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Sample records for reactor conversion program

  1. U.S. Domestic Reactor Conversion Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolstenhulme, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The Conversion Projects Include: the revision of the facilities safety basis documents and supporting analysis, the fabrication of new LEU fuel, the change-out of the reactor core, and the removal of the used HEU fuel (by INL University Fuels Program or DOE-NE). The major entities involved are: the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the University reactor department, the fuel and hardware fabricators, the Spent fuel receipt facilities, the Spent fuel shipping services, and the U.S. Department of Energy and their subcontractors. Three major Reactor Conversion Program milestones have been accomplished since 2006: the conversion of the TRIGA reactor at Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center, the conversion of the University of Florida Training Reactor, and the conversion of the Purdue University Reactor. Four Reactor Conversion Program milestones yet to be accomplished in 2008 and 2009: the Washington State University Nuclear Radiation Center reactor, the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor, the University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor, and the Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility. NNSA is committed to doing things cheaper, better, smarter, safer through a 'Lessons Learned' process. The conversion team assessed each major activity grouping: Project Initiation, Conversion Proposal Development, Fuel Fabrication and Hardware, Core Conversion, and Spent Nuclear Fuel Removal. Issues were identified and recommendations were given

  2. Conversion of research and test reactors to low enriched uranium fuel: technical overview and program status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roglans-Ribas, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the nuclear research and test reactors worldwide operate with high enriched uranium fuel. In response to worries over the potential use of HEU from research reactors in nuclear weapons, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of HEU fuel by converting research reactors to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The Reactor Conversion program is currently under the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). 55 of the 129 reactors included in the scope have been already converted to LEU fuel or have shutdown prior to conversion. The major technical activities of the Conversion Program include: (1) the development of advanced LEU fuels; (2) conversion analysis and conversion support; and (3) technology development for the production of Molybdenum-99 (Mo 99 ) with LEU targets. The paper provides an overview of the status of the program, the technical challenges and accomplishments, and the role of international collaborations in the accomplishment of the Conversion Program objectives. Nuclear research and test reactors worldwide have been in operation for over 60 years. Many of these facilities operate with high enriched uranium fuel. In response to increased worries over the potential use of HEU from research reactors in the manufacturing of nuclear weapons, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of HEU fuel in research reactors by converting them to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor conversion program was initially focused on U.S.-supplied reactors, but in the early 1990s it expanded and began to collaborate with Russian institutes with the objective of converting Russian supplied reactors to the use of LEU fuel.

  3. The LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A reliable supply of HEU metal from the United States used in the manufacture of targets for the NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to ultimate use by the physician, has been established using this proven and established method of HEU target irradiation and processing to extract molybdenum-99. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the construction of two MAPLE reactors and a New Processing Facility. The design of the MAPLE facilities was based on an established process developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a three phase LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. Phase 1, the Initial Feasibility Study, which identified the technical issues to convert the MAPLE reactor targets from HEU to LEU for large scale commercial production was reported on at the RERTR- 2000 conference. The second phase of the LEU Target Development and Conversion Program was developed with extensive consultation and involvement of experts knowledgeable in target development, process system design, enriched uranium conversion chemistry and commercial scale reactor operations and molybdenum production. This paper will provide an overview of the Phase 2 Conversion Development Program, report on progress to date, and further

  4. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo; Ritchie, Iain G.

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programs have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU), and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. (author)

  5. The LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    The availability of isotope grade, Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), from the United States for use in the manufacture of targets for molybdenum-99 production in AECL's NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a reliable, secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets is a proven and established method that has reliably produced medical isotopes for several decades. The HEU process provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume, molybdenum-99 production. Other medical isotopes such as I-131 and Xe-133, which play an important role in nuclear medicine applications, are also produced from irradiated HEU targets as a by-product of the molybdenum-99 process. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the commissioning of two MAPLE reactors and an associated isotope processing facility (the New Processing Facility). The new MAPLE facilities, which will be dedicated exclusively to medical isotope production, will provide an essential contribution to a secure, robust global healthcare system. Design and construction of these facilities has been based on a life cycle management philosophy for the isotope production process. This includes target irradiation, isotope extraction and waste management. The MAPLE reactors will operate with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel, a significant contribution to the objectives of the RERTR program. The design of the isotope production process in the MAPLE facilities is based on an established process - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. This is a proven technology that has been demonstrated over more than three decades of operation. However, in support of the RERTR program and in compliance with U.S. legislation, MDS Nordion has undertaken a LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. This paper will provide an

  6. An update on the LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Eng, B.Sc; Eng, P.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada, has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A reliable supply of HEU metal from the United States used in the manufacture of targets for the NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to ultimate use by the physician, has been established using this proven and established method of HEU target irradiation and processing to extract molybdenum-99. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the construction of two MAPLE reactors and a New Processing Facility. The design of the MAPLE facilities was based on an established process developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL)-extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a three phase LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. Phase 1, the Initial Feasibility Study, which identified the technical issues to convert the MAPLE reactor targets from HEU to LEU for large scale commercial production was reported on at the RERTR-2000 conference. The second phase of the LEU Target Development and Conversion Program was developed with extensive consultation and involvement of experts knowledgeable in target development, process system design, enriched uranium conversion chemistry and commercial scale reactor operations and molybdenum production. This paper will provide an overview of the Phase 2 Conversion Development Program, report on progress to date, and further

  7. Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, G.L.

    2005-10-03

    This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

  8. High conversion burner type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Shin-ichi; Kawashima, Masatoshi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To simply and easily dismantle and reassemble densified fuel assemblies taken out of a high conversion ratio area thereby improve the neutron and fuel economy. Constitution: The burner portion for the purpose of fuel combustion is divided into a first burner region in adjacent with the high conversion ratio area at the center of the reactor core, and a second burner region formed to the outer circumference thereof and two types of fuels are charged therein. Densified fuel assemblies charged in the high conversion ratio area are separatably formed as fuel assemblies for use in the two types of burners. In this way, dense fuel assembly is separated into two types of fuel assemblies for use in burner of different number and arranging density of fuel elements which can be directly charged to the burner portion and facilitate the dismantling and reassembling of the fuel assemblies. Further, since the two types of fuel assemblies are charged in the burner portion, utilization factor for the neutron fuels can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Conversion program in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, E.B. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    The conversion of the Swedish 50 MW R2 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel has been successfully accomplished over a 16 cycles long process. The conversion started in January 1991 with the introduction of 6 LEU assemblies in the 8*8 core. The first all LEU core was loaded in March 1993 and physics measurements were performed for the final licensing reports. A total of 142 LEU fuel assemblies have been irradiated up until September 1994 without any fuel incident. The operating licence for the R2 reactor was renewed in mid 1994 taking into account new fuel type. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) pointed out one crucial problem with the LEU operation, that the back end of the LEU fuel cycle has not yet been solved. For the HEU fuel Sweden had the reprocessing alternative. The country is now relying heavily on the success of the USDOEs Off Site Fuels Policy to take back the spent fuel from the research reactors. They have in the meantime increased their intermediate storage facilities. There is, however, a limit both in time and space for storage of MTR-type of assemblies in water. The penalty of the lower thermal neutron flux in LEU cores has been reduced by improvements of the new irradiation rigs and by fine tuning the core calculations. The Studsvik code package, CASMO-SIMULATE, widely used for ICFM in LWRs has been modified to suit the compact MTR type of core.

  10. NCSU Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University provides the PULSTAR Research Reactor and associated facilities to eligible institutions with support, in part, from the Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Participation in the NCSU Reactor Sharing Program continues to increase steadily with visitors ranging from advance high school physics and chemistry students to Ph.D. level research from neighboring universities

  11. Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He 3 reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored

  12. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  13. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-01-01

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores treated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcome the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better thermal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor

  14. Research reactor core conversion programmes, Department of Research and Isotopes, International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    In order to put the problem of core conversion into perspective, statistical information on research reactors on a global scale is presented (from IAEA Research reactor Data Base). This paper describes the research reactor core conversion program of the Department of Research and Isotopes. Technical committee Meetings were held on the subject of research reactor core conversion since 1978, and results of these meetings are published in TECDOC-233, TECDOC-324, TECDOC-304. Additional publications are being prepared, several missions of experts have visited countries to discuss and help to plan core conversion programs; training courses and seminars were organised; IAEA has supported attendance of participants from developing countries to RERTR Meetings

  15. An overview of the RECH-1 reactor conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.; Medel, J.; Daie, J.; Torres, H.

    2000-01-01

    The RECH-l research reactor achieved the first criticality on October 13, 1974 using HEU MTR type fuel elements, which were fabricated by the UKAEA at Dounreay, Scotland. In 1979, the conversion of the reactor to use LEU fuel was decided; however, a rough estimate of the uranium density needed to convert the reactor gave 3.7 g/cm 3 . This density was not available, and to maintain the overall fuel element geometry it was necessary to convert the reactor to use 45% enriched uranium fuel. In 1985, the conversion of the reactor to use medium enriched uranium was achieved. Some years later, the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission developed the capability to produce fuel elements based on U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. Once the plant and the manufacturing and quality control procedures were commissioned to permit the production of fuel elements, a fabrication program starts to produce LEU fuel elements with a uranium density of 3.4 g/cm 3 . A fabrication qualification period that extended to the required fuel plates for the assembly of two fuel elements started. In November 1998, the first four LEU fuel elements manufactured by the Chilean Fuel Fabrication Plant were delivered to the reactor. When the first two fuel elements were introduced into the core a LEU fuel element qualification program began. While those fuel elements remain in the core, an evaluation program is being applied to observe its performance under irradiation condition. (author)

  16. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hanson, A. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cheng, L-Y [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cuadra, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  17. Preparation results for lifetime test of conversion LEU fuel in plutonium production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulin, A.; Stetskiy, Yu.; Kukharkin, N.; Kalougin, A.; Gavrilov, P.; Ivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    The program of converting Russian production reactors for the purpose to stop their plutonium fabrication is currently in progress. The program also provides for operation of these reactors under the conversion mode with using of low-enriched fuel (LEU). LEU fuel elements were developed and activities related to their preparation for reactor tests were carried out. (author)

  18. Development of high conversion boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Mochida, Takaaki; Uchikawa, Sadao.

    1988-01-01

    It is expected that the period of LWRs being the main source of electric power supply becomes long, therefore, the development of next generation LWRs placing emphasis on the effective utilization of uranium resources and the improvement of economical efficiency is necessary. In this paper, as the next generation BWRs subsequent to ABWRs, the concept of the core of high conversion type BWRs is reported, in which emphasis is placed on the saving of natural uranium resources by raising the rate of conversion to plutonium. This core is that of realizing the high rate of conversion by utilizing the void in the core, which is the feature of BWRs, and the case of making the change of the core structure relatively small by using cross type control rods and the case of changing the core structure for further heightening the rate of conversion and making control rods into cluster type are described. In order to meet the demand like this, Hitachi Ltd. has engaged in the development of the concept of the core of next generation LWRs. In the high conversion type BWRs, there is not large change in the reactor system and turbine system from the current BWRs. The features and the concept of the core of high conversion type BWRs are described. (Kako, I.)

  19. Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehan, Terry

    2002-01-01

    Support utilization of the RINSC reactor for student and faculty instructions and research. The Department of Energy award has provided financial assistance during the period 9/29/1995 to 5/31/2001 to support the utilization of the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) reactor for student and faculty instruction and research by non-reactor owning educational institutions within approximately 300 miles of Narragansett, Rhode Island. Through the reactor sharing program, the RINSC (including the reactor and analytical laboratories) provided reactor services and laboratory space that were not available to the other universities and colleges in the region. As an example of services provided to the users: Counting equipment, laboratory space, pneumatic and in-pool irradiations, demonstrations of sample counting and analysis, reactor tours and lectures. Funding from the Reactor Sharing Program has provided the RINSC to expand student tours and demonstration programs that emphasized our long history of providing these types of services to the universities and colleges in the area. The funding have also helped defray the cost of the technical assistance that the staff has routinely provided to schools, individuals and researchers who have called on the RINSC for resolution of problems relating to nuclear science. The reactor has been featured in a Public Broadcasting System documentary on Pollution in the Arctic and how a University of Rhode Island Professor used Neutron Activation Analysis conducted at the RINSC to discover the sources of the ''Arctic Haze''. The RINSC was also featured by local television on Earth Day for its role in environmental monitoring

  20. Core conversion anaylses for the Portuguese Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.; Stevens, J.G.; Feldman, E.E.; Stillman, J.A.; Dunn, F.E.; Kalimullah, K.; Marques, J.G.; Barradas, N.P.; Ramos, A.R.; Kling, A.

    2006-01-01

    Design and safety analyses are presented for conversion of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) from the use of HEU fuel to the use of LEU fuel. The analyses were performed jointly by the RERTR Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN). The LEU fuel assembly design uses U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel with 4.8 g U/cm 3 and is very similar to the HEU fuel design. The results of neutronic studies, steady-state thermal-hydraulic analyses, accident analyses, and revisions to the Operating Limits and Conditions demonstrate that the RPI reactor can be operated safely with the new LEU fuel assemblies. Delivery of the LEU fuel is expected around the end of 2006, with conversion in early 2007. The HEU fuel is planned to be returned to the US in 2008.

  1. High conversion heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Yoshio; Wakabayashi, Toshio.

    1989-01-01

    In the present invention, fuel rods using uranium-plutonium oxide mixture fuels are arranged in a square lattice at the same pitch as that in light water cooled reactor and heavy water moderators are used. Accordingly, the volume ratio (Vm/Vf) between the moderator and the fuel can be, for example, of about 2. When heavy water is used for the moderator (coolant), since the moderating effect of heavy water is lower than that of light water, a high conversion ratio of not less than 0.8 can be obtained even if the fuel rod arrangement is equal to that of PWR (Vm/Vf about 2). Accordingly, it is possible to avoid problems caused by dense arrangement of fuel rods as in high conversion rate light water cooled reactors. That is, there are no more troubles in view of thermal hydrodynamic characteristics, re-flooding upon loss of coolant accident, etc., as well as the fuel production cost is not increased. (K.M.)

  2. Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, Steven J.; Hoffman, Edward A.; Bays, Samuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 ('burners') do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 ('breeders') have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is 'attractive' for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR 1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

  3. Advanced Reactor Technology/Energy Conversion Project FY17 Accomplishments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochau, Gary E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the ART Energy Conversion (EC) Project is to provide solutions to convert the heat from an advanced reactor to useful products that support commercial application of the reactor designs.

  4. Integral Fast Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1992. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R ampersand D

  5. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  6. Design study of eventual core conversion for the research reactor RA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M. V.; Marinkovic, N.

    1998-01-01

    Main options are specified for the future status of the 6.5 MW heavy water research reactor RA. Arguments pro and contra restarting the reactor are presented. When considering the option to restart the RA reactor, possibilities to improve its neutronic parameters, such as neutron flux values and irradiation capabilities are discussed, as well as the compliance with the worldwide activities of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. Possibility of core conversion is examined. Detailed reactor physics design calculations are performed for different fuel types and uranium loading. For different fuel management schemes results are presented for the effective, multiplication factor, power distribution, fuel burnup and consumption. It is shown that, as far as reactor core parameters are considered, conversion to lower enrichment fuel could be easily accomplished. However, conversion to the lower enrichment could only be justified if combined with improvement of some other reactor attributes. (author)

  7. Status of LEU conversion program at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, I.C.

    1991-01-01

    After briefly reviewing the salient features of the NRU Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), the progress of our LEU fuel development and testing program is described. The results (to date) of full-size prototype fuel-rod irradiations are reviewed, and the status of the new fuel-fabrication facility on the site is updated. Although development work is proceeding on U 3 Si 2 dispersions, all indications so far are that CRNL's U 3 Si fuel is fully acceptable for reactor operation. Fuel rods from the new fabrication shop will be installed in NRU in 1990, and the complete core conversion of NRU to LEU driver fuel is expected by 1991. (orig.)

  8. University Reactor Instrumentation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1992-11-01

    Recognizing that the University Reactor Instrumentation Program was developed in response to widespread needs in the academic community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactors at institutions such as the University of Florida, the items proposed to be supported by this grant over its two year period have been selected as those most likely to reduce foreed outages, to meet regulatory concerns that had been expressed in recent years by Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors or to correct other facility problems and limitations. Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG07-90ER129969 was provided to the University of Florida Training Reactor(UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Instrumentation Program. The original proposal submitted in February, 1990 requested support for UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment upgrades for seven items in the amount of $107,530 with $13,800 of this amount to be the subject of cost sharing by the University of Florida and $93,730 requested as support from the Department of Energy. A breakdown of the items requested and total cost for the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment improvements is presented

  9. Nuclear Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) is licensed to operate at a maximum power level of 500 kW. A pool-type reactor using flat-plate, low enriched fuel elements, the OSURR provides several experimental facilities including two 6-inch i.d. beam ports, a graphite thermal column, several graphite-isotope-irradiation elements, a pneumatic transfer system (Rabbit), various dry tubes, and a Central Irradiation Facility (CIF). The core arrangement and accessibility facilitates research programs involving material activation or core parameter studies. The OSURR control room is large enough to accommodate laboratory groups which can use control instrumentation for monitoring of experiments. The control instrumentation is relatively simple, without a large amount of duplication. This facilitates opportunities for hands-on experience in reactor operation by nuclear engineering students making reactor parameter measurements. For neutron activation analysis and analyses of natural environmental radioactivity, the NRL maintains the gamma ray spectroscopy system (GRSS). It is comprised of two PC-based 8192-channel multichannel analyzers (MCAs) with all the required software for quantitative analysis. A 3 double-prime x 3 double-prime NaI(Tl), a 14 percent Ge(Li), and a High Purity Germanium detector are currently available for use with the spectroscopy system

  10. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

  11. Proceedings of the technical committee on high conversion and high burnup reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiroya, Seiji; Kanda, Keiji; Sekiya, Tamotsu

    1990-02-01

    The present issue is the proceedings of 'the Technical Committee on High Conversion and High Burnup Reactors' held at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) on December 12 and 22, 1988. In this committee, members so much concerned with this theme were asked to report their recent accomplishment and activities. By such a program, the committee was intended to make a survey of future direction of research in this type of reactor. (J.P.N.)

  12. Biomass thermochemical conversion program: 1987 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate a base of scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels. To accomplish this objective, in fiscal year 1987 the Thermochemical Conversion Program sponsored research activities in the following four areas: Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology; Gasification Technology; Direct Combustion Technology; Program Support Activities. In this report an overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program is presented. Specific research projects are then described. Major accomplishments for 1987 are summarized.

  13. Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program for Advanced Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Gyu-Mahn; Kim, Jong-Wook; Park, Keun-Bae; Kim, Keung-Koo

    2008-10-15

    This report provides the design requirements of an integral type reactor vessel surveillance program for an integral type reactor in accordance with the requirements of Korean MEST (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Development) Notice 2008-18. This report covers the requirements for the design of surveillance capsule assemblies including their test specimens, test block materials, handling tools, and monitors of the surveillance capsule neutron fluence and temperature. In addition, this report provides design requirements for the program for irradiation surveillance of reactor vessel materials, a layout of specimens and monitors in the surveillance capsule, procedures of installation and retrieval of the surveillance capsule assemblies, and the layout of the surveillance capsule assemblies in the reactor.

  14. University Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material and producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding continues to give small colleges and universities the valuable opportunity to use the NSC for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy. The Reactor Sharing Program has supported the construction of a Fast Neutron Flux Irradiator for users at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Houston. This device has been characterized and has been found to have near optimum neutron fluxes for A39/Ar 40 dating. Institution final reports and publications resulting from the use of these funds are on file at the Nuclear Science Center

  15. Core conversion effects on the safety analysis of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoussis, J.N.; Chrysochoides, N.G.; Papastergiou, C.N.

    1982-07-01

    The safety related parameters of the 5 MW Democritus research reactor that will be affected by the scheduled core conversion to use LEU instead of HEU are considered. The analysis of the safety related items involved in such a core conversion, mainly the consequences due to MCA, DBA, etc., is of a general nature and can, therefore, be applied to other similar pool type reactors as well. (T.A.)

  16. Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. NASA thermionic-conversion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    NASA's program for applied research and technology (ART) in thermionic energy conversion (TEC) has made worthwhile contributions in a relatively short time: Many of these accomplishments are incremental, yet important. And their integration has yielded gains in performance as well as in the knowledge necessary to point productive directions for future work. Both promise and problems derive from the degrees of freedom allowed by the current programmatic emphasis on out-of-core thermionics. Materials and designs previously prohibited by in-core nucleonics and geometries now offer new potentialities. But as a result a major TEC-ART responsibility is the efficient reduction of the glitter of diverse possibilities to the hard glint of reality. As always high-temperature material effects are crucial to the level and duration of TEC performance: New electrodes must increase and maintain power output regardless of emitter-vapor deposition on collectors. They must also serve compatibly with hot-shell alloys. And while space TEC must face high-temperature vaporization problems externally as well as internally, terrestrial TEC must tolerate hot corrosive atmospheres outside and near-vacuum inside. Furthermore, some modes for decreasing interelectrode losses appear to require rather demanding converter geometries to produce practical power densities. In these areas and others significant progress is being made in the NASA TEC-ART Program

  18. Parametric study for high conversion pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuchert, E.; Ruetten, H. J.

