WorldWideScience

Sample records for reactor neutron fission

  1. Neutron and thermal dynamics of a gaseous core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Dam, H.; Kuijper, J.C.; Stekelenburg, A.J.C.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Kistemaker, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper neutron kinetics and thermal dynamics of a Gaseous Core Fission Reactor with magnetical pumping are shown to have many unconventional aspects. Attention is focused on the properties of the fuel gas, the non-linear neutron kinetics and the energy balance in thermodynamical cycles

  2. Neutronics issues in fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chengan

    1995-01-01

    The coupled neutron and γ-ray transport equations and nuclear number density equations, and its computer program systems concerned in fusion-fission hybrid reactor design are briefly described. The current status and focal point for coming work of nuclear data used in fusion reactor design are explained

  3. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  4. Measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products in nuclear reactor coolant water during reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the detection and measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products contained in nuclear reactor coolant water while the reactor is operating. The method is limited to the measurement of the delayed neutron-emitting bromine isotope of mass 87 and the delayed neutron-emitting iodine isotope of mass 137. The other delayed neutron-emitting fission products cannot be accurately distinguished from nitrogen 17, which is formed under some reactor conditions by neutron irradiation of the coolant water molecules. The method includes a description of significance, measurement variables, interferences, apparatus, sampling, calibration, standardization, sample measurement procedures, system efficiency determination, calculations, and precision

  5. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  6. Neutron dosimetry for radiation damage in fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of materials subjected to the intense neutron radiation fields characteristic of fission power reactors or proposed fusion energy devices is a field of extensive current research. These investigations seek important information relevant to the safety and economics of nuclear energy. In high-level radiation environments, neutron metrology is accomplished predominantly with passive techniques which require detailed knowledge about many nuclear reactions. The quality of neutron dosimetry has increased noticeably during the past decade owing to the availability of new data and evaluations for both integral and differential cross sections, better quantitative understanding of radioactive decay processes, improvements in radiation detection technology, and the development of reliable spectrum unfolding procedures. However, there are problems caused by the persistence of serious integral-differential discrepancies for several important reactions. There is a need to further develop the data base for exothermic and low-threshold reactions needed in thermal and fast-fission dosimetry, and for high-threshold reactions needed in fusion-energy dosimetry. The unsatisfied data requirements for fission reactor dosimetry appear to be relatively modest and well defined, while the needs for fusion are extensive and less well defined because of the immature state of fusion technology. These various data requirements are examined with the goal of providing suggestions for continued dosimetry-related nuclear data research

  7. Review of the neutron capture process in fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The importance of the neutron capture process and the status of the more important cross section data are reviewed. The capture in fertile and fissile nuclei is considered. For thermal reactors the thermal to epithermal capture ratio for 238 U and 232 Th remains a problem though some improvements were made with more recent measurements. The capture cross section of 238 U in the fast energy range remains quite uncertain and a long standing discrepancy for the calculated versus experimental central reaction rate ratio C28/F49 persists. Capture in structural materials, fission product nuclei and the higher actinides is also considered

  8. Utilization of fast reactor excess neutrons for burning long-lived fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Kaneto, K.

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation is made on a large MOX fuel fast reactor's capability of burning long lived fission product Tc-99, which dominates the long term radiotoxicity of the high level radioactive waste. The excess neutrons generated in the fast reactor core are utilized to transmute Tc-99 to stable isotopes due to neutron capture reaction. The fission product target assemblies which consist of Tc-99 are charged to the reactor core periphery. The fission product target neutrons are moderated to a great deal to pursue the possibility of enhancing the transmutation rate. Any impacts of loading the fission product target assemblies on the core nuclear performances are assessed. A long term Tc-99 accumulation scenario is considered in the mix of fission product burner fast reactor and non-burner LWRs. (author)

  9. Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2011-07-01

    In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

  10. Preliminary neutronics calculation of fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xubo; Chen Yixue; Gao Bin

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of using the fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel in PWR was preliminarily studied in this paper. According to the fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel characteristics, PWR assembly including fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel was designed. The parameters such as fuel temperature coefficient, moderator temperature coefficient and their variation were investigated. Results show that the neutron properties of uranium-based assembly and hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel assembly are similar. The design of this paper has a smaller uniformity coefficient of power at the same fissile isotope mass percentage. The results will provide technical support for the future fusion-fission hybrid reactor and PWR combined with cycle system. (authors)

  11. Nuclear data requirements for fission reactor neutronics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finck, P.

    1998-01-01

    The paper discusses current European nuclear data measurement and evaluation requirements for fission reactor technology applications and problems involved in meeting the requirements. Reference is made to the NEA High Priority Nuclear Data Request List and to the production of the new JEFF-3 library of evaluated nuclear data. There are requirements for both differential (or basic) nuclear data measurements and for different types of integral measurement critical facility measurements and isotopic sample irradiation measurements. Cross-section adjustment procedures are being used to take into account the simpler types of integral measurement, and to define accuracy needs for evaluated nuclear data

  12. AUS, Neutron Transport and Gamma Transport System for Fission Reactors and Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: AUS is a neutronics code system which may be used for calculations of a wide range of fission reactors, fusion blankets and other neutron applications. The present version, AUS98, has a nuclear cross section library based on ENDF/B-VI and includes modules which provide for reactor lattice calculations, one-dimensional transport calculations, multi-dimensional diffusion calculations, cell and whole reactor burnup calculations, and flexible editing of results. Calculations of multi-region resonance shielding, coupled neutron and photon transport, energy deposition, fission product inventory and neutron diffusion are combined within the one code system. The major changes from the previous release, AUS87, are the inclusion of a cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI, the addition of the POW3D multi-dimensional diffusion module, the addition of the MICBURN module for controlling whole reactor burnup calculations, and changes to the system as a consequence of moving from IBM mainframe computers to UNIX workstations. 2 - Method of solution: AUS98 is a modular system in which the modules are complete programs linked by a path given in the input stream. A simple path is simply a sequence of modules, but the path is actually pre-processed and compiled using the Fortran 77 compiler. This provides for complex module linking if required. Some of the modules included in AUS98 are: MIRANDA Cross-section generation in a multi-region resonance subgroup calculation and preliminary group condensation. ANAUSN One-dimensional discrete ordinates calculation. ICPP Isotropic collision probability calculation in one dimension and for rod clusters. POW3D Multi-dimensional neutron diffusion calculation including feedback-free kinetics. AUSIDD One-dimensional diffusion calculation. EDITAR Reaction-rate editing and group collapsing following a transport calculation. CHAR Lattice and global burnup calculation. MICBURN Control of global burnup

  13. The 235U Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum in the BR1 Reactor at SCK•CEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, Jan; Malambu, Edouard; Borms, Luc; Fiorito, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The BR1 research reactor at SCK•CEN has a spherical cavity in the graphite above the reactor core. In this cavity an accurately characterised Maxwellian thermal neutron field is present. Different converters can be loaded in the cavity in order to obtain other types of neutron (and gamma) irradiation fields. Inside the so-called MARK III converter a fast 235U(n,f) prompt fission neutron field can be obtained. With the support of MCNP calculations, irradiations in MARK III can be directly related to the pure 235U(n,f) prompt fission neutron spectrum. For this purpose MARK III spectrum averaged cross sections for the most relevant fluence dosimetry reactions have been determined. A calibration factor for absolute measurements has been determined applying activation dosimetry following ISO/IEC 17025 standards.

  14. The 235U Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum in the BR1 Reactor at SCK•CEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagemans Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The BR1 research reactor at SCK•CEN has a spherical cavity in the graphite above the reactor core. In this cavity an accurately characterised Maxwellian thermal neutron field is present. Different converters can be loaded in the cavity in order to obtain other types of neutron (and gamma irradiation fields. Inside the so-called MARK III converter a fast 235U(n,f prompt fission neutron field can be obtained. With the support of MCNP calculations, irradiations in MARK III can be directly related to the pure 235U(n,f prompt fission neutron spectrum. For this purpose MARK III spectrum averaged cross sections for the most relevant fluence dosimetry reactions have been determined. A calibration factor for absolute measurements has been determined applying activation dosimetry following ISO/IEC 17025 standards.

  15. Physical Investigation for Neutron Consumption and Multiplication in Blanket Module of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq Siddique, M.; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactor can be the first milestone of fusion technology and achievable in near future. It can provide operational experience for tritium recycling for pure fusion reactor and be used for incineration of high-level long-lived waste isotopes from existing fission power reactors. Hybrid reactor for waste transmutation (Hyb-WT) was designed and optimized to assess its otential for waste transmutation. ITER will be the first large scaled experimental tokamak facility for the testing of test blanket modules (TBM) which will layout the foundation for DEMO fusion power plants. Similarly hybrid test blanket module (HTBM) will be the foundation for rationality of fusion fission hybrid reactors. Designing and testing of hybrid blankets will lead to another prospect of nuclear technology. This study is initiated with a preliminary design concept of a hybrid test blanket module (HTBM) which would be tested in ITER. The neutrons generated in D-T fusion plasma are of high energy, 14.1 MeV which could be multiplied significantly through inelastic scattering along with fission in HTBM. In current study the detailed neutronic analysis is performed for the blanket module which involves the neutron growth and loss distribution within blanket module with the choice of different fuel and coolant materials. TRU transmutation and tritium breeding performance of HTBM is analyzed under ITER irradiation environment for five different fuel types and with Li and LiPb coolants. Simple box geometry with plate type TRU fuel is adopted so that it can be modelled with heterogeneous material geometry in MCNPX. Waste transmutation ratio (WTR) of TRUs and tritium breeding ration (TBR) is computed to quantify the HTBM performance. Neutron balance is computed in detail to analyze the performance parameters of HTBM. Neutron spectrum and fission to capture ratio in TRU fuel types is also calculated for detailed analysis of HTBM

  16. Physical Investigation for Neutron Consumption and Multiplication in Blanket Module of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tariq Siddique, M.; Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactor can be the first milestone of fusion technology and achievable in near future. It can provide operational experience for tritium recycling for pure fusion reactor and be used for incineration of high-level long-lived waste isotopes from existing fission power reactors. Hybrid reactor for waste transmutation (Hyb-WT) was designed and optimized to assess its otential for waste transmutation. ITER will be the first large scaled experimental tokamak facility for the testing of test blanket modules (TBM) which will layout the foundation for DEMO fusion power plants. Similarly hybrid test blanket module (HTBM) will be the foundation for rationality of fusion fission hybrid reactors. Designing and testing of hybrid blankets will lead to another prospect of nuclear technology. This study is initiated with a preliminary design concept of a hybrid test blanket module (HTBM) which would be tested in ITER. The neutrons generated in D-T fusion plasma are of high energy, 14.1 MeV which could be multiplied significantly through inelastic scattering along with fission in HTBM. In current study the detailed neutronic analysis is performed for the blanket module which involves the neutron growth and loss distribution within blanket module with the choice of different fuel and coolant materials. TRU transmutation and tritium breeding performance of HTBM is analyzed under ITER irradiation environment for five different fuel types and with Li and LiPb coolants. Simple box geometry with plate type TRU fuel is adopted so that it can be modelled with heterogeneous material geometry in MCNPX. Waste transmutation ratio (WTR) of TRUs and tritium breeding ration (TBR) is computed to quantify the HTBM performance. Neutron balance is computed in detail to analyze the performance parameters of HTBM. Neutron spectrum and fission to capture ratio in TRU fuel types is also calculated for detailed analysis of HTBM.

  17. Resonance self-shielding effect in uncertainty quantification of fission reactor neutronics parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Go; Tsuji, Masashi; Narabayashi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    In order to properly quantify fission reactor neutronics parameter uncertainties, we have to use covariance data and sensitivity profiles consistently. In the present paper, we establish two consistent methodologies for uncertainty quantification: a self-shielded cross section-based consistent methodology and an infinitely-diluted cross section-based consistent methodology. With these methodologies and the covariance data of uranium-238 nuclear data given in JENDL-3.3, we quantify uncertainties of infinite neutron multiplication factors of light water reactor and fast reactor fuel cells. While an inconsistent methodology gives results which depend on the energy group structure of neutron flux and neutron-nuclide reaction cross section representation, both the consistent methodologies give fair results with no such dependences.

  18. RESONANCE SELF-SHIELDING EFFECT IN UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION OF FISSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GO CHIBA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to properly quantify fission reactor neutronics parameter uncertainties, we have to use covariance data and sensitivity profiles consistently. In the present paper, we establish two consistent methodologies for uncertainty quantification: a self-shielded cross section-based consistent methodology and an infinitely-diluted cross section-based consistent methodology. With these methodologies and the covariance data of uranium-238 nuclear data given in JENDL-3.3, we quantify uncertainties of infinite neutron multiplication factors of light water reactor and fast reactor fuel cells. While an inconsistent methodology gives results which depend on the energy group structure of neutron flux and neutron-nuclide reaction cross section representation, both the consistent methodologies give fair results with no such dependences.

  19. Fission track dating method: I. Study of neutron flux uniformity in some irradiation positions of IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, A.M.; Hadler, J.C.; Iunes, P.J.; Paulo, S.R. de

    1993-06-01

    In order to use the fission track dating method the flux gradient was verified within the sample holder, in some irradiation positions of the IEA-R1 reactor at IPEN/CNEN, Sao Paulo. The fission track dating method considers only the thermal neutron fission tracks, to subtract the other contributions sample irradiations with a cadmium cover was performed. The neutron flux cadmium influence was studied. (author)

  20. In-reactor testing of self-powered neutron detectors and miniature fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, J.; LeMeur, R.; Verdant, R.

    1975-01-01

    The CEA has tested a variety of ''slow'' self-powered neutron detectors with rhodium, silver and vanadium emitters. Currently there are 120 vanadium detectors in the EL4 heavy water reactor. In addition, ''fast'' detectors with cobalt emitters have been tested at Saclay and 50 of these are in reactor. Other studies are concerned with 6 mm diameter miniature fission chambers. Two fast response chambers with argon-nitrogen filling gas became slow during irradiation, but operated to 600 deg C. An argon filled chamber of 4.7 mm diameter, for traversing in core system in pressurized water reactor, has shown satisfactory test results. (author)

  1. Japanese list of requests for neutron nuclear data for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarasi, Sin-iti; Asami, Tetsuo

    1977-05-01

    Requests for neutron nuclear data for fission reactors are presented. These are screened by a WRENDA Working Group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee and submitted to WRENDA 76/77. This report includes 163 requests of which 55 requests are newly registered in the WRENDA. Three requests of the previous list are withdrawn. This activity is a part of the international cooperation with CCDN, NEANDC and INDC. (auth.)

  2. Dosimetry of fission neutrons in a 1-W reactor, UTR-KINKI

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, S; Yoshitake, Y

    2002-01-01

    The energy spectrum of fission neutrons in the biological irradiation field of the Kinki University reactor, UTR-KINKI, has been determined by a multi-foil activation analysis coupled with artificial neural network techniques and a Au-foil activation method. The mean neutron energy was estimated to be 1.26+-0.05 MeV from the experimentally determined spectrum. Based on this energy value and other information, the neutron dose rate was estimated to be 19.7+-1.4 cGy/hr. Since this dose rate agrees with that measured by a pair of ionizing chambers (21.4 cGy/hr), we conclude that the mean neutron energy could be estimated with reasonable accuracy in the irradiation field of UTR-KINKI. (author)

  3. Highlighted requests of neutron nuclear data measurements for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Highlighted requests were selected from lists of requests for neutron nuclear Data measurements. This work was made by WRENDA Working Group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee in response to an action of the NEANDC. This will be submitted to a NEA meeting on request lists. Compiled requests in this note correspond finally to the parts of the WRENDA 76/77 with some modifications and additional comments. (auth.)

  4. The neutronics studies of a fusion fission hybrid reactor using pressure tube blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Youqi; Zu Tiejun; Wu Hongchun; Cao Liangzhi; Yang Chao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a fusion fission hybrid reactor used for energy producing is proposed based on the situation of nuclear power in China. The pressurized light water is applied as the coolant. The fuel assemblies are loaded in the pressure tubes with a modular type structure. The neutronics analysis is performed to get the suitable design and prove the feasibility. The energy multiplication and tritium self-sustaining are evaluated. The neutron load is also cared. From different candidates, the PWR spent fuel is selected as the feed fuel. The results show that the hybrid reactor can meet the expected reactor core lifetime of 5 years with 1000 MWe power output. Two ways are discussed including burning the discharged PWR spent fuel and burning the reprocessed plutonium. The energy multiplication is big enough and the tritium can be self-sustaining for both of the two ways. The neutron wall load in the operating time is kept smaller than the one of ITER. The way to use the reprocessed plutonium brings low neutron wall load, but also brings additional difficulties in operating the hybrid reactor. The way to use the discharged spent fuel is proposed to be a better choice currently.

  5. Irradiation effects in fused quartz 'Suprasil' as a detector of fission fragments under high flux of reactor neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, O.M.G. de.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic study about the registration characteristics of synthetic fused quartz 'Suprasil I' use as a detector of fission fragments under high flux of reactor neutrons and the effects of irradiation on it was performed. Fission fragments of 252 Cf, gamma radiation doses of of 60 Co up to 150 MGy, and integrated neutrons fluxes up to 10 20 n/cm 2 were used. A model to explain the effects on track registration and development characteristics of 'Suprasil I' irradiated on reactors were proposed, based on the obtained results for efficiency an for annealing. (C.G.C.) [pt

  6. 239Pu prompt fission neutron spectra impact on a set of criticality and experimental reactor benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peneliau, Y.; Litaize, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.

    2014-01-01

    A large set of nuclear data are investigated to improve the calculation predictions of the new neutron transport simulation codes. With the next generation of nuclear power plants (GEN IV projects), one expects to reduce the calculated uncertainties which are mainly coming from nuclear data and are still very important, before taking into account integral information in the adjustment process. In France, future nuclear power plant concepts will probably use MOX fuel, either in Sodium Fast Reactors or in Gas Cooled Fast Reactors. Consequently, the knowledge of 239 Pu cross sections and other nuclear data is crucial issue in order to reduce these sources of uncertainty. The Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra (PFNS) for 239 Pu are part of these relevant data (an IAEA working group is even dedicated to PFNS) and the work presented here deals with this particular topic. The main international data files (i.e. JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0, BRC-2009) have been considered and compared with two different spectra, coming from the works of Maslov and Kornilov respectively. The spectra are first compared by calculating their mathematical moments in order to characterize them. Then, a reference calculation using the whole JEFF-3.1.1 evaluation file is performed and compared with another calculation performed with a new evaluation file, in which the data block containing the fission spectra (MF=5, MT=18) is replaced by the investigated spectra (one for each evaluation). A set of benchmarks is used to analyze the effects of PFNS, covering criticality cases and mock-up cases in various neutron flux spectra (thermal, intermediate, and fast flux spectra). Data coming from many ICSBEP experiments are used (PU-SOL-THERM, PU-MET-FAST, PU-MET-INTER and PU-MET-MIXED) and French mock-up experiments are also investigated (EOLE for thermal neutron flux spectrum and MASURCA for fast neutron flux spectrum). This study shows that many experiments and neutron parameters are very sensitive to

  7. Measurement and analysis of 14 MeV neutron-induced double-differential neutron emission cross sections needed for fission and fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dahai.

    1990-10-01

    The main objectives of this IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme are to improve the data on 14 MeV neutron-induced double-differential neutron emission cross sections for materials needed for fission and fusion reactor technology. This report summarizes the conclusions and recommendations which were agreed by all participants during the Second Research Co-ordination Meeting

  8. Neutronic analysis for the fission Mo99 production by irradiation of leu targets in TRIGA 14 MW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulugeac, S. D.; Mladin, M.; Budriman, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum production can be a solution for the future in the utilization of the Romanian TRIGA, taking into account the international market supply needs. Generally, two different techniques are available for Mo 99 production for use in medical Tc 99 generation.The first one is based on neutron irradiation of molybdenum targets of natural isotopic composition or enriched in Mo 98 . In a second process, Mo 99 is obtained as a result of the neutron induced fission of U 235 according to U 235 (n,f) Mo 99 . The objectives of the paper are related to Mo 99 production as a result of fission. Neutron physics parameters are determined and presented, such as: thermal flux axial distribution for the critical reactor at 10 MW inside the irradiation location; reactivity introduced by three Uranium foil containers; neutron fluxes and fission rates in the Uranium foils; released and deposited power in the Uranium foils; Mo 99 activity in the Uranium foils. (authors)

  9. Neutronics analysis of water-cooled energy production blanket for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jieqiong; Wang Minghuang; Chen Zhong; Qiu Yuefeng; Liu Jinchao; Bai Yunqing; Chen Hongli; Hu Yanglin

    2010-01-01

    Neutronics calculations were performed to analyse the parameters of blanket energy multiplication factor (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR) in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor for energy production named FDS (Fusion-Driven hybrid System)-EM (Energy Multiplier) blanket. The most significant and main goal of the FDS-EM blanket is to achieve the energy gain of about 1 GWe with self-sustaining tritium, i.e. the M factor is expected to be ∼90. Four different fission materials were taken into account to evaluate M in subcritical blanket: (i) depleted uranium, (ii) natural uranium, (iii) enriched uranium, and (iv) Nuclear Waste (transuranic from 33 000 MWD/MTU PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and depleted uranium) oxide. These calculations and analyses were performed using nuclear data library HENDL (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) and a home-developed code VisualBUS. The results showed that the performance of the blanket loaded with Nuclear Waste was most attractive and it could be promising to effectively obtain tritium self-sufficiency and a high-energy multiplication.

  10. Fission neutron multiplicity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.; Ruben, A.; Seeliger, D.

    1991-01-01

    A model for calculating neutron multiplicities in nuclear fission is presented. It is based on the solution of the energy partition problem as function of mass asymmetry within a phenomenological approach including temperature-dependent microscopic energies. Nuclear structure effects on fragment de-excitation, which influence neutron multiplicities, are discussed. Temperature effects on microscopic energy play an important role in induced fission reactions. Calculated results are presented for various fission reactions induced by neutrons. Data cover the incident energy range 0-20 MeV, i.e. multiple chance fission is considered. (author). 28 refs, 13 figs

  11. A comparison of the free vacancy production in α brass by fission reactor neutrons and 14.8-MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damask, A.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.; Borg, R.J.; Dienes, G.J.

    1976-01-01

    Enhancement of substitutional diffusion is observed in α brass (30 wt% Zn) by following the decrease in electrical resistivity with neutron irradiation of a thermally equilibrated alloy; the decrease arises from the increase in short-range order. It was determined by previous research that this diffusion enhancement is largely caused by the annealling of radiation-produced vacancies in excess of the thermal equilibrium concentration. Therefore, the results reported here are based upon a well-established technique. The rate of resistivity change per neutron of different energies will give the relative number of free vacancies produced per neutron. This experiment compares the effect of 14.8 MeV neutrons with neutrons from a fission reactor. The results indicate that 14.8 MeV neutrons produce 10 +- 2 times as many free vacancies as reactor neutrons when the latter are expressed in terms of those neutrons with energies greater than 0.1 MeV. (author)

  12. Neutronic calculation and cross section sensitivity analysis of the Livermore mirror fusion/fission hybrid reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, L.P.; Price, W.G. Jr.

    1977-08-01

    The neutronic calculation for the Livermore mirror fusion/fission hybrid reactor blanket was performed using the PPPL cross section library. Significant differences were found in the tritium breeding and plutonium production in comparison to the results of the LLL calculation. The cross section sensitivity study for tritium breeding indicates that the response is sensitive to the cross section of 238 U in the neighborhood of 14 MeV and 1 MeV. The response is also sensitive to the cross sections of iron in the vicinity of 14 MeV near the first wall. Neutron transport in the resonance region is not important in this reactor model

  13. Development and optimization of neutron measurement methods by fission chamber on experimental reactors - management, treatment and reduction of uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc-De-Lanaute, N.

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of this research thesis are the management and reduction of uncertainties associated with measurements performed by means of a fission-chamber type sensor. The author first recalls the role of experimental reactors in nuclear research, presents the various sensors used in nuclear detection (photographic film, scintillation sensor, gas ionization sensor, semiconducting sensor, other types of radiation sensors), and more particularly addresses neutron detection (activation sensor, gas filling sensor). In a second part, the author gives an overview of the state of the art of neutron measurement by fission chamber in a mock-up reactor (signal formation, processing and post-processing, associated measurements and uncertainties, return on experience of measurements by fission chamber on Masurca and Minerve research reactors). In a third part, he reports the optimization of two intrinsic parameters of this sensor: the thickness of fissile material deposit, and the pressure and nature of the filler gas. The fourth part addresses the improvement of measurement electronics and of post-processing methods which are used for result analysis. The fifth part deals with the optimization of spectrum index measurements by means of a fission chamber. The impact of each parameter is quantified. Results explain some inconsistencies noticed in measurements performed on the Minerve reactor in 2004, and allow the improvement of biases with computed values [fr

  14. Fission reactor based epithermal neutron irradiation facilities for routine clinical application in BNCT-Hatanaka memorial lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, Otto K.

    2009-01-01

    Based on experience gained in the recent clinical studies at MIT/Harvard, the desirable characteristics of epithermal neutron irradiation facilities for eventual routine clinical BNCT are suggested. A discussion of two approaches to using fission reactors for epithermal neutron BNCT is provided. This is followed by specific suggestions for the performance and features needed for high throughput clinical BNCT. An example of a current state-of-the-art, reactor based facility, suited for routine clinical use is discussed. Some comments are provided on the current status of reactor versus accelerator based epithermal neutron sources for BNCT. This paper concludes with a summary and a few personal observations on BNCT by the author.

  15. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis for production of fission molybdenum-99 at Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushtaq, A. [Isotope Production Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: mushtaqa@pinstech.org.pk; Iqbal, Massod; Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain; Mahmood, Tariq; Mahmood, Tayyab; Ahmad, Zahoor; Zaman, Qamar [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-02-15

    Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis for the fission molybdenum-99 production at PARR-1 has been performed. Low enriched uranium foil (<20% {sup 235}U) will be used as target material. Annular target designed by ANL (USA) will be irradiated in PARR-1 for the production of 100 Ci of molybdenum-99 at the end of irradiation, which will be sufficient to prepare required {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generators at PINSTECH and its supply in the country. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis were performed using various codes. Data shows that annular targets can be safely irradiated in PARR-1 for production of required amount of fission molybdenum-99.

  16. HAC and fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, I.; Moriyama, H.; Tachikawa, E.

    1984-01-01

    In the fission process, newly formed fission products undergo hot atom reactions due to their energetic recoil and abnormal positive charge. The hot atom reactions of the fission products are usually accompanied by secondary effects such as radiation damage, especially in condensed phase. For reactor safety it is valuable to know the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of these radioactive fission products. Here, the authors study the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of the fission products from the viewpoint of hot atom chemistry (HAC). They analyze the experimental results concerning fission product behaviour with the help of the theories in HAC and other neighboring fields such as radiation chemistry. (Auth.)

  17. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the range of characteristics attainable from hybrid reactor blankets; blanket design considerations; hybrid reactor designs; alternative fuel hybrid reactors; multi-purpose hybrid reactors; and hybrid reactors and the energy economy. Hybrid reactors are driven by a fusion neutron source and include fertile and/or fissile material. The fusion component provides a copious source of fusion neutrons which interact with a subcritical fission component located adjacent to the plasma or pellet chamber. Fissile fuel and/or energy are the main products of hybrid reactors. Topics include high F/M blankets, the fissile (and tritium) breeding ratio, effects of composition on blanket properties, geometrical considerations, power density and first wall loading, variations of blanket properties with irradiation, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design considerations, safety considerations, tokamak hybrid reactors, tandem-mirror hybrid reactors, inertial confinement hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources, fissile-fuel and energy production ability, simultaneous production of combustible and fissile fuels, fusion reactors for waste transmutation and fissile breeding, nuclear pumped laser hybrid reactors, Hybrid Fuel Factories (HFFs), and scenarios for hybrid contribution. The appendix offers hybrid reactor fundamentals. Numerous references are provided

  18. Yields of some fragments on 235U, 238U and 239Pu fission due to the neutrons of the SBR-1 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurova, L.N.; Bushuev, A.V.; Ozerkov, V.N.; Chachin, V.V.; Zvonarev, A.V.; Liforov, Yu.G.; Koleganov, Yu.V.; Miller, V.V.; Gorbatyuk, O.V.

    1979-01-01

    Determined are the values of the yields of fission fragments in spectrum close to that of the neutron fission using the data on yields at fission by thermal neutrons. The relation between the activities of fragments in samples irradiated in the BR-1 center and in the thermal colomn of the same reactor was measured with the help of the Ge(Li). The relative rate of fissions in uranium and plutonium samples in the center or in thermal colomn were measured by track detectors. The comparison of the yields obtained and the data of other authors is being made

  19. The Oklo natural nuclear reactors: neutron parameters, age and duration of the reactions, uranium and fission products migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffenach, J.-C.

    1979-09-01

    Mass spectrometry and isotopic dilution technique are used in order to carry out, on various samples from the fossil nuclear reactors at Oklo, Gabon, isotopic and chemical analyses of some particular elements involved in the nuclear reactions: uranium, lead, bismuth, thorium, rare gases (krypton, xenon), rare earths (neodymium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, dysprosium), ruthenium and palladium. Interpretations of these analyses lead to the determination of many neutron parameters such as the neutron fluence received by the samples, the spectrum index, the conversion coefficient, and also the percentages of fissions due to uranium-238 and plutonium-239 and the total number of fissions relative to uranium. All these results make it possible to determine the age of the nuclear reactions by measuring the amounts of fission rare earths formed, i.e. 1.97 billion years. This study brings some informations to the general problem of radioactive wastes storage in deep geological formations, the storage of uranium, plutonium and many fission products having been carried out naturally, and for about two billion years [fr

  20. Nuclear data for neutron emission in the fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.

    1991-11-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Nuclear Data for Neutron Emission in the Fission Process, Vienna, 22 - 24 October 1990. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers provide a review of the status of experimental and theoretical data on neutron emission in spontaneous and neutron induced fission with reference to the data needs for reactor applications oriented towards actinide burner studies. The specific topics covered are the following: experimental measurements and theoretical predictions and evaluations of fission neutron energy spectra, average prompt fission neutron multiplicity, correlation in neutron emission from complementary fragments, neutron emission during acceleration of fission fragments, statistical properties of neutron rich nuclei by study of emission spectra of neutrons from the excited fission fragments, integral qualification of nu-bar for the major fissile isotopes, nu-bar total of 239 Pu and 235 U, and related problems. Refs figs and tabs

  1. Reactor AQUILON. The hardening of neutron spectrum in natural uranium rods, with a computation of epithermal fissions (1961); Pile AQUILON. Durcissement du spectre des neutrons dans les barreaux d'uranium et calcul des fissions epithermiques (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand -Smet, R; Lourme, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    - Microscopic flux measurements in reactor Aquilon have allowed to investigate the thermal and epithermal flux distribution in natural uranium rods, then to obtain the neutron spectrum variations in uranium, Wescott '{beta}' term of the average spectrum in the rod, and the ratio of epithermal to therma fissions. A new definition for the infinite multiplication factor is proposed in annex, which takes into account epithermal parameters. (authors) [French] - Un certain nombre de mesures effectuees dans la pile Aquilon ont permis d'etablir la distribution fine des flux thermique et epithermique dans les barreaux d'uranium, et d'en deduire les variations du spectre des neutrons dans l'uranium, le terme {beta} du spectre de Wescott moyen dans le barreau et le nombre de fissions epithermiques. En annexe, il est propose une definition nouvelle du coefficient de multiplication infini, qui fait intervenir les parametres epithermiques. (auteurs)

  2. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  3. Intelligent uranium fission converter for neutron production on the periphery of the nuclear reactor core (MARIA reactor in Swierk - Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryzinski, M.A.; Wielgosz, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    The multipurpose, high flux research reactor MARIA in Otwock - Swierk is an open-pool type, water and beryllium moderated and graphite reflected. There are two not occupied experimental H1 and H2 horizontal channels with complex of empty rooms beside them. Making use of these two channels is not in conflict with other research or commercial employing channels. They can work simultaneously, moreover commercial channels covers the cost of reactor working. Such conditions give beneficial possibility of creating epithermal neutron stand for researches in various field at the horizontal channel H2 of MARIA reactor (co-organization of research at H1 channel is additionally planned). At the front of experimental channels the neutron flux is strongly thermalized - neutrons with energies above 0.625 eV constitute only ∼2% of the total flux. This thermalized neutron flux will be used to achieve high flux of epithermal neutrons at the level of 2x10{sup 9} n cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} by uranium neutron converter (fast neutron production - conversion of reactor core thermal neutrons to fast neutrons - and then filtering, moderating and finally cutting of unwanted gamma radiation). The intelligent converter will be placed in the reactor pool, near the front of the H2 channel. It will replace one graphite block at the periphery of MARIA graphite reflector. The converter will consist of 20 fuel elements - low enriched uranium plates. A fuel plate will be a part which will measure 110 mm wide by 380 mm long and will consist of a thin layer of uranium sealed between two aluminium plates. These plates, once assembled, form the fuel element used in converter. The plates will be positioned vertically. There are several important requirements which should be taken into account at the converter design stage: -maximum efficiency of the converter for neutrons conversion, -cooling of the converter need to be integrated with the cooling circuit of the reactor pool and if needed equipped with

  4. Diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber for thermal neutron detection at the VR-1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomorski, Michal; Mer-Calfati, Christine [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Foulon, Francois [CEA, National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sklenka, Lubomir; Rataj, Jan; Bily, Tomas [Department of Nuclear Reactors,Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, V. Holesovickach 2, 180 00 PRAHA 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Diamond exhibits a combination of properties which makes it attractive for neutron detection in hostile conditions. In the particular case of detection in a nuclear reactor, it is resilient to radiation, exhibits a natural low sensitivity to gamma rays, and its small size (as compared with that of gas ionisation chambers) enables fluency monitoring with a high position resolution. We report here on the use of synthetic CVD diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber with U-235 converting material for in-core thermal neutron monitoring. Two types of thin diamond detectors were developed for this application. The first type of detector is fabricated using thin diamond membrane obtained by etching low-cost commercially available single crystal CVD intrinsic diamond, so called 'optical grade' material. Starting from a few hundred of micrometre thick samples, the sample is sliced with a laser and then plasma etched down to a few tenths of micrometre. Here we report the result obtained with a 17 μm thick device. The detection surface of this detector is equal to 1 mm{sup 2}. Detectors with surfaces up to 1 cm{sup 2} can be fabricated with this technique. The second type of detector is fabricated by growing successively two thin films of diamond, by the microwave enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique, on HPHT single crystal diamond. A first, a film of boron doped (p+) single crystal diamond, a few microns thick, is deposited. Then a second film of intrinsic diamond with a thickness of a few tens of microns is deposited. This results in a P doped, Intrinsic, Metal structure (PIM) structure in which the intrinsic volume id the active part of the detector. Here we report the results obtained with a 20 μm thick intrinsic whose detection surface is equal to 0.5 mm{sup 2}, with the possibility to enlarge the surface of the detector up to 1 cm{sup 2}. These two types of detector were tested at the VR-1 research reactor at the Czech Technical University in

  5. Diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber for thermal neutron detection at the VR-1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomorski, Michal; Mer-Calfati, Christine; Foulon, Francois; Sklenka, Lubomir; Rataj, Jan; Bily, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Diamond exhibits a combination of properties which makes it attractive for neutron detection in hostile conditions. In the particular case of detection in a nuclear reactor, it is resilient to radiation, exhibits a natural low sensitivity to gamma rays, and its small size (as compared with that of gas ionisation chambers) enables fluency monitoring with a high position resolution. We report here on the use of synthetic CVD diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber with U-235 converting material for in-core thermal neutron monitoring. Two types of thin diamond detectors were developed for this application. The first type of detector is fabricated using thin diamond membrane obtained by etching low-cost commercially available single crystal CVD intrinsic diamond, so called 'optical grade' material. Starting from a few hundred of micrometre thick samples, the sample is sliced with a laser and then plasma etched down to a few tenths of micrometre. Here we report the result obtained with a 17 μm thick device. The detection surface of this detector is equal to 1 mm 2 . Detectors with surfaces up to 1 cm 2 can be fabricated with this technique. The second type of detector is fabricated by growing successively two thin films of diamond, by the microwave enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique, on HPHT single crystal diamond. A first, a film of boron doped (p+) single crystal diamond, a few microns thick, is deposited. Then a second film of intrinsic diamond with a thickness of a few tens of microns is deposited. This results in a P doped, Intrinsic, Metal structure (PIM) structure in which the intrinsic volume id the active part of the detector. Here we report the results obtained with a 20 μm thick intrinsic whose detection surface is equal to 0.5 mm 2 , with the possibility to enlarge the surface of the detector up to 1 cm 2 . These two types of detector were tested at the VR-1 research reactor at the Czech Technical University in Prague. The

  6. Neutronic performance of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor designed for fuel enrichment for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yapici, H.; Baltacioglu, E.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the breeding performance of a fission hybrid reactor was analyzed to provide fissile fuel for Light Water Reactors (LWR) as an alternative to the current methods of gas diffusion and gas centrifuge. LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or ThO 2 fertile material were located in the fuel zone of the blanket and helium gas or Flibe (Li 2 BeF 4 ) fluid was used as coolant. As a result of the analysis, according to fusion driver (D,T and D,D) and the type of coolant the enrichment of 3%-4% were achieved for operation periods of 12 and 36 months in case of fuel rods containing UO 2 , respectively and for operation periods of 18 and 48 months in case of fuel rods containing ThO 2 , respectively. Depending on the type of fusion driver, coolant and fertile fuel, varying enrichments of between 3% and 8.9% were achieved during operation period of four years

  7. Fission reactors and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions

  8. Home brew technetium : clinical scale desktop plasma fusion neutron source to produce Tc99m as an alternative to industrial scale fission reactor sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosi, S.G.; Khachan, J.; Oborn, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Tc-99m (decay product of Mo-99) accounts for ∼ 90% of world's production of radiopharmaceuticals. Recent unexpected shutdowns of two fission reactors and routine maintenance closures .e created a global shortage of Tc-99m, hence the large global effort to find alternative sources. This project aims to design and produce a novel prototype Mo-99/Tc-99m source. An operational desktop neutron source is available at the University of Sydney, employing a deuterium fusion-plasma to create 2.45 MeV neutrons. These neutrons will be used to activate Mo-98 thin an activation vessel. In one embodiment, the activation vessel contains an aqueous slurry or gel containing Mo-98 which converts to 0-99 upon activation. The decay product Tc-99m could then be milked, similar to existing Tc-99m generators. Monte Carlo will be :ed to assess yield versus size and geometry for various vessel designs. The neutron source filled with deuterium operating at 250 W, produces 3 x 106 neutrons continuously. The neutron flux can be increased ∼ 100-fold if the fill gas is 50% tritium and by another ∼ 100-1000-fold by increasing the power. This is being designed for local use, perhaps on the scale f one or a few hospitals, so the yield would not need to be industrial ;ale as with fission reactor sources. This device is low cost <$300 K) compared with cyclotrons and fission reactors.

  9. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  10. Reactor physics and thermodynamics of a gaseous core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Van Dam, H.; Stekelenburg, A.J.C.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Kistemaker, J.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron kinetics and thermodynamics of a Gaseous Core Fission Reactor with magnetical pumping are shown to have many unconventional aspects. Attention is focussed on the properties of the fuel gas, the stationary temperature distribution, the non-linear neutron kinetics and the energy balance in thermodynamical cycles

  11. Mechanisms of fission neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.

    1991-01-01

    The time evolution in fission is the starting point for discussing not only the main mechanism of fission neutron emission, the evaporation from fully accelerated fragments, but also possible secondary ones connected with dynamical features of nuclear fission. ''Asymptotic'' conditions as relevant for describing the particle release from highly excited, rapidly moving fragments are defined. Corresponding statistical model approaches to fission neutron emission, based on the adequate consideration of the intricate fragment occurrence probability, reproduce most of the experimental data. The remarkable influence of fission modes on neutron observables is analyzed in the framework of a macroscopic-microscopic scission point model consistent with energy conservation. Finally, chances and deficiencies for solving the mechanism puzzle are summarized. (author). 87 refs, 21 figs

  12. Neutron multiplicity of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelrahman, Y S [Physics department, mu` rah university Al-Karak, (Jordan)

    1995-10-01

    The total average neutron multiplicity of the fission fragments produced by the spontaneous fission of {sup 248} Cm has been measured. This measurement has been done by using a new experimental technique. This technique mainly depends on {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence using a very high resolution high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. 2 figs.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  14. Method and apparatus for producing ultralowmass fissionable deposits for reactor neutron dosimetry by recoil ion-implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.

    1988-01-01

    A method for producing a fissionable deposit of selectively ultralow mass for neutron dosimetry is described comprising the steps of: (a) spacing in opposing relation a substrate and an alpha-emitting parent source which decays to implant into the substrate of fissionable daughter ejected from the parent source as a result of the decay; and (b) holding the opposing relation for a period of time until the parent source decays to form a corresponding mass of isotopically pure fissionable daughter uniformly on the substrate

  15. Role and use of nuclear theories and models in practical evaluation of neutron nuclear data needed for fission and fusion reactor design and other nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, A.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the various nuclear models used in the evaluation of neutron nuclear data for fission and fusion reactors is presented. Computer codes embodying the principles of the relevant nuclear models are compared with each other and with experimental data. The regions of validity and limitations of the conceptual formalisms are also included, along with the effects of the numerical procedures used in the codes themselves. Conclusions and recommendations for future demands are outlined.15 tables, 15 figures, 90 references

  16. The role and use of nuclear theories and models in practical evaluation of neutron nuclear data needed for fission and fusion reactor design and other nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, A.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the various nuclear models used in the evaluation of neutron nuclear data for fission and fusion reactors is presented. Computer codes embodying the principles of the relevant nuclear models are compared with each other and with experimental data. The regions of validity and limitations of the conceptual formalisms are also included, along with the effects of the numerical procedures used in the codes themselves. Conclusions and recommendations for future demands are outlined. (author)

  17. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator is described which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40--60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator. 2 claims, 4 figures

  18. Matching of dense plasma focus devices with fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.; Heindler, M.

    1978-01-01

    The potential role of dense plasma focus devices as compact neutron sources for fissile fuel breeding in conjunction with existing fission reactors is considered. It is found that advanced plasma focus devices can be used effectively in conjunction with neutronically efficient fission reactors to constitute ''self-sufficient'' breeders. Correlations among the various parameters such as the power output and conversion ratio of the fission reactor with the neutron yield and capacitor bank energy of the dense plasma focus device are presented and discussed

  19. A standard fission neutron irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahasrabudhe, S.G.; Chakraborty, P.P.; Iyer, M.R.; Kirthi, K.N.; Soman, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    A fission neutron irradiation facility (FISNIF) has been set up at the thermal column of the CIRUS reactor at BARC. The spectrum and the flux have been measured using threshold detectors. The paper describes the setting up of the facility, measurement and application. A concentric cylinder containing UO 2 powder sealed inside surrounds the irradiation point of a pneumatic sample transfer system located in the thermal column of the reactor. Samples are loaded in a standard aluminium capsule with cadmium lining and transported pneumatically. A sample transfer time of 1 s can be achieved in the facility. Typical applications of the facility for studying activation of iron and sodium in fission neutrons are also discussed. (Auth.)

  20. A calculational study on neutron kinetics and thermodynamics of a gaseous core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1992-06-01

    A numerical and analytical study of the static and dynamic properties of a GCFR with oscillating fuel gas (uranium and carbon fluorides) is presented. Neutron kinetics parts of combined GCFR models are introduced. Thermodynamic properties of the GCFR and of the fuel gas are treated. (HP)

  1. Nuclear fission sustainability with subcritical reactors driven by external neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuente, A.; Piera, M.

    2011-01-01

    Although nuclear breeder reactors are a promising way to enhance the potential energy currently retrievable from the Uranium reserves, they still have disadvantages because of their safety features (i.e. poor stabilizing mechanisms) and the security of their fuel cycle (diversion of Pu for non-civilian purposes). Loading natural nuclear fuels to a reactor and completely burning them without reprocessing would be ideal, however, this is not possible in critical reactors due to the limitations imposed by the maximum achievable burn-up. An alternative option to attain very high percentages of nuclear natural materials exploitation, while meeting other objectives of Nuclear Sustainability, could consist of using externally-driven subcritical reactors to reach the desired high burn-ups (of the order of 30% and more) without reprocessing. Such scheme would lead to an efficient exploitation of the available raw material, without any risk of proliferation. Exploring this type of reactor concept, this paper analyzes the different ways to accomplish this goal while identifying potential setbacks.

  2. Nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulo, V.

    1989-06-01

    The document presents the status of nuclear reaction theory concerning optical model development, level density models and pre-equilibrium and direct processes used in calculation of neutron nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors. 6 refs

  3. Radiation shielding for fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Radiation shielding aspects relating fission reactors have been reviewed. Domestic activities in the past five years have been mainly described concerning nuclear data, calculation methods, shielding and skyshine experiments, Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR), Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR), High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), Experimental and Prototype Fast Reactors (JOYO, MONJU), Demonstration FBR, core shroud replacement of BWR, and spent fuel transportation cask and vessel. These studies have valuable information in safety and cost reduction issues of fission reactor design for not only existing reactors but also new reactor concepts in the next century. It has been concluded that we should maintain existing shielding technologies and improve these data and methods for coming generations in the next millennium. (author)

  4. Fission reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Tomoo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a control rod in a PWR type reactor. A control rod has an inner cladding tube and an outer cladding tube disposed coaxially, and a water draining hole is formed at the inside of the inner cladding tube. Neutron absorbers are filled in an annular gap between the outer cladding tube and the inner cladding tube. The water draining hole opens at the lower end thereof to the top end of the control rod and at the upper end thereof to the side of the upper end plug of the control rod. If the control rod is dropped to a control rod guide thimble for reactor scram, coolants from the control rod guide thimble are flown from the lower end of the water draining hole and discharged from the upper end passing through the water draining hole. In this way, water from the control rod guide thimble is removed easily when the control rod is dropped. Further, the discharging amount of water itself is reduced by the provision of the water draining hole. Accordingly, sufficient control rod dropping speed can be attained. (I.N.)

  5. Independent fission yields of Rb and Cs from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Forman, L.

    1975-01-01

    The relative independent fission yields of Rb and Cs from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 239 Pu have been measured on line using a mass spectrograph and thermalized neutrons from a burst reactor. Independent yields were derived by normalizing the measurements to products of chain yields and fractional independent yields, estimating the latter from measured cumulative yields of Kr and Xe. Comparing the independent yields with those from 238 U fission, the 239 Pu results show shifts in isotopic yield distribution toward lower mass for both Rb and Cs and also toward the production of more Cs and less Rb when 239 Pu is fissioned

  6. Production of Fission Product 99Mo using High-Enriched Uranium Plates in Polish Nuclear Research Reactor MARIA: Technology and Neutronic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroszewicz Janusz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of 235U irradiation is to obtain the 99mTc isotope, which is widely used in the domain of medical diagnostics. The decisive factor determining its availability, despite its short lifetime, is a reaction of radioactive decay of 99Mo into 99mTc. One of the possible sources of molybdenum can be achieved in course of the 235U fission reaction. The paper presents activities and the calculation results obtained upon the feasibility study on irradiation of 235U targets for production of 99Mo in the MARIA research reactor. Neutronic calculations and analyses were performed to estimate the fission products activity for uranium plates irradiated in the reactor. Results of dummy targets irradiation as well as irradiation uranium plates have been presented. The new technology obtaining 99Mo is based on irradiation of high-enriched uranium plates in standard reactor fuel channel and calculation of the current fission power generation. Measurements of temperatures and the coolant flow in the molybdenum installation carried out in reactor SAREMA system give online information about the current fission power generated in uranium targets. The corrective factors were taken into account as the heat generation from gamma radiation from neighbouring fuel elements as well as heat exchange between channels and the reactor pool. The factors were determined by calibration measurements conducted with aluminium mock-up of uranium plates. Calculations of fuel channel by means of REBUS code with fine mesh structure and libraries calculated by means of WIMS-ANL code were performed.

  7. Determination of the fission-neutron averaged cross sections of some high-energy threshold reactions of interest for reactor dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arribere, M.A.; Kestelman, A.J.; Korochinsky, S.; Blostein, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    For three high threshold reactions, we have measured the cross sections averaged over a 235 U fission neutron spectrum. The measured reactions, and corresponding averaged cross sections found, are: 127 I(n,2n) 126 I, (1.36±0.12) mb; 90 Zr(n,2n) 89m Zr, (13.86±0.83) μb; and 58 Ni(n,d+np+pn) 57 Co, (274±15) μb; all referred to the well known standard of (111±3) mb for the 58 Ni(n,p) 58m+g Co averaged cross section. The measured cross sections are of interest in nuclear engineering for the characterization of the fast neutron component in the energy distribution of reactor neutrons. (author)

  8. MANTA. An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Neutron cross-sections characterize the way neutrons interact with matter. They are essential to most nuclear engineering projects and, even though theoretical progress has been made as far as the predictability of neutron cross-section models, measurements are still indispensable to meet tight design requirements for reduced uncertainties. Within the field of fission reactor technology, one can identify the following specializations that rely on the availability of accurate neutron cross-sections: (1) fission reactor design, (2) nuclear fuel cycles, (3) nuclear safety, (4) nuclear safeguards, (5) reactor monitoring and neutron fluence determination and (6) waste disposal and transmutation. In particular, the assessment of advanced fuel cycles requires an extensive knowledge of transuranics cross sections. Plutonium isotopes, but also americium, curium and up to californium isotope data are required with a small uncertainty in order to optimize significant features of the fuel cycle that have an impact on feasibility studies (e.g. neutron doses at fuel fabrication, decay heat in a repository, etc.). Different techniques are available to determine neutron cross sections experimentally, with the common denominator that a source of neutrons is necessary. It can either come from an accelerator that produces neutrons as a result of interactions between charged particles and a target, or it can come from a nuclear reactor. When the measurements are performed with an accelerator, they are referred to as differential since the analysis of the data provides the cross-sections for different discrete energies, i.e. σ(Ei), and for the diffusion cross sections for different discrete angles. Another approach is to irradiate a very pure sample in a test reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after

  9. Use of code DTF-4 for determining the coefficient of back-reflection of the neutron within the thermonuclear plasma of a thermonuclear reactor controlled by the rate of the fission reactions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristea, G.

