the unified reactor plant (RP) SVBR-75/100 with fast neutron reactor core and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) in the primary circuit. Technical design of SVBR-75/100 reactor plant is based on the following: 50-year operation experience in development and operation of RP with LBC for nuclear submarines; experience in development and operation of fast reactor with sodium coolant; experience in optimization of LBC technology at nuclear submarines and ground-based test benches; conceptual design of SVBR-75 reactor plant (for renovation of Units 2, 3 and 4 of Novovoronezh NPP). Technical solutions laid down in the basis of SVBR-75/100 reactor plant design are oriented towards the industrial basis, structural materials existing in Russia, as well as the unique LBC technology with experimental and practical support. The concept of SVBR-75/100 reactor plant safety assurance is based on the following provisions: maximum usage of inherent safety supported by physical features of fast neutron reactor, chemically inert LBC in the primary circuit, integral layout and special design solutions; maximum possible combination of normal operation and safety functions in RP systems. Small power of SVBR-75/100 RP makes it possible to manufacture the complete set of RP main equipment at the factory and delivery it to NPP site as-finished practically using any transport including railway. Possible fields of application of SVBR-75/100 reactor plants: modular NPPs of different power; renovation of NPPs with light water reactors exhausted their service life; independent nuclear power sources for different applications (ground-based nuclear water-desalinating plants, etc. )(author)

  13. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  14. Probabilistic safety analysis and risk-based inspection of nuclear research reactors: state-of-the-art and implementation proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Raíssa O.; Vasceoncelos, Vanderley de; Soares, Wellington A.; Silva Júnior, Silvério F.; Raso, Amanda L.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: raissaomarques@gmail.com, E-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, E-mail: soaresw@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, E-mail: amandaraso@hotmail.com, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Industrial facilities systems deteriorate over time during operation, thus increasing the possibility of accidents. Risk-Based Inspection (RBI) classifies such systems by their risk information with the purpose of prioritizing inspection efforts. RBI can reduce inspection activities, resulting in lower risk levels, and maintaining reliability and safety in acceptable levels. Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection (RI-ISI) is a RBI approach used in nuclear industry. RI-ISI uses outcomes from Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) to plan In-Service Inspections (ISI). Despite nuclear research reactors are simpler and have lower risks than power reactors, the application of PSA to them may be useful for safety improvements once they are more flexible, provide easier access to its core, and allow changes in fuel configurations in case of experimental tests. Ageing management of structures, systems and components important to safety of a nuclear research reactor throughout its lifetime is also required to assure continued adequacy of safety levels, reliable operation, and compliance with operational limits and conditions. This includes periodic review of ISI programs in which monitoring of material deterioration and aging effects are considered, and that can be supported by the RBI approach. A review of state-of-the-art of PSA and RBI applications to nuclear reactors is presented in this work. Advantages to apply these methodologies are also analyzed. PSA and RBI implementation proposal applied to nuclear research reactors is also presented, as well as its application to a TRIGA research nuclear reactor using computer codes developed by ReliaSoft® Corporation. (author)

  15. Probabilistic safety analysis and risk-based inspection of nuclear research reactors: state-of-the-art and implementation proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Raíssa O.; Vasceoncelos, Vanderley de; Soares, Wellington A.; Silva Júnior, Silvério F.; Raso, Amanda L.; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2017-01-01

    Industrial facilities systems deteriorate over time during operation, thus increasing the possibility of accidents. Risk-Based Inspection (RBI) classifies such systems by their risk information with the purpose of prioritizing inspection efforts. RBI can reduce inspection activities, resulting in lower risk levels, and maintaining reliability and safety in acceptable levels. Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection (RI-ISI) is a RBI approach used in nuclear industry. RI-ISI uses outcomes from Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) to plan In-Service Inspections (ISI). Despite nuclear research reactors are simpler and have lower risks than power reactors, the application of PSA to them may be useful for safety improvements once they are more flexible, provide easier access to its core, and allow changes in fuel configurations in case of experimental tests. Ageing management of structures, systems and components important to safety of a nuclear research reactor throughout its lifetime is also required to assure continued adequacy of safety levels, reliable operation, and compliance with operational limits and conditions. This includes periodic review of ISI programs in which monitoring of material deterioration and aging effects are considered, and that can be supported by the RBI approach. A review of state-of-the-art of PSA and RBI applications to nuclear reactors is presented in this work. Advantages to apply these methodologies are also analyzed. PSA and RBI implementation proposal applied to nuclear research reactors is also presented, as well as its application to a TRIGA research nuclear reactor using computer codes developed by ReliaSoft® Corporation. (author)

  16. The software safety analysis based on SFTA for reactor power regulating system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhaohui; Yang Xiaohua; Liao Longtao; Wu Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The digitalized Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system of Nuclear power plants can provide many advantages. However, digital control systems induce new failure modes that differ from those of analog control systems. While the cost effectiveness and flexibility of software is widely recognized, it is very difficult to achieve and prove high levels of dependability and safety assurance for the functions performed by process control software, due to the very flexibility and potential complexity of the software itself. Software safety analysis (SSA) was one way to improve the software safety by identify the system hazards caused by software failure. This paper describes the application of a software fault tree analysis (SFTA) at the software design phase. At first, we evaluate all the software modules of the reactor power regulating system in nuclear power plant and identify various hazards. The SFTA was applied to some critical modules selected from the previous step. At last, we get some new hazards that had not been identified in the prior processes of the document evaluation which were helpful for our design. (author)

  17. New and recently finalised activities within the NKS Programmes for Nordic cooperation on nuclear reactor safety and emergency preparedness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andgren, Karin; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Magnússon, Sigurður M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, NKS has provided funding for hundreds of research activities in fields comprising reactor safety, decommissioning, nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness, and management of radioactive waste. Advanced technologies and methods developed under the NKS framework have been used...... within the Nordic countries as well as internationally. Two programme areas are defined under the NKS platform: The NKS-R programme on nuclear reactor safety and the NKS-B programme on emergency preparedness. Three articles, giving an introduction to NKS and its two programmes, were published...

  18. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Procedures, operations and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toto, G.; Lindgren, A.J.

    1981-02-01

    The 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island commercial nuclear power plant has led to a number of studies of nuclear reactors, in both the public and private sectors. One of these is that of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee, which has outlined tasks for assessment of 13 reactors owned by DOE and operated by contractors. This report covers one of the tasks, the assessment of procedures, operations, and maintenance at the DOE reactor facilities, based on a review of actual documents used at the reactor sites

  19. Calculation of reactivity for safety in nuclear reactors; Calculo de la reactividad para seguridad en reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suescun D, D. [Universidad Surcolombiana, Av. Pastrana Borrero - Carrera 1, Neiva, Huila (Colombia); Rojas A, O., E-mail: daniel.suescun@usco.edu.co [Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla, Av. 9 Pte 1908, Barrio de Santiago, 72410 Puebla (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    The measurement of reactivity is a function of time and its calculation results from the variation in nuclear power from the inverse equation of punctual kinetics. This equation is a differential integral, where the term of the integral conserves the historical power and the differential part is directly related to the period of the reactor. In practice, in a nuclear plant, sensors are required to record the signals. For example, the movements of the control rods that cause the fluctuations of nuclear power over time commonly generate signals with noise, an event that makes difficult to estimate the reactivity. Thus is necessary and very useful to build digital reactivity meters in real time, since allows a reactor to be operated with greater security. The calculation of the reactivity is carried out using punctual kinetics, especially the concentration of delayed neutron precursors. In this work we present a new way to reduce the fluctuations in the calculation of the reactivity, for the high precision we propose the generalization of the predictor and corrector of the Adams-Bashforth-Moulton (ABM) method of order 4 to solve numerically the equations of the point kinetics for the calculation of the reactivity, without using the power history, due to the nature of the equations of the punctual kinetics, the modifiers of the different predictors are used to increase the accuracy in the approximation obtained accompanied by the filter known as Savitzky-Golay (Sg), allow to reduce the fluctuations of reactivity. It is known that the Sg filter softens and does not attenuate the nuclear power regardless of its shape, guarantees to reduce noise levels up to σ = 0.01, with a calculation time step of σ = 0.01, s. This formulation uses a polynomial approximation of Gram, with a degree d = 2, to calculate the convolution coefficients by means of an analytical formula that is implemented computationally and avoids problems of bad conditioning, caused by the inversion of a

  20. Transportable nuclear power plant T3C-M with two reactor plants of improved safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogloblin, B.G.; Gromov, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    Development and cultivating of districts in Siberia, North, Far East, Kamchatka and other remote or almost inaccessible district of the country depends to a large degree on their providing with power. The specific character of these districts imposes in turn a wide variety of special requirements upon the power sources. In particular, it is essential to provide the following; maximum manufacture availability of the whole equipment at the minimum volume of construction and installation work on operation site, high safety, longterm service life, ecologically, minimum scope of work on equipment in-service maintenance and inspection, etc. Taking into account the well-known difficulties connected with the delivery of conventional energy carriers to the above-mentioned districts and the situation with the alternative power sources, the application of the low-power nuclear plants (NPP) for these purposes looks definitely promising. Among the probable trends in creating the NPPs of this type as very promising is considered the possibility to apply the two-circuit reactor plant of the vessel type with the liquid lead as a primary coolant and free air as a secondary coolant and working medium in the open gas-turbine cycle. The nuclear plant T3C-M of improved safety with two of this type reactor plants with total electric power of 8 MW is developed by CDB of Machine Building with participation of several enterprises of St. Petersburg under the scientific leadership and is intended for generation of electric power and up to 4 Gcal/h of heat for populated areas and installations placed at long distance from the main electric power supply sources where it is difficult or non-efficient economically to deliver the conventional kinds of fuel. The main principles being laid as a basis when developing the proposed NPP will allow one to create mobile power sources which possess a high degree of safety and inherent self-protection

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  2. Study on the nuclear heat application system with a high temperature gas-cooled reactor and its safety evaluation (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Yoshitomo

    2008-03-01

    Aiming at the realization of the nuclear heat application system with a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), research and development on the whole evaluation of the system, the connection technology between the HTGR and a chemical plant such as the safety evaluation against the fire and explosion and the control technology, and the vessel cooling system of the HTGR were carried out. In the whole evaluation of the nuclear heat application system, an ammonia production system using nuclear heat was examined, and the technical subjects caused by the connection of the chemical plant to the HTGR were distilled. After distilling the subjects, the safety evaluation method against the fire and explosion to the reactor, the mitigation technology of thermal disturbance to the reactor, and the reactor core cooling by the vessel cooling system were discussed. These subjects are very important in terms of safety. About the fire and explosion, the safety evaluation method was established by developing the process and the numerical analysis code system. About the mitigation technology of the thermal disturbance, it was demonstrated that the steam generator, which was installed at the downstream of the chemical reactor in the chemical plant, could mitigate the thermal disturbance to the reactor. In order to enhance the safety of the reactor in accidents, the heat transfer characteristic of the passive indirect core cooling system was investigated, and the heat transfer equation considering both thermal radiation and natural convection was developed for the system design. As a result, some technical subjects related to safety in the nuclear heat application system were solved. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor (e.g. one having coolant down-flow through a core to a hearth below) thermal insulation (e.g. of a floor of the hearth) comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles thereon, with smaller clearances between the tiles than between the bricks but with the bricks being of reduced cross-section immediately adjacent the tiles so as to be surrounded by interconnected passages, of relatively large dimensions, constituting a continuous chamber extending behind the layer of tiles. By this arrangement, lateral coolant flow in the inter-brick clearances is much reduced. The reactor core is preferably formed of hexagonal columns, supported on diamond-shaped plates each supported on a pillar resting on one of the hearth-floor tiles. Each plate has an internal duct, four upper channels connecting the duct with coolant ducts in four core columns supported by the plate, and lower channels connecting the duct to a downwardly-open recess common to three plates, grouped to form a hexagon, at their mutually-adjacent corners. This provides mixing, and temperature-averaging, of coolant from twelve columns

  4. Main design and safety features of a 200MW nuclear heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Wenxiang; Gao, Zuying; Wang, Dazhong

    1992-01-01

    Inept has been in charge of the development of a nuclear heating reactor since 1980s, which is one of the national key R and D Programs in China. A 5MWt experimental NCR was completed at Inept in 1989 and has operated successfully for space heating since then. In order to realize the commercialization of the NCR, it has been decided to construct a 200MW demonstration NCR in 1993. A number of advanced features, including natural circulation, integrated arrangement, self-pressurized performance, dual vessel structure, hydraulic control rod drive and passive safety systems, have been incorporated into the NCR-200 to achieve its safety goal and economic viability. This makes the NCR safe, simple, reliable, easy-constructed and maintained. At present, the design work of the NCR-200 have shown that its safety characteristics are excellent. The NCR could play an important role in resolving future energy and environmental problems in China. The paper will mainly cover the key design considerations, main technical features and safety analysis results of the NCR-200

  5. Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, Reactor Safety and Nuclear Non-Proliferation in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassen, Lars van; Delalic, Zlatan; Ekblad, Christer; Keyser, Peter; Turner, Roland; Rosengaard, Ulf; German, Olga; Grapengiesser, Sten; Andersson, Sarmite; Sandberg, Viviana; Olsson, Kjell; Stenberg, Tor

    2009-10-15

    The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) is trusted with the task of implementing Sweden's bilateral assistance to Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Belarus and Armenia in the fields of reactor safety, nuclear waste management, nuclear non-proliferation as well as radiation protection and emergency preparedness. In these fields, SSM also participates in various projects financed by the European Union. The purpose of this project-oriented report is to provide the Swedish Government and other funding agencies as well as other interested audiences in Sweden and abroad with an encompassing understanding of our work and in particular the work performed during 2008. the activities are divided into four subfields: Nuclear waste management; Reactor safety; Radiation safety and emergency preparedness; and, Nuclear non-proliferation. SSM implements projects in the field of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management in Russia. The problems in this field also exist in other countries, yet the concentration of nuclear and radioactive materials are nowhere higher than in north-west Russia. And given the fact that most of these materials stem from the Cold War era and remain stored under conditions that vary from 'possibly acceptable' to 'wildly appalling' it is obvious that Sweden's first priority in the field of managing nuclear spent fuel and radioactive waste lies in this part of Russia. The prioritisation and selection of projects in reactor safety are established following thorough discussions with the partners in Russia and Ukraine. For specific guidance on safety and recommended safety improvements at RBMK and VVER reactors, SSM relies on analyses and handbooks established by the IAEA in the 1990s. In 2008, there were 16 projects in reactor safety. SSM implements a large number of projects in the field of radiation protection and emergency preparedness. The activities are at a first glance at some distance from the activities covered and

  6. OECD/CSNI specialist meeting on nuclear aerosols in reactor safety - Summary and Conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allelein, Hans-Josef; Boulaud, Denis; Guentay, Salih; Dehbi, Abdelouahab; Hontanon, Esther; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Jones, Alan V.; Koroll, Grant W.; Tinkler, Charles G.; Schaperow, J.; Royen, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    The Third OECD Specialist Meeting on Nuclear Aerosols in Reactor Safety was organised in Cologne, Germany, from 15-18 June 1998, in collaboration with the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH. It was attended by sixty-five specialists representing thirteen OECD Member countries and the Commission of the European Communities. Thirty-nine papers were presented, in eight sessions. The meeting was concluded by a general discussion devoted to the following topics: - What has been solved up to the level of plant applications and accident management? - Where is more work needed for plant applications? Over the last eight years significant progress has been made in source term modelling and code development. Results have been consolidated in codes which are being used for plant calculations to address safety issues. For example, two countries used their source term codes last year to assess the impact of heating from deposited fission products on the potential for steam generator tube rupture. Also, another source term code was used to assess the need of sprays for fission product removal in the proposed design of a new type of reactor. Over the next few years, experiments and model development will continue, with more emphasis on application to risk-important severe accident scenarios

  7. Development and Verification of the Computer Codes for the Fast Reactors Nuclear Safety Justification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisselev, A.E.; Mosunova, N.A.; Strizhov, V.F.

    2015-01-01

    The information on the status of the work on development of the system of the nuclear safety codes for fast liquid metal reactors is presented in paper. The purpose of the work is to create an instrument for NPP neutronic, thermohydraulic and strength justification including human and environment radiation safety. The main task that is to be solved by the system of codes developed is the analysis of the broad spectrum of phenomena taking place on the NPP (including reactor itself, NPP components, containment rooms, industrial site and surrounding area) and analysis of the impact of the regular and accidental releases on the environment. The code system is oriented on the ability of fully integrated modeling of the NPP behavior in the coupled definition accounting for the wide range of significant phenomena taking place on the NPP under normal and accident conditions. It is based on the models that meet the state-of-the-art knowledge level. The codes incorporate advanced numerical methods and modern programming technologies oriented on the high-performance computing systems. The information on the status of the work on verification of the separate codes of the system of codes is also presented. (author)

  8. Generic safety issues for nuclear power plants with pressurized heavy water reactors and measures for their resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    be used in reassessing the safety of individual operating plants. In 1998, the IAEA completed IAEA-TECDOC-1044 entitled Generic Safety Issues for Nuclear Power Plants with Light Water Reactors and Measures Taken for their Resolution and established the associated LWRGSIDB database (Computer Manual Series No. 13). The present compilation, which is based on broad international experience, is an extension of this work to cover pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). As in the case of LWRs, it is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. It addresses generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants using PHWRs. In most cases, the measures taken or planned to resolve these issues are also identified. The work on this report was initiated by the Senior Regulators of Countries Operating CANDU-Type Nuclear Power Plants at one of their annual meetings. It was carried out within the framework of the IAEA's programme on National Regulatory Infrastructure for Nuclear Installation Safety and serves to enhance regulatory effectiveness through the exchange of safety related information

  9. Promoting safety in nuclear installations. The IAEA has established safety standards for nuclear reactors and provides expert review and safety services to assist Member States in their application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    More than 430 nuclear power plants (NPPs) are currently operating in 30 countries around the world. The nuclear share of total electricity production ranges from about 20 percent in the Czech Republic and United States to nearly 78 percent in France and Lithuania. Worldwide, nuclear power generates about 16% of the total electricity. The safety of such nuclear installations is fundamental. Every aspect of a power plant must be closely supervised and scrutinized by national regulatory bodies to ensure safety at every phase. These aspects include design, construction, commissioning, trial operation, commercial operation, repair and maintenance, plant upgrades, radiation doses to workers, radioactive waste management and, ultimately, plant decommissioning. Safety fundamentals comprise defence-in-depth, which means having in place multiple levels of protection. nuclear facilities; regulatory responsibility; communicating with the public; adoption of the international convention on nuclear safety including implementation of IAEA nuclear safety standards. This publication covers topics of designing for safety (including safety concepts, design principles, and human factors); operating safety (including safety culture and advance in operational safety); risk assessment and management

  10. Regulatory risks associated with nuclear safety legislation after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident in Japan. Focus on legal structure of the nuclear reactor regulation act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tomoyuki; Maruyama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear safety regulations enforced after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident under the Nuclear Reactor Regulation Act face the following regulatory problems that involve potential risk factors for nuclear businesses; 1) 'entity based regulation' unable to cope with business cessation or bankruptcy of the entity subject of regulation, 2) potential risk of the Nuclear Regulation Authority's inappropriate involvement in nuclear industry policy beyond their duty, and 3) compliance of backfits under vague regulations. In order to alleviate them, this report, through analyzing these regulatory problems from the view point of sound development of the nuclear industry, proposes the following regulatory reforms; (1) To clarify the rule for industry policy in nuclear regulations and enable the authority, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, to choose most appropriate industrial policy measure. (2) Through establishing safety goals as measures to promote continuous improvement of nuclear safety regulations, to stimulate timely adjustments of the regulations, and to introduce a legal mechanism into the nuclear regulation systems under which validity of administrative law and its application can be checked. (author)

  11. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to auxiliary means of cooling the nuclear fuel clusters used in light or heavy water cooled nuclear reactors. One method is to provide one or more spray cooling tubes. From holes in the side walls of those tubes coolant water may be sprayed laterally into the cluster against the rods. The flow of main coolant may thus be supplemented or even replaced by the auxiliary coolant. A difficulty, however, is that only those fuel rods close to a spray cooling tube can readily be reached by the auxiliary coolant. In the arrangement described, where the fuel rods are spaced apart by transverse grids, at least one of the interspaces between the grids is provided with an axially extending auxiliary coolant conduit having lateral holes through which an auxiliary coolant is sprayed into the cluster. A deflector is provided that extends from a transverse grid into a position in front of the holes and deflects auxiliary coolant on to parts of the fuel rods otherwise inaccessible to the auxiliary coolant. The construction of the deflector is described. (U.K.)