    1975-06-15

    Tables are presented of fuel cycle costs, conversion ratios and accompanying variations in fuel element designs for a 3,00 MWth high conversion pebble bed reactor with initial high enriched uranium/thorium cycle and subsequent recycling of U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

  19. HEU core conversion of Russian production reactors: a major threat to the international RERTR regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperman, Alan J.; Leventhal, Paul L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper calls the attention for the major threat to the International Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, represented by the HEU core conversion of russian production reactors. This program aims to reduce and eventually eliminate international civilian commerce in nuclear weapons-usable, highly enriched uranium , and thereby significantly lower risks of the material being stolen or diverted by terrorist or states for producing nuclear weapons

  20. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program: 1986 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. Thermochemical conversion processes can generate a variety of products such as gasoline hydrocarbon fuels, natural gas substitutes, or heat energy for electric power generation. The US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on biomass conversion technologies through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been designated the Technical Field Management Office for the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program with overall responsibility for the Program. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1986. 88 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at

  2. Conceptual design study of high conversion light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Akie, Hiroshi; Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Yukio

    1990-06-01

    Since 1984, R and D work has been made for high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs), at JAERI, to improve the natural uranium saving and effective plutonium utilization by the use of conventional or extended LWR technology. This report summarizes the results of the feasibility study made mainly from the viewpoint of nuclear design in the Phase-I Program (1985∼1989). Until now, the following various types of HCLWR core concepts have been investigated; 1) homogeneous core with tight pitch lattice of fuel rods, 2) homogeneous core with semi-tight pitch lattice, 3) spectral shift core using fertile rod with semi-tight pitch lattice, 4) flat-core, 5) axial heterogeneous core. The core burnup and thermohydraulic analyses during normal operations have been performed to clear up the burnup performances and feasibility for each core. Based on the analysis results, the axial heterogeneous HCLWR core was selected as the JAERI reference core. (author)

  3. The HOR core conversion program development and licensing experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.W. de; Gibcus, H.P.M.; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the experiences in the development of a fuel conversion program for a 2 MW university type research reactor, the HOR. It gives an overview of the technical and administrative aspects concerning the fuel conversion program development since the eighties, including the safety review and licensing process. The overall final safety report was submitted in 1995, together with the environmental impact report, and a licence application was submitted accordingly. The licence permitting the conversion was issued in 1996, coming into force at the beginning of this year, although an appeal case is still pending. At the moment the necessary preparations for starting the actual conversion of the HOR are made. The general program characteristics are addressed. (author)

  4. A Review of Previous Research in Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUONG, HENRY; POLANSKY, GARY F.; SANDERS, THOMAS L.; SIEGEL, MALCOLM D.

    1999-01-01

    From the earliest days of power reactor development, direct energy conversion was an obvious choice to produce high efficiency electric power generation. Directly capturing the energy of the fission fragments produced during nuclear fission avoids the intermediate conversion to thermal energy and the efficiency limitations of classical thermodynamics. Efficiencies of more than 80% are possible, independent of operational temperature. Direct energy conversion fission reactors would possess a number of unique characteristics that would make them very attractive for commercial power generation. These reactors would be modular in design with integral power conversion and operate at low pressures and temperatures. They would operate at high efficiency and produce power well suited for long distance transmission. They would feature large safety margins and passively safe design. Ideally suited to production by advanced manufacturing techniques, direct energy conversion fission reactors could be produced more economically than conventional reactor designs. The history of direct energy conversion can be considered as dating back to 1913 when Moseleyl demonstrated that charged particle emission could be used to buildup a voltage. Soon after the successful operation of a nuclear reactor, E.P. Wigner suggested the use of fission fragments for direct energy conversion. Over a decade after Wigner's suggestion, the first theoretical treatment of the conversion of fission fragment kinetic energy into electrical potential appeared in the literature. Over the ten years that followed, a number of researchers investigated various aspects of fission fragment direct energy conversion. Experiments were performed that validated the basic physics of the concept, but a variety of technical challenges limited the efficiencies that were achieved. Most research in direct energy conversion ceased in the US by the late 1960s. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this

  5. Research reactor core conversion guidebook. V.1: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    In view of the proliferation concerns caused by the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and in anticipation that the supply of HEU to research and test reactors will be more restricted in the future, this guidebook has been prepared to assist research reactor operators in addressing the safety and licensing issues for conversion of their reactor cores from the use of HEU fuel to the use of low enriched uranium fuel. This Guidebook, in five volumes, addresses the effects of changes in the safety-related parameters of mixed cores and the converted core. It provides an information base which should enable the appropriate approvals processes for implementation of a specific conversion proposal, whether for a light or for a heavy water moderated research reactor. Refs, figs, bibliographies and tabs

  6. The Puerto Rico nuclear center reactor conversion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-Campos, R [Puerto Rico Nuclear Center (Puerto Rico)

    1974-07-01

    For the purpose of upgrading the control and instrumentation system to meet new AEC requirements, to increase the available neutron flux for experimenters and to replace burned out fuel the Puerto Rico Nuclear Center started a modification program on its old MTR type, one megawatt reactor on March 1971. A TRIGA core utilizing the newly developed FLIP fuel, capable of operating at two megawatts with natural convection cooling and with pulsing capabilities was chosen. The major conversion tasks included: 1. Modification of the bridge, tower and grid plate structures, 2. Modification of the water cooling system (inside the reactor pool), 3. Installation of a larger heat exchanger and cooling tower, 4. Installation of a new instrumentation and control console (including neutron detectors and rod drive mechanisms). 5. Installation of a TRIGA FLIP core. Initial criticality was achieved on January 1972. For the chosen operating configuration the critical mass was 11,522 grams of uranium 235. Core excess reactivity was $7.12 and the total (5) rod worth was $12.06. During the early stages of the startup program to determine the basic core parameters and while conducting a stepwise increase in power to the design power level of two megawatts a power fluctuation on all neutron detectors was noticed. It was determined that the power fluctuations started at about 1.4 megawatts and sharply increased as power approached 2 megawatts. Experiments to determine the cause of the problem and to correct the condition were conducted on July and December 1972 and June 1973. Modifications to the core included changing fuel pin pitch and the addition of dummy elements in the central region of the core. Final acceptance by AEC Headquarters was requested on October 1973. (author)

  7. Thermionic conversion reactor technology assessment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    The in-core thermionic space nuclear power supply may be the only identified reactor-power concept that can meet the SP-100 size functional requirements with demonstrated state-of-the-art reactor system and space-qualified power system component temperatures. The SP-100 configuration limits provide a net 40 m 2 of primary non-deployed radiator area. If a reasonable 7-year degradation allowance of 15% to 20% is provided then the beginning of life (BOL) net power output requirement is about 120 kWe. Consequently, the SP-100 power system must produce a P/A of 2.7 kWe/m 2 . This non-deployed radiator area power density performance can only be reasonably achieved by the thermionic in-core convertr system, the potassium Rankine turbine system and the Stirling engine system. The purpose of this study is to examine past and current tests and data, and to assess the potential for successful development of suitable fueled-thermionic converters that will meet SP-100 and growth requirements. The basis for the assessment will be provided and the recommended key developments plan set forth

  8. N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    This N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan is structured to provide the basic methodology required to place N Reactor and supporting facilities · in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition such that they can be decommissioned at a later date. Deactivation will be in accordance with facility transfer criteria specified in Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) guidance. Transition activities primarily involve shutdown and isolation of operational systems and buildings, radiological/hazardous waste cleanup, N Fuel Basin stabilization and environmental stabilization of the facilities. The N Reactor Deactivation Program covers the period FY 1992 through FY 1997. The directive to cease N Reactor preservation and prepare for decommissioning was issued by DOE to WHC on September 20, 1991. The work year and budget data supporting the Work Breakdown Structure in this document are found in the Activity Data Sheets (ADS) and the Environmental Restoration Program Baseline, that are prepared annually

  9. Measurements of conversion factor of the Argonauta reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, M.I.S.

    1988-01-01

    The conversion factor (Fc) in the Argonauta reactor using uranium target prepared by electrodeposition method, irradiated in the core and in thermal collumn with thermal neutrons flux maximum is studied. Some data obtained through γ radiation emited by U-239 are shown. (M.J.C.) [pt

  10. Metal plutonium conversion to components of nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotin, V.G.; Panov, A.V.; Mashirev, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    Capabilities of different technologies for plutonium conversion to the fuel components of nuclear reactors are studied. Advantages and shortcomings of aqueous and nonaqueous methods of plutonium treatment are shown. Proposals to combine and coordinate efforts of world scientific and technological community in solving problems concerning plutonium of energetic and weapon origin treatment were put forward. (authors)

  11. Metal plutonium conversion to components of nuclear reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbotin, V.G.; Panov, A.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, ALL-Russian Science and Research, Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Mashirev, V.P. [ALL-Russian Science and Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    Capabilities of different technologies for plutonium conversion to the fuel components of nuclear reactors are studied. Advantages and shortcomings of aqueous and nonaqueous methods of plutonium treatment are shown. Proposals to combine and coordinate efforts of world scientific and technological community in solving problems concerning plutonium of energetic and weapon origin treatment were put forward. (authors)

  12. NASA-OAST photovoltaic energy conversion program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, J. P.; Loria, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA program in photovoltaic energy conversion research is discussed. Solar cells, solar arrays, gallium arsenides, space station and spacecraft power supplies, and state of the art devices are discussed.

  13. Breazeale Reactor Modernization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C. C.

    2003-01-01

    The Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor is the longest operating licensed research reactor in the nation. The facility has played a key role in educating scientists, engineers and in providing facilities and services to researchers in many different disciplines. In order to remain a viable and effective research and educational institution, a multi-phase modernization project was proposed. Phase I was the replacement of the 25-year old reactor control and safety system along with associated wiring and hardware. This phase was fully funded by non-federal funds. Tasks identified in Phases II-V expand upon and complement the work done in Phase I to strategically implement state-of-the-art technologies focusing on identified national needs and priorities of the future

  14. High conversion ratio plutonium recycle in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edlund, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    The use of Pu light water reactors in such a way as to minimise the depletion of Pu needed for future use, and therefore to reduce projected demands for U ore and U enrichment is envisaged. Fuel utilisation in PWRs could be improved by tightly-packed fuel rod lattices with conversion ratios of 0.8 to 0.9 compared with ratios of about 0.5 in Pu recycle designs using fuel to water volume ratios of currently operating PWRs. A conceptual design for the Babcock and Wilcox Company reactors now in operation is presented and for illustrative purposes thermalhydraulic design considerations and the reactor physics are described. Principle considerations in the mechanical design of the fuel assemblies are the effect of hydraulic forces, thermal expansion, and fission gas release. The impact of high conversion ratio plutionium recycle in separative work and natural U requirements for PWRs likely to be in operation by 1985 are examined. (U.K.)

  15. A procedure validation for high conversion reactors fuel elements calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, V.N.; Patino, N.E.; Abbate, M.J.; Sbaffoni, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The present work includes procedure validation of cross sections generation starting from nuclear data and the calculation system actually used at the Bariloche Atomic Center Reactor and Neutrons Division for its application to fuel elements calculation of a high conversion reactor (HCR). To this purpose, the fuel element calculation belonging to a High Conversion Boiling water Reactor (HCBWR) was chosen as reference problem, employing the Monte Carlo method. Various cases were considered: with and without control bars, cold of hot, at different vacuum fractions. Multiplication factors, reaction rates, power maps and peak factors were compared. A sensitivity analysis of typical cells used, the approximations employed to solve the transport equation (Sn or Diffusion), the 1-D or 2-D representation and densification of the spatial network used, with the aim of evaluating their influence on the parameters studied and to come to an optimum combination to be used in future design calculations. (Author) [es

  16. The direct conversion of heat into electricity in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devin, B.; Bliaux, J.; Lesueur, R.

    1964-01-01

    The direct conversion of heat into electricity by thermionic emission in an atomic reactor has been studied with the triple aim of its utilisation: as an energy source for a space device, at the head of a conventional conversion system in power installations, or finally in association with the thermoelectric conversion in very low power installations. The laboratory experiments were mainly orientated towards the electron extraction of metals and compounds and their behaviour at high temperatures. Converters furnishing up to 50 amps at 0. 4 volts with an efficiency close to 10 p. 100 have been constructed in the laboratory; the emitters were heated by electron bombardment and were composed of tungsten covered with an uranium carbide deposit or molybdenum covered with cesium. The main aspects of the coupling between the converter and the reactor have been covered from the point of view of electronics: the influence of the mismatching of the load on the temperature of the emitter and the influence of thermal flux density on the temperature of the emitter and the stability of the converter. Converters using uranium carbide as the electron emitter have been tested in reactors. Tests have been made under dynamic conditions in order to determine the dynamic characteristics. The load matching curves have been constructed and the overall performances of several cells coupled in such a way as to form a reactor rod have been deduced. This information is fundamental to the design of a control system for a thermionic conversion reactor. The problems associated with the reliability of thermionic converters connected in series in the same reactor rod have been examined theoretically. Finally, the absorption isotherms have been drawn at the ambient temperatures for krypton and xenon on activated carbon with the aim of investigating the escape of fission products in a converter. (author) [fr

  17. Lead-cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforova, Anna; Hejzlar, Pavel; Todreas, Neil E.

    2009-01-01

    Lead-cooled reactor systems capable of accepting either zero or unity conversion ratio cores depending on the need to burn actinides or operate in a sustained cycle are presented. This flexible conversion ratio reactor is a pool-type 2400 MWt reactor coupled to four 600 MWt supercritical CO 2 (S-CO 2 ) power conversion system (PCS) trains through intermediate heat exchangers. The cores which achieve a power density of 112 kW/l adopt transuranic metallic fuel and reactivity feedbacks to achieve inherent shutdown in anticipated transients without scram, and lead coolant in a pool vessel arrangement. Decay heat removal is accomplished using a reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) complemented by a passive secondary auxiliary cooling system (PSACS). The transient simulation of station blackout (SBO) using the RELAP5-3D/ATHENA code shows that inherent shutdown without scram can be accommodated within the cladding temperature limit by the enhanced RVACS and a minimum (two) number of PSACS trains. The design of the passive safety systems also prevents coolant freezing in case all four of the PSACS trains are in operation. Both cores are also shown able to accommodate unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and unprotected transient overpower (UTOP) accidents using the S-CO 2 PCS.

  18. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - Options and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the U.S. Department of Energy. (author)

  19. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab

  20. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Foyto, L [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; McKibben, J C [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Peters, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  1. The 'SURA' fast reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique's SURA program on fast reactor safety consists of two specific testing programs on fastbreeder reactor safety: the Cabri and Scarabee programs. Both Cabri and Scarabee are examples of multinational research collaboration. The CEA and the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center are each covering half of the construction costs. Britain, the US and Japan are also due to participate in these experiments. The aim of the programs is to examine the behaviour of fuel in sodium cooled fast reactors. The Cabri program consists of setting off a reactivity accident in a power reactor core which is cooled with liquid sodium, such an accident occurring after a sharp increase in reactivity or as a result of the pump suddenly breaking down without there at the same time being any fall in the control rods. In 1967 the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique started its Scarabee research program which is trying to analyse the sort of things that can go wrong with fuel cooling systems and what the consequences can be [fr

  2. New Production Reactors Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    Part I of this New Production Reactors (NPR) Program Plan: describes the policy basis of the NPR Program; describes the mission and objectives of the NPR Program; identifies the requirements that must be met in order to achieve the mission and objectives; and describes and assesses the technology and siting options that were considered, the Program's preferred strategy, and its rationale. The implementation strategy for the New Production Reactors Program has three functions: Linking the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities to policies requirements, and the process for selecting options. The development of an implementation strategy ensures that activities and procedures are consistent with the rationale and analysis underlying the Program. Organization of the Program. The strategy establishes plans, organizational structure, procedures, a budget, and a schedule for carrying out the Program. By doing so, the strategy ensures the clear assignment of responsibility and accountability. Management and monitoring of the Program. Finally, the strategy provides a basis for monitoring the Program so that technological, cost, and scheduling issues can be addressed when they arise as the Program proceeds. Like the rest of the Program Plan, the Implementation Strategy is a living document and will be periodically revised to reflect both progress made in the Program and adjustments in plans and policies as they are made. 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. New Production Reactors Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    Part I of this New Production Reactors (NPR) Program Plan: describes the policy basis of the NPR Program; describes the mission and objectives of the NPR Program; identifies the requirements that must be met in order to achieve the mission and objectives; and describes and assesses the technology and siting options that were considered, the Program's preferred strategy, and its rationale. The implementation strategy for the New Production Reactors Program has three functions: Linking the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities to policies requirements, and the process for selecting options. The development of an implementation strategy ensures that activities and procedures are consistent with the rationale and analysis underlying the Program. Organization of the Program. The strategy establishes plans, organizational structure, procedures, a budget, and a schedule for carrying out the Program. By doing so, the strategy ensures the clear assignment of responsibility and accountability. Management and monitoring of the Program. Finally, the strategy provides a basis for monitoring the Program so that technological, cost, and scheduling issues can be addressed when they arise as the Program proceeds. Like the rest of the Program Plan, the Implementation Strategy is a living document and will be periodically revised to reflect both progress made in the Program and adjustments in plans and policies as they are made. 21 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Energy Conversion & Storage Program, 1993 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in: production of new synthetic fuels; development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; and the study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  5. University Reactor Matching Grants Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Valentine; Farzad Rahnema; Said Abdel-Khalik

    2003-01-01

    During the 2002 Fiscal year, funds from the DOE matching grant program, along with matching funds from the industrial sponsors, have been used to support research in the area of thermal-hydraulics. Both experimental and numerical research projects have been performed. Experimental research focused on two areas: (1) Identification of the root cause mechanism for axial offset anomaly in pressurized water reactors under prototypical reactor conditions, and (2) Fluid dynamic aspects of thin liquid film protection schemes for inertial fusion reactor chambers. Numerical research focused on two areas: (1) Multi-fluid modeling of both two-phase and two-component flows for steam conditioning and mist cooling applications, and (2) Modeling of bounded Rayleigh-Taylor instability with interfacial mass transfer and fluid injection through a porous wall simulating the ''wetted wall'' protection scheme in inertial fusion reactor chambers. Details of activities in these areas are given

  6. Conversion rate for PWR reactors in thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelkorte, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    This work concerns to the determination of the conversion-rate for a PWR reactor with an enrichment of 7.47%, considering a cell, geometrically equal to Angra I, composed by Thorium and U-238 in a 1:1 relation. The study was performed considering neutrons of one and two groups of energy, according to the suggestion from other authors sup(1,2). It was also performed a study about the production and consumption of fissile material. (author)

  7. Burnup calculation in microcells of high conversion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, S.E.; Salvatore, M.; Patino, N.E.; Abbate, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    The development of high converter reactors (HCR) requires careful burnup calculations because their main goals are reach high discharge burnup levels (Up to 50 GWd/T) and a close to one conversion ratio. Then, it is necessary a revision of design elements used for this type of calculation. In this work, a burnup module (BUM) developed in order to use nuclear data directly from evaluated data files is presented; these was included in the AMPX system. (author)

  8. Modeling on a PWR power conversion system with system program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Rui; Yang Yanhua; Lin Meng

    2007-01-01

    Based on the power conversion system of nuclear and conventional islands of Daya Bay Power Station, this paper models the thermal-hydraulic systems of primary and secondary loops for PWR by using the PWR best-estimate program-RELAP5. To simulate the full-scope power conversion system, not only the traditional basic system models of nuclear island, but also the major system models of conventional island are all considered and modeled. A comparison between the calculated results and the actual data of reactor demonstrates a fine match for Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station, and manifests the feasibility in simulating full-scope power conversion system of PWR by RELAP5 at the same time. (authors)

  9. Novel, Integrated Reactor / Power Conversion System (LMR-AMTEC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pablo Rubiolo, Principal Investigator

    2003-03-21

    The main features of this project were the development of a long life (up to 10 years) Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) and a static conversion subsystem comprising an Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric (AMTEC) topping cycle and a ThermoElectric (TE) Bottom cycle. Various coupling options of the LMR with the energy conversion subsystem were explored and, base in the performances found in this analysis, an Indirect Coupling (IC) between the LMR and the AMTEC/TE converters with Alkali Metal Boilers (AMB) was chosen as the reference design. The performance model of the fully integrated sodium-and potassium-AMTEC/TE converters shows that a combined conversion efficiency in excess of 30% could be achieved by the plant. (B204)

  10. The Sloping Land Conversion Program in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen

    conversion program. Our results show that SLCP works as a valid external policy intervention on rural livelihood diversification. In addition, the findings demonstrate that there exist heterogeneous effects of SLCP implementation on livelihood diversification across different rural income groups. The lower...