    1975-01-01

    The neutron problems are discussed of the thermonuclear reactor controlled by the rate of the fission reactions. The results obtained by rolling the DTF-4 program in a spherical geometry in the case of an ''external source'' problem permit to draw conclusions concerning the problems of the neutronics system of this thermonuclear reactor type. A relation is deduced for estimating the coefficient of back-reflection of the neutrons within the thermonuclear plasma and the focussion system is discussed of the neutronics of this reactor type

  10. Remarks concerning the accurate measurement of differential cross sections for threshold reactions used in fast-neutron dosimetry for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1976-12-01

    Some remarks are submitted concerning the measurement of differential cross sections for threshold reactions which are used in fast-neutron dosimetry for fission reactors. The objective is to familiarize the reader with some of the problems associated with these measurements and, in the process, to explain why the existence of large discrepancies in the data sets for many of these reactions is not surprising. Limits to the accuracy which can be expected for these cross sections in the near future--using current technology and available resources--are examined in a general way and recommendations for improving the accuracy of the differential data base for dosimetry reactions are presented

  11. Post-scission fission theory: Neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of theoretical representations of two of the observables in neutron emission in fission is given, namely, the prompt fission neutron spectrum N (E) and the average prompt neutron multiplicity bar ν p . Early representations of the two observables are presented and their deficiencies are discussed. This is followed by summaries and examples of recent theoretical models for the calculation of these quantities. Emphasis is placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the recent models. In particular, the dependencies of N (E) and bar ν p upon the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy are treated. Recent work in the calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum matrix N (E, E n ), where E n is the energy of the neutron inducing fission, is then discussed. Concluding remarks address the current status of our ability to calculate these observables with confidence, the direction of future theoretical efforts, and limitations to current (and future) approaches

  12. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  13. Proposal to represent neutron absorption by fission products by a single pseudo-fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsibulya, A.M.; Kochetkov, A.L.; Kravchenko, I.V.; Nikolaev, M.N.

    1991-01-01

    The concentration of fission products during reactor operation is analyzed. The dependence of a composite fission product capture cross-section as a function of time and on the nature of the A of the fissile nuclide are investigated, and the neutron radiative capture in fission products of a thermal reactor is evaluated. It is concluded that neutron absorption by fission products can be described by pseudo-fragments. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Dose-response relationship of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes obtained for the fission neutron therapy facility MEDAPP at the research reactor FRM II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, E; Wagner, F M; Romm, H; Walsh, L; Roos, H

    2009-02-01

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons from the neutron therapy facility MEDAPP (mean neutron energy 1.9 MeV) at the new research reactor FRM II at Garching, Germany, has been analyzed, at different depths in a polyethylene phantom. Whole blood samples were exposed to the MEDAPP beam in special irradiation chambers to total doses of 0.14-3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and 0.18-3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth of the phantom. The neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose rates were measured to be 0.55 Gy min(-1) and 0.27 Gy min(-1) at 2-cm depth, while they were 0.28 and 0.25 Gy min(-1) at 6-cm depth. Although the irradiation conditions at the MEDAPP beam and the RENT beam of the former FRM I research reactor were not identical, neutrons from both facilities gave a similar linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes at a depth of 2 cm. Different dose-response curves for dicentrics were obtained for the MEDAPP beam at 2 and 6 cm depth, suggesting a significantly lower biological effectiveness of the radiation with increasing depth. No obvious differences in the dose-response curves for dicentric chromosomes estimated under interactive or additive prediction between neutrons or gamma-rays and the experimentally obtained dose-response curves could be determined. Relative to (60)Co gamma-rays, the values for the relative biological effectiveness at the MEDAPP beam decrease from 5.9 at 0.14 Gy to 1.6 at 3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and from 4.1 at 0.18 Gy to 1.5 at 3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth. Using the best possible conditions of consistency, i.e., using blood samples from the same donor and the same measurement techniques for about two decades, avoiding the inter-individual variations in sensitivity or the differences in methodology usually associated with inter-laboratory comparisons, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the mixed neutron and gamma-ray MEDAPP field as well as for its fission neutron part was obtained. Therefore, the debate on whether the fission-neutron

  15. Hybrid fission-fusion nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid could contribute to all components of nuclear power - fuel supply, electricity production, and waste management. The idea of the fusion-fission hybrid is many decades old. Several ideas, both new and revisited, have been investigated by hybrid proponents. These ideas appear to have attractive features, but they require various levels of advances in plasma science and fusion and nuclear technology. As a first step towards the development of hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources can be considered as an option. Compact high-field tokamaks can be a candidate for being the neutron source in a fission-fusion hybrid, essentially due to their design characteristics, such as compact dimensions, high magnetic field, flexibility of operation. This study presents the development of a tokamak neutron source for a material testing facility using an Ignitor-based concept. The computed values show the potential of this neutron-rich device for fusion materials testing. Some full-power months of operation are sufficient to obtain relevant radiation damage values in terms of dpa. (Author)

  16. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, G.D.; Lynn, J.E.; Michaudon, A.; Rowlands, J.; de Saussure, G.

    1981-01-01

    A general presentation of current knowledge of the fission process is given with emphasis on the low energy fission of actinide nuclei and neutron induced fission. The need for and the required accuracy of fission cross section data in nuclear energy programs are discussed. A summary is given of the steps involved in fission cross section measurement and the range of available techniques. Methods of fission detection are described with emphasis on energy dependent changed and detector efficiency. Examples of cross section measurements are given and data reduction is discussed. The calculation of fission cross sections is discussed and relevant nuclear theory including the formation and decay of compound nuclei and energy level density is introduced. A description of a practical computation of fission cross sections is given.

  17. Cumulative fission yield of Ce-148 produced by thermal-neutron fission of U-235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, A.A.

    1984-12-01

    Cumulative fission yield of 148 cesium isotopes and some other fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 235 uranium is determined by Germanium/Lithium spectroscopic methods. The measuremets were done at Tsing-Hua open pool reactor using 3 to 4 mg of 93.15% enriched 235 uranium samples. Gamma rays are assigned to the responsible fission products by matching gamma rays energies and half lives. Fission rate is calculated by fission track method. Cumulative fission yields of 148 cesium, 90 krypton, 130 iodine, 144 lanthanum, 89 krypton, 136 xenon, 137 xenon and 140 cesium are calculated. This values are compared with previously predicted values and showed good agreement. 21 Ref

  18. Contained fissionly vaporized imploded fission explosive breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwick, E.F.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor system which produces useful thermal power and breeds fissile isotopes wherein large spherical complex slugs containing fissile and fertile isotopes as well as vaporizing and tamping materials are exploded seriatim in a large containing chamber having walls protected from the effects of the explosion by about two thousand tons of slurry of fissile and fertile isotopes in molten alkali metal. The slug which is slightly sub-critical prior to its entry into the centroid portion of the chamber, then becomes slightly more than prompt-critical because of the near proximity of neutron-reflecting atoms and of fissioning atoms within the slurry. The slurry is heated by explosion of the slugs and serves as a working fluid for extraction of heat energy from the reactor. Explosive debris is precipitated from the slurry and used for the fabrication of new slugs

  19. On the mechanism of fission neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.; Richter, D.; Seeliger, D.

    1986-01-01

    This review represents the present knowledge of the mechanism of prompt fission neutron emission. Starting with a brief fission process characterization related with neutron emission, possible emission mechanisms are discussed. It is emphasized that the experimental study of special mechanisms, i.e. scission neutron emission processes, requires a sufficiently correct description of emission probabilities on the base of the main mechanism, i.e. the evaporation from fully accelerated fragments. Adequate statistical-model approaches have to account for the complexity of nuclear fission reflected by an intricate fragment distribution. The present picture of scission neutron emission is not clarified neither experimentally nor theoretically. Deduced data are contradictory and depend on the used analysis procedures often involving rough discriptions of evaporated-neutron distributions. The contribution of two secondary mechanisms of fission neutron emission, i.e. the neutron evaporation during fragment acceleration and neutron emission due to the decay of 5 He after ternary fission, is estimated. We summarize the recent progress of the theoretical description of fission neutron spectra in the framework of statistical models considering the standard spectrum of 252 Cf(sf) neutrons especially. The main experimental basis for the study of fission neutron emission is the accurate measurement of emission probabilities as a function of emission energy and angle (at least) as well as fragment parameters (mass number ratio and kinetic energy). The present status is evaluated. (author)

  20. Physics of neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1989-06-01

    The document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the Physics of Neutron Emission in Fission, Mito City (Japan), 24-27 May 1988. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers cover the following topics: Energy dependence of the number of fission neutrons ν-bar (3 papers), multiplicity distribution of fission neutrons (3 papers), competition between neutron and γ-ray emission (4 papers), the fission neutron yield in resonances (2 papers) and the energy spectrum of fission neutrons in experiment (9 papers), theory (4 papers) and evaluation (1 paper). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Neutron-nucleus interactions and fission. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The central problem in nuclear-reactor kinetics is to predict the evolution in time of the neutron population in a multiplying medium. Point kinetics allows study of the global behaviour of the neutron population from the average properties of the medium. Before tackling, in the following chapters, the equations governing the time variation of the reactor power (proportional to the total neutron population), the properties of a neutron-multiplying medium shall be discussed briefly. After recalling a number of definitions, a qualitative description shall be given of the principal nuclear reactions at play in a self-sustaining chain reaction, with emphasis on the source of fission neutrons. Since delayed neutrons play a crucial role in reactor kinetics, their production in a reactor shall be described in greater detail. (author)

  2. Neutron gamma competition in fast fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frehaut, J.

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper we analyse the data we have obtained on the distribution of the gamma-ray energy per fission, as well as on the average energy E-barγ released per fission for the neutron induced fission of several isotopes, in the energy range up to 15 MeV. 6 refs, 9 figs

  3. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Existing thermal reactors are energy production scale limited because of low portion of raw uranium usage. Fast reactors are limited by reprocessing need of huge mass of raw uranium at the initial stage of development. The possibility of development of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction, which solves the problem, is discussed here. Neutron losses are decreased, uranium-thorium fuel with artificial fission materials equilibrium regime is used, additional in-core and out-core neutron sources are used for supplying of high fission materials reproduction. Liquid salt reactors can use dynamic loading regime for this purpose. Preferable construction is channel type reactor with heavy water moderator. Good materials for fuel element shells and channel walls are zirconium alloys enriched by 90Zr. Water cooled reactors with usage 12% of raw uranium and liquid metal cooled reactors with usage 25% of raw uranium are discussed. Reactors with additional neutron sources obtain full usage of raw uranium with small additional energy expenses. On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  4. A new neutron counter for fission research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, B., E-mail: benoit.laurent@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Granier, T.; Bélier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Martin, J.-F.; Taieb, J. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Hambsch, F.-J. [EC-JRC Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg, 2440 Geel (Belgium); Tovesson, F.; Laptev, A.B.; Haight, R.C.; Nelson, R.O.; O' Donnell, J.M. [Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    A new neutron counter for research experiments on nuclear fission has been developed. This instrument is designed for the detection of prompt fission neutrons within relatively high levels of gamma and neutron background. It is composed of a set of {sup 3}He proportional counters arranged within a block of polyethylene which serves as moderator. The detection properties have been studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations and experiments with radioactive sources. These properties are confirmed by an experiment on neutron-induced fission of {sup 238}U at the WNR facility of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center during which the mean prompt fission neutron multiplicity, or ν{sup ¯} has been measured from 1 to 20 MeV of incident neutron energy.

  5. Neutronics of Laser Fission-Fusion Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.

    1976-01-01

    Neutronics of Fission-Fusion microsystems inertially confined by Lasers are analysed by transport calculation, both stationary (DTF, TIHOC) and time dependent (TDA, TIHEX), discussing the results obtained for the basic parameters of the fission process (multiplication factor, neutron generation time and Rossi-∞). (Author) 14 refs

  6. Neutronics of Laser Fission-Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, G

    1976-07-01

    Neutronics of Fission-Fusion microsystems inertially confined by Lasers are analysed by transport calculation, both stationary (DTF, TIHOC) and time dependent (TDA, TIHEX), discussing the results obtained for the basic parameters of the fission process (multiplication factor, neutron generation time and Rossi-{infinity}). (Author) 14 refs.

  7. Neutron-induced fission cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigmann, H.

    1991-01-01

    In the history of fission research, neutron-induced fission has always played the most important role. The practical importance of neutron-induced fission rests upon the fact that additional neutrons are produced in the fission process, and thus a chain reaction becomes possible. The practical applications of neutron-induced fission will not be discussed in this chapter, but only the physical properties of one of its characteristics, namely (n,f) cross sections. The most important early summaries on the subject are the monograph edited by Michaudon which also deals with the practical applications, the earlier review article on fission by Michaudon, and the review by Bjornholm and Lynn, in which neutron-induced fission receives major attention. This chapter will attempt to go an intermediate way between the very detailed theoretical treatment in the latter review and the cited monograph which emphasizes the applied aspects and the techniques of fission cross-section measurements. The more recent investigations in the field will be included. Section II will survey the properties of cross sections for neutron-induced fission and also address some special aspects of the experimental methods applied in their measurement. Section Ill will deal with the formal theory of neutron-induced nuclear reactions for the resolved resonance region and the region of statistical nuclear reactions. In Section IV, the fission width, or fission transmission coefficient, will be discussed in detail. Section V will deal with the broader structures due to incompletely damped vibrational resonances, and in particular will address the special case of thorium and neighboring isotopes. Finally, Section VI will briefly discuss parity violation effects in neutron-induced fission. 74 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Fission reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Katsuhiko.

    1991-01-01

    Cooling water is sent without using dynamic equipments upon loss of coolants accident in a pressure vessel by improving an arrangement of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. That is, a containing space is formed at the center of a suppression chamber for storing cooling water while being partitioned with each other, in which the pressure vessel is placed. Further, a water reservoir is formed above the pressure vessel. Then a water discharge pipe is connected to the reservoir for submerging the stored water over the pressure vessel upon occurrence of loss of coolants accident. Further, a water injection pipe is disposed between the pressure suppression chamber and the pressure vessel for injecting the cooling water in the pressure suppression chamber to the reactor core of the pressure vessel by the difference of a water head upon loss of coolants accident. With such a constitution, the pressure vessel has high earthquake proofness. Further, upon loss of coolants accident of the pressure vessel, the cooling water in the reservoir is discharged to submerge and cool the pressure vessel efficiently. Further, the reactor core of the pressure vessel can certainly be cooled by the cooling water of the pressure suppression chamber without relying on dynamic equipments. (I.S.)

  9. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  10. Chromosomal mutation by fission neutrons and X-rays in higher plants. A review on results of the joint research program utilizing Kinki University reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Yoshihiko

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the efficiency of fission neutrons from the nuclear reactor of Kinki University (UTR-KINKI) and X-rays to chromosomes of higher plants for over 20 years. In this review, we described the development of bio-dosimeter using hyper-sensibility of germinating onion roots for irradiation, the analysis of chromosome structure in Haplopappus gracilis (Asteraceae), with the special reference of latent centromeres and survived telomeres throughout chromosomal evolution, the experimental studies on the induction of chromosomal rearrangement in Zebrina pendula (Commelinaceae), the behavior of chromosome fragments with non-localized centromeres in Carex and Eleocharis (Cyperaceae), and the possibility as a bio-dosimeter of pollen mother cells of Tradescantia paludosa (Commelinaceae) for the detection of low-dose radiation. (author)

  11. Neutron converter at reactor RB; Konvertor neutrona na reaktoru RB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strugar, P; Sotic, P; Ninkovic, M; Pesic, M [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1977-07-01

    A neutron converter at Reactor RB in the 'Boris Kidric' Institute of Nuclear Sciences - Vinca has been constructed. Preliminary measurements have been shown that the converted neutron spectrum is very similar to the fission neutron spectrum. For the same integral reactor power, the measured neutron radiation dose has been for about ten times larger with the neutron converter. The neutron converter offers wide possibilities, as in investigations in the reactor physics, where the fission neutron spectra have been required, as well as in the field of neutron dosimetry and biological irradiations (author)

  12. Prompt neutron fission spectrum mean energies for the fissile nuclides and 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    The international standard for a neutron spectrum is that produced from the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf, while the thermal neutron induced fission neutron spectra for the four fissile nuclides, 233 U, 235 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Pu are of interest from the standpoint of nuclear reactors. The average neutron energies of these spectra are tabulated. The individual measurements are recorded with the neutron energy range measured, the method of detection as well as the average neutron energy for each author. Also tabulated are the measurements of the ratio of mean energies for pairs of fission neutron spectra. 75 refs., 9 tabs

  13. Status of measurements of fission neutron spectra of Minor Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapchinsky, L.; Shiryaev, B. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The report considers experimental and theoretical works on studying the energy spectra of prompt neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission and neutron induced fission of Minor Actinides. It is noted that neutron spectra investigations were done for only a small number of such nuclei, most measurements, except those of Cf-252, having been carried out long ago by obsolete methods and imperfectapparatus. The works have no detailed description of experiments, analysis of errors, detailed numerical information about results of experiments. A conclusion is made that the available data do not come up to modern requirements. It is necessary to make new measurements of fission prompt neutron spectra of transuranium nuclides important for the objectives of working out a conception of minor actinides transmutation by means of special reactors. (author)

  14. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    James, G D; Michaudon, A; Michaudon, A; Cierjacks, S W; Chrien, R E

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Fission and Neutron-Induced Fission Cross-Sections is the first volume in a series on Neutron Physics and Nuclear Data in Science and Technology. This volume serves the purpose of providing a thorough description of the many facets of neutron physics in different fields of nuclear applications. This book also attempts to bridge the communication gap between experts involved in the experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear properties and those involved in the technological applications of nuclear data. This publication will be invaluable to those interested in studying nuclear fis

  15. Theory of neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Following a summary of the observables in neutron emission in fission, a brief history is given of theoretical representations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) and average prompt neutron multiplicity /bar /nu///sub p/. This is followed by descriptions, together with examples, of modern approaches to the calculation of these quantities including recent advancements. Emphasis will be placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the modern approaches. In particular, the dependence of N(E) and /bar /nu///sub p/ on the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy will be discussed, as will the effects of and competition between first-, second- and third-chance fission in circumstances of high excitation energy. Finally, properties of neutron-rich (fission-fragment) nuclei are discussed that must be better known to calculate N(E) and /bar /nu///sub p/ with higher accuracy than is currently possible. 17 refs., 11 figs

  16. The LOFA analysis of fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.-C.; Xie, H.

    2014-01-01

    The fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor can produce energy, breed nuclear fuel, and handle the nuclear waste, etc, with the fusion neutron source striking the subcritical blanket. The passive safety system, consisting of passive residual heat removal system, passive safety injection system and automatic depressurization system, was adopted into the fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor in this paper. Modeling and nodalization of primary loop, passive core cooling system and partial secondary loop of the fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor using RELAP5 were conducted and LOFA (Loss of Flow Accident) was analyzed. The results of key transient parameters indicated that the PRHRs could mitigate the accidental consequence of LOFA effectively. It is also concluded that it is feasible to apply the passive safety system concept to fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor. (author)

  17. Measurement of prompt fission gamma-ray spectra in fast neutron-induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laborie, J.M.; Belier, G.; Taieb, J.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of prompt fission gamma-ray emission has been of major interest in reactor physics for a few years. Since very few experimental spectra were ever published until now, new measurements would be also valuable to improve our understanding of the fission process. An experimental method is currently being developed to measure the prompt fission gamma-ray spectrum from some tens keV up to 10 MeV at least. The mean multiplicity and total energy could be deduced. In this method, the gamma-rays are measured with a bismuth germanate (BGO) detector which has the advantage to present a high P/T ratio and a high efficiency compared to other gamma-ray detectors. The prompt fission neutrons are rejected by the time of flight technique between the BGO detector and a fission trigger given by a fission chamber or a scintillating active target. Energy and efficiency calibration of the BGO detector were carried out up to 10.76 MeV by means of the Al-27(p, gamma) reaction. First prompt fission gamma-ray spectrum measurements performed for the spontaneous fission of Cf-252 and for 1.7 and 15.6 MeV neutron-induced fission of U-238 at the CEA, DAM, DIF Van de Graaff accelerator, will be presented. (authors)

  18. Search for other natural fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apt, K.E.; Balagna, J.P.; Bryant, E.A.; Cowan, G.A.; Daniels, W.R.; Vidale, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Precambrian uranium ores have been surveyed for evidence of other natural fission reactors. The requirements for formation of a natural reactor direct investigations to uranium deposits with large, high-grade ore zones. Massive zones with volumes approximately greater than 1 m 3 and concentrations approximately greater than 20 percent uranium are likely places for a fossil reactor if they are approximately greater than 0.6 b.a. old and if they contained sufficient water but lacked neutron-absorbing impurities. While uranium deposits of northern Canada and northern Australia have received most attention, ore samples have been obtained from the following worldwide locations: the Shinkolobwe and Katanga regions of Zaire; Southwest Africa; Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; the Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Ranger, and El Sharana ore bodies of the Northern Territory, Australia; the Beaverlodge, Maurice Bay, Key Lake, Cluff Lake, and Rabbit Lake ore bodies and the Great Bear Lake region, Canada. The ore samples were tested for isotopic variations in uranium, neodymium, samarium, and ruthenium which would indicate natural fission. Isotopic anomalies were not detected. Criticality was not achieved in these deposits because they did not have sufficient 235 U content (a function of age and total uranium content) and/or because they had significant impurities and insufficient moderation. A uranium mill monitoring technique has been considered where the ''yellowcake'' output from appropriate mills would be monitored for isotopic alterations indicative of the exhumation and processing of a natural reactor

  19. Measurement and analysis of 14 MeV neutron-induced double-differential neutron emission cross sections needed for fission and fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dahai; Mehta, M.K.

    1988-07-01

    The main objectives of this IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme are to improve the current status of data for 14 MeV neutron-induced double-differential neutron emission cross sections for V, Cr, Fe, Nb, Ta and 238 U. The principal objectives of this first meeting were to report on the status of participants' work, to exchange experience in experimental work and to establish the future work. Considering the unsatisfactory status of the data for 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, Mo, W and Bi and their importance in fusion reactor technology participants agreed to include these isotopes in the programme

  20. Neutron transport. Physics and calculation of nuclear reactors with applications to pressurized water reactors and fast neutron reactors. 2 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussac, J.; Reuss, P.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the main physical bases of neutron theory and nuclear reactor calculation. 1) Interactions of neutrons with matter and basic principles of neutron transport; 2) Neutron transport in homogeneous medium and the neutron field: kinetic behaviour, slowing-down, resonance absorption, diffusion equation, processing methods; 3) Theory of a reactor constituted with homogeneous zones: critical condition, kinetics, separation of variables, calculation and neutron balance of the fundamental mode, one-group and multigroup theories; 4) Study of heterogeneous cell lattices: fast fission factor, resonance absorption, thermal output factor, diffusion coefficient, computer codes; 5) Operation and control of reactors: perturbation theory, reactivity, fuel properties evolution, poisoning by fission products, calculation of a reactor and fuel management; 6) Study of some types of reactors: PWR and fast breeder reactors, the main reactor types of the present French program [fr

  1. Fission fragment simulation of fusion neutron radiation effects on bulk mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Mitchell, J.B.; Guinan, M.W.; Stuart, R.N.; Borg, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    This research demonstrates the feasibility of using homogeneously-generated fission fragments to simulate high-fluence fusion neutron damage in niobium tensile specimens. This technique makes it possible to measure radiation effects on bulk mechanical properties at high damage states, using conveniently short irradiation times. The primary knock-on spectrum for a fusion reactor is very similar to that produced by fission fragments, and nearly the same ratio of gas atoms to displaced atoms is produced in niobium. The damage from fission fragments is compared to that from fusion neutrons and fission reactor neutrons in terms of experimentally measured yield strength increase, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, and calculated damage energies

  2. The resonance neutron fission on heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopach, Yu.N.; Popov, A.B.; Furman, V.I.; Alfimenkov, V.P.; Lason', L.; Pikel'ner, L.B.; ); Gonin, N.N.; Kozlovskij, L.K.; Tambovtsev, D.I.; Gagarskij, A.M.; Petrov, G.A.; Sokolov, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach to the description of the fission, similar to the well-known reaction theory and based on the helicity representation for the exit fission channels, is briefly summarized. This approach allows one to connect the multimodal fission representation with A. Bohr's concept of the fission transition states and to obtain formulae for the partial and differential fission cross sections. The formulae are used for analysis of the angular anisotropy of fragments in the neutron resonance induced fission of aligned 235 U nuclei and of the P-even angular forward-backward and right-left correlations of fragments oe the P-odd correlations caused by the interference of s- and p-wave neutron resonances [ru

  3. Space Fission Reactor Structural Materials: Choices Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T.; Leonard, Keith J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear powered spacecraft will enable missions well beyond the capabilities of current chemical, radioisotope thermal generator and solar technologies. The use of fission reactors for space applications has been considered for over 50 years, although, structural material performance has often limited the potential performance of space reactors. Space fission reactors are an extremely harsh environment for structural materials with high temperatures, high neutron fields, potential contact with liquid metals, and the need for up to 15-20 year reliability with no inspection or preventative maintenance. Many different materials have been proposed as structural materials. While all materials meet many of the requirements for space reactor service, none satisfy all of them. However, continued development and testing may resolve these issues and provide qualified materials for space fission reactors.

  4. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M.

    2011-01-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  5. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecherl, T., E-mail: thomas.buecherl@radiochemie.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) (Germany)

    2011-09-21

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  6. NECTAR—A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F. M.

    2011-09-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/ D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  7. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels

  8. Measurement of 235U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections and neutron spectrum adjusted with the activation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Kobayashi, Tooru

    1992-01-01

    The 235 U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections for 13 threshold reactions were measured with the fission plate (27 cm in diameter and 1.1 cm thick) at the heavy water thermal neutron facility of the Kyoto University Reactor. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was applied to check the deviation from the 235 U fission neutron spectrum due to the room-scattered neutrons, and it was found that the resultant spectrum was close to that of 235 U fission neutrons. Supplementally, the relations to derive the absorbed dose rates with the fission plate were also given using the calculated neutron spectra and the neutron Kerma factors. Finally, the present values of the fission spectrum-averaged cross sections were employed to adjust the 235 U fission neutron spectrum with the NEUPAC code. The adjusted spectrum showed a good agreement with the Watt-type fission neutron spectrum. (author)

  9. Fission multipliers for D-D/D-T neutron generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, T.P.; Vujic, J.L.; Koivunoro, H.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.

    2003-01-01

    A compact D-D/D-T fusion based neutron generator is being designed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to have a potential yield of 10 12 D-D n/s and 10 14 D-T n/s. Because of its high neutron yield and compact size (∼20 cm in diameter by 4 cm long), this neutron generator design will be suitable for many applications. However, some applications required higher flux available from nuclear reactors and spallation neutron sources operated with GeV proton beams. In this study, a subcritical fission multiplier with k eff of 0.98 is coupled with the compact neutron generators in order to increase the neutron flux output. We have chosen two applications to show the gain in flux due to the use of fission multipliers--in-core irradiation and out-of-core irradiation. For the in-core irradiation, we have shown that a gain of ∼25 can be achieved in a positron production system using D-T generator. For the out-of-core irradiation, a gain of ∼17 times is obtained in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using a D-D neutron generator. The total number of fission neutrons generated by a source neutron in a fission multiplier with k eff is ∼50. For the out-of-core irradiation, the theoretical maximum net multiplication is ∼30 due to the absorption of neutrons in the fuel. A discussion of the achievable multiplication and the theoretical multiplication will be presented in this paper

  10. Thermal neutron converter for irradiations with fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, F.M.; Kampfer, S.; Kastenmuller, A.; Waschkowski, W.; Bucherl, Th.; Kampfer, S.

    2007-01-01

    The new research reactor FRM II at Garching started operation in March 2004. The compact core is cooled by light water, and moderated by heavy water. Two fuel plates mounted in the heavy water tank convert thermal to fast neutrons. The fast neutron flux in the connected beam tube is up to 7 centre dot 10 8 s -1 cm -2 (depending on filters and collimation); the mean neutron energy is about 1.6 MeV. There are two irradiation rooms along the beam. The first is mainly used for medical therapy (MEDAPP facility), the second for materials characterization (NECTAR facility). At the former therapy facility RENT at the old research reactor FRM, the same beam quality was available until July 2000. Therefore, only a small program is run for the determination of the biological effectiveness of the new beam. The neutron and gamma dose rates in the medical beam are 0.54 and 0.20 Gy/min, respectively. The therapy facility MEDAPP is still under examination according to European regulations for medical devices. Full medical operation will start in 2007. The radiography and tomography facility NECTAR is in operation and aims at non-destructive inspection of objects up to 400 kg mass and 80 centre dot 80 centre dot 80 cm 3 in size. As for fission neutrons the macroscopic cross section of hydrogen is much higher than for other materials (e. g. Fe and Pb), one special application is the detection of hydrogen-containing materials (e. g. oil) in dense materials

  11. Reactor Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.

    1994-01-01

    The present status and the prospects for development of reactor neutron sources for neutron scattering research in the world are considered. The fields of application of neutron scattering relative to synchrotron radiation, the creation stages of reactors (steady state and pulsed) and their position in comparison with spallation neutron sources at present and in the foreseen future are discussed. (author). 15 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. Angular distribution of oriented nucleus fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.; Grechukhin, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of anisotropy of angular distribution of oriented 235 U nuclei thermal fission neutrons have been carried out. the neutrons were assumed to evaporate isotropically by completely accelerated fragements in the fragment system with only its small part, i. e. fission-producing neutrons, emitted at the moment of neck break. It has been found out that at low energies of neutrons Esub(n)=1-2 MeV the sensitivity of the angular distribution anisotropy to variations of spectrum of neutron evaporation from fragments and the magnitude of a share of fission-producing neutrons reaches approximately 100%, which at high energies, Esub(n) > 5 MeV it does not exceed approximately 20%. Therefore the angular distribution of fast neutrons to a greater degree of confidence may be used for restoring the angular distribution anisotropy of fragments while the angular distribution of low energy neutrons may be used for deriving information on the fission process, but only in case 6f the experiment accuracy is better than approximately 3%

  13. Photofission observations in reactor environments using selected fission-product yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for the observation of photofission in reactor environments is advanced. It is based on the in-situ observation of fission product yield. In fact, at a given in-situ reactor location, the fission product yield is simply a weighted linear combination of the photofission product yield, Y/sub gamma/, and the neutron induced fission product yield, Y/sub n. The weight factors arising in this linear combination are the photofission fraction and neutron induced fission fraction, respectively. This method can be readily implemented with established techniques for measuring in-situ reactor fission product yield. For example, one can use the method based on simultaneous irradiation of radiometric (RM) and solid state track recorder (SSTR) fission monitors. The sensitivity and accuracy and current knowledge of fission product yields. Unique advantages of this method for reactor applications are emphasized

  14. Reactor neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najzer, M.; Pauko, M.; Glumac, B.; Acquah, I.N.; Moskon, F.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of requirements and possibilities for experimental neutron spectrum determination during the reactor pressure vessel surveil lance programme is given. Fast neutron spectrum and neutron dose rate were measured in the Fast neutron irradiation facility of our TRIGA reactor. It was shown that the facility can be used for calibration of neutron dosimeters and for irradiation of samples sensitive to neutron radiation. The investigation of the unfolding algorithm ITER was continued. Based on this investigations are two specialized unfolding program packages ITERAD and ITERGS written this year. They are able to unfold data from activation detectors and NaI(T1) gamma spectrometer respectively

  15. Studying the effect of xenon poisoning on the power of the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, I.; Khattab, K.

    1999-07-01

    The uranium 235 is often used as a fuel to produce the energy in nuclear reactors. Uranium nuclei are fissioned with thermal neutrons and produce energy plus a number of neutrons. A fraction of such fission neutrons is involved in other fission with new nuclei to sustain the fission reactions. The remain fraction of the neutrons is lost from the reactor in two ways: escaped from the reactor, or absorbed with other nuclei that exist in the reactor before or produced from fission. Fission nuclei which absorb neutrons heavily are called p oison , such as Xe 135. Because Xe 135 absorbs neutrons heavily, it reduces the number of neutrons in the reactor. Hence, Xe 135 is studied explicitly in the MNSR reactor, and calculation of its negative reactivity is presented in this research during the operation, equilibrium, and after the shutting down of the reactor. (author)

  16. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  17. Fission Product Yields of 233U, 235U, 238U and 239Pu in Fields of Thermal Neutrons, Fission Neutrons and 14.7-MeV Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurec, J.; Adam, A.; de Bruyne, T.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T.; Aupiais, J.; Bersillon, O.; Le Petit, G.; Authier, N.; Casoli, P.

    2010-12-01

    The yields of more than fifteen fission products have been carefully measured using radiochemical techniques, for 235U(n,f), 239Pu(n,f) in a thermal spectrum, for 233U(n,f), 235U(n,f), and 239Pu(n,f) reactions in a fission neutron spectrum, and for 233U(n,f), 235U(n,f), 238U(n,f), and 239Pu(n,f) for 14.7 MeV monoenergetic neutrons. Irradiations were performed at the EL3 reactor, at the Caliban and Prospero critical assemblies, and at the Lancelot electrostatic accelerator in CEA-Valduc. Fissions were counted in thin deposits using fission ionization chambers. The number of fission products of each species were measured by gamma spectrometry of co-located thick deposits.

  18. Theoretical descriptions of neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    Brief descriptions are given of the observables in neutron emission in fission together with early theoretical representations of two of these observables, namely, the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) and the average prompt neutron multiplicity ν-bar p . This is followed by summaries, together with examples, of modern approaches to the calculation of these two quantities. Here, emphasis is placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the new approaches. In particular, the dependencies of N(E) and ν-bar p upon the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy are discussed. Then, recent work in multiple-chance fission and other recent work involving new measurements are presented and discussed. Following this, some properties of fission fragments are mentioned that must be better known and better understood in order to calculate N(E) and ν-bar p with higher accuracy than is currently possible. In conclusion, some measurements are recommended for the purpose of benchmarking simultaneous calculations of neutron emission and gamma emission in fission. (author). 32 refs, 26 figs

  19. Theory of neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of theoretical representations of two of the observables in neutron emission in fission is given, namely, the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) and the average prompt neutron multiplicity bar ν p . Early representations of the two observables are presented and their deficiencies are discussed. This is followed by summaries and some examples of recent theoretical models for the calculation of these quantities. Emphasis is placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the recent models. In particular, the dependencies of N(E) and bar ν p upon the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy are treated in detail for the Los Alamos model. Recent work in the calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum matrix N(E, E n ), where E n is the energy of the neutron inducing fission, is then discussed. Concluding remarks address the current status of the ability to calculate these observables with confidence, the direction of future theoretical efforts, and limitations to current (and future) approaches. This paper is an extension of a similar paper presented at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in 1996

  20. Theoretical models of neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    A brief survey of theoretical representations of two of the observables in neutron emission in fission is given, namely, the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) and the average prompt neutron multiplicity bar v p . Early representations of the two observables are presented and their deficiencies are discussed. This is followed by summaries and examples of recent theoretical models for the calculation of these quantities. Emphasis is placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the new models. In particular, the dependencies of N(E) and bar v p upon the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy are treated. Recent work in the calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum matrix N(E,E n ), where E n is the energy of the neutron inducing fission, is then discussed. Concluding remarks address the current status of our ability to calculate these observables with confidence, the direction of future theoretical efforts, and limititations to current and future calculations. Finally, recommendations are presented as to which model should be used currently and which model should be pursued in future efforts

  1. Correlation properties of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piksaikin, V.M.; Isaev, S.G.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental studies of the energy dependence of the delayed neutron parameters for various fissioning systems has shown that the behavior of a some combination of delayed neutron parameters (group relative abundances a i and half lives T i ) has a similar features. On the basis of this findings the systematics of delayed neutron experimental data for thorium, uranium, plutonium and americium isotopes have been investigated with the purpose to find a correlation of DN parameters with characteristics of fissioning system as well as a correlation between the delayed neutron parameters themselves. Below we will present the preliminary results which were obtained during this study omitting the physics interpretation of the results. (author)

  2. Ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gönnenwein Friedrich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary fission of (e,e U- and Pu- isotopes induced by cold polarized neutrons discloses some new facets of the process. In the so-called ROT effect shifts in the angular distributions of ternary particles relative to the fission fragments show up. In the so-called TRI effect an asymmetry in the emission of ternary particles relative to a plane formed by the fragment momentum and the spin of the neutron appear. The two effects are shown to be linked to the components of angular momentum perpendicular and parallel to the fission axis at the saddle point of fission. Based on theoretical models the spectroscopic properties of the collective transitional states at the saddle point are inferred from experiment.

  3. Expected value of finite fission chain lengths of pulse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianjun; Zhou Zhigao; Zhang Ben'ai

    2007-01-01

    The average neutron population necessary for sponsoring a persistent fission chain in a multiplying system, is discussed. In the point reactor model, the probability function θ(n, t 0 , t) of a source neutron at time t 0 leading to n neutrons at time t is dealt with. The non-linear partial differential equation for the probability generating function G(z; t 0 , t) is derived. By solving the equation, we have obtained an approximate analytic solution for a slightly prompt supercritical system. For the pulse reactor Godiva-II, the mean value of finite fission chain lengths is estimated in this work and shows that the estimated value is reasonable for the experimental analysis. (authors)

  4. Least squares analysis of fission neutron standard fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.; Williams, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    A least squares analysis of fission neutron standard fields has been performed using the latest dosimetry cross sections. Discrepant nuclear data are identified and adjusted spectra for 252 Cf spontaneous fission and 235 U thermal fission fields are presented

  5. Neutron Induced Capture and Fission Processes on 238U

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear data on Uranium isotopes are of crucial interest for new generation of nuclear reactors. Processes of interest are the nuclear reactions induced by neutrons and in this work mainly the capture and the fission process on 238U will be analyzed in a wide energy interval. For slow and resonant neutrons the many levels Breit – Wigner formalism is necessary. In the case of fast and very fast neutrons up to 200 MeV the nuclear reaction mechanism implemented in Talys will be used. The present evaluations are necessary in order to obtain the field of neutrons in the design of nuclear reactors and they are compared with experimental data from literature obtained from capture and (n,xn processes.

  6. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on 239Pu, 235U, 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, H.D.; Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for 99 Mo, 95 Zr, 137 Cs, 140 Ba, 141,143 Ce, and 147 Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the 147 Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by ∼5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except

  7. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - Status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R. C.; Noda, S.; Nelson, R. O.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taiebb, J.; Laurent, B.; Belier, G.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 239 Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 0.7 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date are summarized in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including measurements of fission neutrons below 0.7 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV. (authors)

  8. Prompt fission neutron spectra and average prompt neutron multiplicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.; Nix, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    We present a new method for calculating the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) and average prompt neutron multiplicity anti nu/sub p/ as functions of the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy. The method is based on standard nuclear evaporation theory and takes into account (1) the motion of the fission fragments, (2) the distribution of fission-fragment residual nuclear temperature, (3) the energy dependence of the cross section sigma/sub c/ for the inverse process of compound-nucleus formation, and (4) the possibility of multiple-chance fission. We use a triangular distribution in residual nuclear temperature based on the Fermi-gas model. This leads to closed expressions for N(E) and anti nu/sub p/ when sigma/sub c/ is assumed constant and readily computed quadratures when the energy dependence of sigma/sub c/ is determined from an optical model. Neutron spectra and average multiplicities calculated with an energy-dependent cross section agree well with experimental data for the neutron-induced fission of 235 U and the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf. For the latter case, there are some significant inconsistencies between the experimental spectra that need to be resolved. 29 references

  9. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  10. Natural fission reactors - the Oklo phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Overview describes the discovery of the site, location of the reactors and site geology and discusses the permanence of fission products, nuclear reaction control mechanisms and trace concentrations of elements that act as poisons. (Author)

  11. Fission gas behaviour in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    During irradiation, nuclear fuel changes volume, primarily through swelling. This swelling is caused by the fission products and in particular by the volatile ones such as krypton and xenon, called fission gas. Fission gas behaviour needs to be reliably predicted in order to make better use of nuclear fuel, a factor which can help to achieve the economic competitiveness required by today's markets. These proceedings communicate the results of an international seminar which reviewed recent progress in the field of fission gas behaviour in light water reactor fuel and sought to improve the models used in computer codes predicting fission gas release. State-of-the-art knowledge is presented for both uranium-oxide and mixed-oxide fuels loaded in water reactors. (author)

  12. Neutron induced current pulses in fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboas, A.L.; Buck, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism of neutron induced current pulse generation in fission chambers is discussed. By application of the calculated detector transfer function to proposed detector current pulse shapes, and by comparison with actually observed detector output voltage pulses, a credible, semi-empirical, trapezoidal pulse shape of chamber current is obtained

  13. Fission neutron output measurements at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Haight, Robert C.; Devlin, Matthew J.; Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Laptev, Alexander; O'Donnell, John M.; Taddeucci, Terry N.; Tovesson, Fredrik; Ullmann, J.L.; Wender, Stephen A.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Jandel, M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Becker, J.A.; Stoyer, M.A.; Henderson, R.; Sutton, M.; Belier, Gilbert; Chatillon, A.; Granier, Thierry; Laurent, Benoit; Taieb, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Accurate data for both physical properties and fission properties of materials are necessary to properly model dynamic fissioning systems. To address the need for accurate data on fission neutron energy spectra, especially at outgoing neutron energies below about 200 keV and at energies above 8 MeV, ongoing work at LANSCE involving collaborators from LANL, LLNL and CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel is extending the energy range, efficiency and accuracy beyond previous measurements. Initial work in the outgoing neutron energy range from 1 to 7 MeV is consistent with current evaluations and provides a foundation for extended measurements. As part of these efforts, a new fission fragment detector that reduces backgrounds and improves timing has been designed fabricated and tested, and new neutron detectors are being assessed for optimal characteristics. Simulations of experimental designs are in progress to ensure that accuracy goals are met. Results of these measurements will be incorporated into evaluations and data libraries as they become available.

  14. Determination of the fission products yields, lanthanide and yttrium, in the fission of 238U with neutrons of fission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoli, I.G.

    1981-06-01

    A radiochemical investigation is performed to measure the cumulative fission product yields of several lantanides and yttrium nuclides in the 238 U by fission neutron spectra. Natural and depleted uranium are irradiated under the same experimental conditions in order to find a way to subtract the contribution of the 235 U fission. 235 U percentage in the natural uranium was 3.5 times higher than in the depleted uranium. Uranium oxides samples are irradiated inside the core of the Argonaut Reactor, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, and the lantanides and yttrium are chemically separated. The fission products gamma activities were detected, counted and analysed in a system constituted by a high resolution Ge(Li) detector, 4096 multichannel analyser and a PDP-11 computer. Cumulative yields for fission products with half-lives between 1 to 33 hours are measured: 93 Y, 141 La, 142 La, 143 Ce and 149 Nd. The chain total yields are calculated. The cumulative fission yields measured for 93 Y, 141 La, 142 La, 143 Ce and 149 Nd are 4,49%, 4,54%, 4,95%, 4,16% and 1,37% respectively and they are in good agreement with the values found in the literature. (Author) [pt

  15. Ternary Fission of U235 by Resonance Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvitek, I.; Popov, Ju.P.; Rjabov, Ju.V.

    1965-01-01

    Recently a number of papers have appeared indicating considerable variations in the ratio of the ternary-fission cross-section to the binary-fission cross-section of U 235 on transition from one neutron resonance to another. However, such variations have not been discovered in U 233 and Pu 239 . The paper reports investigations of the ternary fission of U 235 by neutrons with an energy of 0.1 to 30 eV. Unlike other investigators of the ternary fission of U 235 , we identified the ternary-fission event by the coincidence of one of the fission fragments with a light long-range particle. This made it passible to separate ternary fissions from the possible contribution of the (n, α)reaction. The measurements were performed at the fast pulsed reactor of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research by the time-of-flight method. A flight length of 100 m was used, giving a resolution of 0.6 μs/m. Gas scintillation counters filled with xenon at a pressure of 2 atm were used to record the fission fragments and the light long-range particle. A layer of enriched U 235 ∼2 mg/cm 2 thick and ∼300 cm 2 in area was applied to an aluminium foil 20-fim thick. The scintillations from the fission fragments were recorded in the gas volume on one side of the foil and those from the light long-range particles in that on the other. In order to assess the background (e.g . coincidences of the pulse from a fragment with that from a fission gamma quantum or a proton from the (n, p) reaction in the aluminium foil), a measurement was carried out in which the volume recording the long-range particle was shielded with a supplementary aluminium filter 1-mm thick. The results obtained indicate the absence of the considerable variations in the ratio between the ternary-and binary- fission cross-sections for U 235 that have been noted by other authors. Measurements showed no irregularity in the ratio of the cross-sections in the energy range 0.1 to 0.2 eV. The paper discusses the possible effect of

  16. Delayed neutron spectra from short pulse fission of uranium-235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwater, H.F.; Goulding, C.A.; Moss, C.E.; Pederson, R.A.; Robba, A.A.; Wimett, T.F.; Reeder, P.; Warner, R.

    1986-01-01

    Delayed neutron spectra from individual short pulse (∼50 μs) fission of small 235 U samples (50 mg) were measured using a small (5 cm OD x 5 cm length) NE 213 neutron spectrometer. The irradiating fast neutron flux (∼10 13 neutrons/cm 2 ) for these measurements was provided by the Godiva fast burst reactor at the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF). A high speed pneumatic transfer system was used to transfer the 50 mg 235 U samples from the irradiation position near the Godiva assembly to a remote shielded counting room containing the NE 213 spectrometer and associated electronics. Data were acquired in sixty-four 0.5 s time bins and over an energy range 1 to 7 MeV. Comparisons between these measurements and a detailed model calculation performed at Los Alamos is presented

  17. Fission and activation of uranium by fashion-plasma neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Hochl, F.; McFarland, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    Disks of enriched and depleted uranium were irradiated by neutrons from the D-D fusions in a dense plasma-focus. A fission yield of 10 6 fissions-cm -3 in U 235 per pulse was determined with Ge(Li) gamme-ray spectrometry. Activation of U 238 caused increased beta activity after the plasma-neutron irradiation but alpha-particle spectrometry showed Pu 239 production was negligible. In addition, with a disk of lithium in the apparatus, 13.3 MeV neutrons from 7 Li(d,n) 8 Be was observed with a 80-m time-of-flight neutron detector. Dense plasma focuses are now operated not only in a single coaxial gun, but also in improved geometries, such as the hypocycloidal pinch and the staged plasma focus, from which a multiple plasma-focus array suitable for experimental verification of, and eventuel development into a fusion-fission hybrid reactor could be produced. (orig.) [de

  18. Hefei experimental hybrid fusion-fission reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Lijian; Luan Guishi; Xu Qiang

    1992-03-01

    A new concept of hybrid reactor is introduced. It uses JET-like(Joint European Tokamak) device worked at sub-breakeven conditions, as a source of high energy neutrons to induce a blanket fission of depleted uranium. The solid breeding material and helium cooling technique are also used. It can produce 100 kg of 239 Pu per year by partial fission suppressed. The energy self-sustained of the fusion core is not necessary. Plasma temperature is maintained by external 20 MW ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) and 10 MW ECRF (electron cyclotron resonance frequency) heating. A steady state plasma current at 1.5 Ma is driven by 10 MW LHCD (lower hybrid current driven). Plasma density will be kept by pellet injection. ICRF can produce a high energy tail in ion distribution function and lead to significant enhancement of D-T reaction rate by 2 ∼ 5 times so that the neutron source strength reaches to the level of 1 x 10 19 n/s. This system is a passive system. It's power density is 10 W/cm 3 and the wall loading is 0.6 W/cm 2 that is the lower limitation of fusion and fission technology. From the calculation of neutrons it could always be in sub-critical and has intrinsic safety. The radiation damage and neutron flux distribution on the first wall are also analyzed. According to the conceptual design the application of this type hybrid reactor earlier is feasible

  19. Systematics of neutron-induced fission yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blachot, J.; Brissot, R.

    1983-10-01

    The main characteristics of the mass and charge distributions for thermal neutron induced fission of actinides are reviewed. We show that these distributions can be reasonably reproduced with only 24 data as input. We use a representation where the element yields together with the most probable mass Ap(Z) play the dominant role. The ability of this model to calculate mass yields for the fission of not yet measured actinides is also shown. The influence of the excitation energy of the fissile system on charge and mass distribution is also discussed

  20. Radiochemical studies on fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on nuclear chemistry; topics considered include: recoil range and kinetic energy distribution in the thermal neutron ftssion of /sup 245/Cm; mass distribution and recoil range measurements in the reactor neutron-induced fission of /sup 232/U; fission yields in the thermal neutron fission of /sup 241/PU highly asymmetric binary fission of uranium induced by reactor neutrons; and nuclear charge distribution in low energy fission. ( DHM)

  1. Pulsed neutron uranium borehole logging with prompt fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivens, H.M.; Smith, G.W.; Jensen, D.H.

    1976-01-01

    The gross count natural gamma log normally used for uranium borehole logging is seriously affected by disequilibrium. Methods for the direct measurement of uranium, such as neutron logging, which are not affected by disequilibrium have been the object of considerable effort in recent years. This paper describes a logging system for uranium which uses a small accelerator to generate pulses of 14 MeV neutrons to detect and assay uranium by the measurement of prompt fission neutrons in the epithermal energy range. After an initial feasibility study, a prototype logging probe was built for field evaluation which began in January 1976. Physical and operational characteristics of the prototype probe, the neutron tube-transformer assembly, and the neutron tube are described. In logging operations, only the epithermal prompt fission neutrons detected between 250 microseconds to 2500 microseconds following the excitation neutron pulse are counted. Comparison of corrected neutron logs with the conventional gross count natural gamma logs and the chemical assays of cores from boreholes are shown. The results obtained with this neutron probe clearly demonstrate its advantages over the gross count natural gamma log, although at this time the accuracy of the neutron log assay is not satisfactory under some conditions. The necessary correction factors for various borehole and formation parameters are being determined and, when applied, should improve the assay accuracy

  2. Transmutation of Tc-99 in fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloosterman, J.L.; Li, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    Transmutation of Tc-99 in three different types of fission reactors is considered: A heavy water reactor, a fast reactor and a light water reactor. For the first type a CANDU reactor was chosen, for the second one the Superphenix reactor, and for the third one a PWR. The three most promising Tc-99 transmuters are the fast reactor with a moderated subassembly in the inner core, a fast reactor with a non-moderated subassembly in the inner core, and a heavy water reactor with Tc-99 target pins in the moderator between the fuel bundles. Transmutation half lives of 15 to 25 years can be achieved, with yearly transmuted Tc-99 masses of about 100 kg at a thermal reactor power of about 3000 MW. (orig.)