  12. Nuclear ships and their safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-04-15

    Several aspects of nuclear ship propulsion, with special reference to nuclear safety, were discussed at an international symposium at Taormina, Italy, from 14-18 November 1960. Discussions on specific topics are conducted, grouped under the following headings: Economics and National Activities in Nuclear Ship Propulsion; International Problems and General Aspects of Safety for Nuclear Ships; Nuclear Ship Projects from the Angle of Safety; Ship Reactor Problems; Sea Motion and Hull Problems; Maintenance and Refuelling Problems; and Safety Aspects of Nuclear Ship Operation.

  13. Contributions to the research programs in nuclear and industrial electronics, domestic production of instrumentation, safety and control systems and equipment for nuclear reactors and auxiliary installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talpariu, C; Talpariu, J.; Matei, C.

    2001-01-01

    Domestic production of component system and equipment for the control and safety of nuclear facilities was one of the priority objective of the Nuclear Research Institute Pitesti. The problems addressed were particularly related to design and production of analog and digital equipment for measurements, triggering and display of the values of process parameters as well as to regulating complex functions of this equipment. Associated to this effort were the research works concerning: - reliability and in-service life-time of the electronic components and equipment in the safety and control systems for nuclear processes; - radiation endurance of industrial electronic components; utilization of whirling currents in calandria tube testing; - expert systems and applications in nuclear reactor control and safety; design and testing methods of process real time software packages for safety in control critical systems for nuclear domain. There are presented characteristics of the following equipment: 1. amplifier for ionization chambers with triggering comparator circuits for the CANDU 600 reactor shut down system; 2. amplifier for ionization chambers without triggering comparator circuits for power regulating system; 3. safety and regulating computerized system for C9 and C5 cans; 4. acquisition system for dosimetric data in nuclear facilities; 5. program able digital comparator for the reactor shut down system; 6. stationary gamma areal monitors for CANDU 600 reactors and other nuclear facilities

  14. Introductory user's manual for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Reactor Safety Research Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scofield, N.R.; Hardy, H.A.; Laats, E.T.

    1984-03-01

    The United States NRC has established the NRC/Division of Accident Evaluation (DAE) Data Bank Program to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. Local direction of the program is provided by EG and G Idaho, Inc., prime contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The NRC/DAE Data Bank Program provides a central computer storage mechanism and access software for data that is to be used by code development and assessment groups in meeting the code and correlation needs of the nuclear industry. The administrative portion of the program provides data entry, documentation, training, and advisory services to users and the NRC. The NRC/DAE Data Bank and the capabilities of the data access software are described in this document

  15. The US nuclear safety approach to upgrading the Russian and Ukrainian reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, S.

    1993-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory reporting to the Department of Energy has the technical and administrative management responsibilities for improving the operational and design safety systems of RBMK and the VVER reactors in Russia and the Ukraine. U.S. experts and industry interact with the Russian/Ukraine designers and operators to jointly develop the detailed requirements for system upgrades. When available, indigenous equipment and materials will be utilized. The construction and installation of most upgrades will be accomplished by Russia and the Ukraine with U.S. support and participation. This will maximize technology transfer, provide funds to U.S. and recipient country industry, and limit the nuclear liability of U.S. industry. (author)

  16. Design of the reactor coolant system and associated systems in nuclear power plants. Safety guide (Spanish Edition); Diseno del sistema de refrigeracion del reactor y los sistemas asociados en las centrales nucleares. Guia de seguridad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for establishing safety standards for nuclear power plants. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are established in the Safety Requirements publication, Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1 on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, which it supplements. This Safety Guide describes how the requirements for the design of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and associated systems in nuclear power plants should be met. This publication is a revision and combination of two previous Safety Guides, Safety Series No. 50-SG-D6 on Ultimate Heat Sink and Directly Associated Heat Transport Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (1982), and Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13 on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (1987), which are superseded by this new Safety Guide. The revision takes account of developments in the design of the RCS and associated systems in nuclear power plants since the earlier Safety Guides were published in 1982 and 1987, respectively. The other objectives of the revision are to ensure consistency with Ref., issued in 2004, and to update the technical content. In addition, an appendix on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) has been included.

  17. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Beroux, P.

    2012-01-01

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  18. Improving Research Reactor Accident Response Capability at the Hungarian Nuclear Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegh, J.; Gajdos, F.; Horvath, Cs.; Matisz, A.; Nyisztor, D.

    2013-06-01

    The paper describes the design and implementation of an on-line operation monitoring and accident response support system to be used at the CERTA emergency response centre of Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA). The monitored facility is the Budapest Research Reactor (BRR), which is a tank-type thermal reactor having 10 MW thermal power. The basic reason for the development of the on-line safety information system is to extend the emergency response capability of the CERTA crisis centre to include emergencies related to BRR, as well. CERTA is operated by HAEA at its Budapest headquarters and the centre already has an on-line system for monitoring the state of the four units of Paks NPP, Hungary. The system is called CERTA VITA and it is able to monitor the four VVER-440/V213 units during their normal operation, and during emergencies (including severe accidents). Ensuring appropriate emergency response capabilities, as well as improving the presently available systems and tools was one of the important recommendations resulting from the analyses following the severe accident at Fukushima. This task is valid not only for the operators of the nuclear facilities but also for the nuclear safety authorities, therefore HAEA decided to launch a project - together with the Centre for Energy Research, the operator of BRR - to establish an on-line information system similar to the CERTA VITA used for monitoring the four units of the Paks NPP. It is believed that by the introduction of this new on-line system the accident response capabilities of HAEA will be further enhanced and the BRR emergencies will be handled at the same professional level as potential emergencies at Paks NPP. (authors)

  19. Nuclear safety considerations in the conceptual design of a fast reactor for space electric power and propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.-M.; Koenig, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Some nuclear safety aspects of a 3.2 mWt heat pipe cooled fast reactor with out-of-core thermionic converters are discussed. Safety related characteristics of the design including a thin layer of B4C surrounding the core, the use of heat pipes and BeO reflector assembly, the elimination of fuel element bowing, etc., are highlighted. Potential supercriticality hazards and countermeasures are considered. Impacts of some safety guidelines of space transportation system are also briefly discussed, since the currently developing space shuttle would be used as the primary launch vehicle for the nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft.

  20. Safeguarding the nuclear safety of WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels at SKODA Plzen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrbek, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The approach is described of the SKODA enterprise to safety assurance and to providing the reliability of WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels. The philosophy is analyzed of in-service inspection and determination of the residual service life of pressure vessels. This follows up on the so-called conception of basic safety whose main aim is to preclude failures at production stage by the selection of suitable material, namely by optimizing the choice of raw materials, of metallurgical procedures such as will lead to high purity of the pressure vessel material, by introducing multiple inspection in production, reducing the sensitivity of materials to technological operations, and by high-quality welds. The quality of in-service inspections is given by the use of technical diagnostic instruments of peak quality and of modern methods of nondestructive materials testing. The instruments and methods used are described. It is stated that the experience gained with in-service inspection will make it possible to draw up operating regulations and safety criteria for nuclear installations and own inspection regulations, this with regard to technical and economic factors. (Z.M.)

  1. Selected safety aspects of containments for nuclear power plants with WWER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, M.W.; Kulig, M.J.; Strupczewski, A.; Balabanov, E.D.

    1996-01-01

    Considerable attention has been and continues to be focused on the design and operational features that prevent the release of radioactive materials to the environment for a spectrum of accidents for the two classes of WWER-440 reactors: the older 230 model and the more recently designed 213 models. This paper, based on published and unpublished information, aims to clarify the perceptions of the Russian WWER-440 models 230 and 213 nuclear power plant containment system designs and their relevance to selected aspects of accident mitigation. It should be noted that these are unclearly and often negatively perceived, primarily because of a lack of reliable information and a poorly assembled experimental database. Conflicting statements have been made regarding the nature and the features of the plant's containment system. The paper presents a brief outline of the design of both WWER-440 models with respect to their confinement functions. Selected safety-related aspects of the accident localization systems are discussed, and the recognized shortcomings and safety merits are pointed out. The older 230 units experience high leak rates and are designed to withstand medium-size pipe breaks. The possible implications for safety are pointed out in the paper. The on going studies that concentrate on improving the system are highlighted. (orig.)

  2. Technology of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelet, F.

    2016-01-01

    This academic report for graduation in engineering first presents operation principles of a nuclear reactor core. It presents core components, atomic nuclei, the notions of transmutation and radioactivity, quantities used to characterize ionizing radiations, the nuclear fission, statistical aspects of fission and differences between fast and slow neutrons, a comparison between various heat transfer fluids, the uranium enrichment process, and different types of reactor (boiling water, natural uranium and heavy water, pressurized water, and fourth generation). Then, after having recalled the French installed power, the author proposes an analysis of a typical 900 MWe nuclear power plant: primary circuit, reactor, fuel, spent fuel, pressurizer and primary pump, secondary circuit, aspects related to control-command, regulation, safety and exploitation. The last part proposes a modelling of the thermodynamic cycle of a pressurized water plant by using an equivalent Carnot cycle, a Rankine cycle, and a two-phase expansion cycle with drying-overheating

  3. Working Group 7.1 on environmental transport, US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains brief summaries of the status of projects of the Environmental Transport Group of the US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety. Projects reported on include: Management and Administration; Atmospheric Transport; Resuspension; External Dose; Terrestrial Food Chains; Aquatic Food Chains; Hydrological Transport; and Intercalibration

  4. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  5. Nuclear reactors to come

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2002-01-01

    The demand for nuclear energy will continue to grow at least till 2050 because of mainly 6 reasons: 1) the steady increase of the world population, 2) China, India and Indonesia will reach higher social standard and their energy consumption will consequently grow, 3) fossil energy resources are dwindling, 4) coal will be little by little banned because of its major contribution to the emission of green house effect gas, 5) renewable energies need important technological jumps to be really efficient and to take the lead, and 6) fusion energy is not yet ready to take over. All these reasons draw a promising future for nuclear energy. Today 450 nuclear reactors are operating throughout the world producing 17% of the total electrical power demand. In order to benefit fully of this future, nuclear industry has to improve some characteristics of reactors: 1) a more efficient use of uranium (it means higher burnups), 2) a simplification and automation of reprocessing-recycling chain of processes, 3) efficient measures against proliferation and against any misuse for terrorist purposes, and 4) an enhancement of safety for the next generation of reactors. The characteristics of fast reactors and of high-temperature reactors will likely make these kinds of reactors the best tools for energy production in the second half of this century. (A.C.)

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  7. Generic safety issues for nuclear power plants with light water reactors and measures taken for their resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The IAEA Conference on 'The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future' in 1991 was a milestone in nuclear safety. Two of the important items addressed by this conference were ensuring and enhancing safety of operating plants and treatment of nuclear power plants built to earlier safety standards. A number of publications related to these two items issued subsequent to this conference were: A Common Basis for Judging the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards, INSAG-9 (1995), the IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-O12, periodic Safety Review of Operational Nuclear Power Plants (1994) and an IAEA publication on the Safety Evaluation of Operating Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards - A Common Basis for Judgement (1997). Some of the findings of the 1991 Conference have not yet been fully addressed. An IAEA Symposium on reviewing the Safety of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in 1996 showed that there is an urgent need for operating organizations and national authorities to review operating nuclear power plants which do not meet the high safety levels of the vast majority of plants and to undertake improvements with assistance from the international community if required. Safety reviews of operating nuclear power plants take on added importance in the context of the Convention on Nuclear safety and its implementation. The purpose of this TECDOC compilation based on broad international experience, is to assist the Member States in the reassessment of operating plants by providing a list of generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants together with measures taken to resolve these issues. These safety issues are generic in nature with regard to light water reactors and the measures for their resolution are for use as a reference for the safety reassessment of operating plants. The TECDOC covers issues thought to be significant to Member States based on consensus process. It provides an introduction to the use of generic safety issues for

  8. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  9. Radiological controls and worker and public health and safety: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tew, J.L.; Miles, M.E.; Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    DOE has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the Report of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors were reviewed by the Committee. This report was prepared to provide a measure of how the radiological control and environmental practices at the 13 individual DOE reactor facilities measure up to (1) the recommendations contained in the Report of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island, (2) the requirements and guidelines contained, and (3) the requirements of the applicable Title and Part of the Code of Federal Regulations

  10. Nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports that since the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident in 1986, over 70 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's 112 member states have adopted two conventions to enhance international cooperation by providing timely notification of an accident and emergency assistance. The Agency and other international organizations also developed programs to improve nuclear power plant safety and minimize dangers from radioactive contamination. Despite meaningful improvements, some of the measures have limitations, and serious nuclear safety problems remain in the design and operation of the older, Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. The Agency's ability to select reactors under its operational safety review program is limited. Also, information on the extent and seriousness of safety-related incidents at reactors in foreign countries is not publicly available. No agreements exist among nuclear power countries to make compliance with an nuclear safety standards or principles mandatory. Currently, adherence to international safety standards or principles is voluntary and nonbinding. Some states support the concept of mandatory compliance, but others, including the United States, believe that mandatory compliance infringes on national sovereignty and that the responsibility for nuclear reactor safety remains with each nation

  11. Nuclear reactor safety. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.F.; Stevenson, M.G.

    1978-02-01

    Progress in reactor safety research is summarized. LWR studies include TRAC code development for thermal-hydraulic analysis of accidents, containment systems evaluation, and safety experiments. LMFBR studies include SIMMER code development and applications, modeling of core disruptive accidents, and safety test facilities studies. HTGR safety studies cover fission product release and transport, structural evaluation, phenomena modeling, systems analysis, and accident delineation. GCFR studies are focussed on core disruptive testing

  12. Computerized reactor protection and safety related systems in nuclear power plants. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Though the majority of existing control and protection systems in nuclear power plants use old analogue technology and design philosophy, the use of computers in safety and safety related systems is becoming a current practice. The Specialists Meeting on ''Computerized Reactor Protection and Safety Related Systems in Nuclear Power Plants'' was organized by IAEA (jointly by the Division of Nuclear Power and the Fuel Cycle and the Division of Nuclear Installation Safety), in co-operation with Paks Nuclear Power Plant in Hungary and was held from 27-29 October 1997 in Budapest, Hungary. The meeting focused on computerized safety systems under refurbishment, software reliability issues, licensing experiences and experiences in implemented computerized safety and safety related systems. Within a meeting programme a technical visit to Paks NPP was organized. The objective of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion on R and D, in-plant experiences in I and C important to safety, backfits and arguments for and reservations against the digital safety systems. The meeting was attended by 70 participants from 16 countries representing NPPs and utility organizations, design/engineering, research and development, and regulatory organizations. In the course of 4 sessions 25 technical presentations were made. The present volume contains the papers presented by national delegates and the conclusions drawn from the final general discussion

  13. Hermetic cable penetrations for containments of nuclear power reactors meet high safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusserow, J.; Gurr, W.; Pflug, H.

    1985-05-01

    Different types of cable penetrations for containments of nuclear power reactors have been developed and fabricated in the GDR. The technical parameters achieved are in accordance with the radiation protection requirements

  14. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  15. Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material in evaluation of the safety analysis report of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widia Lastana Istanto

    2011-01-01

    Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material that must be met by applicants for nuclear power plants construction permit has been investigated in this paper. The fracture toughness should be described in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) document that will be evaluated by the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN). Because BAPETEN does not have a regulations or standards/codes regarding the material used for the reactor vessel, especially in the fracture toughness requirements, then the acceptance criteria that applied to evaluate the fracture toughness of reactor vessel material refers to the regulations/provisions from the countries that have been experienced in the operation of nuclear power plants, such as from the United States, Japan and Korea. Regulations and standards used are 10 CFR Part 50, ASME and ASTM. Fracture toughness of reactor vessel materials are evaluated to ensure compliance of the requirements and provisions of the Regulatory Body and the applicable standards, such as ASME or ASTM, in order to assure a reliability and integrity of the reactor vessels as well as providing an adequate safety margin during the operation, testing, maintenance, and postulated accident conditions over the reactor vessel lifetime. (author)

  16. Best Practice Guidelines for the use of CFD in Nuclear Reactor Safety Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaffy, J.; Chung, B.; Song, C.; Dubois, F.; Graffard, E.; Ducros, F.; Heitsch, M.; Scheuerer, M.; Henriksson, M.; Komen, E.; Moretti, F.; Morii, T.; Muehlbauer, P.; Rohde, U.; Smith, B. L.; Watanabe, T.; Zigh, G.

    2007-01-01

    In May 2002, an 'Exploratory Meeting of Experts to Define an Action Plan on the Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Codes to Nuclear Reactor Safety Problems' was held at Aix-en-Provence, France. One of three recommended actions was the formation of this writing group to report on the need for guidelines for use of CFD in single phase Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) applications. CSNI approved this writing group at the end of 2002, and work began in March 2003. A final report was submitted to GAMA in September 2004, summarizing existing Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) for CFD, and recommending creation of a BPG document for Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) applications. The present document is intended to provide an internally complete set of guidelines for a range of single phase applications of CFD to NRS problems. However, it is not meant to be comprehensive; it is recognized that for any specific application a higher level of specificity is possible on questions of nodalization, model selection, and validation. This document should provide direct guidance on the key considerations in known single phase applications, and general directions for resolving remaining details. The intent is that it will serve as a template for further application specific (e.g. PTS, induced break) BPG documents that will provide much more detailed information and examples. The document begins with a summary of NRS related CFD analysis in countries represented by the authors. Chapter 3 deals with definition of the problem and its solution approach. This includes isolation of the portion of the NRS problem most in need of CFD, and use of a classic thermal hydraulic (TH) safety code to provide boundary conditions for the CFD based upon less detailed simulation of the balance of plant. Chapter 4 provides guidance in choosing between various options, and also discusses use of a transient calculation with tightly coupled CFD and TH codes. Chapter 5 discusses selection of physical

  17. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the General Electric-Nuclear Test Reactor (GE-NTR) (Docket No. 50-73)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the General Electric Company (GE) for a renewal license number R-33 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by GE and is located in Pleasanton, California. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by GE without endangering the health and safety of the public

  18. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis.