  11. Review of direct energy conversion for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, W.L.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The direct conversion to electrical energy of the energy carried by the leakage plasma from a fusion reactor and by the ions that are not converted to neutrals in a neutral-beam injector is discussed. The conversion process is electrostatic deceleration and direct particle collection as distinct from plasma expansion against a time-varying magnetic field or conversion in an EXB duct (both MHD). Relatively simple 1-stage plasma direct converters are discussed which can have efficiencies of about 50 percent. More complex and costly (measured in $/kW) 2-, 3-, 4-, and 22-stage concepts have been tested at efficiencies approaching 90 percent. Beam direct converters have been tested at 15 keV and 2 kW of power at 70 +- 2 percent efficiency, and a test of a 120-keV, 1-MW version is being prepared. Designs for a 120-keV, 4-MW unit are presented. The beam direct converter, besides saving on power supplies and on beam dumps, should raise the efficiency of creating a neutral beam from 40 percent without direct conversion to 70 percent with direct conversion for a 120-keV deuterium beam. The technological limits determining power handling and lifetime such as space-charge effects, heat removal, electrode material, sputtering, blistering, voltage holding, and insulation design, are discussed. The application of plasma direct converters to toroidal plasma confinement concepts is also discussed

  12. Mirror hybrid reactor blanket and power conversion system conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.; Backus, G.A.; Baxi, C.B.; Dee, J.B.; Estrine, E.A.; Rao, R.; Veca, A.R.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for a gas-cooled mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor is presented. The designs of the fuel, blanket module and power conversion system are based on existing gas-cooled fission reactor technology that has been developed at General Atomic Company. The uranium silicide fuel is contained in Inconel-clad rods and is cooled by helium gas. The fuel is contained in 16 spherical segment modules which surround the fusion plasma. The hot helium is used to raise steam for a conventional steam cycle turbine generator. The details of the method of support for the massive blanket modules and helium ducts remain to be determined. Nevertheless, the conceptual design appears to be technically feasible with existing gas-cooled technology. A preliminary safety analysis shows that with the development of a satisfactory method of primary coolant circuit containment and support, the hybrid reactor could be licensed under existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations

  13. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1984 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the program is to generate scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective process for converting biomass resources into clean fuels. The goal of the program is to develop the data base for biomass thermal conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and by exploring those parameters that are critical to the conversion processes. The research activities can be divided into: (1) gasification technology; (2) liquid fuels technology; (3) direct combustion technology; and (4) program support activities. These activities are described in detail in this report. Outstanding accomplishments during fiscal year 1984 include: (1) successful operation of 3-MW combustor/gas turbine system; (2) successful extended term operation of an indirectly heated, dual bed gasifier for producing medium-Btu gas; (3) determination that oxygen requirements for medium-Btu gasification of biomass in a pressurized, fluidized bed gasifier are low; (4) established interdependence of temperature and residence times on biomass pyrolysis oil yields; and (5) determination of preliminary technical feasibility of thermally gasifying high moisture biomass feedstocks. A bibliography of 1984 publications is included. 26 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Status report on conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor to low enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.A.; Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. The US Department of Energy is funding a program to compare reactor performance with high and low enrichment fuels. The goals of the program are: (1) to amend the SAR and the technical specifications of the GTRR so that LEU U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel plates can replace the current HEU U-Al alloy fuel, and (2) to optimize the LEU core such that maximum value neutron beams can be extracted for possible neutron capture therapy application. This paper presents a status report on the LEU conversion effort. (author)

  15. Status report on conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor to low enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.A.; Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. The US Department of Energy is funding a program to compare reactor performance with high and low enrichment fuels. The goals of the program are: (1) to amend the SAR and the Technical Specifications of the GTRR so that LEU U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel plates can replace the current HEU U-Al alloy fuel, and (2) to optimize the LEU core such that maximum value neutron beams can be extracted for possible neutron capture therapy application. This paper presents a status report on the LEU conversion effort

  16. Energy conversion & storage program. 1995 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1996-06-01

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Energy Conversion and Storage (EC&S) Program. The report is divided into three categories: electrochemistry, chemical applications, and material applications. Research performed in each category during 1995 is described. Specific research topics relate to the development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, the development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion, the characterization of new chemical processes and complex chemical species, and the study and application of novel materials related to energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials and deposition technologies, and advanced methods of analysis.

  17. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gas cooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language

  18. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned. (author)

  19. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned.

  20. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned. (author).

  1. A Reload and Startup Plan for and #8233;Conversion of the NIST Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Varuttamaseni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-09-30

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology operates a 20 MW research reactor for neutron-based research. The heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) but a program to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is underway. Among other requirements, a reload and startup test plan must be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for their approval. The NRC provides guidance for what should be in the plan to ensure that the licensee has sufficient information to operate the reactor safely. Hence, a plan has been generated consisting of two parts.The reload portion of the plan specifies the fuel management whereby initially only two LEU fuel elements are in the core for eight fuel cycles. This is repeated until a point when the optimum approach is to place four fresh LEU elements into the reactor each cycle. This final transition is repeated and after eight cycles the reactor is completely fueled with LEU. By only adding two LEU fuel elements initially, the plan allows for the consumption of HEU fuel elements that are expected to be in storage at the time of conversion and provides additional qualification of production LEU fuel under actual operating conditions. Because the reload is to take place over many fuel cycles, startup tests will be done at different stages of the conversion. The tests, to be compared with calculations to show that the reactor will operate as planned, are the measurement of critical shim arm position and shim arm and regulating rod reactivity worths. An acceptance criterion for each test is specified based on technical specifications that relate to safe operation. Additional tests are being considered that have less safety significance but may be of interest to bolster the validation of analysis tools.

  2. A reload and startup plan for conversion of the NIST research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology operates a 20 MW research reactor for neutron-based research. The heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) but a program to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is underway. Among other requirements, a reload and startup test plan must be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for their approval. The NRC provides guidance for what should be in the plan to ensure that the licensee has sufficient information to operate the reactor safely. Hence, a plan has been generated consisting of two parts. The reload portion of the plan specifies the fuel management whereby initially only two LEU fuel elements are in the core for eight fuel cycles. This is repeated until a point when the optimum approach is to place four fresh LEU elements into the reactor each cycle. This final transition is repeated and after eight cycles the reactor is completely fueled with LEU. By only adding two LEU fuel elements initially, the plan allows for the consumption of HEU fuel elements that are expected to be in storage at the time of conversion and provides additional qualification of production LEU fuel under actual operating conditions. Because the reload is to take place over many fuel cycles, startup tests will be done at different stages of the conversion. The tests, to be compared with calculations to show that the reactor will operate as planned, are the measurement of critical shim arm position and shim arm and regulating rod reactivity worths. An acceptance criterion for each test is specified based on technical specifications that relate to safe operation. Additional tests are being considered that have less safety significance but may be of interest to bolster the validation of analysis tools.

  3. Conversion of Reactor LVR-15 in Czech Republic from HEU to LEU Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broz, V.; Miletic, M.; Koleska, M.; Ernest, J.; Vins, M. [Research Reactors, Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec-Rez 130, CZ 250 68 (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    Accordingly to the IAEA recommendations and RERTR program, the LVR-15 reactor started the process of conversion from fuel enriched to 36 % to fuel enriched up to 20 % U{sup 235}. As the most suitable fuel for the reactor was chosen the IRT-4M fuel enriched to 19.7% U{sup 235}, fabricated in NZCHK Novosibirsk. The most important requirements, the fuel had to fulfill, were attainability, constructional continuity with the old type of FAs and operational experiences. The conversion procedure began in January 2010 with testing irradiation of 3 IRT-4M FAs. Test irradiation took 9 reactor operation cycles. During this period were done visual inspection and sipping tests of FAs. An experiment with the aim to compare the influence of the fuel changing to neutron flux and the reactivity and to verify basic physical characteristics of the new fuel was performed at the start of test irradiation. The conversion itself is going on since January 2011. In this time, every cycle will be replaced 1 or 2 burned-up IRT-2M FAs with fresh IRT-4M FAs. This period will take 14 cycles and at the end should be in the core used only IRT-4M fuel. (author)

  4. Experience on Russian military origin plutonium conversion into fast reactor nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachev, A.F.; Skiba, O.V.; Bychkov, A.V.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Kisly, V.A.; Bobrov, D.A.; Osipenko, A.G.; Babikov, L.G.; Mishinev, V.B.

    2001-01-01

    According to the Concept of Russian Minatom on military plutonium excess utilization, the State Scientific Center of Russian Federation ''Research Institute of Atomic Reactors'' (Dimitrovgrad) has begun study on possibility of technological processing of the metal military plutonium into MOX fuel. The Program and the stages of its realization are submitted in the paper. During 1998-2000 the first stage of the Program was fulfilled and 50 kg of military origin metallic plutonium was converted to MOX fuel for the BOR-60 and BN-600 reactor. The plutonium conversion into MOX fuel is carried out under the original technology developed by SSC RIAR. It includes pyro-electrochemical process for production of fuel on the domestic equipment with the subsequent fuel pins manufacturing for the fast reactors by the vibro-packing method. The produced MOX fuel is purified from alloy additives (Ga) and corresponds to the vibro-packed fuel standard for fast reactors. The fuel pins manufacturing for BOR-60 and BN-600 reactors are carried out by the vibro-packing method on a standard procedure, which is used in SSC RIAR more than 20 years. (author)

  5. The US Liquid-Metal Reactor Program - overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, J.E.; Gyorey, G.L.; Salerno, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    The US Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor (ALMR) Program has three major elements being developed in an integrated fashion to produce a system meeting the US long-term nuclear energy needs. Reactor design, one of those elements, is the focus of this paper. The other two elements, the integral fast reactor metal-fuel cycle and the light water reactor (LWR) spent-fuel actinide recycle, will be addressed in companion papers. The ALMR is adaptable to multiple missions with few modifications such as the core arrangements. The missions identified to date are (a) the extension of the existing uranium resources through breeding and highly efficient uranium utilization, (b) the recycle and utilization of the long-life actinides in LWR spent fuel as fissile material for the ALMR, and (c) the conversion of excess weapons fissil material into electricity. In addition to these missions, the reactor design is adaptable to either the metal-fuel cycle or the oxide fuel cycle

  6. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1994-12-31

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generate electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A Strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy converter are mentioned. (author).

  7. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1994-01-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generate electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A Strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy converter are mentioned. (author)

  8. Advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Walters, L.C.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory are the subject of this paper. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The advances stressed in the paper include fuel irradiation performance, improved passive safety, and the development of a prototype fuel cycle facility. 14 refs

  9. The experimental program of neutronphysics for advanced water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Deider, L.; Cathalu, S.; Santamarina, A.; Gomit, M.

    1985-11-01

    The C.E.A. and E.D.F. has jointly undertaken a program of experimental studies on under-moderated water lattices, with mixed oxide fuel UO 2 -PuO 2 . Undermoderated lattices offer high conversion ratios. This type of lattice could limit in the future the natural uranium consumption of pressurized water reactors. This experimental program is aimed at qualifying neutron transport calculations in a large range of moderating ratio (between 0.5 and 1.5). It includes three experiments: ERASME, a critical experiment of large size in the EOLE reactor at Cadarache; ICARE, an irradiation experiment in the MELUSINE reactor at Grenoble; and an experiment to measure the reactivity effects by oscillations in the MINERVE reactor at Cadarache [fr

  10. The Core Conversion of the TRIGA Reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Bergmann, R.; Musilek, A.; Sterba, J.H.; Böck, H.; Messick, C.

    2016-01-01

    The TRIGA Reactor Vienna has operated for many years with a mixed core using Al-clad and stainless-steel (SST) clad low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and a few SST high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. In view of the US spent fuel return program, the average age of these fuel elements and the Austrian position not to store any spent nuclear fuel on its territory, negotiation started in April 2011 with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The sensitive subject was to return the old TRIGA fuel and to find a solution for a possible continuation of reactor operation for the next decades. As the TRIGA Vienna is the closest nuclear facility to the IAEA headquarters, high interest existed at the IAEA to have an operating research reactor nearby, as historically close cooperation exists between the IAEA and the Atominstitut. Negotiation started before summer 2011 between the involved Austrian ministries, the IAEA and the US DOE leading to the following solution: Austria will return 91 spent fuel elements to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) while INL offers 77 very low burnt SST clad LEU elements for further reactor operation of the TRIGA reactor Vienna. The titles of these 77 new fuel elements will be transferred to Euratom in accordance with Article 86 of the Euratom-US Treaty. The fuel exchange with the old core returned to the INL, and the new core transferred to Vienna was carried out in one shipment in late 2012 through the ports of Koper/Slovenia and Trieste/Italy. This paper describes the administrative, logistic and technical preparations of the fuel exchange being unique world-wide and first of its kind between Austria and the USA performed successfully in early November 2012. (author)

  11. The United States Advanced Reactor Technologies Research and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The following aspects are addressed: • Nuclear energy mission; • Reactor research development and deployment (RD&D) programs: - Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program; - Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support; - Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART)

  12. NCSU reactor sharing program. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University provides the PULSTAR Research Reactor and associated facilities to eligible institutions with support, in part, from the Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Participation in the NCSU Reactor Sharing Program continues to increase steadily with visitors ranging from advance high school physics and chemistry students to Ph.D. level research from neighboring universities. This report is the Final Technical Report for the DOE award reference number DE-FG05-95NE38136 which covers the period September 30, 1995 through September 30, 1996

  13. Neutronic feasibility studies for LEU conversion of the HFR Petten reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Deen, J.R.; Matos, J.E.; Hendriks, J.A.; Thijssen, P.J.M.; Wijtsma, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    Design and safety analyses to determine an optimum LEU fuel assembly design using U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel with up to 4.8 g/cm 3 for conversion of the HFR Petten reactor were performed by the RERTR program in cooperation with the Joint Research Centre and NRG. Credibility of the calculational methods and models were established by comparing calculations with recent measurements by NRG for a core configuration set up for this purpose. This model and methodology were then used to study various LEU fissile loading and burnable poison options that would satisfy specific design criteria. (author)

  14. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  15. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfro, David G.; Cook, David Howard; Freels, James D.; Griffin, Frederick P.; Ilas, Germina; Sease, John D.; Chandler, David

    2012-01-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  16. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Cowherd, W. M. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program; Rickman, B. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program

    2014-12-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. In the framework of non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MURR. This report presents the results of a study of core behavior under a set of accident conditions for MURR cores fueled with HEU U-Alx dispersion fuel or LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo

  17. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new computerized control system for a transient test reactor incorporates a simulator for pre-operational testing of control programs. The part of the simulator pertinent to the discussion here consists of two microprocessors. An 8086/8087 reactor simulator calculates simulated reactor power by solving the reactor kinetics equations. An 8086 instrument simulator takes the most recent power value developed by the reactor simulator and simulates the appropriate reading on each of the eleven reactor instruments. Since the system is required to run on a one millisecond cycle, careful programming was required to take care of all eleven instruments in that short time. This note describes the special programming techniques used to attain the needed performance

  18. Reactor use in nuclear engineering programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear reactors for dual use in training and research were established at about 50 universities in the period since 1950, with assistance by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and the National Science Foundation. Most of the reactors are in active use for a variety of educational functions--laboratory teaching of undergraduates and graduate students, graduate research, orientation of visitors, and nuclear power plant reactor operator training, along with service to the technical community. As expected, the higher power reactors enjoy a larger average weekly use. Among special programs are reactor sharing and high-school teachers' workshops

  19. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program. FY 1977 program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    An overview is given of the ongoing research, development, and demonstration efforts. Each of the DOE's Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion projects funded during fiscal year 1977 (October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1977) is described and each project's status as of December 31, 1977 is reflected. These projects are grouped as follows: program support, definition planning, engineering development, engineering test and evaluation, and advanced research and technology. (MHR)

  20. Impacts on power reactor health physics programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    The impacts on power reactor health physics programs form implementing the revised 10 CFR Part 20 will be extensive and costly. Every policy, program, procedure and training lesson plan involving health physics will require changes and the subsequent retraining of personnel. At each power reactor facility, hundreds of procedures and thousands of people will be affected by these changes. Every area of a power reactor health physics program will be affected. These areas include; ALARA, Respiratory Protection, Exposure Control, Job Coverage, Dosimetry, Radwaste, Effluent Accountability, Emergency Planning and Radiation Worker Training. This paper presents how power reactor facilities will go about making these changes and gives possible examples of some of these changes and their impact on each area of power reactor health physics program

  1. Reactor core conversion studies of Ghana: Research Reactor-1 and proposal for addition of safety rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odoi, H.C.

    2014-06-01

    The inclusion of an additional safety rod in conjunction with a core conversion study of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) was carried out using neutronics, thermal hydraulics and burnup codes. The study is based on a recommendation by Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors (INSARP) mission to incorporate a safety rod to the reactor safety system as well as the need to replace the reactor fuel with LEU. Conversion from one fuel type to another requires a complete re-evaluation of the safety analysis. Changes to the reactivity worth, shutdown margin, power density and material properties must be taken into account, and appropriate modifications made. Neutronics analysis including burnup was studied followed by thermal hydraulics analyses which comprise steady state and transients. Four computer codes were used for the analysis; MCNP, REBUS, PLTEP and PARET. The neutronics analysis revealed that the LEU core must be operated at 34 Kw in order to attain the flux of 1.0E12 n/cm 2 .s as the nominal flux of the HEU core. The auxiliary safety rod placed at a modified irradiation site gives a better worth than the cadmium capsules. For core excess reactivity of 4 mk, 348 fuel pins would be appropriate for the GHARR-1 LEU core. Results indicate that flux level of 1.0E12 n/cm 2 .s in the inner irradiation channel will not be compromised, if the power of the LEU core is increased to 34 kW. The GHARR-1 core using LEU-U0 2 -12.5% fuel can be operated for 23 shim cycles, with cycles length 2.5 years, for over 57 years at the 17 kW power level. All 23 LEU cycles meet the ∼ 4.0 mk excess reactivity required at the beginning of cycle . For comparison, the MNSR HEU reference core can also be operated for 23 shim cycles, but with a cycle length of 2.0 years for just over 46 years at 15.0kW power level. It is observed that the GHARR-1 core with LEU UO 2 fuel enriched to 12.5% and a power level of 34 kW can be operated ∼25% longer than the current HEU core operated at

  2. The advanced test reactor strategic evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    Since the Chernobly accident, the safety of test reactors and irradiation facilities has been critically evaluated from the public's point of view. A systematic evaluation of all safety, environmental, and operational issues must be made in an integrated manner to prioritize actions to maximize benefits while minimizing costs. Such a proactive program has been initiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This program, called the Strategic Evaluation Program (STEP), is being conducted for the ATR to provide integrated safety and operational reviews of the reactor against the standards applied to licensed commercial power reactors. This has taken into consideration the lessons learned by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) and the follow-on effort known as the Integrated Safety Assessment Program (ISAP). The SEP was initiated by the NRC to review the designs of older operating nuclear power plants to confirm and document their safety. The ATR STEP objectives are discussed

  3. The US Liquid Metal Reactor Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Arnold, W.H.; Griffith, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The US Liquid Metal Reactor Development Program has been restructured to take advantage of the opportunity today to carry out R and D on truly advanced reactor technology. The program gives particular emphasis to improvements to reactor safety. The new directions are based on the technology of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Much of the basis for superior safety performance using IFR technology has been experimentally verified and aggressive programs continue in EBR-II and TREAT. Progress has been made in demonstrating both the metallic fuel and the new electrochemical processes of the IFR. The FFTF facility is converting to metallic fuel; however, FFTF also maintains a considerable US program in oxide fuels. In addition, generic programs are continuing in steam generator testing, materials development, and, with international cooperation, aqueous reprocessing. Design studies are carried out in conjunction with the IFR technology development program. In summary, the US maintains an active development program in Liquid Metal Reactor technology, and new directions in reactor safety are central to the program

  4. Preliminary conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for the Mirror Hybrid Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.W.; Rao, S.B.; Rao, S.R.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design of a commercial Mirror Hybrid Reactor, optimized for 239 Pu production, has been completed. This design is the product of a joint effort by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and General Atomic Company, and follows directly from earlier work on the Mirror Hybrid. This paper describes the blanket and power conversion system of the reactor design. Included are descriptions of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel that supports the magnets and contains the blanket and power conversion system components, the blanket module design, the blanket fuel design, and the power conversion system

  5. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION (DEC) FISSION REACTORS - A U.S. NERI PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, D.; Polansky, G.