  3. Fission product release from SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnden-Gillis, A M.C. [Queen` s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Increasing radiation fields at several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with highly enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel have begun to interfere with the daily operation of these reactors. To investigate this phenomenon, samples of reactor container water and gas from the headspace were obtained at four SLOWPOKE-2 reactor facilities and examined by gamma ray spectroscopy methods. These radiation fields are due to the circulation of fission products within the reactor container vessel. The most likely source of the fission product release is an area of uranium-bearing material exposed to the coolant at the end weld line which originated at the time of fuel fabrication. The results of this study are compared with observations from an underwater visual examination of one core and the metallographic examination of archived fuel elements. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  4. Advanced nuclear fuel production by using fission-fusion hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kusayer, T.A.; Sahin, S.; Abdulraoof, M.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts are made at the College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh to lay out the main structure of a prototype experimental fusion and fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor blanket in cylindrical geometry. The geometry is consistent with most of the current fusion and hybrid reactor design concepts in respect of the neutronic considerations. Characteristics of the fusion chamber, fusion neutrons and the blanket are provided. The studies have further shown that 1 GWe fission-fusion reactor can produce up to 957 kg/year which is enough to fuel five light water reactors of comparable power. Fuel production can be increased further. 29 refs

  5. Calculating the mass distribution of heavy nucleus fission product by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, A.N.; Koldobskij, A.B.; Kolobashkin, V.M.; Semenova, E.V.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of calculating the fission product mass yields by neutrons which are necessary for performing nucleus physical calculations in designing nuclear reactor cores is considered. The technique is based on the approximation of fission product mass distribution over the whole mass range by five Gauss functions. New analytical expressions for determining energy weights of used gaussians are proposed. The results of comparison of experimental data with calculated values for fission product mass obtained for reference processes in the capacity of which the fission reactions are chosen: 233 U, 235 U fission by thermal neutrons, 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U by fission spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons and for 232 Th fission reactions by 11 MeV neutrons and 238 U by 7.7 MeV neutrons. On the basis of the analysis of results obtained the conclusion is drawn on a good agreement of fission product mass yield calculation values obtained using recommended values of mass distribution parameters with experimental data [ru

  6. New fission-neutron-spectrum representation for ENDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1982-04-01

    A new representation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum is proposed for use in the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). The proposal is made because a new theory exists by which the spectrum can be accurately predicted as a function of the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy. Thus, prompt fission neutron spectra can be calculated for cases where no measurements exist or where measurements are not possible. The mathematical formalism necessary for application of the new theory within ENDF is presented and discussed for neutron-induced fission and spontaneous fission. In the case of neutron-induced fission, expressions are given for the first-chance, second-chance, third-chance, and fourth-chance fission components of the spectrum together with that for the total spectrum. An ENDF format is proposed for the new fission spectrum representation, and an example of the use of the format is given

  7. Prompt fission neutron spectra of n + 235U above the (n, nf) fission threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Nengchuan; Chen Yongjing; Liu Tingjin; Jia Min

    2015-01-01

    Calculations of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) from the 235 U(n, f) reaction were performed with a semi-empirical method for En = 7.0 and 14.7 MeV neutron energies. The total PFNS were obtained as a superposition of (n, xnf) pre-fission neutron spectra and post-fission spectra of neutrons which were evaporated from fission fragments, and these two kinds of spectra were taken as an expression of the evaporation spectrum. The contributions of (n, xnf) fission neutron spectra on the calculated PFNS were discussed. The results show that emission of one or two neutrons in the (n, nf) or (n, 2nf) reactions influences the PFNS shape, and the neutron spectra of the (n, xnf) fission-channel are soft compared with the neutron spectra of the (n, f) fission channel. In addition, analysis of the multiple-chance fission component showed that second-chance fission dominates the PFNS with an incident neutron energy of 14.7 MeV whereas first-chance fission dominates the 7 MeV case. (authors)

  8. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, D.M.; Burns, K.; Campbell, L.W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M.S., E-mail: markskos@gmail.com; Orrell, J.L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L.S.; Wootan, D.W.

    2015-03-11

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  9. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, Robert C.; Noda, Shusaku; Nelson, Ronald O.; O' Donnell, John M.; Devlin, Matt; Chatillon, Audrey; Granier, Thierry; Taieb, Julien; Laurent, Benoit; Belier, Gilbert; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 239 Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  10. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, S.H. de.

    1980-03-01

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author) [pt

  11. Neutron emission during acceleration of 252Cf fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batenkov, O.I.; Blinov, M.V.; Blinov, A.B.; Smirnov, S.N.

    1991-01-01

    We investigate neutron emission during acceleration of fission fragments in the process of spontaneous fission of 252 Cf. Experimental angular and energy distributions of neutrons are compared with the results of calculations of neutron evaporation during fragment acceleration. (author). 8 refs, 3 figs

  12. Fission-neutrons source with fast neutron-emission timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusev, G., E-mail: rusev@lanl.gov; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.M.; Jandel, M.

    2016-05-01

    A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. The time is provided by registering the fission fragments in a layer of a thin scintillation film with a signal rise time of 1 ns. The scintillation light output is measured by two silicon photomultipliers with rise time of 0.5 ns. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements using it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  13. Mirror hybrid (fusion--fission) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.S.; Devoto, R.S.; Galloway, T.R.; Fink, J.H.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.; Rao, S.

    1977-10-01

    The reference mirror hybrid reactor design performed by LLL and General Atomic is summarized. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing fissile fuel for consumption in fission power reactors. As in the past, we have emphasized the use of existing technology where possible and a minimum extrapolation of technology otherwise. The resulting reactor may thus be viewed as a comparatively near-term goal of the fusion program, and we project improved performance for the hybrid in the future as more advanced technology becomes available

  14. Semiconductor research with reactor neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro

    1992-01-01

    Reactor neutrons play an important role for characterization of semiconductor materials as same as other advanced materials. On the other hand reactor neutrons bring about not only malignant irradiation effects called radiation damage, but also useful effects such as neutron transmutation doping and defect formation for opto-electronics. Research works on semiconductor materials with the reactor neutrons of the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) are briefly reviewed. In this review, a stress is laid on the present author's works. (author)

  15. Fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections of some threshold reactions on cadmium: production feasibility of no-carrier-added 103Pd in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, I.A.; Subhani, M.S.; Zaidi, J.H.; Arif, M.

    2006-01-01

    Systematic studies on fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections of some threshold reactions like (n, p) and (n, α) on cadmium were carried out using the activation technique in combination with radiochemical separations and high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. Special attention was paid to the formation of 103 Pd via the 106 Cd(n,a α) 103 Pd reaction since it is an important therapeutic radionuclide. At a fast flux neutron density of 7.5 x 10 13 cm 2 s -1 and an irradiation time of 120 h, using 100% enriched 106 Cd target 340 MBq of no-carrier-added 103 Pd per batch could be produced. The method is thus suitable for medium-scale production of this radionuclide. (orig.)

  16. Calibration of a special neutron dosemeter based on solid-state track detectors and fission radiators in various neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Krusche, M.; Schuricht, V.

    1980-01-01

    The calibration of a personnel neutron dosemeter in different neutron fields is described. The badge-like dosemeter contains 5 detectors: polycarbonate foil (10 μm, Makrofol KG), 232 Th, natural uranium, natural uranium with boron, and natural uranium with cadmium. Detector sensitivity and calibration factors have been calculated and measured in radiation fields of 252 Cf fission neutrons, WWR-S reactor neutrons with and without Cd and Fe shielding, 3-MeV (d,t) generator neutrons, and 238 PuBe neutrons. Measurement range and achievable accuracy are discussed from the point of view of applying the dosemeter in routine and emergency uses

  17. distributions for the thermal neutron induced fission of 234U

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Adili A.

    2016-01-01

    In addition, the analysis of thermal neutron induced fission of 234U(n,f will be discussed. Currently analysis of data is ongoing, originally taken at the ILL reactor. The experiment is of particular interest since no measurement exist of the mass and energy distributions for this system at thermal energies. One main problem encountered during analysis was the huge background of 235U(nth,f. Despite the negligible isotopic traces in the sample, the cross section difference is enormous. Solution to this parasitic background will be highlighted.

  18. Conceptual design of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor for transmutation of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, L.J.; Wu, Y.C.; Yang, Y.W.; Wu, Y.; Luan, G.S.; Xu, Q.; Guo, Z.J.; Xiao, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of the transmutation of long-lived radioactive waste using fusion-fission hybrid reactors, we are studying all the possible types of blanket, including a comparison of the thermal and fast neutron spectrum blankets. Conceptual designs of a small tokamak hybrid blanket with small inventory of actinides and fission products are presented. The small inventory of wastes makes the system safer. The small hybrid reactor system based on a fusion core with experimental parameters to be realized in the near future can effectively transmute actinides and fission products at a neutron wall loading of 1MWm -2 . An innovative energy system is also presented, including a fusion driver, fuel breeder, high level waste transmuter, fission reactor and so on. An optimal combination of all types of reactor is proposed in the system. ((orig.))

  19. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  20. Correlated Production and Analog Transport of Fission Neutrons and Photons using Fission Models FREYA, FIFRELIN and the Monte Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4® .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Jérôme M.; Petit, Odile; Chebboubi, Abdelhazize; Litaize, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Fission modeling in general-purpose Monte Carlo transport codes often relies on average nuclear data provided by international evaluation libraries. As such, only average fission multiplicities are available and correlations between fission neutrons and photons are missing. Whereas uncorrelated fission physics is usually sufficient for standard reactor core and radiation shielding calculations, correlated fission secondaries are required for specialized nuclear instrumentation and detector modeling. For coincidence counting detector optimization for instance, precise simulation of fission neutrons and photons that remain correlated in time from birth to detection is essential. New developments were recently integrated into the Monte Carlo transport code TRIPOLI-4 to model fission physics more precisely, the purpose being to access event-by-event fission events from two different fission models: FREYA and FIFRELIN. TRIPOLI-4 simulations can now be performed, either by connecting via an API to the LLNL fission library including FREYA, or by reading external fission event data files produced by FIFRELIN beforehand. These new capabilities enable us to easily compare results from Monte Carlo transport calculations using the two fission models in a nuclear instrumentation application. In the first part of this paper, broad underlying principles of the two fission models are recalled. We then present experimental measurements of neutron angular correlations for 252Cf(sf) and 240Pu(sf). The correlations were measured for several neutron kinetic energy thresholds. In the latter part of the paper, simulation results are compared to experimental data. Spontaneous fissions in 252Cf and 240Pu are modeled by FREYA or FIFRELIN. Emitted neutrons and photons are subsequently transported to an array of scintillators by TRIPOLI-4 in analog mode to preserve their correlations. Angular correlations between fission neutrons obtained independently from these TRIPOLI-4 simulations, using

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, A.M.; Vernon, H.C.

    1961-05-30

    A neutronic reactor is described. It has a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water and having a K-factor greater than unity which is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water having a Kfactor less than unity.

  2. Curves and tables of neutron cross sections of fission product nuclei in JENDL-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo [ed.

    1992-06-15

    Neutron cross sections of 172 nuclei in the fission product region stored in JENDL-3 are shown in graphs and tables. The evaluation work of these nuclei was made by the Fission Product Nuclear Data Working Group of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, in the neutron energy region from 10{sup {minus}5} eV to 20 MeV. Almost of the cross section data reproduced in graphs in this report. The cross section averaged over 38 energy intervals are listed in a table. Shown in order tables are thermal cross sections, resonance integrals, Maxwellian neutron flux average cross sections, fission spectrum average cross sections, 14-MeV cross sections, one group average cross sections in neutron flux of typical types of fission reactors and average cross sections in the 30-keV Maxwellian spectrum.

  3. Curves and tables of neutron cross sections of fission product nuclei in JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo

    1992-06-01

    Neutron cross sections of 172 nuclei in the fission product region stored in JENDL-3 are shown in graphs and tables. The evaluation work of these nuclei was made by the Fission Product Nuclear Data Working Group of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, in the neutron energy region from 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV. Almost all the cross section data are reproduced in graphs in this report. The cross section averaged over 38 energy intervals are listed in a table. Shown in other tables are thermal cross sections, resonance integrals, Maxwellian neutron flux average cross sections, fission spectrum average cross sections, 14-MeV cross sections, one group average cross sections in neutron flux of typical types of fission reactors and average cross sections in the 30-keV Maxwellian spectrum. (author)

  4. Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, I.; Murty, K. L.

    2010-09-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-W reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses, and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This article addresses the material requirements for these advanced fission reactor types, specifically addressing structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas.

  5. Conceptual design of neutron diagnostic systems for fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, T.; Kaneko, J.; Nakazawa, M.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron measurement in fusion experimental reactors is very important for burning plasma diagnostics and control, monitoring of irradiation effects on device components, neutron source characterization for in-situ engineering tests, etc. A conceptual design of neutron diagnostic systems for an ITER-like fusion experimental reactor has been made, which consists of a neutron yield monitor, a neutron emission profile monitor and a 14-MeV spectrometer. Each of them is based on a unique idea to meet the required performances for full power conditions assumed at ITER operation. Micro-fission chambers of 235 U (and 238 U) placed at several poloidal angles near the first wall are adopted as a promising neutron yield monitor. A collimated long counter system using a 235 U fission chamber and graphite neutron moderators is also proposed to improve the calibration accuracy of absolute neutron yield determination

  6. The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fission product release from nuclear rocket propulsion reactor fuel is an important consideration for nuclear rocket development and application. Fission product data from the last six reactors of the Rover program are collected in this paper to provide as basis for addressing development and testing issues. Fission product loss from the fuel will depend on fuel composition and reactor design and operating parameters. During ground testing, fission products can be contained downstream of the reactor. The last Rover reactor tested, the Nuclear Furnance, was mated to an effluent clean-up system that was effective in preventing the discharge of fission products into the atmosphere

  7. Safety device for nuclear fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownlee, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A plurality of radially arranged and neutron absorbing baffles are stacked in vertical sets under the fuel core assemblies, and the whole enclosed in a bottle shaped containment vessel. The radially arranged baffles of each set extend vertically, and each set has double the number of baffles as the set above it in the stack. A melt-down of a fuel core assembly drops the fissioning nuclear fuel into the stacked sets of baffles, there, as it passes through, to be progressively divided, redivided and dispersed in smaller and smaller masses between the doubling number of baffles in safe fuel pellet size. Neutron absorbing containment prevents contamination of the environment and together with cooling means stops fissioning of fuel

  8. {sup 235}U(n,F) prompt fission neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, M.V.; Tetereva, N.A. [Joint Institute of Nuclear and Energy Research, Minsk-Sosny (Belarus); Pronyaev, V.P.; Kagalenko, A.B. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Capote, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Granier, T.; Morillon, B. [CEA, Centre DAM-IIe de France, 91 - Arpajon (France); Hambsch, F.J. [EC-JRC Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Sublet, J.C. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    The longstanding problem of inconsistency of integral thermal data testing and differential prompt fission neutron spectra data (PFNS) is mostly due to rather poor fits of differential PFNS data in major data libraries. The measured database is updated by using modern standards including Manhart's evaluation of the spontaneous fission neutron spectra of {sup 252}Cf(sf). That largely removes the inconsistency of older thermal neutron-induced PFNS measurements with newest data of JRC IRMM by Hambsch et al. (2009). A phenomenological approach, developed by Kornilov et al. (1999), for the first-chance fission and extended for the emissive fission domain by Maslov et al. (2005) is calibrated at E{sub th} to predict both the PFNS average energy and PFNS shape up to 20 MeV. The latter is extremely important, since rather close values in fact correspond to quite discrepant spectra shapes, which influences reactor neutronics strongly. The proposed phenomenological representation of the PFNS reproduces both soft and hard energy tails of {sup 235}U(n{sub th},F) PFNS at thermal incident neutron energy E{sub th}. In the first-chance and emissive fission domain evaluated PFNS are consistent with the data by Ethvignot et al. (2005). A compiled MF=5 Endf/B-formatted file of the {sup 235}U(n,F) PFNS largely removes the inconsistencies of the evaluated differential PFNS with integral data benchmarks. Almost perfect fits are attained for available differential PFNS data from E{sub th} up to E{sub n}=14.7 MeV, with few exceptions at E{sub n}=2.9 and E{sub n}=5 MeV. Fast integral critical experiment like GODIVA or Flattop benchmarks might be reproduced almost with the same accuracy as with the PFNS of the major data libraries. That reveals a rather delicate compensation effect, since present and previous PFNS shapes are drastically different from each other. Thermal assemblies benchmarking reveals positive biases in k(eff), which might be attributed to the influence of

  9. Calculation of the distribution of the escaping from a fissionable sample neutrons number when introducing one fission neutron in that sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorlet, J.

    1991-01-01

    A describing algorithm furnishes the probabilities of having exactly N escaping neutrons in the descent of one fission neutron, using the punctual reactor model. Calculations can be performed even for N-values greater than 1000. Numerical results show that discrete neutrons counting is unfit to obtain the N mean value, even for very far subcritical devices. That mean value is still very used in the existing theoretical studies, because its obvious correlation with the device effective multiplication coefficient. For that reason modelling coincidence neutrons counting is not suitable using statistical moments approach, but only using probabilities it selves [fr

  10. Calculations on neutron irradiation damage in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho; Shiraishi, Kensuke

    1976-01-01

    Neutron irradiation damage calculations were made for Mo, Nb, V, Fe, Ni and Cr. Firstly, damage functions were calculated as a function of neutron energy with neutron cross sections of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and (n,2n) and (n,γ) reactions filed in ENDF/B-III. Secondly, displacement damage expressed in displacements per atom (DPA) was estimated for neutron environments such as fission spectrum, thermal neutron reactor (JMTR), fast breeder reactor (MONJU) and two fusion reactors (The Conceptual Design of Fusion Reactor in JAERI and ORNL-Benchmark). then, damage cross section in units of dpa. barn was defined as a factor to convert a given neutron fluence to the DPA value, and was calculated for the materials in the above neutron environments. Finally, production rates of helium and hydrogen atoms were calculated with (n,α) and (n,p) cross sections in ENDF/B-III for the materials irradiated in the above reactors. (auth.)

  11. Comparison of Thermal Neutron Flux Measured by Uranium 235 Fission Chamber and Rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector in MTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lyoussi, A.; Geslot, B.; Malo, J.-Y.; Carcreff, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.

    2013-06-01

    Thermal neutron flux is one of the most important nuclear parameter to be measured on-line in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). In particular two types of sensors with different physical operating principles are commonly used: self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) and fission chambers with uranium 235 coating. This work aims to compare on one hand the thermal neutron flux evaluation given by these two types of sensors and on the other hand to compare these evaluations with activation dosimeter measurements, which are considered as the reference for absolute neutron flux assessment. This study was conducted in an irradiation experiment, called CARMEN-1, performed during 2012 in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France). The CARMEN-1 experiment aims to improve the neutron and photon flux and nuclear heating measurements in MTRs. In this paper we focus on the thermal neutron flux measurements performed in CARMEN-1 experiment. The use of fission chambers to measure the absolute thermal neutron flux in MTRs is not very usual. An innovative calibration method for fission chambers operated in Campbell mode has been developed at the CEA Cadarache (France) and tested for the first time in the CARMEN-1 experiment. The results of these measurements are discussed, with the objective to measure with the best accuracy the thermal neutron flux in the future Jules Horowitz Reactor. (authors)

  12. Modeling delayed neutron monitoring systems for fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, W.L.; Tang, E.L.

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop a general expression relating the count rate of a delayed neutron monitoring system to the introduction rate of fission fragments into the sodium coolant of a fast breeder reactor. Most fast breeder reactors include a system for detecting the presence of breached fuel that permits contact between the sodium coolant and the mixed oxide fuel. These systems monitor for the presence of fission fragments in the sodium that emit delayed neutrons. For operational reasons, the goal is to relate the count rate of the delayed neutron monitor to the condition of the breach in order that appropriate action might be taken

  13. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, Dana Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  14. 238U subthreshold neutron induced fission cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Difilippo, F.C.; Perez, R.B.; De Saussure, G.; Olsen, D.K.; Ingle, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    High resolution measurements of the 238 U neutron induced fission cross section are reported for neutron energies between 600 eV and 2 MeV. The average subthreshold fission cross section between 10 and 100 keV was found to be 44 +- 6 μb

  15. Reference and standard benchmark field consensus fission yields for U.S. reactor dosimetry programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, D.M.; Helmer, R.G.; Greenwood, R.C.; Rogers, J.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Popek, R.J.; Kellogg, L.S.; Lippincott, E.P.; Hansen, G.E.; Zimmer, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Measured fission product yields are reported for three benchmark neutron fields--the BIG-10 fast critical assembly at Los Alamos, the CFRMF fast neutron cavity at INEL, and the thermal column of the NBS Research Reactor. These measurements were carried out by participants in the Interlaboratory LMFBR Reaction Rates (ILRR) program. Fission product generation rates were determined by post-irradiation analysis of gamma-ray emission from fission activation foils. The gamma counting was performed by Ge(Li) spectrometry at INEL, ANL, and HEDL; the sample sent to INEL was also analyzed by NaI(Tl) spectrometry for Ba-140 content. The fission rates were determined by means of the NBS Double Fission Ionization Chamber using thin deposits of each of the fissionable isotopes. Four fissionable isotopes were included in the fast neutron field measurements; these were U-235, U-238, Pu-239, and Np-237. Only U-235 was included in the thermal neutron yield measurements. For the fast neutron fields, consensus yields were determined for three fission product isotopes--Zr-95, Ru-103, and Ba-140. For these fission product isotopes, a separately activated foil was analyzed by each of the three gamma counting laboratories. The experimental standard deviation of the three independent results was typically +- 1.5%. For the thermal neutron field, a consensus value for the Cs-137 yield was also obtained. Subsidiary fission yields are also reported for other isotopes which were studied less intensively (usually by only one of the participating laboratories). Comparisons with EBR-II fast reactor yields from destructive analysis and with ENDF/B recommended values are given

  16. Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinhua; Guo Haiping; Mou Yunfeng; Zheng Pu; Liu Rong; Yang Xiaofei; Yang Jian

    2013-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established. It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium. The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D + beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode. The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-Ⅵ data file. The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(α, β) thermal scattering model, so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors. (authors)

  17. Prompt neutrons from {sup 236}U fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldeman, J W; Musgrove, A.R. de L.; Walsch, R L

    1971-03-01

    Measurements were made of prompt neutron emission in the thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U. The mean neutron emission per fragment was obtained for particular values of the fragment mass and total kinetic energy. A direct neutron counting method was employed and a comparison made with data from previous experiments of this type. (author)

  18. Search for sp-interference effect in emission of prompt neutrons of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U fission by thermal polarized neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Danilyan, G V; Pavlov, V S; Fedorov, A V

    2001-01-01

    The results of the experiment for the search of the sp-interference effect in the distribution of the prompt neutrons of the sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U fission by thermal polarized neutrons are presented. The experiment is carried out on the polarized neutrons beam of the MIFI reactor. The scheme of the installation and the flight time spectrum are presented

  19. Determination of procedures for transmutation of fission product wastes by fusion neutrons. Volume 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, G.P.

    1980-12-01

    This study is concerned with the engineering aspects of the transmutation of fission products utilizing neutrons generated in fusion reactors. It is assumed that fusion reactors, although not yet developed, will be available around the turn of the century. Therefore, early studies of this type are appropriate as a guide to the large amount of further investigations that will be needed to fully evaluate this concept. Not all of the radioactive products from light water reactors can be economically transmuted, but it appears that the most hazardous can. This requires that fission-product wastes must first be separated into a number of fractions, and in some instances this must be accomplished with extremely high separation factors. A review of current commercial separation processes and of promising methods that are now in the laboratory stage indicate that the necessary processes can most likely be developed but will require an active and sustained development program. Current fusion reactor concepts were examined as to their suitability for transmuting the separated fission wastes. It was concluded that the long-lived fission products were most amenable to transmutation. The medium-lived fission products, Cs-137 and Sr-90, require higher neutron fluxes than are available in the most developed fusion reactor concepts. Concepts which are less developed may eventually be adaptable as transmuters of these fission products

  20. JENDL-4.0 benchmarking for fission reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Go; Okumura, Keisuke; Sugino, Kazuteru; Nagaya, Yasunobu; Yokoyama, Kenji; Kugo, Teruhiko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Okajima, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Benchmark testing for the newly developed Japanese evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 is carried out by using a huge amount of integral data. Benchmark calculations are performed with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code and with the deterministic procedure, which has been developed for fast reactor analyses in Japan. Through the present benchmark testing using a wide range of benchmark data, significant improvement in the performance of JENDL-4.0 for fission reactor applications is clearly demonstrated in comparison with the former library JENDL-3.3. Much more accurate and reliable prediction for neutronic parameters for both thermal and fast reactors becomes possible by using the library JENDL-4.0. (author)

  1. The electronuclear cycle: from fission to new reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belier, G.; Cugnon, J.; Lapoux, V.; Liatard, E.; Porquet, Marie-Genevieve; Rudolf, G.

    2006-09-01

    The Joliot Curie School trains each year, and since 1981, PhD students, post-Doctorates and researchers on scientific breakthroughs performed in a topic related to nuclear physics, in a broad range. These proceedings brings together the 11 lectures given at the 2006 session of Joliot Curie School on the topic of the electronuclear cycle: - Fission: from phenomenology to theory (Berger, J.F.); - Physics of nuclear reactors (Baeten, P.); - Data modeling and evaluation (Bauge, E.; Hilaire, S.); - Measurement of cross sections of interest for minor actinides incineration (Jurado, B.); - Spallation data and modelling for hybrid reactors (Boudard, A.); - Nuclear wastes: overview (Billard, I.); - Long living nuclear wastes transmutation processes and feasibility (Varaine, F.); - Hybrid reactors: recent advances for a demonstrator (Billebaud, A.); - Systems of the future and strategy (David, S.); - Non-nuclear energies (Nifenecker, H.); - Fundamental physics with ultracold neutrons (Protasov, K). The last section is a compilation of abstracts of presentations given by Young searchers' (Young searchers' seminars)

  2. Neutron induced fission of 237Np – status, challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruskov Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is an increased interest in a complete study of the neutron-induced fission of 237Np. This is due to the need of accurate and reliable nuclear data for nuclear science and technology. 237Np is generated (and accumulated in the nuclear reactor core during reactor operation. As one of the most abundant long-lived isotopes in spent fuel (“waste”, the incineration of 237Np becomes an important issue. One scenario for burning of 237Np and other radio-toxic minor actinides suggests they are to be mixed into the fuel of future fast-neutron reactors, employing the so-called transmutation and partitioning technology. For testing present fission models, which are at the basis of new generation nuclear reactor developments, highly accurate and detailed neutron-induced nuclear reaction data is needed. However, the EXFOR nuclear database for 237Np on neutron-induced capture cross-section, σγ, and fission cross-section, σf, as well as on the characteristics of capture and fission resonance parameters (Γγ, Γf, σoΓf, fragments mass-energy yield distributions, multiplicities of neutrons vn and γ-rays vγ, has not been updated for decades.

  3. Tritium chemistry in fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Masson, M.; Briec, M.

    1986-09-01

    We are interested in the behaviour of tritium inside the solids where it is generated both in the case of fission nuclear reactor fuel elements, and in that of blankets of future fusion reactor. In the first case it is desirable to be able to predict whether tritium will be found in the hulls or in the uranium oxide, and under what chemical form, in order to take appropriate steps for it's removal in reprocessing plants. In fusion reactors breeding large amounts of tritium and burning it in the plasma should be accomplished in as short a cycle as possible in order to limit inventories that are associated with huge activities. Mastering the chemistry of every step is therefore essential. Amounts generated are not of the same order of magnitude in the two cases studied. Ternary fissions produce about 66 10 13 Bq (18 000 Ci) per year of tritium in a 1000 MWe fission generator, i.e., about 1.8 10 10 Bq (0.5 Ci) per day per ton of fuel

  4. Theory of neutron slowing down in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H; Dunworth, J V

    2013-01-01

    The Theory of Neutron Slowing Down in Nuclear Reactors focuses on one facet of nuclear reactor design: the slowing down (or moderation) of neutrons from the high energies with which they are born in fission to the energies at which they are ultimately absorbed. In conjunction with the study of neutron moderation, calculations of reactor criticality are presented. A mathematical description of the slowing-down process is given, with particular emphasis on the problems encountered in the design of thermal reactors. This volume is comprised of four chapters and begins by considering the problems

  5. Neutron analysis of a hybrid system fusion-fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorantes C, J. J.; Francois L, J. L.

    2011-11-01

    The use of energy at world level implies the decrease of natural resources, reduction of fossil fuels, in particular, and a high environmental impact. In view of this problem, an alternative is the energy production for nuclear means, because up to now is one of the less polluting energy; however, the nuclear fuel wastes continue being even a problem without being solved. For the above mentioned this work intends the creation of a device that incorporates the combined technologies of fission and nuclear fusion, called Nuclear Hybrid Reactor Fusion-Fission (HRFF). The HRFF has been designed theoretically with base in experimental fusion reactors in different parts of the world like: United States, Russia, Japan, China and United Kingdom, mainly. The hybrid reactor model here studied corresponds at the Compact Nuclear Facility Source (CNFS). The importance of the CNFS resides in its feasibility, simple design, minor size and low cost; uses deuterium-tritium like main source of neutrons, and as fuel can use the spent fuel of conventional nuclear reactors, such as the current light water reactors. Due to the high costs of experimental research, this work consists on simulating in computer a proposed model of CNFS under normal conditions of operation, to modify the arrangement of the used fuel: MOX and IMF, to analyze the obtained results and to give final conclusions. In conclusion, the HRFF can be a versatile system for the management of spent fuel of light water reactors, so much for the possibility of actinides destruction, like for the breeding of fissile material. (Author)

  6. Tensile property changes of metals and irradiated to low doses with fission, fusion and spallation neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Hamilton, M.L.; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the effects of the neutron energy spectrum in low dose irradiations on the microstructures and mechanical properties of metals. Radiation effects due to low doses of spallation neutrons are compared directly to those produced by fission and fusion neutrons. Yield stress changes of pure Cu, alumina-dispersion-strengthened Cu and AISI 316 stainless steel irradiated at 36-55 C in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) are compared with earlier results of irradiations at 90 C using 14 MeV D-T fusion neutrons at the Rotating Target Neutron Source and fission reactor neutrons in the Omega West Reactor. At doses up to 0.04 displacements per atom (dpa), the yield stress changes due to the three quite different neutron spectra correlate well on the basis of dpa in the stainless steel and the Cu alloy. However, in pure Cu, the measured yield stress changes due to spallation neutrons were anomalously small and should be verified by additional irradiations. With the exception of pure Cu, the low dose, low temperature experiments reveal no fundamental differences in radiation hardening by fission, fusion or spallation neutrons when compared on the basis of dpa

  7. A method for prediction of prompt fission neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grashin, A.F.; Lepeshkin, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    Three-parameter formula for the prompt-fission-neutron integral spectrum is derived from a thermodynamical model. Two parameters, scission-neutron weight p = 11 % and anisotropy factor for accelerated fragments b = 10 %, are determined from experimental data, the same values being assumed for any type of fission. The thermodynamical theory provides the value of the third parameter, temperature τ, thus prognozing neutron spectrum and average energy with an error about 1 %. (author)

  8. Utilization of fission reactors for fusion engineering testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fission reactors can be used to conduct some of the fusion nuclear engineering tests identified in the FINESSE study. To further define the advantages and disadvantages of fission testing, the technical and programmatic constraints on this type of testing are discussed here. This paper presents and discusses eight key issues affecting fission utilization. Quantitative comparisons with projected fusion operation are made to determine the technical assets and limitations of fission testing. Capabilities of existing fission reactors are summarized and compared with technical needs. Conclusions are then presented on the areas where fission testing can be most useful

  9. BR2 reactor neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neve de Mevergnies, M.

    1977-01-01

    The use of reactor neutron beams is becoming increasingly more widespread for the study of some properties of condensed matter. It is mainly due to the unique properties of the ''thermal'' neutrons as regards wavelength, energy, magnetic moment and overall favorable ratio of scattering to absorption cross-sections. Besides these fundamental reasons, the impetus for using neutrons is also due to the existence of powerful research reactors (such as BR2) built mainly for nuclear engineering programs, but where a number of intense neutron beams are available at marginal cost. A brief introduction to the production of suitable neutron beams from a reactor is given. (author)

  10. Nuclear materials for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.; Schumacher, G.

    1992-01-01

    This volume brings together 47 papers from scientists involved in the fabrication of new nuclear fuels, in basic research of nuclear materials, their application and technology as well as in computer codes and modelling of fuel behaviour. The main emphasis is on progress in the development of non -oxide fuels besides reporting advances in the more conventional oxide fuels. The two currently performed large reactor safety programmes CORA and PHEBUS-FP are described in invited lectures. The contributions review basic property measurements, as well as the present state of fuel performance modelling. The performance of today's nuclear fuel, hence UO 2 , at high burnup is also reviewed with particular emphasis on the recently observed phenomenon of grain subdivision in the cold part of the oxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called 'rim' effect. Similar phenomena can be simulated by ion implantation in order to better elucidate the underlying mechanism and reviews on high resolution electron microscopy provide further information. The papers will provide a useful treatise of views, ideas and new results for all those scientists and engineers involved in the specific questions of current nuclear waste management

  11. Fusion-Fission hybrid reactors and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-09-01

    New options for the development of the nuclear energy economy which might become available by a successful development of fusion-breeders or fusion-fission hybrid power reactors, identified and their nonproliferative attributes are discussed. The more promising proliferation-resistance ettributes identified include: (1) Justification for a significant delay in the initiation of fuel processing, (2) Denaturing the plutonium with 238 Pu before its use in power reactors of any kind, and (3) Making practical the development of denatured uranium fuel cycles and, in particular, denaturing the uranium with 232 U. Fuel resource utilization, time-table and economic considerations associated with the use of fusion-breeders are also discussed. It is concluded that hybrid reactors may enable developing a nuclear energy economy which is more proliferation resistant than possible otherwise, whileat the same time, assuring high utilization of t he uranium and thorium resources in an economically acceptable way. (author)

  12. Dynamic of fission and quasi-fission revealed by pre-scission neutron evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D.J.

    1991-06-01

    The dependence of pre-scission neutron multiplicities (ν-pre) on the mass-split and total kinetic energy (TKE) in fusion-fission and quasi-fission has been measured for a wide range of projectile-target combinations. the data indicate that the fusion-fission time scale is shorter for asymmetric splits than for symmetric splits, whilst there is no dependence on TKE. For quasi-fission reactions induced using 64 Ni projectiles, ν-pre falls rapidly with increasing TKE, indicating that these neutrons are emitted near to or after scission. A new interpretation of both neutron multiplicities and mean energies (the neutron clock-thermometer) allows the extraction of time scales with much less uncertainty than previously, and also gives information about the deformation from which the neutrons are emitted. 15 refs., 13 figs

  13. Study of the number of neutrons produced by fission of {sup 239}Pu; Etude du nombre de neutrons produits par la fission de {sup 239}Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Study of the number of neutrons produced by fission of {sup 239}Pu. The counting by coincidence of fissions and neutrons produced by these fissions allows the study of the variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by {nu} fission. In the first chapter, it studied the variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by {sup 239}Pu fission with the energy of the incident neutron. A description of the experiment is given: a spectrometer with a crystal of sodium chloride or beryllium (mounted on a goniometer) is used, a fission chamber containing 10 mg of {sup 239}Pu and the neutron detection system constituted of BF{sub 3} counters which are enriched in {sup 10}B. In the second part, the counting by coincidence of fissions and neutrons produced by the same fission and received by two different groups of counters allow the determination of a relationship between the root mean square and the average of neutron number produced by fission. The variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission of {sup 239}Pu is studied when we change from a thermal spectra of neutrons to a fission spectra of incident neutrons. Finally, when separating in two different part the fission chamber, it is possible to measure the mean number of neutrons emitted from fission of two different sources. It compared the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 233}U. (M.P.)

  14. Application of Nonnegative Tensor Factorization for neutron-gamma discrimination of Monte Carlo simulated fission chamber’s output signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounia Laassiri

    Full Text Available For efficient exploitation of research reactors, it is important to discern neutron flux distribution inside the reactor with the best possible precision. For this reason, fission and ionization chambers are used to measure the neutron field. In these arrays, the sequences of the neutron interaction points in the fission chamber can correctly be identified in order to obtain true neutron energies emitted by nuclei of interest. However, together with the neutrons, gamma-rays are also emitted from nuclei and thereby affect neutron spectra. The originality of this study consists in the application of tensor based blind source separation methods to extract independent components from signals recorded at the fission chamber preamplifier’s output. The objective is to achieve software neutron-gamma discrimination using Nonnegative Tensor Factorization tools. For reasons of nuclear safety, we first simulate the neutron flux inside the TRIGA Mark II Reactor using Monte Carlo methods under Geant4 platform linked to Garfield++. Geant4 simulations allow the fission chamber construction whereas linking the model to Garfield++ permits to simulate drift parameters from the ionization of the filling gas, which is not possible otherwise. Keywords: Fission chamber (FC, Geant4, Garfield++, Neutron-gamma discrimination, Nonnegative Tensor Factorization (NTF

  15. Fission rate measurements in fuel plate type assembly reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The methods, materials and equipment have been developed to allow extensive and precise measurement of fission rate distributions in water moderated, U-Al fuel plate assembly type reactor cores. Fission rate monitors are accurately positioned in the reactor core, the reactor is operated at a low power for a short time, the fission rate monitors are counted with detectors incorporating automated sample changers and the measurements are converted to fission rate distributions. These measured fission rate distributions have been successfully used as baseline information related to the operation of test and experimental reactors with respect to fission power and distribution, fuel loading and fission experiments for approximately twenty years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 7 refs., 8 figs

  16. Transient coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor using the Transient Fission Matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureau, A., E-mail: laureau.axel@gmail.com; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Rubiolo, P.R.; Allibert, M.; Aufiero, M.

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic ‘Transient Fission Matrix’ approach coupled to the CFD OpenFOAM code. • Fission Matrix interpolation model for fast spectrum homogeneous reactors. • Application for coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor. • Load following, over-cooling and reactivity insertion transient studies. • Validation of the reactor intrinsic stability for normal and accidental transients. - Abstract: In this paper we present transient studies of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This generation IV reactor is characterized by a liquid fuel circulating in the core cavity, requiring specific simulation tools. An innovative neutronic approach called “Transient Fission Matrix” is used to perform spatial kinetic calculations with a reduced computational cost through a pre-calculation of the Monte Carlo spatial and temporal response of the system. Coupled to this neutronic approach, the Computational Fluid Dynamics code OpenFOAM is used to model the complex flow pattern in the core. An accurate interpolation model developed to take into account the thermal hydraulics feedback on the neutronics including reactivity and neutron flux variation is presented. Finally different transient studies of the reactor in normal and accidental operating conditions are detailed such as reactivity insertion and load following capacities. The results of these studies illustrate the excellent behavior of the MSFR during such transients.

  17. Transient coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor using the Transient Fission Matrix approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laureau, A.; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Rubiolo, P.R.; Allibert, M.; Aufiero, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutronic ‘Transient Fission Matrix’ approach coupled to the CFD OpenFOAM code. • Fission Matrix interpolation model for fast spectrum homogeneous reactors. • Application for coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor. • Load following, over-cooling and reactivity insertion transient studies. • Validation of the reactor intrinsic stability for normal and accidental transients. - Abstract: In this paper we present transient studies of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This generation IV reactor is characterized by a liquid fuel circulating in the core cavity, requiring specific simulation tools. An innovative neutronic approach called “Transient Fission Matrix” is used to perform spatial kinetic calculations with a reduced computational cost through a pre-calculation of the Monte Carlo spatial and temporal response of the system. Coupled to this neutronic approach, the Computational Fluid Dynamics code OpenFOAM is used to model the complex flow pattern in the core. An accurate interpolation model developed to take into account the thermal hydraulics feedback on the neutronics including reactivity and neutron flux variation is presented. Finally different transient studies of the reactor in normal and accidental operating conditions are detailed such as reactivity insertion and load following capacities. The results of these studies illustrate the excellent behavior of the MSFR during such transients.

  18. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [INL

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  19. Survey of neutron spectra generated by the fission of heavy nuclei induced by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovchikova, G.N.; Trufanov, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    A review of neutron fission spectra measurements is presented. This review and the results of this analysis was performed with the participation of the authors. It is shown that there is a need for additional measurements of the energy and angular distributions of secondary neutrons in order to improve the understanding of the neutron emission mechanism in fission. (author). 21 refs, 6 figs

  20. Simultaneous measurement of neutrons and fission fragments of thermal neutron fission of U-233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itsuro Kimura; Katsuhisa Nishio; Yoshihiro Nakagome

    2000-01-01

    The multiplicity and the energy of prompt neutrons from the fragments for 233 U(n th , f) were measured as functions of fragment mass and total kinetic energy. Average neutron energy against the fragment mass showed a nearly symmetric distribution about the half mass division with two valleys at 98 and 145 u. The slope of the neutron multiplicity with total kinetic energy depended on the fragment mass and showed the minimum at about 130 u. The obtained neutron data were applied to determine the total excitation energy of the system, and the resulting value in the typical asymmetric fission lied between 22 and 25 MeV. The excitation energy agreed with that determined by subtracting the total kinetic energy from the Q-value within 1 MeV, thus satisfied the energy conservation. In the symmetric fission, where the mass yield was drastically suppresses, the total excitation energy is significantly large and reaches to about 40 MeV, suggesting that fragment pairs are preferentially formed in a compact configuration at the scission point [ru

  1. A proposed standard on medical isotope production in fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenter, R. E.; Brown, G. J.; Holden, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    Authors Robert E. Sehenter, Garry Brown and Charles S. Holden argue that a Standard for 'Medical Isotope Production' is needed. Medical isotopes are becoming major components of application for the diagnosis and treatment of all the major diseases including all forms of cancer, heart disease, arthritis, Alzheimer's, among others. Current nuclear data to perform calculations is incomplete, dated or imprecise or otherwise flawed for many isotopes that could have significant applications in medicine. Improved data files will assist computational analyses to design means and methods for improved isotope production techniques in the fission reactor systems. Initial focus of the Standard is expected to be on neutron cross section and branching data for both fast and thermal reactor systems. Evaluated and reviewed tables giving thermal capture cross sections and resonance integrals for the major target and product medical isotopes would be the expected 'first start' for the 'Standard Working Group'. (authors)

  2. Teratogenic and embryolethal effects in mice of fission-spectrum neutrons and γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairnie, A.B.; Grahn, D.; Rayburn, H.B.; Williamson, F.S.; Brown, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    Fission-spectrum neutrons from the Janus reactor at Argonne National Laboratory were compared with γ-rays in terms of their relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for embryolethal and teratogenic effects in mice. No evidence was found of any processes that were abnormally sensitive to neutrons. The RBE for killing embryos and producing abnormal embryos or specific abnormalities was between 2 and 3. This is close to the values found in other systems for processes involving cell killing. (U.S.)

  3. Prompt neutron emission; Emission des neutrons prompts de fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    It is shown that Ramanna and Rao's tentative conclusion that prompt fission neutrons are emitted (in the fragment system) preferentially in the direction of fragment motion is not necessitated by their angular distribution measurements, which are well explained by the usual assumptions of isotropic emission with a Maxwell (or Maxwell-like) emission spectrum. The energy distribution (Watt spectrum) and the angular distribution, both including the effects of anisotropic emission, are given. (author) [French] On montre que la conclusion experimentale de Ramanna et Rao selon laquelle les neutrons prompts de fission sont emis (dans le systeme de reference des fragments) preferentiellement dans la direction du mouvement du fragment, ne decoule pas necessairement de leurs mesures de distribution angulaire. Celles-ci sont bien expliquees par l'hypothese classique de l'emission isotrope et d'un spectre d'emission maxwellien (ou quasi-maxwellien). On donne la distribution en energie (ou spectre de Watt) et la distribution angulaire, comprenant toutes les deux les effets d'emission anisotrope. (auteur)

  4. A delayed neutron technique for measuring induced fission rates in fresh and burnt LWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K.A., E-mail: kajordan@gmail.co [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Behaviour, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Behaviour, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-04-01

    The LIFE-PROTEUS program at the Paul Scherrer Institut is being undertaken to characterize the interfaces between burnt and fresh fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. Techniques are being developed to measure fission rates in burnt fuel following re-irradiation in the zero-power PROTEUS research reactor. One such technique utilizes the measurement of delayed neutrons. To demonstrate the feasibility of the delayed neutron technique, fresh and burnt UO{sub 2} fuel samples were irradiated in different positions in the PROTEUS reactor, and their neutron outputs were recorded shortly after irradiation. Fission rate ratios of the same sample irradiated in two different positions (inter-positional) and of two different samples irradiated in the same position (inter-sample) were derived from the measurements and compared with Monte Carlo predictions. Derivation of fission rate ratios from the delayed neutron measured signal requires correcting the signal for the delayed neutron source properties, the efficiency of the measurement setup, and the time dependency of the signal. In particular, delayed neutron source properties strongly depend on the fissile and fertile isotopes present in the irradiated sample and must be accounted for when deriving inter-sample fission rate ratios. Measured inter-positional fission rate ratios generally agree within 1{sigma} uncertainty (on the order of 1.0%) with the calculation predictions. For a particular irradiation position, however, a bias of about 2% is observed and is currently under investigation. Calculated and measured inter-sample fission rate ratios have C/E values deviating from unity by less than 1% and within 2{sigma} of the statistical uncertainties. Uncertainty arising from delayed neutron data is also assessed, and is found to give an additional 3% uncertainty factor. The measurement data indicate that uncertainty is overestimated.

  5. EPRTM Reactor neutron instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, Maxime; SALA, Stephanie

    2013-06-01

    The core safety during operation is linked, in particular, to the respect of criteria related to the heat generated in fuel rods and to the heat exchange between the rods and the coolant. This local power information is linked to the power distribution in the core. In order to evaluate the core power distribution, the EPR TM reactor relies on several types of neutron detectors: - ionization chambers located outside the vessel and used for protection and monitoring - a fixed in-core instrumentation based on Cobalt Self Powered Neutron Detectors used for protection and monitoring - a mobile reference in-core instrumentation based on Vanadium aero-balls This document provides a description of this instrumentation and its use in core protection, limitation, monitoring and control functions. In particular, a description of the detectors and the principles of their signal generation is supplied as well as the description of the treatments related to these detectors in the EPR TM reactor I and C systems (including periodical calibration). (authors)

  6. Delayed neutron yield from fast neutron induced fission of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piksaikin, V.M.; Kazakov, L.E.; Isaev, S.G.; Roshchenko, V.A.; Goverdovski, A.A.; Tertytchnyi, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    The measurements of the total delayed neutron yield from fast neutron induced fission of 238 U were made. The experimental method based on the periodic irradiation of the fissionable sample by neutrons from a suitable nuclear reaction had been employed. The preliminary results on the energy dependence of the total delayed neutron yield from fission of 238 U are obtained. According to the comparison of experimental data with our prediction based on correlation properties of delayed neutron characteristics, it is concluded that the value of the total delayed neutron yield near the threshold of (n,f) reaction is not a constant. (author)

  7. Induction of chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes by fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcia Augusta da; Coelho, Paulo Rogerio Pinto; Bartolini, Paolo; Okazaki, Kayo

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation (low-LET) are well known and cytogenetic analyses of irradiated human lymphocytes have been widely applied to biological dosimetry. However, much less is known about chromosome aberrations induced by densely ionizing radiation (high LET), such as that of alpha particles or neutrons. Such particles induce DNA strand breaks, as well as chromosome breakage and rearrangements of high complexity. This damage is more localized and less efficiently repaired than after X- or γ-ray irradiation. This preferential production of complex aberrations by densely ionizing radiation is related to the unique energy deposition patterns, which produces highly localized multiple DNA damage at the chromosomal level. A better knowledge of the interactions between different types of radiation and cellular DNA is of importance, not only from the radiobiological viewpoint but also for dosimetric and therapeutic purposes. The objective of the present study was to analyse the cytogenetic effects of fission neutrons on peripheral blood lymphocytes in order to evaluate structural and numerical aberrations and number of cells in the different mitotic cycles. So, blood samples from five healthy donors, 22-25 years old, of both sexes, were irradiated in the Research Reactor IEA-R1 of our Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP) with thermal and fast neutrons at doses of 0.2; 0.3; 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. The γ contribution to the total absorbed dose was about 30%. These doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosemeters: LiF-600 (for neutrons) and LiF-700 (for γ-rays). The data concerning structural aberrations were evaluated with regard to three parameters: percentage of cells with aberrations, number of aberrations/cell and number of dicentric/cell. The cytogenetic results showed an increase in the three parameters after irradiation with neutrons, as a function of radiation dose. Apparently, there was no influence of neutrons on the kinetics of cellular

  8. The study of prompt neutron spectra of 238U fission induced by fast neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Anli; Bai Xixiang; Wang Yufeng; Wang Xiaozhong; Men Jiangchen; Huang Shengnian

    1990-01-01

    The measurements of prompt neutron time-of-flight spectra of U fission induced by 11 MeV neutrons were carried out at HI-13 Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator Laboratory in 1989. The block diagram of the electronics is shown. A fission neutron TOF spectrum for the sixth section of the fission plates and the left detector at low bias is given. The data accumulation time is 60 h

  9. Chemical immobilization of fission products reactive with nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.N.; Kaznoff, A.I.; Clukey, H.V.