  19. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis

  20. Technology relevance of the 'uncertainty analysis in modelling' project for nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Langenbuch, S.; Royer, E.; Del Nevo, A.; Parisi, C.; Petruzzi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) endorsed the setting up of an Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) in June 2006. This Expert Group reports to the Working Party on Scientific issues in Reactor Systems (WPRS) and because it addresses multi-scale / multi-physics aspects of uncertainty analysis, it will work in close co-ordination with the benchmark groups on coupled neutronics-thermal-hydraulics and on coupled core-plant problems, and the CSNI Group on Analysis and Management of Accidents (GAMA). The NEA/NSC has endorsed that this activity be undertaken with Prof. K. Ivanov from the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) as the main coordinator and host with the assistance of the Scientific Board. The objective of the proposed work is to define, coordinate, conduct, and report an international benchmark for uncertainty analysis in best-estimate coupled code calculations for design, operation, and safety analysis of LWRs entitled 'OECD UAM LWR Benchmark'. At the First Benchmark Workshop (UAM-1) held from 10 to 11 May 2007 at the OECD/NEA, one action concerned the forming of a sub-group, led by F. D'Auria, member of CSNI, responsible for defining the objectives, the impact and benefit of the UAM for safety and licensing. This report is the result of this action by the subgroup. (authors)

  1. Development of a computational database for probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Vagner S.; Oliveira, Patricia S. Pagetti de; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de, E-mail: vagner.macedo@usp.br, E-mail: patricia@ipen.br, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work is to describe the database being developed at IPEN - CNEN / SP for application in the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of nuclear research reactors. The database can be accessed by means of a computational program installed in the corporate computer network, named IPEN Intranet, and this access will be allowed only to professionals previously registered. Data updating, editing and searching tasks will be controlled by a system administrator according to IPEN Intranet security rules. The logical model and the physical structure of the database can be represented by an Entity Relationship Model, which is based on the operational routines performed by IPEN - CNEN / SP users. The web application designed for the management of the database is named PSADB. It is being developed with MySQL database software and PHP programming language is being used. Data stored in this database are divided into modules that refer to technical specifications, operating history, maintenance history and failure events associated with the main components of the nuclear facilities. (author)

  2. Development of a computational database for probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Vagner S.; Oliveira, Patricia S. Pagetti de; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to describe the database being developed at IPEN - CNEN / SP for application in the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of nuclear research reactors. The database can be accessed by means of a computational program installed in the corporate computer network, named IPEN Intranet, and this access will be allowed only to professionals previously registered. Data updating, editing and searching tasks will be controlled by a system administrator according to IPEN Intranet security rules. The logical model and the physical structure of the database can be represented by an Entity Relationship Model, which is based on the operational routines performed by IPEN - CNEN / SP users. The web application designed for the management of the database is named PSADB. It is being developed with MySQL database software and PHP programming language is being used. Data stored in this database are divided into modules that refer to technical specifications, operating history, maintenance history and failure events associated with the main components of the nuclear facilities. (author)

  3. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 14, Safety protection measures; Izvestaj o sigurnosti nuklearnog reaktora RA, Knjiga 14, Sigurnosne zastitne mere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-11-01

    Nuclear reactor accidents can be caused by three type of errors: failure of reactor components including (1) control and measuring instrumentation, (2) errors in operation procedure, (3) natural disasters. Safety during reactor operation are secured during its design and construction and later during operation. Both construction and administrative procedures are applied to attain safe operation. Technical safety features include fission product barriers, fuel elements cladding, primary reactor components (reactor vessel, primary cooling pipes, heat exchanger in the pump), reactor building. Safety system is the system for safe reactor shutdown and auxiliary safety system. RA reactor operating regulations and instructions are administrative acts applied to avoid possible human error caused accidents. [Serbo-Croat] Uzroci udesa na nuklearnim reaktorima mogu se svrstati u jednu od sledece tri grupe: (1) otkaz pojedinih delova opreme, ukljucujuci mernu i kontrolnu instrumentaciju, (2) greske u pogonu i eksploataciji, (3) prirodne nepogode, katastrofe. Bezbednost i sigurnost u radu nuklearnog reaktora osiguravaju se odredjenim merama koje se preduzimaju pri njegovoj izgradnji i kasnije njegovoj elsploataciji. Te mere se mogu podeliti u sledece dve kategorije: (1) mere tehnicke zastite, i (2) administrativne mere. Mere tehnicke zastite sastoje se od barijere fissionih produkata, kosuljice gorivnih elemenata, primarnog kola reaktora RA (reaktorski sud, cevovod primarnog kola, toploizmenjivac u pimpi), zgrada reaktora. Sigurnosni sistem cini sistem za sigurnosno zaustavljanje reaktora i pomocni sigurnosni sistem. Kroz odgovarajuce propise i uputstva za rad na reaktoru RA primenjene su administrativne mere neophodne za sprecavanje udes koji bi mogao nastati kao posledica ljudskog faktora.

  4. Nuclear reaction data and nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paver, N [University of Trieste (Italy); Herman, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Gandini, A [ENEA, Rome (Italy)

    2001-12-15

    These two volumes contain the lecture notes of the workshop 'Nuclear Reaction Data and Nuclear Reactors: Physics, Design and Safety', which was held at the Abdus Salam ICTP in the Spring of 2000. The workshop consisted of five weeks of lecture courses followed by practical computer exercises on nuclear data treatment and design of nuclear power systems. The spectrum of topics is wide enough to timely cover the state-of-the-art and the perspectives of this broad field. The first two weeks were devoted to nuclear reaction models and nuclear data evaluation. Nuclear data processing for applications to reactor calculations was the subject of the third week. On the last two weeks reactor physics and on-going projects in nuclear power generation, waste disposal and safety were presented.

  5. Safety of nuclear power reactors in the former Eastern European Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the safety of nuclear power plants in the former Eastern European countries (including the former Soviet Union). The current international design, fabrication, construction, operation, safety, regulatory standards and practices, and ways to resolve plant problems are addressed in light of experience with the Western nuclear power development programs

  6. Steam--water mixing in nuclear reactor safety loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, S.A.; Schwarz, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    Computer models used to predict the response of reactors to hypothesized accidents necessarily incorporate approximating assumptions. To verify the models by comparing predicted and measured responses in test facilities, these assumptions must be confirmed to be realistic. Recent experiments in facilities capable of repeatedly duplicating the transient behavior of a pressurized water reactor undergoing a pipe rupture show that the assumption of complete water-steam mixing during the transient results in the predicted decompression being faster than that observed. Water reactor safety studies currently in progress include programs aimed at the verification of computer models or ''codes'' used to predict reactor system responses to various hypothesized accidents. The approach is to compare code predictions of transients with the actual test transients in experimental facilities. The purpose of this paper is to explain an important instance in which predictions and data are not in complete agreement and to indicate the significance to water reactor safety studies

  7. Nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the main safety aspects of the French nuclear energy programme and of the general safety organization is followed by a discussion on the current thinking in CEA on some important safety issues. As far as methodology is concerned, the use of probabilistic analysis in the licensing procedure is being extensively developed. Reactor safety research is aimed at a better knowledge of the safety margins involved in the present designs of both PWRs and LMFBRs. A greater emphasis should be put during the next years in the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle installations, including waste disposals. Finally, it is suggested that further international cooperation in the field of nuclear safety should be developed in order to insure for all countries the very high safety level which has been achieved up till now. (author)

  8. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and technical review. Ontario Hydro Submission to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Ontario Hydro is responsible for the safety of its nuclear stations: safety analysis, design and construction, training of operators, operating practices, and maintenance procedures. The utility must demonstrate to the regulatory body and the public that it is capable of operating nuclear stations safely. the dedicated attention of management and workers alike has been given to the achievement of an excellent safety record. Safety begins with well understood corporate goals, objectives and policies, and the clear assignment of responsibilities to well-trained, competent people who have the relevant experience and the right information and equipment. A prime cause of both the Chernobyl and the Three Mile Island accidents was a breakdown in operational procedures and human factors. On the contrary, the pressure tube failure at Pickering unit 2 in 1983 was understood almost immediately by the operators, who took the correct steps to shut down the reactor. This success is related to well-designed control room information systems and good understanding of fundamentals by the operators. Increasingly, in the design of nuclear plant control and instrumentation systems and in training in Ontario Hydro, the well-being, capabilities and limitations of humans are being taken into account. This report describes the series of barriers between the radioactive material in the fuel and the series of barriers between the radioactive material in the fuel and the environment, and the stringent quality control and technical measures taken to make the likelihood of malfunctions very small. Defence in depth protection for the public is a feature of all Ontario Hydro nuclear stations. As safety-related systems are updated in new stations, improvements are in some cases being backfitted to older stations

  9. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Proceedings of the international meeting on thermal nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current issues in nuclear power plant safety; national programs in nuclear power plant safety; radiological source terms; probabilistic risk assessment methods and techniques; non LOCA and small-break-LOCA transients; safety goals; pressurized thermal shocks; applications of reliability and risk methods to probabilistic risk assessment; human factors and man-machine interface; and data bases and special applications

  11. Proceedings of the international meeting on thermal nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-02-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current issues in nuclear power plant safety; national programs in nuclear power plant safety; radiological source terms; probabilistic risk assessment methods and techniques; non LOCA and small-break-LOCA transients; safety goals; pressurized thermal shocks; applications of reliability and risk methods to probabilistic risk assessment; human factors and man-machine interface; and data bases and special applications.

  12. Nuclear reactors for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Kamble, M.T.; Dulera, I.V.

    2013-01-01

    For the sustainable development of nuclear power plants with enhanced safety features, economic competitiveness, proliferation resistance and physical protection, several advanced reactor developments have been initiated world-wide. The major advanced reactor initiatives and the proposed advanced reactor concepts have been briefly reviewed along with their advantages and challenges. Various advanced reactor designs being pursued in India have also been briefly described in the paper. (author)

  13. The Role of Nuclear Power in Slovak Republic; Safety Upgrading Program for WWER Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, A.

    1998-01-01

    Implementation of Slovenske elektrarne Production Base Development Program, where all these safety upgrading projects of nuclear power sources at Slovak Republic are included will ensure first of all safety of nuclear power sources on internationally acceptable level, operational reliability of nuclear power units, balanced consumption and production of electric energy in Slovakia and decrease of long term ecological impact in according with international commitments of Slovakia

  14. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response

  15. Verification of reactor safety codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murley, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    The safety evaluation of nuclear power plants requires the investigation of wide range of potential accidents that could be postulated to occur. Many of these accidents deal with phenomena that are outside the range of normal engineering experience. Because of the expense and difficulty of full scale tests covering the complete range of accident conditions, it is necessary to rely on complex computer codes to assess these accidents. The central role that computer codes play in safety analyses requires that the codes be verified, or tested, by comparing the code predictions with a wide range of experimental data chosen to span the physical phenomena expected under potential accident conditions. This paper discusses the plans of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for verifying the reactor safety codes being developed by NRC to assess the safety of light water reactors and fast breeder reactors. (author)

  16. Public's right to information: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokely, E.

    1981-02-01

    The events at TMI prompted the Under Secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE) to establish the Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee. This Committee was assigned the task of assessing the adequacy of nuclear facility personnel qualification and training at DOE-owned reactors in light of the Three Mile Island accident. The Committee was also asked to review recommendations and identify possible implications for DOE's nuclear facilities

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  18. CFD for Nuclear Reactor Safety Applications (CFD4NRS-4) - Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    papers given at the Workshop covered different nuclear safety topics, and, for the first time, some reactor-design issues. However, the ratio of papers devoted to experimentation to those devoted to analysis was not as well balanced as previously seen, with too few experimental studies reported. The session topics were wide and various, including advanced reactor modelling, flow mixing issues, boiling and condensation modelling, multi-phase and multi-physics problems, containment analysis, plant application, hydrogen transport and fires, advanced measuring techniques, and single and multiphase flow in rod bundles. This paper only provides the list of presentations and the summary of the technical sessions

  19. Assessment of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for nuclear reactor safety problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B. L.; Andreani, M.; Bieder, U.; Bestion, D.; Ducros, F.; Graffard, E.; Heitsch, M.; Scheuerer, M.; Henriksson, M.; Hoehne, T.; Rohde, U.; Lucas, D.; Komen, E.; Houkema, M.; Mahaffy, J.; Moretti, F.; Morii, T.; Muehlbauer, P.; Song, C.H.; Zigh, G.; Menter, F.; Watanabe, T.

    2008-01-01

    The basic objective of the present work was to provide documented evidence of the need to perform CFD simulations in Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS), concentrating on single-phase applications, and to assess the competence of the present generation of CFD codes to perform these simulations reliably. The fulfilling of this objective involves multiple tasks, summarized as: to provide a classification of NRS problems requiring CFD analysis, to identify and catalogue existing CFD assessment bases, to identify shortcomings in CFD approaches, to put into place a means for extending the CFD assessment database, with an emphasis on NRS applications. The resulting document is presented here. After some introductory remarks, chapter 3 lists twenty-two NRS issues for which it is considered that the application of CFD would bring real benefits in terms of better predictive capability. This classification is followed by a short description of the safety issue, a state-of-the-art summary of what has been attempted, and what is still needed to be done to improve reliability. Chapter 4 details the assessment bases that have already been established in both the nuclear and non-nuclear domains, and discusses the usefulness and relevance of the work to NRS applications, where appropriate. This information is augmented in Chapter 5 by descriptions of the existing CFD assessment bases that have been established around specific, NRS problems. Typical examples are experiments devoted to the boron dilution issue, pressurised thermal shock, and thermal fatigue in pipes. Chapter 6 is devoted to identifying the technology gaps which need to be closed to make CFD a more trustworthy analytical tool. Some deficiencies identified are lack of a Phenomenon Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT), limitations in the range of application of turbulence models, coupling of CFD with neutronics and system codes, and computer power limitations. Most CFD codes currently being used have their own, custom

  20. Prospects for nuclear safety research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a paper presented by Eric S. Beckjord (Director, Nuclear Regulatory Research/NRC) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 1994. The following topics are briefly reviewed: (1) Reactor vessel research, (2) Probabilistic risk assessment, (3) Direct containment heating, (4) Advanced LWR research, (5) Nuclear energy prospects in the US, and (6) Future nuclear safety research. Subtopics within the last category include economics, waste disposal, and health and safety.

  1. Nuclear regulation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed

  2. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, R.

    1992-01-01

    Some aspects of safety of nuclear power with special reference to Indian nuclear power programme are discussed. India must develop technology to protect herself from the adverse economic impact arising out of the restrictive regime which is being created through globalization of safety and environmental issues. Though the studies done and experience gained so far have shown that the PHWR system adopted by India has a number of superior safety features, research work is needed in the field of operation and maintenance of reactors and also in the field of reactor life extension through delaying of ageing effects. Public relations work must be pursued to convince the public at large of the safety of nuclear power programme. The new reactor designs in the second stage of evolution are based on either further improvement of existing well-proven designs or adoptions of more innovative ideas based on physical principles to ensure a higher level of safety. The development of Indian nuclear power programme is characterised by a balanced approach in the matter of assuring safety. Safety enforcement is not just looked upon as a pure administrative matter, but experts with independent minds are also involved in safety related matters. (M.G.B.)

  3. Nuclear reactor kinetics and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewins, J.

    1978-01-01

    A consistent, integrated account of modern developments in the study of nuclear reactor kinetics and the problem of their efficient and safe control. It aims to prepare the student for advanced study and research or practical work in the field. Special features include treatments of noise theory, reliability theory and safety related studies. It covers all aspects of the operation and control of nuclear reactors, power and research and is complete in providing physical data methods of calculation and solution including questions of equipment reliability. The work uses illustrations of the main types of reactors in use in the UK, USA and Europe. Each chapter contains problems and worked examples suitable for course work and study. The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introductory review; neutron and precursor equations; elementary solutions at low power; linear reactor process dynamics with feedback; power reactor control systems; fluctuations and reactor noise; safety and reliability; nonlinear systems (safety and control); analogue computing. (author)

  4. Approaches to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    This article examines the factors which affect the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. Some of these are an organizational and individual dedication to safety and excellence in every aspect of plant functions, international cooperation, and advanced reactor design. These are in addition to excellence in management of nuclear plants and the training of key operations personnel. The author feels all of these are necessary to restore public confidence in nuclear power

  5. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  6. Nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  7. Effect of radiation damage on operating safety of steel pressure vessels of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Stoces, B.; Brumovsky, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects are assessed of the environment upon mechanical properties of steel used generally for pressure vessels of light water nuclear reactors. Changes caused by radiation affect the reliability of vessels. Deterioration of steel properties is mainly due to neutron radiation. The article deals with factors bearing upon damage and with methods allowing to evaluate the reliability of vessels and predict their service life. Operating reliability of vessels is very unfavourably affected by planned and accidental reactor transients. (author)

  8. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of two main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  9. Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.

    2008-01-01

    performed. This Ordinance regulates nuclear safety and protection conditions for siting, design, construction, use and decommissioning of a facility in which a nuclear activity is performed. This Ordinance defines facilities in which a nuclear activity is performed. Beside general conditions for siting, design, construction, use and decommissioning of a facility in which a nuclear activity is performed, this Ordinance regulates specific conditions for siting, design, construction, use and decommissioning of nuclear power plants or facilities with nuclear reactors and for radioactive waste disposal facilities.(author)

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sekine, Katsuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the thickness of a reactor container and reduce the height and the height and plate thickness of a roof slab without using mechanical vibration stoppers. Constitution: Earthquake proofness is improved by filling fluids such as liquid metal between a reactor container and a secondary container and connecting the outer surface of the reactor container with the inner surface of the secondary container by means of bellows. That is, for the horizontal seismic vibrations, horizontal loads can be supported by the secondary container without providing mechanical vibration stoppers to the reactor container and the wall thickness can be reduced thereby enabling to simplify thermal insulation structure for the reduction of thermal stresses. Further, for the vertical seismic vibrations, verical loads can be transmitted to the secondary container thereby enabling to reduce the wall thickness in the same manner as for the horizontal load. By the effect of transferring the point of action of the container load applied to the roof slab to the outer circumferential portion, the intended purpose can be attained and, in addition, the radiation dose rate at the upper surface of the roof slab can be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Databases on safety issues for WWER and RBMK reactors. Users' manual. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    At the beginning of the IAEA Extrabudgetary Programme on the safety of WWER reactors a great number of findings and recommendations (safety items) were collected as a result of design review and safety review missions of the WWER-440/230 type reactors. On the basis of these findings a technical database containing more than 1300 records was established to support the consolidation of the information obtained and to help in identification of safety issues. After the scope of the WWER extrabudgetary programme was extended similar data sets were prepared for the WWER-440/213, WWER-1000 and RBMK nuclear power plants. This publication describes the structure of the databases on safety issues of WWER and RBMK NPPs, the information sources used in the databases and interrogation capabilities for users to obtain the necessary information. 14 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  13. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of four main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents, the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; the development and application of a probabilistic reactor dynamics method. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  14. Aspects of PWR nuclear power plant secondary cycle relating to reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.E.F.; Leal, M.R.L.V.; Dominguez, D.

    1981-01-01

    A safety study of the main steam system, condensate and feedwater systems and water treatment system that belong to the secondary cooling circuits of a PWR nuclear power plant is presented. (E.G.) [pt

  15. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.; Tasker, A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power currently provides about a fifth of both Britain's and the world's electricity. It is the largest single source of electricity in Western Europe; in France three quarters of electricity is generated by nuclear power stations. This booklet is about the safety of those plants. It approaches the subject by outlining the basic principles and approaches behind nuclear safety, describing the protective barriers and safety systems that are designed to prevent the escape of radioactive material, and summarising the regulations that govern the construction and operation of nuclear power stations. The aim is to provide a general understanding of the subject by explaining the general principles of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor and setting out the UKAEA strategy for nuclear safety, the objective being always to minimize risk. (author)

  16. Safety analysis of fusion reactors pertaining to nuclear incidents and accidents. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeder, J.; Weller, A.; Wolf, R.; Jin, X.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Stieglitz, R.; Carloni, D.; Pistner, C.; Herb, J.