    2000-01-01

    The direct conversion of the electrical energy of charged fission fragments was examined early in the nuclear reactor era, and the first theoretical treatment appeared in the literature in 1957. Most of the experiments conducted during the next ten years to investigate fission fragment direct energy conversion (DEC) were for understanding the nature and control of the charged particles. These experiments verified fundamental physics and identified a number of specific problem areas, but also demonstrated a number of technical challenges that limited DEC performance. Because DEC was insufficient for practical applications, by the late 1960s most R and D ceased in the US. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this day, but there have been no recent programs to develop the technology. This has changed with the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative that was funded by the U.S. Congress in 1999. Most of the previous concepts were based on a fission electric cell known as a triode, where a central cathode is coated with a thin layer of nuclear fuel. A fission fragment that leaves the cathode with high kinetic energy and a large positive charge is decelerated as it approaches the anode by a charge differential of several million volts, it then deposits its charge in the anode after its kinetic energy is exhausted. Large numbers of low energy electrons leave the cathode with each fission fragment; they are suppressed by negatively biased on grid wires or by magnetic fields. Other concepts include magnetic collimators and quasi-direct magnetohydrodynamic generation (steady flow or pulsed). We present the basic principles of DEC fission reactors, review the previous research, discuss problem areas in detail and identify technological developments of the last 30 years relevant to overcoming these obstacles. A prognosis for future development of direct energy conversion fission reactors will be presented

  6. High conversion pressurized water reactor with boiling channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margulis, M., E-mail: maratm@post.bgu.ac.il [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shwageraus, E., E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of partially boiling PWR core was proposed and studied. • Self-sustainable Th–{sup 233}U fuel cycle was utilized in this study. • Seed-blanket fuel assembly lattice optimization was performed. • A coupled Monte Carlo, fuel depletion and thermal-hydraulics studies were carried out. • Thermal–hydraulic analysis assured that the design matches imposed safety constraints. - Abstract: Parametric studies have been performed on a seed-blanket Th–{sup 233}U fuel configuration in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with boiling channels to achieve high conversion ratio. Previous studies on seed-blanket concepts suggested substantial reduction in the core power density is needed in order to operate under nominal PWR system conditions. Boiling flow regime in the seed region allows more heat to be removed for a given coolant mass flow rate, which in turn, may potentially allow increasing the power density of the core. In addition, reduced moderation improves the breeding performance. A two-dimensional design optimization study was carried out with BOXER and SERPENT codes in order to determine the most attractive fuel assembly configuration that would ensure breeding. Effects of various parameters, such as void fraction, blanket fuel form, number of seed pins and their dimensions, on the conversion ratio were examined. The obtained results, for which the power density was set to be 104 W/cm{sup 3}, created a map of potentially feasible designs. It was found that several options have the potential to achieve end of life fissile inventory ratio above unity, which implies potential feasibility of a self-sustainable Thorium fuel cycle in PWRs without significant reduction in the core power density. Finally, a preliminary three-dimensional coupled neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analysis for a single seed-blanket fuel assembly was performed. The results indicate that axial void distribution changes drastically with burnup. Therefore

  7. Turkey's regulatory plans for high enriched to low enriched conversion of TR-2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelol Oezdere, Oya

    2003-01-01

    Turkey is a developing country and has three nuclear facilities two of which are research reactors and one pilot fuel production plant. One of the two research reactors is TR-2 which is located in Cekmece site in Istanbul. TR-2 Reactor's core is composed of both high enriched and low enriched fuel and from high enriched to low enriched core conversion project will take place in year 2005. This paper presents the plans for drafting regulations on the safety analysis report updates for high enriched to low enriched core conversion of TR-2 reactor, the present regulatory structure of Turkey and licensing activities of nuclear facilities. (author)

  8. Energy conversion options for ARIES-III - A conceptual D-3He tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarius, J.F.; Blanchard, J.P.; Emmert, G.A.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Ghoneim, N.M.; Hasan, M.Z.; Mau, T.K.; Greenspan, E.; Herring, J.S.; Kernbichler, W.; Klein, A.C.; Miley, G.H.; Miller, R.L.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1989-01-01

    The potential for highly efficient conversion of fusion power to electricity provides one motivation for investigating D- 3 He fusion reactors. This stems from: (1) the large fraction of D- 3 He power produced in the forms of charged particles and synchrotron radiation which are amenable to direct conversion, and (2) the low neutron fluence and lack of tritium breeding constraints, which increase design flexibility. The design team for a conceptual D- 3 He tokamak reactor, ARIES-III, has investigated numerous energy conversion options at a scoping level in attempting to realize high efficiency. The energy conversion systems have been studied in the context of their use on one or more of three versions of a D- 3 He tokamak: a first stability regime device, a second stability regime device, and a spherical torus. The set of energy conversion options investigated includes bootstrap current conversion, compression-expansion cycles, direct electrodynamic conversion, electrostatic direct conversion, internal electric generator, liquid metal heat engine blanket, liquid metal MHD, plasma MHD, radiation boiler, scrape-off layer thermoelectric, synchrotron radiation conversion by rectennas, synchrotron radiation conversion by thermal cycles, thermionic/AMTEC/thermal systems, and traveling wave conversion. The original set of options is briefly discussed, and those selected for further study are described in more detail. The four selected are liquid metal MHD, plasma MHD, rectenna conversion, and direct electrodynamic conversion. Thermionic energy conversion is being considered, and some options may require a thermal cycle in parallel or series. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment 233U conversion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the 233 U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019

  10. LOGOS. HX: a core simulator for high conversion boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuiki, Makoto; Sakurada, Koichi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional physics simulator 'LOGOS. HX' has been developed for the designing analysis of high conversion boiling water reactor (HCBWR) cores. Its functions, calculational methods, and verification results will briefly be discussed. (author)

  11. Numerical simulation of ion transport membrane reactors: Oxygen permeation and transport and fuel conversion

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup; Kirchen, Patrick; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2012-01-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) based reactors have been suggested as a novel technology for several applications including fuel reforming and oxy-fuel combustion, which integrates air separation and fuel conversion while reducing complexity

  12. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on ''modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D- 3 He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs

  13. Reactor Containment Spray Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Row, T. H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1968-12-15

    The design basis accident in water moderated power reactors is a loss-of-coolant accident in which water sprays are generally employed to control the containment pressure transient by condensing the released steam-air mixture. Additives to the spray have been proposed as a way to increase their usefulness by enhancing the removal of various forms of radioiodine from the containment atmosphere. A program to investigate the gas-liquid systems involved is co-ordinated by ORNL for the US Atomic Energy Commission. A basic part of the program is the search for various chemical additives that will increase the spray affinity for molecular iodine and methyl iodide. A method for evaluating additives was developed that measures equilibrium distribution coefficients for iodine between air and aqueous solutions. Additives selected are used in single drop-wind tunnel experiments where the circulating gas contains iodine or CH{sub 3}I. Mass transfer coefficients and transient distribution coefficients have been determined as a function of relative humidity, temperature, drop size, and solution pH and concentration. Tests have shown that surfactants and organic amines increase the solution ability to getter CH{sub 3}l. Results from single drop tests help in planning spray experiments in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant, a large ({approx}38 m{sup 3}) facility, where accident conditions are closely simulated. Iodine and CH{sub 3}I removal rates have been determined for a number of solutions, including 1 wt% Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 3000 ppm B + 0.153 M NaOH and 3000 ppm B + 0.153 M NaOH. The additive has very little effect in removal of I{sub 2} with half-lives of less than 1 mm typical for any aqueous solution. These same solutions remove CH{sub 3}I with a half-life of one hour. Analytical models for the removal processes have been developed. Consideration is also being given to corrosion, thermal and radiation stability of the solutions. Radiation studies have indicated the loss

  14. Operational impacts of low-enrichment uranium fuel conversion on the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, F.E.; Brannon, C.C.; Burgard, N.E.; Burn, R.R.; Cook, G.M.; Simpson, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Michigan Department of Nuclear Engineering and the Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Project have been engaged in a cooperative effort with Argonne National Laboratory to test and analyze low-enrichment fuel in the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR). The effort was begun in 1979, as part of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program, to demonstrate on a whole-core basis the feasibility of enrichment reduction from 93% to <20% in Materials Test Reactor-type fuel designs. The first low-enrichment uranium (LEU) core was loaded into the FNR and criticality was achieved on December 8, 1981. The final LEU core was established October 11, 1984. No significant operational impacts have resulted from conversion of the FNR to LEU fuel. Thermal flux in the core has decreased slightly; thermal leakage flux has increased. Rod worths, temperature coefficient, and void coefficient have changed imperceptibly. Impressions from the operators are that power defect has increased slightly and that fuel lifetime has increased

  15. Irradiation Tests Supporting LEU Conversion of Very High Power Research Reactors in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolstenhulme, N. E.; Cole, J. I.; Glagolenko, I.; Holdaway, K. K.; Housley, G. K.; Rabin, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    The US fuel development team is developing a high density uranium-molybdenum alloy monolithic fuel to enable conversion of five high-power research reactors. Previous irradiation tests have demonstrated promising behavior for this fuel design. A series of future irradiation tests will enable selection of final fuel fabrication process and provide data to qualify the fuel at moderately-high power conditions for use in three of these five reactors. The remaining two reactors, namely the Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor, require additional irradiation tests to develop and demonstrate the fuel’s performance with even higher power conditions, complex design features, and other unique conditions. This paper reviews the program’s current irradiation testing plans for these moderately-high irradiation conditions and presents conceptual testing strategies to illustrate how subsequent irradiation tests will build upon this initial data package to enable conversion of these two very-high power research reactors.

  16. Test Results from a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Component level testing of power conversion units proposed for use in fission surface power systems has typically been done using relatively simple electric heaters for thermal input. These heaters do not adequately represent the geometry or response of proposed reactors. As testing of fission surface power systems transitions from the component level to the system level it becomes necessary to more accurately replicate these reactors using reactor simulators. The Direct Drive Gas-Brayton Power Conversion Unit test activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates a reactor simulator with an existing Brayton test rig. The response of the reactor simulator to a change in Brayton shaft speed is shown as well as the response of the Brayton to an insertion of reactivity, corresponding to a drum reconfiguration. The lessons learned from these tests can be used to improve the design of future reactor simulators which can be used in system level fission surface power tests.

  17. Nuclear Power Reactor simulator - based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, S.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear power stations will continue playing a major role as an energy source for electric generation and heat production in the world. in this paper, a nuclear power reactor simulator- based training program will be presented . this program is designed to aid in training of the reactor operators about the principles of operation of the plant. also it could help the researchers and the designers to analyze and to estimate the performance of the nuclear reactors and facilitate further studies for selection of the proper controller and its optimization process as it is difficult and time consuming to do all experiments in the real nuclear environment.this program is written in MATLAB code as MATLAB software provides sophisticated tools comparable to those in other software such as visual basic for the creation of graphical user interface (GUI). moreover MATLAB is available for all major operating systems. the used SIMULINK reactor model for the nuclear reactor can be used to model different types by adopting appropriate parameters. the model of each component of the reactor is based on physical laws rather than the use of look up tables or curve fitting.this simulation based training program will improve acquisition and retention knowledge also trainee will learn faster and will have better attitude

  18. Program summary for the Civilian Reactor Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This Civilian Reactor Development Program document has the prime purpose of summarizing the technical programs supported by the FY 1983 budget request. This section provides a statement of the overall program objectives and a general program overview. Section II presents the technical programs in a format intended to show logical technical interrelationships, and does not necessarily follow the structure of the formal budget presentation. Section III presents the technical organization and management structure of the program

  19. Developmental Light-Water Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Developmental Light-Water Reactor (DLWR) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY 1989. It also includes (1) a brief description of the program, (2) definition of goals, (3) earlier achievements, and (4) proposed future activities

  20. AFRRI TRIGA Reactor water quality monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Mark; George, Robert; Spence, Harry; Nguyen, John

    1992-01-01

    AFRRI has started a water quality monitoring program to provide base line data for early detection of tank leaks. This program revealed problems with growth of algae and bacteria in the pool as a result of contamination with nitrogenous matter. Steps have been taken to reduce the nitrogen levels and to kill and remove algae and bacteria from the reactor pool. (author)

  1. IRSN research programs concerning reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardelay, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is made up of 3 parts. The first part briefly presents the missions of IRSN (French research institute on nuclear safety), the second part reviews the research works currently led by IRSN in the following fields : -) the assessment of safety computer codes, -) thermohydraulics, -) reactor ageing, -) reactivity accidents, -) loss of coolant, -) reactor pool dewatering, -) core meltdown, -) vapor explosion, and -) fission product release. In the third part, IRSN is shown to give a major importance to experimental programs led on research or test reactors for collecting valid data because of the complexity of the physical processes that are involved. IRSN plans to develop a research program concerning the safety of high or very high temperature reactors. (A.C.)

  2. Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion in Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Presby, Andrew L

    2004-01-01

    .... This has potential benefits for space nuclear reactor power systems currently in development. The primary obstacle to space operation of thermophotovoltaic devices appears to be the low heat rejection temperatures which necessitate large radiator areas...

  3. Conversion of research reactors to low-enrichment uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    There are at present approximately 350 research reactors in 52 countries ranging in power from less than 1 watt to 100 Megawatt and over. In the 1970's, many people became concerned about the possibility that some fuels and fuel cycles could provide an easy route to the acquisition of nuclear weapons. Since enrichment to less than 20% is internationally recognized as a fully adequate barrier to weapons usability, certain Member States have moved to minimize the international trade in highly enriched uranium and have established programmes to develop the technical means to help convert research reactors to the use of low-enrichment fuels with minimum penalties. This could involve modifications in the design of the reactor and development of new fuels. As a result of these programmes, it is expected that most research reactors can be converted to the use of low-enriched fuel

  4. Kinetics of propionate conversion in anaerobic continuously stirred tank reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2008-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of anaerobic propionate degradation by biomass from 7 continuously stirred tank reactors differing in temperature, hydraulic retention time and substrate composition were investigated. In substrate-depletion experiments (batch) the maximum propionate degradation rate, A......-m, was estimated. The results demonstrate that the rate of endogenous substrate (propionate) production should be taken into account when estimating kinetic parameters in biomass from manure-based anaerobic reactors....

  5. Thorium utilization: conversion ratio and fuel needs in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    As a preparatory study for thorium utilization in thermal reactors a study has been made of the fuel comsumption in existing reactor types. A quantitative description is given of the influence of enrichment, burnup, amount of structural material, choise of coolant and control requirements on the convertion ratio. The enrichment is an important factor and a low fuel comsumption can be achieved by increasing the enrichment

  6. Development of a model for dimethyl ether non-adiabatic reactors to improve methanol conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasrollahi, Fatemeh [University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bakeri, Gholamreza; Rahimnejad, Mostafa [Babol Noshirvani University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai (Malaysia); Imanian, Mahdi [Mohajer Technical University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The modeling of adiabatic and non-adiabatic reactors, using three cooling mediums in the shell side of a shell and tube reactor in cocurrent and countercurrent flow regimes has been conducted. The cooling mediums used in this research are saturated water and methanol feed gas to a reactor which is preheated in the shell side and a special type of oil. The results of adiabatic reactor modeling show good compatibility with the data received from a commercial plant. The results of non-adiabatic reactor modeling showed that more methanol conversion can be achieved in a lower length of reactor, even though in some cases the maximum temperature in the tube side of the reactor is more than the deactivation temperature of the catalyst.

  7. NASA-OAST program in photovoltaic energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, J. P.; Flood, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA program in photovoltaic energy conversion includes research and technology development efforts on solar cells, blankets, and arrays. The overall objectives are to increase conversion efficiency, reduce mass, reduce cost, and increase operating life. The potential growth of space power requirements in the future presents a major challenge to the current state of technology in space photovoltaic systems.

  8. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jaluvka, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members in the Research and Test Reactor Department at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. MURR LEU conversion is part of an overall effort to develop and qualify high-density fuel within the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversion (USHPRR) program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3).

  9. Preliminary Accident Analyses for Conversion of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) from Highly Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Floyd E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Olson, Arne P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wilson, Erik H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Kaichao S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Newton, Jr., Thomas H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MITR. This report presents the preliminary accident analyses for MITR cores fueled with LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo. Preliminary results demonstrate adequate performance, including thermal margin to expected safety limits, for the LEU accident scenarios analyzed.

  10. Conversion Rate Optimization : Visual Neuro Programming Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Berezhnaya, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the world wide web has already spread in every business. Consequently, it has become crucial to develop strong online presence and offer qualified user experience for website visitors. Website optimization undeniably has proved its importance in the recent decade. This research was conducted in order to study the practical application and structure of the stages of the CRO (Conversion Rate Optimization) framework that focuses on the most representative website metric – c...

  11. Trends in light water reactor dosimetry programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.; Serpan, C.Z.; Fabry, A.; McElroy, W.N.; Grundl, J.A.; Debrue, J.

    1977-01-01

    Dosimetry programs and techniques play an essential role in the continued assurance of the safety and reliability of components of light water reactors. Primary concern focuses on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels and methods by which the integrity of a pressure vessel can be predicted and monitored throughout its service life. Research in these areas requires a closely coordinated program which integrates the elements of the calculational and material sciences, the development of advanced dosimetric techniques and the use of benchmarks and validation of these methods. The paper reviews the status of the various international efforts in the dosimetry area

  12. Conversion of a reactor to partial power output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iljunin, W.G.; Kusnezow, I.A.; Murogow, W.M.; Schmelew, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    The method, among other things, involves an increase in the rate of secondary fissile material production in a fast breeder reactor if the flow of the working fluid through a turbine is reduced as a function of a given amount of reduction of the electric load. This objective will be served by a circuit and circuit variants, respectively, which include a high temperature cooling circuit with, for instance, a sodium cooled HTR, a low temperature cooling circuit with, for instance, a fast or thermal breeder reactor, a working fluid circuit with the turbine, and a heat consumption circuit. In the scheme suggested for operation in the partial power production mode it is envisaged that, as the electric load of the plant decreases the flow of the working fluid upstream of the turbine is kept constant by means of a control system in the working fluid circuit. Additional control systems are used to reduce the amount of heat transmitted by the breeder reactor to the working fluid. The excess amount of heat is distributed to the load connected. This again reduces the temperatures at the inlet and the outlet of the breeder reactor, thus raising its thermal power output. However, the flow through the breeder reactor remains constant all the time. (DG/RF) [de

  13. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants; Programa de reactores y centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, Carlos R [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes

    2001-07-01

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined.

  14. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined

  15. Review and summary of Solar Thermal Conversion Program planning assistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-06-01

    The Solar Thermal Conversion Program comprises a major part of the national solar energy program which must be continuously reviewed and modified where necessary. Modifications are typically required to reflect technical achievements and uncertainties which arise from within the program or from other technical programs, changes in budgets available for supporting the program as well as internal program funding priorities, changing goals such as through acceleration or stretch-out of the program schedule, significant organizational changes involving responsible governmental agencies, the introduction of new project management support contractors, and required budget or schedule changes occurring within individual projects that make up the Solar Thermal Conversion Program. The Aerospace Corporation has provided data to assist in planning, review, coordination, and documentation of the overall Solar Thermal Conversion Program. The Solar Thermal Conversion Program Plan is described in detail. Sections 2.0 through 5.0 cover the discussion and detail planning covering the objectives, justification, basic and alternative plans, budgets, and schedules for the Solar Thermal sub-unit portion of the Solar Electric Applications effort. Appendices B1, B2, and B3 include the March 21, March 28, and April 5, 1975, Program Plan submissions of the complete Solar Electric Applications effort. In Appendix B the Solar Thermal, Solar Photovoltaic, Wind Energy, and Ocean Thermal sub-unit texts have been condensed and formatted for integration in the overall ERDA budget package. (WHK)

  16. Conversion of methane to hydrogen by a pulsed plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbanzadeh, A. M.; Matin, N.; Parandvar, M. R.; Rasouli, C.; Mazouchi, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    A pulsed atmospheric glow discharge, employing corona as a preionization, was used to convert methane to hydrogen and higher hydrocarbons. The experimental results showed that the overall conversion and specific energy, defined as energy needed to dissociate one mole methane, was mainly dependent on E/P, banking capacitance, repetition rate and flow rate. The dependence on E/P, especially, is more pronounced. The minimum specific energy was less than 1 MJ and it is expected that it could be further lowered by choosing higher E/P, lower banking capacitance and introducing an oxidizer to enhance the conversion efficiency

  17. Conversion ratio and consumption of fissile material in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiba, C.

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown that the uranium resources will be insufficient for future projected demand. The many solutions to this problem are considered and, in particular, the effect of enrichment on the conversion ratio and hence total uranium comsumption is studied. The developed computacional method employs the one-group neutron diffusion theory. The model is verified by calculating typical burn-up, conversion ratio, U-235 comsumption and plutonium production values in PWR's, and comparing results with those in the published literature. The associated costs of U and U-Pu fuel cycles are also studied for various enrichment values [pt

  18. Refurbishment, core conversion and safety analysis of Apsara reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raina, V.K.; Sasidharan, K.; Sengupta, S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)]. E-mail: nram@@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    1998-07-01

    Apsara, a 1 MWt pool type reactor using HEU fuel has been in operation at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay since 1956. In view of the long service period seen by the reactor it is now planned to carry out extensive refurbishment of the reactor with a view to extend its useful life. It is also proposed to modify the design of the reactor wherein the core will be surrounded by a heavy water reflector tank to obtain a good thermal neutron flux over a large radial distance from the core. Beam holes and the majority of the irradiation facilities will be located inside the reflector tank. The coolant flow direction through the core will be changed from the existing upward flow to downward flow. A delay tank, located inside the pool, is provided to facilitate decay of short lived radioactivity in the coolant outlet from the core in order to bring down radiation field in the operating areas. Analysis of various anticipated operational occurrences and accident conditions like loss of normal power, core coolant flow bypass, fuel channel blockage and degradation of primary coolant pressure boundary have been performed for the proposed design. Details of the proposed design modifications and the safety analyses are given in the paper. (author)

  19. National Conversion Pilot Project Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, G.G.; Simmons, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy facilities are in the process of downsizing. Most plans for downsizing focus on the decontamination and decommissioning of excess production facilities. A different approach for downsizing is taken at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), which has four production buildings. These buildings were used for the production of weapons components from uranium and beryllium and contain unique and valuable equipment, such as rolling mills, furnaces, and high-capacity presses, which could be utilized for stage-III metal recycling. The mission of this National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP) open-quotes is to explore and demonstrate, at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the feasibility of economic conversion at Department of Energy facilities.close quotes The NCPP has been divided into three stages: 1. Stage I-planning and feasibility determination 2. Stage II-facility cleanup for reuse and operational assessment 3. Stage III-metals recycling. The NCPP has recently been approved to begin stage II. The objective of the NCPP stage II is to prepare the four NCPP buildings for stage III, to remove unwanted equipment, and to decontaminate buildings and essential equipment to levels consistent with those that commercial industrial operations must meet pursuant to applicable Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and state workplace regulations

  20. TRIGA Research Reactor Conversion to LEU and Modernization of Safety Related Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanda, R. M. [Institute for Nuclear Research Piteşti (SCN-Piteşti), Piteşti (Romania)

    2014-08-15

    The USA and IAEA proposed an international programme to reduce the enrichment of uranium in research reactors by converting nuclear fuel containing HEU into fuel containing 20% enriched uranium. The Government of Romania joined the programme and actively supported political, scientific, technical and economic actions that led to the conversion of the active area of the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at the Institute for Nuclear Research in Piteşti in May 2006. This confirmed the continuity of the Romanian Government’s non-proliferation policy and their active support of international cooperation. Conversion of the Piteşti research reactor was made possible by completion of milestones in the Research Agreement for Reactor Conversion, a contract signed with the US Department of Energy and Argonne National Laboratory. This agreement provided scientific and technical support and the possibility of delivery of all HEU TRIGA fuel to the United States. Additionally, about 65% of the fresh LEU fuel needed to start the conversion was delivered in the period 1992–1994. Furthermore, conversion was promoted through IAEA Technical Cooperation project ROM/4/024 project funded primarily by the United States that supported technical and scientific efforts and the delivery of the remaining required LEU nuclear fuel to complete the conversion. Nuclear fuel to complete the conversion was made by the French company CERCA with a tripartite contract among the IAEA, CERCA and Romania. The contract was funded by the US Department of Energy with a voluntary contribution by the Romanian Government. The contract stipulated manufacturing and delivery of LEU fuel by CERCA with compliance measures for quality, delivery schedule and safety requirements set by IAEA standards and Romanian legislation. The project was supported by the ongoing technical cooperation, safeguards, legal and procurement assistance of the IAEA, in particular its Department of Nuclear Safety. For Romanian research, the

  1. The direct conversion of heat into electricity in reactors; Conversion directe de la chaleur en electricite dans les piles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devin, B; Bliaux, J; Lesueur, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The direct conversion of heat into electricity by thermionic emission in an atomic reactor has been studied with the triple aim of its utilisation: as an energy source for a space device, at the head of a conventional conversion system in power installations, or finally in association with the thermoelectric conversion in very low power installations. The laboratory experiments were mainly orientated towards the electron extraction of metals and compounds and their behaviour at high temperatures. Converters furnishing up to 50 amps at 0. 4 volts with an efficiency close to 10 p. 100 have been constructed in the laboratory; the emitters were heated by electron bombardment and were composed of tungsten covered with an uranium carbide deposit or molybdenum covered with cesium. The main aspects of the coupling between the converter and the reactor have been covered from the point of view of electronics: the influence of the mismatching of the load on the temperature of the emitter and the influence of thermal flux density on the temperature of the emitter and the stability of the converter. Converters using uranium carbide as the electron emitter have been tested in reactors. Tests have been made under dynamic conditions in order to determine the dynamic characteristics. The load matching curves have been constructed and the overall performances of several cells coupled in such a way as to form a reactor rod have been deduced. This information is fundamental to the design of a control system for a thermionic conversion reactor. The problems associated with the reliability of thermionic converters connected in series in the same reactor rod have been examined theoretically. Finally, the absorption isotherms have been drawn at the ambient temperatures for krypton and xenon on activated carbon with the aim of investigating the escape of fission products in a converter. (author) [French] La conversion directe de chaleur en electricite par emission thermionique dans une

  2. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, C.