    1975-01-01

    This invention teaches a method of immobilizing deleterious fission products produced in nuclear fuel materials during nuclear fission chain reactions through the use of additives. The additives are disposed with the nuclear fuel materials in controlled quantities to form new compositions preventing attack of reactor components, especially nuclear fuel cld, by the deleterious fission products. (Patent Office Record)

  10. Neutron emission as a probe of fusion-fission and quasi-fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Pre- and post scission neutron yeilds have been measured as a function of projectile mass, compound nucleus fissility, and fission mass-split and total kinetic energy (TKE) for 27 fusion-fission and quasi-fission reactions induced by beams of 16,18 O, 40 Ar and 64 Ni. A new method of interpretation of experimental pre-scission neutron multiplicities ν-pre and mean kinetic energies ε ν allows the extraction of fission time scales with much less uncertainty than previously, all fusion-fission results being consistent with a dynamical time scale of (35±15) x 10 -21 s for symmetric fission. All reactions show that ν-pre falls quite rapidly with increasing mass-asymmetry; evidence is presented that for fusion-fission reactions this is partly due to a reduction of the dynamical fission time scale with mass-asymmetry. For quasi-fission, the data indicate that the pre-scission multiplicity and mean neutron kinetic energy are very sensitive to the final mass-asymmetry, but that the time scale is virtually independent of mass-asymmetry. It is concluded that for fusion-fission there is no dependence of ν-pre on TKE, whilst for 64 Ni-induced quasi-fission reactions, a strong increase of ν-pre with decreasing TKE is observed, probably largely caused by neutron emission during the acceleration time of the fission fragments in these fast reactions. Interpretation of post-scission multiplicities in terms of fragment excitation energies leads to deduced time scales consistent with those determined from the pre-scission data. 54 refs., 17 tabs., 25 figs

  11. History of the discovery of uranium fission by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simane, C.

    1989-01-01

    The history is briefly described of the discovery of uranium fission by neutrons, based on the texts of original scientific studies, memories or biographies of those who participated in the discovery and of their contemporaries. Obstacles that stood in the way of the discovery are discussed. It is stated that only a few scientists contributed to the discovery of uranium fission. The fission process itself still remains subject of physical research which studies its detailed laws. (Z.M.). 2 tabs., 16 refs

  12. Asymmetry in ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons and fission mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunakov, V.E.; Gennenvajn, F.; Dzhessinger, P.; Mutterer, M.; Petrov, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    The results of measuring the P-odd, P-even (right-left) and T-odd asymmetries of the charged particles emission in the double and ternary fission, induced by the polarized neutrons, are considered. It is shown, what kind of information on the mechanism of the ternary nuclear fission may be obtained from the theoretical analysis of these data [ru

  13. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Kotov

    2012-01-01

    On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  14. Prompt neutron spectrum of the spontaneous fission of californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamyatnin, Yu.S.; Kroshkin, N.I.; Korostylev, V.A.; Nefedov, V.N.; Ryazanov, D.K.; Starostov, B.I.; Semenov, A.F.

    1976-01-01

    The californium-252 spontaneous fission neutron spectrum was measured in the energy range of 0.01 to 10 MeV by the time-of-flight technique using various neutron detectors. The measurements of 252 Cf neutron spectrum at energies of 0.01 to 5 MeV were performed as a function of fission fragment kinetic energy. The mean neutron spectrum energy in the range of 0.7 to 10 MeV was found from the results of measurements. The irregularity in the 252 Cf neutron spectrum in the neutron energy range of less than 0.7 MeV compared to theoretical values is discussed. The mechanism of 252 Cf neutron emission is also discussed on the basis of neutron yield angle measurements. 12 references

  15. Neutron threshold activation detectors (TAD) for the detection of fissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Stevenson, John; King, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    Prompt fission neutrons are one of the strongest signatures of the fission process. Depending on the fission inducing radiation, their average number ranges from 2.5 to 4 neutrons per fission. They are more energetic and abundant, by about 2 orders of magnitude, than the delayed neutrons (≈3 vs. ≈0.01) that are commonly used as indicators for the presence of fissionable materials. The detection of fission prompt neutrons, however, has to be done in the presence of extremely intense probing radiation that stimulated them. During irradiation, the fission stimulation radiation, X-rays or neutrons, overwhelms the neutron detectors and temporarily incapacitate them. Consequently, by the time the detectors recover from the source radiation, fission prompt neutrons are no longer emitted. In order to measure the prompt fission signatures under these circumstances, special measures are usually taken with the detectors such as heavy shielding with collimation, use of inefficient geometries, high pulse height bias and gamma-neutron separation via pulse-shape discrimination with an appropriate organic scintillator. These attempts to shield the detector from the flash of radiation result in a major loss of sensitivity. It can lead to a complete inability to detect the fission prompt neutrons. In order to overcome the blinding induced background from the source radiation, the detection of prompt fission neutrons needs to occur long after the fission event and after the detector has fully recovered from the source overload. A new approach to achieve this is to detect the delayed activation induced by the fission neutrons. The approach demonstrates a good sensitivity in adverse overload situations (gamma and neutron "flash") where fission prompt neutrons could normally not be detected. The new approach achieves the required temporal separation between the detection of prompt neutrons and the detector overload by the neutron activation of the detector material. The technique

  16. Neutron threshold activation detectors (TAD) for the detection of fissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Stevenson, John; King, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Prompt fission neutrons are one of the strongest signatures of the fission process. Depending on the fission inducing radiation, their average number ranges from 2.5 to 4 neutrons per fission. They are more energetic and abundant, by about 2 orders of magnitude, than the delayed neutrons (∼3 vs. ∼0.01) that are commonly used as indicators for the presence of fissionable materials. The detection of fission prompt neutrons, however, has to be done in the presence of extremely intense probing radiation that stimulated them. During irradiation, the fission stimulation radiation, X-rays or neutrons, overwhelms the neutron detectors and temporarily incapacitate them. Consequently, by the time the detectors recover from the source radiation, fission prompt neutrons are no longer emitted. In order to measure the prompt fission signatures under these circumstances, special measures are usually taken with the detectors such as heavy shielding with collimation, use of inefficient geometries, high pulse height bias and gamma-neutron separation via pulse-shape discrimination with an appropriate organic scintillator. These attempts to shield the detector from the flash of radiation result in a major loss of sensitivity. It can lead to a complete inability to detect the fission prompt neutrons. In order to overcome the blinding induced background from the source radiation, the detection of prompt fission neutrons needs to occur long after the fission event and after the detector has fully recovered from the source overload. A new approach to achieve this is to detect the delayed activation induced by the fission neutrons. The approach demonstrates a good sensitivity in adverse overload situations (gamma and neutron 'flash') where fission prompt neutrons could normally not be detected. The new approach achieves the required temporal separation between the detection of prompt neutrons and the detector overload by the neutron activation of the detector material. The technique

  17. Neutron threshold activation detectors (TAD) for the detection of fissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozani, Tsahi, E-mail: tgozani@rapiscansystems.com [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Stevenson, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Prompt fission neutrons are one of the strongest signatures of the fission process. Depending on the fission inducing radiation, their average number ranges from 2.5 to 4 neutrons per fission. They are more energetic and abundant, by about 2 orders of magnitude, than the delayed neutrons ({approx}3 vs. {approx}0.01) that are commonly used as indicators for the presence of fissionable materials. The detection of fission prompt neutrons, however, has to be done in the presence of extremely intense probing radiation that stimulated them. During irradiation, the fission stimulation radiation, X-rays or neutrons, overwhelms the neutron detectors and temporarily incapacitate them. Consequently, by the time the detectors recover from the source radiation, fission prompt neutrons are no longer emitted. In order to measure the prompt fission signatures under these circumstances, special measures are usually taken with the detectors such as heavy shielding with collimation, use of inefficient geometries, high pulse height bias and gamma-neutron separation via pulse-shape discrimination with an appropriate organic scintillator. These attempts to shield the detector from the flash of radiation result in a major loss of sensitivity. It can lead to a complete inability to detect the fission prompt neutrons. In order to overcome the blinding induced background from the source radiation, the detection of prompt fission neutrons needs to occur long after the fission event and after the detector has fully recovered from the source overload. A new approach to achieve this is to detect the delayed activation induced by the fission neutrons. The approach demonstrates a good sensitivity in adverse overload situations (gamma and neutron 'flash') where fission prompt neutrons could normally not be detected. The new approach achieves the required temporal separation between the detection of prompt neutrons and the detector overload by the neutron activation of the detector

  18. Assay of low-enriched uranium using spontaneous fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Fainberg, A.

    1980-01-01

    Low-enriched uranium oxide in bulk containers can be assayed for safeguards purposes, using the neutrons from spontaneous fission of 238 U as a signature, to complement enrichment and mass measurement. The penetrability of the fast fission neutrons allows the inner portion of bulk samples to register. The measurement may also be useful for measuring moisture content, of significance in process control. The apparatus used can be the same as for neutron correlation counting for Pu assay. The neutron multiplication observed in 238 U is of intrinsic interest

  19. Measurement of the 235U/238U fission cross section ratio in the 235U fission neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimi-Garakani, D.; Bagheri-Darbandi, M.

    1983-06-01

    Fission cross section ratio of 235 U to 238 U has been measured in the fast neutron field generated by the 235 U fission plate installed on the thermal column of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) with a Makrofol solid state nuclear track detector. The experiments were carried out with a set of total six enriched 235 U and depleted 238 U deposits with different masses and Makrofol films of 0.025mm and 0.060mm thicknesses. The chemically etched tracks were counted by an optical microscope. No significant differences were observed with the thin and the thick films. The results showed that the average fission cross section ratio is 3.83+-0.25. (author)

  20. Assessment of the high temperature fission chamber technology for the French fast reactor program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Geslot, B.; Domenech, T.; Normand, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA (France)

    2011-07-01

    High temperature fission chambers are key instruments for the control and protection of the sodium-cooled fast reactor. First, the developments of those neutron detectors, which are carried out either in France or abroad are reviewed. Second, the French realizations are assessed with the use of the technology readiness levels in order to identify tracks of improvement. (authors)

  1. Applications: fission, nuclear reactors. Fission: the various ways for reactors and cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    1997-01-01

    A historical review is presented concerning the various nuclear reactor systems developed in France by the CEA: the UNGG (graphite-gas) system with higher CO 2 pressures, bigger fuel assemblies and powers higher than 500 MW e, allowed by studies on reactor physics, cladding material developments and reactor optimization; the fast neutron reactor system, following the graphite-gas development, led to the Superphenix reactor and important progress in simulation based on experiment and return of experience; and the PWR system, based on the american license, which has been successfully accommodated to the french industry and generates up to 75% of the electric power in France

  2. Measurements of fission cross-sections and of neutron production rates; Mesures de sections efficaces de fission et du nombre de neutrons prompts emis par fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billaud, P; Clair, C; Gaudin, M; Genin, R; Joly, R; Leroy, J L; Michaudon, A; Ouvry, J; Signarbieux, C; Vendryes, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    a) Measurements of neutron induced fission cross-sections in the low energy region. The variation of the fission cross sections of several fissile isotopes has been measured and analysed, for neutron energies below 0,025 eV. The monochromator was a crystal spectrometer used in conjunction with a mechanical velocity selector removing higher order Bragg reflections. The fissile material was laid down on the plates of a fission chamber by painting technic. An ionization chamber, having its plates coated with thin {sup 10}B layers, was used as the neutron flux monitor. b) Measurement of the fission cross section of {sup 235}U. We intend to measure the variation of the neutron induced fission cross section of {sup 235}U over the neutron energy range from 1 keV by the time of flight method. The neutron source is the uranium target of a pulsed 28 MeV electron linear accelerator. The detector is a large fission chamber, with parallel plates, containing about 10 g of {sup 235}U (20 deposits of 25 cm diameter). The relative fission data were corrected for the neutron spectrum measured with a set of BF{sub 3} proportional counters. c) Mean number {nu} of neutrons emitted in neutron induced fission. We measured the value of {nu} for several fissile isotopes in the case of fission induced by 14 MeV neutrons. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by D (t, n) {alpha} reaction by means of a 300 kV Cockcroft Walton generator. (author)Fren. [French] a) Mesures de sectionficaces de fission a basse energie. Nous avons mesure et analyse la variation de la section efficace de fission de divers isotopes fissiles pour des neutrons d'energie inferieure a 0,025 eV. Le monochromateur est constitue par un spectrometre a cristal auquel est associe un selecteur mecanique destine a eliminer les diffractions de Bragg d'ordre superieur au premier. Le materiau fissile est contenu dans une chambre a fission sous forme de depots realises par peinture; une chambre d'ionisation a depots minces de B{sub 10

  3. T-odd angular correlations in the emission of prompt gamma rays and neutrons in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    Study of the T-odd three-vector correlation in the emission of prompt neutrons from 235 U fission by polarized cold neutrons has been continued at the facility MEPHISTO of the FRM II reactor (Technical University of Munich). The sought correlation was not found within experimental error of 2.3 × 10 −5 . The upper limit for the asymmetry coefficient has been set to vertical bar D n vertical bar −5 at 99% confidence level, whereas for ternary fission correlation coefficient D α = (170±20) × 10 −5 . This limit casts doubt on a model that explains the three-vector correlation in ternary fission by the Coriolis mechanism. At the same time, five-vector correlation in the emission of prompt fission neutrons has been measured, which describes the rotation of the fissioning nucleus at the moment it breaks (ROT effect). At the angle 22.5° to the fission axis, the correlation coefficient was found to be (1.57 ± 0.20) × 10 −4 , while at the angle of 67.5° it is zero within the experimental uncertainty. The existence of ROT effect in the emission of prompt fission neutrons can be explained by the anisotropy of neutron emission in the rest frame of the fragment (fission fragments are aligned with respect to the axis of deformation of the fissioning nucleus), similar to the mechanism of ROT effect in the emission of prompt γ-rays.

  4. Neutron source for a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiromasa.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To easily increase a start-up power of a reactor without irradiation in other reactors. Structure: A neutron source comprises Cf 252 , a natural antimony rod, a layer of beryllium, and a vessel of neutron source. On upper and lower portion of Cf 252 are arranged natural antimony rods, which are surrounded by the Be layer, the entirety being charged into the vessel. The Cf 252 may emit neutron, has a half life more than a period of operating cycle of the reactor and is less deteriorated even irradiated by radioactive rays while being left within the reactor. The natural antimony rod is radioactivated by neutron from Cf 252 and neutron as reactor power increases to emit γ rays. The Be absorbs γ rays to emit the neutron. The antimony rod is irradiated within the reactor. Further, since the Cf 252 is small in neutron absorption cross section, it is hard to be deteriorated even while being inserted within the reactor. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Fission and r-process nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, Samuel Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Fission plays a crucial role for the r-process nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers. Due to the high neutron densities achieved in this astrophysical scenario the sequence of neutron captures and beta decays that constitutes the r process produces superheavy neutron rich nuclei that become unstable against fission. Fission determines thus the heaviest nuclei that can be produced by the r process and the fission yields shape the abundances of lighter nuclei. But despite the key role of fission the sensitivity of the r-process nucleosynthesis to uncertainties in fission predictions has not been explored. Nowadays there are only few set of fission rates suited for r-process calculations and most of them rely on a simplified treatment of the fission process. In this thesis we go beyond these approximations and compute the fission properties of r-process nuclei using the energy density functional approach. Fission is described as a tunneling process where the nucleus ''moves'' in a collective space characterized by coordinates describing the nuclear shape. Thus fission depends on the evolution of the energy with the deformation but also on the inertia due to the motion in the collective space. This is analogous to the quantum mechanical tunneling of a particle inside a potential well. In our study the relevant quantities for the description of the fission process are consistently computed for 3642 nuclei following the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov theory with constraining operators. We perform an extensive benchmark against the available experimental data and explore the variations of the fission properties along the superheavy landscape. We find that while collective inertias have a strong impact in the fission probabilities of light nuclei their role becomes less relevant in r -process nuclei. Within the statistical model we compute the neutron induced stellar reaction rates relevant for the r-process nucleosynthesis. These sets of stellar reaction

  6. Ternary fission of spontaneously fissile uranium isomers excited by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarenko, V.E.; Molchanov, Y.D.; Otroshchenko, G.A.; Yan'kov, G.B.

    1989-01-01

    Spontaneously fissile isomers (SFI) of uranium were excited in the reactions 236,238 U(n,n') at an average neutron energy 4.5 MeV. A pulsed electrostatic accelerator and time analysis of the fission events were used. Fission fragments were detected by the scintillation method, and long-range particles from fission were detected by an ionization method. The relative probability of fission of nuclei through a spontaneously fissile isomeric state was measured: (1.30±0.01)·10 -4 ( 236 U) and (1.48±0.02)·10 -4 ( 238 U). Half-lives of the isomers were determined: 121±2 nsec (the SFI 236 U) and 267±13 nsec (the SFI 238 U). In study of the ternary fission of spontaneously fissile isotopes of uranium it was established that the probability of the process amounts to one ternary fission per 163±44 binary fissions of the SFI 236 U and one ternary fission per 49±14 binary fissions of the SFI 238 U. The substantial increase of the probability of ternary fission of SFI of uranium in comparison with the case of ternary fission of nuclei which are not in an isomeric state may be related to a special nucleon configuration of the fissile isomers of uranium

  7. Identification of Fissionable Materials Using the Tagged Neutron Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keegan, R.P.; Hurley, J.P.; Tinsley, J.R.; Trainham, R.

    2009-01-01

    This summary describes experiments to detect and identify fissionable materials using the tagged neutron technique. The objective of this work is to enhance homeland security capability to find fissionable material that may be smuggled inside shipping boxes, containers, or vehicles. The technique distinguishes depleted uranium from lead, steel, and tungsten. Future work involves optimizing the technique to increase the count rate by many orders of magnitude and to build in the additional capability to image hidden fissionable materials. The tagged neutron approach is very different to other techniques based on neutron die-away or photo-fission. This work builds on the development of the Associated Particle Imaging (API) technique at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL). Similar investigations have been performed by teams at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia, and by the EURITRACK collaboration in the European Union

  8. Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant)

  9. Independent yields of Rb and Cs isotopes from thermal-neutron induced fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Decker, R.; Wollnik, H.; Wuensch, K.D.; Jung, G.; Koglin, E.; Siegert, G.

    1979-01-01

    The relative yields of Rb and Cs isotopes from thermal-neutron fission of 235 U have been redetermined using the mass separator OSTIS, on-line at a neutron guide of the High-Flux Beam Reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France. The separator ion source was a hot oven containing 235 U in a graphite matrix. The neutron beam was pulsed. Alkali fission products diffused out of the graphite and were ionized, thus producing a stepwise increase in the analyzed ion beam proportional to the independent fission yield. The ion beam and the fissions in the source were monitored simultaneously. The diffusion of Rb and Cs from the source was exponential in time with half-lives ranging from 2.8 to 18 sec, depending upon the element and source temperature. The independent fission yields of Rb and Cs are normalized by equating their element yields to each other and to a value computed from the charge distributions observed with the recoil separator LOHENGRIN and well established mass yields. Fractional independent yields are deduced from the independent fission yields, and these compare very well with the EOZ model described by Wahl

  10. Comparative measurements of independent yields of 239Pu fission fragments induced by thermal and resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundorin, N.A.; Kopach, Y.N.; Telezhnikov, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The independent yields of 239 Pu fission fragments by means of gamma-spectroscopy method were measured for light and heavy groups on the IBR-30 reactor in Dubna. Comparative analysis of experimental data for fission induced by thermal and resonance neutrons was performed. The possibilities to increase the measurement's precision consist of the employment of a HPGe detector with high efficiency and its open-quotes activeclose quotes shielding in the gamma spectrometer, as well as a high speed electronics system. In this way the number of identified fragments will be increased and independent yields will be measured to a precision of 1-3%. Measurements at the source with shorter neutron pulse duration to increase neutron energy resolution will be possible after the reconstruction of a modern neutron source in Dubna in accordance with the IREN project

  11. Fission decay properties of ultra neutron-rich uranium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in the chain of neutron-rich uranium isotopes is examined here. The neutron ... mean field theory, this nucleus is shown to undergo exotic decay mode of thermal neu- .... For 250U with a fission barrier of 4.3 MeV [5], we obtain the value of.

  12. Progress on the conceptual design of a mirror hybrid fusion--fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Burleigh, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design study was made of a fusion-fission reactor for the purpose of producing fissile material and electricity. The fusion component is a D-T plasma confined by a pair of magnetic mirror coils in a Yin-Yang configuration and is sustained by neutral beam injection. The neutrons from the fusion plasma drive the fission assembly which is composed of natural uranium carbide fuel rods clad with stainless steel and helium cooled. It was shown conceptually how the reactor might be built using essentially present-day technology and how the uranium-bearing blanket modules can be routinely changed to allow separation of the bred fissile fuel

  13. Backtracing neutron analysis in the fusion-fission dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennand, E. de Goes; Hanappe, F.; Stuttge, L.

    2001-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of multi parametric experimental data is used in the study of the dynamics of the fission process for the compound system 126 Ba. We apply this method to obtain the correlation between thermal energy related to the neutron total multiplicity and the correlation between pre-scission neutron and pos-scission neutron multiplicities. The results obtained are interpreted into the framework of a dynamical model. From this interpretation we have access to the following information: the friction intensity which drives the dynamical evolution of the system; the initial deformation of the compound system; the barrier evolution with temperature and angular momentum, and fission times. (author)

  14. Development and manufacturing of special fission chambers for in-core measurement requirements in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geslot, B.; Berhouet, F.; Oriol, L.; Breaud, S.; Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    The Dosimetry Command control and Instrumentation Laboratory (LDCI) at CEA/Cadarache is specialized in the development, design and manufacturing of miniature fission chambers (from 8 mm down to 1.5 mm in diameter). The LDCI fission chambers workshop specificity is its capacity to manufacture and distribute special fission chambers with fissile deposits other than U 235 (typically Pu 242 , Np 237 , U 238 , Th 232 ). We are also able to define the characteristics of the detector for any in-core measurement requirements: sensor geometry, fissile deposit material and mass, filling gas composition and pressure, operating mode (pulse, current or Campbelling) with associated cable and electronics. The fission chamber design relies on numerical simulation and modeling tools developed by the LDCI. One of our present activities in fission chamber applications is to develop a fast neutron flux instrumentation using Campbelling mode dedicated to measurements in material testing reactors. (authors)

  15. Development and manufacturing of special fission chambers for in-core measurement requirements in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geslot, B.; Berhouet, F.; Oriol, L.; Breaud, S.; Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F. [CEA, DEN, Dosimetry Command Control and Instrumentation Laboratory, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    The Dosimetry Command control and Instrumentation Laboratory (LDCI) at CEA/Cadarache is specialized in the development, design and manufacturing of miniature fission chambers (from 8 mm down to 1.5 mm in diameter). The LDCI fission chambers workshop specificity is its capacity to manufacture and distribute special fission chambers with fissile deposits other than U{sup 235} (typically Pu{sup 242}, Np{sup 237}, U{sup 238}, Th{sup 232}). We are also able to define the characteristics of the detector for any in-core measurement requirements: sensor geometry, fissile deposit material and mass, filling gas composition and pressure, operating mode (pulse, current or Campbelling) with associated cable and electronics. The fission chamber design relies on numerical simulation and modeling tools developed by the LDCI. One of our present activities in fission chamber applications is to develop a fast neutron flux instrumentation using Campbelling mode dedicated to measurements in material testing reactors. (authors)

  16. Micro fission chamber for the ITER neutron monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo; Ochiai, Kentaro; Ebisawa, Katsuyuki

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the fabrication of a prototype micro-fission chamber and test results under ITER relevant conditions including wide neutron spectrum and intense gamma-rays, and the performance as a ITER power monitor is discussed. A micro-fission chamber with 12 mg UO 2 and a dummy chamber without uranium were designed and fabricated for the in-vessel neutron flux monitoring of ITER. The measurement ability was tested with the FNS facility for 14 MeV neutrons and the 60 Co gamma-ray irradiation facility at JAERI-Takasaki. Employing the Campbelling mode in the electronics, the ITER requirement for the temporal resolution was satisfied. The excellent linearity of the detector output versus the neutron flux was confirmed in the temperature range from 20degC to 250degC. As a result, it was concluded that the developed micro-fission chamber is applicable for ITER. (author)

  17. Fission fragment assisted reactor concept for space propulsion: Foil reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The concept is to fabricate a reactor using thin films or foils of uranium, uranium oxide and then to coat them on substrates. These coatings would be made so thin as to allow the escaping fission fragments to directly heat a hydrogen propellant. The idea was studied of direct gas heating and direct gas pumping in a nuclear pumped laser program. Fission fragments were used to pump lasers. In this concept two substrates are placed opposite each other. The internal faces are coated with thin foil of uranium oxide. A few of the advantages of this technology are listed. In general, however, it is felt that if one look at all solid core nuclear thermal rockets or nuclear thermal propulsion methods, one is going to find that they all pretty much look the same. It is felt that this reactor has higher potential reliability. It has low structural operating temperatures, very short burn times, with graceful failure modes, and it has reduced potential for energetic accidents. Going to a design like this would take the NTP community part way to some of the very advanced engine designs, such as the gas core reactor, but with reduced risk because of the much lower temperatures

  18. Study of the number of neutrons produced by fission of 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.

    1958-01-01

    Study of the number of neutrons produced by fission of 239 Pu. The counting by coincidence of fissions and neutrons produced by these fissions allows the study of the variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by ν fission. In the first chapter, it studied the variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by 239 Pu fission with the energy of the incident neutron. A description of the experiment is given: a spectrometer with a crystal of sodium chloride or beryllium (mounted on a goniometer) is used, a fission chamber containing 10 mg of 239 Pu and the neutron detection system constituted of BF 3 counters which are enriched in 10 B. In the second part, the counting by coincidence of fissions and neutrons produced by the same fission and received by two different groups of counters allow the determination of a relationship between the root mean square and the average of neutron number produced by fission. The variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission of 239 Pu is studied when we change from a thermal spectra of neutrons to a fission spectra of incident neutrons. Finally, when separating in two different part the fission chamber, it is possible to measure the mean number of neutrons emitted from fission of two different sources. It compared the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission of 239 Pu and 233 U. (M.P.)

  19. Reaction Rate Benchmark Experiments with Miniature Fission Chambers at the Slovenian TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štancar, Žiga; Kaiba, Tanja; Snoj, Luka; Barbot, Loïc; Destouches, Christophe; Fourmentel, Damien; Villard, Jean-François AD(; )

    2018-01-01

    A series of fission rate profile measurements with miniature fission chambers, developed by the Commisariat á l'énergie atomique et auxénergies alternatives, were performed at the Jožef Stefan Institute's TRIGA research reactor. Two types of fission chambers with different fissionable coating (235U and 238U) were used to perform axial fission rate profile measurements at various radial positions and several control rod configurations. The experimental campaign was supported by an extensive set of computations, based on a validated Monte Carlo computational model of the TRIGA reactor. The computing effort included neutron transport calculations to support the planning and design of the experiments as well as calculations to aid the evaluation of experimental and computational uncertainties and major biases. The evaluation of uncertainties was performed by employing various types of sensitivity analyses such as experimental parameter perturbation and core reaction rate gradient calculations. It has been found that the experimental uncertainty of the measurements is sufficiently low, i.e. the total relative fission rate uncertainty being approximately 5 %, in order for the experiments to serve as benchmark experiments for validation of fission rate profiles. The effect of the neutron flux redistribution due to the control rod movement was studied by performing measurements and calculations of fission rates and fission chamber responses in different axial and radial positions at different control rod configurations. It was confirmed that the control rod movement affects the position of the maximum in the axial fission rate distribution, as well as the height of the local maxima. The optimal detector position, in which the redistributions would have minimum effect on its signal, was determined.

  20. Contributions to the theory of fission neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeliger, D.; Maerten, H.; Ruben, A.

    1990-03-01

    This report gives a compilation of recent work performed at Technical University, Dresden by D. Seeliger, H. Maerten and A. Ruben on the topic of fission neutron emission. In the first paper calculated fission neutron spectra are presented using the temperature distribution model FINESSE for fissioning actinide nuclei. In the second paper, starting from a general energy balance, Terrell's approach is generalized to describe average fragment energies as a function of incident energy; trends of fragment energy data in the Th-Pu region are well reproduced. In the third contribution, prompt fission neutron spectra and fragment characteristics for spontaneous fission of even Pu-isotopes are presented and discussed in comparison with experimental data using a phenomenological scission point model including temperature dependent shell effects. In the fourth paper, neutron multiplicities and energy spectra as well as average fragment energies for incident energies from threshold to 20 MeV (including multiple-chance fission) for U-238 are compared with traditional data representations. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Neutron detector for detecting rare events of spontaneous fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter-Akop'yan, G.M.; Popeko, A.G.; Sokol, E.A.; Chelnokov, L.P.; Smirnov, V.I.; Gorshkov, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The neutron detector for registering rare events of spontaneous fission by detecting multiple neutron emission is described. The detector represents a block of plexiglas of 550 mm diameter and 700 mm height in the centre of which there is a through 160 mm diameter channel for the sample under investigation. The detector comprises 56 3 He filled counters (up to 7 atm pressure) with 1% CO 2 addition. The counters have a 500 mm length and a 32 mm diameter. The sampling of fission events is realized by an electron system which allows determining the number of detected neutrons, numbers of operated counters, signal amplitude and time for fission event detecting. A block diagram of a neutron detector electron system is presented and its operation principle is considered. For protection against cosmic radiation the detector is surronded by a system of plastic scintillators and placed behind the concrete shield of 6 m thickness. The results of measurements of background radiation are given. It has been found that the background radiation of single neutron constitutes about 150 counts per hour, the detecting efficiency of single neutron equals 0.483 +- 0.005, for a 10l detector sensitive volume. By means of the detector described the parameters of multiplicity distribution of prompt neutrons for 256 Fm spontaneous fission are measured. The average multiplicity equals 3.59+-0.06 the dispersion being 2.30+-0.65

  2. Experimental neutronic science and instrumentation: from hybrid reactors to fourth generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jammes, Ch.

    2010-07-01

    After an overview of his academic career and scientific and research activities, the author proposes a rather detailed synthesis and overview of his scientific activities in the fields of cross sections and Doppler effect (development and validation of a code), on the MUSE-4 hybrid reactor (experiments, static and dynamic measurements), on the TRADE hybrid reactor (experimental means, sub-critical reactivity measurement), on the RACE hybrid reactor (experimental results, modelling and interpretation), and on neutron detection (design and modelling of fission chamber, on-line measurement of the fast flow). The next part gives an overview of some research programs (neutron monitoring in sodium-cool fast reactors, research and development on fission chambers, improvement of effective delayed neutron measurements)

  3. Preconceptual design and analysis of a solid-breeder blanket test in an existing fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Hsu, P.Y.; Watts, K.D.

    1983-01-01

    Preconceptual design and analysis have been performed to examine the capabilities of a proposed fission-based test of a water-cooled Li 2 O blanket concept. The mechanical configuration of the test piece is designed to simulate a unit cell of a breeder-outside-tube concept. This test piece will be placed in a fission test reactor, which provides an environment similar to that in a fusion reactor. The neutron/gamma flux from the reactor produces prototypical power density, tritium production rates, and operating temperatures and stresses. Steady-state tritium recovery from the test piece can be attained in short-duration (5-to-6-day) tests. The capabilities of this test indicate that fission-based testing can provide important near-term engineering information to support the development of fusion technology

  4. Simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and prompt neutrons for thermal neutron-induced fission of U-235

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kimura, Itsuro; Nakagome, Yoshihiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and prompt neutrons following the thermal neutron induced fission of U-235 has been performed in order to obtain the neutron multiplicity (v) and its emission energy ({eta}) against the specified mass (m{sup *}) and the total kinetic energy (TKE). The obtained value of -dv/dTKE(m{sup *}) showed a saw-tooth distribution. The average neutron energy <{eta}>(m{sup *}) had a distribution with a reflection symmetry around the half mass division. The measurement also gave the level density parameters of the specified fragment, a(m{sup *}), and this parameters showed a saw-tooth trend too. The analysis by a phenomenological description of this parameters including the shell and collective effects suggested the existence of a collective motion of the fission fragments. (author)

  5. Studies on the properties of hard-spectrum, actinide fissioning reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.B.; Prichard, A.W.; Schofield, P.E.; Robinson, A.H.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1980-01-01

    It is technically feasible to construct an operable (e.g., safe and stable) reactor to burn waste actinides rapidly. The heart of the concept is a driver core of EBR-II type, with a central radial target zone in which fuel elements, made entirely of waste actinides are exposed. This target fuel undergoes fission, as a result of which actinides are rapidly destroyed. Although the same result could be achieved in more conventionally designed LWR or LMFBR systems, the fast spectrum reactor does a much more efficient job, by virtue of the fact that in both LWR and LMFBR reactors, actinide fission is preceded by several captures before a fissile nuclide is formed. In the fast spectrum reactor that is called ABR (actinide burning reactor), these neutron captures are short-circuited

  6. Role of fission-reactor-testing capabilities in the development of fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.; Takata, M.L.; Watts, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Testing of fusion materials and components in fission reactors will be increasingly important in the future due to the near-term lack of fusion engineering test devices, and the long-term high demand for testing when fusion reactors become available. Fission testing is capable of filling many gaps in fusion reactor design information, and thus should be aggressively pursued. EG and G Idaho has investigated the application of fission testing in three areas, which are discussed in this paper. First, we investigated radiation damage to magnet insulators. This work is now continuing with the use of an improved test capsule. Second, a study was performed which indicated that a fission-suppressed hybrid blanket module could be effectively tested in a reactor such as the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), closely reproducing the predicted performance in a fusion environment. Finally, we explored a conceptual design for a fission-based Integrated Test Facility (ITF), which can accommodate entire First Wall/Blanket (FW/B) modules for testing in a nuclear environment, simultaneously satisfying many of the FW/B test requirements. This ITF can provide a cyclic neutron/gamma flux, as well as the necessary module support functions

  7. Innovative fission reactors for this century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2007-01-01

    of the 21st Century both innovative fission reactors and fusion reactors. For 2025, it seems that many countries of EU will have to construct NPPs until 40 GWe: France, UK, Germany, North Europe, Russia, Spain, Rumania and Turkey, between others. The viability of these innovative concepts will be presented in this paper

  8. Fission-product yields for thermal-neutron fission of curium-243

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breederland, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Cumulative fission yields for 25 gamma rays emitted during the decay of 23 fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 243 Cm have been determined. Using Ge(Li) spectroscopy, 33 successive pulse-height spectra of gamma rays emitted from a 77-ng sample of 243 Cm over a period of approximately two and one-half months were analyzed. Reduction of these spectra resulted in the identification and matching of gamma-ray energies and half-lives to specific radionuclides. Using these results, 23 cumulative fission-product yields were calculated. Only those radionuclides having half-lives between 6 hours and 65 days were observed. Prior to this experiment, no fission-product yields had been recorded for 243 Cm

  9. Monitor for reactor neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakami, Hisayuki; Shibata, Masatoshi

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention judges as to whether a neutron detector is normal or not while considering the change of indication value depending on the power change of a reactor core. That is, the device of the present invention comprises a standard value setting device for setting the standard value for calibrating the neutron detector and an abnormality judging device for comparing the standard value with a measured value of the neutron detector and judging the abnormality when the difference is greater than a predetermined value. The measured value upon initialization of each of the neutron detectors is determined as a quasi-standard value. An average value of the difference between the measured value and the quasi-standard value of a plurality of effective neutron detectors at a same level for the height of the reactor core is multiplied to a power rate based on the reactor core power at a position where the neutron detector is disposed upon calibration. The value obtained by adding the multiplied value and the quasi-standard value is determined as a standard value. The abnormality judging device compares the standard value with the measured value of the neutron detector and, if the difference is greater than a predetermined value, the neutron detector is determined as abnormal. As a result, judgement can be conducted more accurately than conventional cases. (I.S.)

  10. Two specialized delayed-neutron detector designs for assays of fissionable elements in water and sediment samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Balagna, J.P.; Menlove, H.O.

    1976-01-01

    Two specialized neutron-sensitive detectors are described which are employed for rapid assays of fissionable elements by sensing for delayed neutrons emitted by samples after they have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor. The more sensitive of the two detectors, designed to assay for uranium in water samples, is 40% efficient; the other, designed for sediment sample assays, is 27% efficient. These detectors are also designed to operate under water as an inexpensive shielding against neutron leakage from the reactor and neutrons from cosmic rays. (Auth.)

  11. On Line Neutron Flux Mapping in Fuel Coolant Channels of a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbot, Loic; Domergue, Christophe; Villard, Jean-Francois; Destouches, Christophe; Braoudakis, George; Wassink, David; Sinclair, Bradley; Osborn, John-C.; Wu, Huayou; Blandin, C.; Thevenin, Mathieu; Corre, Gwenole; Normand, Stephane

    2013-06-01

    This work deals with the on-line neutron flux mapping of the OPAL research reactor. A specific irradiation device has been set up to investigate fuel coolant channels using subminiature fission chambers to get thermal neutron flux profiles. Experimental results are compared to first neutronic calculations and show good agreement (C/E ∼0.97). (authors)

  12. Fission Fragment Yield Data in Support of Advanced Reactor Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Adam [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-11-21

    Within the 3 year POP we propose to continue to test and further develop the fission spectrometers, to do development tests and full data acquisition run at the national laboratory neutron beam facilities, to measure correlated fission fragment yields at low neutron energies with 235 U fission targets, and make these data available to the nuclear community. The spectrometer development will be both on the university based r\\prototype and on the National Laboratory Spectrometer, and measurements will be performed with both. Over the longer time frame of the collaboration, we will take data over a range of low energies, and use other fission targets available to the laboratory. We will gather energy specific fragment distributions and reaction cross sections. We will further develop the data acquisition capabilities to take correlated fission fragment'gamma ray/neurton data, all on an event-by-event basis. This really is an enabling technology.

  13. Measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section of minor-actinide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Naohiro

    1997-03-01

    In fuel cycles with recycled actinide, core characteristics are largely influenced by minor actinide (MA: Np, Am, Cm). Accurate nuclear data of MA such as fission cross section are required to estimate the effect of MA with high accuracy. In this study, fast neutron induced fission cross section of MA is measured using Dynamitron Accelerator in Tohoku University. The experimental method and the samples, which were developed or introduced during the last year, were improved in this fiscal year: (1) Development of a sealed fission chamber, (2) Intensification of Li neutron target, (3) Improvement of time-resolution of Time-of-Flight (TOF) electronic circuit, (4) Introduction of Np237 samples with large sample mass and (5) Introduction of a U235 sample with high purity. Using these improved tools and samples, the fission cross section ratio of Np237 relative to U235 was measured between 5 to 100 keV, and the fission cross section of Np237 was deduced. On the other hand, samples of Am241 and Am243 were obtained from Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) after investigating fission cross section of two americium isotopes (Am241 and Am 243) which are important for core physics calculation of fast reactors. (author)

  14. Angular distribution in the neutron-induced fission of actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leong L.S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Above 1 MeV of incident neutron energy the fission fragment angular distribution (FFAD has generally a strong anisotropic behavior due to the combination of the incident orbital momentum and the intrinsic spin of the fissioning nucleus. This effect has to be taken into account for the efficiency estimation of devices used for fission cross section measurements. In addition it bears information on the spin deposition mechanism and on the structure of transitional states. We designed and constructed a detection device, based on Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC, for measuring the fission fragment angular distributions of several isotopes, in particular 232Th. The measurement has been performed at n_TOF at CERN taking advantage of the very broad energy spectrum of the neutron beam. Fission events were recognized by back to back detection in coincidence in two position-sensitive detectors surrounding the targets. The detection efficiency, depending mostly on the stopping of fission fragments in backings and electrodes, has been computed with a Geant4 simulation and validated by the comparison to the measured case of 235U below 3 keV where the emission is isotropic. In the case of 232Th, the result is in good agreement with previous data below 10 MeV, with a good reproduction of the structures associated to vibrational states and the opening of second chance fission. In the 14 MeV region our data are much more accurate than previous ones which are broadly scattered.

  15. Nuclear data in the problem of fission reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manokhin, V.N.; Kulagin, N.T.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a review of the works published in Russia during last several years and devoted to the problem of nuclear data and calculations of nuclear facilities activation for fission reactor decommissioning. 6 refs

  16. Industrial development of neutron detectors, fission chambers, self powered detectors, ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constans, H.; Coville, P.; Guerre, J.

    1975-01-01

    Reactor control requires the determination of neutron flux at all times. The needed characteristics lead to use of several types of detectors: boron lined counters, boron lined ionization chambers, fission ionization chambers and self powered detectors. The principle of the reaction involved the fabrication requirements, the different modes of utilization and the characteristics obtained are examined for each detector. The problem of electric connections in the active area has been solved by developing ''integrated cables'' [fr

  17. Measurement of reaction cross sections of fission products induced by DT neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Daisuke; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    With the view of future application of fusion reactor to incineration of fission products, we have measured the {sup 129}I(n,2n){sup 128}I reaction cross section by DT neutrons with the activation method. The measured cross section was compared with the evaluated nuclear data of JENDL-3.2. From the result, it was confirmed that the evaluation overestimated the cross section by about 20-40%. (author)

  18. Radiography and tomography using fission neutrons at FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    Fission neutrons offer complementary information in radiography and tomography compared to the well established techniques using X-rays, gamma-rays, thermal or cold neutrons. They penetrate thick layers of high density materials with only little attenuation, while for light, specially for hydrogen containing materials, their attenuation is high. In the past, fast neutrons for NDT (non-destructive testing) were only available at accelerator driven systems. These high energy neutrons have to be moderated to achieve acceptable detection efficiencies thus drastically reducing the available neutron intensities and either resulting in a high beam divergence or in additional losses in neutron intensities due to beam collimation. The recently installed neutron computerized tomography and radiography system NECTAR at the Forschungsreaktor Muenchen-II (FRM-II) overcomes these disadvantages by using fission neutrons of about 1.7 MeV mean energy created in two converter plates set-up of highly enriched uranium. The beam quality, i.e. the neutron divergence can be adapted to the object to be measured by using different collimators, resulting in L/D-values up to 300. The available neutron beam intensity at the measuring position is up to 1.7E+08 cm -2 s -1 for a maximum beam area of 40 cm x 40 cm. For conventional imaging a two-dimensional detector system based on a CCD-camera is used, other more specialised systems are available. (author)

  19. Radiography and tomography using fission neutrons at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Inst. fuer Radiochemie, TU-Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Fission neutrons offer complementary information in radiography and tomography compared to the well established techniques using X-rays, gamma-rays, thermal or cold neutrons. They penetrate thick layers of high density materials with only little attenuation, while for light, specially for hydrogen containing materials, their attenuation is high. In the past, fast neutrons for NDT (non-destructive testing) were only available at accelerator driven systems. These high energy neutrons have to be moderated to achieve acceptable detection efficiencies thus drastically reducing the available neutron intensities and either resulting in a high beam divergence or in additional losses in neutron intensities due to beam collimation. The recently installed neutron computerized tomography and radiography system NECTAR at the Forschungsreaktor Muenchen-II (FRM-II) overcomes these disadvantages by using fission neutrons of about 1.7 MeV mean energy created in two converter plates set-up of highly enriched uranium. The beam quality, i.e. the neutron divergence can be adapted to the object to be measured by using different collimators, resulting in L/D-values up to 300. The available neutron beam intensity at the measuring position is up to 1.7E+08 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for a maximum beam area of 40 cm x 40 cm. For conventional imaging a two-dimensional detector system based on a CCD-camera is used, other more specialised systems are available. (author)

  20. Fabrication and Testing of a Modular Micro-Pocket Fission Detector Instrumentation System for Test Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Michael A.; Nichols, Daniel M.; Stevenson, Sarah R.; Swope, Tanner M.; Hilger, Caden W.; Roberts, Jeremy A.; Unruh, Troy C.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2018-01-01

    Advancements in nuclear reactor core modeling and computational capability have encouraged further development of in-core neutron sensors. Measurement of the neutron-flux distribution within the reactor core provides a more complete understanding of the operating conditions in the reactor than typical ex-core sensors. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors have been developed and tested previously but have been limited to single-node operation and have utilized highly specialized designs. The development of a widely deployable, multi-node Micro-Pocket Fission Detector assembly will enhance nuclear research capabilities. A modular, four-node Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array was designed, fabricated, and tested at Kansas State University. The array was constructed from materials that do not significantly perturb the neutron flux in the reactor core. All four sensor nodes were equally spaced axially in the array to span the fuel-region of the reactor core. The array was filled with neon gas, serving as an ionization medium in the small cavities of the Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors. The modular design of the instrument facilitates the testing and deployment of numerous sensor arrays. The unified design drastically improved device ruggedness and simplified construction from previous designs. Five 8-mm penetrations in the upper grid plate of the Kansas State University TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor were utilized to deploy the array between fuel elements in the core. The Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array was coupled to an electronic support system which has been specially developed to support pulse-mode operation. The Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array composed of four sensors was used to monitor local neutron flux at a constant reactor power of 100 kWth at different axial locations simultaneously. The array was positioned at five different radial locations within the core to emulate the deployment of multiple arrays and develop a 2-dimensional measurement of

  1. On angular distribution of nucleus fission fragments by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.; Grechukhin, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of amplitudes of quadrupole and hexadecapole components of angular distribution of nucleus fission fragments by neutrons with the energies E n < or approx. 6 MeV is conducted. Stability of this amplitude to permeability optical coefficient variations for neutrons is revealed. It is shown, that the ratio of these amplitudes as well as the character of their dependence on the target nucleus orientation degree are sensitive to the type of fission probability distribution along K projection if fissile nucleus J spin to the fragment scattering axis. This sensitivity may be used for fragment angular distribution anisotropy formation statistical model verification

  2. Fission meter and neutron detection using poisson distribution comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark S; Snyderman, Neal J

    2014-11-18

    A neutron detector system and method for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. Comparison of the observed neutron count distribution with a Poisson distribution is performed to distinguish fissile material from non-fissile material.

  3. 8-group relative delayed neutron yields for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piksaikin, V.M.; Kazakov, L.E.; Isaev, S.G.; Korolev, G.G.; Roshchenko, V.A.; Tertychnyj, R.G

    2002-01-01

    The energy dependence of the relative yield of delayed neutrons in an 8-group model representation was obtained for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of 239 Pu. A comparison of this data with the available experimental data by other authors was made in terms of the mean half-life of the delayed neutron precursors. (author)

  4. Preparation of a primary target for the production of fission products in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arino, H.; Cosolito, F.J.; George, K.D.; Thornton, A.K.

    1976-01-01

    A primary target for the production of fission products in a nuclear reactor, such as uranium or plutonium fission products, is comprised of an enclosed, cylindrical vessel, preferably comprised of stainless steel, having a thin, continuous, uniform layer of fissionable material, integrally bonded to its inner walls and a port permitting access to the interior of the vessel. A process is also provided for depositing uranium material on to the inner walls of the vessel. Upon irradiation of the target with neutrons from a nuclear reactor, radioactive fission products, such as molybdenum-99, are formed, and thereafter separated from the target by the introduction of an acidic solution through the port to dissolve the irradiated inner layer. The irradiation and dissolution are thus effected in the same vessel without the necessity of transferring the fissionable material and fission products to a separate chemical reactor. Subsequently, the desired isotopes are extracted and purified. Molybdenum-99 decays to technetium-99m which is a valuable medical diagnostic radioisotope. 3 claims, 1 drawing figure

  5. Contained fission explosion breeder reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhl, N.H.; Marwick, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    A reactor system for producing useful thermal energy and valuable isotopes, such as plutonium-239, uranium-233, and/or tritium, in which a pair of sub-critical masses of fissile and fertile actinide slugs are propelled into an ellipsoidal pressure vessel. The propelled slugs intercept near the center of the chamber where the concurring slugs become a more than prompt configuration thereby producing a fission explosion. Re-useable accelerating mechanisms are provided external of the vessel for propelling the slugs at predetermined time intervals into the vessel. A working fluid of lean molten metal slurry is injected into the chamber prior to each explosion for the attenuation of the explosion's effects, for the protection of the chamber's walls, and for the absorbtion of thermal energy and debris from the explosion. The working fluid is injected into the chamber in a pattern so as not to interfere with the flight paths of the slugs and to maximize the concentration of working fluid near the chamber's center. The heated working fluid is drained from the vessel and is used to perform useful work. Most of the debris from the explosion is collected as precipitate and is used for the manufacture of new slugs

  6. Description and performance characteristics for the neutron Coincidence Collar for the verification of reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.

    1981-08-01

    An active neutron interrogation method has been developed for the measurement of 235 U content in fresh fuel assemblies. The neutron Coincidence Collar uses neutron interrogation with an AmLi neutron source and coincidence counting the induced fission reaction neutrons from the 235 U. This manual describes the system components, operation, and performance characteristics. Applications of the Coincidence Collar to PWR and BWR types of reactor fuel assemblies are described

  7. Fission product behavior in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, E.L.; Kirslis, S.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.; Blankenship, F.F.; Grimes, W.R.

    1975-10-01

    Essentially all the fission product data for numerous and varied samples taken during operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment or as part of the examination of specimens removed after particular phases of operation are reported, together with the appropriate inventory or other basis of comparison, and relevant reactor parameters and conditions. Fission product behavior fell into distinct chemical groups. Evidence for fission product behavior during operation over a period of 26 months with 235 U fuel (more than 9000 effective full-power hours) was consistent with behavior during operation using 233 U fuel over a period of about 15 months (more than 5100 effective full-power hours)

  8. Chemistry of fission product iodine under nuclear reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.; Bell, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotopes of iodine are generally acknowledged to be the species whose release into the biosphere as a result of a nuclear reactor accident is of the greatest concern. In the course of its release, the fission product is subjected to differing chemical environments; these can alter the physicochemical form of the fission product and thus modify the manner and extent to which release occurs. Both the chemical environments which are characteristic of reactor accidents and their effect in determining physical and chemical form of fission product iodine have been studied extensively, and are reviewed in this report. 76 refs

  9. Device for detecting neutron flux in nuclear reactor. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessho, Y; Nishizawa, Y

    1976-07-30

    The object of the invention is to ensure accuracy in the operation of the nuclear reactor by reducing the difference that results between the readings of a Traversing Incore Probe (TIP) and a Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) when the neutron flux distribution undergoes a change. In an apparatus for detecting neutrons in a nuclear reactor, an LPRM sensor comprising a layer containing a substance capable of nuclear fission, a section filled with argon gas and a collector is constructed so as to surround a TIP within a TIP guide tube at the height of the reactor axis. In this way, the LPRM detects the average value of neutron distribution in the region surrounding the TIP, so that no great difference between the readings of both the sensors is produced even if the neutron flux distribution is changed.