    2013-11-01

    The BfS gave the projekt partners IPP, KIT, Oeko-Institut e. V., and GRS the order to carry out a literature study on the topic of safety of fusion power plants regarding nuclear incidents and accidents. In the framework of this study the actual status of science and technology of the safety concept of fusion power plants should be determined and the applicability of the nuclear safety regulations hitherto developed for nuclear power plants checked. For future commercial fusion power plants today only conceptional designs exist. The most advanced conceptual study for a future fusion power plant is the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) from the year 2005, which is based on the tokamak principle. In this study also fundamental aspects of the safety concept of nuclear fusion are treated. Hereby several different conceptual approaches are discussed, which differ among others also in the lay-out approaches relevant for the safety of a facility like for instance the choice of the breeding concept or the materials for the blanket/divertor structure and the coolants. The safety concept of nuclear fusion is oriented on safety concepts for facilities with radioactive inventory. It is based on the concept of tiered safety levels. In order to check whether for the nuclear fusion a safety concept comparable with the nuclear fission at all is necessary, in a first step it was considered, which consequences are possible at a postulated release o large parts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant. Such a worst-case scenario was compared with a corresponding, postulated release of large parts of the radioactive inventory of a nuclear power plant. As scale hereby served the radiological criterion, at the transgression of which in the environment of the facility an evacuation would be necessary. In a next step the transferability of the safety concept of the tiered safety levels of nuclear technology to the fusion was checked. Beside events transferable from

  17. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  18. Guidebook to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1976-05-01

    A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the channel stability and the reactor core stability in a spontaneous circulation state of coolants. Constitution: A reactor core stabilizing device comprising a differential pressure automatic ON-OFF valve is disposed between each of a plurality of jet pumps arranged on a pump deck. The stabilizing device comprises a piston exerted with a pressure on the lower side of the pump deck by way of a pipeway and a valve for flowing coolants through the bypass opening disposed to the pump deck by the opening and closure of the valve ON-OFF. In a case where the jet pumps are stopped, since the differential pressure between the upper and the lower sides of the pump deck is removed, the valve lowers gravitationally into an opened state, whereby the coolants flow through the bypass opening to increase the spontaneous circulation amount thereby improve the stability. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. Processes and Procedures for Application of CFD to Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz; Patrick J. Roache; Ismail B. Celik; William D. Pointer; Yassin A. Hassan

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, nuclear reactor safety analysis has been performed using systems analysis codes such as RELAP5, which was developed at the INL. However, goals established by the Generation IV program, especially the desire to increase efficiency, has lead to an increase in operating temperatures for the reactors. This increase pushes reactor materials to operate towards their upper temperature limits relative to structural integrity. Because there will be some finite variation of the power density in the reactor core, there will be a potential for local hot spots to occur in the reactor vessel. Hence, it has become apparent that detailed analysis will be required to ensure that local ''hot spots'' do not exceed safety limits. It is generally accepted that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are intrinsically capable of simulating fluid dynamics and heat transport locally because they are based on ''first principles''. Indeed, CFD analysis has reached a fairly mature level of development, including the commercial level. However, CFD experts are aware that even though commercial codes are capable of simulating local fluid and thermal physics, great care must be taken in their application to avoid errors caused by such things as inappropriate grid meshing, low-order discretization schemes, lack of iterative convergence and inaccurate time-stepping. Just as important is the choice of a turbulence model for turbulent flow simulation. Turbulence models model the effects of turbulent transport of mass, momentum and energy, but are not necessarily applicable for wide ranges of flow types. Therefore, there is a well-recognized need to establish practices and procedures for the proper application of CFD to simulate flow physics accurately and establish the level of uncertainty of such computations. The present document represents contributions of CFD experts on what the basic practices, procedures and guidelines should be to aid CFD analysts to obtain accurate estimates

  1. Suggestion on the safety classification of spent fuel dry storage in China’s pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Qu, Yunhuan; Meng, De; Zhang, Qiaoer; Lu, Xinhua

    2018-01-01

    China’s spent fuel storage in the pressurized water reactors(PWR) is stored with wet storage way. With the rapid development of nuclear power industry, China’s NPPs(NPPs) will not be able to meet the problem of the production of spent fuel. Currently the world’s major nuclear power countries use dry storage as a way of spent fuel storage, so in recent years, China study on additional spent fuel dry storage system mainly. Part of the PWR NPP is ready to apply for additional spent fuel dry storage system. It also need to safety classificate to spent fuel dry storage facilities in PWR, but there is no standard for safety classification of spent fuel dry storage facilities in China. Because the storage facilities of the spent fuel dry storage are not part of the NPP, the classification standard of China’s NPPs is not applicable. This paper proposes the safety classification suggestion of the spent fuel dry storage for China’s PWR NPP, through to the study on China’s safety classification principles of PWR NPP in “Classification for the items of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants (GB/T 17569-2013)”, and safety classification about spent fuel dry storage system in NUREG/CR - 6407 in the United States.

  2. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Between a PWR's reactor pressure vessel made of steel and the biological shield made of concrete there is a gap. This gap is filled up with a heat insulation facting the reactor pressure vessel, for example with insulating concrete segments jacketed with sheet steel and with an additional layer. This layer serves for smooth absorption of compressive forces originating in radial direction from the reactor pressure vessel. It consists of cylinder-segment shaped bricks made of on situ concrete, for instance. The bricks have cooling agent ports in one or several rows which run parallel to the wall of the pressure vessel and in alignment with superposed bricks. Between the layer of bricks and the biological shield or rather the heat insulation, there are joints which are filled, however, with injected mortar. That guarantees a smooth series of connected components resistant tom compression. Besides, a slip foil can be set between the heat insulation and the joining joint filled with mortar for the reduction of the friction at thermal expansions. (TK) [de

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Nuclear safety management at the Wolsong NGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong-Seob, Han [Korea Electric Power Corp., Wolson NPP no. 1 and 2 (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Nuclear safety management at the Wolsong nuclear power plant is described, including the following issues: site selection; plant history; operational goals; operational guidelines; reactor safety; safety training; plant maintenance; management of plant equipment lifetime; future tasks.

  5. Nuclear safety management at the Wolsong NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bong-Seob

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear safety management at the Wolsong nuclear power plant is described, including the following issues: site selection; plant history; operational goals; operational guidelines; reactor safety; safety training; plant maintenance; management of plant equipment lifetime; future tasks

  6. Design characteristics for pressurized water small modular nuclear power reactors with focus on safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kani, Iraj Mahmoudzadeh [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Civil Faculty; Zandieh, Mehdi [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Civil Faculty; International Univ. of Imam Khomeini (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Architecture Faculty; Abadi, Saeed Kheirollahi Hossein [International Univ. of Imam Khomeini (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Architecture Faculty

    2016-05-15

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are a technology, attracting attention. Light water SMR possess an upgraded design case and emphasize the significance of integral models. Beside of these advantages, SMRs has faced numerous challenges, e.g. licensing, cost/investment, safety and security observation, social and environmental issues in building new plants.

  7. Modernization for safety purposes of Russian nuclear power plants with channel-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riakhin, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    The nineties have crucially changed the Russian policy towards channel-type reactors known as RBMK. After the period of intensive commissioning the new Units (Kursk NPP: 1976, 1979, 1983,1985; Smolensk NPP 1982, 1985, 1990), the main financial flow was directed into reconstruction of these units. Safety upgrade of the units of Kursk NPP is presented in more details

  8. Two-field and drift-flux models with application to nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The ideas of the two-field (6 equation model) and drift-flux (4 equation model) description of two-phase flows are presented. Several example calculations relating to reactor safety are discussed and comparisons of the numerical results and experimental data are shown to be in good agreement. 16 refs., 32 figs

  9. The failure diagnoses of nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Huanxing.

    1986-01-01

    The earlier period failure diagnoses can raise the safety and efficiency of nuclear reactors. This paper first describes the process abnormality monitoring of core barrel vibration in PWR, inherent noise sources in BWR, sodium boiling in LMFBR and nuclear reactor stability. And then, describes the plant failure diagnoses of primary coolant pumps, loose parts in nuclear reactors, coolant leakage and relief valve location

  10. CSNI collective statement on support facilities for existing and advanced reactors. The function of OECD/Nea joint projects Nea committee on the safety of nuclear installations (CSNI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) has recently completed a study on the availability and utilisation of facilities supporting safety studies for current and advanced nuclear power reactors. The study showed that significant steps had been undertaken in the past several years in support of safety test facilities, mainly by conducting multinational joint projects centered on the capability of unique test facilities worldwide. Given the positive experience of the safety research projects, it has been recommended that efforts be made to prioritize technical issues associated with advanced (Generation IV) reactor designs and to develop options on how to efficiently obtain the necessary data through internationally co-ordinated research, preparing a gradual extension of safety research beyond the needs set by currently operating reactors. This statement constitutes a reference for future CSNI activities and for safety authorities, R and D centres and industry for internationally co-ordinated research initiatives in the nuclear safety research area. (author)

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1979-01-01

    The support grid for the fuel rods of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor has a regular hexagonal contour and contains a large number of unit cells arranged honeycomb fashion. The totality of these cells make up a hexagonal shape. The grid contains a number of strips of material, and there is a window in each of three sidewalls staggered by one sidewall. The other sidewalls have embossed protrusions, thus generating a guide lining or guide bead. The windows reduce the rigidity of the areas in the middle between the ends of the cells. (DG) [de

  12. DESIGN SAFETY PROBLEMS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS IN SPACE FOR ELECTRICAL POWER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickler, D A

    1963-06-15

    A general treatment is presented of some of the problems in the design safety of reactors which are to be operated in space. The basic requirements of these reachigh temperatures. The usual concept of a space reactor is described briefly, and the hazards of an assumed unmanned vehicle with an enriched-U-fueled reactor are examined during its launching, orbit, and reentry. Graphs are given for the dose vs distance downwind for an excursion of 100 Mw-sec, for the activity vs time after shutdown of a reactor which has been operated for 5 yr at 100 kw(t), and for the altitude vs orbital lifetime. Apparent conflicts between the basic requirements are discussed. (D.L.C.)

  13. Nuclear safety culture and nuclear safety supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Jianshe

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the author reviews systematically and summarizes up the development process and stage characteristics of nuclear safety culture, analysis the connotation and characteristics of nuclear safety culture, sums up the achievements of our country's nuclear safety supervision, dissects the challenges and problems of nuclear safety supervision. This thesis focused on the relationship between nuclear safety culture and nuclear safety supervision, they are essential differences, but there is a close relationship. Nuclear safety supervision needs to introduce some concepts of nuclear safety culture, lays emphasis on humanistic care and improves its level and efficiency. Nuclear safety supervision authorities must strengthen nuclear safety culture training, conduct the development of nuclear safety culture, make sure that nuclear safety culture can play significant roles. (author)

  14. Can the acceptance of nuclear reactors be raised by a simpler, more transparent safety concept employing improved containments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.

    1993-01-01

    Sociological and psychological findings are presented which describe problems society faces with risky technologies. It turns out that for a small but influential group of the society not only the risk, but also the transparency of the technology and the engineered safeguards are important. For this group an improvement of the transparency should raise the acceptance of the technology. However, for the majority of the public, broad discussions about a different more transparent safety concept could generate a feeling of insecurity, especially concerning existing nuclear power plants. In order to improve the transparency in engineered safeguards of nuclear reactors, four basic principles are introduced. Nuclear containments, which remain intact after failure of all emergency cooling systems resulting in a core meltdown accident with steam and hydrogen explosions, are in line with these principles. Such containments are under investigation in Germany right now. It is pointed out that the public should be informed prudently about this work to improve the containments, and the required transparency of the engineered safeguards should be underlined as a major goal. Vague descriptions, providing only superficially information about safer reactors, could easily cause misunderstandings. If one goes along this line a simpler and more transparent safety concept employing improved containments will have the potential to raise the acceptance of nuclear reactors. (orig.)

  15. Safety of research reactors - A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Due to historical reasons research reactors have received less regulatory attention in the world than nuclear power plants. This has given rise to several safety issues which, if not addressed immediately, may result in an undesirable situation. However, in Pakistan, research reactors and power reactors have received due attention from the regulatory authority. The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 has been under regulatory surveillance since 1965, the year of its commissioning. The second reactor has also undergone all the safety reviews and checks mandated by the licensing procedures. A brief description of the regulatory framework, the several safety reviews carried out have been briefly described in this paper. Significant activities of the regulatory authority have also been described in verifying the safety of research reactors in Pakistan along with the future activities. The views of the Pakistani regulatory authority on the specific issues identified by the IAEA have been presented along with specific recommendations to the IAEA. We are of the opinion that there are more Member States operating nuclear research reactors than nuclear power plants. Therefore, there should be more emphasis on the research reactor safety, which somehow has not been the case. In several recommendations made to the IAEA on the specific safety issues the emphasis has been, in general, to have a similar documentation and approach for maintaining and verifying operational safety at research reactors as is currently available for nuclear power reactors and may be planned for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (author)

  16. Safety issues at the defense production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The United States produces plutonium and tritium for use in nuclear weapons at the defense production reactors - the N Reactor in Washington and the Savannah River reactors in South Carolina. This report reaches general conclusions about the management of those reactors and highlights a number of safety and technical issues that should be resolved. The report provides an assessment of the safety management, safety review, and safety methodology employed by the Department of Energy and the private contractors who operate the reactors for the federal government. This report examines the safety objective established by the Department of Energy for the production reactors and the process the Department of its contractors use to implement the objective; focuses on a variety of uncertainties concerning the production reactors, particularly those related to potential vulnerabilities to severe accidents; and identifies ways in which the DOE approach to management of the safety of the production reactors can be improved

  17. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  19. Nuclear health and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This paper is a review of environmental and safety programs at facilities in the Naval Reactors Program which shows no basis for allegations that unsafe conditions exist there or that the environment is being harmed by activities conducted there. The prototype reactor design provides safety measures that are consistent with commercial nuclear power plants. Minor incidents affecting safety and the environment have occurred, however, and dents affecting safety and the environment have occurred, however, and as with other nuclear facilities, past activities have caused environmental problems that require ongoing monitoring and vigilance. While the program has historically been exempt from most oversight, some federal and state environmental oversight agencies have recently been permitted access to Naval Reactors facilities for oversight purposes. The program voluntarily cooperates with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regarding reactor modifications, safety improvements, and component reliability. In addition, the program and its contractors have established an extensive internal oversight program that is geared toward reporting the slightest deviations from requirements or procedures. Given the program's classification policies and requirements, it does not appear that the program routinely overclassifies information to prevent its release to the public or to avoid embarrassment. However, GAO did not some instances in which documents were improperly classified

  20. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    In the system described the fuel elements are arranged vertically in groups and are supported in such a manner as to tend to tilt them towards the center of the respective group, the fuel elements being urged laterally into abutment with one another. The elements have interlocking bearing pads, whereby lateral movement of adjacent elements is resisted; this improves the stability of the reactor core during refuelling operations. Fuel elements may comprise clusters of parallel fuel pins enclosed in a wrapper of hexagonal cross section, with bearing pads in the form of spline-like ribs located on each side of the wrapper and extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the fuel element, being interlockable with ribs on pads of adjacent fuel elements. The arrangement is applicable to a reactor core in which fuel elements and control rod guide tubes are arranged in modules each of which comprises a cluster of at least three fuel elements, one of which is rigidly supported whilst the others are resiliently tilted towards the center of the cluster so as to lean on the rigidly supported element. It is also applicable to modules comprising a cluster of six fuel elements, each resiliently tilted towards a central void to form a circular arch. The modules may include additional fuel elements located outside the clusters and also resiliently tilted towards the central voids, the latter being used to accommodate control rod guide tubes. The need for separate structural members to act as leaning posts is thus avoided. Such structural members are liable to irradiation embrittlement, that could lead to core failure. (U.K.)

  1. Technical regulations on the general design and safety criteria for design and construction of nuclear reactors of May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    These Technical Regulations published on 5th September 1975 were made in implementation of Section 33 of Decree No 7/9141 on the procedure for the licensing of nuclear installations. They serve as a guide to licensing authorities, project designers and operators in the nuclear field and therefore provide general criteria for safety standards, engineering codes, siting considerations, design bases for overall environmental radiation protection, and also deal with reactor core design, instrumentation, control, alarm systems, including an emergency core cooling system. Finally, the safe design of fuel elements must be ensured and fuel storage and handling techniques complied with. (NEA) [fr

  2. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  3. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor systems engineering. Fourth edition, Volume Two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-01-01

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in the design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new materials on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: the systems concept, design decisions, and information tools; energy transport; reactor fuel management and energy cost considerations; environmental effects of nuclear power and waste management; nuclear reactor safety and regulation; power reactor systems; plant operations; and advanced plants and the future

  4. The use of experimental data in an MTR-type nuclear reactor safety analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Simon E.

    Reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) are a category of events required for research reactor safety analysis. A subset of this is unprotected RIAs in which mechanical systems or human intervention are not credited in the response of the system. Light-water cooled and moderated MTR-type ( i.e., aluminum-clad uranium plate fuel) reactors are self-limiting up to some reactivity insertion limit beyond which fuel damage occurs. This characteristic was studied in the Borax and Spert reactor tests of the 1950s and 1960s in the USA. This thesis considers the use of this experimental data in generic MTR-type reactor safety analysis. The approach presented herein is based on fundamental phenomenological understanding and uses correlations in the reactor test data with suitable account taken for differences in important system parameters. Specifically, a semi-empirical approach is used to quantify the relationship between the power, energy and temperature rise response of the system as well as parametric dependencies on void coefficient and the degree of subcooling. Secondary effects including the dependence on coolant flow are also examined. A rigorous curve fitting approach and error assessment is used to quantify the trends in the experimental data. In addition to the initial power burst stage of an unprotected transient, the longer term stability of the system is considered with a stylized treatment of characteristic power/temperature oscillations (chugging). A bridge from the HEU-based experimental data to the LEU fuel cycle is assessed and outlined based on existing simulation results presented in the literature. A cell-model based parametric study is included. The results are used to construct a practical safety analysis methodology for determining reactivity insertion safety limits for a light-water moderated and cooled MTR-type core.

  5. The use of experimental data in an MTR-type nuclear reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, S.E.

    2006-01-01

    Reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) are a category of events required for research reactor safety analysis. A subset of this is unprotected RIAs in which mechanical systems or human intervention are not credited in the response of the system. Light-water cooled and moderated MTR-type (i.e., aluminum-clad uranium plate fuel) reactors are self-limiting up to some reactivity insertion limit beyond which fuel damage occurs. This characteristic was studied in the Borax and Spert reactor tests of the 1950s and 1960s in the USA. This thesis considers the use of this experimental data in generic MTR-type reactor safety analysis. The approach presented herein is based on fundamental phenomenological understanding and uses correlations in the reactor test data with suitable account taken for differences in important system parameters. Specifically, a semi-empirical approach is used to quantify the relationship between the power, energy and temperature rise response of the system as well as parametric dependencies on void coefficient and the degree of subcooling. Secondary effects including the dependence on coolant flow are also examined. A rigorous curve fitting approach and error assessment is used to quantify the trends in the experimental data. In addition to the initial power burst stage of an unprotected transient, the longer term stability of the system is considered with a stylized treatment of characteristic power/temperature oscillations (chugging). A bridge from the HEU-based experimental data to the LEU fuel cycle is assessed and outlined based on existing simulation results presented in the literature. A cell-model based parametric study is included. The results are used to construct a practical safety analysis methodology for determining reactivity insertion safety limits for a light-water moderated and cooled MTR-type core. (author)

  6. The use of experimental data in an MTR-type nuclear reactor safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, S.E

    2006-07-01

    Reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) are a category of events required for research reactor safety analysis. A subset of this is unprotected RIAs in which mechanical systems or human intervention are not credited in the response of the system. Light-water cooled and moderated MTR-type (i.e., aluminum-clad uranium plate fuel) reactors are self-limiting up to some reactivity insertion limit beyond which fuel damage occurs. This characteristic was studied in the Borax and Spert reactor tests of the 1950s and 1960s in the USA. This thesis considers the use of this experimental data in generic MTR-type reactor safety analysis. The approach presented herein is based on fundamental phenomenological understanding and uses correlations in the reactor test data with suitable account taken for differences in important system parameters. Specifically, a semi-empirical approach is used to quantify the relationship between the power, energy and temperature rise response of the system as well as parametric dependencies on void coefficient and the degree of subcooling. Secondary effects including the dependence on coolant flow are also examined. A rigorous curve fitting approach and error assessment is used to quantify the trends in the experimental data. In addition to the initial power burst stage of an unprotected transient, the longer term stability of the system is considered with a stylized treatment of characteristic power/temperature oscillations (chugging). A bridge from the HEU-based experimental data to the LEU fuel cycle is assessed and outlined based on existing simulation results presented in the literature. A cell-model based parametric study is included. The results are used to construct a practical safety analysis methodology for determining reactivity insertion safety limits for a light-water moderated and cooled MTR-type core. (author)

  7. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  8. Assessment of CFD Codes for Nuclear Reactor Safety Problems - Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.L.; Andreani, M.; Bieder, U.; Ducros, F.; Bestion, D.; Graffard, E.; Heitsch, M.; Scheuerer, M.; Henriksson, M.; Hoehne, T.; Houkema, M.; Komen, E.; Mahaffy, J.; Menter, F.; Moretti, F.; Morii, T.; Muehlbauer, P.; Rohde, U.; Krepper, E.; Song, C.H.; Watanabe, T.; Zigh, G.; Boyd, C.F.; Archambeau, F.; Bellet, S.; Munoz-Cobo, J.M.; Simoneau, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Following recommendations made at an 'Exploratory Meeting of Experts to Define an Action Plan on the Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Codes to Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) Problems', held in Aix-en-Provence, France, 15-16 May, 2002, and a follow-up meeting 'Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Codes for Safety Analysis of Reactor Systems including Containment', which took place in Pisa on 11-14 Nov., 2002, a CSNI action plan was drawn up which resulted in the creation of three Writing Groups, with mandates to perform the following tasks: (1) Provide a set of guidelines for the application of CFD to NRS problems; (2) Evaluate the existing CFD assessment bases, and identify gaps that need to be filled; (3) Summarise the extensions needed to CFD codes for application to two-phase NRS problems. Work began early in 2003. In the case of Writing Group 2 (WG2), a preliminary report was submitted to Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents (WGAMA) in September 2004 that scoped the work needed to be carried out to fulfil its mandate, and made recommendations on how to achieve the objective. A similar procedure was followed by the other two groups, and in January 2005 all three groups were reformed to carry out their respective tasks. In the case of WG2, this resulted in the issue of a CSNI report (NEA/CSNI/R(2007)13), issued in January 2008, describing the work undertaken. The writing group met on average twice per year during the period March 2005 to May 2007, and coordinated activities strongly with the sister groups WG1 (Best Practice Guidelines) and WG3 (Multiphase Extensions). The resulting document prepared at the end of this time still represents the core of the present revised version, though updates have been made as new material has become available. After some introductory remarks, Chapter 3 lists twenty-three (23) NRS issues for which it is considered that the application of CFD would bring real benefits

  9. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  10. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  11. Aging impact on the safety and operability of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation embrittlement causes a loss of reactor vessel material fracture toughness as nuclear plants age. Fracture mechanics based regulatory requirements limit the permissible level of irradiation embrittlement such that essential fracture prevention margins are maintained throughout the plant operating life. This paper reviews the regulatory requirements and the underlying fracture mechanics technology. Issues identified with that technology are identified and research programs implemented to resolve the issues are described. Where possible, an assessment is given of the anticipated impact on the research program output will have on the reactor vessel fracture-margin assessment process

  12. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.; Nystrup, P.E.; Thorlaksen, B.