    1988-01-01

    This note discusses 8086/8087 machine-language programming for simulation of nuclear reactor instrument current inputs by means of a digital-analog converter (DAC) feeding a bank of series input resistors. It also shows FORTRAN programming for generating the parameter tales used in the simulation. These techniques would be generally useful for high-speed simulation of quantities varying over many orders of magnitude

  3. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1983-09-01

    Conversion of research and test reactor cores from the use of high enrichment uranium to the use of low enrichment uranium depends on the cooperation of many research organizations, reactor operators, and government agencies. At a technical level, it involves almost all aspects of the fuel cycle, including fuel development, testing, shipping and reprocessing; experiment performance; economics; and safety and licensing aspects. The reactors involved and the conversion activities are distributed among approximately 25 countries, making this a subject which is best dealt with on an international basis. To foster direct communication in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the fifth of a series which began in 1978. The previous meetings were held at Argonne (International Meeting of Research Reactor Fuel Designers, Developers, and Fabricators, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 910, 1978), at Saclay (IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Research Reactor Core Conversions from HEU to LEU, Centre d'etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay, France, December 12-14, 1979), at Argonne (International Meeting on Development, Fabrication and Application of Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 12-14, 1980) and at Juelich (Seminar on Research Reactor Operation and Use, Juelich Nuclear Research Center, Juelich, F.R.G., September 48, 1981). Proceedings from the two most recent previous meetings were published as ANL/RERTR/TM-3 (CONF-801144) and IAEA-SR-77. The spirit of this meeting differs slightly from that of the previous meetings. The advances which have been made and the growing maturity of the effort have caused a gradual shift of emphasis away from those topics which dominated the floor during the first meetings, such as fuel and methods development, and towards topics which concern more

  4. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Conversion of research and test reactor cores from the use of high enrichment uranium to the use of low enrichment uranium depends on the cooperation of many research organizations, reactor operators, and government agencies. At a technical level, it involves almost all aspects of the fuel cycle, including fuel development, testing, shipping and reprocessing; experiment performance; economics; and safety and licensing aspects. The reactors involved and the conversion activities are distributed among approximately 25 countries, making this a subject which is best dealt with on an international basis. To foster direct communication in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the fifth of a series which began in 1978. The previous meetings were held at Argonne (International Meeting of Research Reactor Fuel Designers, Developers, and Fabricators, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 910, 1978), at Saclay (IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Research Reactor Core Conversions from HEU to LEU, Centre d'etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay, France, December 12-14, 1979), at Argonne (International Meeting on Development, Fabrication and Application of Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 12-14, 1980) and at Juelich (Seminar on Research Reactor Operation and Use, Juelich Nuclear Research Center, Juelich, F.R.G., September 48, 1981). Proceedings from the two most recent previous meetings were published as ANL/RERTR/TM-3 (CONF-801144) and IAEA-SR-77. The spirit of this meeting differs slightly from that of the previous meetings. The advances which have been made and the growing maturity of the effort have caused a gradual shift of emphasis away from those topics which dominated the floor during the first meetings, such as fuel and methods development, and towards topics which concern more

  5. A Preliminary Neutral Framework for the Accident Sequence Evaluation for a Hydrogen Conversion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seok Jung; Yang, Joon Eon

    2005-01-01

    A framework for an early stage PSA for a hydrogen conversion reactor has been proposed in this paper. The approach is based on a functional and top-down approach. A main concerning point of this approach is to use a design neutral framework. A design neutral framework of PSA can provide a flexibility to apply to several candidate design concepts or options. This neutral-framework idea was borrowed from a proposed regulatory framework in US NRC. The feasibility of our proposed approach has been assessed to be applied in an accident sequence analysis for a hydrogen conversion reactor

  6. Steam conversion of liquefied petroleum gas and methane in microchannel reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, S. V.; Gasenko, O. A.; Fokin, M. I.; Kuznetsov, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    This study presents experimental results of steam conversion of liquefied petroleum gas and methane in annular catalytic reactor - heat exchanger. The steam reforming was done on the Rh/Al2O3 nanocatalyst with the heat applied through the microchannel gap from the outer wall. Concentrations of the products of chemical reactions in the outlet gas mixture are measured at different temperatures of reactor. The range of channel wall temperatures at which the ratio of hydrogen and carbon oxide in the outlet mixture grows substantially is determined. Data on the composition of liquefied petroleum gas conversion products for the ratio S/C = 5 was received for different GHVS.

  7. EPRI program in water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.; Gelhaus, F.; Gopalakrishnan, A.

    1975-01-01

    The basis for EPRI's water reactor safety program is twofold. First is compilation and development of fundamental background data necessary for quantified light-water reactor (LWR) safety assurance appraisals. Second is development of realistic and experimentally bench-marked analytical procedures. The results are expected either to confirm the safety margins in current operating parameters, and to identify overly conservative controls, or, in some cases, to provide a basis for improvements to further minimize uncertainties in expected performance. Achievement of these objectives requires the synthesis of related current and projected experimental-analytical projects toward establishment of an experimentally-based analysis for the assurance of safety for LWRs

  8. Physics and safety studies of a low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J. E.; Smith, M. A.; Hill, R. N.; Dunn, F. E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the feasibility of a compact fast burner reactor that can achieve a low transuranic conversion ratio. The major design option considered is the reduction of fissile breeding by the removal of fertile material from the fast reactor system. Reductions in the fuel pin diameter and thus fuel loading were employed to remove fertile material. Reactor performance parameters and reactivity coefficients were evaluated for a compact core design with a targeted conversion ratio of 0.25. To assess the safety implications, a detailed transient analysis model was employed using the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 computer code. A series of calculations was performed to assess the behavior of the reactor and plant in an unprotected loss-of-flow accident (ULOF). A parametric study was also carried out using increasingly conservative modeling assumptions. The computational results show that for nominal, best-estimate analysis assumptions and input data, the low conversion ratio reactor design responds to the ULOF with a very high level of self-protection. Both short-term and long-term quasi-equilibrium reactor conditions predicted in the analysis indicate very large margins of safety. (authors)

  9. CY205 conversion of the NAMMU program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindewall, L.

    1986-02-01

    The NAMMU program has been converted from an IBM double precision version to a CY205 single precision version. Due to different dialects among compilers, differences on system levels and machine dependencies some changes to the code have been made. They are documented in this report. A scalar optimized version is delivered. Direct vectorization did not improve performance. Changes in program logic is necessary to take advantage of the the vector capabilities. That and a study of the input-output operations are needed to improve performance. (author)

  10. Present status and subjects of research on heat removal in high conversion light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio

    1990-01-01

    Merits of high conversion LWRs: (1) The utilization of nuclear fuel several times as much as that in LWRs is possible. The rate of effective utilization of uranium is 4-6%. (2) The active storage of plutonium is feasible. (3) The bridging to the nuclear fuel cycle industries in fast reactor age can be done. (4) These contribute to the control of plutonium storage as the partner of FBRs in fast reactor age. (5) These contribute to the flexibility of medium and long term energy strategy. The reduction of natural uranium demand by the introduction of high conversion LWRs: Assuming the scale of nuclear power facilities in 2030 as 107 million kW, and that HCLWRs are introduced from 2000, the reduction till 2100 is 13%. The features of high conversion LWRs, the effect of improving the conversion ratio by spectral hardening and so on are explained. The specification of high conversion LWRs is shown in comparison with other reactor types. The aim is the high conversion PWRs in which the same safety as conventional LWRs is ensured, and energy resources and economical efficiency are attractive. The schedule of the research and the subjects of the thermo-hydraulic engineering research are shown. (K.I.)

  11. SYNCOM: A general syntax conversion language and computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindon, D.C.

    1972-09-01

    The problems of syntax conversion are discussed and the reasons given for the choice of the Interpretive method. A full description is given of the SYNCON language and computer program together with brief details of some programs written in the language. (author)

  12. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of reactor and weapons plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.; Trapp, T.J.; Arthur, E.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Davidson, J.W.; Linford, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    An accelerator-based conversion (ABC) system is presented that is capable of rapidly burning plutonium in a low-inventory sub-critical system. The system also returns fission power to the grid and transmutes troublesome long-lived fission products to short lived or stable products. Higher actinides are totally fissioned. The system is suited not only to controlled, rapid burning of excess weapons plutonium, but to the long range application of eliminating or drastically reducing the world total inventory of plutonium. Deployment of the system will require the successful resolution of a broad range of technical issues introduced in the paper

  13. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of reactor and weapons plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R.J.; Trapp, T.J.; Arthur, E.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Davidson, J.W.; Linford, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    An accelerator-based conversion (ABC) system is presented that is capable of rapidly burning plutonium in a low-inventory sub-critical system. The system also returns fission power to the grid and transmutes troublesome long-lived fission products to short lived or stable products. Higher actinides are totally fissioned. The system is suited not only to controlled, rapid burning of excess weapons plutonium, but to the long range application of eliminating or drastically reducing the world total inventory of plutonium. Deployment of the system will require the successful resolution of a broad range of technical issues introduced in the paper.

  14. SEGY to ASCII: Conversion and Plotting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mark R.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents a computer program to convert standard 4 byte, IBM floating point SEGY files to ASCII xyz format. The program then optionally plots the seismic data using the GMT plotting package. The material for this publication is contained in a standard tar file (of99-126.tar) that is uncompressed and 726 K in size. It can be downloaded by any Unix machine. Move the tar file to the directory you wish to use it in, then type 'tar xvf of99-126.tar' The archive files (and diskette) contain a NOTE file, a README file, a version-history file, source code, a makefile for easy compilation, and an ASCII version of the documentation. The archive files (and diskette) also contain example test files, including a typical SEGY file along with the resulting ASCII xyz and postscript files. Requirements for compiling the source code into an executable are a C++ compiler. The program has been successfully compiled using Gnu's g++ version 2.8.1, and use of other compilers may require modifications to the existing source code. The g++ compiler is a free, high quality C++ compiler and may be downloaded from the ftp site: ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu Requirements for plotting the seismic data is the existence of the GMT plotting package. The GMT plotting package may be downloaded from the web site: http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/gmt/

  15. The conversion of the DIDO-type reactor FRJ-2. Studies and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemich, A.; Siebertz, Ch.; Wickert, M.

    1985-01-01

    For the FRJ-2 (23 MW) of the KFA-Juelich the conversion from HEU- to LEU-fuel was investigated. Before starting the conversion calculations our methods were qualified for the application to heavy water moderated research reactors. A combination of LEU-elements with two different U-235 loadings of 180 g and 225 g was found as suitable for conversion. With these LEU-elements a working core and a transition phase was calculated. The change of the mechanical fuel element design was taken into account. (author)

  16. Power conversion systems based on Brayton cycles for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, J.I.; Herranz, L.E.; Moratilla, B.Y.; Serrano, I.P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates Brayton power cycles for fusion reactors. Two working fluids have been explored: helium in classical configurations and CO 2 in recompression layouts (Feher cycle). Typical recuperator arrangements in both cycles have been strongly constrained by low temperature of some of the energy thermal sources from the reactor. This limitation has been overcome in two ways: with a combined architecture and with dual cycles. Combined architecture couples the Brayton cycle with a Rankine one capable of taking advantage of the thermal energy content of the working fluid after exiting the turbine stage (iso-butane and steam fitted best the conditions of the He and CO 2 cycles, respectively). Dual cycles set a specific Rankine cycle to exploit the lowest quality thermal energy source, allowing usual recuperator arrangements in the Brayton cycle. The results of the analyses indicate that dual cycles could reach thermal efficiencies around 42.8% when using helium, whereas thermal performance might be even better (46.7%), if a combined CO 2 -H 2 O cycle was set.

  17. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic - DBD plasma reactor was designed and developed for co-generation of synthesis gas and C2+ hydrocarbons from methane. A hybrid Artificial Neural Network - Genetic Algorithm (ANN-GA was developed to model, simulate and optimize the reactor. Effects of CH4/CO2 feed ratio, total feed flow rate, discharge voltage and reactor wall temperature on the performance of catalytic DBD plasma reactor was explored. The Pareto optimal solutions and corresponding optimal operating parameters ranges based on multi-objectives can be suggested for catalytic DBD plasma reactor owing to two cases, i.e. simultaneous maximization of CH4 conversion and C2+ selectivity, and H2 selectivity and H2/CO ratio. It can be concluded that the hybrid catalytic DBD plasma reactor is potential for co-generation of synthesis gas and higher hydrocarbons from methane and carbon dioxide and showed better than the conventional fixed bed reactor with respect to CH4 conversion, C2+ yield and H2 selectivity for CO2 OCM process. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: I. Istadi, N.A.S. Amin. (2007. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 37-44.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/8][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  18. A novel condensation reactor for efficient CO2 to methanol conversion for storage of renewable electric energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Martin Johan; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2015-01-01

    A novel reactor design for the conversion of CO2 and H2 to methanol is developed. The conversion limitations because of thermodynamic equilibrium are bypassed via in situ condensation of a water/methanol mixture. Two temperatures zones inside the reactor ensure optimal catalyst activity (high

  19. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor heat source for coal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, R.W. Jr.; Lewis, A.C.

    1992-09-01

    In the industrial nations, transportable fuels in the form of natural gas and petroleum derivatives constitute a primary energy source nearly equivalent to that consumed for generating electric power. Nations with large coal deposits have the option of coal conversion to meet their transportable fuel demands. But these processes themselves consume huge amounts of energy and produce undesirable combustion by-products. Therefore, this represents a major opportunity to apply nuclear energy for both the environmental and energy conservation reasons. Because the most desirable coal conversion processes take place at 800 degree C or higher, only the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) have the potential to be adapted to coal conversion processes. This report provides a discussion of this utilization of HTGR reactors

  20. Status of reduced enrichment program for research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaieda, Keisuke; Baba, Osamu; Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Kanda, Keiji; Nakagome, Yoshihiro

    1999-01-01

    The reduced enrichment programs for the JRR-3M, JRR-4 and JMTR of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have been completed. The KUR of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) has been partially completed and is still in progress under the Joint Study Program with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The JRR-3M commenced using LEU silicide fuel elements instead of LEU aluminide fuel elements in September, 1999. The Japanese Government approved a cancellation of the KUHFR Project in February 1991, and April 1994 the U.S. Government gave an approval to utilize HEU fuel in the KUR instead of the KUHFR. Therefore, the KUR will be operated with HEU fuel until March 2004, then the full core conversion with LEU silicide will be done. The first shipment of spent fuels since 1974 was done in August, 1999. (author)

  1. A generalized perturbation program for CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Heon; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Won Sik [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    A generalized perturbation program has been developed for the purpose of estimating zonal power variation of a CANDU reactor upon refueling operation. The forward and adjoint calculation modules of RFSP code were used to construct the generalized perturbation program. The numerical algorithm for the generalized adjoint flux calculation was verified by comparing the zone power estimates upon refueling with those of forward calculation. It was, however, noticed that the truncation error from the iteration process of the generalized adjoint flux is not negligible. 2 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  2. A generalized perturbation program for CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Heon; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Won Sik [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A generalized perturbation program has been developed for the purpose of estimating zonal power variation of a CANDU reactor upon refueling operation. The forward and adjoint calculation modules of RFSP code were used to construct the generalized perturbation program. The numerical algorithm for the generalized adjoint flux calculation was verified by comparing the zone power estimates upon refueling with those of forward calculation. It was, however, noticed that the truncation error from the iteration process of the generalized adjoint flux is not negligible. 2 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  3. Conversion of reactor neutrons by lithium deuteride; Konverzija reaktorskih neutrona pomocu litijumdeuterida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strugar, P; Altiparmakov, D [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1979-07-01

    Nuclear reactors are powerful neutron sources. But for many purposes, neutrons of higher than fission energy are needed. Such neutrons may be produced by the conversion of reactor neutrons into 14 MeV neutrons using lithium deuteride converter. For that converter is generally employed {sup 6}LiD, the usual material for the thermonuclear weapons, and therefore hardly accessible in needed quantity. That was the reason to analyse such converter made of LiD with the lithium of natural isotopic content. This analysis starts with the basic conversion relations, takes into account neutron absorption and tritium generation, and finally, estimates the 14 MeV neutron flux and the heat generated in proposed converter, when the converter was coupled to each of three Yugoslav nuclear reactors. Results show that the converter made of LiD with the natural lithium is 50% less efficient than the converter of {sup 6}LiD. Intensity of 14 MeV neutrons is within limits 5. 10{sup 5} - 10{sup 10} (n/cm{sup 2}.s) for the converter used either as external converter with reactor RB, within the thermal column in the reactor TRIGA or as a 'fuel' segment at the reactor RA. (author)

  4. Conversion of metallurgical coke and coal using a Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) moving bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Siwei; Bayham, Samuel; Zeng, Liang; McGiveron, Omar; Chung, Elena; Majumder, Ankita; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Accumulated more than 300 operation hours were accomplished for the moving bed reducer reactor. • Different reactor operation variables were investigated with optimal conditions identified. • High conversions of sub-bituminous coal and bituminous coal were achieved without flow problems. • Co-current and counter-current contact modes were tested and their applicability was discussed. - Abstract: The CLC process has the potential to be a transformative commercial technology for a carbon-constrained economy. The Ohio State University Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) process directly converts coal, eliminating the need for a coal gasifier oran air separation unit (ASU). Compared to other solid-fuel CLC processes, the CDCL process is unique in that it consists of a countercurrent moving bed reducer reactor. In the proposed process, coal is injected into the middle of the moving bed, whereby the coal quickly heats up and devolatilizes, splitting the reactor roughly into two sections with no axial mixing. The top section consists of gaseous fuel produced from the coal volatiles, and the bottom section consists of the coal char mixed with the oxygen carrier. A bench-scale moving bed reactor was used to study the coal conversion with CO 2 as the enhancing gas. Initial tests using metallurgical cokefines as feedstock were conducted to test the effects of operational variables in the bottom section of the moving bed reducer, e.g., reactor temperature, oxygen carrier to char ratio, enhancer gas CO 2 flow rate, and oxygen carrier flow rates. Experiments directly using coal as the feedstock were subsequently carried out based on these test results. Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and Illinois #6 coal were tested as representative sub-bituminous and bituminous coals, respectively. Nearly complete coal conversion was achieved using composite iron oxide particles as the oxygen carriers without any flow problems. The operational results demonstrated that a

  5. Status of the RERTR [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor] program in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorsetti, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission started in 1978 the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors in the field of reactor engineering; engineering, development and manufacturing of fuel elements and research reactors operators. This program was initiated with the conviction that it would contribute to the international efforts to reduce risks of nuclear weapons proliferation owing to an uncontrolled use of highly enriched uranium. It was intended to convert RA-3 reactor to make possible its operation with low enriched fuel (LEU), instead of high enriched fuel (HEU) and to develop manufacturing techniques for said LEU. Afterwards, this program was adapted to assist other countries in reactors conversion, development of the corresponding fuel elements and supply of fuel elements to other countries. (Author)

  6. Space reactor/organic Rankine conversion - A near-term state-of-the-art solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggemann, R. E.; Lacey, D.

    The use of demonstrated reactor technology with organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power conversion can provide a low cost, minimal risk approach to reactor-powered electrical generation systems in the near term. Several reactor technologies, including zirconium hydride, EBR-II and LMFBR, have demonstrated long life and suitability for space application at the operating temperature required by an efficient ORC engine. While this approach would not replace the high temperature space reactor systems presently under development, it could be available in a nearer time frame at a low and predictable cost, allowing some missions requiring high power levels to be flown prior to the availability of advanced systems with lower specific mass. Although this system has relatively high efficiency, the heat rejection temperature is low, requiring a large radiator on the order of 3.4 sq m/kWe. Therefore, a deployable heat pipe radiator configuration will be required.

  7. 24 CFR 982.502 - Conversion to voucher program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Assistance Payment § 982.502 Conversion to voucher program. (a) New HAP contracts. On and after the merger... part, including calculation of the voucher housing assistance payment in accordance with § 982.505... requirements under this part, including calculation of the voucher housing assistance payment in accordance...