  10. On the safety of conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.; Badham, V.; Caspi, S.; Chan, C.K.; Ferrell, W.J.; Frederking, T.H.K.; Grzesik, J.; Lee, J.Y.; McKone, T.E.; Pomraning, G.C.; Ullman, A.Z.; Ting, T.D.; Kim, Y.I.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary examination of some potential safety questions for conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors is presented in this paper. The study and subsequent analysis was largely based upon one design, a conceptual mirror fusion-fission reactor, operating on the deuterium-tritium plasma fusion fuel cycle and the uranium-plutonium fission fuel cycle. The major potential hazards were found to be: (a) fission products, (b) actinide elements, (c) induced radioactivity, and (d) tritium. As a result of these studies, it appears that highly reliable and even redundent decay heat removal must be provided. Loss of the ability to remove decay heat results in melting of fuel, with ultimate release of fission products and actinides to the containment. In addition, the studies indicate that blankets can be designed which will remain subcritical under extensive changes in both composition and geometry. Magnet safety and the effects of magnetic fields on thermal parameters were also considered. (Auth.)

  11. Beta decay heat following U-235, U-238 and Pu-239 neutron fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengjie

    1997-09-01

    This is an experimental study of beta-particle decay heat from 235U, 239Pu and 238U aggregate fission products over delay times 0.4-40,000 seconds. The experimental results below 2s for 235U and 239Pu, and below 20s for 238U, are the first such results reported. The experiments were conducted at the UMASS Lowell 5.5-MV Van de Graaff accelerator and 1-MW swimming-pool research reactor. Thermalized neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction induced fission in 238U and 239Pu, and fast neutrons produced in the reactor initiated fission in 238U. A helium-jet/tape-transport system rapidly transferred fission fragments from a fission chamber to a low background counting area. Delay times after fission were selected by varying the tape speed or the position of the spray point relative to the beta spectrometer that employed a thin-scintillator-disk gating technique to separate beta-particles from accompanying gamma-rays. Beta and gamma sources were both used in energy calibration. Based on low-energy(energies 0-10 MeV. Measured beta spectra were unfolded for their energy distributions by the program FERD, and then compared to other measurements and summation calculations based on ENDF/B-VI fission-product data performed on the LANL Cray computer. Measurements of the beta activity as a function of decay time furnished a relative normalization. Results for the beta decay heat are presented and compared with other experimental data and the summation calculations.

  12. A proton-driven, intense, subcritical, fission neutron source for radioisotope production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jongen, Y. [Chemin du Cyclotron, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    1995-10-01

    {sup 99m}Tc, the most frequently used radioisotope in nuclear medicine, is distributed as {sup 99}Mo=>{sup 99m}Tc generators. {sup 99}Mo is a fission product of {sup 235}U. To replace the aging nuclear reactors used today for this production, the author proposes to use a spallation neutron source, with neutron multiplication by fission. A 150 MeV, H{sup {minus}} cyclotron can produce a 225 kW proton beam with 50% total system energy efficiency. The proton beam would hit a molten lead target, surrounded by a water moderator and a graphite reflector, producing around 0.96 primary neutron per proton. The primary spallation neutrons, moderated, would strike secondary targets containing a subcritical amount of {sup 235}U. The assembly would show a k{sub eff} of 0.8, yielding a fivefold neutron multiplication. The thermal neutron flux at the targets location would be 2 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}.s, resulting in a fission power of 500 to 750 kW. One such system could supply the world demand in {sup 99}Mo, as well as other radioisotopes. Preliminary indications show that the cost would be lower than the cost of a commercial 10 MW isotope production reactor. The cost of operation, of disposal of radiowaste and of decommissioning should be significantly lower as well. Finally, the non-critical nature of the system would make it more acceptable for the public than a nuclear reactor and should simplify the licensing process.

  13. Fission-product energy release for times following thermal-neutron fission of 235U between 2 and 14000 seconds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; Emery, J.F.; Love, T.A.; McConnell, J.W.; Northcutt, K.J.; Peelle, R.W.; Weaver, H.

    1977-10-01

    Fission-product decay energy-releases rates were measured for thermal-neutron fission of 235 U. Samples of mass 1 to 10 μg were irradiated for 1 to 100 sec by use of the fast pneumatic-tube facility at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The resulting beta- and gamma-ray emissions were counted for times-after-fission between 2 and 14,000 seconds. The data were obtained for beta and gamma rays separately as spectral distributions, N(E/sub γ/) vs E/sub γ/ and N(E/sub beta/) vs E/sub β/. For the gamma-ray data the spectra were obtained by using a NaI detector, while for the beta-ray data the spectra were obtained by using an NE-110 detector with an anticoincidence mantle. The raw data were unfolded to provide spectral distributions of modest resolution. These were integrated over E/sub γ/ and E/sub β/ to provide total yield and energy integrals as a function of time after fission. Results are low compared to the present 1973 ANS Decay-heat standard. A complete description of the experimental apparatus and data-reduction techniques is presented. The final integral data are given in tabular and graphical form and are compared with published data. 41 figures, 13 tables

  14. Fission power: a search for a ''second-generation'' reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report touches on the history of US fission reactors and explores the current technical status of such reactors around the world, including experimental reactors. Its purpose is to identify, evaluate, and rank the most promising concepts among existing reactors, proposed but unadopted designs, and what can be described as ''new'' concepts. Also discussed are such related concerns as utility requirements and design considerations. The report concludes with some recommendations for possible future LLNL involvement

  15. Effect of fission dynamics on the spectra and multiplicities of prompt fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, J.R.; Madland, D.G.; Sierk, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    With the goal of examining their effect on the spectra and multiplicities of the prompt neutrons emitted in fission, we discuss recent advances in a unified macroscopic-microscopic description of large-amplitude collective nuclear dynamics. The conversion of collective energy into single-particle excitation energy is calculated for a new surface-plus-window dissipation mechanism. By solving the Hamilton equations of motion for initial conditions appropriate to fission, we obtain the average fission-fragment translational kinetic energy and excitation energy. The spectra and multiplicities of the emitted neutrons, which depend critically upon the average excitation energy, are then calculated on the basis of standard nuclear evaporation theory, taking into account the average motion of the fission fragments, the distribution of fission-fragment residual nuclear temperature, the energy dependence of the cross section for the inverse process of compound-nucleus formation, and the possibility of multiple-chance fission. Some illustrative comparisons of our calculations with experimental data are shown

  16. DETECTION OF COATING FAILURES IN A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, A.H.; Allison, S.K.

    1958-02-11

    This patent relates to water-cooled reactor systems and discloses a means to detect leaks in the jackets of jacketed fuel elements comprising a neutron detector located in the cooling water discharge pipe,the pipe being provided with an enlarged portion for housing the detector so that the latter is completely surrounded by the water in its passage through the pipe, said enlarged portion and detector being shielded from the reactor for the purpose of detecting only those delayed neutrons emitted in the cooling water and due to the latter picking up fission fragments from the defective fuel elements.

  17. Neutron kinetics in moderators and SNM detection through epithermal-neutron-induced fissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozani, Tsahi, E-mail: tgmaven@gmail.com [1050 Harriet St., Palo Alto, CA 94301 (United States); King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories Inc., 520 Almanor Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Extension of the well-established Differential Die Away Analysis (DDAA) into a faster time domain, where more penetrating epithermal neutrons induce fissions, is proposed and demonstrated via simulations and experiments. In the proposed method the fissions stimulated by thermal, epithermal and even higher-energy neutrons are measured after injection of a narrow pulse of high-energy 14 MeV (d,T) or 2.5 MeV (d,D) source neutrons, appropriately moderated. The ability to measure these fissions stems from the inherent correlation of neutron energy and time (“E–T” correlation) during the process of slowing down of high-energy source neutrons in common moderating materials such as hydrogenous compounds (e.g., polyethylene), heavy water, beryllium and graphite. The kinetic behavior following injection of a delta-function-shaped pulse (in time) of 14 MeV neutrons into such moderators is studied employing MCNPX simulations and, when applicable, some simple “one-group” models. These calculations served as a guide for the design of a source moderator which was used in experiments. Qualitative relationships between slowing-down time after the pulse and the prevailing neutron energy are discussed. A laboratory system consisting of a 14 MeV neutron generator, a polyethylene-reflected Be moderator, a liquid scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and a two-parameter E–T data acquisition system was set up to measure prompt neutron and delayed gamma-ray fission signatures in a 19.5% enriched LEU sample. The measured time behavior of thermal and epithermal neutron fission signals agreed well with the detailed simulations. The laboratory system can readily be redesigned and deployed as a mobile inspection system for SNM in, e.g., cars and vans. A strong pulsed neutron generator with narrow pulse (<75 ns) at a reasonably high pulse frequency could make the high-energy neutron induced fission modality a realizable SNM detection technique.

  18. Determination of the effective delayed neutron fraction in the Coral-I Reactor; Determinacion de la fraccion efectiva de neutrones retardados en el Reactor Coral-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, J L. de; Perez-Navarro, A; Rodriguez-Mayquez, E

    1973-07-01

    The effective delayed neutron fraction, {beta} eff, has been determined from the measurement of E / {beta}{sup 2}, by means of reactor noise analysis in the time domain, and the neutron detector efficiency, {epsilon}. For the {epsilon} measurement it is necessary to determine the fission rate in the reactor. This value can be obtained from the absolute measurement of the fission rate per cm{sup 3}, at a certain point of the reactor, and the determination of these two values ratio, which has been calculated by the Monte Cario method and also measured with results in good agreement. (Author)

  19. Neutron emission and fragment yield in high-energy fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Klinov, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    The KRIS special library of spectra and emission probabilities in the decays of 1500 nuclei excited up to energies between 150 and 250 MeV was developed for correctly taking into account the decay of highly excited nuclei appearing as fission fragments. The emission of neutrons, protons, and photons was taken into account. Neutron emission fromprimary fragments was found to have a substantial effect on the formation of yields of postneutron nuclei. The library was tested by comparing the calculated and measured yields of products originating from the fission of nuclei that was induced by high-energy protons. The method for calculating these yields was tested on the basis of experimental data on the thermal-neutroninduced fission of 235 U nuclei

  20. The relationship between dose rate and transformation induction in C3H/10T1/2 cells by TRIGA reactor fission neutrons at 0.3 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E.K.; Harrison, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present their own and other data showing dose-effect relations for cell survival and the induction of transformations in C3H/IOT 1/2 cells in exponential or stationary cultures after a range of high dose-rate irradiations with X-rays or AFRRI neutrons. (UK)

  1. Analytic computation of average energy of neutrons inducing fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Alexander Rich

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this report is to describe how I analytically computed the average energy of neutrons that induce fission in the bare BeRP ball. The motivation of this report is to resolve a discrepancy between the average energy computed via the FMULT and F4/FM cards in MCNP6 by comparison to the analytic results.

  2. Inventories of radioactive fission products in the core of thermal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, N.

    1977-01-01

    As a part of the analysis concerning radiological consequences of a major LWR accident, inventories of the most significant radioactive nuclides and stable fission gases in the core of a PWR type reactor have been calculated. Calculations were performed by the DELFIN code using nuclide data and neutron flux data earlier obtained by the METHUSELAH code. Comparison with simplified calculation method show that it is quite rough for certain nuclides but the accuracy may be sufficient for safety analysis purposes recalling the inaccuracies in the later parts of fission product transport process (author)

  3. MADNIX a code to calculate prompt fission neutron spectra and average prompt neutron multiplicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, A.C.

    1986-03-01

    A code has been written and tested on the CDC Cyber-170 to calculate the prompt fission neutron spectrum, N(E), as a function of both the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy. In this note a brief description of the underlying physical principles involved and a detailed explanation of the required input data (together with a sample output for the fission of 235 U induced by 14 MeV neutrons) are presented. Weisskopf's standard nuclear evaporation theory provides the basis for the calculation. Two important refinements are that the distribution of fission-fragment residual nuclear temperature and the cooling of the fragments as neutrons are emitted approximately taken into account, and also the energy dependence of the cross section for the inverse process of compound nucleus formation is included. This approach is then used to calculate the average number of prompt neutrons emitted per fission, v-bar p . At high excitation energies, where fission is still possible after neutron emission, the consequences of the competition between first, second and third chance fission on N(E) and v-bar p are calculated. Excellent agreement with all the examples given in the original work of Madland and Nix is obtained. (author) [pt

  4. A hybrid source-driven method to compute fast neutron fluence in reactor pressure vessel - 017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren-Tai, Chiang

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid source-driven method is developed to compute fast neutron fluence with neutron energy greater than 1 MeV in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The method determines neutron flux by solving a steady-state neutron transport equation with hybrid neutron sources composed of peripheral fixed fission neutron sources and interior chain-reacted fission neutron sources. The relative rod-by-rod power distribution of the peripheral assemblies in a nuclear reactor obtained from reactor core depletion calculations and subsequent rod-by-rod power reconstruction is employed as the relative rod-by-rod fixed fission neutron source distribution. All fissionable nuclides other than U-238 (such as U-234, U-235, U-236, Pu-239 etc) are replaced with U-238 to avoid counting the fission contribution twice and to preserve fast neutron attenuation for heavy nuclides in the peripheral assemblies. An example is provided to show the feasibility of the method. Since the interior fuels only have a marginal impact on RPV fluence results due to rapid attenuation of interior fast fission neutrons, a generic set or one of several generic sets of interior fuels can be used as the driver and only the neutron sources in the peripheral assemblies will be changed in subsequent hybrid source-driven fluence calculations. Consequently, this hybrid source-driven method can simplify and reduce cost for fast neutron fluence computations. This newly developed hybrid source-driven method should be a useful and simplified tool for computing fast neutron fluence at selected locations of interest in RPV of contemporary nuclear power reactors. (authors)

  5. Brief review of the fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1977-01-01

    Much of the conceptual framework of present day fusion-fission hybrid reactors is found in the original work of the early 1950's. Present day motivations for development are quite different. The role of the hybrid reactor is discussed as well as the current activities in the development program

  6. Experimental study of a methodology for Fission-track Dating without neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadler, J.C.; Iunes, P.J.; Tello, C.A.; Chemale, F.; Kawashita, K.; Curvo, E.A.C.; Santos, F.G.S.; Gasparini, T.E.; Moreira, P.A.F.P.; Guedes, S.

    2009-01-01

    To carry out the dating by the Fission Track Method (FTM) the international community that works with this method employs methodologies in which the mineral to be dated must be irradiated with neutrons. Such irradiation, performed in a nuclear reactor, demand a relatively long waiting time so that the activity of the sample attain a proper level for handling. The present work aims to establish a methodology that makes possible the dating by FTM using a mass spectrometer instead of a nuclear reactor. This methodology was applied to apatite samples from Durango, Mexico.

  7. Recent developments on micrometric fission chambers for high neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, A.; Bringer, O.; Dupont, E.; Marie, F.; Panebianco, S.; Toussaint, J. C.; Veyssiere, C.; Chabod, S.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.

    2009-01-01

    With the development of innovative nuclear systems and new generation neutron sources, the nuclear instrumentation should be adapted. Since several years, we developed microscopic fission chambers to study the transmutation of minor actinides in high thermal-neutron fluxes. The recent developments done to fulfill the drastic conditions of irradiations are described in this paper together with the feedback from the measurements. Two installations were used: the HFR of the ILL for its highest thermal neutron flux of the world and the MEGAPIE target which was the first 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi spallation target in the world. (authors)

  8. Recent developments on micrometric fission chambers for high neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letourneau, A. [Irfu, Service de Physique Nucleaire, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bringer, O.; Dupont, E.; Marie, F.; Panebianco, S.; Toussaint, J. C.; Veyssiere, C. [Irfu, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chabod, S. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Breaud, S.; Oriol, L. [DEN/DER/SPEX, CEA-Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France)

    2009-07-01

    With the development of innovative nuclear systems and new generation neutron sources, the nuclear instrumentation should be adapted. Since several years, we developed microscopic fission chambers to study the transmutation of minor actinides in high thermal-neutron fluxes. The recent developments done to fulfill the drastic conditions of irradiations are described in this paper together with the feedback from the measurements. Two installations were used: the HFR of the ILL for its highest thermal neutron flux of the world and the MEGAPIE target which was the first 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi spallation target in the world. (authors)

  9. Integral measurement of fission products capture in fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Deidier, Loick.

    1979-12-01

    For the SUPERPHENIX reactor project, it was necessary to know fission products capture with about 10% accuracy in the fast breeder reactor spectra. In this purpose, integral measurements have been carried out on the main separated products by different experimental technics (oscillation, activation and irradiation methods), but particularly on irradiated fuel pins from RAPSODIE and PHENIX reactors in order to directly obtain total effect of fission products. Same tendencies have been observed for both enriched uranium fuel and LMFBR characteristic plutonium fuel. All experimental results have been introduced in CARNAVAL cross section set [fr

  10. Uranium borehole logging using delayed or prompt fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, G.; Wuerz, H.

    1977-04-01

    The measurement of induced fission neutrons using Cf 252 and 14 MeV neutrons is a sensitive method for an in situ determination of Uranium. Applying this methods requires a unique relation between concentration of Uranium and intensity of induced fission neutrons. A discussion of parameters influencing the determination of concentration is given. A simple method is developed allowing an elemination of the geochemistry of the deposit and of the borehole configuration. Borehole probes using the methods described are of considerable help during the phase of detailed exploration of uranium ore deposits. These on-line tools allow an immediate determination of concentration. Thus avoiding the expensive and time consuming step of core drilling and subsequent chemical analysis. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Analysis of calculated neutron flux response at detectors of G.A. Siwabessy multipurpose reactor (RSG-GAS Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taryo, Taswanda

    2002-01-01

    Multi Purpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy (RSG-GAS) reactor core possesses 4 fission-chamber detectors to measure intermediate power level of RSG-GAS reactor. Another detector, also fission-chamber detector, is intended to measure power level of RSG-GAS reactor. To investigate influence of space to the neutron flux values for each detector measuring intermediate and power levels has been carried out. The calculation was carried out using combination of WIMS/D4 and CITATION-3D code and focused on calculation of neutron flux at different detector location of RSG-GAS typical working core various scenarios. For different scenarios, all calculation results showed that each detector, located at different location in the RSG-GAS reactor core, causes different neutron flux occurred in the reactor core due to spatial time effect

  12. Fission gas pressure build-up and fast-breeder economy; Accumulation de la pression des gaz de fission et economie des reacteurs surgenerateurs a neutrons rapides; Nakoplenie davleniya gazov produktov deleniya i ehkonomika reaktorov-razmnozhitelej na bystrykh nejtronakh; Aumento de la presion de los gases de fision y economia de los reactores reproductores rapidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, P [Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1962-03-15

    Fuel-cycle costs and doubling time of fast-breeder reactors are strongly affected by the fuel-burn-up obtainable. Use of oxide or carbide fuel offers the possibility of reaching a burn-up of 100 000 MWd/t. In fuel-clad elements, a limiting factor is the fission-gas-pressure build-up. At the high burn-up considered, an appreciable fraction of the fission gases gets into the pores and thus contributes to the pressure on the can. Starting from the known fission-product yields and decay chains, gas production and pressure build-up have been calculated. Three physical models have been employed in calculating the pressure acting upon the can : the gas is contained either in interconnected pores, in separate pores, or in a central hole. The pressure-dependence upon free volume (fuel density) and temperature will be discussed. Cans made of high-strength materials as Ineonel-X and molybdenum could stand the fission-gas pressure at operating temperatures. Unfortunately, these materials have higher absorption cross-sections than stainless steel. Results of a multi-group calculation are given, showing the effect of using these can materials and of decreasing the fuel density on critical mass and breeding ratio in small and medium-size breeders. (author) [French] Le cout du cycle de combustible et la periode de doublement des reacteurs surgenerateurs a neutrons rapides dependent etroitement du taux de combustion. En utilisant pour combustible un oxyde ou un carbure, on peut atteindre un taux de combustion de 100 000 MW j/t. Avec des combustibles gaines, l'accumulation de la pression des gaz de fission est un facteur limitatif. Pour le fort taux de combustion envisage, une fraction non negligeable des gaz de fission penetre dans les interstices et contribue ainsi a la pression sur la gaine. A partir des rendements en produits de fission et des chaines de desintegration connus, l'auteur a calcule la production de gaz et l'accumulation de pression. Pour calculer la pression

  13. Yields of fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 229Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; McConnell, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Absolute yields have been determined for 47 gamma rays emitted in the decay of 37 fission products representing 25 mass chains created during thermal-neutron fission of 229 Th. Using a Ge(Li) detector, spectra were obtained of gamma rays emitted between 15 min and 0.4 yr after very short irradiations by thermal neutrons of a 15-μg sample of 229 Th. On the basis of measured gamma-ray yields and known nuclear data, yields for cumulative production of 37 fission products were deduced. The absolute overall normalization uncertainty is 235 U, we postulate a simple functional dependence sigma = sigma(Z/sub p/), and using this dependence obtain values of Z/sub p/(A) for 15 mass chains created during fission of 229 Th. Values of Z/sub p/(A) were estimated for other mass chains based upon results of a recent study of Z/sub p/(A). Charge distributions determined using the deduced mass distribution and the deduced sets of Z/sub p/(A) and sigma(Z/sub p/) are in very good agreement with recent measurements, exhibiting a pronounced even-odd effect in elemental yields. These results may be used to predict unmeasured yields for 229 Th fission

  14. Neutron noise in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaquiere, A.; Pachowska, R.

    1961-06-01

    The power of a nuclear reactor, in the operating conditions, presents fluctuations due to various causes. This random behaviour can be included in the study of 'noises'. Among other sources of noise, we analyse hereafter the fluctuations due: a) to the discontinuous emissions of neutrons from an independent source; b) to the multiplication of neutrons inside the reactor. The method which we present makes use of the analogies between the rules governing a nuclear reactor in operation and a number of radio-electrical systems, in particular the feed-back loops. The reactor can be characterized by its 'passing band' and is described as a system submitted to a sequence of random pulses. In non linear operating condition, the effect of neutron noise is defined by means of a non-linear functional, this theory is thus related to previous works the references of which are given at the end of the present report. This leads us in particular in the case of nuclear reactors to some results given by A. Blaquiere in the case of radio-electrical loops. (author) [fr

  15. Differential and integral characteristics of prompt fission neutrons in the statistical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimenko, B.F.; Rubchenya, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory is the most consistent approach to the calculation of both spectra and prompt fission neutrons characteristics. On the basis of this approach a statistical model for calculation of differential prompt fission neutrons characteristics of low energy fission has been proposed and improved in order to take into account the anisotropy effects arising at prompt fission neutrons emission from fragments. 37 refs, 6 figs

  16. Feasibility study of Self Powered Neutron Detectors in Fast Reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jammes, Christian; Filliatre, Philippe; Verma, Vasudha; Hellesen, Carl; Jacobsson Svard, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor system. Diverse possibilities of detector systems installation have to be investigated with respect to practicality and feasibility according to the detection parameters. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution. We show that the gamma contribution from fission products decay in the fuel and activation of structural materials is very small compared to the fission gammas. Thus, it is possible for the in-core SPND signal to follow changes in local neutron flux as they are proportional to each other. This implies that the signal from an in-core SPND can provide dynamic information on the neutron flux perturbations occurring inside the reactor core. (authors)

  17. Feasibility study of Self Powered Neutron Detectors in Fast Reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammes, Christian; Filliatre, Philippe [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance, (France); Verma, Vasudha; Hellesen, Carl; Jacobsson Svard, Staffan [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala, (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor system. Diverse possibilities of detector systems installation have to be investigated with respect to practicality and feasibility according to the detection parameters. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution. We show that the gamma contribution from fission products decay in the fuel and activation of structural materials is very small compared to the fission gammas. Thus, it is possible for the in-core SPND signal to follow changes in local neutron flux as they are proportional to each other. This implies that the signal from an in-core SPND can provide dynamic information on the neutron flux perturbations occurring inside the reactor core. (authors)

  18. Conceptual design study of Hyb-WT as fusion–fission hybrid reactor for waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddique, Muhammad Tariq; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Conceptual design study of fusion-fission hybrid reactor for waste transmutation. • MCNPX and MONTEBURNS are compared for transmutation performance of WT-Hyb. • Detailed neutronic performance of final optimized Hyb-WT design is analyzed. • A new tube-in-duct core design is implemented and compared with pin type design. • Study shows many aspects of hybrid reactor even though scope was limited to neutronic analysis. - Abstract: This study proposes a conceptual design of a hybrid reactor for waste transmutation (Hyb-WT). The design of Hyb-WT is based on a low-power tokamak (less than 150 MWt) and an annular ring-shaped reactor core with metal fuel (TRU 60 w/o, Zr 40 w/o) and a fission product (FP) zone. The computational code systems MONTEBURNS and MCNPX2.6 are investigated for their suitability in evaluating the performance of Hyb-WT. The overall design performance of the proposed reactor is determined by considering pin-type and tube-in-duct core designs. The objective of such consideration is to explore the possibilities for enhanced transmutation with reduced wall loading from fusion neutrons and reduced transuranic (TRU) inventory. TRU and FP depletion is analyzed by calculating waste transmutation ratio, mass burned per full power year (in units of kg/fpy), and support ratio. The radio toxicity analysis of TRUs and FPs is performed by calculating the percentage of toxicity reduction in TRU and FP over a burn cycle

  19. Measurement of 237Np fission rate ratio relative to 235U fission rate in cores with various thermal neutron spectrum at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unesaki, Hironobu; Shiroya, Seiji; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Kitada, Takanori; Kuroda, Mitsuo; Kohashi, Akio; Kato, Takeshi; Ikeuchi, Yoshitaka

    2000-01-01

    Integral measurements of 237 Np fission rate ratio relative to 235 U fission rate have been performed at Kyoto University Citrical Assembly. The fission rates have been measured using the back-to back type double fission chamber at five thermal cores with different H/ 235 U ratio so that the neutron spectra of the cores were systematically varied. The measured fission rate ratio per atom was 0.00439 to 0.0298, with a typical uncertainty of 2 to 3%. The measured data were compared with the calculated results using SRAC/TWOTRAN and MVP based on JENDL-3.2, which gave the averaged C/E values of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. Obtained results of C/E using 237 Np cross sections from JENDL-3/2, ENDF/B-VI.5 and JEF2.2 show that the latter two gave smaller results than JENDL-3.2 by about 4%, which clearly reflects the discrepancy in the evaluated cross section among the libraries. This difference arises from both fast fission and resonance region. Although further improvement is recommended, 237 Np fission cross section in JENDL-3.2 is considered to be superior to those in the other libraries and can be adopted for use in design calculations for minor actinide transmutation system using thermal reactors with prediction precision of 237 Np fission rate with in 10%. (author)

  20. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Werner, James; Qualls, Louis; Radel, Ross

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO 2 -fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  1. Calculation of neutron importance function in fissionable assemblies using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feghhi, S.A.H.; Shahriari, M.; Afarideh, H.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to develop an efficient solution method for the calculation of neutron importance function in fissionable assemblies for all criticality conditions, based on Monte Carlo calculations. The neutron importance function has an important role in perturbation theory and reactor dynamic calculations. Usually this function can be determined by calculating the adjoint flux while solving the adjoint weighted transport equation based on deterministic methods. However, in complex geometries these calculations are very complicated. In this article, considering the capabilities of MCNP code in solving problems with complex geometries and its closeness to physical concepts, a comprehensive method based on the physical concept of neutron importance has been introduced for calculating the neutron importance function in sub-critical, critical and super-critical conditions. For this propose a computer program has been developed. The results of the method have been benchmarked with ANISN code calculations in 1 and 2 group modes for simple geometries. The correctness of these results has been confirmed for all three criticality conditions. Finally, the efficiency of the method for complex geometries has been shown by the calculation of neutron importance in Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) research reactor

  2. Review of microscopic integral cross section data in fundamental reactor dosimetry benchmark neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; McElroy, W.N.; Kellogg, L.S.; Lippincott, E.P.; Grundl, J.A.; Gilliam, D.M.; Hansen, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper is intended to review and critically discuss microscopic integral cross section measurement and calculation data for fundamental reactor dosimetry benchmark neutron fields. Specifically the review covers the following fundamental benchmarks: the spontaneous californium-252 fission neutron spectrum standard field; the thermal-neutron induced uranium-235 fission neutron spectrum standard field; the (secondary) intermediate-energy standard neutron field at the center of the Mol-ΣΣ, NISUS, and ITN-ΣΣ facilities; the reference neutron field at the center of the Coupled Fast Reactor Measurement Facility; the reference neutron field at the center of the 10% enriched uranium metal, cylindrical, fast critical; the (primary) Intermediate-Energy Standard Neutron Field

  3. Review of microscopic integral cross section data in fundamental reactor dosimetry benchmark neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; McElroy, W.N.; Kellogg, L.S.; Lippincott, E.P.; Grundl, J.A.; Gilliam, D.M.; Hansen, G.E.

    1976-10-01

    The paper is intended to review and critically discuss microscopic integral cross section measurement and calculation data for fundamental reactor dosimetry benchmark neutron fields. Specifically the review covers the following fundamental benchmarks: (1) the spontaneous californium-252 fission neutron spectrum standard field; (2) the thermal-neutron induced uranium-235 fission neutron spectrum standard field; (3) the (secondary) intermediate-energy standard neutron field at the center of the Mol-ΣΣ, NISUS, and ITN--ΣΣ facilities; (4) the reference neutron field at the center of the Coupled Fast Reactor Measurement Facility (CFRMF); (5) the reference neutron field at the center of the 10 percent enriched uranium metal, cylindrical, fast critical; and (6) the (primary) Intermediate-Energy Standard Neutron Field

  4. Fission neutrons experiments, evaluation, modeling and open problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kornilov, Nikolay

    2014-01-01

    Although the fission of heavy nuclei was discovered over 75 years ago, many problems and questions still remain to be addressed and answered. The reader will be presented with an old, but persistent problem of this field: The contradiction between Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) spectra measured with differential (microscopic) experiments and integral (macroscopic and benchmark) experiments (the Micro-Macro problem). The difference in average energy is rather small ~3% but it is stable and we cannot explain the difference due to experimental uncertainties. Can we measure the PFN spectrum with hig

  5. Development of a position-sensitive fission counter and measurement of neutron flux distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Hideshi; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Kakuta, Tsunemi

    2001-08-01

    A position-sensitive fission counter (PSFC) that operates in high neutron flux and high gamma-ray background such as at the side of a power reactor vessel has been developed. Neutron detection using the PSFC with a solenoid electrode is based on a delay-line method. The PSFC that has the outer diameter of 25 mm and the sensitive length of 1000 mm was manufactured for investigation of the performances. The PSFC provided output current pulses that were sufficiently higher than the alpha noise, though the PSFC has a solenoid electrode and large electrode-capacitance. The S/N ratio of PSFC outputs proved to be higher than that of ordinary fission counters with 200 mm sensitive length. A performance test to measure neutron flux distributions by a neutron measuring system with the PSFC was carried out by the side of a graphite pile, W2.4 x H1.4 x L1.2 m, with neutron sources, Am-Be 370 GBq x 2. It was confirmed that the neutron flux distribution was well measured with the system. (author)

  6. Monitoring the fast neutrons in a high flux: The case for 242Pu fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Oriol, L.; Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.

    2009-01-01

    Fission chambers are widely used for on-line monitoring of neutron fluxes in irradiation reactors. A selective measurement of a component of interest of the neutron flux is possible in principle thanks to a careful choice of the deposit material. However, measuring the fast component is challenging when the flux is high (up to 10 15 n/cm 2 /s) with a significant thermal component. The main problem is that the isotopic content of a material selected for its good response to fast neutrons evolves with irradiation, so that the material is more and more sensitive to thermal neutrons. Within the framework of the FNDS (Fast Neutron Detector System) project, we design tools that simulate the evolution of the isotopic composition and fission rate for several deposits under any given flux. In the case of a high flux with a significant thermal component, 242 Pu is shown after a comprehensive study of all possibilities to be the best choice for measuring the fast component, as long as its purity is sufficient. If an estimate of the thermal flux is independently available, one can correct the signal for that component. This suggests a system of two detectors, one of which being used for such a correction. It is of very high interest when the detectors must be operated up to a high neutron fluence. (authors)

  7. Monitoring the fast neutrons in a high flux: The case for {sup 242}Pu fission chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Oriol, L.; Geslot, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/SPEX/LDCI, Centre de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2009-07-01

    Fission chambers are widely used for on-line monitoring of neutron fluxes in irradiation reactors. A selective measurement of a component of interest of the neutron flux is possible in principle thanks to a careful choice of the deposit material. However, measuring the fast component is challenging when the flux is high (up to 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s) with a significant thermal component. The main problem is that the isotopic content of a material selected for its good response to fast neutrons evolves with irradiation, so that the material is more and more sensitive to thermal neutrons. Within the framework of the FNDS (Fast Neutron Detector System) project, we design tools that simulate the evolution of the isotopic composition and fission rate for several deposits under any given flux. In the case of a high flux with a significant thermal component, {sup 242}Pu is shown after a comprehensive study of all possibilities to be the best choice for measuring the fast component, as long as its purity is sufficient. If an estimate of the thermal flux is independently available, one can correct the signal for that component. This suggests a system of two detectors, one of which being used for such a correction. It is of very high interest when the detectors must be operated up to a high neutron fluence. (authors)

  8. Fission ionisation chamber for the measurement of low fluxes of slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.; Duchene, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    The ionisation chamber described is designed for the measurement of slow neutron fluxes of average or low intensity, in the presence, eventually, of very high gamma fluxes. The capture of a slow neutron by a fissile material, in this case 235 U, gives rise to fission fragments, high-energy particles which ionise the gas contained in the chamber. The neutrons are detected by virtue of the potential pulses, on the collecting electrode of the chamber, deriving from the collection of the ions produced by the fission fragments. The pulses are counted by means of a measuring system consisting of a preamplifier, a 2 Mc amplifier, a discriminator and an electronic scale with numerator or integrator. The general characteristics are as follows: sensitivity to neutrons: 0.07 kicks/n/cm 2 .s, sensitivity to γ rays: zero up to 3.10 4 R/H, a background noise at the normal discrimination voltage: 0.01 kicks/s, working H.T.: -500 V, capacity: 40 μμF, average height of pulse: 8 mV, limits of use: from several neutrons to 10 6 n/cm 2 .s. This chamber may be used in all cases where low fluxes of slow neutrons must be measured, especially in the presence of high gamma fluxes, for example in the checking of Pu concentrations in an extraction plant or for the starting up of reactors. (author) [fr

  9. Burn-up calculation of fusion-fission hybrid reactor using thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shido, S.; Matsunaka, M.; Kondo, K.; Murata, I.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A burn-up calculation system has been developed to estimate performance of blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor which is a fusion reactor with a blanket region containing nuclear fuel. In this system, neutron flux is calculated by MCNP4B and then burn-up calculation is performed by ORIGEN2. The cross-section library for ORIGEN2 is made from the calculated neutron flux and evaluated nuclear data. The 3-dimensional ITER model was used as a base fusion reactor. The nuclear fuel (reprocessed plutonium as the fission materials mixed with thorium as the fertile materials), transmutation materials (minor actinides and long-lived fission products) and tritium breeder were loaded into the blanket. Performances of gas-cooled and water-cooled blankets were compared with each other. As a result, the proposed reactor can meet the requirement for TBP and power density. As far as nuclear waste incineration is concerned, the gas-cooled blanket has advantages. On the other hand, the water cooled-blanket is suited to energy production. (author)

  10. Study on the technical feasibility of Fission-Track dating at two irradiation positions of the RA-6 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorval, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The method of Fission-Track dating is based upon the detection of the damage caused by fission fragments from the Uranium contained in geological samples.In order to determine the age of a sample, both the amount of spontaneous fissions occurred and the Uranium concentration must be known.The latter requires the irradiation of the samples inside a reactor with a well-thermalized flux, so that fissions are induced over 235 U targets only. Therefore, the Uranium concentration may be determined.The main inconvenient presented by the irradiation sites at the RA-6 MTR-type reactor is that neutron flux is not completely thermal there, which means that fissions due to epithermal and fast neutrons will not be negligible.In the same way, tracks due to fissions of 238 U and 232 Th will be detected. In order to know the corrections that must be applied to those measurements performed in this reactor, it is necessary to characterize fast flux.Because of it, this laboratory's gamma spectrometry equipment had to be calibrated. After that, several activation detectors were irradiated and results were analyzed. Finally, it was determined that it is feasible to Fission-Track date at the I6 position. However, limitations associated to this method were analyzed for the values of flux measured in the different sites

  11. Feasibility study of applying the passive safety system concept to fusion–fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhang-cheng; Xie, Heng

    2014-01-01

    The fusion–fission hybrid reactor can produce energy, breed nuclear fuel, and handle the nuclear waste, etc., with the fusion neutron source striking the subcritical blanket. The passive safety system consists of passive residual heat removal system, passive safety injection system and automatic depressurization system was adopted into the fusion–fission hybrid reactor in this paper. Modeling and nodalization of primary loop, partial secondary loop and passive core cooling system for the fusion–fission hybrid reactor using relap5 were conducted and small break LOCA on cold leg was analyzed. The results of key transient parameters indicated that the actuation of passive safety system could mitigate the accidental consequence of the 4-inch cold leg small break LOCA on cold leg in the early time effectively. It is feasible to apply the passive safety system concept to fusion–fission hybrid reactor. The minimum collapsed liquid level had great increase if doubling the volume of CMTs to increase its coolant injection and had no increase if doubling the volume of ACCs

  12. On fusion and fission breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B.; Schuurman, W.; Klippel, H.Th.

    1981-02-01

    Fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors are suitable candidates for centralized, long-term energy production, their fuel reserves being practically unlimited. The technology of a durable and economical fusion reactor is still to be developed. Such a development parallel with the fast breeder is valuable by reasons of safety, proliferation, new fuel reserves, and by the very broad potential of the development of the fusion reactor. In order to facilitate a discussion of these aspects, the fusion reactor and the fast breeder reactor were compared in the IIASA-report. Aspects of both reactor systems are compared

  13. Actinide neutron-induced fission up to 20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.M.

    2001-01-01

    Fission and total level densities modelling along with double-humped fission barrier parameters allow to describe available actinide neutron-induced fission cross section data in the incident neutron energy range of ∼ 10 keV - 20 MeV. Saddle asymmetries relevant to shell correction model calculations influence fission barriers, extracted by cross section data analysis. The inner barrier was assumed axially symmetric in case of U, Np and Pu neutron-deficient nuclei. It is shown that observed irregularities in neutron-induced fission cross section data in the energy range of 0.5-3 MeV could be attributed to the interplay of few-quasiparticle excitations in the level density of fissioning and residual nuclei. Estimates of first-chance fission cross section and secondary neutron spectrum model were validated by 238 U fission, (n,2n) and (n,3n) data description up to 20 MeV. (author)

  14. Actinide neutron-induced fission up to 20 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, V M [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute, Minsk-Sosny (Belarus)

    2001-12-15

    Fission and total level densities modelling along with double-humped fission barrier parameters allow to describe available actinide neutron-induced fission cross section data in the incident neutron energy range of {approx} 10 keV - 20 MeV. Saddle asymmetries relevant to shell correction model calculations influence fission barriers, extracted by cross section data analysis. The inner barrier was assumed axially symmetric in case of U, Np and Pu neutron-deficient nuclei. It is shown that observed irregularities in neutron-induced fission cross section data in the energy range of 0.5-3 MeV could be attributed to the interplay of few-quasiparticle excitations in the level density of fissioning and residual nuclei. Estimates of first-chance fission cross section and secondary neutron spectrum model were validated by {sup 238}U fission, (n,2n) and (n,3n) data description up to 20 MeV. (author)

  15. Neutron transport-burnup code MCORGS and its application in fusion fission hybrid blanket conceptual research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xue-Ming; Peng, Xian-Jue

    2016-09-01

    Fusion science and technology has made progress in the last decades. However, commercialization of fusion reactors still faces challenges relating to higher fusion energy gain, irradiation-resistant material, and tritium self-sufficiency. Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactors (FFHR) can be introduced to accelerate the early application of fusion energy. Traditionally, FFHRs have been classified as either breeders or transmuters. Both need partition of plutonium from spent fuel, which will pose nuclear proliferation risks. A conceptual design of a Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactor for Energy (FFHR-E), which can make full use of natural uranium with lower nuclear proliferation risk, is presented. The fusion core parameters are similar to those of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. An alloy of natural uranium and zirconium is adopted in the fission blanket, which is cooled by light water. In order to model blanket burnup problems, a linkage code MCORGS, which couples MCNP4B and ORIGEN-S, is developed and validated through several typical benchmarks. The average blanket energy Multiplication and Tritium Breeding Ratio can be maintained at 10 and 1.15 respectively over tens of years of continuous irradiation. If simple reprocessing without separation of plutonium from uranium is adopted every few years, FFHR-E can achieve better neutronic performance. MCORGS has also been used to analyze the ultra-deep burnup model of Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) from LLNL, and a new blanket design that uses Pb instead of Be as the neutron multiplier is proposed. In addition, MCORGS has been used to simulate the fluid transmuter model of the In-Zinerater from Sandia. A brief comparison of LIFE, In-Zinerater, and FFHR-E will be given.

  16. Synergies in the design and development of fusion and generation IV fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, E.; Carre, F.; Knebel, J.; Aoto, K.

    2007-01-01

    Future fusion reactors or systems and Generation IV fission reactors are designed and developed in worldwide programmes mostly involving the same partners to investigate and assess their potential for realisation and contribution to meet the future energy needs beyond 2030. Huge scientific and financial effort is necessary to meet these objectives. First programmes have been launched in Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for fission and in the Broader Approach for fusion reactor system development. Except the physics basis for the energy source, future fusion and fission reactors, in particular those with fast neutron core face similar design issues and development needs. Therefore the call for the identification of synergies became evident. Beyond ITER cooled by water, future fusion reactors or systems will be designed for helium and liquid metal cooling and higher temperatures similar to those proposed for some of the six fission reactor concepts in GIF with their diverse coolants. Beside materials developments which are not discussed in this paper, design and performance of components and systems related to the diverse coolants including lifetime and maintenance aspects might offer significant potentials for synergies. Furthermore, the use of process heat for applications in addition to electricity production as well as their safety approaches might create synergistic design and development programmes. Therefore an early identification of possible synergies in the relevant programmes should be endorsed to minimise the effort for future power plants in terms of investments and resources. In addition to a general overview of a possible synergistic work programme which promotes the interaction between fusion and fission programmes towards an integrated organisation of their design and R and D programmes, some specific remarks will be given for joint design tools, numerical code systems and joint experiments in support of common technologies. (orig.)

  17. Synergies in the design and development of fusion and generation IV fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, E.; Carre, F.; Knebel, J.U.; Aoto, K.

    2008-01-01

    Future fusion reactor and Generation IV fission reactor systems are designed and developed in worldwide programmes to investigate and assess their potential for realisation and contribution to the future energy needs beyond 2030 mostly involving the same partners. Huge scientific and financial effort is necessary to meet these objectives. First programmes have been launched in Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for fission and in the Broader Approach for fusion reactor system development. Except for the physics basis for the energy source, future fusion and fission reactors, in particular those with fast neutron core, face similar design issues and development needs. Therefore, the call for the identification of synergies became evident. Beyond ITER cooled by water, future fusion reactor systems will be designed for high-temperature helium and liquid metal cooling but also water including supercritical water and molten salt similar to those proposed for some of the six fission reactor concepts in GIF with their diverse coolants. Beside materials developments which are not discussed in this paper, design and performance of components and systems related to the diverse coolants including lifetime and maintenance aspects might offer significant potentials for synergies. Furthermore, the use of process heat for applications in addition to electricity production as well as their safety approaches can create synergistic design and development programmes. Therefore, an early identification of possible synergies in the relevant programmes should be endorsed to minimise the effort for future power plants in terms of investments and resources. In addition to a general overview of a possible synergistic work programme which promotes the interaction between fusion and fission programmes towards an integrated organisation of their design and R and D programmes, some specific remarks will be given for joint design tools, numerical code systems and joint experiments in

  18. Accelerator driven reactors, - the significance of the energy distribution of spallation neutrons on the neutron statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fhager, V

    2000-01-01

    In order to make correct predictions of the second moment of statistical nuclear variables, such as the number of fissions and the number of thermalized neutrons, the dependence of the energy distribution of the source particles on their number should be considered. It has been pointed out recently that neglecting this number dependence in accelerator driven systems might result in bad estimates of the second moment, and this paper contains qualitative and quantitative estimates of the size of these efforts. We walk towards the requested results in two steps. First, models of the number dependent energy distributions of the neutrons that are ejected in the spallation reactions are constructed, both by simple assumptions and by extracting energy distributions of spallation neutrons from a high-energy particle transport code. Then, the second moment of nuclear variables in a sub-critical reactor, into which spallation neutrons are injected, is calculated. The results from second moment calculations using number dependent energy distributions for the source neutrons are compared to those where only the average energy distribution is used. Two physical models are employed to simulate the neutron transport in the reactor. One is analytical, treating only slowing down of neutrons by elastic scattering in the core material. For this model, equations are written down and solved for the second moment of thermalized neutrons that include the distribution of energy of the spallation neutrons. The other model utilizes Monte Carlo methods for tracking the source neutrons as they travel inside the reactor material. Fast and thermal fission reactions are considered, as well as neutron capture and elastic scattering, and the second moment of the number of fissions, the number of neutrons that leaked out of the system, etc. are calculated. Both models use a cylindrical core with a homogenous mixture of core material. Our results indicate that the number dependence of the energy

  19. Accelerator driven reactors, - the significance of the energy distribution of spallation neutrons on the neutron statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fhager, V.

    2000-01-01

    In order to make correct predictions of the second moment of statistical nuclear variables, such as the number of fissions and the number of thermalized neutrons, the dependence of the energy distribution of the source particles on their number should be considered. It has been pointed out recently that neglecting this number dependence in accelerator driven systems might result in bad estimates of the second moment, and this paper contains qualitative and quantitative estimates of the size of these efforts. We walk towards the requested results in two steps. First, models of the number dependent energy distributions of the neutrons that are ejected in the spallation reactions are constructed, both by simple assumptions and by extracting energy distributions of spallation neutrons from a high-energy particle transport code. Then, the second moment of nuclear variables in a sub-critical reactor, into which spallation neutrons are injected, is calculated. The results from second moment calculations using number dependent energy distributions for the source neutrons are compared to those where only the average energy distribution is used. Two physical models are employed to simulate the neutron transport in the reactor. One is analytical, treating only slowing down of neutrons by elastic scattering in the core material. For this model, equations are written down and solved for the second moment of thermalized neutrons that include the distribution of energy of the spallation neutrons. The other model utilizes Monte Carlo methods for tracking the source neutrons as they travel inside the reactor material. Fast and thermal fission reactions are considered, as well as neutron capture and elastic scattering, and the second moment of the number of fissions, the number of neutrons that leaked out of the system, etc. are calculated. Both models use a cylindrical core with a homogenous mixture of core material. Our results indicate that the number dependence of the energy

  20. Yields of fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 245Cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; McConnell, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Absolute yields have been determined for 105 gamma rays emitted in the decay of 95 fission products representing 54 mass chains created during thermal-neutron fission of 245 Cm. These results include 17 mass chains for which no prior yield data exist. Using a Ge(Li) detector, spectra were obtained of gamma rays between 30 sec and 0.3 yr after very short irradiations of thermal neutrons on a 1 μg sample of 245 Cm. On the basis of measured gamma-ray yields and known nuclear data, total chain mass yields and relative uncertainties were obtained for 51 masses between 84 and 156. The absolute overall normalization uncertainty is 239 Pu and for 252 Cf(s.f.); the influences of the closed shells Z=50, N=82 are not as marked as for thermal-neutron fission of 239 Pu but much more apparent than for 252 Cf(s.f.). Information on the charge distribution along several isobaric mass chains was obtained by determining fractional yields for 12 fission products. The charge distribution width parameter, based upon data for the heavy masses, A=128 to 140, is independent of mass to within the uncertainties of the measurements. Gamma-ray assignments were made for decay of short-lived fission products for which absolute gamma-ray transition probabilities are either not known or in doubt. Absolute gamma-ray transition probabilities were determined as (51 +- 8)% for the 374-keV gamma ray from decay of 110 Rh, (35 +- 7)% for the 1096-keV gamma ray from decay of 133 Sb, and (21.2 +- 1.2)% for the 255-keV gamma ray from decay of 142 Ba

  1. Delayed neutrons as a probe of nuclear charge distribution in fission of heavy nuclei by neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Isaev, S G; Piksaikin, V M; Roshchenko, V A

    2001-01-01

    A method of the determination of cumulative yields of delayed neutron precursors is developed. This method is based on the iterative least-square procedure applied to delayed neutron decay curves measured after irradiation of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U sample by thermal neutrons. Obtained cumulative yields in turns were used for deriving the values of the most probable charge in low-energy fission of the above-mentioned nucleus.