    2010-05-01

    The report is the seventh report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2009 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations, conflicts and the European safety directive. (LN)

  13. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  14. Passive Safety Systems in Advanced Water Cooled Reactors (AWCRS). Case Studies. A Report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-09-01

    This report presents the results from the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) collaborative project (CP) on Advanced Water Cooled Reactor Case Studies in Support of Passive Safety Systems (AWCR), undertaken under the INPRO Programme Area C. INPRO was launched in 2000 - on the basis of a resolution of the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21) - to ensure that nuclear energy is available in the 21st century in a sustainable manner, and it seeks to bring together all interested Member States to consider actions to achieve innovation. An important objective of nuclear energy system assessments is to identify 'gaps' in the various technologies and corresponding research and development (R and D) needs. This programme area fosters collaboration among INPRO Member States on selected innovative nuclear technologies to bridge technology gaps. Public concern about nuclear reactor safety has increased after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident caused by the loss of power to pump water for removing residual heat in the core. As a consequence, there has been an increasing interest in designing safety systems for new and advanced reactors that are passive in nature. Compared to active systems, passive safety features do not require operator intervention, active controls, or an external energy source. Passive systems rely only on physical phenomena such as natural circulation, thermal convection, gravity and self-pressurization. Passive safety features, therefore, are increasingly recognized as an essential component of the next-generation advanced reactors. A high level of safety and improved competitiveness are common goals for designing advanced nuclear power plants. Many of these systems incorporate several passive design concepts aimed at improving safety and reliability. The advantages of passive safety systems include simplicity, and avoidance of human intervention, external power or signals. For these reasons, most

  15. Power reactor core safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.; Kim, W.C.; Shon, D.S.; Kim, J.

    1981-01-01

    As a part of nuclear safety research program, a project was launched to develop a model to predict fuel failure, to produce the data required for the localizaton of fuel design and fabrication technology, to establish safety limits for regulation of nuclear power plants and to develop reactor operation method to minimize fuel failure through the study of fuel failure mechanisms. During 1980, the first year of this project, various fuel failure mechanisms were analyzed, an experimental method for out-of-pile tests to study the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of Zircaloy cladding underiodine environment was established, and characteristics of PWR and CANDU Zircaloy specimens were examined. Also developed during 1980 were the methods and correlations to evaluate fuel failures in the reactor core based on operating data from power reactors

  16. Safety evaluation of the Dalat research reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, V.H.; Lam, P.V.; An, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    After an introduction presenting the essential characteristics of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor, the document presents i) The safety assurance condition of the reactor, ii) Its safety behaviour after 5 years of operation, iii) Safety research being realized on the reactor. Following is questionnaire of safety evaluation and a list of attachments, which concern the reactor

  17. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, B.N.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod

  18. Technical assessment: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, R.S.

    1981-02-01

    Inherent in the design of DOE reactors under review are many features which provide significant protection against the likelihood of TMI-type accidents. In addition, other features in the design or operating characteristics would tend to limit or reduce the consequences of the accident. Some of these features were discussed earlier in this report. However, some of the events included within the TMI accident sequence contain technical implications for the DOE reactors. These implications were reviewed by this Assessment Team, and the results of this review are reported in this and the following sections of this report. It is also important to reemphasize that as a result of this review, no major TMI-related safety issues have been identified that would indicate that these DOE reactors cannot be operated in a safe manner. Rather, the findings of this report, by nature, generally reemphasize and support ongoing DOE efforts and identify areas for additional improvements

  19. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2007-04-01

    The report is the fourth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2006 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  20. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The report is the second report in a new series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2004 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  1. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampman, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2006-03-01

    The report is the third report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2005 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  2. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.

    2009-06-01

    The report is the fifth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2008 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  3. Nuclear power reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Risoe National Laboratory was established more than twenty years ago with research and development of nuclear reactor technology as its main objective. The Laboratory has by now accumulated many years of experience in a number of areas vital to nuclear reactor technology. The work and experience of, and services offered by the Laboratory within the following fields are described: Health physics site supervision; Treatment of low and medium level radioactive waste; Core performance evaluation; Transient analysis; Accident analysis; Fuel management; Fuel element design, fabrication and performance evaluation; Non-destructive testing of nuclear fuel; Theoretical and experimental structural analysis; Reliability analysis; Site evaluation. Environmental risk and hazard calculation; Review and analysis of safety documentation. Risoe has already given much assistance to the authorities, utilities and industries in such fields, carrying out work on both light and heavy water reactors. The Laboratory now offers its services to others as a consultant, in education and training of staff, in planning, in qualitative and quantitative analysis, and for the development and specification of fabrication techniques. (author)

  4. New Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.; Cizmek, A.

    2008-01-01

    Beside new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment (Official Gazette No. 15/08), from 2006 State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) adopted Ordinance on performing nuclear activities (Official Gazette No. 74/06) and Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety (Official Gazette No. 74/06), based on Nuclear Safety Act (Official Gazette No. 173/03). The Ordinance on performing nuclear activities regulates the procedure of announcing the intention to perform nuclear activity, submitting an application for the issue of a license to perform nuclear activity, and the procedure for adoption a decision on issuing a nuclear activity license. The Ordinance also regulates the contents of the application form for the announcement of the intention to perform nuclear activity, as well as of the application for the issue of a nuclear activity license and the method of keeping a nuclear activity register. The Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety regulates these mentioned conditions, whereas compliance is established by a decision passed by the SONS. Special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety are organizational, technical, technological conditions and established system of quality assurance. In 2007, SONS finalized the text of new Ordinance on nuclear safety and protection conditions for location, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of facility in which nuclear activity is performed. This Ordinance regulates nuclear safety and protection conditions for location, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of facility in which nuclear activity is performed. This Ordinance defines facilities in which nuclear activity is

  5. Basic researches on thermo-hydraulic non-equilibrium phenomena related to nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Akira; Kataoka, Isao; Aritomi, Masanori.

    1989-01-01

    A review was made of recent developments of fundamental researches on thermo-hydraulic non-equilibrium phenomena related to light water reactor safety, in relation to problems to be solved for the improvement of safety analysis codes. As for the problems related to flow con ditions, fundamental researches on basic conservation equations and constitutive equations for transient two-phase flow were reviewed. Regarding to the problems related to thermal non-equilibrium phenomena, fundamental researches on film boiling in pool and forced convection, transient boiling heat transfer and flow behavior caused by pressure transients were reviewed. (author)

  6. Ensuring the nuclear safety of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessels in Skoda, Concern Enterprise, Plzen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrbek, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Various types of routine inspections are described of reactor pressure vessels with the aim of identifying residual lifetime and overall safety. The inspection programme includes: choice of systems and instruments, type of tests, test frequency, safety criteria, measures to be taken in case of unsatisfactory results, documentation. The criteria are given for periodical inspections and requirements listed for instruments and equipment. The main three groups of tests are: visual inspection and dimension tests, surface inspection and volumetric inspection. Briefly described is some of the equipment used. (M.D.)

  7. State of the art of computer codes and experimental investigations on safety of nuclear power plants with reactors of WWER type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmolov, V.G.; Volkov, G.A.; Elikin, I.V.; Mysenkov, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    As is well-known investigations on mathematical models of accidental situations from the point of view of nuclear safety as well as their experimental investigation are of great importance in the design of reactor units for nuclear power plants. This paper gives a review of the state of the art of thermodynamic models and computer codes used for safety analysis of WWER reactors in the USSR, the experimental basis and experimental investigations of the appropriate thermal processes. The actual and future trends of theoretical and experimental investigation on safety problems of WWER type nuclear power plants are briefly described. (author)

  8. Safety of nuclear ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Interest in the utilization of nuclear steam supply systems for merchant ships and icebreakers has recently increased considerably due to the sharp rise in oil prices and the continuing trend towards larger and faster merchant ships. Canada, for example, is considering construction of an icebreaker in the near future. On the other hand, an accident which could result in serious damage to or the sinking of a nuclear ship is potentially far more dangerous to the general public than a similar accident with a conventional ship. Therefore, it was very important to evaluate in an international forum the safety of nuclear ships in the light of our contemporary safety philosophy, taking into account the results of cumulative operating experience with nuclear ships in operation. The philosophy and safety requirement for land-based nuclear installations were outlined because of many common features for both land-based nuclear installations and nuclear ships. Nevertheless, essential specific safety requirements for nuclear ships must always be considered, and the work on safety problems for nuclear ships sponsored by the NEA was regarded as an important step towards developing an international code of practice by IMCO on the safety of nuclear merchant ships. One session was devoted to the quantitative assessment of nuclear ship safety. The probability technique of an accident risk assessment for nuclear power plants is well known and widely used. Its modification, to make it applicable to nuclear propelled merchant ships, was discussed in some papers. Mathematical models for describing various postulated accidents with nuclear ships were developed and reported by several speakers. Several papers discussed a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) with nuclear steam supply systems of nuclear ships and engineering design features to prevent a radioactive effluence after LOCA. Other types of postulated accidents with reactors and systems in static and dynamic conditions were also

  9. Development of a methodology for safety classification on a non-reactor nuclear facility illustrated using an specific example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuermann, F.; Lehradt, O.; Traichel, A.

    2015-01-01

    To realize the safety of personnel and environment systems and components of nuclear facilities are classified according to their potential danger into safety classes. Based on this classification different demands on the manufacturing quality result. The objective of this work is to present the standardized method developed by NUKEM Technologies Engineering Services for the categorization into the safety classes restricted to Non-reactor nuclear facilities (NRNF). Exemplary the methodology is used on the complex Russian normative system (four safety classes). For NRNF only the lower two safety classes are relevant. The classification into the lowest safety class 4 is accordingly if the maximum resulting dose following from clean-up actions in case of incidents/accidents remains below 20 mSv and the volume activity restrictions of set in NRB-99/2009 are met. The methodology is illustrated using an example. In short the methodology consists of: - Determination of the working time to remove consequences of incidents, - Calculation of the dose resulting from direct radiation and due to inhalation during these works. The application of this methodology avoids over-conservative approaches. As a result some previously higher classified equipment can be classified into the lower safety class.

  10. Neutronic calculation of safety parameters for the RP-0 and RP-10 nuclear reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro, Gerardo; Deen, James R.; Woodruff, William L.

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical safety calculations were done with proved codes utilized by the staff of the RERTR program in the HEU to LEU core conversions. The studies were designed to evaluate the reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters of the reactor involved in the evolution of peak power transients by reactivity insertion accidents. It was done to show the trend of these reactivity coefficients as a function of the core size and fuel depletion for RP10 cores. It was useful to get a better underst...

  11. Calculational framework for safety analyses of non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    A calculational framework for the consequences analysis of non-reactor nuclear facilities is presented. The analysis framework starts with accident scenarios which are developed through a traditional hazard analysis and continues with a probabilistic framework for the consequences analysis. The framework encourages the use of response continua derived from engineering judgment and traditional deterministic engineering analyses. The general approach consists of dividing the overall problem into a series of interrelated analysis cells and then devising Markov chain like probability transition matrices for each of the cells. An advantage of this division of the problem is that intermediate output (as probability state vectors) are generated at each calculational interface. The series of analyses when combined yield risk analysis output. The analysis approach is illustrated through application to two non-reactor nuclear analyses: the Ulysses Space Mission, and a hydrogen burn in the Hanford waste storage tanks

  12. Nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Laurer, E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention is concerned with a quick-closing valve on the main-steam pipe of a nuclear reactor plant. The quick-closing valve serves as isolating valve and as safety valve permitting depressurization in case of an accident. For normal operation a tube-shaped gate valve is provided as valve disc, enclosing an auxiliary valve disc to be used in case of accidents and which is opened at increased pressure to provide a smaller flow cross-section. The design features are described in detail. (RW) [de

  13. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  14. Recent advances in MEMS radiation detectors for improving radiation safety in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhisikar, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical-system) is a core technology that leverages integrated circuit (IC) fabrication technology, builds ultra-miniaturized components and, enables radical new system applications. When considering MEMS radiation detectors; they are the specific micromechanical structures which are designed to sense doses of radiations. The present article reviews the most recent progress made in the domain of MEMS ionizing radiation sensors at international level for nuclear reactors which can be relevant to Indian context. (author)

  15. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This course gives an introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics. The first chapter explains the most important parameters and concepts in nuclear reactor physics such as fission, cross sections and the effective multiplication factor. Further on, in the second chapter, the flux distributions in a stationary reactor are derived from the diffusion equation. Reactor kinetics, reactor control and reactor dynamics (feedback effects) are described in the following three chapters. The course concludes with a short description of the different types of existing and future reactors. (author)

  16. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, October--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.B.

    1977-04-01

    Light water reactor safety research performed October through December 1976 is discussed. An analysis to determine the effect of emergency core coolant (ECC) injection location and pump speed on system response characteristics was performed. An analysis to evaluate the capability of commonly used critical heat flux (CHF) correlations to calculate the time of the first CHF in the Semiscale core during a loss-of-coolant experiment (LOCE) was performed. A test program and study to determine the effect thermocouples mounted on the outside fuel rod surfaces would have on the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) phenomena in the LOFT core during steady state operation were completed. A correlation for use in predicting DNB heat fluxes in the LOFT core was developed. Tests of an experimental transit time flowmeter were completed. A nuclear test was performed to obtain fuel rod behavior data from four PWR-type rods during film boiling operation representative of PWR conditions. Preliminary results from the postirradiation examination of Test IE-1 fuel rods are given. Results of Irradiation Effects Tests IE-2 and IE-3 are given. Gap Conductance Test GC 2-1 was performed to evaluate the effects of fuel density, initial gap width, and fill gas composition on the pellet-cladding gap conductance

  17. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, October--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, J. B. [ed.

    1977-04-01

    Light water reactor safety research performed October through December 1976 is discussed. An analysis to determine the effect of emergency core coolant (ECC) injection location and pump speed on system response characteristics was performed. An analysis to evaluate the capability of commonly used critical heat flux (CHF) correlations to calculate the time of the first CHF in the Semiscale core during a loss-of-coolant experiment (LOCE) was performed. A test program and study to determine the effect thermocouples mounted on the outside fuel rod surfaces would have on the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) phenomena in the LOFT core during steady state operation were completed. A correlation for use in predicting DNB heat fluxes in the LOFT core was developed. Tests of an experimental transit time flowmeter were completed. A nuclear test was performed to obtain fuel rod behavior data from four PWR-type rods during film boiling operation representative of PWR conditions. Preliminary results from the postirradiation examination of Test IE-1 fuel rods are given. Results of Irradiation Effects Tests IE-2 and IE-3 are given. Gap Conductance Test GC 2-1 was performed to evaluate the effects of fuel density, initial gap width, and fill gas composition on the pellet-cladding gap conductance.

  18. Research on application of system of neutron, thermohydraulic and safety analysis codes in order to simulation of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Van Lam; Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem

    2004-01-01

    Requirements of neutron, thermohydraulic and safety analysis calculation are very important because of issuing new version of SAR for DNRR, research on construction of new research reactor and nuclear power plant. Research on application of system of neutron, thermohydraulic and safety analysis codes in order to simulation of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor has been done in the frame work of research theme in the year 2002-2003. The purposes of the research are maintaining safety operation of the DNRR and enhancement of man power and calculation and safety analysis tool potential. (author)

  19. Activities performed within the program of nuclear safety research on structural and cladding materials for innovative reactor system able to transmute nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, C.; Rieth, M.; Lindau, R.; Aktaa, J.; Schneider, H-C.; Konys, J.; Yurechko, M.; Mueller, G.; Weisenburger, A.

    2009-01-01

    The transmutation of nuclear waste to reduce the burden on a geological repository is a relevant topic within the Program of Nuclear Safety Research of the Research Centre Karlsruhe. Several studies have confirmed that a high efficiency of transmutation of actinides is reached in fast neutron spectrum reactor system. Therefore, an important effort is dedicated to the study of transmutation strategies with different fast reactors and their associated technologies. Moreover, in international contexts as Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP), fast reactors are considered in the frame of sustainable development of nuclear energy and reduction of waste. The systems that are currently under investigation, in the frame of the different fuel cycle scenarios, are liquid metal cooled and gas cooled fast reactors as well as Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Transmutation devices (ADS). These innovative reactor systems, call for structural and clad materials, which are able to perform in a safe manner under the envisaged operational and postulated transient conditions. In this context the European Commission supports the FP7 project GETMAT, with the objective to contribute to the development and selection of reference structure materials for core components and primary systems of fast neutron reactors. Several institutes of the Research Centre Karlsruhe are involved in this project with activities in the area of 9Cr ODS steel development and mechanical characterisation; optimisation and ranking of weld and joining techniques as Electron Beam, TIG and Diffusion Bonding; assessment of materials behaviour in corrosive environment and in neutron and neutron/proton irradiation field; and development of corrosion protection barriers for cladding and primary system components and their characterisation. The objective of this contribution is to describe the context in which the GETMAT activities are embedded in the Program

  20. The future of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1989-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards began work in early 1948 with the firm and unanimous conviction that nuclear power could not survive a significant damaging accident. They as a committee felt that their job was to make reactors so safe that no such event would ever occur. However, ambitious reactor planners did not like all the buts and cautions that the committee was raising. They seemed to delay unduly their setting sail into the brave new world of clean, cheap, safe nuclear energy. The committee was soon nicknamed the Committee on Reactor Prevention. Reactors, of course, represented a tremendous step into the future. To an unprecedented extent, they were based on theory. But the committee did not have the luxury of putting a preliminary model into operation and waiting for difficulties to show up. In assessing new designs and developments, they had to anticipate future difficulties. Their proposals in good part were accepted, but their deep emphasis on safety did not become a part of the program. Today, forty years later, the author still believes both in the need for nuclear reactors and in the need of a thorough-going, pervasive emphasis on their safety. Real, understandable safety can be achieved, and that achievement is the key to our nuclear future. The details he gives are only examples. The need for reactors that are not only safe but obviously safe can be ignored only at our peril

  1. Research on the reactor physics and reactor safety of VVER reactors. AER Symposium 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliem, S.