  8. Contribution of the anti HIV/AIDS community conversation programs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV/AIDS has now been around for about three and half decades since first diagnosed in 1981. If we wish to curb the spread of HIV/AIDS effectively and sustainably, we need to design strategies that help mobilizing communities at large. Anti-HIV/AIDS Community Conversation (CC) Programs are part of ...

  9. The Socioeconomic Assessment of Sloping Land Conversion Program in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen

    Abstract This thesis mainly focuses on the socioeconomic impact of the largest Ecological Recovery Program ― the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP), also called Grain for Green Program (GFG) in China. The central government initiated this program in 1999 and it was launched nationwide in 2002...... of which support the policy intention of central government according to our own understanding, whereas the effects differ depending on the group, region and period. This research provides a detailed understanding of the treatment effects of the SLCP and thus, contributes to the on-going political debate...

  10. The RERTR [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor] program:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1987-01-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results and new developments which ocurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U 3 Si 2 -Al and U 3 Si-Al fuels was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm 3 was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40 % average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission 99 Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of U.S. university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U 3 Si-Al with 19.75 % enrichment and U 3 Si 2 -Al with 45 % enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR program. (Author)

  11. Core management and reactor physics aspects of the conversion of the NRU reactor to LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atfield, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Results of work done to assess the effects of converting the NRU reactor to LEU are presented. The effects are small, and the operational rules and safety analysis, appropriate to the HEU core, will still apply. (author)

  12. Accident analysis of heat pipe cooled and AMTEC conversion space reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Shan, Jianqiang; Zhang, Bin; Gou, Junli; Bo, Zhang; Lu, Tianyu; Ge, Li; Yang, Zijiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A transient analysis code TAPIRS for HPS has been developed. • Three typical accidents are analyzed using TAPIRS. • The reactor system has the self-stabilization ability under accident conditions. - Abstract: A space power with high power density, light weight, low cost and high reliability is of crucial importance to future exploration of deep space. Space reactor is an excellent candidate because of its unique characteristics of high specific power, low cost, strong environment adaptability and so on. Among all types of space reactors, heat pipe cooled space reactor, which adopts the passive heat pipe (HP) as core cooling component, is considered as one of the most promising choices and is widely studied all over the world. This paper develops a transient analysis code (TAPIRS) for heat pipe cooled space reactor power system (HPS) based on point reactor kinetics model, lumped parameter core heat transfer model, combined HP model (self-diffusion model, flat-front startup model and network model), energy conversion model of Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion units (AMTEC), and HP radiator model. Three typical accidents, i.e., control drum failure, AMTEC failure and partial loss of the heat transfer area of radiator are then analyzed using TAPIRS. By comparing the simulation results of the models and steady state with those in the references, the rationality of the models and the solution method is validated. The results show the following. (1) After the failure of one set of control drums, the reactor power finally reaches a stable value after two local peaks under the temperature feedback. The fuel temperature rises rapidly, however it is still under safe limit. (2) The fuel temperature is below a safe limit under the AMTEC failure and partial loss of the heat transfer area of radiator. This demonstrates the rationality of the system design and the potential applicability of the TAPIRS code for the future engineering application of

  13. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.; Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country of origin where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programmes have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium, and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. It is hoped that an announcement of the extension of the U.S. Acceptance Programme, which is expected in the very near future, will facilitate the life extensions of many productive TRIGA reactors around the world. (author)

  14. Neutronic calculations in core conversion of the IAN-R1 research reactor from MTR HEU to TRIGA LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarta Fuentes, Jose A.; Castiblanco, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    With cooperation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), neutronic calculations were carried out for conversion of the Ian-R1 Reactor from MTR-HEU fuel to TRIGA-LEU fuel. In order to establish a staff for neutronic calculation at the Instituto de Cancan's Nucleares y Energia s Alternatives (INEA) a program was established. This program included training, acquisition of hardware, software and calculation for the core with MTR-HEU fuel , enriched nominally to 93% and calculation for several arrangements with the TRIGA-LEU fuel, enriched to 19.7%. The results were verified and compared with several groups of calculation at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) in Mexico, and General Atomics (GA) in United States. As a result of this program, several technical reports have been wrote. (author)

  15. Adaptability of Brayton cycle conversion systems to fast, epithermal and thermal spectrum space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.P.

    1988-01-01

    The two French Government Agencies C.N.E.S. (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and C.E.A. (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) are carrying out joint preliminary studies on space nuclear power systems for future ARIANE 5 launch vehicle applications. The Brayton cycle is the reference conversion system, whether the heat source is a liquid metal-cooled (NaK, Na or Li) reactor or a gas-cooled direct cycle concept. The search for an adequate utilization of this energy conversion means has prompted additional evaluations featuring the definition of satisfactory cycle conditions for these various kinds of reactor concepts. In addition to firstly studied fast and epithermal spectrum ones, thermal spectrum reactors can offer an opportunity of bringing out some distinctive features of the Brayton cycle, in particular for the temperature conditioning of the efficient metal hydrides (ZrH, Li/sub 7/H) moderators. One of the purposes of the paper is to confirm the potential of long lifetime ZrH moderated reactors associated with a gas cycle and to assess the thermodynamical consequences for both Nak(Na)-cooled or gas-cooled nuclear heat sources. This investigation is complemented by the definition of appropriate reactor arrangements which could be presented on a further occasion

  16. The Advanced Test Reactor Strategic Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of safety, environmental, and operational issues has been initiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This program, the Strategic Evaluation Program (STEP), provides an integrated review of safety and operational issues against the standards applied to licensed commercial facilities. In the review of safety issues, 18 deviations were identified which required prompt attention. Resolution of these items has been accelerated in the program. An integrated living schedule is being developed to address the remaining findings. A risk evaluation is being performed on the proposed corrective actions and these actions will then be formally ranked in order of priority based on considerations of safety and operational significance. Once the final ranking is completed, an integrated schedule will be developed, which will include considerations of availability of funding and operating schedule. 3 refs., 2 figs

  17. Safety And Transient Analyses For Full Core Conversion Of The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong Ba Vien; Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem; Nguyen Kien Cuong

    2011-01-01

    Preparing for full core conversion of Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR), safety and transient analyses were carried out to confirm about ability to operate safely of proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) working core. The initial LEU core consisting 92 LEU fuel assemblies and 12 Beryllium rods was analyzed under initiating events of uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod, cooling pump failure, earthquake and fuel cladding fail. Working LEU core response were evaluated under these initial events based on RELAP/Mod3.2 computer code and other supported codes like ORIGEN, MCNP and MACCS2. Obtained results showed that safety of the reactor is maintained for all transients/accidents analyzed. (author)

  18. Measurement of the initial conversion ratio in AQUILON and EDF 2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, J.; Le Baud, P.; Sautiez, B.

    1968-01-01

    In natural uranium fuelled reactors, it is important to know the initial conversion ratio, i.e. the ratio of uranium 238 absorption to uranium 235 destruction. The separation of absorption products from fission products is a difficult feature in the measurement of the conversion ratio. A physical method was chosen, the γγ coincidence technique which uses the properties of the decay scheme of neptunium 239 and allows the neptunium activity to be separated from the fission product activity, with some corrections. Detectors of natural uranium are used. The accuracy obtained in the measurements is of the order of 2%. (authors) [fr

  19. Program of RA reactor start-up to nominal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The zero start-up program is followed by the program of RA reactor start-up to nominal power. This program is described in detail and includes the following measurements: radiation characteristics at the exit of the channels; gamma and fast neutron dose distribution in the reactor; influence of absorbers on the reactivity; temperature effect; absolute flux and calibration of ionization chambers; xenon effect; thermal and hydraulics; dosimetry around the reactor; neutron flux in the reactor core and in the reactor hall; heavy water level; thermal characteristics after shutdown. A list of measuring devices and instrumentation is included with the detailed action plan and list of responsible staff members

  20. Critical evaluation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors applicable to coal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; DeStefano, J.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1975-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the technology and costs of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTRs) applicable to nuclear coal conversion. Coal conversion processes suitable for coupling to reactors are described. Vendor concepts of the VHTR are summarized. The materials requirements as a function of process temperature in the range 1400 to 2000 0 F are analyzed. Components, environmental and safety factors, economics and nuclear fuel cycles are reviewed. It is concluded that process heat supply in the range 1400 to 1500 0 F could be developed with a high degree of assurance. Process heat at 1600 0 F would require considerably more materials development. While temperatures up to 2000 0 F appear to be attainable, considerably more research and risk were involved. A demonstration plant would be required as a step in the commercialization of the VHTR

  1. Biomass Program 2007 Program Peer Review - Thermochemical Conversion Platform Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-10-27

    This document discloses the comments provided by a review panel at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program Peer Review held on November 15-16, 2007 in Baltimore, MD and the Biomass Program Peer Review for the Thermochemical Platform, held on July 9th and 10th in Golden, Colorado.

  2. Digital computer study of nuclear reactor thermal transients during startup of 60-kWe Brayton power conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, K. S.; Tew, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A digital computer study was made of reactor thermal transients during startup of the Brayton power conversion loop of a 60-kWe reactor Brayton power system. A startup procedure requiring the least Brayton system complication was tried first; this procedure caused violations of design limits on key reactor variables. Several modifications of this procedure were then found which caused no design limit violations. These modifications involved: (1) using a slower rate of increase in gas flow; (2) increasing the initial reactor power level to make the reactor respond faster; and (3) appropriate reactor control drum manipulation during the startup transient.

  3. Manufacture of components for Canadian reactor programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, L.P.

    Design features, especially those relating to calandrias, are pointed out for many CANDU-type reactors and the Taiwan research reactor. The special requirements shouldered by the Canadian suppliers of heavy reactor components are analyzed. (E.C.B.)

  4. Status of reduced enrichment programs for research reactors in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Keiji; Nishihara, Hedeaki [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan); Shirai, Eiji; Oyamada, Rokuro; Sanokawa, Konomo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    The reduced enrichment programs for the JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and JMTR of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and the KUR of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) have been partially completed and are mostly still in progress under the Joint Study Programs with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The JMTR and JRR-2 have been already converted to use MEU aluminide fuels in 1986 and 1987, respectively. The operation of the upgraded JRR-3(JRR-3M) has started in March 1990 with the LEU aluminide fuels. Since May 1992, the two elements have been inserted in the KUR. The safety review application for the full core conversion to use LEU silicide in the JMTR was approved in February 1992 and the conversion has been done in January 1994. The Japanese Government approved a cancellation of the KUHFR Project in February 1991, and in April 1994 the U.S. Government gave an approval to utilize HEU in the KUR instead of the KUHFR. Therefore, the KUR will be operated with HEU fuel until 2001. Since March 1994, Kyoto University is continuing negotiation with UKAEA Dounreay on spent fuel reprocessing and blending down of recovered uranium, in addition to that with USDOE.

  5. Status of reduced enrichment programs for research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Keiji; Nishihara, Hedeaki; Shirai, Eiji; Oyamada, Rokuro; Sanokawa, Konomo

    1997-01-01

    The reduced enrichment programs for the JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and JMTR of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and the KUR of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) have been partially completed and are mostly still in progress under the Joint Study Programs with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The JMTR and JRR-2 have been already converted to use MEU aluminide fuels in 1986 and 1987, respectively. The operation of the upgraded JRR-3(JRR-3M) has started in March 1990 with the LEU aluminide fuels. Since May 1992, the two elements have been inserted in the KUR. The safety review application for the full core conversion to use LEU silicide in the JMTR was approved in February 1992 and the conversion has been done in January 1994. The Japanese Government approved a cancellation of the KUHFR Project in February 1991, and in April 1994 the U.S. Government gave an approval to utilize HEU in the KUR instead of the KUHFR. Therefore, the KUR will be operated with HEU fuel until 2001. Since March 1994, Kyoto University is continuing negotiation with UKAEA Dounreay on spent fuel reprocessing and blending down of recovered uranium, in addition to that with USDOE

  6. Small-scale semi-continuous reactor for the conversion of wood to fuel oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eager, R L; Pepper, J M; Mathews, J F

    1983-04-01

    The design and operation of a small-scale semi-continuous reactor to convert aspen wood meal into an oil product is described. Modifications that reduce erosion/corrosion are also presented. Short residence times and relatively low operating pressures have been achieved for the reaction of aspen with CO and H2O in the presence of Na2CO3. Conversions, char formation, and the effect of sodium carbonate concentration on oil product are reported.

  7. Energy Conversion and Storage Program. 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  8. Effects of conversion ratio change on the core performances in medium to large TRU burning reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Sang-Ji; Yoo, Jae-Woon; Kim, Yeong-Il

    2009-01-01

    Conceptual fast reactor core designs with sodium coolant are developed at 1,500, 3,000 and 4,500 MWt which are configured to transmute recycled transuranics (TRU) elements with external feeds consisting of LWR spent fuel. Even at each pre-determined power level, the performance parameters, reactivity coefficients and their implications on the safety analysis can be different when the target TRU conversion ratio changes. In order to address this aspect of design, a study on TRU conversion ratio change was performed. The results indicate that it is feasible to design a TRU burner core to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratios by employing different fuel cladding thicknesses. The TRU consumption rate is found to be proportional to the core power without any significant deterioration in the core performance at higher power levels. A low conversion ratio core has an increased TRU consumption rate and much faster burnup reactivity loss, which calls for appropriate means for reactivity compensation. As for the reactivity coefficients related with the conversion ratio change, the core with a low conversion ratio has a less negative Doppler coefficient, a more negative axial expansion coefficient, a more negative control rod worth per rod, a more negative radial expansion coefficient, a less positive sodium density coefficient and a less positive sodium void worth. A slight decrease in the delayed neutron fraction is also noted, reflecting the fertile U-238 fraction reduction. (author)

  9. Effective conversion of biomass tar into fuel gases in a microwave reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anis, Samsudin, E-mail: samsudin-anis@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universitas Negeri Semarang, Kampus Sekaran, Gunungpati, 50229 Semarang, 8508101 (Indonesia); Zainal, Z. A., E-mail: mezainal@usm.my [School of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-06-03

    This work deals with conversion of naphthalene (C{sub 10}H{sub 8}) as a biomass tar model compound by means of thermal and catalytic treatments. A modified microwave oven with a maximum output power of 700 W was used as the experimental reactor. Experiments were performed in a wide temperature range of 450-1200°C at a predetermined residence time of 0.24-0.5 s. Dolomite and Y-zeolite were applied to convert naphthalene catalytically into useful gases. Experimental results on naphthalene conversion showed that conversion efficiency and yield of gases increased significantly with the increase of temperature. More than 90% naphthalene conversion efficiency was achieved by thermal treatment at 1200°C and 0.5 s. Nevertheless, this treatment was unfavorable for fuel gases production. The main product of this treatment was soot. Catalytic treatment provided different results with that of thermal treatment in which fuel gases formation was found to be the important product of naphthalene conversion. At a high temperature of 900°C, dolomite had better conversion activity where almost 40 wt.% of naphthalene could be converted into hydrogen, methane and other hydrocarbon gases.

  10. Parametric study on thermal-hydraulic characteristics of high conversion light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Fujii, Sadao.

    1988-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs) from the thermal-hydraulic viewpoint, parametric study on thermal-hydraulic characteristics of HCLWR has been carried out by using a unit cell model. It is assumed that a HCLWR core is contained in a current 1000 MWe PWR plant. At the present study, reactor core parameters such as fuel pin diameter, pitch, core height and linear heat rate are widely and parametrically changed to survey the relation between these parameters and the basic thermal-hydraulic characteristics, i.e. maximum fuel temperature, minimum DNBR, reduction of reactor thermal output and so on. The validity of the unit cell model used has been ensured by comparison with the result of a subchannel analysis carried out for a whole core. (author)

  11. HEU to LEU conversion experience at the UMass-Lowell research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, John R.; Bobek, Leo M.

    2005-01-01

    The UMass-Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) operated safely with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for over 25 years. Having reached the end of core lifetime and due to proliferation concerns, the reactor was recently converted to low-enriched uranium silicide (LEU) fuel. The actual process for converting the UMLRR from HEU to LEU fuel covered a period of over 15 years. The conversion effort - from the initial conceptual design studies in the late 1980s to the final offsite shipment of the spent HEU fuel in August 2004 - was a unique experience for the faculty and staff of a small university research reactor. This paper gives a historical view of the process and it highlights several key milestones along the road to successful completion of this project. (author)

  12. Conversion, core redesign and upgrade of the Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMeglio, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    The 2 MW Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission reactor is required to convert from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using a standard LEU fuel plate which is thinner and contains more Uranium-235 than the current HEU plate. These differences, coupled with the fact that the conversion should be accomplished without serious degradation of reactor characteristics and capability, has resulted in core design studies and thermal hydraulic studies not only at the current 2 MW but also at the maximum power level of the reactor, 5 MW. In addition, during the course of its 23 years of operation, it has become clear that the main uses of the reactor are neutron scattering and neutron activation analysis. The requirement to convert to LEU presents an opportunity during the conversion to optimize the core for the utilization and to restudy the thermal hydraulics using modern techniques. This paper will present the preliminary conclusions of both aspects. (Author)

  13. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a partial energy conversion system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  14. The US plutonium materials conversion program in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zygmunt, S.J.; Mason, C.F.V.; Hahn, W.K.

    2000-01-01

    Progress has been made in Russia towards the conversion of weapons-grade plutonium (w-Pu) into plutonium oxide (PuO 2 ) suitable for further manufacture into mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. This program was started in 1998 in response to US proliferation concerns and the acknowledged international need to decrease the available weapons-grade Pu. A similar agenda is being followed in the US to address disposition of US surplus weapons-grade Pu. In Russia a conversion process has been selected and a site proposed. This paper discusses the present state of the program in support of this future operating facility that will process up to 5 metric tons of plutonium a year. (authors)

  15. R and D on the power conversion system for gas turbine high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Takakazu; Takada, Shoji; Yan Xing; Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Katanishi, Shoji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    designed so that both the critical speeds and vibration modes are matched to those of the actual rotors. A 1/3-scale test model of a turbo-machine rotor system and magnetic bearings were designed and fabrication of the test model was started. Testing of magnetic bearing performance, unbalance response, stability, and auxiliary bearing reliability will be carried out together with development of advanced control method in the program. The test will validate the design methods of the rotor system and magnetic bearing control system. The test will verify the rotor design of GTHTR300 and the results will identify technical issues in scaling up of magnetic bearings. The gas-turbine system operation and control test is aiming to demonstrate operability and controllability of the closed-cycle gas-turbine system. Preliminary design was made for the test facility that is an integrated scaled model of the GTHTR300 power conversion system. Pressurized helium gas at around 1 MPa is used as the working fluid, and an electric heater simulates the reactor. Planned test modes are normal operation, start-up, shutdown, load change, loss of load, and emergency shutdown. Specifications of the system operation and control were defined to fulfill the test requirements. The test will verify the design of the GTHTR300 control system and establish the operation and control method. Development and verification of a plant dynamics analysis code will be made based on the test results. Major components of the facility, such as a turbine, a heater, a recuperator, and a pre-cooler, were designed to meet the specifications. Preliminary transient analyses were made for the test facility design. It was confirmed from the results of the analyses that the test facility can be operated to meet the requirements of the test plan and controlled satisfactorily. A revision of the design is underway for purposes of the reduction in the power demands and the improvement in the control system. These scaled tests will

  16. 75 FR 8391 - Assisted Living Conversion Program (ALCP) and Emergency Capital Repair Program (ECRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Conversion Program (ALCP) provides funding for the physical costs of converting some or all the units of an... DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5376-N-10] Assisted Living Conversion... rehabilitate, modernize, or retrofit aging structure, common areas, or individual dwelling units through the...

  17. Conversion of the RB reactor neutrons by highly enriched uranium fuel and lithium deuteride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugar, P.; Sotic, O.; Ninkovic, M.; Pesic, M.; Altiparmakov, D.

    1981-01-01

    A thermal-to-fast-neutron converter has been constructed at the RB reactor. The material used for the conversion of thermal neutrons is highly enriched uranium fuel of Soviet production applied in Yugoslav heavy water experimental reactors RA and RB. Calculations and preliminary measurements show that the spectrum of converted neutrons only slightly differs from that of fission neutrons. The basic characteristics of converted neutrons can be expressed by the neutron radiation dose of 800 rad (8 Gy) for 1 h of reactor operation at a power level of 1 kW. This dose is approximately 10 times higher than the neutron dose at the same place without converter. At the same time, thermal neutron and gamma radiation doses are negligible. The constructed neutron converter offers wide possibilities for applications in reactor and nuclear physics and similar disciplines, where neutron spectra of high energies are required, as well as in the domain of neutron dosimetry and biological irradiations in homogeneous fields of larger dimensions. The possibility of converting thermal reactor neutrons with energies of about 14 MeV with the aid of lithium deuteride from natural lithium has been considered too. (author)

  18. Progress in the neutronic core conversion (HEU-LEU) analysis of Ghana research reactor-1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anim-Sampong, S.; Maakuu, B. T.; Akaho, E. H. K.; Andam, A.; Liaw, J. J. R.; Matos, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Ghana Atomic Energy Commission; Kwame Nkrumah Univ. of Science and Technology

    2006-01-01

    The Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) and has operated at different power levels since its commissioning in March 1995. As required for all nuclear reactors, neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis are being performed for the HEU-LEU core conversion studies of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) facility, which is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). Stochastic Monte Carlo particle transport methods and tools (MCNP4c/MCNP5) were used to fine-tune a previously developed 3-D MCNP model of the GHARR-1 facility and perform neutronic analysis of the 90.2% HEU reference and candidate LEU (UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, U-9Mo) fresh cores with varying enrichments from 12.6%-19.75%. In this paper, the results of the progress made in the Monte Carlo neutronic analysis of the HEU reference and candidate LEU fuels are presented. In particular, a comparative performance assessment of the LEU with respect to neutron flux variations in the fission chamber and experimental irradiation channels are highlighted.