  2. Delayed neutrons as a probe of nuclear charge distribution in fission of heavy nuclei by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, S.G.; Piksaikin, V.M.; Kazakov, L.E.; Roshchenko, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    A method of the determination of cumulative yields of delayed neutron precursors is developed. This method is based on the iterative least-square procedure applied to delayed neutron decay curves measured after irradiation of 235 U sample by thermal neutrons. Obtained cumulative yields in turns were used for deriving the values of the most probable charge in low-energy fission of the above-mentioned nucleus. (author)

  3. Radiation effects in fuel materials for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.

    1983-01-01

    Physical and chemical changes that occur in fuel materials during fission are described. Emphasis is placed on the fuels used today, or those foreseen for the future, hence oxides and carbides of uranium and plutonium. Examples are given to illustrate the most interesting neutron effects. (author)

  4. Fission product chemistry in severe nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-09-01

    A specialist's meeting was held at JRC-Ispra from 15 to 17 January 1990 to review the current understanding of fission-product chemistry during severe accidents in light water reactors. Discussions focussed on the important chemical phenomena that could occur across the wide range of conditions of a damaged nuclear plant. Recommendations for future chemistry work were made covering the following areas: (a) fuel degradation and fission-product release, (b) transport and attenuation processes in the reactor coolant system, (c) containment chemistry (iodine behaviour and core-concrete interactions)

  5. Yields of fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 249Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; McConnell, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Absolute yields have been determined for 107 gamma rays emitted in the decay of 97 fission products representing 54 mass chains created during thermal-neutron fission of 249 Cf. These results include 14 mass chains for which no prior yield data exist. Using a Ge(Li) detector, spectra were obtained of gamma rays emanating from a 0.4 μg sample of 249 Cf between 45 s and 0.4 yr after very short irradiations of the 249 Cf by thermal neutrons. On the basis of measured gamma-ray yields and known nuclear data, total chain mass yields and relative uncertainties were obtained for 51 masses between 89 and 156. The absolute overall normalization uncertainty is approx.8%. The measured A-chain cumulative yields make up 77% of the total light mass (A 249 Cf

  6. What can be learnt from the channel analysis of the 232Th neutron fission cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.; Jary, J.; Trochon, J.; Boldeman, J.W.; Musgrove, A.R. de L.

    1979-10-01

    Channel analyses of the neutron fission cross section of 232 Th have been made in two laboratories. The calculated fission cross sections and fission fragment anisotropies are compared with the experimental data. Despite some differences in the methods used, the conclusions on the physical aspects of the fission process are very similar

  7. Design of ITER neutron monitor using micro fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Ebisawa, Katsuyuki; Ando, Toshiro; Kasai, Satoshi; Johnson, L.C.; Walker, C.

    1998-08-01

    We are designing micro fission chambers, which are pencil size gas counters with fissile material inside, to be installed in the vacuum vessel as neutron flux monitors for ITER. We found that the 238 U micro fission chambers are not suitable because the detection efficiency will increase up to 50% in the ITER life time by breading 239 Pu. We propose to install 235 U micro fission chambers on the front side of the back plate in the gap between adjacent blanket modules and behind the blankets at 10 poloidal locations. One chamber will be installed in the divertor cassette just under the dome. Employing both pulse counting mode and Campbelling mode in the electronics, we can accomplish the ITER requirement of 10 7 dynamic range with 1 ms temporal resolution, and eliminate the effect of gamma-rays. We demonstrate by neutron Monte Carlo calculation with three-dimensional modeling that we avoid those detection efficiency changes by installing micro fission chambers at several poloidal locations inside the vacuum vessel. (author)

  8. Fission energy: The integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1989-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a such next- generation reactor concept. The IFR concept has a number of specific technical advantages that collectively address the potential difficulties facing the expansion of nuclear power deployment. In particular, the IFR concept can meet all three fundamental requirements needed in a next-generation reactor as discussed below. This document discusses these requirements

  9. Fission energy: The integral fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1989-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a such next- generation reactor concept. The IFR concept has a number of specific technical advantages that collectively address the potential difficulties facing the expansion of nuclear power deployment. In particular, the IFR concept can meet all three fundamental requirements needed in a next-generation reactor as discussed below. This document discusses these requirements.

  10. Determination of the effective delayed neutron fraction in the Coral-I Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco, J. L. de; Perez-Navarro, A.; Rodriguez-Mayquez, E.

    1973-01-01

    The effective delayed neutron fraction, β eff, has been determined from the measurement of E / β 2 , by means of reactor noise analysis in the time domain, and the neutron detector efficiency, ε. For the ε measurement it is necessary to determine the fission rate in the reactor. This value can be obtained from the absolute measurement of the fission rate per cm 3 , at a certain point of the reactor, and the determination of these two values ratio, which has been calculated by the Monte Cario method and also measured with results in good agreement. (Author)

  11. Recent improvements in the calculation of prompt fission neutron spectra: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.; LaBauve, R.J.; Nix, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    We consider three topics in the refinement and improvement of our original calculations of prompt fission neutron spectra. These are an improved calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) from the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf, a complete calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum matrix N(E,E n ) from the neutron-induced fission of 235 U, at incident neutron energies ranging from 0 to 15 MeV, and an assessment of the scission neutron component of the prompt fission neutron spectrum. Preliminary results will be presented and compared with experimental measurements and an evaluation. A suggestion is made for new integral cross section measurements. (author). 45 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab

  12. Utilizing horizontal reactors channels for neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovsky, E.Yu.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.

    2000-01-01

    Two experimental heterogeneous reactors have been considered. The reactors may be applied in neutron capture therapy and in a conventional manner. The channel out of the core serves as the neutron source. At each of these facilities, both fast and epithermal neutron fluxes for BNCT research, human clinical trials, and characterized common computational techniques have been evaluated. (authors)

  13. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  14. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A shield for a nuclear reactor includes at least two layers of alternating wide and narrow rectangular blocks so arranged that the spaces between blocks in adjacent layers are out of registry, each block having an opening therein equally spaced from the sides of the blocks and nearer the top of the block than the bottom, the distance from the top of the block to the opening in one layer being different from this distance in adjacent layers, openings in blocks in adjacent layers being in registry. 1 claim, 7 drawing figures

  15. Irradiation positions for fission-track dating in the University of Pavia TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddone, Massimo; Meloni, Sandro; Balestrieri, Maria Laura; Bigazzi, Giulio

    2002-01-01

    An irradiation position arranged is described in the present paper for fission-track dating in the Triga Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia. Fluence values determined using the NIST glass standard SRM 962a for fission-track dating and the traditional metal foils are compared. Relatively good neutron thermalization (φ th /φ f = 0.956) and lack of significant fluence spatial gradients are good factors for fission-track dating. Finally, international age standards (or putative age standards) irradiated in this new position yielded results consistent with independent reference ages. (author)

  16. Parallel Monte Carlo reactor neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, R.N.; Brown, F.B.

    1994-01-01

    The issues affecting implementation of parallel algorithms for large-scale engineering Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations are discussed. For nuclear reactor calculations, these include load balancing, recoding effort, reproducibility, domain decomposition techniques, I/O minimization, and strategies for different parallel architectures. Two codes were parallelized and tested for performance. The architectures employed include SIMD, MIMD-distributed memory, and workstation network with uneven interactive load. Speedups linear with the number of nodes were achieved

  17. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  18. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  19. Influence of fission product transport on delayed neutron precursors and decay heat sources in LMFBR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, C.E. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for studying the influence of fission product transpot on delayed neutron precursors and decay heat sources during Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) unprotected accidents. The model represents the LMFBR core as a closed homogeneous cell. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium theory is used to predict fission product mobility. Reactor kinetics behavior is analyzed by an extension of point kinetics theory. Group dependent delayed neutron precursor and decay heat source retention factors, which represent the fraction of each group retained in the fuel, are developed to link the kinetics and thermodynamics analysis. Application of the method to a highly simplified model of an unprotected loss-of-flow accident shows a time delay on the order of 10 ms is introduced in the predisassembly power history if fission product motion is considered when compared to the traditional transient solution. The post-transient influence of fission product transport calculated by the present model is a 24 percent reduction in the decay heat level in the fuel material which is similar to traditional approximations. Isotopes of the noble gases, Kr and Xe, and the elements I and Br are shown to be very mobile and are responsible for a major part of the observed effects. Isotopes of the elements Cs, Se, Rb, and Te were found to be moderately mobile and contribute to a lesser extent to the observed phenomena. These results obtained from the application of the described model confirm the initial hypothesis that sufficient fission product transport can occur to influence a transient. For these reasons, it is concluded that extension of this model into a multi-cell transient analysis code is warranted

  20. Neutron multiplicity for neutron induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu as a function of neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Holden, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent development in the theory and practice of neutron correlation (''coincidence'') counting require knowledge of the higher factorial moments of the P/sub ν/ distribution (the probability that (ν) neutrons are emitted in a fission) for the case where the fission is induced by bombarding neutrons of more than thermal energies. In contrast to the situation with spontaneous and thermal neutron induced fission, where with a few exceptions the P/sub ν/ is reasonably well known, in the fast neutron energy region, almost no information is available concerning the multiplicity beyond the average value, [ν], even for the most important nuclides. The reason for this is the difficulty of such experiments, with consequent statistically poor and physically inconsistent results

  1. Measurements of fission cross-sections and of neutron production rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billaud, P.; Clair, C.; Gaudin, M.; Genin, R.; Joly, R.; Leroy, J.L.; Michaudon, A.; Ouvry, J.; Signarbieux, C.; Vendryes, G.

    1958-01-01

    a) Measurements of neutron induced fission cross-sections in the low energy region. The variation of the fission cross sections of several fissile isotopes has been measured and analysed, for neutron energies below 0,025 eV. The monochromator was a crystal spectrometer used in conjunction with a mechanical velocity selector removing higher order Bragg reflections. The fissile material was laid down on the plates of a fission chamber by painting technic. An ionization chamber, having its plates coated with thin 10 B layers, was used as the neutron flux monitor. b) Measurement of the fission cross section of 235 U. We intend to measure the variation of the neutron induced fission cross section of 235 U over the neutron energy range from 1 keV by the time of flight method. The neutron source is the uranium target of a pulsed 28 MeV electron linear accelerator. The detector is a large fission chamber, with parallel plates, containing about 10 g of 235 U (20 deposits of 25 cm diameter). The relative fission data were corrected for the neutron spectrum measured with a set of BF 3 proportional counters. c) Mean number ν of neutrons emitted in neutron induced fission. We measured the value of ν for several fissile isotopes in the case of fission induced by 14 MeV neutrons. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by D (t, n) α reaction by means of a 300 kV Cockcroft Walton generator. (author) [fr

  2. Systematic evaluation of prompt neutron spectra in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Takaaki

    1995-01-01

    To create the nuclear data fail JEND-32, the prompt fission neutron spectra X(E) of 233 U, 235 U, 238 U and 239 Pu were reevaluated and some improvement were added to the calculation models. We tried to extend the calculation method of fission spectra of nuclides with poor measurement data in consideration of increasing the importance of nuclear data of minor actinoids. We improved and extended the following five points. (1) On JENDL-3.1, the fission spectra of principal fissible materials had been calculated by the Modland-Nix model which the neutron emissions of fragments were calculated under the approximation of the constant inverse process cross section. In the paper, the spectra were calculated by the use of the inverse process cross section depend on the energy obtained by the calculation of the optical model. The result showed the increase of low energy components and the softening effect of spectra (2) On JENDL-3.1, the all fission processes were assumed to undergo (n,f) reaction. In the paper, they were calculated by the multi-chance fission such as (n, n'f), (n, 2nf) and (n, 3nf) etc. Softening of the spectra (En > 6 MeV) was obtained by this method. (3) The level density parameter (LDP) has been assumed as a = A/C in either case of light fragment (LF) and heavy fragment (HF) in the original Madland-Nix model. But we used LDP based on the Ignatyuk model under consideration of the shell effects of nuclear fragments, hence the neutron spectra of heavy fragments were hardening. (4) Nuclear temperature of both fragments had been assumed to be the same at original model, but now R T = Tm/TmH was derived to calculate them. The ratio of middle/both side components of spectra was changed. (5) Unknown neutron fission spectra of minor actinide were able to the assumed on the basis of Moriyama-Ohnishi model. (S.Y.)

  3. Fission ionisation chamber for the measurement of low fluxes of slow neutrons; Chambre d'ionisation a fission pour la mesure des faibles flux de neutrons lents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weill, J; Duchene, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The ionisation chamber described is designed for the measurement of slow neutron fluxes of average or low intensity, in the presence, eventually, of very high gamma fluxes. The capture of a slow neutron by a fissile material, in this case {sup 235}U, gives rise to fission fragments, high-energy particles which ionise the gas contained in the chamber. The neutrons are detected by virtue of the potential pulses, on the collecting electrode of the chamber, deriving from the collection of the ions produced by the fission fragments. The pulses are counted by means of a measuring system consisting of a preamplifier, a 2 Mc amplifier, a discriminator and an electronic scale with numerator or integrator. The general characteristics are as follows: sensitivity to neutrons: 0.07 kicks/n/cm{sup 2}.s, sensitivity to {gamma} rays: zero up to 3.10{sup 4} R/H, a background noise at the normal discrimination voltage: 0.01 kicks/s, working H.T.: -500 V, capacity: 40 {mu}{mu}F, average height of pulse: 8 mV, limits of use: from several neutrons to 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}.s. This chamber may be used in all cases where low fluxes of slow neutrons must be measured, especially in the presence of high gamma fluxes, for example in the checking of Pu concentrations in an extraction plant or for the starting up of reactors. (author) [French] La chambre d'ionisation decrite est destinee a la mesure des flux de neutrons lents d'intensite moyenne ou faible, en presence eventuelle de flux gamma tres importants. La capture d'un neutron lent par un materiau fissile, en l'occurrence {sup 235}U, donne naissance a des fragments de fission, particules de grande energie qui ionisent le gaz contenu dans la chambre. Les neutrons sont detectes grace aux impulsions de potentiel, sur l'electrode collectrice de la chambre, provenant de la collection des ions produits par les fragments de fission. Une chaine de mesure comprenant un preamplificateur, un amplificateur 2 Mc, un discriminateur, une echelle

  4. Updated comparison of economics of fusion reactors with advanced fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The projected cost of electricity (COE) for fusion is compared with that from current and advanced nuclear fission and coal-fired plants. Fusion cost models were adjusted for consistency with advanced fission plants and the calculational methodology and cost factors follow guidelines recommended for cost comparisons of advanced fission reactors. The results show COEs of about 59--74 mills/kWh for the fusion designs considered. In comparison, COEs for future fission reactors are estimated to be in the 43--54 mills/kWh range with coal-fired plant COEs of about 53--69 mills/kWh ($2--3/GJ coal). The principal cost driver for the fusion plants relative to fission plants is the fusion island cost. Although the estimated COEs for fusion are greater than those for fission or coal, the costs are not so high as to preclude fusion's competitiveness as a safe and environmentally sound alternative

  5. Characteristics of the neutron field near the fission plate; Karakteristike nevtronskega polja fisijske plosce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glumac, B [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1979-07-01

    After the reconstruction of the exposure room of the TRIGA reactor a new measurement of the neutron spectrum behind the fission converter was necessary. The multiple foil method was applied. Following twelve reactions were chosen: 197-Au (n, {gamma}), 63-Cu (n, {gamma}), 59-Co (n, {gamma}), 115-In (n.n'), 64-Zn )n.p), 27-Al (n, {alpha}), 25 Mg (n,p), 56-Fe (n,p), 19 F (n,2n'), 237-Np (n,f), 239 Pu (n,f) and 235-U (n,f). The neutron spectrum was calculated from measured reaction rates using our unfolding code ITERAD. The neutron cross sections library DOCROS 77 was applied for the calculations. (author)

  6. Thermochemical data for reactor materials and fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Konings, R.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This volume presents a collection of critically assessed data on inorganic compounds which are of special interest in nuclear reactor safety studies. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations are an important and widely used instrument in the understanding of the chemical behavior and release of fission products in the course of nuclear reactor accidents. The reliability of such calculations is, nevertheless, limited by the availability of accurate input data for relevant compounds

  7. Systems study of tokamak fusion--fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.; Bathke, C.G.; Price, W.G. Jr.; Bohlke, W.H.; Mills, R.G.; Johnson, E.F.; Todd, A.M.M.; Buchanan, C.H.; Gralnick, S.L.

    1978-11-01

    This publication reports the results of a two to three year effort at a systematic analysis of a wide variety of tokamak-driven fissioning blanket reactors, i.e., fusion--fission hybrids. It addresses the quantitative problems of determining the economically most desirable mix of the two products: electric power and fissionable fuel and shows how the price of electric power can be minimized when subject to a variety of constraints. An attempt has been made to avoid restricting assumptions, and the result is an optimizing algorithm that operates in a six-dimensional parameter space. Comparisons are made on sets of as many as 100,000 distinct machine models, and the principal results of the study have been derived from the examination of several hundred thousand possible reactor configurations

  8. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport. Refs, figs, tabs.

  9. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport

  10. Energy released in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.F.

    1969-05-01

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  11. Neutron-neutron angular correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf and 240Pu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Nakae, L. F.; Vogt, R.

    2018-04-01

    Background: Angular anisotropy has been observed between prompt neutrons emitted during the fission process. Such an anisotropy arises because the emitted neutrons are boosted along the direction of the parent fragment. Purpose: To measure the neutron-neutron angular correlations from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and 240Pu oxide samples using a liquid scintillator array capable of pulse-shape discrimination. To compare these correlations to simulations combining the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX with the fission event generator FREYA. Method: Two different analysis methods were used to study the neutron-neutron correlations with varying energy thresholds. The first is based on setting a light output threshold while the second imposes a time-of-flight cutoff. The second method has the advantage of being truly detector independent. Results: The neutron-neutron correlation modeled by FREYA depends strongly on the sharing of the excitation energy between the two fragments. The measured asymmetry enabled us to adjust the FREYA parameter x in 240Pu, which controls the energy partition between the fragments and is so far inaccessible in other measurements. The 240Pu data in this analysis was the first available to quantify the energy partition for this isotope. The agreement between data and simulation is overall very good for 252Cf(sf ) and 240Pu(sf ) . Conclusions: The asymmetry in the measured neutron-neutron angular distributions can be predicted by FREYA. The shape of the correlation function depends on how the excitation energy is partitioned between the two fission fragments. Experimental data suggest that the lighter fragment is disproportionately excited.

  12. Application of Campbell's MSV method in monitoring of reactor's fission power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovic, S.J.; Vukcevic, M.; Loncar, B.; Vasic, A.; Osmokrovic, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents some possibilities of Campbell's MSV (Mean Square Value) method in monitoring the reactor's fission power. Investigation of gamma discrimination compared to neutron component of signal along with change of variance and mean value the detector output signal for a specified range of reactor's fission power (10mW-22W) was carried out. The uncompensated ionization chamber for mixed n- gamma fields was used as detector element. Experimental measurements were performed using digitized MSV method, and obtained results were compared to those obtained by classical measuring chain. The final conclusion is that the order of discrimination in MSV signal processing is about fifty times larger than for classical measuring method (author)

  13. Conceptual design of a fission-based integrated test facility for fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, K.D.; Deis, G.A.; Hsu, P.Y.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Miller, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    The testing of fusion materials and components in fission reactors will become increasingly important because of lack of fusion engineering test devices in the immediate future and the increasing long-term demand for fusion testing when a fusion reactor test station becomes available. This paper presents the conceptual design of a fission-based Integrated Test Facility (ITF) developed by EG and G Idaho. This facility can accommodate entire first wall/blanket (FW/B) test modules such as those proposed for INTOR and can also accommodate smaller cylindrical modules similar to those designed by Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) and Westinghouse. In addition, the facility can be used to test bulk breeder blanket materials, materials for tritium permeation, and components for performance in a nuclear environment. The ITF provides a cyclic neutron/gamma flux as well as the numerous module and experiment support functions required for truly integrated tests

  14. Major features of a mirror fusion--fast fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Burleigh, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    A conceptual design was made of a fusion-fission reactor. The fusion component is a D-T plasma confined by a pair of magnetic mirror coils in a Yin-Yang configuration and sustained by hot neutral beam injection. The neutrons from the fusion plasma drive the fission assembly which is composed of natural uranium carbide fuel rods clad with stainless steel and is cooled by helium. It was shown how the reactor can be built using essentially present day construction technology and how the uranium bearing blanket modules can be routinely changed to allow separation of the bred fissile fuel of which approximately 1200 kg of plutonium are produced each year along with the approximately 750 MW of electricity. (U.S.)

  15. Feasibility study of a fission supressed blanket for a tandem-mirror hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Barr, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    A study of fission suppressed blankets for the tandem mirror not only showed such blankets to be feasible but also to be safer than fissioning blankets. Such hybrids could produce enough fissile material to support up to 17 light water reactors of the same nuclear power rating. Beryllium was compared to 7 Li for neutron multiplication; both were considered feasible but the blanket with Li produced 20% less fissile fuel per unit of nuclear power in the reactor. The beryllium resource, while possibly being too small for extensive pure fusion application, would be adequate (with carefully planned industrial expansion) for the hybrid because of the large support ratio, and hence few hybrids required. Radiation damage and coatings for beryllium remain issues to be resolved by further study and experimentation. Molten salt reprocessing was compared to aqueous solution reprocessing

  16. On the combination of delayed neutron and delayed gamma techniques for fission rate measurement in nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, G.; Jordan, K. A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, 5232 (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Novel techniques to measure newly induced fissions in spent fuel after re-irradiation at low power have been developed and tested at the Proteus zero-power research reactor. The two techniques are based on the detection of high energy gamma-rays emitted by short-lived fission products and delayed neutrons. The two techniques relate the measured signals to the total fission rate, the isotopic composition of the fuel, and nuclear data. They can be combined to derive better estimates on each of these parameters. This has potential for improvement in many areas. Spent fuel characterisation and safeguard applications can benefit from these techniques for non-destructive assay of plutonium content. Another application of choice is the reduction of uncertainties on nuclear data. As a first application of the combination of the delayed neutron and gamma measurement techniques, this paper shows how to reduce the uncertainties on the relative abundances of the longest delayed neutron group for thermal fissions in {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and fast fissions in {sup 238}U. The proposed experiments are easily achievable in zero-power research reactors using fresh UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel and do not require fast extraction systems. The relative uncertainties (1{sigma}) on the relative abundances are expected to be reduced from 13% to 4%, 16% to 5%, and 38% to 12% for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu, respectively. (authors)

  17. Theoretical model application to the evaluation of fission neutron data up to 20 MeV incidence energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, A.; Maerten, H.; Seeliger, D.

    1990-01-01

    A complex statistical theory of fission neutron emission combined with a phenomenological fission model has been used to calculate fission neutron data for 238 U. Obtained neutron multiplicities and energy spectra as well as average fragment energies for incidence energies from threshold to 20 MeV (including multiple-chance fission) are compared with traditional data representations. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  18. Reactor-moderated intermediate-energy neutron beams for neutron-capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Less, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    One approach to producing an intermediate energy beam is moderating fission neutrons escaping from a reactor core. The objective of this research is to evaluate materials that might produce an intermediate beam for NCT via moderation of fission neutrons. A second objective is to use the more promising moderator material in a preliminary design of an NCT facility at a research reactor. The evaluations showed that several materials or combinations of materials could produce a moderator source for an intermediate beam for NCT. The best neutron spectrum for use in NCT is produced by Al 2 O 3 , but mixtures of Al metal and D 2 O are also attractive. Using the best moderator materials, results were applied to the design of an NCT moderator at the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Reactor's bio-medical facility. The amount of photon shielding and thermal neutron absorber were optimized with respect to the desired photon dose rate and intermediate neutron flux at the patient position

  19. Fission-suppressed hybrid reactor: the fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Coops, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    Results of a conceptual design study of a 233 U-producing fusion breeder are presented. The majority of the study was devoted to conceptual design and evaluation of a fission-suppressed blanket and to fuel cycle issues such as fuel reprocessing, fuel handling, and fuel management. Studies in the areas of fusion engineering, reactor safety, and economics were also performed

  20. Fission cross section and fission fragment angular distribution for oriented nucleus fission by intermediate energy neutrons (epsilon < or approximately 1 Mev)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.; Grechukhin, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    General analysis is conducted, and formulae for fission cross section and angular distribution of fission fragments of oriented nuclei by fast neutrons are presented. Geometrical coefficients making up the formulae permitting to carry out calculations for target nuclei with spins I=3/2, 5/2, 7/2 at interaction energies epsilon < or approximately 1 MeV are tabulated. Results of demonstrative calculation of fission fragment angular distribution of oriented sup(235)U nuclei by 0.1 <= epsilon <= 1.0 MeV neutrons reveal that angular distribution weakly depends on the set of permeability factors of neutron waves applied in the calculations

  1. Determination of technetium-99 in mixed fission products by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bate, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    A method has been developed for analysis of 99 Tc in fission product mixtures. The analysis consists of a chemical separation of 99 Tc, neutron irradiation of the isolated 99 Tc, and gamma-ray spectrometric determination of the induced 100 Tc radioactivity. Technetium-99 is chemically separated from most fission products by a cyclohexanone extraction from basic carbonate solution. Technetium-99 is stripped into water by addition of carbon tetrachloride to the cyclohexanone phase. A final step in the separation procedure is adsorption of 99 Tc on an anion exchange column which provides additional decontamination and places the 99 Tc in a concentrated form for neutron activation analysis. Neutron irradiations of the isolated 99 Tc were made in the pneumatic tube facility at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at a flux of 5 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec for 11 seconds. Induced 100 Tc radioactivity was determined immediately after irradiation using gamma-ray spectrometry to measure the 540 and 591 keV lines. Sensitivity of the analysis under these conditions is approximately 5 ng, and samples of up to about 100 ml volume can be easily processed. The method has been successfully applied to reactor fuel solutions and off-gas traps containing 6.5 x 10 -4 to 240 μg 99 Tc/ml

  2. Independent yields of Rb and Cs isotopes from thermal-neutron induced fission of /sup 235/U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Decker, R.; Wollnik, H.; Wuensch, K.D.; Jung, G.; Koglin, E.; Siegert, G.

    1979-12-01

    The relative yields of Rb and Cs isotopes from thermal-neutron fission of /sup 235/U have been redetermined using the mass separator OSTIS, on-line at a neutron guide of the High-Flux Beam Reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France. The separator ion source was a hot oven containing /sup 235/U in a graphite matrix. The neutron beam was pulsed. Alkali fission products diffused out of the graphite and were ionized, thus producing a stepwise increase in the analyzed ion beam proportional to the independent fission yield. The ion beam and the fissions in the source were monitored simultaneously. The diffusion of Rb and Cs from the source was exponential in time with half-lives ranging from 2.8 to 18 sec, depending upon the element and source temperature. The independent fission yields of Rb and Cs are normalized by equating their element yields to each other and to a value computed from the charge distributions observed with the recoil separator LOHENGRIN and well established mass yields. Fractional independent yields are deduced from the independent fission yields, and these compare very well with the EOZ model described by Wahl.

  3. General remarks on fast neutron reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, J.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The main aspects of fast reactor physics, presented in these lecture notes, are restricted to LMFBR's. The emphasis is placed on the core neutronic balance and the burn-up problems. After a brief description of the power reactor main components and of the fast reactor chronology, the fundamental parameters of the one-group neutronic balance are briefly reviewed. Then the neutronic burn-up problems related to the Pu production and to the doubling time are considered

  4. Induction of micronuclei in the root tip cells of Haplopappus germinating seeds by fission neutrons and X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanmoto, Hidehiro; Yonezawa, Yoshihiko; Itoh, Tetsuo; Kondo, Sohei.

    1992-01-01

    Seeds of Haplopappus gracilis (2n=4), an annual Compositae, were soaked in water for 24 hr and then irradiated with fission neutrons from the 1-wattage reactor, UTR-KINKI, or X rays. The root tip cells were inspected at 48 hr post-irradiation for evidence of chromosome damage using micronucleus as endpoint. The frequency of neutron-induced micronuclei increased almost linearly as the dose increased up to as much as 1.2 Gy. X-ray-induced micronuclei showed an exponential dose-response relation. From dose-response data, we estimated that the dose necessary to induce micronuclei at a frequency of 5 per 1,000 cells was 1.2 Gy for neutrons and 8.6 Gy for X rays. Thus, to induce chromosome damage in the somatic cells of germinating Haplopappus seeds, fission neutrons were much more effective than X rays. (author)

  5. A neutron amplifier: prospects for reactor-based waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanovsky, A.

    2004-01-01

    A design concept and characteristics for an epithermal breeder controlled by variable feedback and external neutron source intensity are presented. By replacing the control rods with neutron sources, we could maintain good power distribution and perform radioactive waste burning in high flux subcritical reactors (HFSR) that have primary system size, power density and cost comparable to a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Another approach for actinide transmutation is a molten salt subcritical reactor proposed by Russian scientists. To increase neutron source intensity the HFSR is divided into two zones: a booster and a blanket with solid and liquid fuels. A neutron gate (absorber and moderator) imposed between two zones permits fast neutrons from the booster to flow to the blanket. Neutrons moving in the reverse direction are moderated and absorbed in the absorber zone. In the HFSR, neptunium-plutonium fuel is circulated in the booster and blanket, and americium-curium in the absorber zone and outer reflector. Use of a liquid actinide fuel permits transport of the delayed-neutron emitters from the blanket to the booster, where they can provide additional neutrons (source-dominated mode) or all the necessary excitation without an external neutron source (self-amplifying mode). With a blanket neutron multiplication gain of 20 and a booster gain of 50, an external neutron source rate of at least 10 15 n/s (0.7 MW D-T or 2.5 MW electron beam power) is needed to control the HFSR that produces 300 MWt. Most of the power could be generated in the blanket that burns about 100 kg of actinides a year. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of HFSR design aspects including the wave model of observed relativistic phenomena, plant seismic diagnostics, fission electric cells (FEC) with a multistage collector (anode) and layered cathode. (author)

  6. Life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, D.; Duggal, K.; Lombard, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The primary focus of this program is to obtain information on the late effects of whole body exposure to low doses of a high linear-energy-transfer (LET) and a low-LET ionizing radiation in experimental animals to provide guidance for the prediction of radiation hazards to man. The information obtained takes the form of dose-response curves for life shortening and for the induction of numerous specific types of tumors. The animals are irradiated with fission neutrons from the Janus reactor and with 60 Co gamma rays, delivered as single, weekly, or duration-of-life exposures covering the range of doses and dose rates. 6 refs

  7. Above-threshold structure in {sup 244}Cm neutron-induced fission cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, V.M. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk-Sosny (Belarus)

    1997-03-01

    The quasi-resonance structure appearing above the fission threshold in neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 244}Cm(n,f) is interpreted. It is shown to be due to excitation of few-quasiparticle states in fissioning {sup 245}Cm and residual {sup 244}Cm nuclides. The estimate of quasiparticle excitation thresholds in fissioning nuclide {sup 245}Cm is consistent with pairing gap and fission barrier parameters. (author)

  8. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors - 202

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recktenwald, G.D.; Bronk, L.A.; Deinert, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks. (authors)

  9. Prompt fission neutron spectra and anti νp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    Methods used to obtain the evaluated prompt fisson neutron spectrum N(E) and the average prompt neutron multiplicity anti ν/sub p/ are reviewed. The relative influence of experimental data; interpolated, extrapolated, and fitted experimental data; systematics; and nuclear theory are considered for the cases where (a) abundant experimental data exist, (b) some experimental data exist, and (c) no experimental data exist. The Maxwellian and Watt distributions, and the determination of the parameters of these distributions by data fitting, are described and compared to recent new theoretical work on the calculation of N(E). Similarly, various expressions for anti γ/sub p/ that have been obtained by data fitting and systematics are described and compared to recent new theoretical work. Complications in the evaluation of N(E) and anti γ/sub p/ due to the onset of multiple-chance fission and the interrelationships between N(E), anti γΔ/sub p/ and the multiple-chance fission cross section are discussed using the example of the fission of 235 U. Some statistics and comments are given on the evaluations of N(E) and anti γ/sub p/ contained in ENDF/B-V, and a number of concluding recommendations are made for future evaluation work

  10. Fission barriers of two odd-neutron heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Meng-Hock; Bonneau, L.; Nhan Hao, T. V.; Duc, Dao Duy; Quentin, P.

    2015-01-01

    The fission barriers of two odd-neutron heavy odd nuclei,namely the 235 U and 239 Pu isotopes have been calculated within a self-consistent Hartree-Fock-plus-BCS approach with blocking. A Skyrme nucleon-nucleon effective interaction has been used together with a seniority force to describe pairing correlations. A full account of the genuine time-reversal symmetry breaking due to the presence of an unpaired nucleon has been incorporated at the mean field level. The SIII and SkM* parametrizations of the Skyrme interaction have been retained as well as for a part a newer parametrization, SLy5*. The seniority force parameters have been fitted to reproduce experimental odd-even mass differences in the actinide region. To assess the relevance of our calculated fission barrier distribution (as a function of the quantum numbers), we have studied the quality of our results with respect to the spectroscopy of band heads (for configurations deemed to be a pure single particle character) in the ground and fission isomeric states. Fission barriers of the considered odd nuclei have been compared with what is obtained for their even-even neighbouring isotopes (namely 234 U and 236 U, 238 Pu and 240 Pu respectively) to determine the so-called specialization energies. Various corrections and associated uncertainties have been discussed in order to compare our results with available data

  11. Spectral effects in low-dose fission and fusion neutron irradiated metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Atkin, S.D.; Martinez, C.

    1986-04-01

    Flat miniature tensile specimens were irradiated to neutron fluences up to 9 x 10 22 n/m 2 in the RTNS-II and in the Omega West Reactor. Specimen temperatures were the same in both environments, with runs being made at both 90 0 C and 290 0 C. The results of tensile tests on AISI 316 stainless steel, A302B pressure vessel steel and pure copper are reported here. The radiation-induced changes in yield strength as a function of neutron dose in each spectrum are compared. The data for 316 stainless steel correlate well on the basis of displacements per atom (dpa), while those for copper and A302B do not. In copper the ratio of fission dpa to 14 MeV neutron dpa for a given yield stress change is about three to one. In A302B pressure vessel steel this ratio is more than three at lower fluences, but the yield stress data for fission and 14 MeV neutron-irradiated A302B steel appears to coalesce or intersect at the higher fluences

  12. Research reactors for the social safety and prosperous neutron use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    The present status of nuclear reactors in Japan and the world was briefly described in this report. Aiming to construct a background of stable future society dependent on nuclear energy, the necessity to establish an organization for research reactors in Japan was pointed out. There are a total of 468 reactors in the world, but only 248 of them are running at present and most of them are superannuated. In Japan, 15 research reactors are running and 8 of them are under collaborative utilization, but not a few of them have various problems. In the education of atomic energy, a reactor is dispensable for understanding its working principle through practice learning. Furthermore, a research reactor has important roles for development of power reactor in addition to various basic studies such as activation analysis, fission track, biological irradiation, neutron scattering, etc. Application of a reactor has been also progressing in industrial and medical fields. However, operation of the reactors has become more and more difficult in Japan because of a large running cost and a lack of residential consensus for nuclear reactor. Here, the author proposed an establishment of organization of research reactor in order to promote utilization of a reactor in the field of education, rearing of professionals and science and engineering. (M.N.)

  13. Calculation of neutron importance function in fissionable assemblies using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feghhi, S. A. H.; Afarideh, H.; Shahriari, M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to develop an efficient solution method to calculate neutron importance function in fissionable assemblies for all criticality conditions, using Monte Carlo Method. The neutron importance function has a well important role in perturbation theory and reactor dynamic calculations. Usually this function can be determined by calculating adjoint flux through out solving the Adjoint weighted transport equation with deterministic methods. However, in complex geometries these calculations are very difficult. In this article, considering the capabilities of MCNP code in solving problems with complex geometries and its closeness to physical concepts, a comprehensive method based on physical concept of neutron importance has been introduced for calculating neutron importance function in sub-critical, critical and supercritical conditions. For this means a computer program has been developed. The results of the method has been benchmarked with ANISN code calculations in 1 and 2 group modes for simple geometries and their correctness has been approved for all three criticality conditions. Ultimately, the efficiency of the method for complex geometries has been shown by calculation of neutron importance in MNSR research reactor

  14. Conceptual Analysis of Fission Fragment Magnetic Collimator Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel V.; Parish, Theodore A.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the current research work within the US DOE NERI Direct Electricity Conversion (DEC) Project on methods for utilizing direct electricity conversion in nuclear reactors, a detailed study of a Fission Fragment Magnetic Collimator Reactor (FFMCR) has been performed. The FFMCR concept is an advanced DEC system that combines advantageous design solutions proposed for application in both fission and fusion reactors. The present study was focused on determining the electrical efficiency and other important operational aspects of the FFMCR concept. In principle, acceptable characteristics have been demonstrated, and results obtained are presented in the paper. Technological visibility of the FFMCR concept and required further design development are discussed. Preliminary characteristics of the promising design are outlined. (authors)

  15. Developments and Tendencies in Fission Reactor Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamov, E. O.; Fuji-Ie, Y.

    This chapter describes, in two parts, new-generation nuclear energy systems that are required to be in harmony with nature and to make full use of nuclear resources. The issues of transmutation and containment of radioactive waste will also be addressed. After a short introduction to the first part, Sect. 58.1.2 will detail the requirements these systems must satisfy on the basic premise of peaceful use of nuclear energy. The expected designs themselves are described in Sect. 58.1.3. The subsequent sections discuss various types of advanced reactor systems. Section 58.1.4 deals with the light water reactor (LWR) whose performance is still expected to improve, which would extend its application in the future. The supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR) will also be shortly discussed. Section 58.1.5 is mainly on the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which offers efficient and multipurpose use of nuclear energy. The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) is also included. Section 58.1.6 focuses on the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) as a promising concept for advanced nuclear reactors, which may help both to achieve expansion of energy sources and environmental protection thus contributing to the sustainable development of mankind. The molten-salt reactor (MSR) is shortly described in Sect. 58.1.7. The second part of the chapter deals with reactor systems of a new generation, which are now found at the research and development (R&D) stage and in the medium term of 20-30 years can shape up as reliable, economically efficient, and environmentally friendly energy sources. They are viewed as technologies of cardinal importance, capable of resolving the problems of fuel resources, minimizing the quantities of generated radioactive waste and the environmental impacts, and strengthening the regime of nonproliferation of the materials suitable for nuclear weapons production. Particular attention has been given to naturally safe fast reactors with a closed fuel cycle (CFC

  16. Status on potential of advanced fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-Zaleski, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    In this short lecture, only two types of reactors will be discussed: the liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and the high temperature reactors (HTR). This does not mean that other very interesting concepts do not exist, but there are or proven light water reactors and heavy water reactors or has not reached the state of industrial development like molten-salt or gas breeder reactors. In discussing any types of industrial development, it seems to me useful, first to indicate the reasons or motivations for this development. Then I will give a short historical review and analysis of what has been done up to now. For HTR's a very brief status report will be presented. For LMFBR's, I will give indications of experience gained with demonstration plants and more specifically with Phenix, before listing the most important technical problems which still need more work to be fully solved. Finally, I will briefly discuss the economic status and perspectives of LMFBR's and will mention the public acceptance problem

  17. Angular distributions in the neutron-induced fission of actinides

    CERN Multimedia

    In 2003 the n_TOF Collaboration performed the fission cross section measurement of several actinides ($^{232}$Th, $^{233}$U, $^{234}$U, $^{237}$Np) at the n_TOF facility using an experImental setup made of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC). The method based on the detection of the 2 fragments in coincidence allowed to clearly disentangle the fission reactions among other types of reactions occurring in the spallation domain. We have been therefore able to cover the very broad neutron energy range 1eV-1GeV, taking full benefit of the unique characteristics of the n_TOF facility. Figure 1 shows an example obtained in the case of $^{237}$Np where the n_ TOF measurement showed that the cross section was underestimated by a large factor in the resonance region.

  18. Conceptual design of a hybrid fusion-fission reactor with intrinsic safety and optimized energy productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebi, Hosein; Sadat Kiai, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Designing a high yield and feasible Dense Plasma Focus for driving the reactor. • Presenting a structural method to design the dual layer cylindrical blankets. • Finding, the blanket production energy, in terms of its geometrical and material parameters. • Designing a subcritical blanket with optimization of energy amplification in detail. - Abstract: A hybrid fission-fusion reactor with a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) as a fusion core and the dual layer fissionable blanket as the energy multiplier were conceptually designed. A cylindrical DPF, energized by a 200 kJ bank energy, is considered to produce fusion neutron, and these neutrons drive the subcritical fission in the surrounding blankets. The emphasis has been placed on the safety and energy production with considering technical and economical limitations. Therefore, the k eff-t of the dual cylindrical blanket was defined and mathematically, specified. By applying the safety criterion (k eff-t ≤ 0.95), the geometrical and material parameters of the blanket optimizing the energy amplification were obtained. Finally, MCNPX code has been used to determine the detailed dimensions of the blankets and fuel rods.

  19. Time-frequency feature analysis and recognition of fission neutrons signal based on support vector machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Wei Biao; Feng Peng; Tang Yuelin; Zhou Mi

    2010-01-01

    Based on the interdependent relationship between fission neutrons ( 252 Cf) and fission chain ( 235 U system), the paper presents the time-frequency feature analysis and recognition in fission neutron signal based on support vector machine (SVM) through the analysis on signal characteristics and the measuring principle of the 252 Cf fission neutron signal. The time-frequency characteristics and energy features of the fission neutron signal are extracted by using wavelet decomposition and de-noising wavelet packet decomposition, and then applied to training and classification by means of support vector machine based on statistical learning theory. The results show that, it is effective to obtain features of nuclear signal via wavelet decomposition and de-noising wavelet packet decomposition, and the latter can reflect the internal characteristics of the fission neutron system better. With the training accomplished, the SVM classifier achieves an accuracy rate above 70%, overcoming the lack of training samples, and verifying the effectiveness of the algorithm. (authors)

  20. Geochemical properties and nuclear chemical characteristics of Oklo natural fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Hiroshi [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-07-01

    There are six uranium deposits in the Gabonese Republic in the cnetral Africa. `Fission reactor zone`, the fission chain reactions generated about 200 billion years ago, was existed in a part of them. CEA begun geochemical researches of Oklo deposits etc. in 1991. The geochemical and nuclear chemical properties of Oklo were reviewed from the results of researches. Oklo deposits is consisted of main five sedimentary faces such as sandstone (FA), Black Shale formation (FB), mudstone (FC), tuff (FD) and volcaniclastic sandstone (FE) from the bottom on the base rock of granite in the Precambrian era. Uranium is enriched in the upper part of FA layer and the under part of FB layer. {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U, U content, fission proportion, duration time, neutron fluence, temperature, restitution factor of {sup 235}U and epithermal index ({gamma}) were investigated and compared. The geochemical properties of Oklo are as followed: large enrich of uranium, the abundance ratio of {sup 235}U as same as that of enriched uranium, interaction of natural water and small rear earth elements. These factors made casually Oklo fission reactor. (S.Y.)

  1. Miniature fission chambers calibration in pulse mode: interlaboratory comparison at the. SCK·CEN BR1 and CEA CALIBAN reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamirand, V.; Geslot, B.; Gregoire, G.; Garnier, D.; Breaud, S.; Mellier, F.; Di-Salvo, J.; Destouches, C.; Blaise, P.; Wagemans, J.; Borms, L.; Malambu, E.; Casoli, P.; Jacquet, X.; Rousseau, G.; Sauvecane, P.

    2013-06-01

    Miniature fission chambers are suited tools for instrumenting experimental reactors, allowing online and in-core neutron measurements of quantities such as fission rates or reactor power. A new set of such detectors was produced by CEA to be used during the next experimental program at the EOLE facility starting in 2013. Some of these detectors will be employed in pulse mode for absolute measurements, thus requiring calibration. The calibration factor is expressed in mass units and thus called 'effective mass'. A calibration campaign was conducted in December 2012 at the SCK.CEN BR1 facility within the framework of the scientific cooperation VEP (VENUS-EOLE-PROTEUS) between SCK.CEN, CEA and PSI. Two actions were conducted in order to improve the calibration method. First a new characterisation of the thermal flux cavity and the MARK3 neutron flux conversion device performed by SCK.CEN allowed using calculated effective cross sections for determining detectors effective masses. Dosimetry irradiations were performed in situ in order to determine the neutron flux level and provide link to the metrological standard. Secondly two fission chambers were also calibrated at the CEA CALIBAN reactor (fast neutron spectrum), using the same method so that the results can be compared with the results obtained at the SCK.CEN. In this paper the calibration method and recent improvements on uncertainty reduction are presented. The results and uncertainties obtained in the two reactors CALIBAN and BR1 are compared and discussed. (authors)

  2. New ceramics for nuclear industry. Case of fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yvars, M.

    1979-10-01

    The ceramics used in the nuclear field are described as is their behaviour under radiation. 1) Power reactors - nuclear fission. Ceramics enter into the fabrication of nuclear fuels: oxides, carbides, uranium or plutonium nitrides or oxy-nitrides. Silicon carbide SiC is used for preparing the fuels of helium cooled high temperature reactors. Its use is foreseen in the design of gas high temperature gas thermal exchangers, as is silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ). In the materials for safety or control rods, the intense neutron flows induce nuclear reactions which increase the temperature of the neutron absorbing material. Boron carbide B 4 C, rare earth oxides Ln 2 O 3 , or B 4 C-Cu or B 4 C-Al cermets are employed. Burnable poison materials are formed of Al 2 O 3 -B 4 C or Al 2 O 3 -Ln 2 O 3 cermets. The moderators of thermal neutron reactors are in high purety polycrystalline graphite. For the thermal insulation of reactor vessels and jackets, honeycomb ceramics are used as well as ceramic fibres on an increasing scale (kaolin, alumina and other fibres). 2) fusion reactors (Tokomak). These require refractory materials with a low atomic number. Carbon fibres, boron carbide, some borons (Al B 12 ), silicon nitrides and oxy-nitrides and high density alumina are the substances considered [fr

  3. The different facilities of the reactor Phenix for radio isotope production and fission product burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, P.; Clerc, R.; Tommasi, J.

    1993-01-01

    During the last few years different tests have been made to optimize the blanket of the reactor. Year after year the breeding ratio has lost a part of interest regarding the production and availability of plutonium in the world. A characteristic of a fast reactor is to have important neutron leaks from the core. The spectrum of those neutrons is intermediate, the idea was to find a moderator compatible with sodium and stable in temperature. After different tests we kept as a moderator the calcium hydride and as a samply support, a cluster which is separated from the carrier. At the end we present the model used for thermalized calculations. The scheme is then applied to a heavy nuclide transmutation example (Np237 Pu238) and to fission product transmutation (Tc99). (authors). 9 figs

  4. Influence of core model parameters on the characteristics of neutron beams of the research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Khafizova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IRT MEPhI reactor is equipped with a number of facilities at horizontal experimental channels (HEC. Knowing of parameters influencing spatio-angular distribution of irradiation fields is essential for each application area. The research for neutron capture therapy (NCT facility at HEC of the reactor was made. Calculation methods have been used to estimate how the reactor core parameters influence neutron beam characteristics at the HEC output. The impact of neutron source model in Monte Carlo calculations by MCNP code on the parameters of neutron and secondary photon field at the output of irradiation beam tubes of research reactor is estimated. The study shows that specifying neutron source with fission reaction rate distribution in SDEF option gives almost the same results as criticality calculation considered the most accurate. Our calculations show that changes of the core operational parameters have insignificant influence on characteristics of neutron beams at HEC output.

  5. Study on neutron spectrum for effective transmutation of minor actinides in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu; Yokoyama, Kenji

    1997-01-01

    The transmutation of minor actinides (MAs) has been investigated in thermal reactor cells using mixed oxide fuel with MAs. The effect of neutron spectra on transmutation is studied by changing the neutron spectra. Five transmutation rates are compared: direct fission incineration rate, capture transmutation rate, consumption rate, overall fission incineration rate and inventory difference transmutation rate. The relations between these transmutation rates and their dependence on the neutron spectrum were investigated. To effectively incinerate MAs it is necessary to maximize the overall fission incineration rate and the inventory difference transmutation rate. These transmutation rates become maximum when the fraction of neutrons below 1 eV is about 8% for the case where the MA addition is 1-3%. When the MA addition is over 5%, the transmutation rates become maximum for very hard neutron spectrum. (Author)

  6. A fission-fusion hybrid reactor in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Mark; Parker, Ronald R.; Forget, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    This work develops a conceptual design for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor operating in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with a subcritical natural or depleted uranium pebble bed blanket. A liquid lithium-lead alloy breeds enough tritium to replenish that consumed by the D-T fusion reaction. The fission blanket augments the fusion power such that the fusion core itself need not have a high power gain, thus allowing for fully non-inductive (steady-state) low confinement mode (L-mode) operation at relatively small physical dimensions. A neutron transport Monte Carlo code models the natural uranium fission blanket. Maximizing the fission power gain while breeding sufficient tritium allows for the selection of an optimal set of blanket parameters, which yields a maximum prudent fission power gain of approximately 7. A 0-D tokamak model suffices to analyze approximate tokamak operating conditions. This fission blanket would allow the fusion component of a hybrid reactor with the same dimensions as ITER to operate in steady-state L-mode very comfortably with a fusion power gain of 6.7 and a thermal fusion power of 2.1 GW. Taking this further can determine the approximate minimum scale for a steady-state L-mode tokamak hybrid reactor, which is a major radius of 5.2 m and an aspect ratio of 2.8. This minimum scale device operates barely within the steady-state L-mode realm with a thermal fusion power of 1.7 GW. Basic thermal hydraulic analysis demonstrates that pressurized helium could cool the pebble bed fission blanket with a flow rate below 10 m/s. The Brayton cycle thermal efficiency is 41%. This reactor, dubbed the Steady-state L-mode non-Enriched Uranium Tokamak Hybrid (SLEUTH), with its very fast neutron spectrum, could be superior to pure fission reactors in terms of breeding fissile fuel and transmuting deleterious fission products. It would likely function best as a prolific plutonium breeder, and the plutonium it produces could actually be more

  7. Measurement of fission yields far from the center of isotopic distributions in the thermal neutron fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmid, M.