    2017-09-15

    The selected paperscan be attributed to the following main subjects: Reactor start-up tests and use of corresponding data for code validation, code development and application, approaches for safety analyses, closure of nuclear fuel cycle, prospective reactor concepts.

  2. Control for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, E.B.; Bernath, L.; Facha, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided with several hydraulically-supported spherical bodies having a high neutron absorption cross section, which fall by gravity into the core region of the reactor when the flow of supporting fluid is shut off. (auth)

  3. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: CANDU reactor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g. caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance, design or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must therefore be effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wearout of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring, and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs) including the Soviet designed water moderated and water cooled energy reactors (WWERs), are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age-related licensing issues. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life-cycle management of the plant components, which

  4. The Swr 1000: a nuclear power plant concept with boiling water reactor for maximum safety and economy of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschuh, W.

    2001-01-01

    The SWR 1000 is a design concept for a light water reactor nuclear power plant that meets all requirements regarding plant safety, economic efficiency and environ-mental friendliness. As a result of the plant's safety concept, the occurrence of core damage can, for all practical intents and purposes, be ruled out. If a core melt accident should nevertheless occur, the molten core can be retained inside the RPV, thus ensuring that all consequences of such an accident remain restricted to the plant itself. The power generating costs of the SWR 1000 are lower than with those of coal-fired and combined-cycle power plants. Power generation using nuclear energy does not release carbon dioxide to the environment, thus meeting the need for sustainable protection of our global climate. (author)

  5. Evaluation on Safety of Stainless Steels in Chemical Decontamination Process with Immersion Type of Reactor Coolant Pump for Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Jong; Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Ki Joon

    2011-01-01

    Due to commercialization of nuclear power, most countries have taken interest in decontamination process of nuclear power plant and tried to develop a optimum process. Because open literature of the decontamination process are rare, it is hard to obtain skills on decontamination of foreign country and it is necessarily to develop proper chemical decontamination process system in Korea. In this study, applicable possibility in chemical decontamination for reactor coolant pump (RCP) was investigated for the various stainless steels. The stainless steel (STS) 304 showed the best electrochemical properties for corrosion resistance and the lowest weight loss ratio in chemical decontamination process with immersion type than other materials. However, the pitting corrosion was generated in both STS 415 and STS 431 with the increasing numbers of cycle. The intergranular corrosion in STS 431 was sporadically observed. The sizes of their pitting corrosion also increased with increasing cycle numbers

  6. Applications in nuclear data and reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.; Muranaka, R.; Schmidt, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on reactor kinetics and nuclear data collections. Topics considered at the conference included nuclear data processing, PWR core design calculations, reactor neutron dosimetry, in-core fuel management, reactor safety analysis, transients, two-phase flow, fuel cycles of research reactors, slightly enriched uranium, highly enriched uranium, reactor start-up, computer codes, and the transport of spent fuel elements

  7. International Experts’ Meeting on Reactor and Spent Fuel Safety in the Light of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The primary objectives of this International Experts’ Meeting (IEM) were: to analyse relevant technical aspects of reactor and spent nuclear fuel management safety and performance related to severe accidents; to review what is known to date about the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in order to understand more fully its root causes; and to share the lessons learned from the accident. The meeting identified the necessary priorities for further actions in these areas in different power reactor types, focusing in particular on boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The meeting provided a forum for discussions and exchange of information among technical experts from Member States on reactor and spent nuclear fuel safety and performance under severe conditions. The meeting was of particular interest to technical experts from utilities, research and design organizations, regulatory bodies, manufacturing and service companies and other stakeholders. In particular, the objectives of the meeting was to: • Identify and analyse reactor and spent nuclear fuel safety and performance issues; • Consider the design, engineering and analysis of current and new systems for accident prevention and mitigation; • Exchange information on national assessments of reactor and spent nuclear fuel safety and performance; and • Identify potential priority areas for research and development, technology development and management

  8. Safety Management at PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligam, A.S.; Zarina Masood; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim

    2011-01-01

    Adequate safety measures and precautions, which follow relevant safety standards and procedures, should be in place so that personnel safety is assured. Nevertheless, the public, visitor, contractor or anyone who wishes to enter or be in the reactor building should be well informed with the safety measures applied. Furthermore, these same elements of safety are also applied to other irradiation facilities within the premises of Nuclear Malaysia. This paper will describes and explains current safety management system being enforced especially in the TRIGA PUSPATI Reactor (RTP) namely radiation monitoring system, safety equipment, safe work instruction, and interconnected internal and external health, safety and security related departments. (author)

  9. Advanced reactor concepts and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    The need for some consistency in the terms used to describe the evolution of methods for ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors has been identified by the IAEA. This is timely since there appears to be a danger that the precision of many valuable words is being diluted and that a new jargon may appear that will confuse rather than aid the communication of important but possibly diverse philosophies and concepts. Among the difficulties faced by the nuclear industry is promoting and gaining a widespread understanding of the risks actually posed by nuclear reactors. In view of the importance of communication to both the public and to the technical community generally, the starting point for the definition of terms must be with dictionary meanings and common technical usage. The nuclear engineering community should use such words in conformance with the whole technical world. This paper addresses many of the issues suggested in the invitation to meet and also poses some additional issues for consideration. Some examples are the role of the operator in either enhancing or degrading safety and how the meaning or interpretation of the word 'safety' can be expected to change during the next few decades. It is advantageous to use criteria against which technologies and ongoing operating performance can be judged provided that the criteria are generic and not specific to particular reactor concepts. Some thoughts are offered on the need to frame the criteria carefully so that innovative solutions and concepts are fostered, not stifled

  10. A recommendation of the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection for the appointment of Nuclear Safety Control Officers for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, B.

    1990-01-01

    The Ordinance on the Implementation of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR requires that the managers of plants where nuclear facilities are operated appoint Control Officers for the fields of radiation protection, nuclear safety, physical protection, and accounting for and control of nuclear materials. The Control Officers are staff members of the operating organization but their appointment is subject to approval by the National Board and requires adequate qualification. The main task of the Control Officers as specialists is to give advice to the plant manager who retains responsibility for the safety of nuclear facilities, and to verify on his behalf that all requirements within their competence are met by the operating group. For this reason the Control Officer has to be absolutely independent of the head of the operating group. To enable the Control Officers to accomplish all necessary control activities and to guarantee independence from the head of the operating group, the plant manager has to establish adequate regulations of operation. As a pattern for such regulations the National Board has issued a Recommendation for the Appointment of Nuclear Safety Control Officers for Research Reactors, which provides a comprehensive survey of the requisite qualification features as well as the duties and rights of these Control Officers. This recommendation will be dealt with in the presentation

  11. The AMEBA PWR, a new concept in the technology of nuclear reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, A

    2000-05-01

    AMEBA is an Italian acronym which stands for 'alta moderazione e basso arricchimento' (high moderation and low enrichment). The AMEBA reactor is nothing more than a PWR which possesses very unusual values of both volumetric ratio moderator/fuel and U-235 enrichment of UO{sub 2}. The possibility is shown of the technical realisation of a nuclear power plant equipped with an AMEBA PWR reactor. Among the most enticing properties of AMEBA are the following: self-shut-down in any abnormal condition, elimination of all need for control rods and boric acid dissolution in the water, absolute impossibility of reaching values of reactivity greater than a fraction of a dollar, intrinsic subcriticality, attaining to several dollars, in non-operative condition when the water is at ambient temperature, normal operation with a very small-sized pressurizer, self-start-up.

  12. The AMEBA PWR, a new concept in the technology of nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novelli, A.

    2000-01-01

    AMEBA is an Italian acronym which stands for 'alta moderazione e basso arricchimento' (high moderation and low enrichment). The AMEBA reactor is nothing more than a PWR which possesses very unusual values of both volumetric ratio moderator/fuel and U-235 enrichment of UO 2 . The possibility is shown of the technical realisation of a nuclear power plant equipped with an AMEBA PWR reactor. Among the most enticing properties of AMEBA are the following: self-shut-down in any abnormal condition, elimination of all need for control rods and boric acid dissolution in the water, absolute impossibility of reaching values of reactivity greater than a fraction of a dollar, intrinsic subcriticality, attaining to several dollars, in non-operative condition when the water is at ambient temperature, normal operation with a very small-sized pressurizer, self-start-up

  13. High-reliability logic system evaluation of a programmed multiprocessor solution. Application in the nuclear reactor safety field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lallement, Dominique.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are monitored by several systems combined. The hydraulic and mechanical limitations on the equipment and the heat transfer requirements in the core set a reliable working range for the boiler defined with certain safety margins. The control system tends to keep the power plant within this working range. The protection system covers all the electrical and mechanical equipment needed to safeguard the boiler in the event of abnormal transients or accidents accounted for in the design of the plant. On units in service protection is handled by cabled automatic systems. For better reliability and safety operation, greater flexibility of use (modularity, adaptability) and improved start-up criteria by data processing the tendency is to use digital programmed systems. Computers are already present in control systems but their introduction into protection systems meets with some reticence on the part of the nuclear safety authorities. A study on the replacement of conventional by digital protection systems is presented. From choices partly made on the principles which should govern the hardware and software of a protection system the reliability of different structures and elements was examined and an experimental model built with its simulator and test facilities. A prototype based on these options and studies is being built and is to be set up on one of the CEN-G reactors for tests [fr

  14. Hardware resilience: a way to achieve reliability and safety in new nuclear reactors I and C systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Marcos S.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R. de, E-mail: msantana@ien.gov.br, E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Divisão de Engenharia Nuclear. Serviço de Instrumentação; Nedjah, Nadia, E-mail: nadia@eng.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Sistemas e Telecomunicações

    2017-07-01

    The idea that systems have a property called ‘resilience’ has emerged in the last decade [1]. In this paper we intend to bring the idea of resilient systems for the hardware applied in safety-critical systems, such as the new nuclear reactor instrumentation and control (I and C) systems. The new systems (based in hardware description language (HDL) programmable devices) have been developed in response to the obsolescence of old analog technologies and current microprocessor-based digital technologies. Although HDL programmable devices have been widely used in various other industries for decades, they are still very new in nuclear reactors systems, which can be seen as a challenge and risk in the safety analyses and licensing efforts for utilities and designers. The goal of this work is to develop and test hardware architectures to tolerate the occurrence of faults, including multiple faults, minimizing the impact of the recovery process on system availability. Basic concepts of resilience in complex systems, as 'return to equilibrium', 'robustness' and 'extra adaptive capacity' were analyzed from the point of view of hardware architectures, leading to linkages between concepts and methods for resilience using an approach that increases reliability and simplifies the licensing process of systems based in HDL programmable devices in nuclear plants. (author)

  15. Hardware resilience: a way to achieve reliability and safety in new nuclear reactors I and C systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Marcos S.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R. de; Nedjah, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The idea that systems have a property called ‘resilience’ has emerged in the last decade [1]. In this paper we intend to bring the idea of resilient systems for the hardware applied in safety-critical systems, such as the new nuclear reactor instrumentation and control (I and C) systems. The new systems (based in hardware description language (HDL) programmable devices) have been developed in response to the obsolescence of old analog technologies and current microprocessor-based digital technologies. Although HDL programmable devices have been widely used in various other industries for decades, they are still very new in nuclear reactors systems, which can be seen as a challenge and risk in the safety analyses and licensing efforts for utilities and designers. The goal of this work is to develop and test hardware architectures to tolerate the occurrence of faults, including multiple faults, minimizing the impact of the recovery process on system availability. Basic concepts of resilience in complex systems, as 'return to equilibrium', 'robustness' and 'extra adaptive capacity' were analyzed from the point of view of hardware architectures, leading to linkages between concepts and methods for resilience using an approach that increases reliability and simplifies the licensing process of systems based in HDL programmable devices in nuclear plants. (author)

  16. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor design basics. Fourth edition, Volume One

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-01-01

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new material on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management, and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; neutron transport; nuclear design basics; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; radiation protection and shielding; and reactor materials

  17. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Aage, H.K.; Kampmann, D.; Nystrup, P.E.; Thomsen, J.

    2012-07-01

    The report is the ninth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2011 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations and conflicts, and the Fukushima accident. (LN)

  18. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Nonboel, E.; Israelson, C.; Kampmann, D.; Nystrup, P.E.; Thomsen, J.

    2013-11-01

    The report is the tenth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is prepared in collaboration between DTU Nutech and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2012 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations and conflicts, and the results of the EU stress test. (LN)

  19. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels

  20. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on nuclear aerosols in reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The technical program, as recorded by these proceedings, includes opening addresses, a panel discussion on 'nuclear aerosol measurement', a panel discussion on 'what remains to be done', six invited review papers, and 33 papers from six different countries grouped into the following topical areas: (1) aerosol source terms (nuclear aerosol formation and characterization, nucleation and condensation, size and composition of primary particles, aerosol source terms for postulated accidents); (2) aerosol processes (correction factors, growth and interaction rates, removal rates); (3) measurement techniques (focused on assessing limits of accuracy and implications for code validation for accident consequence analysis); (4) mathematical and computer modelling; (5) comparison of codes and experiments); and (6) applications (focused on application of aerosol technology to reactor design, sensitivity of results, and implications for radiological consequence assessment for hypothetical accidents)

  1. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on nuclear aerosols in reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-10-15

    The technical program, as recorded by these proceedings, includes opening addresses, a panel discussion on 'nuclear aerosol measurement', a panel discussion on 'what remains to be done', six invited review papers, and 33 papers from six different countries grouped into the following topical areas: (1) aerosol source terms (nuclear aerosol formation and characterization, nucleation and condensation, size and composition of primary particles, aerosol source terms for postulated accidents); (2) aerosol processes (correction factors, growth and interaction rates, removal rates); (3) measurement techniques (focused on assessing limits of accuracy and implications for code validation for accident consequence analysis); (4) mathematical and computer modelling; (5) comparison of codes and experiments); and (6) applications (focused on application of aerosol technology to reactor design, sensitivity of results, and implications for radiological consequence assessment for hypothetical accidents)

  2. Safety of nuclear reactors - Part A - unsteady state temperature history mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shayeb, M.; Yusoff, M.Z.; Boosroh, M.H.; Ideris, F.; Hasmady Abu Hassan, S.; Bondok, A.

    2004-01-01

    A nuclear reactor structure under abnormal operations of near meltdown will be exposed to a tremendous amount of heat flux in addition to the stress field applied under normal operation. Temperature encountered in such case is assumed to be beyond 1000 Celsius degrees. A 2-dimensional mathematical model based on finite difference methods, has been developed for the fire resistance calculation of a concrete-filled square steel column with respect to its temperature history. Effects due to nuclear radiation and mechanical vibrations will be explored in a later future model. The temperature rise in each element can be derived from its heat balance by applying the parabolic unsteady state, partial differential equation and numerical solution into the steel region. Calculation of the temperature of the elementary regions needs to satisfy the symmetry conditions and the relevant material properties. The developed mathematical model is capable to predict the temperature history in the column and on the surface with respect to time. (authors)

  3. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  4. Nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    Action at the international level will assume greater importance as the number of nuclear power plants increases, especially in the more densely populated parts of the world. Predictions of growth made prior to October 1973 [9] indicated that, by 1980, 14% of the electricity would be supplied by nuclear plants and by the year 2000 this figure would be about 50%. This will make the topic of international co-operation and standards of even greater importance. The IAEA has long been active in providing assistance to Member States in the siting design and operation of nuclear reactors. These activities have been pursued through advisory missions, the publication of codes of practice, guide books, technical reports and in arranging meetings to promote information exchange. During the early development of nuclear power, there was no well-established body of experience which would allow formulation of internationally acceptable safety criteria, except in a few special cases. Hence, nuclear power plant safety and reliability matters often received an ad hoc approach which necessarily entailed a lack of consistency in the criteria used and in the levels of safety required. It is clear that the continuation of an ad hoc approach to safety will prove inadequate in the context of a world-wide nuclear power industry, and the international trade which this implies. As in several other fields, the establishment of internationally acceptable safety standards and appropriate guides for use by regulatory bodies, utilities, designers and constructors, is becoming a necessity. The IAEA is presently planning the development of a comprehensive set of basic requirements for nuclear power plant safety, and the associated reliability requirements, which would be internationally acceptable, and could serve as a standard frame of reference for nuclear plant safety and reliability analyses

  5. Safety of research reactors (Design and Operation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirar, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to conduct a comprehensive up-to-date literature review on the current status of safety of research reactor both in design and operation providing the future trends in safety of research reactors. Data and technical information of variety selected historical research reactors were thoroughly reviewed and evaluated, furthermore illustrations of the material of fuel, control rods, shielding, moderators and coolants used were discussed. Insight study of some historical research reactors was carried with considering sample cases such as Chicago Pile-1, F-1 reactor, Chalk River Laboratories,. The National Research Experimental Reactor and others. The current status of research reactors and their geographical distribution, reactor category and utilization is also covered. Examples of some recent advanced reactors were studied like safety barriers of HANARO of Korea including safety doors of the hall and building entrance and finger print identification which prevent the reactor from sabotage. On the basis of the results of this research, it is apparent that a high quality of safety of nuclear reactors can be attained by achieving enough robust construction, designing components of high levels of efficiency, replacing the compounds of the reactor in order to avoid corrosion and degradation with age, coupled with experienced scientists and technical staffs to operate nuclear research facilities.(Author)

  6. International co-operation for reactor safety: the World Association of Nuclear Operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckered, T.

    1989-01-01

    On 5 and 6 October 1987, senior representatives of most of the world's nuclear operators met in Paris with Lord Marshall of the UK Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) as Chairman. They resolved to strengthen the existing links and co-operation among nuclear operators by setting up the World Association of Nuclear Operators (Wano). The mission of the association is to be: 'to maximize the safety and reliability of the operation of nuclear power stations by exchanging information, encouraging comparison and stimulating emulation among nuclear power station operators.' The formation of Wano presents some information technology problems of a rather special kind that have to be solved before Wano can begin operation. The representatives at the Paris meeting therefore appointed a steering committee under Lord Marshall's chairmanship to formulate detailed proposals. The leaders of the world's nuclear operators will meet again in Moscow on 15-17 May 1989 in order to ratify the steering committee proposals and appoint the first Wano Board of Governors. A small interim secretariat is already working in London. (author)

  7. The significance of the human factor in the safety of nuclear reactors: the French experience and the lessons of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houze, C.; Oury, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    The importance of the human factor to French nuclear safety policy and the application of human fallibility as a parameter of safety analysis are described. The impact of reactor operating experience on future theoretical and practical application considerations is discussed. Particular reference is given to the lessons of Three Mile Island

  8. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6 : nuclear waste management & reactor safety report 2009/2010 ; material science for nuclear waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumeier, S.; Bosbach, D. (Editors)

    2011-01-01

    This is the first issue of a new series of bi-annual reports intended to provide an overview of research activities for the safe management of nuclear waste in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety devision in Jülich. The report gives a thematic overview of the research in 2009 and 2010 by short papers of five to eight pages. Some papers are discussing the work within different projects with intensive overlap, such as ...

  9. Study of the effect of slight variants to a 3-loop pressurized water nuclear reactor design in order to improve the reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglia, F.; Oliveri, E.; Taibi, S.; Vella, G.

    1992-01-01

    In order to improve the safety features of a 3-loop pressurized water nuclear reactor we propose a slight design variant consisting in the introduction of a bypass hole in the divider plate of the coolant chambers of the steam generators. The aim is to reduce both the extent and the duration of the core exposure and thus the maximum value of the peak cladding temperature, in case of a hypothetical cold leg small break loss of coolant accident. The proposal, as attested by a preliminary RELAP5/MOD3 analysis, seems to deserve some attention. (6 figures) (Author)

  10. Reactor safety activities at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN)-Nuclebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, R.B.