  19. Neutronics substantiation of possibility for conversion of the WWR-K reactor core to operation with low-enriched fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arinkin, F.M.; Gizatulin, Sh.H.; Zhantikin, T.M.; Koltochnik, S.N.; Takibaev, A.Zh.; Talanov, S.V.; Chakrov, P.V.; Chekushina, L.V.

    2002-01-01

    The studies are aimed to calculation and experimental justification of possibility for conversion of the WWR-R reactor core to low-enriched nuclear fuel (the 19.75-% enrichment in isotope U-235), resulting in reducing the risk of non-sanctioned proliferation of nuclear materials which can be used as weapons materials. The analysis of available published data, related to problem of reduction of enrichment in the fuel used in research thermal reactors, has been carried out. Basing on the analysis results, reference fuel compositions have been chosen, in particular, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) in aluminum master form and the UA1 4 alloy. Preliminary calculations have shown that, with the WWR-K reactor core preserved existing critical characteristics (the fuel composition: UA1 4 ), the uranium concentration in the fuel element is to be increased by a factor of 2.0-2.2, being impossible technologically. The calculations have been performed by means of the Monte Carlo computational codes. The program of optimal conversion of the WWR-K reactor core to low-enriched fuel has been developed, including: development of calculation models of the reactor core, composed of various designs of fuel elements and fuel assemblies (FA), on a base of corresponding computational codes (diffusion, statistical, etc.); implementation of experiments in the zero-power reactor (critical assembly) with the WWR-C-type FA, in view of correction of the computational constants used in calculations; implementation of reactor core neutronics calculations, in view of selection of the U-235 optimal content in the low-enriched fuel elements and choice of FA reload strategy at the regime of reactor core after burning; determination of the fuel element specification; determination of the critical and operational loads for the reactor core composed of rod/tubular fuel elements; calculation of the efficiency of the protection control system effectors, optimization of its composition, number and locations in the

  20. Programming Guidelines for FBD Programs in Reactor Protection System Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Se Jin; Lee, Dong Ah; Kim, Eui Sub; Yoo, Jun Beom; Lee, Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Properties of programming languages, such as reliability, traceability, etc., play important roles in software development to improve safety. Several researches are proposed guidelines about programming to increase the dependability of software which is developed for safety critical systems. Misra-c is a widely accepted programming guidelines for the C language especially in the sector of vehicle industry. NUREG/CR-6463 helps engineers in nuclear industry develop software in nuclear power plant systems more dependably. FBD (Function Block Diagram), which is one of programming languages defined in IEC 61131-3 standard, is often used for software development of PLC (programmable logic controllers) in nuclear power plants. Software development for critical systems using FBD needs strict guidelines, because FBD is a general language and has easily mistakable elements. There are researches about guidelines for IEC 61131-3 programming languages. They, however, do not specify details about how to use languages. This paper proposes new guidelines for the FBD based on NUREG/CR-6463. The paper introduces a CASE (Computer-Aided Software Engineering) tool to check FBD programs with the new guidelines and shows availability with a case study using a FBD program in a reactor protection system. The paper is organized as follows

  1. Programming Guidelines for FBD Programs in Reactor Protection System Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Se Jin; Lee, Dong Ah; Kim, Eui Sub; Yoo, Jun Beom [Division of Computer Science and Engineering College of Information and Communication, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jang Su [Man-Machine Interface System team Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Properties of programming languages, such as reliability, traceability, etc., play important roles in software development to improve safety. Several researches are proposed guidelines about programming to increase the dependability of software which is developed for safety critical systems. Misra-c is a widely accepted programming guidelines for the C language especially in the sector of vehicle industry. NUREG/CR-6463 helps engineers in nuclear industry develop software in nuclear power plant systems more dependably. FBD (Function Block Diagram), which is one of programming languages defined in IEC 61131-3 standard, is often used for software development of PLC (programmable logic controllers) in nuclear power plants. Software development for critical systems using FBD needs strict guidelines, because FBD is a general language and has easily mistakable elements. There are researches about guidelines for IEC 61131-3 programming languages. They, however, do not specify details about how to use languages. This paper proposes new guidelines for the FBD based on NUREG/CR-6463. The paper introduces a CASE (Computer-Aided Software Engineering) tool to check FBD programs with the new guidelines and shows availability with a case study using a FBD program in a reactor protection system. The paper is organized as follows.

  2. Research program plan: reactor vessels. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagins, M.; Taboada, A.

    1985-07-01

    The ability of the licensing staff of the NRC to make decisions concerning the present and continuing safety of nuclear reactor pressure vessels under both normal and abnormal operating conditions is dependent upon the existence of verified analysis methods and a solid background of applicable experimental data. It is the role of this program to provide both the analytical methods and the experimental data needed. Specifically, this program develops fracture mechanics analysis methods and design criteria for predicting the stress levels and flaw sizes required for crack initiation, propagation, and arrest in LWR pressure vessels under all known and postulated operations conditions. To do this, not only must the methods be developed but they must be experimentally validated. Further, the materials data necessary for input to these analytical methods must be developed. Thus, in addition to methods development and large scale experimental verification this program also develops data to show that slow-load fracture toughness, rapid-load fracture toughness, and crack arrest toughness obtained from small laboratory specimens are truly representative of the toughness characteristics of the material behavior in pressure vessels in both the unirradiated and the irradiated conditions

  3. Distributed secondary gas injection via a fractal injector : A nature-inspired approach to improving conversion in fluidized bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, D.O.

    2008-01-01

    The conversion in bubbling fluidized bed reactors is suppressed because the interphase mass transfer and gas-solid contact in bubbling fluidized bed reactors are often poor. Most of the gas is present in the form of bubbles, which have low surface-to-volume ratios and are nearly devoid of catalyst

  4. The coupling effect of gas-phase chemistry and surface reactions on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion in ITM reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup; Kirchen, Patrick; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The effect of the coupling between heterogeneous catalytic reactions supported by an ion transport membrane (ITM) and gas-phase chemistry on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation in ITM reactors is examined. In ITM reactors

  5. US Department of Energy 1992--1993 Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1994-04-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor serves as a host institution to support various educational institutions which are located primarily within the state of Florida. All users and uses were carefully screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program. Three tables are included that provide basic information about the 1992--1993 program and utilization of the reactor facilities by user institutions

  6. High thermal efficiency x-ray energy conversion scheme for advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quimby, D.C.; Taussig, R.T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reports on a new radiation energy conversion scheme which appears to be capable of producing electricity from the high quality x-ray energy with efficiencies of 60 to 70 percent. This new reactor concept incorporates a novel x-ray radiation boiler and a new thermal conversion device known as an energy exchanger. The low-Z first walls of the radiation boiler are semi-transparent to x-rays, and are kept cool by incoming working fluid, which is subsequently heated to temperatures of 2000 to 3000 0 K in the interior of the boiler by volumetric x-ray absorption. The radiation boiler may be a compact part of the reactor shell since x-rays are readily absorbed in high-Z materials. The energy exchanger transfers the high-temperature working fluid energy to a lower temperature gas which drives a conventional turbine. The overall efficiency of the cycle is characterized by the high temperature of the working fluid. The high thermal efficiencies which appear achievable with this cycle would make an otherwise marginal advanced fusion reactor into an attractive net power producer. The operating principles, initial conceptual design, and engineering problems of the radiation boiler and thermal cycle are presented

  7. SP-100 Program: space reactor system and subsystem investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    For a space reactor power system, a comprehensive safety program will be required to assure that no undue risk is present. This report summarizes the nuclear safety review/approval process that will be required for a space reactor system. The documentation requirements are presented along with a summary of the required contents of key documents. Finally, the aerospace safety program conducted for the SNAP-10A reactor system is summarized. The results of this program are presented to show the type of program that can be expected and to provide information that could be usable in future programs

  8. Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.; Durand, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    An integration study was performed by Rocketdyne under contract to NASA-LeRC. The study was concerned with coupling an SP-0100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion system. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one stand-by unit. Integration design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion systems could be integrated with the PS-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to off-set the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9 percent mass advantage, and the Stirling had a 50 percent radiator advantage

  9. Nuclear reactor closed Brayton cycle power conversion system optimization trends for extra-terrestrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashe, T.L.; Baggenstoss, W.G.; Bons, R.

    1990-01-01

    Extra-terrestrial exploration and development missions of the next century will require reliable, low-mass power generation modules of 100 kW e and more. These modules will be required to support both fixed-base and manned rover/explorer power needs. Low insolation levels at and beyond Mars and long periods of darkness on the moon make solar conversion less desirable for surface missions. For these missions, a closed Brayton cycle energy conversion system coupled with a reactor heat source is a very attractive approach. The authors conducted parametric studies to assess optimized system design trends for nuclear-Brayton systems as a function of operating environment and user requirements. The inherent design flexibility of the closed Brayton cycle energy conversion system permits ready adaptation of the system to future design constraints. This paper describes a dramatic contrast between system designs requiring man-rated shielding. The paper also considers the ramification of using indigenous materials to provide reactor shielding for a fixed-base power source

  10. The use of gas based energy conversion cycles for sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez, M.; Haubensack, D.; Alpy, N.; Gerber, A.; Daid, F.

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of Sodium Fast Reactors, CEA, AREVA and EDF are involved in a substantial effort providing both significant expertise and original work in order to investigate the interest to use a gas based energy conversion cycle as an alternative to the classical steam cycle. These gas cycles consist in different versions of the Brayton cycle, various types of gas being considered (helium, nitrogen, argon, separately or mixed, sub or supercritical carbon dioxide) as well as various cycle arrangements (indirect, indirect / combined cycles). The interest of such cycles is analysed in details by thermodynamic calculations and cycle optimisations. The objective of this paper is to provide a comparison between gas based energy conversion cycles from the viewpoint of the overall plant efficiency. Key factors affecting the Brayton cycle efficiency include the turbine inlet temperature, compressors and turbine efficiencies, recuperator effectiveness and cycle pressure losses. A nitrogen Brayton cycle at high pressure (between 100 and 180 bar) could appear as a potential near-term solution of classical gas power conversion system for maximizing the plant efficiency. At long-term, supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle appears very promising for Sodium Fast Reactors, with a potential of high efficiency using even at a core outlet temperature of 545 deg. C. (authors)

  11. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Nuclear fuel cycles were evaluated for the Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor under development in the Federal Republic of Germany. The basic fuel cycle specified for the HTR-K and PNP is well qualified and will meet the requirements of these reactors. Twenty alternate fuel cycles are described, including high-conversion cycles, net-breeding cycles, and proliferation-resistant cycles. High-conversion cycles, which have a high probability of being successfully developed, promise a significant improvement in resource utilization. Proliferation-resistant cycles, also with a high probability of successful development, compare very favorably with those for other types of reactors. Most of the advanced cycles could be adapted to first-generation pebble bed reactors with no significant modifications

  12. A green approach to ethyl acetate: Quantitative conversion of ethanol through direct dehydrogenation in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Gaofeng; Chen, Tao; He, Lipeng; Pinnau, Ingo; Lai, Zhiping; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Pincers do the trick: The conversion of ethanol to ethyl acetate and hydrogen was achieved using a pincer-Ru catalyst in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor. Near quantitative conversions and yields could be achieved without the need for acid or base promoters

  13. A green approach to ethyl acetate: Quantitative conversion of ethanol through direct dehydrogenation in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Gaofeng

    2012-11-07

    Pincers do the trick: The conversion of ethanol to ethyl acetate and hydrogen was achieved using a pincer-Ru catalyst in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor. Near quantitative conversions and yields could be achieved without the need for acid or base promoters or hydrogen acceptors (see scheme). © 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The University of Missouri Research Reactor HEU to LEU conversion project status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, James C; Kutikkad, Kiratadas; Foyto, Leslie P; Peters, Nickie J; Solbrekken, Gary L; Kennedy, John [University of Missouri Research Reactor, Missouri (United States); Stillman, John A; Feldman, Earl E; Tzanos, Constantine P; Stevens, John G [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is one of five U.S. high performance research and test reactors that are actively collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to find a suitable low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel replacement for the currently required highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. A conversion feasibility study based on U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel was completed in 2009. It was concluded that the proposed LEU fuel assembly design, in conjunction with an increase in power level from 10 to 12 MWth, will (1) maintain safety margins during operation, (2) allow operating fuel cycle lengths to be maintained for efficient and effective use of the facility, and (3) preserve an acceptable level and spectrum of key neutron fluxes to meet the scientific mission of the facility. The MURR and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) team is continuing to work toward realization of the conversion. The 'Preliminary Safety Analysis Report Methodologies and Scenarios for LEU Conversion of MURR' was completed in June 2011. This report documents design parameter values critical to the Fuel Development (FD), Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) and Hydromechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF) projects. The report also provides a preliminary evaluation of safety analysis techniques and data that will be needed to complete the fuel conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR), especially those related to the U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel. Specific studies are underway to validate the proposed path to an LEU fuel conversion. Coupled fluid-structure simulations and experiments are being conducted to understand the hydrodynamic plate deformation risk for 0.965 mm (38 mil) thick fuel plates. Methodologies that were recently developed to answer the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Request for Additional Information (RAI) regarding the MURR 2006 relicensing submittal will be used in the LEU conversion effort. Transition LEU fuel elements that will have a minimal impact on

  15. Reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned reactor safety research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The reactor safety research program, sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, is described in terms of its program objectives, current status, and future plans. Elements of safety research work applicable to water reactors, fast reactors, and gas cooled reactors are presented together with brief descriptions of current and planned test facilities. (U.S.)

  16. Research reactor core conversion from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low enriched uranium fuels guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    In view of the proliferation concerns caused by the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and in anticipation that the supply of HEU to research and test reactors will be more restricted in the future, this document has been prepared to assist reactor operators in determining whether conversion to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel designs is technically feasible for their specific reactor, and to assist in making a smooth transition to the use of LEU fuel designs where appropriate

  17. 76 FR 52006 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Assisted Living Conversion Program; Fiscal Year 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... Year 2009 Assisted Living Conversion Program Arizona Phoenix, Kivel Manor, $3,292,367, 15 units... Awards for the Assisted Living Conversion Program; Fiscal Year 2009 AGENCY: Office of the Assistant... funding under the Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Assisted Living Conversion Program (ALCP...

  18. Environmental monitoring program design for uranium refining and conversion operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop recommendations for the design of environmental monitoring programs at Canadian uranium refining and conversion operations. In order to develop monitoring priorities, chemical and radioactive releases to the air and water were developed for reference uranium refining and conversion facilities. The relative significance of the radioactive releases was evaluated through a pathways analysis which estimated dose to individual members of the critical receptor group. The effects of chemical releases to the environment were assessed by comparing predicted air and water contaminant levels to appropriate standards or guidelines. For the reference facilities studied, the analysis suggested that environmental effects are likely to be dominated by airborne release of both radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. Uranium was found to be the most important radioactive species released to the air and can serve as an overall indicator of radiological impacts for any of the plants considered. The most important nonradioactive air emission was found to be fluoride (as hydrogen fluoride) from the uranium hexafluoride plant. For the uranium trioxide and uranium dioxide plants, air emissions of oxides of nitrogen were considered to be most important. The study recommendations for the design of an environmental monitoring program are based on consideration of those factors most likely to affect local air and water quality, and human radiation exposure. Site- and facility-specific factors will affect monitoring program design and the selection of components such as sampling media, locations and frequency, and analytical methods

  19. Development Program of the Advanced HANARO Reactor in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, I.-S.; Ahn, J.-H.; Han, K.-I.; Parh, C.; Jun, B.-J.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2006-01-01

    The development program of an advanced HANARO (AHR) reactor started in Korea to keep abreast of the increasing future demand, from both home and abroad, for research activities. This paper provides a review of the status of research reactors in Korea, the operating experience of the HANARO, the design principles and preliminary features of an advanced HANARO reactor, and the specific strategy of an advanced HANARO reactor development program. The design principles were established in order to design a new multi-purpose research reactor that is safe, economically competitive and technically feasible. These include the adaptation of the HANARO design concept, its operating experience, a high ratio of flux to power, a high degree of safety, improved economic efficiency, improved operability and maintainability, increased space and expandability, and ALARA design optimization. The strategy of an advanced HANARO reactor development program considers items such as providing a digital advanced HANARO reactor in cyber space, a method for the improving the design quality and economy of research reactors by using Computer Integrated Engineering, and more effective advertising using diverse virtual reality. This development program will be useful for promoting the understanding of and interest in the operating HANARO as well as an advanced HANARO reactor under development in Korea. It will provide very useful information to a country that may need a research reactor in the near future for the promotion of public health, bio-technology, drug design, pharmacology, material processing, and the development of new materials. (author)

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, George; Youngblood, Robert; Busby, Jeremy; Hallbert, Bruce; Barnard, Cathy; McCarthy, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  2. Fission product model for lattice calculation of high conversion boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, S.; Yoshida, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    1988-01-01

    A high precision fission product model for boiling water reactor (BWR) lattice calculation was developed, which consists of 45 nuclides to be treated explicitly and one nonsaturating pseudo nuclide. This model is applied to a high conversion BWR lattice calculation code. From a study based on a three-energy-group calculation of fission product poisoning due to full fission products and explicitly treated nuclides, the multigroup capture cross sections and the effective fission yields of the pseudo nuclide are determined, which do not depend on fuel types or reactor operating conditions for a good approximation. Apart from nuclear data uncertainties, the model and the derived pseudo nuclide constants would predict the fission product reactivity within an error of 0.1% Δk at high burnup

  3. Study of parameters affecting the conversion in a plug flow reactor for reactions of the type 2A→B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Prieto, Juan Carlos; Long, Nguyen Huynh Bach Son

    2018-04-01

    Modeling of chemical reactors is an important tool to quantify reagent conversion, product yield and selectivity towards a specific compound and to describe the behavior of the system. Proposal of differential equations describing the mass and energy balance are among the most important steps required during the modeling process as they play a special role in the design and operation of the reactor. Parameters governing transfer of heat and mass have a strong relevance in the rate of the reaction. Understanding this information is important for the selection of reactor and operating regime. In this paper we studied the irreversible gas-phase reaction 2A→B. We model the conversion that can be achieved as function of the reactor volume and feeding temperature. Additionally, we discuss the effect of activation energy and the heat of reaction on the conversion achieved in the tubular reactor. Furthermore, we considered that dimerization occurs instantaneously in the catalytic surface to develop equations for the determination of rate of reaction per unit area of three different catalytic surface shapes. This data can be combined with information about the global rate of conversion in the reactor to improve regent conversion and yield of product.

  4. Evaluation of some resonance self-shielding procedures employed in high conversion light water reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino, N.E.; Abbate, M.J.; Sbaffoni, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The procedures employed in the treatment of the resonance shielding effect have been identified as one of the causes of the large discrepancies found in the neutronic calculation of high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs), indicating the need for a revision of the self-shielding procedures employed. In this work some well known techniques applied in HCLWR self-shielding calculations are evaluated; the study involves the comparison of methods for the generation of group constants, the analysis of the impact of considering some isotopes as infinitely diluted and the evaluation of the usual approximations utilized for the treatment of heterogeneities

  5. Research reactor core conversion guidebook. V.2: Analysis (Appendices A-F)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Volume 2 consists of detailed Appendices, covering safety analyses for generic 10 MW reactor, safety analysis - probabilistic methods, methods for preventing LOCA, radiological consequence analyses, examples of safety report amendments and safety specifications. Included in Volume 2 are example analyses for cores with with highly enriched uranium and low enriched uranium fuels showing differences that can be expected in the safety parameters and radiological consequences of postulated accidents. There are seven examples of licensing documents related to core conversion and two examples of methods for determining power limits for safety specifications in the document. Refs, figs, bibliographies and tabs

  6. 100 kWe lunar/Mars surface power utilizing the SP-100 reactor with dynamic conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.; Mason, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an integration study which was performed coupling an SP-100 reactor with either a Brayton of Stirling power conversion subsystem. a power level of 100 kWe was selected for the study. The power system was to be compatible with both the lunar and Mars surface environment and require no site preparation. In addition, the reactor was to have integral shielding and be completely self-contained, including its own auxiliary power for start-up. Initial reliability studies were performed to determine power conversion redundancy and engine module size. For the lunar environment, the reactor and primary coolant loop would be contained in a guard vessel to protect from a loss of primary loop containment. For the Mars environment, all refractory components including the reactor, primary coolant, and power conversion components would be contained in a vacuum vessel for protection against the CO 2 environment

  7. Reactor Network Synthesis Using Coupled Genetic Algorithm with the Quasi-linear Programming Method

    OpenAIRE

    Soltani, H.; Shafiei, S.; Edraki, J.

    2016-01-01

    This research is an attempt to develop a new procedure for the synthesis of reactor networks (RNs) using a genetic algorithm (GA) coupled with the quasi-linear programming (LP) method. The GA is used to produce structural configuration, whereas continuous variables are handled using a quasi-LP formulation for finding the best objective function. Quasi-LP consists of LP together with a search loop to find the best reactor conversions (xi), as well as split and recycle ratios (yi). Quasi-LP rep...

  8. Possible ways and aspects of conversions for the German low power research reactors BER II, FRM, and FMRB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.