    1979-08-01

    The main purpose of this work was to measure independent yields, in the thermal neutron fission of 235 U, of fission products which lie far from the centers of the isotopic and isobaric yield distributions. These measurements were used to test the predictions of semi-empirical systematics of fission yields and theoretical fission models. Delay times were measured as a function of temperature in the range 1200-2000degC. The very low delay times achieved in the present work permitted expanding the measurable region to the isotopes 147 , 148 Cs and 99 Rb which are of special interest in the present work. The delay times of Sr and Ba isotopes achieved were more than two orders of magnitude lower than values reported in the literature and thus short-lived isotopes of these elements could be separated for the first time by mass spectrometry. The half-lives of 147 Ba, 148 Ba, 149 La and 149 Ce were measured for the first time. The isotopic distributions of fission yields were measured for the elements Rb, Sr, Cs and Ba in the thermal neutron fission of 235 U, those of 99 Rb, 147 Cs and 148 Cs having been measured for the first time. A comparison of the experimental yields with the predictions of the currently accepted semi-empirical systematics of fission yields, which is the odd-even effect systematics, shows that the systematics succeeds in accounting for the strong odd-even proton effect and the weaker odd-even neutron effect and also in predicting the shape of the distributions in the central region. It is shown that prompt neutron emission broadens the distribution only slightly in the wing of heavy isotopes and more significantly in the wing of light isotopes. But the effect of prompt neutron emission cannot explain the large discrepancies existing between the predictions of fission models and the experimentally measured fission yield in the wings of the isotopic distributions. (B.G.)

  8. INR TRIGA Research Reactors: A Neutron Source for Radioisotopes and Materials Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbos, D.; Ciocanescu, M.; Paunoiu, C.; Bucsa, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    At the INR there are 2 high intensity neutron sources. These sources are in fact the two nuclear TRIGA reactors: TRIGA SSR 14 MW and TRIGA ACPR. TRIGA stationary reactor is provided with several in-core irradiation channels. Other several out-of-core irradiation channels are located in the vertical channels in the beryllium reflector blocks. The maximum value of the thermal neutron flux (E 14 cm -2 s -1 and of fast neutron flux (E>1 MeV) is 6.89×10 13 cm -2 s -1 . For neutron activation analysis both reactors are used and k0-NAA method has been implemented. At INR Pitesti a prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis devices has been designed, manufactured ant put into operation. For nuclear materials properties investigation neutron radiography methods was developed in INR. For these purposes two neutron radiography devices were manufacture, one of them underwater and other one dry. The neutron beams are used for investigation of materials properties and components produced or under development for applications in the energy sector (fission and fusion). At TRIGA 14 MW reactor a neutron difractormeter and a SANS devices are available for material residual stress and texture measurements. TRIGA 14 MW reactor is used for medical and industrial radioisotopes production ( 131 I, 125 I, 192 Ir, etc) and a method for 99 Mo- 99 Tc production from fission is under developing. At INR Pitesti several special programmes for new types of nuclear fuel behavior characterization are under development. (author)

  9. Neutron detectors for nuclear reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, Jean; Verdant, Robert.

    1974-01-01

    In view of the importance of in-core measurements the distinction is made between detectors used outside and inside the core. In the former case proportional counters, fission chambers and boron chambers are reviewed in turn. The only in-core detectors considered are those giving a direct measurement, i.e. supplying an electric signal representative of the neutron fluence rate while in the measurement position at the point given. Two kinds of detectors are used for direct measurements: miniature fission chambers and collectors, known also as neutron-electron converters [fr

  10. A comparison of microstructures in copper irradiated with fission, fusion, and spallation neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Heinisch, H.L.; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the effects of the neutron energy spectrum in low dose irradiations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of metals. The microstructures of pure copper irradiated to low doses at 36-90 C with spallation neutrons, fusion neutrons and fission neutrons are compared. The defect cluster densities for the spallation and fusion neutrons are very similar when compared on the basis of displacements per atom (dpa). In both cases, the density increases in proportion to the square root of the dpa. The difference in defect density between fusion neutrons and fission neutrons corresponds with differences observed in data on yield stress changes

  11. Campbelling-type theory of fission chamber signals generated by neutron chains in a multiplying medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pál, L.; Pázsit, I.

    2015-01-01

    The signals of fission chambers are usually evaluated with the help of the co-called Campbelling techniques. These are based on the Campbell theorem, which states that if the primary incoming events, generating the detector pulses, are independent, then relationships exist between the moments of various orders of the signal in the current mode. This gives the possibility to determine the mean value of the intensity of the detection events, which is proportional to the static flux, from the higher moments of the detector current, which has certain advantages. However, the main application area of fission chambers is measurements in power reactors where, as is well known, the individual detection events are not independent, due to the branching character of the neutron chains (neutron multiplication). Therefore it is of interest to extend the Campbelling-type theory for the case of correlated neutron events. Such a theory could address two questions: partly, to investigate the bias when the traditional Campbell techniques are used for correlated incoming events; and partly, to see whether the correlation properties of the detection events, which carry information on the multiplying medium, could be extracted from the measurements. This paper is devoted to the investigation of these questions. The results show that there is a potential possibility to extract the same information from fission chamber signals in the current mode as with the Rossi- or Feynman-alpha methods, or from coincidence and multiplicity measurements, which so far have required detectors working in the pulse mode. It is also shown that application of the standard Campbelling techniques to neutron detection in multiplying systems does not lead to an error for estimating the stationary flux as long as the detector is calibrated in in situ measurements

  12. Two reports: (i) Correlation properties of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission. (ii) Method and set-up for measurements of trace level content of heavy fissionable elements based on delayed neutron counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piksaikin, V.M.; Isaev, S.G.; Goverdovski, A.A.; Pshakin, G.M.

    1998-10-01

    The document includes the following two reports: 'Correlation properties of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission' and 'Method and set-up for measurements of trace level content of heavy fissionable elements based on delayed neutron counting. A separate abstract was prepared for each report

  13. Evaluation of fission product neutron cross sections for JENDL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The recent activities on the evaluation of fission product (FP) neutron cross sections for JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) are presented briefly. The integral test of JENDL-1 FP cross section file was performed using the CFRMF sample activation data and the STEK sample reactivity data, and the ratio of experiment to calculation was nearly constant for all the samples in the STEK measurement. Therefore, a tentative analysis was performed by applying the correction to the calculated scattering reactivity component. Better agreement with the experiment was obtained after applying this correction in most cases. The evaluation work on the JENDL-2 FP neutron cross sections is now in progress. The improvement of the data evaluation is presented in an itemized form. The JENDL-2 FP file will contain the evaluated data for 100 nuclides from Kr to Tb. The improvement and the future scope of the integral test for JENDL-2 FP data are summarized. (Asami, T.)

  14. Fission neutron damage rates and efficiencies in several metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klabunde, C.E.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Initial rates of resistivity-measured low-temperature damage production by fission-spectrum fast neutrons have been determined for 14 metals in the same very well characterized irradiation facility. Six of these metals were fcc, 5 bcc, and 3 hcp. Most were of quite high purity. Observed damage rates, after correction for all known extraneous resistivity-producing effects, were compared with rates predicted by the damage calculation code RECOIL, using parameters chosen from the literature. These parameters, effective displacement threshold energy, E/sub d/, and Frenkel-pair resistivity, rho/sub F/, were in many cases only best estimates, the further refinement of which may be aided by the present results. Damage efficiencies (measured/predicted rates) follow the same trends by crystal classes as seen in other fast-neutron studies

  15. The universal library of fission products and delayed neutron group yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koldobskiy, A.B.; Zhivun, V.M.

    1997-01-01

    A new fission product yield library based on the Semiempirical method for the estimation of their mass and charge distribution is described. Contrary to other compilations, this library can be used with all possible excitation energies of fissionable actinides. The library of delayed neutron group yields, based on the fission product yield compilation, is described as well. (author). 15 refs, 4 tabs

  16. Fission product release from TRIGA-LEU reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, N.L.; Foushee, F.C.; Greenwood, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Due to present international concerns over nuclear proliferation, TRIGA reactor fuels will utilize only low-enriched uranium (LEU) (enrichment <20%). This requires increased total uranium loading per unit volume of fuel in order to maintain the appropriate fissile loading. Tests were conducted to determine the fractional release of gaseous and metallic fission products from typical uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA fuels containing up to 45 wt-% uranium. These tests, performed in late 1977 and early 1978, were similar to those conducted earlier on TRIGA fuels with 8.5 wt-% U. Fission gas release measurements were made on prototypic specimens from room temperature to 1100 deg. C in the TRIGA King Furnace Facility. The fuel specimens were irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at a low power level. The fractional releases of the gaseous nuclides of krypton and xenon were measured under steady-state operating conditions. Clean helium was used to sweep the fission gases released during irradiation from the furnace into a standard gas collection trap for gamma counting. The results of these tests on TRIGA-LEU fuel agree well with data from the similar, earlier tests on TRIGA fuel. The correlation used to calculate the release of fission products from 8.5 wt-% U TRIGA fuel applies equally well for U contents up to 45 wt-%. (author)

  17. Fission reactor recycling pump handling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togasawa, Hiroshi; Komita, Hideo; Susuki, Shoji; Endo, Takio; Yamamoto, Tetsuzo; Takahashi, Hideaki; Saito, Noboru.

    1991-01-01

    This invention provides a device for handling a recycling pump in a nuclear reactor upon periodical inspections in a BWR type power plant. That is, in a handling device comprising a support for supporting components of a recycling pump, and a lifter for vertically moving the support below a motor case disposed passing through a reactor pressure vessel, a weight is disposed below the support. Then, the center of gravity of the components, the support and the entire weight is substantially aligned with the position for the support. With such a constitution, the components can be moved vertically to the motor case extremely safely, to remarkably suppress vibrations. Further, the operation safety can remarkably be improved by preventing turning down upon occurrence of earthquakes. Further, since vibration-proof jigs as in a prior art can be saved, operation efficiency can be improved. (I.S.)

  18. Fission reactor recycling pump handling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togasawa, Hiroshi; Komita, Hideo; Susuki, Shoji; Endo, Takio; Yamamoto, Tetsuzo; Takahashi, Hideaki; Saito, Noboru

    1991-06-24

    This invention provides a device for handling a recycling pump in a nuclear reactor upon periodical inspections in a BWR type power plant. That is, in a handling device comprising a support for supporting components of a recycling pump, and a lifter for vertically moving the support below a motor case disposed passing through a reactor pressure vessel, a weight is disposed below the support. Then, the center of gravity of the components, the support and the entire weight is substantially aligned with the position for the support. With such a constitution, the components can be moved vertically to the motor case extremely safely, to remarkably suppress vibrations. Further, the operation safety can remarkably be improved by preventing turning down upon occurrence of earthquakes. Further, since vibration-proof jigs as in a prior art can be saved, operation efficiency can be improved. (I.S.).

  19. Neutron radiation characteristics of the IVth generation reactor spent fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenko, Sergey; Shamanin, Igor; Grachev, Victor; Knyshev, Vladimir; Ukrainets, Olesya; Zorkin, Andrey

    2018-03-01

    Exploitation of nuclear power plants as well as construction of new generation reactors lead to great accumulation of spent fuel in interim storage facilities at nuclear power plants, and in spent fuel «wet» and «dry» long-term storages. Consequently, handling the fuel needs more attention. The paper is focused on the creation of an efficient computational model used for developing the procedures and regulations of spent nuclear fuel handling in nuclear fuel cycle of the new generation reactor. A Thorium High-temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Unit (HGTRU, Russia) was used as an object for numerical research. Fuel isotopic composition of HGTRU was calculated using the verified code of the MCU-5 program. The analysis of alpha emitters and neutron radiation sources was made. The neutron yield resulting from (α,n)-reactions and at spontaneous fission was calculated. In this work it has been shown that contribution of (α,n)-neutrons is insignificant in case of such (Th,Pu)-fuel composition and HGTRU operation mode, and integral neutron yield can be approximated by the Watt spectral function. Spectral and standardized neutron distributions were achieved by approximation of the list of high-precision nuclear data. The distribution functions were prepared in group and continuous form for further use in calculations according to MNCP, MCU, and SCALE.

  20. Overview of standards subcommittee 8, fissionable materials outside reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society's Standards Subcommittee 8, titled open-quotes Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors,close quotes has worked for the past 35 yr to prepare and promote standards on nuclear criticality safety for the handling, processing, storing, and transportation of fissionable materials outside reactors. The reader is referred to the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, Vols. 39 (1981) and 64 (1991), for previous papers associated with ANS-8 poster sessions. In addition to discussions on the then-current standards, the reader will find articles on working group efforts that never materialized into standards, such as proposed 8.13, open-quotes Use of the Solid-Angle Method in Nuclear Criticality Safety,close quotes and on applications and critiques of current standards. The paper by McLendon in Vol. 39 is particularly interesting as an overview of the early history of ANS-8 and its standards

  1. An evaluation of neutron and gamme heating in fission product isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, L.C.; Hill, R.N.; Khalil, H.S.

    1993-01-01

    The accurate prediction of the energy deposition rate in fast reactors, particularly in blanket and nonfueled regions, requires explicit treatment of gamma photon transport. Such an explicit treatment is part of the coupled neutron-photon heating method in use at Argonne National Laboratory, (ANL). In applying this procedure, three approximations are made in connection with the modeling of fission products (FPs): 1. The contribution of the FP neutron interactions to the gamma source is neglected. 2. In computing the macroscopic gamma interaction cross sections, the FPs are either neglected or simulated with an element (usually molybdenum) representative of an open-quotes averageclose quotes FP. 3. The heating contribution of the FP is neglected by use of zero FP kerma factors

  2. Maintenance of fission and fusion reactors. 10. workshop on fusion reactor engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report contains copies of OHP presented at the title meeting. The presented topics are as follows, maintenance of nuclear power plants and ITER, exchange of shroud in BWR type reactors, deterioration of fission and fusion reactor materials, standards of pressure vessels, malfunction diagnosis method with neural network. (J.P.N.)

  3. Method to Reduce Long-lived Fission Products by Nuclear Transmutations with Fast Spectrum Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Satoshi; Wakabayashi, Toshio; Tachi, Yoshiaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Terashima, Atsunori; Okumura, Shin; Yoshida, Tadashi

    2017-10-24

    Transmutation of long-lived fission products (LLFPs: 79 Se, 93 Zr, 99 Tc, 107 Pd, 129 I, and 135 Cs) into short-lived or non-radioactive nuclides by fast neutron spectrum reactors without isotope separation has been proposed as a solution to the problem of radioactive wastes disposal. Despite investigation of many methods, such transmutation remains technologically difficult. To establish an effective and efficient transmutation system, we propose a novel neutron moderator material, yttrium deuteride (YD 2 ), to soften the neutron spectrum leaking from the reactor core. Neutron energy spectra and effective half-lives of LLFPs, transmutation rates, and support ratios were evaluated with the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MVP-II/MVP-BURN and the JENDL-4.0 cross section library. With the YD 2 moderator in the radial blanket and shield regions, effective half-lives drastically decreased from 106 to 102 years and the support ratios reached 1.0 for all six LLFPs. This successful development and implementation of a transmutation system for LLFPs without isotope separation contributes to a the ability of fast spectrum reactors to reduce radioactive waste by consuming their own LLFPs.

  4. Role of fission gas release in reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    The release of fission gases from oxide pellets to the fuel rod internal voidage (gap) is reviewed with regard to the required safety analysis in reactor licensing. Significant analyzed effects are described, prominent gas release models are reviewed, and various methods used in the licensing process are summarized. The report thus serves as a guide to a large body of literature including company reports and government documents. A discussion of the state of the art of gas release analysis is presented

  5. Dispersion of the Neutron Emission in U{sup 235} Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feynman, R. P.; de Hoffmann, F.; Serber, R.

    1955-01-01

    Equations are developed which allow the calculation of the average number of neutrons per U{sup235} fission from experimental measurements. Experimental methods are described, the results of which give a value of (7.8 + 0.6){sup ½} neutrons per U{sup 235} thermal fission.

  6. Yields of correlated fragment pairs and neutron multiplicity in spontaneous fission of {sup 242}Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veselsky, M.; Kliman, J.; Morhaccaron, M. [Institute of Physics of Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska 9, 84228 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ramayya, A.V.; Kormicki, J.; Daniel, A.V. [Physics Department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville (United States)] Rasmussen, J.O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley (United States)] Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States); Daniel, A.V.; Popeko, G.S.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia)] Greiner, W. [Institut fur Theoretische Physik, J. W. Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Aryaeinejad, R. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Yields of correlated fragment pairs were obtained in spontaneous fission of {sup 242}Pu. Charge, mass and neutron multiplicity distributions of fragment pairs were determined and compared to available data. The yield of cold fission without neutron emission was determined to about 10{percent} for the set of observed correlated fragment pairs. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Opportunities for TRIGA reactors in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, John P.

    1978-01-01

    In this country the two most recent installations of TRIGA reactors have both been for neutron radiography, one at HEDL and the other at ANL. Meanwhile, a major portion of the commercial neutron radiography is performed on a TRIGA fueled reactor at Aerotest. Each of these installations has different primary objectives and some comparative observations can be drawn. Another interesting comparison is between the TRIGA reactors for neutron radiography and other small reactors that are being installed for this purpose such as the MIRENE slow pulse reactors in France, a U-233 fueled reactor for neutron radiography in India and the L88 solution reactor in Denmark. At Monsanto Laboratory, in Ohio, a subcritical reactor based on MTR-type fuel has recently been purchased for neutron radiography. Such systems, when driven by a Van de Graaff neutron source, will be compared with the standard TRIGA reactor. Future demands on TRIGA or competitive systems for neutron radiography are likely to include the pulsing capability of the reactor, and also the extraction of cold neutron beams and resonance energy beams. Experiments recently performed on the Oregon State TRIGA Reactor provide information in each of these categories. A point of particular current concern is a comparison made between the resonance energy beam intensity extracted from the edge of the TRIGA core and from a slot which penetrated to the center of the TREAT reactor. These results indicate that by using such slots on a TRIGA, resonance energy intensities could be extracted that are much higher than previously predicted. (author)

  8. Transient fission product release during reactor shutdown and startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, C.E.L.; Lewis, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    Sweep gas experiments performed at CRL from 1979 to 1985 have been analysed to determine the fraction of the fission product gas inventory that is released on reactor shutdown and startup. Empirical equations were derived and applied to calculate the xenon release from companion fuel elements and from a well documented experimental fuel bundle irradiated in the NRU reactor. The measured gas release could be matched to within about a factor of two for an experimental irradiation with a burnup of 217 MWh/kgU. (author)

  9. Fission-product burnup chain model for research reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Do; Gil, Choong Sup; Lee, Jong Tai [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Republic of Korea)

    1990-12-01

    A new fission-product burnup chain model was developed for use in research reactor analysis capable of predicting the burnup-dependent reactivity with high precision over a wide range of burnup. The new model consists of 63 nuclides treated explicitly and one fissile-independent pseudo-element. The effective absorption cross sections for the preudo-element and the preudo-element yield of actinide nuclides were evaluated in the this report. The model is capable of predicting the high burnup behavior of low-enriched uranium-fueled research reactors.(Author).

  10. The neutron balance of the natural reactors at Oklo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudet, R.; Filip, A.

    1975-01-01

    The authors discuss the main parameters determining criticality: the concentration of fissionable nuclei in the uranium; concentration of neutron-capturing nuclei in the gangue; concentration of uranium in the ore and rearrangement of the uranium to form ''critical masses''; amount of water present. Moderation was caused partly by the water of constitution of the clays in the gangue. Examination of the available data indicates that criticality could quite well have been achieved. A computer code (BINOCLE) was written for handling the neutron physics problems raised by the natural reactors. This very simple code, which can nevertheless handle the important points in sufficient detail, is well suited for describing the ores, providing a clear breakdown of the neutron balance and the quantities necessary for interpreting the analyses. It is designed to serve as a subprogram to a series of other codes: one-dimensional criticality; point evolution; spatial evolution; consideration of thermal transfers. Results showing the role of the main parameters are presented. The physical quantities measured by fission-product analysis are also found: proportions of fast fissions; conversion coefficient; spectral indices

  11. Summary Report of Second Research Coordination Meeting on Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Major Actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote Noy, R.

    2013-09-01

    A summary is given of the Second Research Coordination Meeting on Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides. Experimental data and modelling methods on prompt fission neutron spectra were reviewed. Extensive technical discussions held on theoretical methods to calculate prompt fission spectra. Detailed coordinated research proposals have been agreed. Summary reports of selected technical presentations at the meeting are given. The resulting work plan of the Coordinated Research Programme is summarized, along with actions and deadlines. (author)

  12. Dating by fission track method: study of neutron dosimetry with natural uranium thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iunes, P.J.

    1990-06-01

    Fission track dating is described, focalizing the problem of the decay constant for spontaneous fission of 238 U and the use of neutron dosimetry in fission track analysis. Experimental procedures using thin films of natural uranium as neutron dosimeters and its results are presented. The author shows a intercomparison between different thin films and between the dosimetry with thin film and other dosimetries. (M.V.M.). 52 refs, 12 figs, 9 tabs

  13. Fusion--fission hybrid reactors based on the laser solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.; Quimby, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion-fission reactors, based on the laser solenoid concept, can be much smaller in scale than their pure fusion counterparts, with moderate first-wall loading and rapid breeding capabilities (1 to 3 tonnes/yr), and can be designed successfully on the basis of classical plasma transport properties and free-streaming end-loss. Preliminary design information is presented for such systems, including the first wall, pulse coil, blanket, superconductors, laser optics, and power supplies, accounting for the desired reactor performance and other physics and engineering constraints. Self-consistent point designs for first and second generation reactors are discussed which illustrate the reactor size, performance, component parameters, and the level of technological development required

  14. Thermodynamic cycle calculations for a pumped gaseous core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Van Dam, H.

    1991-01-01

    Finite and 'infinitesimal' thermodynamic cycle calculations have been performed for a 'solid piston' model of a pumped Gaseous Core Fission Reactor with dissociating reactor gas, consisting of Uranium, Carbon and Fluorine ('UCF'). In the finite cycle calculations the influence has been investigated of several parameters on the thermodynamics of the system, especially on the attainable direct (nuclear to electrical) energy conversion efficiency. In order to facilitate the investigation of the influence of dissociation, a model gas, 'Modelium', was developed, which approximates, in a simplified, analytical way, the dissociation behaviour of the 'real' reactor gas. Comparison of the finite cycle calculation results with those of a so-called infinitesimal Otto cycle calculation leads to the conclusion that the conversion efficiency of a finite cycle can be predicted, without actually performing the finite cycle calculation, with reasonable accuracy, from the so-called 'infinitesimal efficiency factor', which is determined only by the thermodynamic properties of the reactor gas used. (author)

  15. Fission product poisoning in KS-150 reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the KS-150 reactor was used to study reactivity changes induced by reactor poisoning with fission products Xe 135 and Sm 149 . A comparison of transients caused by the poisoning showed the following differences: (1) the duration of the transient Xe poisoning (2 days) is shorter by one order of magnitude than the duration of Sm poisoning (20 days); however, the level of Xe poisoning is greater approximately by one order than the level of the Sm poisoning; (2) the level of steady-state Xe poisoning depends on the output level of the reactor; steady-state Sm poisoning does not depend on this level; (3) following reactor shutdown Xe poisoning may increase to the maximum value of up to Δrhosub(Xe)=20% and will then gradually decrease; Sm poisoning may reach maximum values of up to Δrhosub(Sm)=2% and does not decrease. (J.B.)

  16. Conversion of the RB reactor neutrons by highly enriched uranium fuel and lithium deuteride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugar, P.; Sotic, O.; Ninkovic, M.; Pesic, M.; Altiparmakov, D.

    1981-01-01

    A thermal-to-fast-neutron converter has been constructed at the RB reactor. The material used for the conversion of thermal neutrons is highly enriched uranium fuel of Soviet production applied in Yugoslav heavy water experimental reactors RA and RB. Calculations and preliminary measurements show that the spectrum of converted neutrons only slightly differs from that of fission neutrons. The basic characteristics of converted neutrons can be expressed by the neutron radiation dose of 800 rad (8 Gy) for 1 h of reactor operation at a power level of 1 kW. This dose is approximately 10 times higher than the neutron dose at the same place without converter. At the same time, thermal neutron and gamma radiation doses are negligible. The constructed neutron converter offers wide possibilities for applications in reactor and nuclear physics and similar disciplines, where neutron spectra of high energies are required, as well as in the domain of neutron dosimetry and biological irradiations in homogeneous fields of larger dimensions. The possibility of converting thermal reactor neutrons with energies of about 14 MeV with the aid of lithium deuteride from natural lithium has been considered too. (author)

  17. Study of the neutron flux distribution in acylindrical reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vidal-Ferràndiz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the Energy Engineering Degree of the Universitat Politècnica de València, the students attend to the Nuclear Technology course, in which the basic knowledge of this technology is presented. A main objective of this technology is to obtain neutron population distribution inside a reactor core, in order to maintain the fission reaction chain. As this activity cannot be experimentally developed, mathematical modelling is of great importance to achieve such objective.  One of the computer laboratories proposed consists in the neutron flux determination analytically and numerically in a cylindrical geometry. The analytical solution makes use of the Bessel functions and is a good example of their applications. Alternatively, a numerical solution based on finite differences is used to obtain an approximate solution of the neutron flux. In this work, different discretizations of the cylindrical geometry are implemented and their results are compared.

  18. Nuclear data requirements for fission reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    The meeting was attended by 13 participants from 8 Member States and 2 International Organizations who reviewed the status of the nuclear data libraries and computer codes used to calculate the radioactive inventory in the reactor unit components for the decommissioning purposes. Nuclides and nuclear reactions important for determination of the radiation fields during decommissioning and for the final disposal of radioactive waste from the decommissioned units were identified. Accuracy requirements for the relevant nuclear data were considered. The present publication contains the text of the reports by the participants and their recommendations to the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Neutron emission in fission of highly excited californium nuclei (E* = 76 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, M.V.; Bordyug, V.M.; Kozulin, E.M.; Levitovich, M.; Mozhaev, A.N.; Muzychka, Yu.A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.; Pustyl'nik, B.I.

    1990-01-01

    Differential cross sections for neutron production have been measured in fission of excited californium nuclei produced in the reaction 238 U + 12 C (105 MeV). It follows from analysis of the experimental results that the number of neutrons emitted before fission considerably exceeds the number obtained in the framework of the standard statistical model. On the basis of the multiplicity of neutrons they authors have estimated the time of fission of the excited nucleus. The dependence of the number of neutrons and their average energies on the mass of the fragments is determined

  20. The 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum measured by the Chi-Nu project at LANSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chi-Nu experiment aims to accurately measure the prompt fission neutron spectrum for the major actinides. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE, fission can be induced with neutrons ranging from 0.7 MeV and above. Using a two arm time-of-flight (TOF technique, the fission neutrons are measured in one of two arrays: a 22-6Li glass array for lower energies, or a 54-liquid scintillator array for outgoing energies of 0.5 MeV and greater. Presented here are the collaboration's preliminary efforts at measuring the 235U PFNS.

  1. Measurement of fission cross-section of actinides at n_TOF for advanced nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, Marco; Montagnoli, G; Mastinu, P

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the determination of high accuracy neutron-induced fission cross-sections of various isotopes - all of which radioactive - of interest for emerging nuclear technologies. The measurements had been performed at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF. In particular, in this work, fission cross-sections on 233U, the main fissile isotope of the Th/U fuel cycle, and on the minor actinides 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm have been analyzed. Data on these isotopes are requested for the feasibility study of innovative nuclear systems (ADS and Generation IV reactors) currently being considered for energy production and radioactive waste transmutation. The measurements have been performed with a high performance Fast Ionization Chamber (FIC), in conjunction with an innovative data acquisition system based on Flash-ADCs. The first step in the analysis has been the reconstruction of the digitized signals, in order to extract the information required for the discrimination between fission fragm...

  2. Capabilities of a DT tokamak fusion neutron source for driving a spent nuclear fuel transmutation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    The capabilities of a DT fusion neutron source for driving a spent nuclear fuel transmutation reactor are characterized by identifying limits on transmutation rates that would be imposed by tokamak physics and engineering limitations on fusion neutron source performance. The need for spent nuclear fuel transmutation and the need for a neutron source to drive subcritical fission transmutation reactors are reviewed. The likely parameter ranges for tokamak neutron sources that could produce an interesting transmutation rate of 100s to 1000s of kg/FPY (where FPY stands for full power year) are identified (P fus ∼ 10-100 MW, β N ∼ 2-3, Q p ∼ 2-5, R ∼ 3-5 m, I ∼ 6-10 MA). The electrical and thermal power characteristics of transmutation reactors driven by fusion and accelerator spallation neutron sources are compared. The status of fusion development vis-a-vis a neutron source is reviewed. (author)

  3. Upgrades of the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hungyuan B.; Brugger, R.M.; Rorer, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The first epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) was installed in 1988 and produced a neutron beam that was satisfactory for the development of NCT with epithermal neutrons. This beam was used routinely until 1992 when the beam was upgraded by rearranging fuel elements in the reactor core to achieve a 50% increase in usable flux. Next, after computer modeling studies, it was proposed that the Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} moderator material in the shutter that produced the epithermal neutrons could be rearranged to enhance the beam further. However, this modification was not started because a better option appeared, namely to use fission plates to move the source of fission neutrons closer to the moderator and the patient irradiation position to achieve more efficient moderation and production of epithermal neutrons. A fission plate converter (FPC) source has been designed recently and, to test the concept, implementation of this upgrade has started. The predicted beam parameters will be 12 x 10{sup 9} n{sub epi}/cm{sup 2}sec accompanying with doses from fast neutrons and gamma rays per epithermal neutron of 2.8 x 10{sup -11} and < 1 x 10{sup -11} cGycm{sup 2}/n, respectively, and a current-to-flux ratio of epithermal neutrons of 0.78. This conversion could be completed by late 1996.

  4. Energy spectra of neutrons accompanying the emission fission of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirenkin, G.N.; Lovchikova, G.N.; Trufanov, A.M.; Svirin, M.I.; Polyakov, A.V.; Vinogradov, V.A.; Dmitriev, V.D.; Boykov, G.S.

    1996-01-01

    The spectra of fission neutrons emitted from 238U are measured for the first time by the time-of-flight method at incident-neutron energies of 16.0 and 17.7 MeV. Analysis of the neutron spectra shows that experimental results at incident-neutron energies of 14.7, 16.0, and 17.7 MeV (above the threshold of chance fission) differ significantly from those obtained at a neutron energy of 2.9 MeV (below the threshold of chance fission). Owing to the prefission emission of neutrons, the observed spectra of neutrons from emission fission exhibit a characteristic growth of the neutron yield in both hard and soft sections of the spectrum of secondary neutrons. This growth manifests itself as a step in the first case and as a rise in the second case, where it results in a noticeable excess of neutrons over the statistical-model predictions for E<2 MeV. The first feature in the spectra of neutrons from emission fission can be associated with the nonequilibrium decay of an excited fissile nucleus. On the contrary, the origin of the second feature has yet to be clarified. Additional measurements of angular distributions of secondary neutrons may prove helpful in this respect

  5. Tokamak hybrid thermonuclear reactor for the production of fissionable fuel and electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikhov, E.P.; Glukhikh, V.A.; Gur'ev, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The results of feasibility studies of a tokamak- based hybrid reactor concept are presented. The system selected has a D-T plasma volume of 575 m 3 with additional plasma heating by injection of fast neutral particles. The method of heating makes it possible to achieve an economical two-component tokamak regime at ntau=(4-6)x10 13 sxcm -3 , i e. far below the Lawson criterion. Plasma and vacuum chamber are surrounded by a blanket where fissionable plutonium is produced and heat transformed into electric power is generated. Major plasma-neutron-physical characteristics of the 6905 MWth (2500 MWe) reactor and its electromagnetic system are presented. Evaluations show that the hybrid reactor can produce about 800 kg of Pu per 1GWth/yr as compared to 70-150 kg of Pu for fast breeder reactors. The increased Pu production rate is the major merit of the concept promising for both power generation and fuelling thermal fission reactions

  6. On Use of Multi-Chambered Fission Detectors for In-Core, Neutron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2018-01-01

    Presented is a short, computational study on the potential use of multichambered fission detectors for in-core, neutron spectroscopy. Motivated by the development of very small fission chambers at CEA in France and at Kansas State University in the U.S., it was assumed in this preliminary analysis that devices can be made small enough to avoid flux perturbations and that uncertainties related to measurements can be ignored. It was hypothesized that a sufficient number of chambers with unique reactants can act as a real-time, foilactivation experiment. An unfolding scheme based on maximizing (Shannon) entropy was used to produce a flux spectrum from detector signals that requires no prior information. To test the method, integral, detector responses were generated for singleisotope detectors of various Th, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cs isotopes using a simplified, pressurized-water reactor spectrum and fluxweighted, microscopic, fission cross sections, in the WIMS-69 multigroup format. An unfolded spectrum was found from subsets of these responses that had a maximum entropy while reproducing the responses considered and summing to one (that is, they were normalized). Several nuclide subsets were studied, and, as expected, the results indicate inclusion of more nuclides leads to better spectra but with diminishing improvements, with the best-case spectrum having an average, relative, group-wise error of approximately 51%. Furthermore, spectra found from minimum-norm and Tihkonov-regularization inversion were of lower quality than the maximum entropy solutions. Finally, the addition of thermal-neutron filters (here, Cd and Gd) provided substantial improvement over unshielded responses alone. The results, as a whole, suggest that in-core, neutron spectroscopy is at least marginally feasible.

  7. Evaluation of Neutron Induced Reactions for 32 Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Il

    2007-02-15

    Neutron cross sections for 32 fission products were evaluated in the neutron-incident energy range from 10{sup -5} eV to 20 MeV. The list of fission products consists of the priority materials for several applications, extended to cover complete isotopic chains for three elements. The full list includes 8 individual isotopes, {sup 95}Mo, {sup 101}Ru, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 105}Pd, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 131}Xe, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 141}Pr, and 24 isotopes in complete isotopic chains for Nd (8), Sm (9) and Dy (7). Our evaluation methodology covers both the low energy region and the fast neutron region.In the low energy region, our evaluations are based on the latest data published in the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. This resource was used to infer both the thermal values and the resolved resonance parameters that were validated against the capture resonance integrals. In the unresolved resonance region we performed the additional evaluation by using the averages of the resolved resonances and adjusting them to the experimental data.In the fast neutron region our evaluations are based on the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE-2.19 validated against the experimental data. EMPIRE is the modular system of codes consisting of many nuclear reaction models, including the spherical and deformed Optical Model, Hauser-Feshbach theory with the width fluctuation correction and complete gamma-ray emission cascade, DWBA, Multi-step Direct and Multi-step Compound models, and several versions of the phenomenological preequilibrium models. The code is equipped with a power full GUI, allowing an easy access to support libraries such as RIPL and CSISRS, the graphical package, as well the utility codes for formatting and checking. In general, in our calculations we used the Reference Input Parameter Library, RIPL, for the initial set model parameters. These parameters were properly adjusted to reproduce the available experimental data taken from the CSISRS library. Our evaluations cover cross

  8. Evaluation of Neutron Induced Reactions for 32 Fission Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong Il

    2007-02-01

    Neutron cross sections for 32 fission products were evaluated in the neutron-incident energy range from 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV. The list of fission products consists of the priority materials for several applications, extended to cover complete isotopic chains for three elements. The full list includes 8 individual isotopes, 95 Mo, 101 Ru, 103 Rh, 105 Pd, 109 Ag, 131 Xe, 133 Cs, 141 Pr, and 24 isotopes in complete isotopic chains for Nd (8), Sm (9) and Dy (7). Our evaluation methodology covers both the low energy region and the fast neutron region.In the low energy region, our evaluations are based on the latest data published in the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. This resource was used to infer both the thermal values and the resolved resonance parameters that were validated against the capture resonance integrals. In the unresolved resonance region we performed the additional evaluation by using the averages of the resolved resonances and adjusting them to the experimental data.In the fast neutron region our evaluations are based on the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE-2.19 validated against the experimental data. EMPIRE is the modular system of codes consisting of many nuclear reaction models, including the spherical and deformed Optical Model, Hauser-Feshbach theory with the width fluctuation correction and complete gamma-ray emission cascade, DWBA, Multi-step Direct and Multi-step Compound models, and several versions of the phenomenological preequilibrium models. The code is equipped with a power full GUI, allowing an easy access to support libraries such as RIPL and CSISRS, the graphical package, as well the utility codes for formatting and checking. In general, in our calculations we used the Reference Input Parameter Library, RIPL, for the initial set model parameters. These parameters were properly adjusted to reproduce the available experimental data taken from the CSISRS library. Our evaluations cover cross sections for almost all reaction channels

  9. Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors (Workshop Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, RE

    2004-07-15

    The ''Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors'' was convened to determine the degree to which an increased effort in modeling and simulation could help bridge the gap between the data that is needed to support the implementation of these advanced nuclear technologies and the data that can be obtained in available experimental facilities. The need to develop materials capable of performing in the severe operating environments expected in fusion and fission (Generation IV) reactors represents a significant challenge in materials science. There is a range of potential Gen-IV fission reactor design concepts and each concept has its own unique demands. Improved economic performance is a major goal of the Gen-IV designs. As a result, most designs call for significantly higher operating temperatures than the current generation of LWRs to obtain higher thermal efficiency. In many cases, the desired operating temperatures rule out the use of the structural alloys employed today. The very high operating temperature (up to 1000 C) associated with the NGNP is a prime example of an attractive new system that will require the development of new structural materials. Fusion power plants represent an even greater challenge to structural materials development and application. The operating temperatures, neutron exposure levels and thermo-mechanical stresses are comparable to or greater than those for proposed Gen-IV fission reactors. In addition, the transmutation products created in the structural materials by the high energy neutrons produced in the DT plasma can profoundly influence the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of these materials. Although the workshop addressed issues relevant to both Gen-IV and fusion reactor materials, much of the discussion focused on fusion; the same focus is reflected in this report. Most of the physical models and computational methods

  10. Joint ICFRM-14 (14. international conference on fusion reactor materials) and IAEA satellite meeting on cross-cutting issues of structural materials for fusion and fission applications. PowerPoint presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Conference was devoted to the challenges in the development of new materials for advanced fission, fusion and hybrid reactors. The topics discussed include fuels and materials research under the high neutron fluence; post-irradiation examination; development of radiation resistant structural materials utilizing fission research reactors; core materials development for the advanced fuel cycle initiative; qualification of structural materials for fission and fusion reactor systems; application of charged particle accelerators for radiation resistance investigations of fission and fusion structural materials; microstructure evolution in structural materials under irradiation; ion beams and ion accelerators

  11. Mathematical processing of experimental data on neutron yield from separate fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basova, B.G.; Rabinovich, A.D.; Ryazanov, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The algorithm is described for processing the multi-dimensional experiments on measurements of prompt emission of neutrons from separate fission fragments. While processing the data the effect of a number of experimental corrections is correctly taken into account; random coincidence background, neutron spectrum, neutron detector efficiency, instrument angular resolution. On the basis of the described algorithm a program for BESM-4 computer is realized and the treatment of experimental data is performed according to the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf

  12. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-01-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system. - Highlights: • Neutron flux redistribution due to control rod movement in JSI TRIGA has been studied. • Detector response sensitivity to the control rod position has been minimized. • Optimal radial and axial detector positions have been determined

  13. Fission product yields from 6 to 9 MeV neutron induced fission of 235U and 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    The yields of 28 mass chains have been measured for fission of 235 U and 238 U induced by neutrons at four different energies from 6.0 to 9.1 MeV. This is the first experimental measurement where sufficient energy resolution was obtained to observe the effect of the onset of second-chance fission in the case of symmetric fission. The 111 Ag results are compared with measurements at other neutron energies and with previous theoretical predictions. Several of the nuclide results are presented in graphical form, and all nuclide results are presented in tabular form, as a function of neutron energy. The mass chains measured range from 84 to 156, and their half-lives range from 18 minutes to 30 years

  14. 8-group relative delayed neutron yields for epithermal neutron induced fission of 235U and 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piksaikin, V.M.; Kazakov, L.E.; Isaev, S.G.; Korolev, G.G.; Roshchenko, V.A.; Tertychnyj, R.G

    2002-01-01

    An 8-group representation of relative delayed neutron yields was obtained for epithermal neutron induced fission of 235 U and 239 Pu. These data were compared with ENDF/B-VI data in terms of the average half- life of the delayed neutron precursors and on the basis of the dependence of reactivity on the asymptotic period. (author)

  15. Average cross section measurements in U-235 fission neutron spectrum for some threshold reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maidana, N.L.

    1993-01-01

    The average cross section in the 235 U fission spectrum has been measured by the activation technique, for the following thresholds reactions: 115 In(n,n') 115m In, 232 Th(n,f) P.F., 46 , 47 , 48 Ti(n,p) 46,47 , 48 Sc, 55 Mn(n,2 n) 54 Mn, 51 V(n,α) 48 Sc, 90 Zr(n,2 n) 89 Zr, 93 Nb(n,2 n) 92m Nb, 58 Ni(n,2 n) 57 Ni, 24 Mg(n,p) 24 Na, 56 Fe(n,p) 56 Mn, 59 Co(n,α) 56 Mn and 63 Cu(n,α) 60 Co. The activation foils were irradiated close (∼ 4 mm) to the core of the IEA-R1 research reactor in the IPEN-CNEN/SP. The reactor was operated at 2 MW yielding a fast neutron flux around 5 x 10 12 n.cm -2 . s -1 . The neutron flux density was monitored by activation reactions with well known averaged cross sections and with effective thresholds above 1 MeV. The foil activities were measured in a calibrated HPGe spectrometer. The neutron spectrum has been calculated using the SAIPS unfolding system applied to the activation data. A detailed error analysis was performed using the covariance matrix methodology. The results were compared with those from other authors. (author)

  16. Transient fission-product release during reactor shutdown and startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, C.E.L.; Lewis, B.J.; Dickson, L.W.

    1997-12-01

    Sweep-gas experiments performed at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories from 1979 to 1985 have been further analysed to determine the fraction of the gaseous fission-product inventory that is released on reactor shutdown and startup. Empirical equations were derived and applied to calculate the stable xenon release from companion fuel elements and from a well-documented experimental fuel bundle irradiated in the NRU reactor. The calculated gas release could be matched to the measured values within about a factor of two for an experimental irradiation with a burnup of 217 MWh/kgU. There was also limited information on the fraction of the radioactive iodine that was exposed, but not released, on reactor shutdown. An empirical equation is proposed for calculating this fraction. (author)

  17. Improved fission neutron energy discrimination with {sup 4}He detectors through pulse filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ting, E-mail: ting.zhu@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Liang, Yinong; Rolison, Lucas; Barker, Cathleen; Lewis, Jason; Gokhale, Sasmit [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Chandra, Rico [Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd., Räffelstrasse 11, Zürich (Switzerland); Kiff, Scott [Sandia National Laboratories, CA (United States); Chung, Heejun [Korean Institute for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, 1534 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ray, Heather; Baciak, James E.; Enqvist, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-11

    This paper presents experimental and computational techniques implemented for {sup 4}He gas scintillation detectors for induced fission neutron detection. Fission neutrons are produced when natural uranium samples are actively interrogated by 2.45 MeV deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction neutrons. Fission neutrons of energies greater than 2.45 MeV can be distinguished by their different scintillation pulse height spectra since {sup 4}He detectors retain incident fast neutron energy information. To enable the preferential detection of fast neutrons up to 10 MeV and suppress low-energy event counts, the detector photomultiplier gain is lowered and trigger threshold is increased. Pile-up and other unreliable events due to the interrogating neutron flux and background radiation are filtered out prior to the evaluation of pulse height spectra. With these problem-specific calibrations and data processing, the {sup 4}He detector's accuracy at discriminating fission neutrons up to 10 MeV is improved and verified with {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission neutrons. Given the {sup 4}He detector's ability to differentiate fast neutron sources, this proof-of-concept active-interrogation measurement demonstrates the potential of special nuclear materials detection using a {sup 4}He fast neutron detection system.

  18. High-energy Neutron-induced Fission Cross Sections of Natural Lead and Bismuth-209

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrio, D; Carrapico, C; Eleftheriadis, C; Leeb, H; Calvino, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Savvidis, I; Vlachoudis, V; Haas, B; Koehler, P; Vannini, G; Oshima, M; Le Naour, C; Gramegna, F; Wiescher, M; Pigni, M T; Audouin, L; Mengoni, A; Quesada, J; Becvar, F; Plag, R; Cennini, P; Mosconi, M; Rauscher, T; Couture, A; Capote, R; Sarchiapone, L; Vlastou, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dillmann, I; Pavlopoulos, P; Karamanis, D; Krticka, M; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Martinez, T; Trubert, D; Oberhummer, H; Karadimos, D; Plompen, A; Isaev, S; Terlizzi, R; Cortes, G; Cox, J; Cano-Ott, D; Pretel, C; Colonna, N; Berthoumieux, E; Vaz, P; Heil, M; Lopes, I; Lampoudis, C; Walter, S; Calviani, M; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Embid-Segura, M; Stephan, C; Igashira, M; Papachristodoulou, C; Aerts, G; Tavora, L; Berthier, B; Rudolf, G; Andrzejewski, J; Villamarin, D; Ferreira-Marques, R; Tain, J L; O'Brien, S; Reifarth, R; Kadi, Y; Neves, F; Poch, A; Kerveno, M; Rubbia, C; Lazano, M; Dahlfors, M; Wisshak, K; Salgado, J; Dridi, W; Ventura, A; Andriamonje, S; Assimakopoulos, P; Santos, C; Voss, F; Ferrant, L; Patronis, N; Chiaveri, E; Guerrero, C; Perrot, L; Vicente, M C; Lindote, A; Praena, J; Baumann, P; Kappeler, F; Rullhusen, P; Furman, W; David, S; Marrone, S; Tassan-Got, L; Gunsig, F; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Tagliente, G; Haight, R; Chepel, V; Kossionides, E; Badurek, G; Marganiec, J; Lukic, S; Pavlik, A; Goncalves, I; Duran, I; Alvarez, H; Abbondanno, U; Fujii, K; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n\\_TOF) facility is well suited to measure small neutron-induced fission cross sections, as those of subactinides. The cross section ratios of (nat)Pb and (209)Bi relative to (235)U and (238)U were measured using PPAC detectors. The fragment coincidence method allows to unambiguously identify the fission events. The present experiment provides the first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV for (nat)Pb and (209)Bi. A good agreement with previous experimental data below 200 MeV is shown. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross section is close to 1 GeV.

  19. Analytical treatment of space-energy neutron distribution in reactor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, D.

    1971-01-01

    Application of the analytical procedure described in this paper for study of fission spectrum evolution in the reactor cell gave results which enable complete understanding of neutron slowing down and transport p recesses and can be used for testing practical approximative methods. Heterogeneous system made of natural uranium and heavy water was used as an example

  20. Mechanism of fission of neutron-deficient actinoids nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueki, Keisuke; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Tanase, Masakazu; Nagame, Yuichiro; Shinohara, Nobuo; Tsukada, Kazuaki.

    1996-01-01

    A heavy ion reaction ( 19 F+ 209 Bi) is selected. The reaction produces neutron-deficient 228 U which is compound nucleus with a pair of Rb(z=37) and Cs(Z=55). Energy dissipation problem of nucleus was studied by measuring the isotope distribution of two fissile nuclides. Bismuth metal evaporated on aluminium foil was irradiated by 19 F with the incident energy of 105-128 MeV. We concluded from the results that the excess energy of reaction system obtained with increasing the incident energy is consumed by (1) light Rb much more than Cs and (2) about 60% of energy is given to two fission fragments and the rest 40% to the translational kinetic energy or unknown anomalous γ-ray irradiation. (S.Y.)

  1. Fission-neutron displacement cross sections in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Saburo; Aruga, Takeo; Nakata, Kiyotomo

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity damage rates for 22 metals were measured after fission-spectrum neutron irradiation at low temperature and the experimental damage rates were compared with the theoretical calculation. The relation between the theoretical displacement cross section and the atomic weight of metals can be written by two curves; one is for fcc and hcp metals, and another is for bcc metals. On the other hand, the experimental displacement cross section versus atomic weight is shown approximately by a curve for both fcc and bcc metals, and the cross section for hcp metals deviates from the curve. The defect production efficiency is 0.3-0.4 for fcc metals and 0.6-0.8 for bcc metals. (orig.)

  2. Mechanism of fission of neutron-deficient actinoids nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sueki, Keisuke; Nakahara, Hiromichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Hachioji (Japan). Faculty of Science; Tanase, Masakazu; Nagame, Yuichiro; Shinohara, Nobuo; Tsukada, Kazuaki

    1996-01-01

    A heavy ion reaction ({sup 19}F+{sup 209}Bi) is selected. The reaction produces neutron-deficient {sup 228}U which is compound nucleus with a pair of Rb(z=37) and Cs(Z=55). Energy dissipation problem of nucleus was studied by measuring the isotope distribution of two fissile nuclides. Bismuth metal evaporated on aluminium foil was irradiated by {sup 19}F with the incident energy of 105-128 MeV. We concluded from the results that the excess energy of reaction system obtained with increasing the incident energy is consumed by (1) light Rb much more than Cs and (2) about 60% of energy is given to two fission fragments and the rest 40% to the translational kinetic energy or unknown anomalous {gamma}-ray irradiation. (S.Y.)

  3. Analysis of the neutron flux in an annular pulsed reactor by using finite volume method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mário A.B. da; Narain, Rajendra; Bezerra, Jair de L., E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com, E-mail: narain@ufpe.br, E-mail: jairbezerra@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociências. Departamento de Energia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Production of very intense neutron sources is important for basic nuclear physics and for material testing and isotope production. Nuclear reactors have been used as sources of intense neutron fluxes, although the achievement of such levels is limited by the inability to remove fission heat. Periodic pulsed reactors provide very intense fluxes by a rotating modulator near a subcritical core. A concept for the production of very intense neutron fluxes that combines features of periodic pulsed reactors and steady state reactors was proposed by Narain (1997). Such a concept is known as Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) and was analyzed by using diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions and Finite Difference Method with Crank-Nicolson formalism. This research aims to analyze the flux distribution in the Very Intense Continuous Flux High Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) by using the Finite Volume Method and compares its results with those obtained by the previous computational method. (author)

  4. Analysis of the neutron flux in an annular pulsed reactor by using finite volume method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mário A.B. da; Narain, Rajendra; Bezerra, Jair de L.