    1986-08-01

    This report presents the major activities developed at NUCLEBRAS in the area of Reactor Safety. The Thermohydraulics and Reactor Safety program consists of activities in the analytical and experimental area. The more recent activities under way in the analytical area are presented together with some results. They are mainly related to the development and assessment of advanced computer codes to be used in the analysis of the behavior of the plant during operational transients and postulated accidents and in thermohydraulic core design. In the experimental area, the main accomplishments and activities under way are reported they refer to steady state CHF tests in a 9-rod bundle and rewetting experiments in a tubular test section. In particular, the status of the design development of a new facility for Separate Effects LOCA tests (DTL-ES) is described. Concerning the Components Testing program, the basic characteristics of a valve test facility (CTC) are described and the present status of its construction is reported. Reference is also made to existing installations and a summary of tests already performed for Angra-2 components qualification is presented. (Author) [pt

  11. RSAS: a Reactor Safety Assessment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Dixon, B.W.; Bray, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). RSAS is being developed for use at the NRC's Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. The system generates situation assessments for the NRC Reactor Safety Team based on a limited number of plant parameters, known operator actions, and plant status data. The RSAS rule base currently covers one reactor type. The extension of the rule base to other reactor types is also discussed

  12. Refuelling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, J.; Webb, J.; White, W.P.; McLaren, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor refuelling machine is described which can be left in the reactor vault to reduce the off-load refuelling time for the reactor. The system comprises a gripper device rangeable within a tubular chute, the gripper device being movable by a pantograph. (U.K.)

  13. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, October--December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    Light water reactor safety activities performed during October--December 1975 are reported. The blowdown heat transfer tests series of the Semiscale Mod-1 test program was completed. In the LOFT Program, preparations were made for nonnuclear testing. The Thermal Fuels Behavior Program completed a power-cooling-mismatch test and an irradiation effects test on PWR-type fuel rods. Model development and verification efforts of the Reactor Behavior Program included developing new analysis models for the RELAP4 computer code, subroutines for the FRAP-S and FRAP-T codes, and new models for predicting reactor fuel restructuring and zircaloy cladding behavior; an analysis of post-CHF fuel behavior was made using FRAP-T

  14. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, October--December 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-01

    Light water reactor safety activities performed during October--December 1975 are reported. The blowdown heat transfer tests series of the Semiscale Mod-1 test program was completed. In the LOFT Program, preparations were made for nonnuclear testing. The Thermal Fuels Behavior Program completed a power-cooling-mismatch test and an irradiation effects test on PWR-type fuel rods. Model development and verification efforts of the Reactor Behavior Program included developing new analysis models for the RELAP4 computer code, subroutines for the FRAP-S and FRAP-T codes, and new models for predicting reactor fuel restructuring and zircaloy cladding behavior; an analysis of post-CHF fuel behavior was made using FRAP-T.

  15. The role of nuclear law in nuclear safety after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardozo, Diva E. Puig

    2013-01-01

    The paper contains the following topics: nuclear law, origin and evolution, role of the legal instruments on nuclear safety, nuclear safety the impact of major nuclear accidents: Chernobyl and Fukushima. The response of the nuclear law post Fukushima. Safety and security. International framework for nuclear safety: nuclear convention joint convention on safety on spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. The Fukushima World Conference on Nuclear Safety. Convention on Prompt Notification and Assistance in case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. Plan of Action for Nuclear Safety. IAEA recommendations for the safety transport of radioactive material. International framework for nuclear security. Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. International Convention for the Suppression of Acts Against Nuclear Terrorism. Resolution No. 1540 of the Security Council of United Nations (2004). Measures to strengthen international safety. Code of conduct on the safety research reactor

  16. The fuel of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the different steps of the preparation of nuclear fuels performed by Cogema. The documents starts with a presentation of the different French reactor types: graphite moderated reactors, PWRs using MOX fuel, fast breeder reactors and research reactors. The second part describes the fuel manufacturing process: conditioning of nuclear materials and fabrication of fuel assemblies. The third part lists the different companies involved in the French nuclear fuel industry while part 4 gives a short presentation of the two Cogema's fuel fabrication plants at Cadarache and Marcoule. Part 5 and 6 concern the quality assurance, the safety and reliability aspects of fuel elements and the R and D programs. The last part presents some aspects of the environmental and personnel protection performed by Cogema. (J.S.)

  17. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    It is widely accepted that the assessment of software cannot be limited to verification and testing of the end product, i.e. the computer code. Other factors such as the quality of the processes and methods for specifying, designing and coding have an important impact on the implementation. Existing standards provide limited guidance on the regulatory and safety assessment of these factors. An undesirable consequence of this situation is that the licensing approaches taken by nuclear safety authorities and by technical support organisations are determined independently with only limited informal technical co-ordination and information exchange. It is notable that several software implementations of nuclear safety systems have been marred by costly delays caused by difficulties in co-ordinating the development and qualification process. It was thus felt necessary to compare the respective licensing approaches, to identify where a consensus already exists, and to see how greater consistency and more mutual acceptance could be introduced into current practices. This report is the result of the work of a group of regulator and safety authorities' experts. The 2007 version was completed at the invitation of the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA). The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer based systems used in nuclear power plants for the implementation of safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national

  18. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the assessment of software cannot be limited to verification and testing of the end product, i.e. the computer code. Other factors such as the quality of the processes and methods for specifying, designing and coding have an important impact on the implementation. Existing standards provide limited guidance on the regulatory and safety assessment of these factors. An undesirable consequence of this situation is that the licensing approaches taken by nuclear safety authorities and by technical support organisations are determined independently with only limited informal technical co-ordination and information exchange. It is notable that several software implementations of nuclear safety systems have been marred by costly delays caused by difficulties in co-ordinating the development and qualification process. It was thus felt necessary to compare the respective licensing approaches, to identify where a consensus already exists, and to see how greater consistency and more mutual acceptance could be introduced into current practices. This report is the result of the work of a group of regulator and safety authorities' experts. The 2007 version was completed at the invitation of the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA). The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer based systems used in nuclear power plants for the implementation of safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national policies and in revisions

  19. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-10-01

    The Reactor Safety Study was sponsored by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission to estimate the public risks that could be involved in potential accidents in commercial nuclear power plants of the type now in use. It was performed under the independent direction of Professor Norman C. Rasmussen of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The risks had to be estimated, rather than measured, because although there are about 50 such plants now operating, there have been no nuclear accidents to date resulting in significant releases of radioactivity in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The objective of the study was to make a realistic estimate of these risks and, to provide perspective, to compare them with non-nuclear risks to which our society and its individuals are already exposed. This information may be of help in determining the future reliance by society on nuclear power as a source of electricity. The results from this study suggest that the risks to the public from potential accidents in nuclear power plants are comparatively small.

  20. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The Reactor Safety Study was sponsored by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission to estimate the public risks that could be involved in potential accidents in commercial nuclear power plants of the type now in use. It was performed under the independent direction of Professor Norman C. Rasmussen of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The risks had to be estimated, rather than measured, because although there are about 50 such plants now operating, there have been no nuclear accidents to date resulting in significant releases of radioactivity in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The objective of the study was to make a realistic estimate of these risks and, to provide perspective, to compare them with non-nuclear risks to which our society and its individuals are already exposed. This information may be of help in determining the future reliance by society on nuclear power as a source of electricity. The results from this study suggest that the risks to the public from potential accidents in nuclear power plants are comparatively small

  1. Technical report: technical development on the silicide plate-type fuel experiment at nuclear safety research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Hiroki

    1991-08-01

    According to a reduction of fuel enrichment from 45 w/o 235 U to 20 w/o, an aluminide plate-type fuel used currently in the domestic research and material testing reactors will be replaced by a silicide plate-type one. One of the major concern arisen from this alternation is to understand the fuel behavior under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions, this is strongly necessary from the safety and licensing point of view. The in-core RIA experiments are, therefore, carried out at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The silicide plate-type fuel consisted of the ternary alloy of U-Al-Si as a meat with uranium density up to 4.8 g/cm 3 having thickness by 0.51 mm and the binary alloy of Al-3%Mg as a cladding by thickness of 0.38 mm. Comparison of the physical properties of this metallic plate fuel with the UO 2 -zircaloy fuel rod used conventionally in commercial light water reactors shows that the heat conductivity of the former is of the order of about 13 times greater than the latter, however the melting temperature is only one-half (1570degC). Prior to in-core RIA experiments, there were some difficulties lay in our technical path. This report summarized the technical achievements obtained through our four years work. (J.P.N.)

  2. Nuclear power reactors of new generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Slesarev, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents discussions on the following topics: fuel supply for nuclear power; expansion of the sphere of nuclear power applications, such as district heating; comparative estimates of power reactor efficiencies; safety philosophy of advanced nuclear plants, including passive protection and inherent safety concepts; nuclear power unit of enhanced safety for the new generation of nuclear power plants. The emphasis is that designers of new generation reactors face a complicated but technically solvable task of developing highly safe, efficient, and economical nuclear power sources having a wide sphere of application

  3. Thermionic nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Thermionic nuclear reactors can be expected to be candidate space power supplies for power demands ranging from about ten kilowatts to several megawatts. The conventional ''ignited mode'' thermionic fuel element (TFE) is the basis for most reactor designs to date. Laboratory converters have been built and tested with efficiencies in the range of 7-12% for over 10,000 hours. Even longer lifetimes are projected. More advanced capabilities are potentially achievable in other modes of operation, such as the self-pulsed or unignited diode. Coupled with modest improvements in fuel and emitter material performance, the efficiency of an advanced thermionic conversion system can be extended to the 15-20% range. Advanced thermionic power systems are expected to be compatible with other advanced features such as: (1) Intrinsic subcritically under accident conditions, ensuring 100% safety upon launch abort; (2) Intrinsic low radiation levels during reactor shutdown, allowing manned servicing and/or rendezvous; (3) DC to DC power conditioning using lightweight power MOSFETS; and (4) AC output using pulsed converters

  4. Thermal reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport

  5. Thermal reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

  6. A study of digital hardware architectures for nuclear reactors protection systems applications - reliability and safety analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benko, Pedro Luiz

    1997-01-01

    A study of digital hardware architectures, including experience in many countries, topologies and solutions to interface circuits for protection systems of nuclear reactors is presented. Methods for developing digital systems architectures based on fault tolerant and safety requirements is proposed. Directives for assessing such conditions are suggested. Techniques and the most common tools employed in reliability, safety evaluation and modeling of hardware architectures is also presented. Markov chain modeling is used to evaluate the reliability of redundant architectures. In order to estimate software quality, several mechanisms to be used in design, specification, and validation and verification (V and V) procedures are suggested. A digital protection system architecture has been analyzed as a case study. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  8. Spent fuel working group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    In a memo dated 19 August 1993, Secretary O'Leary assigned the Office of Environment, Safety and Health the primary responsibility to identify, characterize, and assess the safety, health, and environmental vulnerabilities of the DOE's existing storage conditions and facilities for the storage of irradiated reactor fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. This volume is divided into three major sections. Section 1 contains the Working Group Assessment Team reports on the following facilities: Hanford Site, INEL, SRS, Oak Ridge Site, West Valley Site, LANL, BNL, Sandia, General Atomics (San Diego), Babcock ampersand Wilcox (Lynchburg Technology Center), and ANL. Section 2 contains the Vulnerability Development Forms from most of these sites. Section 3 contains the documents used by the Working Group in implementing this initiative

  9. Introductory user's manual for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Reactor Safety Research Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scofield, N.R.; Hardy, H.A.; Laats, E.T.

    1983-02-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established the NRC/Division of Accident Evaluation (DAE) Data Bank Program to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water safety research programs. Local direction of the program is provided by E G and G Idaho, Inc., prime contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The NRC/DAE Data Bank Program provides a central computer storage mechanism and access software for data that is to be used by code development and assessment groups in meeting the code and correlation needs of the nuclear industry. The administrative portion of the program provides data entry, documentation, training, and advisory services to users and the NRC. The NRC/DAE Data Bank and the capabilities of the data access software are described

  10. Transportable nuclear power plant TEC-M with two reactor plants of improved safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogloblin, B.G.; Sazonov, A.G.; Svishchev, A.M.; Gromov, B.F.; Zelensky, V.N.; Komkova, O.I.; Sidorov, V.I.; Tolstopyatov, V.P.; Toshinsky, G.I.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid metals are the best to meet the requirements of inherently safety nuclear power plants among the coolants used. A great experience has been gained in lead coolant power plant development and operation as applied to transportable power set-ups. Low chemical activity of this coolant with respect to air-water interaction is a determining factor for this coolant. The transportable nuclear power plant is described. It is intended to generate electric power for populated areas placed a long distance from the main electric power supply sources where it is difficult or not economical to deliver the conventional types of fuel. There are several remote areas in Siberia, Kamchatka in need of this type of power plant

  11. Risk-informing safety reviews for non-reactor nuclear facilities: an example application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubayi, V.; Yue, M.; Bari, R.A.; Azarm, M.A.; Mukaddam, W.; Good, G.; Gonzalez, F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology used to model potential accidents in fuel cycle facilities that employ chemical processes to separate and purify nuclear materials. The methodology is illustrated with an example that uses event and fault trees to estimate the frequency of a specific energetic reaction that can occur in nuclear material processing facilities. The methodology used probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)-related tools as well as information about the chemical reaction characteristics, information on plant design and operational features, and generic data about component failure rates and human error rates. The accident frequency estimates for the specific reaction can be useful to help to risk-inform a safety review process and assess compliance with regulatory requirements. (authors)

  12. Risk-Informing Safety Reviews for Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubayi, V.; Azarm, A.; Yue, M.; Mukaddam, W.; Good, G.; Gonzalez, F.; Bari, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology used to model potential accidents in fuel cycle facilities that employ chemical processes to separate and purify nuclear materials. The methodology is illustrated with an example that uses event and fault trees to estimate the frequency of a specific energetic reaction that can occur in nuclear material processing facilities. The methodology used probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)-related tools as well as information about the chemical reaction characteristics, information on plant design and operational features, and generic data about component failure rates and human error rates. The accident frequency estimates for the specific reaction help to risk-inform the safety review process and assess compliance with regulatory requirements.

  13. Risk-Informing Safety Reviews for Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubayi, V.; Azarm, A.; Yue, M.; Mukaddam, W.; Good, G.; Gonzalez, F.; Bari, R.A.

    2011-03-13

    This paper describes a methodology used to model potential accidents in fuel cycle facilities that employ chemical processes to separate and purify nuclear materials. The methodology is illustrated with an example that uses event and fault trees to estimate the frequency of a specific energetic reaction that can occur in nuclear material processing facilities. The methodology used probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)-related tools as well as information about the chemical reaction characteristics, information on plant design and operational features, and generic data about component failure rates and human error rates. The accident frequency estimates for the specific reaction help to risk-inform the safety review process and assess compliance with regulatory requirements.

  14. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and technical review. Selected consultants' reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, F.K.

    1988-01-01

    The Review commissioned 31 consultants to prepare detailed analyses of specific safety-related questions raised by the design and operation of Ontario Hydro's CANDU reactors. This volume presents 10 of these reports, which I judge to be of sufficient general importance to justify the cost of wide circulation. They have been reproduced precisely as they were submitted. They do not express the Review's own judgements, but do contain a major part of the evidence that influenced those judgements. In several cases the consultants have presented formal recommendations. Some of these have been incorporated, often in modified form, as Review recommendations, in the Minister's Report. Others remain simply as recommendations from the individual consultants. I agree with most of them, but have not seen them as central to the Review's conclusions. I suggest that appropriate institutions--most notably Ontario Hydro and Atomic Energy Control Board--study them, and act as they see fit

  15. Track 2: business outlook and the significance of safety - safety of nuclear power reactor installations in a deregulated environment. Panel Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Stephen P.; Floyd, Stephen; Berkow, Herbert N.; Quinn, Edward L.; Hagen, Ronald E.; Esselman, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Deregulation in the nuclear industry sets the stage for a new production environment with cost and profit-based competition. This not only affects the commercial reactor sector but also is a key element of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DoE's) strategy for facility deployment and commercialization. This panel is designed to explore how these transitions are being made with the assurance of the principle of safety in operations. Panelists have been assembled from industry, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and DOE to explore these challenges and opportunities in the deregulated operational environment from a variety of perspectives. Presentations by each panelist will be followed by a panel session that will explore both technical and process elements of these major transitions. Success in a deregulated environment requires both safety and economic operation of facilities. With respect to each of these attributes, competition may be expected to result in substantially higher levels of performance. This panel will examine how these expectations are likely to be set, how they will be measured, and what will constitute success. The baseline for evaluation begins with assessment of past performance. The panelists have examined this for both the commercial nuclear reactor sector, as well as for the DOE complex. The Nuclear Energy Institute and the NRC have been working over the past few years on a program to establish new performance indicators for monitoring safety of reactor operation. The session participants will first examine the effectiveness of this system as it is designed to measure performance in today's environment. Second, the panelists will project the capabilities and attributes of this system in monitoring safety in transition to a deregulated, consolidated market. Will these systems have the capability to identify trends that will be significant in this new environment? Will today's system and metrics be

  16. Nuclear Safety. 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A quick review of the nuclear safety at EDF may be summarized as follows: - the nuclear safety at EDF maintains at a rather good standard; - none of the incidents that took place has had any direct impact upon safety; - the availability remained good; - initiation of the floor 4 reactor generation (N4 unit - 1450 MW) ensued without major difficulties (the Civaux 1 NPP has been coupled to the power network at 24 december 1997); - the analysis of the incidents interesting from the safety point of view presents many similarities with earlier ones. Significant progress has been recorded in promoting actively and directly a safe operation by making visible, evident and concrete the exertion of the nuclear operation responsibility and its control by the hierarchy. The report develops the following chapters and subjects: 1. An overview on 1997; 1.1. The technical issues of the nuclear sector; 1.2. General performances in safety; 1.3. The main incidents; 1.4. Wastes and radiation protection; 2. Nuclear safety management; 2.1. Dynamics and results; 2.2. Ameliorations to be consolidated; 3. Other important issues in safety; 3.1. Probabilistic safety studies; 3.2. Approach for safety re-evaluation; 3.3. The network safety; 3.4. Crisis management; 3.5. The Lifetime program; 3.6. PWR; 3.7. Documentation; 3.8. Competence; 4. Safety management in the future; 4.1. An open future; 4.2. The fast neutron NPP at Creys-Malville; 4.3. Stabilization of the PWR reference frame; 4.4. Implementing the EURATOM directive regarding the radiation protection standards; 4.5. Development of biomedical research and epidemiological studies; 4.6. New regulations concerning the liquid and gaseous effluents; 5. Visions of an open future; 5.1. Alternative views upon safety ay EDF; 5.2. Safety authority; 5.3. International considerations; 5.4. What happens abroad; 5.5. References from non-nuclear domain. Four appendices are added referring to policy of safety management, policy of human factors in NPPs

  17. Reactor safety device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yasumasa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To scram control rods by processing signals from a plurality of temperature detectors and generating abnormal temperature warning upon occurrence of abnormal temperature in a nuclear reactor. Constitution: A temperature sensor comprising a plurality of reactors each having a magnetic body as the magnetic core having a curie point different from each other and corresponding to the abnormal temperature against which reactor core fuels have to be protected is disposed in an identical instrumentation well near the reactor core fuel outlet/inlet of a reactor. A temperature detection device actuated upon detection of an abnormal temperature by the abrupt reduction of the reactance of each of the reactors is disposed. An OR circuit and an AND circuit for conducting OR and AND operations for each of the abnormal temperature detection signals from the temperature detection device are disposed. The output from the OR circuit is used as the abnormal temperature warning signal, while the output from the AND circuit is utilized as a signal for actuating the scram operation of control rod drive mechanisms. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability of the reactor scram system, particularly, improve the reliability under a high temperature atmosphere. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Convention on Nuclear Safety was adopted on 17 June 1994 by Diplomatic Conference convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency at its Headquarters from 14 to 17 June 1994. The Convention will enter into force on the ninetieth day after the date of deposit with the Depository (the Agency's Director General) of the twenty-second instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval, including the instruments of seventeen States, having each at leas one nuclear installation which has achieved criticality in a reactor core. The text of the Convention as adopted is reproduced in the Annex hereto for the information of all Member States

  19. Applicability of Coupled Thermalhydraulic Codes for Safety Analysis of Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gairola, A.; Bhowmik, P. K.; Shamim, J. A.; Suh, K. Y.