    2017-01-01

    Production of very intense neutron sources is important for basic nuclear physics and for material testing and isotope production. Nuclear reactors have been used as sources of intense neutron fluxes, although the achievement of such levels is limited by the inability to remove fission heat. Periodic pulsed reactors provide very intense fluxes by a rotating modulator near a subcritical core. A concept for the production of very intense neutron fluxes that combines features of periodic pulsed reactors and steady state reactors was proposed by Narain (1997). Such a concept is known as Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) and was analyzed by using diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions and Finite Difference Method with Crank-Nicolson formalism. This research aims to analyze the flux distribution in the Very Intense Continuous Flux High Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) by using the Finite Volume Method and compares its results with those obtained by the previous computational method. (author)

  5. Measurements of neutron flux in the RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.

    1961-12-01

    This report includes the following separate parts: Thermal neutron flux in the experimental channels od RA reactor; Epithermal neutron flux in the experimental channels od RA reactor; Fast neutron flux in the experimental channels od RA reactor; Thermal neutron flux in the thermal column and biological experimental channel; Neutronic measurements in the RA reactor cell; Temperature reactivity coefficient of the RA reactor; design of the device for measuring the activity of wire [sr

  6. Neutron flux measuring system for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kazuo.

    1977-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid the generation of an undesired scram signal due to abrupt changes in the neutron level given to the detectors disposed near the boundary between the moderator and the atmosphere. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor adapted to conduct power control by the change of the level in the moderator such as heavy water, the outputs from the neutron detectors disposed vertically are averaged and the nuclear reactor is scramed corresponding to the averaged value. In this system, moderator level detectors are additionally provided to the nuclear reactor and their outputs, moderator level signal, are sent to a power averaging device where the output signals of the neutron detectors are judged if they are delivered from neutrons in the moderator or not depending on the magnitude of the level signal and the outputs of the detectors out of the moderator are substantially excluded. The reactor interlock signal from the device is utilized as a scram signal. (Seki, T.)

  7. Utilisation of prompt fission neutron technology in Greenfields uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutz, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Conventionally, gamma detection technology has been used in uranium exploration programs for the initial detection of uranium as well as for a determination of uranium concentration. Geophysical logging companies use wireline gamma probes to measure uranium within boreholes, and field technicians utilise hand held gamma meters to detect uranium in rock samples, drill cuttings and cores. Borehole geophysical logging equipment typically records the uranium concentration as %eU 3 O8, where e represents an equivalent determination of uranium concentration as opposed to a laboratory assay. This method of uranium determination is an indirect method, as it measures gamma radiation from uranium-238 (U-238) isotope decay chain progeny; principally the bismuth-214 (Bi-214) isotope. Consequently, the uranium determination can be inaccurate due to natural disequilibrium between the U-238 parent and the decay chain progeny. This is especially true in sedimentary hosted uranium deposits, where the uranium and daughter progeny may have been geochemically separated. The gamma detection method for uranium can also be rendered inaccurate by detecting the gamma signature from potassium in clays as well as from thorium; both of which can provide a false (enhanced) eU 3 O8 determination. Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) technology is a geophysical wireline logging technology used in the same manner as conventional gamma logging. The difference is that PFN provides a direct determination of uranium within a borehole, irrespective of natural disequilibrium or the presence of other radioactive elements. This paper provides a brief description of natural uranium and radioactivity as a basis for explaining the conventional use of gamma radiation detectors for the detection and determination of uranium concentration in exploration boreholes, including the potential pitfalls of this technology. A detailed description of prompt fission neutron technology is also presented, along with a discussion

  8. Neutronics study on hybrid reactor cooled by helium, water and molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zaixin; Feng Kaiming; Zhang Guoshu; Zheng Guoyao; Zhao Fengchao

    2009-01-01

    There is no serious magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problem when helium,water or molten salt of Flibe flows in high magnetic field. Thus helium, water and Flibe were proposed as candidate of coolant for fusion-fission hybrid reactor based on magnetic confinement. The effect on neutronics of hybrid reactor due to coolant was investigated. The analyses of neutron spectra and fuel breeding of blanket with different coolants were performed. Variations of tritium breeding ratio (TBR), blanket energy multiplication (M) and keff with operating time were also studied. MCNP code was used for neutron transport simulation. It is shown that spectra change greatly with different coolants. The blanket with helium exhibits very hard spectrum and good tritium breeding ability. And fission reactions are mainly from fast neutron. The blanket with water has soft spectrum and high energy multiplication factor. However, it needs to improve TBR. The blanket with Flibe has hard spectrum and less energy release. (authors)

  9. Fission product release from UO2 during irradiation. Diffusion data and their application to reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, J.R.; Johnson, F.A.; Turnbull, J.A.; Friskney, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Release of fission product species from UO 2 , and to a limited extent from (U, Pu)0 2 was studied using small scale in-reactor experiments in which these interacting variables may be separated, as far as is possible, and their influences assessed. Experiments were at fuel ratings appropriate to water reactor fuel elements and both single crystal and poly-crystalline specimens were used. They employed highly enriched uranium such that the relative number of fissions occurring in plutonium formed by neutron capture was small. The surface to volume ratio (S/V) of the specimens was well defined thus reducing the uncertainties in the derivation of diffusion coefficients. These experiments demonstrate many of the important characteristics of fission product behaviour in UO 2 during irradiation. The samples used for these experiments were small being always less than 1g with a fissile content usually between 2 and 5mg. Polycrystalline materials were taken from batches of production fuel prepared by conventional pressing and sintering techniques. The enriched single crystals were grown from a melt of sodium and potassium chloride doped with UO 2 powder 20% 235 U content. The irradiations were performed in the DIDO reactor at Harwell. The neutron flux at the specimen was 4x10 16 neutrons m -2 s -1 providing a heat rating within the samples of 34.5 MW/teU

  10. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO 2 emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  11. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckthorpe, Derek [AMEC, Knutsford, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO{sub 2} emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  12. Evolvement simulation of the probability of neutron-initiating persistent fission chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhe; Hong Zhenying

    2014-01-01

    Background: Probability of neutron-initiating persistent fission chain, which has to be calculated in analysis of critical safety, start-up of reactor, burst waiting time on pulse reactor, bursting time on pulse reactor, etc., is an inherent parameter in a multiplying assembly. Purpose: We aim to derive time-dependent integro-differential equation for such probability in relative velocity space according to the probability conservation, and develop the deterministic code Dynamic Segment Number Probability (DSNP) based on the multi-group S N method. Methods: The reliable convergence of dynamic calculation was analyzed and numerical simulation of the evolvement process of dynamic probability for varying concentration was performed under different initial conditions. Results: On Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Bare Spheres, when the time is long enough, the results of dynamic calculation approach to those of static calculation. The most difference of such results between DSNP and Partisn code is less than 2%. On Baker model, over the range of about 1 μs after the first criticality, the most difference between the dynamic and static calculation is about 300%. As for a super critical system, the finite fission chains decrease and the persistent fission chains increase as the reactivity aggrandizes, the dynamic evolvement curve of initiation probability is close to the static curve within the difference of 5% when the K eff is more than 1.2. The cumulative probability curve also indicates that the difference of integral results between the dynamic calculation and the static calculation decreases from 35% to 5% as the K eff increases. This demonstrated that the ability of initiating a self-sustaining fission chain reaction approaches stabilization, while the former difference (35%) showed the important difference of the dynamic results near the first criticality with the static ones. The DSNP code agrees well with Partisn code. Conclusions: There are large numbers of

  13. Neutron emission in fission of highly excited californium nuclei (E*=76 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, M.V.; Bordyug, V.M.; Kozulin, Eh.M.; Mozhaev, A.N.; Levitovich, M.; Muzychka, Yu.A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.; Pustyl'nik, B.I.

    1990-01-01

    The differential cross sections for neutron production in the fission of highly excited californium nuclei formed in the 238 U+ 12 C (105 MeV) reaction have been measured. From the analysis of the experimental data is follows that the number of pre-fission neutrons substantially exceeds the value obtained in the framework of the standard statistical model. The saddle-to-scission time of the excited nucleus is estimated on the basis of the neutron multiplicity. The dependences of the neutron number and neutron average energies upon the fragment mass are determined

  14. The total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of {sup 232}Th

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Jonathan; Yanez, Ricardo; Loveland, Walter; Barrett, J. Spencer; Oscar, Breland [Oregon State University, Dept. of Chemistry, Corvallis, OR (United States); Fotiades, Nikolaos; Tovesson, Fredrik; Young Lee, Hye [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Physics Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-15

    The post-emission total kinetic energy release (TKE) in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 232}Th was measured (using white spectrum neutrons from LANSCE) for neutron energies from E{sub n} = 3 to 91 MeV. In this energy range the average post-neutron total kinetic energy release decreases from 162.3 ± 0.3 at E{sub n} = 3 MeV to 154.9 ± 0.3 MeV at E{sub n} = 91 MeV. Analysis of the fission mass distributions indicates that the decrease in TKE with increasing neutron energy is a combination of increasing yields of symmetric fission (which has a lower associated TKE) and a decrease in the TKE release in asymmetric fission. (orig.)

  15. Measurements of fast neutron-induced fission data of Np-237

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Win, Than; Saito, Keiichiro; Baba, Mamoru; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Ibaraki, Masanobu; Miura, Takako; Sanami, Toshiya; Nauchi, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-03-01

    We have performed the following measurements for {sup 237}Np using the 4.5 MV Dynamitron accelerator of Tohoku University as the pulsed neutron source: (1) Prompt fission neutron spectrum for 0.62 MeV incident neutrons, and (2) Neutron-Induced fission cross-section between 10 and 100 keV. The prompt fission neutron spectrum was measured using TOF method with a heavily shielded NE213 scintillation detector. The Maxwellian temperature T{sub m} derived is 1.28 MeV, which is lower than that of 1.38 MeV in JENDL-3.2. The fission cross sections were measured between 10 - 100 keV. The results are between JENDL-3.2 and ENDF/B-VI. (author)

  16. Consultants' meeting on prompt fission neutron spectra of major actinides. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote Noy, R.; Maslov, V.; Bauge, E.; Ohsawa, T.; Vorobyev, A.; Chadwick, M.B.; Oberstedt, S.

    2009-01-01

    A Consultants' Meeting on 'Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Major Actinides' was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, to discuss the adequacy and quality of the recommended prompt fission neutron spectra to be found in existing nuclear data applications libraries. These prompt fission neutron spectra were judged to be inadequate, and this problem has proved difficult to resolve by means of theoretical modelling. Major adjustments may be required to ensure the validity of such important data. There is a strong requirement for an international effort to explore and resolve these difficulties and recommend prompt fission neutron spectra and uncertainty covariance matrices for the actinides over the neutron energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Participants also stressed that there would be a strong need for validation of the resulting data against integral critical assembly and dosimetry data. (author)

  17. Laser Intertial Fusion Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Kevin James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-04-08

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by LFFH plants. The LFFH engine described utilizes a central fusion chamber surrounded by multiple layers of multiplying and moderating media. These layers, or blankets, include coolant plenums, a beryllium (Be) multiplier layer, a fertile fission blanket and a graphite-pebble reflector. Each layer is separated by perforated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel walls. The central fusion chamber is surrounded by an ODS ferritic steel first wall. The first wall is coated with 250-500 μm of tungsten to mitigate x-ray damage. The first wall is cooled by Li17Pb83 eutectic, chosen for its neutron multiplication and good heat transfer properties. The Li17Pb83 flows in a jacket around the first wall to an extraction plenum. The main coolant injection plenum is immediately behind the Li17Pb83, separated from the Li17Pb83 by a solid ODS wall. This main system coolant is the molten salt flibe (2LiF-BeF2), chosen for beneficial neutronics and heat transfer properties. The use of flibe enables both fusion fuel production (tritium) and neutron moderation and multiplication for the fission blanket. A Be pebble (1 cm diameter) multiplier layer surrounds the coolant injection plenum and the coolant flows radially through perforated walls across the bed. Outside the Be layer, a fission fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles

  18. Neutron Radiography at the RP-10 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinostrosa, H.; Ravello, Y.; Cornejo, N.; Mendoza, M.; Montoya, M.

    1992-01-01

    The facility of neutron radiography at the RP-10 peruvian research reactor is described. The factor of collimation L/D is 149; the Cadmium ratio for the gold in the inspection's area is 4.5, and the thermal neutrons flux on the sample is 3,14 x 10 6 n/cm 2 s (author). 5 refs. 5 fig

  19. Dynamic effects in neutron induced fission of 230Th and 232Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trochon, J.; Frehaut, J.; Pranal, Y.; Simon, G.; Boldeman, J.W.

    1982-09-01

    The fission fragment characteristics of the two thorium isotopes 230 Th and 232 Th have been measured in an attempt to study the evolution of the fissioning nucleus from saddle point to scission. The partial fission channel at the saddle point have been deduced from a fission fragment angular distribution and fission cross section analysis. Changes with energy in the average number of prompt neutron (νsub(p)) emitted per fission and the total fragment kinetic energy (TKE) have been observed in the fission threshold region. A rather good fit of νsub(p) and TKE values has been obtained on the basis of a correlation of these quantities and the partial fission channel ratios. This leads to expect for these isotopes a passage from saddle point to scission sufficiently rapid for the coupling between collective and intrinsic excitation to be very weak [fr

  20. Thermoradiation treatment of sewage sludge using reactor waste fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, M.C.; Hagengruber, R.L.; Zuppero, A.C.

    1974-06-01

    The hazards to public health associated with the application of municipal sewage sludge to land usage are reviewed to establish the need for disinfection of sludge prior to its distribution as a fertilizer, especially in the production of food and fodder. The use of ionizing radiation in conjunction with mild heating is shown to be an effective disinfection treatment and an economical one when reactor waste fission products are utilized. A program for researching and experimental demonstration of the process on sludges is also outlined

  1. Gas dynamics models for an oscillating gaseous core fission reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Dam, H. van; Hoogenboom, J.E. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands))

    1991-01-01

    Two one-dimensional models are developed for the investigation of the gas dynamical behaviour of the fuel gas in a cylindrical gaseous core fission reactor. By numerical and analytical calculations, it is shown that, for the case where a direct energy extraction mechanism (such as magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD)) is not present, increasing density oscillations occur in the gas. Also an estimate is made of the attainable direct energy conversion efficiency, for the case where a direct energy extraction mechanism is present. (author).

  2. The measurement of prompt neutron spectrum in spontaneous fission of {sup 244}Cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batenkov, O.I.; Boykov, G.S.; Drapchinsky, L.V.; Majorov, M.Ju.; Trenkin, V.A. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    Under the Program of Measurements of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Minor Actinides for Transmutation Purposes the integral neutron spectrum in spontaneous fission of {sup 244}Cm has been measured by the time-of-flight method in the energy range of 0.1-15 MeV relative to the standard neutron spectrum in {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission. Essential attention was paid to revealing of possible systematic errors. It is shown, that the {sup 244}Cm spectrum shape may be well described by using Mannhart evaluation with appropriate parameter of Maxwell temperature T{sub M} = 1.37 MeV. (author)

  3. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J. M., E-mail: lewisj@ufl.edu; Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Murer, D. [Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd., 8045 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  4. Properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Henry, E.A.; Griffin, H.C.; Lien, O.G. III; Lane, S.M.; Stevenson, P.C.; Yaffe, R.P.; Skarnemark, G.

    1979-09-01

    A review is given of the properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry and includes the techniques used in elemental isolation and current research on the structure of nuclei near 132 Sn, particle emission, and coexisting structure in both neutron-poor and neutron-rich nuclei. 35 references

  5. Part I. Fuel-motion diagnostics in support of fast-reactor safety experiments. Part II. Fission product detection system in support of fast reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devolpi, A.; Doerner, R.C.; Fink, C.L.; Regis, J.P.; Rhodes, E.A.; Stanford, G.S.; Braid, T.H.; Boyar, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    In all destructive fast-reactor safety experiments at TREAT, fuel motion and cladding failure have been monitored by the fast-neutron/gamma-ray hodoscope, providing experimental results that are directly applicable to design, modeling, and validation in fast-reactor safety. Hodoscope contributions to the safety program can be considered to fall into several groupings: pre-failure fuel motion, cladding failure, post-failure fuel motion, steel blockages, pretest and posttest radiography, axial-power-profile variations, and power-coupling monitoring. High-quality results in fuel motion have been achieved, and motion sequences have been reconstructed in qualitative and quantitative visual forms. A collimated detection system has been used to observe fission products in the upper regions of a test loop in the TREAT reactor. Particular regions of the loop are targeted through any of five channels in a rotatable assembly in a horizontal hole through the biological shield. A well-type neutron detector, optimized for delayed neutrons, and two GeLi gamma ray spectrometers have been used in several experiments. Data are presented showing a time history of the transport of Dn emitters, of gamma spectra identifying volatile fission products deposited as aerosols, and of fission gas isotopes released from the coolant

  6. Neutron Energy Spectra from Neutron Induced Fission of 235U at 0.95 MeV and of 238U at 1.35 and 2.02 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, E; Holmqvist, B; Wiedling, T

    1971-09-15

    The shapes of fission neutron spectra are of interest for power reactor calculations. Recently it has been suggested that the neutron induced fission spectrum of 235U may be harder than was earlier assumed. For this reason measurements of the neutron spectra of some fissile isotopes are in progress at our laboratory. This report will present results from studies of the energy spectra of the neutrons emitted in the neutron induced fission of 235U and 238U. The measurements were performed at an incident neutron energy of 0.95 MeV for 235U and at energies of 1.35 and 2.02 MeV for 238U using time-of-flight techniques. The time-of-flight spectra were only analysed at energies higher than those of the incident neutrons and up to about 10 MeV. Corrections for neutron attenuation in the uranium samples were calculated using a Monte Carlo program. The corrected fission neutron spectra were fitted to Maxwellian temperature distributions. For 235U a temperature of 1.27 +- 0.01 MeV gives the best fit to the experimental data and for 238U the corresponding values are 1.29 +- 0.03 MeV at 1.35 MeV and 1.29 +- 0.02 MeV at 2.02 MeV

  7. Mass distributions in monoenergetic-neutron-induced fission of 232Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenin, L.E.; Gindler, J.E.; Ahmad, I.; Henderson, D.J.; Meadows, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Fission product yields for 38 masses were determined for the fission of 232 Th with essentially monoenergetic neutrons of 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.9, 6.4, 6.9, 7.6, and 8.0 MeV. Fission product activities were measured by Ge(Li) γ-ray spectrometry of irradiated 232 Th foils and by chemical separation of the fission product elements followed by β counting. The mass yield data for 232 Th(n,f ) show a sensitive increase of fission yields in the near-symmetric mass region (valley) with increasing incident neutron energy E/sub n/ and a pronounced dip in yield at the onset of second-chance fission just above the neutron binding energy (at approx. 6 MeV) where the excitation energy is lowered by competition with neutron evaporation prior to fission. The effect of second-chance fission is also seen in the yields of asymmetric peak products. A distinct third peak is observed at symmetry in the valley of the mass distribution, and enhanced yields are observed in the asymmetric peaks at masses associated with even Z (proton pairing effect). The fission yeilds of 232 Th(n,f ) are compared with those of 238 U(n,f ) and 232 Th

  8. Energy measurement of prompt fission neutrons in 239Pu(n,f) for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatillon, A; Granier, Th; Laurent, B; Taïeb, J; Noda, S; Haight, R C; Devlin, M; Nelson, R O; O’Donnell, J M

    2010-01-01

    Prompt fission neutron spectra in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu have been measured for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Preliminary results are discussed and compared to theoretical model calculation.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections for {sup 241}Am at neutron energies below fission threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, K., E-mail: hirose.kentaro@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nishio, K.; Makii, H.; Nishinaka, I.; Ota, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nagayama, T. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ibaraki University, Mito 310-0056 (Japan); Tamura, N. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Goto, S. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Andreyev, A.N. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Vermeulen, M.J. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Gillespie, S.; Barton, C. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Kimura, A.; Harada, H. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Center, JAEA, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Meigo, S. [J-PARC Center, JAEA, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chiba, S. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ohtsuki, T. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho S' ennangun,Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    Fission and capture reactions were simultaneously measured in the neutron-induced reactions of {sup 241}Am at the spallation neutron facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Data for the neutron energy range of E{sub n}=0.1–20 eV were taken with the TOF method. The fission events were observed by detecting prompt neutrons accompanied by fission using liquid organic scintillators. The capture reaction was measured by detecting γ rays emitted in the deexcitation of the compound nuclei using the same detectors, where the prompt fission neutrons and capture γ rays were separated by a pulse shape analysis. The cross sections were obtained by normalizing the relative yields at the first resonance to evaluations or other experimental data. The ratio of the fission to capture cross sections at each resonance is compared with those from an evaluated nuclear data library and other experimental data. Some differences were found between the present values and the library/literature values at several resonances.

  10. Neutronic of heterogenous gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maturana, Roberto Hernan

    2008-01-01

    At present, one of the main technical features of the advanced gas cooled reactor under development is its fuel element concept, which implies a neutronic homogeneous design, thus requiring higher enrichment compared with present commercial nuclear power plants.In this work a neutronic heterogeneous gas cooled reactor design is analyzed by studying the neutronic design of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a low enrichment, gas cooled and graphite moderated nuclear power plant.A search of merit figures (some neutronic parameter, characteristic dimension, or a mixture of both) which are important and have been optimized during the reactor design stage is been done, to aim to comprise how a gas heterogeneous reactor is been design, given that semi-infinity arrangement criteria of rods in LWRs and clusters in HWRs can t be applied for a solid moderator and a gas refrigerator.The WIMS code for neutronic cell calculations is been utilized to model the AGR fuel cell and to calculate neutronic parameters such as the multiplication factor and the pick factor, as function of the fuel burnup.Also calculation is been done for various nucleus characteristic dimensions values (fuel pin radius, fuel channel pitch) and neutronic parameters (such as fuel enrichment), around the design established parameters values.A fuel cycle cost analysis is carried out according to the reactor in study, and the enrichment effect over it is been studied.Finally, a thermal stability analysis is been done, in subcritical condition and at power level, to study this reactor characteristic reactivity coefficients.Present results shows (considering the approximation used) a first set of neutronic design figures of merit consistent with the AGR design. [es

  11. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol on fission-neutron-induced DNA damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grdina, D. J.; Sigdestad, C. P.; Dale, P. J.; Perrin, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect(s) of the radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) on fission-neutron-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 Chinese hamster cells was determined by using a neutral filter elution procedure (pH 7.2). When required, WR1065, at a final working concentration of 4 mM, was added to the culture medium, either 30 min before and during irradiation with fission spectrum neutrons (beam energy of 0.85 MeV) from the JANUS research reactor, or for selected intervals of time following exposure. The frequency of neutron-induced DNA strand breaks as measured by neutral elution as a function of dose equalled that observed for 60Co gamma-ray-induced damage (relative biological effectiveness of one). In contrast to the protective effect exhibited by WR1065 in reducing 60Co-induced DNA damage, WR1065 was ineffective in reducing or protecting against induction of DNA strand breaks by JANUS neutrons. The kinetics of DNA double-strand rejoining were measured following neutron irradiation. In the absence of WR1065, considerable DNA degradation by cellular enzymes was observed. This process was inhibited when WR1065 was present. These results indicate that, under the conditions used, the quality (i.e. nature), rather than quantity, of DNA lesions (measured by neutral elution) formed by neutrons was significantly different from that formed by gamma-rays. PMID:2667608

  12. Investigation of the fission yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of {sup 233}U; Mesure de la distribution en masse et en charge des produits de la fission rapide de l'{sup 233}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galy, J

    1999-09-01

    As a stars, a survey of the different methods of investigations of the fission product yields and the experimental data status have been studied, showing advantages and shortcomings for the different approaches. An overview of the existing models for the fission product distributions has been as well intended. The main part of this thesis was the measurement of the independent yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of{sup 233}U, never investigated before this work. The experiment has been carried out using the mass separator OSIRIS (Isotope Separator On-Line). Its integrated ion-source and its specific properties required an analysis of the delay-parameter and ionisation efficiency for each chemical species. On the other hand, this technique allows measurement of independent yields and cumulative yields for elements from Cu to Ba, covering most of the fission yield distribution. Thus, we measured about 180 independent yields from Zn (Z=30) to Sr (Z=38) in the mass range A=74-99 and from Pd (Z=46) to Ba (Z=56) in the mass range A=113-147, including many isomeric states. An additional experiment using direct {gamma}-spectroscopy of aggregates of fission products was used to determine more than 50 cumulative yields of element with half-life from 15 min to a several days. All experimental data have been compared to estimates from a semi-empirical model, to calculated values and to evaluated values from the European library JEF 2.2. Furthermore, a study of both thermal and fast neutron-induced fission of {sup 233}U measured at Studsvik, the comparison of the OSIRIS and LOHENGRIN facilities and the trends in new data for the Reactors Physics have been discussed. (author)

  13. Evaluation of transmutation performance of long-lived fission products with a super fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Haoliang; Han, Chiyoung; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ikejiri, Satoshi; Ishiwatari, Yuki

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the Super Fast Reactor for transmutation treatment of long-lived fission products (LLFPs) was evaluated. Two regions with soft neutron spectrum, which is of great benefit to the LLFPs transmutation, can be utilized in the Super Fast Reactor. First is in the blanket assembly due to the ZrH 1.7 layer which can slow down the fast neutrons. Second is in the reflector region of core like other metal-cooled fast reactors. The LLFPs selected of transmutation analysis include 99 Tc, 129 I and 135 Cs discharged from LWR. Their isotopes, such as 127 I, 133 Cs, 134 Cs and 137 Cs were also considered. By loading the isotopes ( 99 Tc or 127 I and 129 I) in the blanket assembly and the reflector region simultaneously, the transmutation rates of 5.36%/GWe·y and 2.79%/GWe.y can be obtained for 99 Tc and 129 I, respectively. The transmuted amounts of 99 Tc and 129 I are equal to the outputs from 11.8 and 6.2 1000MWe-class PWRs. Because of the very low capture cross section of 135 Cs and the effect of other cesium isotopes, 135 Cs was loaded with three rings of assemblies in the reflector region to make the transmuted amount be larger than the yields of two 1000MWe-class PWRs. Based on these results, 99 Tc and 129 I can be transmuted conveniently and higher transmutation performance can be obtained by the Super Fast Reactor. However, the transmutation of 135 Cs is very difficult and the transmuted amount is less than that produced by the Super Fast Reactor. It turns out that the 135 Cs transmutation is a challenge not only for the Super Fast Reactor but also for other commercial fast reactors. (author)

  14. Energy dependence of relative abundances and periods of separate groups of delayed neutrons at neutron induced fission of 239Pu in a range of neutrons energies 0.37 - 5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roschenko, V.A.; Piksaikin, V.M.; Kazakov, L.E.; Isaev, S.G.; Korolev, G.G.; Tarasko, M.Z.; Tertychnyi, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental role of delayed neutrons in behavior, control and safety of reactors is well known today. Delayed neutron data are of great interest not only for reactor physics but also for nuclear fission physics and astrophysics. The purpose of the present work was the measurement of energy dependence of delayed neutrons (DN) group parameters at fission of nuclei 239 Pu in a range of energies of primary neutrons from 0.37 up to 5 MeV. The measurements were executed on installation designed on the basis of the electrostatic accelerator of KG - 2.5 SSC RF IPPE. The data are obtained in 6-group representation. It is shown, that there is a significant energy dependence of DN group parameters in a range of primary neutrons energies from thermal meanings up to 5 MeV, which is expressed in reduction of the average half-life of nuclei of the DN precursors on 10 %. The data, received in the present work, can be used at creation of a set of group constants for reactors with an intermediate spectrum of neutrons. (authors)

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of fission yields, kinetic energy, fission neutron spectrum and decay γ-ray spectrum for 232Th(n,f) reaction induced by 3H(d,n) 4He neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wei; Zeen Yao; Changlin Lan; Yan Yan; Yunjian Shi; Siqi Yan; Jie Wang; Junrun Wang; Jingen Chen; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo transport code Geant4 has been successfully utilised to study of neutron-induced fission reaction for 232 Th in the transport neutrons generated from 3 H(d,n) 4 He neutron source. The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of Monte Carlo simulations for the computation of fission reaction process. For this, Monte Carlo simulates and calculates the characteristics of fission reaction process of 232 Th(n,f), such as the fission yields distribution, kinetic energy distribution, fission neutron spectrum and decay γ-ray spectrum. This is the first time to simulate the process of neutron-induced fission reaction using Geant4 code. Typical computational results of neutron-induced fission reaction of 232 Th(n,f) reaction are presented. The computational results are compared with the previous experimental data and evaluated nuclear data to confirm the certain physical process model in Geant4 of scientific rationality. (author)

  16. Neutronic assessment of strontium-90 transmutation in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    Transmutation of 90 Sr using fusion neutrons has been suggested as a possible technique for disposing of this waste nuclide. For transmutation to be attractive, high transmutation rates relative to natural decay are required. Effective half-lives for 90 Sr were computed for fusion reactor blankets constructed of various materials. To obtain satisfactory transmutation rates, fusion reactors with high first wall neutron currents and with highly moderating blankets were found to be necessary. An effective half-life for 90 Sr of 90 Sr inventory and the number of burners required for various fission usage scenarios. Efficient and fast chemical separations were needed to reap the benefits of a short effective half-life. For the fusion burners considered, it was found that the 90 Sr inventory could not be reduced to less than one-fourth of the inventory without transmutation if fission usage continued at a constant rate. Such a reduction is not sufficient to justify the transmutation disposal of 90 Sr

  17. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the CALIBAN metallic core reactor from stochastic neutron measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Chapelle, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DAM, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France)

    2012-07-01

    Several experimental devices are operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Dept. of the CEA Valduc Laboratory. One of these is the Caliban metallic core reactor. The purpose of this study is to develop and perform experiments allowing to determinate some of fundamental kinetic parameters of the reactor. The prompt neutron decay constant and particularly its value at criticality can be measured with reactor noise techniques such as Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman variance-to-mean methods. Subcritical, critical, and even supercritical experiments were performed. Fission chambers detectors were put nearby the core and measurements were analyzed with the Rossi-{alpha} technique. A new value of the prompt neutron decay constant at criticality was determined, which allows, using the Nelson number method, new evaluations of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the in core neutron lifetime. As an introduction of this paper, some motivations of this work are given in part 1. In part 2, principles of the noise measurements experiments performed at the CEA Valduc Laboratory are reminded. The Caliban reactor is described in part 3. Stochastic neutron measurements analysis techniques used in this study are then presented in part 4. Results of fission chamber experiments are summarized in part 5. Part 6 is devoted to the current work, improvement of the experimental device using He 3 neutron detectors and first results obtained with it. Finally, conclusions and perspectives are given in part 7. (authors)

  18. Nuclear fuel assembly for fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyunin, V.G.; Murogov, V.M.; Troyanov, M.F.; Rinejskij, A.A.; Ustinov, G.G.; Shmelev, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    The fuel assembly of a fast reactor consists of fuel elements comprising sections with fissionable and breeding material and tubes with hollows designed for entrapping gaseous fission products. Tubes joining up to the said sections are divided in a middle and a peripheral group such that at least one of the tube groups is placed in the space behind the coolant inlet ports. The configuration above allows reducing internal overpressure in the fuel assembly, thus reducing the volume of necessary structural elements in the core. (J.B.)

  19. Detection of fission signatures induced by a low-energy neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocherashvili, A.; Becka, A.; Mayorovb, V.; Roesgen, E.; Crochemoreb, J.-M.; Mosconi, M.; Pedersen, B.; Heger, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for the detection of special nuclear materials (SNM) in shielded containers which is both sensitive and applicable under field conditions. The method uses an external pulsed neutron source to induce fission in SNM and subsequent detection of the fast prompt fission neutrons. The detectors surrounding the container under investigation are liquid scintillation detectors able to distinguish gamma rays from fast neutrons by means of the pulse shape discrimination method (PSD). One advantage of these detectors, besides the ability for PSD analysis, is that the analogue signal from a detection event is of very short duration (typically few tens of nanoseconds). This allows the use of very short coincidence gates for the detection of the prompt fission neutrons in multiple detectors while benefiting from a low accidental (background) coincidence rate yielding a low detection limit. Another principle advantage of this method derives from the fact that the external neutron source is pulsed. By proper time gating the interrogation can be conducted by epithermal and thermal source neutrons only. These source neutrons do not appear in the fast neutron signal following the PSD analysis thus providing a fundamental method for separating the interrogating source neutrons from the sample response in form of fast fission neutrons. The paper describes laboratory tests with a configuration of eight detectors in the Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly (PUNITA). The sensitivity of the coincidence signal to fissile mass is investigated for different sample configurations and interrogation regimes.

  20. Spherical Harmonics Treatment of Epithermal Neutron Spectra in Reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V.

    1972-04-01

    A procedure has been developed to solve the slowing down transport equation for neutrons in a cylindrized reactor lattice cell. Treating the anisotropy of the epithermal neutron flux by the spherical harmonics formalism, which reduces the space-angle-lethargy-dependent transport equation to the matrix integrodifferential equation in space and lethargy, and replacing the lethargy transfer integrals by finite-difference forms, a set of matrix ordinary differential equations, with lethargy and space dependent coefficients, is obtained. In the resonance region this set takes a lower block triangular form and can be directly solved by forward block substitution; in the lethargy range, where the fast fission effects have to be considered, the iterative procedure is introduced. A simple and efficient approximation is then proposed, making possible the analytical solution for the spatial dependence of the spherical harmonics flux moments. The proposed procedure has been numerically examined and approved. Some typical results are presented and discussed. (author)

  1. Conversion of reactor neutrons by lithium deuteride; Konverzija reaktorskih neutrona pomocu litijumdeuterida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strugar, P; Altiparmakov, D [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1979-07-01

    Nuclear reactors are powerful neutron sources. But for many purposes, neutrons of higher than fission energy are needed. Such neutrons may be produced by the conversion of reactor neutrons into 14 MeV neutrons using lithium deuteride converter. For that converter is generally employed {sup 6}LiD, the usual material for the thermonuclear weapons, and therefore hardly accessible in needed quantity. That was the reason to analyse such converter made of LiD with the lithium of natural isotopic content. This analysis starts with the basic conversion relations, takes into account neutron absorption and tritium generation, and finally, estimates the 14 MeV neutron flux and the heat generated in proposed converter, when the converter was coupled to each of three Yugoslav nuclear reactors. Results show that the converter made of LiD with the natural lithium is 50% less efficient than the converter of {sup 6}LiD. Intensity of 14 MeV neutrons is within limits 5. 10{sup 5} - 10{sup 10} (n/cm{sup 2}.s) for the converter used either as external converter with reactor RB, within the thermal column in the reactor TRIGA or as a 'fuel' segment at the reactor RA. (author)

  2. Actinide neutron induced cross section measurements using the oscillation technique in the Minerve reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, B.; Leconte, P.; Gruel, A.; Antony, M.; Di-Salvo, J.; Hudelot, J.P.; Pepino, A.; Lecluze, A. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DER/SPRC/LEPh, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    CEA is deeply involved research programs concerning nuclear fuel advanced studies (actinides, plutonium), waste management, the scientific and technical support of French PWR reactors and EPR reactor, and innovative systems. In this framework, specific neutron integral experiments have been carried out in the critical ZPR (zero power reactor) facilities of the CEA at Cadarache such as MINERVE, EOLE and MASURCA. This paper deals with MINERVE Pool Reactor experiments. MINERVE is mainly devoted to neutronics studies of different reactor core types. The aim is to improve the knowledge of the integral absorption cross sections of actinides (OSMOSE program), of new absorbers (OCEAN program) and also for fission Products (CBU program) in thermal, epithermal and fast neutron spectra. (authors)

  3. Critical survey of the neutron-induced creep behaviour of steel alloys for the fusion reactor materials programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.

    1985-01-01

    The differences between the irradiation environment of a fission reactor and that of a fusion reactor are respectively described in relation to the radiation damage found and expected in the two types of nuclear reactor. It is shown that the microstructure developing for instance in stainless steel alloys is almost invariant to whether the production rate of helium is high or low. The finding is valid up to neutron doses corresponding to about 60 dpa. For this reason, irradiation creep data obtained in fission reactors may be used, with caution, for predicting creep behaviour in fusion reactors.It was further recognized that irradiation creep performed with high energy particles from an accelerator, yields results which are comparable to those obtained in fission reactors. For this reason, simulation creep experiments are found to be valuable for the development of irradiation creep resistant materials using, for example, high energy electrons or protons. Such kind of experiments are performed in many laboratories. For irradiation doses larger than 60 dpa, predictions with respect to creep rates in fission and fusion reactors are difficult. In end-of-life tests, which concern swelling, ductility, tensile properties, rupture, fatigue and embrittlement, the presence of helium, due to its production rate being much higher in most materials exposed to 14 MeV neutrons than to fission neutrons, may be of great importance

  4. {sup 252}Cf spontaneous prompt fission neutron spectrum measured at 0 degree and 180 degree relative to the fragment motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanglian, Bao; Jinquan, Liu [Beijing Univ., BJ (China); Batenkov, O I; Blinov, M V; Smirnov, S N [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, ST. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1994-09-01

    The {sup 252}Cf spontaneous prompt fission neutron spectrum at 0 degree and 180 degree relative to the motion direction of corresponding fission fragments was measured. High angular resolution for fragment measurements and high energy resolution for neutron measurements were obtained using multi-parameter TOF spectrometer. The results showed that there is a symmetric distribution of `forward` and `backward` for low energy in C.M.S. neutrons, which was an evidence of nonequilibrium neutrons existed in fission process.

  5. Prompt neutron emission from fragments in spontaneous fission of {sup 244,248}Cm and {sup 252}Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Shcherbakov, O. A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad district, 188300 (Russian Federation); Dushin, V. N.; Jakovlev, V. A.; Kalinin, V. A.; Petrov, B. F. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hambsch, F.J [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Laptev, A. B. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad district, 188300 (Russian Federation); Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Neutrons emitted in fission were measured separately for each complementary fragment in correlation with fission fragment energies. Two high efficiency Gd-loaded liquid scintillator tanks were used for neutron registration. Fission fragment energies were measured using a twin Frisch gridded ionization chamber with a pin-hole collimator. The neutron multiplicity distributions were obtained for each value of the fission fragment mass and energy and corrected for neutron registration efficiency, background and pile-up. The dependencies of these distributions on fragment mass and energy for different energy and mass bins, as well as the mass and energy distribution of the fission fragments are presented and discussed. (authors)

  6. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts...... of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as fabricated parts are included. The collection contains 158 neutron radiographs, reproduced on photographic paper...

  7. Goodness of isospin in neutron rich systems from the fission fragment distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Swati; Jain, Ashok Kumar

    2017-09-01

    We present the results of our calculations for the relative yields of neutron-rich fission fragments emitted in 208Pb (18O, fission) reaction by using the concept of the conservation of isospin and compare with the experimental data. We take into account a range of isospin values allowed by the isospin algebra and assume that the fission fragments are formed in isobaric analog states. We also take into account the neutron multiplicity data for various neutron-emission channels in each partition, and use them to obtain the weight factors in calculating the yields. We then calculate the relative yields of the fission fragments. Our calculated results are able to reproduce the experimental trends reasonably well. This is the first direct evidence of the isospin conservation in neutron-rich systems and may prove a very useful tool in their studies.

  8. Pulse-shape discrimination in radioanalytical methods. Part I. Delayed fission neutron counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posta, S.; Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Cervena, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study the principle of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) has been employed in delayed fission neutron counting (DNC) method. Effective elimination of unwanted gamma background signals in measured radiation spectra has been proved. (author)

  9. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting on neutron activation cross sections for fission and fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Vonach, H.

    1990-01-01

    These proceedings of a specialists' meeting on neutron activation cross sections for fission and fusion energy applications are divided into 4 sessions bearing on: - data needs: 4 conferences - experimental work: 11 conferences - theoretical work: 4 conferences - evaluation work: 5 conferences

  10. Consultancy on the potential of fusion/fission sub-critical neutron systems for energy production and transmutation. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Workshop on Sub-critical Neutron Production held at the University of Maryland and the Eisenhower Institute on 11-13 October 2004 brought together members of fusion, fission and accelerator technical communities to discuss issues of spent fuel, nonproliferation, reactor safety and the use of neutrons for sub-critical operation of nuclear reactors. The Workshop strongly recommended that the fusion community work closely with other technical communities to ensure that a wider range of technical solutions is available to solve the spent fuel problem and to utilize the current actinide inventories. Participants of the Workshop recommended that a follow-on Workshop, possibly under the aegis of the IAEA, should be held in the first half of the year 2005. The Consultancy Meeting is the response to this recommendation. The objectives of the Consultancy meeting were to hold discussions on the role of fusion/fission systems in sub-critical operations of nuclear reactors. The participants agreed that development of innovative (fourth generation) fission reactors, advanced fuel cycle options, and disposition of existing spent nuclear fuel inventories in various Member Sates can significantly benefit from including sub-critical systems, which are driven by external neutron sources. Spallation neutrons produced by accelerators have been accepted in the past as the means of driving sub-critical reactors. The accelerator community deserves credit in pioneering this novel approach to reactor design. Progress in the design and operation of fusion devices now offers additional innovative means, broadening the range of sub-critical operations of fission reactors. Participants felt that fusion should participate with accelerators in providing a range of technical options in reactor design. Participants discussed concrete steps to set up a small fusion/fission system to demonstrate actinide burning in the laboratory and what advice should be given to the Agency on its role in

  11. Fast-neutron-induced fission of 242Pu at nELBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kögler Toni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast neutron-induced fission cross section of 242Pu was determined in the range of 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV relative to 235U(n,f at the neutron time-of-flight facility nELBE. The number of target nuclei was calculated by means of measuring the spontaneous fission rate of 242Pu. Neutron transport simulations with Geant4 and MCNP6 are used to correct the relative cross section for neutron scattering. The determined results are in good agreement with current experimental and evaluated data sets.

  12. Time Evolving Fission Chain Theory and Fast Neutron and Gamma-Ray Counting Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. S.; Nakae, L. F.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.; Verbeke, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we solve a simple theoretical model of time evolving fission chains due to Feynman that generalizes and asymptotically approaches the point model theory. The point model theory has been used to analyze thermal neutron counting data. This extension of the theory underlies fast counting data for both neutrons and gamma rays from metal systems. Fast neutron and gamma-ray counting is now possible using liquid scintillator arrays with nanosecond time resolution. For individual fission chains, the differential equations describing three correlated probability distributions are solved: the time-dependent internal neutron population, accumulation of fissions in time, and accumulation of leaked neutrons in time. Explicit analytic formulas are given for correlated moments of the time evolving chain populations. The equations for random time gate fast neutron and gamma-ray counting distributions, due to randomly initiated chains, are presented. Correlated moment equations are given for both random time gate and triggered time gate counting. There are explicit formulas for all correlated moments are given up to triple order, for all combinations of correlated fast neutrons and gamma rays. The nonlinear differential equations for probabilities for time dependent fission chain populations have a remarkably simple Monte Carlo realization. A Monte Carlo code was developed for this theory and is shown to statistically realize the solutions to the fission chain theory probability distributions. Combined with random initiation of chains and detection of external quanta, the Monte Carlo code generates time tagged data for neutron and gamma-ray counting and from these data the counting distributions.

  13. Materials degradation in fission reactors: Lessons learned of relevance to fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, Gary S.

    2007-01-01

    The management of materials in power reactor systems has become a critically important activity in assuring the safe, reliable and economical operation of these facilities. Over the years, the commercial nuclear power reactor industry has faced numerous 'surprises' and unexpected occurrences in materials. Mitigation strategies have sometimes solved one problem at the expense of creating another. Other problems have been solved successfully and have motivated the development of techniques to foresee problems before they occur. This paper focuses on three aspects of fission reactor experience that may benefit future fusion systems. The first is identification of parameters and processes that have had a large impact on the behavior of materials in fission systems such as temperature, dose rate, surface condition, gradients, metallurgical variability and effects of the environment. The second is the development of materials performance and failure models to provide a basis for assuring component integrity. Last is the development of proactive materials management programs that identify and pre-empt degradation processes before they can become problems. These aspects of LWR experience along with the growing experience with materials in the more demanding advanced fission reactor systems form the basis for a set of 'lessons learned' to aid in the successful management of materials in fusion reactor systems

  14. Correlation studies of neutron multiplicities in the 252Cf spontaneous fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhazov, I.D.; Dmitriev, V.D.; Kovalenko, S.S.; Kuznetsov, A.V.; Malkin, L.Z.; Petrzhak, K.A.; Petrov, B.F.; Shpakov, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    Correlations between the numbers of neutrons emitted by the 252 Cf spontaneous fission fragments have been studied as a function of the fragment mass and total kinetic energy. Behaviour of the neutron number dispersions and covariances was studied for the region of symmetric fission. Parameters of the complementary fragment excitation energy distribution (mean values, dispersions, covariances) were determined. Various factors describing correlations between the complementary fragment excitation energies are considered

  15. Possible error-prone repair of neoplastic transformation induced by fission-spectrum neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, C K; Han, A; Elkind, M M

    1948-01-01

    An examination was made of the effect of fission-spectrum neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory, delivered either as acute or protracted irradiation, on the incidence of neoplastic transformation in the C3H 10T1/2 mouse embryo cell line. Acute exposures were delivered at 10-38 cGy min/sup -1/, protracted exposures at 0.086 or 0.43 cGy min/sup -1/. The total doses for both ranged from 2.4 to 350 cGy. In the low dose region (2.4-80 cGy), there was a large enhancement in transformation frequency when the neutrons were delivered at the low dose rates compared with the high dose rates, but the survival of the cells was not significantly different between the two exposures conditions. Analysis of the intial parts of the curves shows that the regression line for protracted doses is about 9 times steeper than that for single acute exposures. Finally, the possibility is discussed that an ''error-prone'' repair process may be causing the enhanced transformation frequency by protracted neutron exposures.

  16. On the research activities in reactor and neutron physics using the first egyptian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A review on the most important research activities in reactor and neutron physics using the first Egyptian Research Reactor (ET-RR-1) is given. An out look on: neutron cross-sections, neutron flux, neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, neutron diffraction and radiation shielding experiments, is presented

  17. EL-2 reactor: Thermal neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, A.; Genthon, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    The flux distribution of thermal neutrons in EL-2 reactor is studied. The reactor core and lattices are described as well as the experimental reactor facilities, in particular, the experimental channels and special facilities. The measurement shows that the thermal neutron flux increases in the central channel when enriched uranium is used in place of natural uranium. However the thermal neutron flux is not perturbed in the other reactor channels by the fuel modification. The macroscopic flux distribution is measured according the radial positioning of fuel rods. The longitudinal neutron flux distribution in a fuel rod is also measured and shows no difference between enriched and natural uranium fuel rods. In addition, measurements of the flux distribution have been effectuated for rods containing other material as steel or aluminium. The neutron flux distribution is also studied in all the experimental channels as well as in the thermal column. The determination of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in all experimental facilities, the thermal column and the fuel channels has been made with a heavy water level of 1825 mm and is given for an operating power of 1000 kW. (M.P.)

  18. Neutron flux distribution forecasting device of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1991-01-01

    A neutron flux distribution is forecast by using current data obtained from a reactor. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux monitor disposed in various positions in the reactor, (2) a forecasting means for calculating and forecasting a one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to imaginable events by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and physical models, and (3) a display means for displaying the results forecast in the forecasting means to a reactor operation console. Since the forecast values for the one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to the imaginable events are calculated in the device of the present invention by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and the physical models, the data as a base of the calculation are new and the period for calculating the forecast values can be shortened. Accordingly, although there is a worry of providing some errors in the forecast values, they can be utilized sufficiently as reference data. As a result, the reactor can be operated more appropriately. (I.N.)

  19. Neutron personnel dosimetry considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, T.P.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The increasing development of fusion reactor technology warrants an evaluation of personnel neutron dosimetry systems to aid in the concurrent development of a radiation protection program. For this reason, current state of knowledge neutron dosimeters have been reviewed with emphasis placed on practical utilization and the problems inherent in each type of dosimetry system. Evaluations of salient parameters such as energy response, latent image instability, and minimum detectable dose equivalent are presented for nuclear emulsion films, track etch techniques, albedo and other thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques, electrical conductivity damage effects, lyoluminescence, thermocurrent, and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission. Brief summaries of dosimetry regulatory requirements and intercomparison study results help to establish compliance and recent trends, respectively. Spectrum modeling data generated by the Neutron Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Facility have been analyzed by both International Commission on Radiological Protection fluence to dose conversion factors and an adjoint technique of radiation dosimetry, in an attempt to determine the applicability of current neutron dosimetry systems to deuterium and tritium fusion reactor leakage spectra. Based on the modeling data, a wide range of neutron energies will probably be present in the leakage spectra of the TFTR facility, and no appreciable risk of somatic injury to occupationally exposed workers is expected. The relative dose contributions due to high energy and thermal neutrons indicate that neutron dosimetry will probably not be a serious limitation in the development of fusion power

  20. Comparison of nuclear irradiation parameters of fusion breeder materials in high flux fission test reactors and a fusion power demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Herring, S.; Hogenbirk, A.; Leichtle, D.; Nagao, Y.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Ying, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear irradiation parameters relevant to displacement damage and burn-up of the breeder materials Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 have been evaluated and compared for a fusion power demonstration reactor and the high flux fission test reactor (HFR), Petten, the advanced test reactor (ATR, INEL) and the Japanese material test reactor (JMTR, JAERI). Based on detailed nuclear reactor calculations with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and binary collision approximation (BCA) computer simulations of the displacement damage in the polyatomic lattices with MARLOWE, it has been investigated how well the considered HFRs can meet the requirements for a fusion power reactor relevant irradiation. It is shown that a breeder material irradiation in these fission test reactors is well suited in this regard when the neutron spectrum is well tailored and the 6 Li-enrichment is properly chosen. Requirements for the relevant nuclear irradiation parameters such as the displacement damage accumulation, the lithium burn-up and the damage production function W(T) can be met when taking into account these prerequisites. Irradiation times in the order of 2-3 full power years are necessary for the HFR to achieve the peak values of the considered fusion power Demo reactor blanket with regard to the burn-up and, at the same time, the dpa accumulation