    2014-01-01

    To this end computational codes like RELAP and TRACE are used to model thermal-hydraulic response of nuclear power plant during an accident. By careful modeling and significant user experience these system codes are able to simulate the behavior of primary system and the containment to a reasonable extent. Comparatively decoupled simulation is simple but might not produce reality and the physics involved in an accurate manner. Thus simulation using two different system codes is interesting as the whole system is coupled through the pressure in the containment and flow through the break. Using this methodology it might be possible to get new insight about the primary and containment behavior by the precise simulation of the accident both in the current reactors and future Gen-III/III+ reactors. Couple thermalhydraulic code methodology is still new and require further investigations. Applicability of such methodology to the GEN-II plants have met with limited success, however a number of situations in which this methodology could be applied are still unexplored and thus provides a room for improvement and modifications

  20. Applicability of Coupled Thermalhydraulic Codes for Safety Analysis of Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gairola, A.; Bhowmik, P. K.; Shamim, J. A.; Suh, K. Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To this end computational codes like RELAP and TRACE are used to model thermal-hydraulic response of nuclear power plant during an accident. By careful modeling and significant user experience these system codes are able to simulate the behavior of primary system and the containment to a reasonable extent. Comparatively decoupled simulation is simple but might not produce reality and the physics involved in an accurate manner. Thus simulation using two different system codes is interesting as the whole system is coupled through the pressure in the containment and flow through the break. Using this methodology it might be possible to get new insight about the primary and containment behavior by the precise simulation of the accident both in the current reactors and future Gen-III/III+ reactors. Couple thermalhydraulic code methodology is still new and require further investigations. Applicability of such methodology to the GEN-II plants have met with limited success, however a number of situations in which this methodology could be applied are still unexplored and thus provides a room for improvement and modifications.

  1. Reactor Safety Commission Code of Practice for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Commission of the Federal German Republic has summarized in the form of Official Guidelines the safety requirements which, in the Commission's view, have to be met in the design, construction and operation of a nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The Third Edition of the RSK Guidelines for pressurized water reactors dated 14.10.81. is a revised and expanded version of the Second Edition dated 24.1.79. The Reactor Safety Commission will with effect from October 1981 use these Guidelines in consultations on the siting of and safety concept for the installation approval of future pressurized water reactors and will assess these nuclear power stations during their erection in the light of these Guidelines. They have not however been immediately conceived for the adaptation of existing nuclear power stations, whether under construction or in operation. The scope of application of these Guidelines to such nuclear power stations will have to be examined for each individual case. The main aim of the Guidelines is to simplify the consultation process within the reactor Safety Commission and to provide early advice on the safety requirements considered necessary by the Commission. (author)

  2. The way to solve the safety problems of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jihui; Zhang Senru

    1991-01-01

    Based on the safety problems that the current water cooled reactor nuclear power plants have the potential danger of core melt, the paper comments upon the safety behaviors of the advanced reactors (AP-600, SIR) and passive safety reactors (PIUS, MHTGR). According to design and user's requirements for next generation water cooled reactor, the paper put forward a new concept about self safety U-ZrH reactor (SUR) which is able to solve the safety problems for water cooled reactor nuclear power plant and become a development direction for world water cooled reactor nuclear power plants. This type of reactor has been studied in NPIC (Nuclear Power Institute of China)

  3. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6. Nuclear waste management and reactor safety report 2009/2010. Material science for nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumeier, S.; Bosbach, D. (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    Due to the use of nuclear energy about 17.000 t (27.000 m{sup 3}) of high level waste and about 300.000 m{sup 3} of low and intermediated level waste will have accumulated in Germany until 2022. Research in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Division focuses on fundamental and applied aspects of the safe management of nuclear waste - in particular the nuclear aspects. In principle, our research in Forschungszentrum Juelich is looking at the material science/solid state aspects of nuclear waste management. It is organized in several research areas: The long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal is a key issue when it comes to the final disposal of high level nuclear waste in a deep geological formation. We are contributing to the scientific basis for the safety case of a nuclear waste repository in Germany. In Juelich we are focusing on a fundamental understanding of near field processes within a waste repository system. The main research topics are spent fuel corrosion and the retention of radionuclides by secondary phases. In addition, innovative waste management strategies are investigated to facilitate a qualified decision on the best strategy for Germany. New ceramic waste forms for disposal in a deep geological formation are studied as well as the partitioning of long-lived actinides. These research areas are supported by our structure research group, which is using experimental and computational approaches to examine actinide containing compounds. Complementary to these basic science oriented activities, IEK-6 also works on rather applied aspects. The development of non-destructive methods for the characterisation of nuclear waste packages has a long tradition in Juelich. Current activities focus on improving the segmented gamma scanning technique and the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. Furthermore, the waste treatment group is developing concepts for the safe management of nuclear

  4. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6. Nuclear waste management and reactor safety report 2009/2010. Material science for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumeier, S.; Bosbach, D.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the use of nuclear energy about 17.000 t (27.000 m 3 ) of high level waste and about 300.000 m 3 of low and intermediated level waste will have accumulated in Germany until 2022. Research in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Division focuses on fundamental and applied aspects of the safe management of nuclear waste - in particular the nuclear aspects. In principle, our research in Forschungszentrum Juelich is looking at the material science/solid state aspects of nuclear waste management. It is organized in several research areas: The long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal is a key issue when it comes to the final disposal of high level nuclear waste in a deep geological formation. We are contributing to the scientific basis for the safety case of a nuclear waste repository in Germany. In Juelich we are focusing on a fundamental understanding of near field processes within a waste repository system. The main research topics are spent fuel corrosion and the retention of radionuclides by secondary phases. In addition, innovative waste management strategies are investigated to facilitate a qualified decision on the best strategy for Germany. New ceramic waste forms for disposal in a deep geological formation are studied as well as the partitioning of long-lived actinides. These research areas are supported by our structure research group, which is using experimental and computational approaches to examine actinide containing compounds. Complementary to these basic science oriented activities, IEK-6 also works on rather applied aspects. The development of non-destructive methods for the characterisation of nuclear waste packages has a long tradition in Juelich. Current activities focus on improving the segmented gamma scanning technique and the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. Furthermore, the waste treatment group is developing concepts for the safe management of nuclear graphite

  5. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6. Nuclear waste management and reactor safety report 2009/2010. Material science for nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkenberg, M; Neumeier, S; Bosbach, D [eds.

    2011-07-01

    Due to the use of nuclear energy about 17.000 t (27.000 m{sup 3}) of high level waste and about 300.000 m{sup 3} of low and intermediated level waste will have accumulated in Germany until 2022. Research in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Division focuses on fundamental and applied aspects of the safe management of nuclear waste - in particular the nuclear aspects. In principle, our research in Forschungszentrum Juelich is looking at the material science/solid state aspects of nuclear waste management. It is organized in several research areas: The long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal is a key issue when it comes to the final disposal of high level nuclear waste in a deep geological formation. We are contributing to the scientific basis for the safety case of a nuclear waste repository in Germany. In Juelich we are focusing on a fundamental understanding of near field processes within a waste repository system. The main research topics are spent fuel corrosion and the retention of radionuclides by secondary phases. In addition, innovative waste management strategies are investigated to facilitate a qualified decision on the best strategy for Germany. New ceramic waste forms for disposal in a deep geological formation are studied as well as the partitioning of long-lived actinides. These research areas are supported by our structure research group, which is using experimental and computational approaches to examine actinide containing compounds. Complementary to these basic science oriented activities, IEK-6 also works on rather applied aspects. The development of non-destructive methods for the characterisation of nuclear waste packages has a long tradition in Juelich. Current activities focus on improving the segmented gamma scanning technique and the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. Furthermore, the waste treatment group is developing concepts for the safe management of nuclear

  6. Self Assessment for the Safety of Research Reactor in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melani, Ai; Chang, Soon Heung

    2008-01-01

    At the present Indonesia has no nuclear power plant in operation yet, although it is expected that the first nuclear power plant will be operated and commercially available in around the year of 2016 to 2017 in Muria Peninsula. National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) has three research reactor; which are: Reactor Triga Mark II at Bandung, Reactor Kartini at Yogyakarta and Reactor Serbaguna (Multi Purpose Reactor) at Serpong. The Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors establishes 'best practice' guidelines for the licensing, construction and operation of research reactors. In this paper the author use the requirement in code of conduct to review the safety of research reactor in Indonesia

  7. Guards: An approach safety-related systems using cots example of MMI and reactor automation in nuclear submarine application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, M.

    1998-01-01

    For at least 10 years, the nuclear industry designs and licences specific digital safety-critical systems (IEC 1226 class A). One key issue for future programs is to design and licence safety-related systems providing more complex functions and using Commercial-Off-The-Shelf components. This issue is especially raised for Reactor automation and Man-Machine-Interface. The usual I and C (Instrumentation and Control) organisation for these functions is based on redundancy between a commercial, up-to-date, unclassified > system and a simplified classified > system using traditional technologies. It clearly appears that such organisation is not satisfying from the point of view of people who have actually to operate these systems: The operator is supposed not to trust the normal system and rely on the back-up system which is less helpful and that he use very few. This paper presents a new approach to that problem using COTS components in low-level layers, safety architecture and mechanisms at medium level layer (GUARDS architecture developed in the current ESPRIT project number 20716), and a pre-validated functional layer. The aim of this solution is to comply with the > IEC 1226 class B requirements, at lower overall cost (design, implementation, licensing, long term confidence). This approach is illustrated by its application in Man-Machine-Interface (MMI) for our future program of Nuclear submarine. (author)

  8. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  9. Safety of Basic nuclear facilities (INB) other than electronuclear reactors. Lessons learned from declared significant events in 2011 and 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The first part of this report presents the different types of basic nuclear facilities other than electronuclear reactors. These installations can be industrial installations dedicated or not to the nuclear fuel cycle, research and support installations, be definitively stopped or being dismantled, or radioactive waste storage installations. After a comment of the main trends noticed in 2011 and 2012, the report proposes a transverse analysis of events which occurred in these installations. These events are related to various risks: dissemination of radioactive materials, exposure to ionizing radiations, criticality, fire and explosion, handling operations, loss of electric supplies or fluids, external aggression. Other events are those significant for the environment with a radiological component, or related to periodic controls and tests. The causes of these events are analysed. Specific events are presented which occurred on different sites (in the MELOX plant, in Areva sites in La Hague, Pierrelatte, in CEA sites in Cadarache and Saclay, in a fuel factory in Romans). Other topics are finally addressed: safety measures after the Fukushima accident, safety and radiation protection management systems of Areva and CEA, dismantling of nuclear installations

  10. Nuclear power: Siting and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Openshaw, S.

    1986-01-01

    By 2030, half, or even two-thirds, of all electricity may be generated by nuclear power. Major reactor accidents are still expected to be rare occurrences, but nuclear safety is largely a matter of faith. Terrorist attacks, sabotage, and human error could cause a significant accident. Reactor siting can offer an additional, design-independent margin of safety. Remote geographical sites for new plants would minimize health risks, protect the industry from negative changes in public opinion concerning nuclear energy, and improve long-term public acceptance of nuclear power. U.K. siting practices usually do not consider the contribution to safety that could be obtained from remote sites. This book discusses the present trends of siting policies of nuclear power and their design-independent margin of safety

  11. Reactors. Nuclear propulsion ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fribourg, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    This article has for object the development of nuclear-powered ships and the conception of the nuclear-powered ship. The technology of the naval propulsion P.W.R. type reactor is described in the article B.N.3 141 'Nuclear Boilers ships'. (N.C.)

  12. Structural mechanics and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, K.

    1983-01-01

    Operational safety and reliability of nuclear power plants widely depend on the mechanical behaviour of their structural components and their resistance to the various and complex influences. Durability and consistency of structural components are determined by the kind of strain - during the life - and by environmental conditions. The Conferences on Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology (SMiRT) are dedicated to the discussion of such questions. The 7th of these Conferences taking place in 2-year increments was held in Chicago in August 1983. The number of contributions again increased, the number of participants slightly decreased. There are some trends in this field worth mentioning, in particular the fact that experience from design and operation of nuclear power plants now available is more and more made use of, and that more and more attention is given the problems of fusion reactors. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Electric Power quality Analysis in research reactor: Impacts on nuclear safety assessment and electrical distribution reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touati, Said; Chennai, Salim; Souli, Aissa

    2015-01-01

    The increased requirements on supervision, control, and performance in modern power systems make power quality monitoring a common practise for utilities. Large databases are created and automatic processing of the data is required for fast and effective use of the available information. Aim of the work presented in this paper is the development of tools for analysis of monitoring power quality data and in particular measurements of voltage and currents in various level of electrical power distribution. The study is extended to evaluate the reliability of the electrical system in nuclear plant. Power Quality is a measure of how well a system supports reliable operation of its loads. A power disturbance or event can involve voltage, current, or frequency. Power disturbances can originate in consumer power systems, consumer loads, or the utility. The effect of power quality problems is the loss power supply leading to severe damage to equipments. So, we try to track and improve system reliability. The assessment can be focused on the study of impact of short circuits on the system, harmonics distortion, power factor improvement and effects of transient disturbances on the Electrical System during motor starting and power system fault conditions. We focus also on the review of the Electrical System design against the Nuclear Directorate Safety Assessment principles, including those extended during the last Fukushima nuclear accident. The simplified configuration of the required system can be extended from this simple scheme. To achieve these studies, we have used a demo ETAP power station software for several simulations. (authors)

  14. Electric Power quality Analysis in research reactor: Impacts on nuclear safety assessment and electrical distribution reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touati, Said; Chennai, Salim; Souli, Aissa [Nuclear Research Centre of Birine, Ain Oussera, Djelfa Province (Algeria)

    2015-07-01

    The increased requirements on supervision, control, and performance in modern power systems make power quality monitoring a common practise for utilities. Large databases are created and automatic processing of the data is required for fast and effective use of the available information. Aim of the work presented in this paper is the development of tools for analysis of monitoring power quality data and in particular measurements of voltage and currents in various level of electrical power distribution. The study is extended to evaluate the reliability of the electrical system in nuclear plant. Power Quality is a measure of how well a system supports reliable operation of its loads. A power disturbance or event can involve voltage, current, or frequency. Power disturbances can originate in consumer power systems, consumer loads, or the utility. The effect of power quality problems is the loss power supply leading to severe damage to equipments. So, we try to track and improve system reliability. The assessment can be focused on the study of impact of short circuits on the system, harmonics distortion, power factor improvement and effects of transient disturbances on the Electrical System during motor starting and power system fault conditions. We focus also on the review of the Electrical System design against the Nuclear Directorate Safety Assessment principles, including those extended during the last Fukushima nuclear accident. The simplified configuration of the required system can be extended from this simple scheme. To achieve these studies, we have used a demo ETAP power station software for several simulations. (authors)

  15. RB research reactor Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.

    1979-04-01

    This RB reactor safety report is a revised and improved version of the Safety report written in 1962. It contains descriptions of: reactor building, reactor hall, control room, laboratories, reactor components, reactor control system, heavy water loop, neutron source, safety system, dosimetry system, alarm system, neutron converter, experimental channels. Safety aspects of the reactor operation include analyses of accident causes, errors during operation, measures for preventing uncontrolled activity changes, analysis of the maximum possible accident in case of different core configurations with natural uranium, slightly and highly enriched fuel; influence of possible seismic events

  16. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer-based systems used in Nuclear Power Plants for safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national policies and in revisions of guidelines; - as a reference in safety cases and demonstrations of safety of software based systems; - as guidance for system design specifications by manufacturers and major I and C suppliers on the international market. The task force decided at an early stage to focus attention on computer based systems used in Nuclear Power Plants for the implementation of safety functions; namely, those systems classified by the IAEA as 'Safety Systems'. Therefore, recommendations of this report - except those of chapter 1.11 - primarily address 'safety systems' and not 'safety related systems'. It was felt that the most difficult aspects of the licensing of digital programmable systems are rooted in the specific properties of the technology. The objective was therefore to delineate practical and technical licensing guidance, rather than discussing or proposing basic principles or requirements. The design requirements and the basic principles of nuclear safety in force in each member state are assumed to remain applicable. This report represents the consensus view achieved by the experts who contributed to the task force. It is the result of what was at the time of its initiation a first attempt at the international level to achieve consensus among nuclear regulators on practical methods for

  17. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlyar, O.M.; West, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device is described for controlling a safety control rod within the core of a nuclear reactor, the reactor controlled by a reactor control system, the device comprising: a safety control rod drive shaft and an electromagnetic clutch co-axial with the drive shaft operatively connected to the safety control rod for driving and positioning the safety control rod within or without the reactor core during reactor operation, the safety rod being oriented in a substantially vertical position to allow the rod to fall into the reactor core under the influence of gravity during shutdown of the reactor; the safety control rod drive shaft further operatively connected to a hydraulic pump such that operation of the drive shaft simultaneously drives and positions the safety control rod and operates the hydraulic pump such that a hydraulic fluid is forced into an accumulator, filling the accumulator with oil for the storage and supply of primary potential energy for safety control rod insertion such that the release of potential energy in the accumulator causes hydraulic fluid to flow through the hydraulic pump, converting the hydraulic pump to a hydraulic motor having speed and power capable of full length insertion and high speed driving of the safety control rod into the reactor core; a solenoid valve interposed between the hydraulic pump and the accumulator, said solenoid valve being a normally open valve, actuated to close when the safety control rod is out of the reactor during reactor operation; and further wherein said solenoid opens in response to a signal from the reactor control system calling for shutdown of the reactor and rapid insertion of the safety control rod into the reactor core, such that the opening of the solenoid releases the potential energy in the accumulator to place the safety control rod in a safe shutdown position

  18. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  19. Present status of space nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1996-01-01

    USA and former USSR led space development, and had the experience of launching nuclear reactor satellites. In USA, the research and development of space nuclear reactor were advanced mainly by NASA, and in 1965, the nuclear reactor for power source ''SNAP-10A'' was launched and put on the orbit around the earth. Thereafter, the reactor was started up, and the verifying test at 500 We was successfully carried out. Also for developing the reactor for thermal propulsion, NERVA/ROVER project was done till 1973, and the technological basis was established. The space Exploration Initiative for sending mankind to other solar system planets than the earth is the essential point of the future projects. In former USSR, the ground experiment of the reactor for 800 We power source ''Romashka'', the development of the reactor for 10 kWe power source ''Topaz-1 and 2'', the flight of the artificial satellites, Cosmos 954 and Cosmos 1900, on which nuclear reactors were mounted, and the operation of 33 ocean-monitoring satellites ''RORSAT'' using small fast reactors were carried out. The mission of space development and the nuclear reactors as power source, the engineering of space nuclear reactors, the present status and the trend of space nuclear reactor development, and the investigation by the UN working group on the safety problem of space nuclear reactors are described. (K.I.)

  20. Criteria for safety-related nuclear-power-plant operator actions: 1982 pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) simulator exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, D.S.; Beare, A.N.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Haas, P.M.

    1983-06-01

    The primary objective of the Safety-Related Operator Action (SROA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to provide a data base to support development of criteria for safety-related actions by nuclear power plant operators. When compared to field data collected on similar events, a base of operator performance data developed from the simulator experiments can then be used to establish safety-related operator action design evaluation criteria, evaluate the effects of performance shaping factors, and support safety/risk assessment analyses. This report presents data obtained from refresher training exercises conducted in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant control room simulator. The 14 exercises were performed by 24 teams of licensed operators from one utility, and operator performance was recorded by an automatic Performance Measurement System. Data tapes were analyzed to extract operator response times (RTs) and error rate information. Demographic and subjective data were collected by means of brief questionnaires and analyzed in an attempt to evaluate the effects of selected performance shaping factors on operator performance