    1983-01-01

    Based on the overall agreement about methods and principal results on core conversions from HEU to MEU within the work done for the IAEA Guidebook, investigations were started of the three specific cases, that means the conversions of the German Research Reactors within the German AF-Program. The first step of this work was done for the three low power MTR-reactors: the Ber II in Berlin operating at KW, FMRB in Brunswick operating at 1 MW, and FRM near Munich operating at 4 W. The simplest core from the point of view of conversion calculations was the BER II reactor. The core is made up out of 33 fuel elements and 5 control elements, it is built up on a 8 x 8 grid plate. On three sides the core is surrounded by reflector elements partially made of graphite and partially of beryllium. The main purpose of the core is to provide high neutron fluxes for the 12 beam tubes on all reflector sides. A little bit more complicated - from the conversion point of view - was the status of the Munich FRM. This is on one hand due to the two different cores they operate: a so-called normal core and a smaller beryllium core and on the other other hand due to the different uranium-loadings of fuel elements partially 230 g 235-U per element and partially 180 g 235-U per element with control elements of both plate loadings as well. The third reactor investigated was the Brunswick FMRB, which has specific design features that cause specific problems. The core is split into two parts, the so-called north core and the south core interacting via a heavy water reflector in between. Calculations with LEU-fuel - in these three cases no MEU-fuel was used - were done looking at different criteria for the conversion. The first group we call cycle length criteria and they are split into two versions, the same cycle length for LEU-fuel as for the existing HEU-fuel measured in MWd with the same excess reactivity at EOL as it exists at present; the same criterion as the previous except the cycle

  9. The development of fast simulation program for marine reactor parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhiyun; Hao Jianli; Chen Wenzhen

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The simplified physical and mathematical models are proposed for a marine reactor system. ► A program is developed with Simulink module and Matlab file. ► The program developed has the merit of easy input preparation, output processing and fast running. ► The program can be used for the fast simulation of marine reactor parameters on the operating field. - Abstract: The fast simulation program for marine reactor parameters is developed based on the Simulink simulating software according to the characteristics of marine reactor with requirement of maneuverability and acute and fast response. The simplified core physical and thermal model, pressurizer model, steam generator model, control rod model, reactivity model and the corresponding Simulink modules are established. The whole program is developed by coupling all the Simulink modules. Two typical transient processes of marine reactor with fast load increase at low power level and load rejection at high power level are adopted to verify the program. The results are compared with those of Relap5/Mod3.2 with good consistency, and the program runs very fast. It is shown that the program is correct and suitable for the fast and accurate simulation of marine reactor parameters on the operating field, which is significant to the marine reactor safe operation.

  10. Comparison of advanced reactors program of different international vendors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnihotri, N.K.

    2001-01-01

    The full text follows. Proposal for presenting a paper on Advanced Reactor Program Given below is the abstract for Track 6 session on Advanced Reactor at the ninth International Conference on Nuclear Engineering being held in Nice, France from April 8. through 12. 2001. This paper will provide an update on Advanced Reactor Program of different vendors in the United States, Japan, and Europe. Specifically the paper will look at the history of different Advanced Reactor Programs, international experience, aspect of economy due to standardization, and the highlights of technical specifications. The paper will also review aspects of Economy due to standardization, public acceptance, required construction time, and the experience of different vendors. The objective of the presentation is to underscore the highlights of the Reactor Program of different vendors in order to keep the attendees of the conference up-to-date. The presentation will be an impartial overview from an outsider's (not part of the Nuclear Steam Supply System's staff). (author)

  11. Key considerations in the conversion to LEU of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor: SAFARI-1 of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, W.E.; Vermaak, A.P.; Ball, G.

    2000-01-01

    Apart from the technological demands and considerations associated with the conversion of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor to LEU, a number of commercial challenges also need to be addressed. This is particularly the case when the reactor is primarily used as a source for the production, on an uninterrupted basis, of significant quantities of Mo-99 to satisfy long term commitments to a range of global customers. This paper highlights key business considerations which are applicable in the conversion process of firstly, reactor fuel to LEU and secondly target plates for Mo-99, also to LEU, using the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa as a typical example of such a commercially utilized reactor. (author)

  12. Key considerations in the conversion to LEU of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor: SAFARI-1 of South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, W E; Vermaak, A P; Ball, G [NECSA, PO Box 582, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2000-10-01

    Apart from the technological demands and considerations associated with the conversion of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor to LEU, a number of commercial challenges also need to be addressed. This is particularly the case when the reactor is primarily used as a source for the production, on an uninterrupted basis, of significant quantities of Mo-99 to satisfy long term commitments to a range of global customers. This paper highlights key business considerations which are applicable in the conversion process of firstly, reactor fuel to LEU and secondly target plates for Mo-99, also to LEU, using the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa as a typical example of such a commercially utilized reactor. (author)

  13. Non-linear programming method in optimization of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelesku, M.; Dumitresku, Kh.; Adam, S.

    1975-01-01

    Application of the non-linear programming methods on optimization of nuclear materials distribution in fast reactor is discussed. The programming task composition is made on the basis of the reactor calculation dependent on the fuel distribution strategy. As an illustration of this method application the solution of simple example is given. Solution of the non-linear program is done on the basis of the numerical method SUMT. (I.T.)

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Busby, Jeremy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Barnard, Cathy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  16. Comparative analysis of power conversion cycles optimized for fast reactors of generation IV; Analisis comparativo de ciclos de conversion de potencia optimizados para reactores rapidos de generacion IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Pichel, G. D.

    2011-07-01

    For the study, which is presented here, has been chosen as the specific parameters of each reactor, which are today the three largest projects within generation IV technology development: ESFR for the reactor's sodium, LEADER for the lead reactor's and finally, GoFastR in the case of reactor gas-cooled.

  17. The national standards program for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    In 1970 a standards committee called ANS-15 was established by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) to prepare appropriate standards for research reactors. In addition, ANS acts as Secretariat for a national standards committee N17 which is responsible to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for the national consensus efforts for standards related to research reactors. To date ANS-15 has completed or is working on 14 standards covering all aspects of the operation of research reactors. Of the 11 research reactor standards submitted to the ANSI N17 Committee since its inception, six have been issued as National standards, and the remaining are still in the process of review. (author)

  18. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans. For the LWRS Program, sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer-than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets with respect to long-term operations: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the industry to implement technology to exceed the performance of the current labor-intensive business model.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-02-15

    proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans. For the LWRS Program, sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer-than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets with respect to long-term operations: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the industry to implement technology to exceed the performance of the current labor-intensive business model.

  20. Participation in the US Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these user institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities. Several methods have been used by the UVA Reactor Facility to achieve this objective. First, many college and secondary school groups toured the Reactor Facility and viewed the UVAR reactor and associated experimental facilities. Second, advanced undergraduate and graduate classes from area colleges and universities visited the facility to perform experiments in nuclear engineering and physics which would not be possible at the user institution. Third, irradiation and analysis services at the Facility have been made available for research by faculty and students from user institutions. Fourth, some institutions have received activated material from UVA for use at their institutions. These areas are discussed further in the report

  1. Breeder reactor program in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, S.

    1978-01-01

    In the United States, commercial fuel reprocessing and demonstration test of plutonium breeder reactors were now postponed. LMFBR project and schedule of FFTF and afterwards await the results of INFCE. However, this is not discarding the development of LMFBRs. With the existing energy resources, the United States can have the opportunity to make careful and thorough study. Emphasis is placed on the research and development on new alternative types of fuel. FFTF going to be operated soon should provide effective means for the developments of FBR fuel and materials. High priority is to be retained for the test and development of sodium system hardwares. The nuclear proliferation problem is not related to heat transfer and secondary systems; it is associated with the selection of fuel and fuel cycle. The whole program is centered around LMFBR design and development. The target output will be 600 x 10 3 -- 700 x 10 3 MW. In the United States, now is the time to develop excellent products and to study the nuclear proliferation problem more carefully. (Mori, K.)

  2. A Singular Perturbation Problem for Steady State Conversion of Methane Oxidation in Reverse Flow Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aang Nuryaman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The governing equations describing the methane oxidation process in reverse flow reactor are given by a set of convective-diffusion equations with a nonlinear reaction term, where temperature and methane conversion are dependent variables. In this study, the process is assumed to be one-dimensional pseudo homogeneous model and takes place with a certain reaction rate in which the whole process of reactor is still workable. Thus, the reaction rate can proceed at a fixed temperature. Under this condition, we restrict ourselves to solve the equations for the conversion only. From the available data, it turns out that the ratio of the diffusion term to the reaction term is small. Hence, this ratio is considered as small parameter in our model and this leads to a singular perturbation problem. In the vicinity of small parameter in front of higher order term, the numerical difficulties will be found. Here, we present an analytical solution by means of matched asymptotic expansions. Result shows that, up to and including the first order of approximation, the solution is in agreement with the exact and numerical solutions of the boundary value problem.

  3. Accuracy of cell calculation methods used for analysis of high conversion light water reactor lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang-Joon; Okumura, Keisuke; Ishiguro, Yukio; Tanaka, Ken-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Validation tests were made for the accuracy of cell calculation methods used in analyses of tight lattices of a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel core in a high conversion light water reactor (HCLWR). A series of cell calculations was carried out for the lattices referred from an international HCLWR benchmark comparison, with emphasis placed on the resonance calculation methods; the NR, IR approximations, the collision probability method with ultra-fine energy group. Verification was also performed for the geometrical modelling; a hexagonal/cylindrical cell, and the boundary condition; mirror/white reflection. In the calculations, important reactor physics parameters, such as the neutron multiplication factor, the conversion ratio and the void coefficient, were evaluated using the above methods for various HCLWR lattices with different moderator to fuel volume ratios, fuel materials and fissile plutonium enrichments. The calculated results were compared with each other, and the accuracy and applicability of each method were clarified by comparison with continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations. It was verified that the accuracy of the IR approximation became worse when the neutron spectrum became harder. It was also concluded that the cylindrical cell model with the white boundary condition was not so suitable for MOX fuelled lattices, as for UO 2 fuelled lattices. (author)

  4. Emergency medical assistance programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnemann, R.E.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with a simple but practical medical support of geographically distributed nuclear reactors in isolated areas. A staff of experts at a centre devote their full attention to accident prevention and preparedness at reactor sites. They establish and maintain emergency medical programs at reactor sites and nearby support hospitals. The emphasis is on first aid and emergency treatment by medical attendants who are not and cannot be experts in radiation but do know how to treat patients. (author)

  5. Qualification of JEFF3.1.1 library for high conversion reactor calculations using the ERASME/R experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, J. F.; Noguere, G.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC/LEPh, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01

    With its low CO{sub 2} production, Nuclear Energy appears to be an efficient solution to the global warming due to green-house effect. However, current LWR reactors are poor uranium users and, pending the development of Fast Neutron Reactors, alternative concepts of PWR with higher conversion ratio (HCPWR) are being studied again at CEA, first studies dating from the middle 80's. In these French designs, low moderation ratio has been performed by tightening the lattice pitch, achieving a conversion ratio of 0.8-0.9 with a MOX fuel coming from PWR UOX recycling. Theses HCPWRs are characterized by a harder neutron spectrum and the calculation uncertainties on the fundamental neutronics parameters are increased by a factor 3 regarding a standard PWR lattice, due to the major contribution of the Plutonium isotopes and of the epithermal energy range to the reaction rates. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a 3-year experimental validation program called ERASME has been performed by CEA from 1984 to 1986 in the EOLE reactor. Monte Carlo analysis of the ERASME/R experiments with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI4 allowed the qualification of the recommended JEFF.3.1.1 library for major neutronics parameters. K{sub eff} of the MOX under-moderated lattice is over-predicted by 440 {+-} 830 pcm (2{sigma}); the conversion ratio, indicator of the good use of uranium, is also slightly over-predicted: 2 % {+-} 4 % (2{sigma}) and the same for B4C absorber rods worth and soluble boron worth, over-predicted by 2 %, both in the 2 standard deviations range. The radial fission maps of heterogeneities (water-holes, B4C and fertile rods) are well reproduced: maximal (C-E)/E dispersion is 1.3 %, maximal power peak error is 2.7 %. The void reactivity worth is the only parameter poorly calculated with an overprediction of +12.4% {+-} 1.5%. ERASME/R analysis of MOX reactivity, void effect and spectral indexes will contribute to the reevaluation of {sup 241}Am and Plutonium isotopes

  6. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program. Renewal for 1994--1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappas, W.J.; Adams, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) has, once again, stimulated a broad use of the reactor facilities by undergraduate and graduate students, visitors, and professionals. Participants are exposed to topics such as nuclear engineering, radiation safety, and nuclear reactor operations. This information is presented through various means including tours, slide presentations, experiments, and discussions. Student research using the MUTR is also encouraged. In addition, the Reactor Sharing Program here at the University of Maryland does not limit itself to the confines of the TRIGA reactor facility. Incorporated in the program are the Maryland University Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, the Maryland University Radiation Effects Laboratory, and the UMCP 2x4 Thermal Hydraulic Loop. These facilities enhance and give an added dimension to the tours and experiments

  7. On the sensitivity of HCPWR [high conversion pressurized water reactors] microcell calculations to geometrical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, Maria; Abbate, Maximo; Patino, Nestor

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactor microcell calculations are, normally, carried out using simplified geometrical models which do not include the total number of homogeneous zones actually present. Regarding the particular case of High Conversion Pressurized Water Reactors (HCPWR), the revision of this approximation has been done to determine the sensitivity of its neutronic parameters to the use of these models. The study was performed comparing multiplication factors, reaction rates and neutron spectra, obtained using different geometrical treatments for a HCPWR typical microcell. From the results, it can be asserted that, if only two zones should be used in the calculation, the model which dilutes the clad into the moderator gives best results for the neutron fluxes, but the model that mix it with the fuel is better for k-infinite and reaction rate values. Considering the significance of these parameters on the physical behaviour of the reactor, the last one is recommended for cell calculations. Even if there is a slight difference between the cells considered, some results of this work were also compared with those of the NEACRP HCLWR benchmark with good agreement, so it can be concluded that the methodology here used for data processing and calculations is applicable to HCR's cell studies. (Author)

  8. Observation of inner surface of flame-tower type reactor for uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amamoto, Ippei; Terai, Takayuki; Umetsu, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    A fluorination reactor, which has been used to convert uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) into uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ), was completed after approximately 6000 hours operation at the uranium conversion facility in Japan. The observation of its inner surface was carried out to understand its corrosive condition and mechanism. The main wall of the reactor is made of Monel Alloy and its operational temperature is approximately 450degC at external surface under gaseous fluorine atmosphere. A sampling was undertaken from the most corrosive part of the reactor wall, and its analysis was carried out to obtain the data for the condition of appearance, thickness, macro and micro structure, etc. The results of observation are as follows: (1) The thickness decreased evenly (average 3.9 mm/year); (2) The chemical composition of corrosive products as coating was mainly nickel fluoride (NiF 2 ), which suggested that the corrosion mechanism could have been caused by the high temperature gas corrosion; (3) The total amount of coating was lower than that of a loss in thickness. For some reason, some of coating would seem to become extinct on the surface of the wall. The deterioration of coating, which formed a protector on the wall due to excess heating of the wall, the sand erosion effect by UF 4 , etc. have contributed to this state of condition. (author)

  9. Numerical simulation of ion transport membrane reactors: Oxygen permeation and transport and fuel conversion

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2012-07-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) based reactors have been suggested as a novel technology for several applications including fuel reforming and oxy-fuel combustion, which integrates air separation and fuel conversion while reducing complexity and the associated energy penalty. To utilize this technology more effectively, it is necessary to develop a better understanding of the fundamental processes of oxygen transport and fuel conversion in the immediate vicinity of the membrane. In this paper, a numerical model that spatially resolves the gas flow, transport and reactions is presented. The model incorporates detailed gas phase chemistry and transport. The model is used to express the oxygen permeation flux in terms of the oxygen concentrations at the membrane surface given data on the bulk concentration, which is necessary for cases when mass transfer limitations on the permeate side are important and for reactive flow modeling. The simulation results show the dependence of oxygen transport and fuel conversion on the geometry and flow parameters including the membrane temperature, feed and sweep gas flow, oxygen concentration in the feed and fuel concentration in the sweep gas. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-05-01

    proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans. For the LWRS Program, sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer-than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets with respect to long-term operations: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the industry to implement technology to exceed the performance of the current labor-intensive business model.

  11. Enhanced arrangement for recuperators in supercritical CO2 Brayton power cycle for energy conversion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, I.P.; Linares, J.I.; Cantizano, A.; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We propose an enhanced power conversion system layout for a Model C fusion reactor. •Proposed layout is based on a modified recompression supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle. •New arrangement in recuperators regards to classical cycle is used. •High efficiency is achieved, comparable with the best obtained in complex solutions. -- Abstract: A domestic research program called TECNO F US was launched in Spain in 2009 to support technological developments related to a dual coolant breeding blanket concept for fusion reactors. This concept of blanket uses Helium (300 °C/400 °C) to cool part of it and a liquid metal (480 °C/700 °C) to cool the rest; it also includes high temperature (700 °C/800 °C) and medium temperature (566 °C/700 °C) Helium cooling circuits for divertor. This paper proposes a new layout of the classical recompression supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle which replaces one of the recuperators (the one with the highest temperature) by another which by-passes the low temperature blanket source. This arrangement allows reaching high turbine inlet temperatures (around 600 °C) with medium pressures (around 225 bar) and achieving high cycle efficiencies (close to 46.5%). So, the proposed cycle reveals as a promising design because it integrates all the available thermal sources in a compact layout achieving high efficiencies with the usual parameters prescribed in classical recompression supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycles

  12. The RERTR [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor] program: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1986-11-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1985, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1986 are reviewed. The second miniplate series, concentrating on U 3 Si 2 -Al and U 3 Si-Al fuels, was expanded and its irradiation continued. Postirradiation examinations of several of these miniplates and of six previously irradiated U 3 Si 2 -Al full-size elements were completed with excellent results. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm 3 is well under way and due for completion before the end of 1987. DOE removed an important barrier to conversions by announcing that the new LEU fuels will be accepted for reprocessing. New DOE prices for enrichment and reprocessing services were calculated to have minimal effect on HEU reactors, and to reduce by about 8 to 10% the total fuel cycle costs of LEU reactors. New program activities include preliminary feasibility studies of LEU use in DOE reactors, evaluation of the feasibility to use LEU targets for the production of fission-product 99 Mo, and responsibility for coordinating safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors, as required by NRC. Achievement of the final program goals is projected for 1990. This progress could not have been achieved without close international cooperation, whose continuation and intensification are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR Program

  13. Advanced reactor development: The LMR integral fast reactor program at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    Reactor technology for the 21st Century must develop with characteristics that can now be seen to be important for the future, quite different from the things when the fundamental materials and design choices for present reactors were made in the 1950s. Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 3 figs

  14. The safety basis of the integral fast reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, D.R.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) and metallic fuel have emerged as the US Department of Energy reference reactor concept and fuel system for the development of an advanced liquid-metal reactor. This article addresses the basic elements of the IFR reactor concept and focuses on the safety advances achieved by the IFR Program in the areas of (1) fuel performance, (2) superior local faults tolerance, (3) transient fuel performance, (4) fuel-failure mechanisms, (5) performance in anticipated transients without scram, (6) core-melt mitigation, and (7) actinide recycle

  15. Method and program for complex calculation of heterogeneous reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, A.G.; Glebov, A.P.; Elovskaya, L.F.; Kuznetsova, L.I.

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm and the GITA program for complex one-dimensional calculation of a heterogeneous reactor which permits to conduct calculations for the reactor and its cell simultaneously using the same algorithm are described. Multigroup macrocross sections for reactor zones in the thermal energy range are determined according to the technique for calculating a cell with complicate structure and then the continuous multi group calculation of the reactor in the thermal energy range and in the range of neutron thermalization is made. The kinetic equation is solved using the Pi- and DSn- approximations [fr

  16. Results and recommendations from the reactor chemistry and corrosion tasks of the reactor materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    Within the general context of extended service life, the Reactor Materials Program was initiated in 1984. This comprehensive program addressed material performance in SRS reactor tanks and the primary coolant or Process Water System (PWS) piping. Three of the eleven tasks concerned moderator quality and corrosion mitigation. Definition and control of the stainless steel aqueous environment is a key factor in corrosion mitigation. The Reactor Materials Program systematically investigated the SRS environment and its effect on crack initiation and propagation in stainless steel, with the objective of improving this environment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the contributions of Tasks 6, 7 and 10 of the Reactor Materials Program to the understanding and control of moderator quality and its relationship to mitigation of stress corrosion cracking

  17. Main activities carried out for the conversion of the reactor core TRIGA, from HEU 8.5/70 / LEU 8.5/20 to LEU 30/20; Principales actividades llevadas a cabo para la conversion del nucleo del reactor TRIGA, de HEU 8.5/70 / LEU 8.5/20 a LEU 30/20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores C, J., E-mail: jorge.floresc@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In agreement with the policies of the global initiative of threats reduction (GTRI), Mexico committed that inside the reduction program of the fuel enrichment in research and test reactors (RERTR), the conversion of the core reactor TRIGA (in the nuclear centre) would be made, to use solely fuel with low enrichment ({<=} 20% U{sup 235}). To support to the execution of this commitment, a series of accords and agreements were established. The Project Agreement and Supply among the IAEA, the United States of America and Mexico was the more relevant. In this work the main activities carried out in the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) with this purpose are presented. (Author)

  18. Decentralization of operating reactor licensing reviews: NRR Pilot Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1984-07-01

    This report, which has incorporated comments received from the Commission and ACRS, describes the program for decentralization of selected operating reactor licensing technical review activities. The 2-year pilot program will be reviewed to verify that safety is enhanced as anticipated by the incorporation of prescribed management techniques and application of resources. If the program fails to operate as designed, it will be terminated

  19. Computerised programming of the Dragon reactor fuel handling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, P.

    1976-11-01

    Two suites of FORTRAN IV computer programs have been written to produce check lists for the operation of the two remote control fuel handling machines of the Dragon Reactor. This document describes the advantages of these programs over the previous manual system of writing check lists, and provides a detailed guide to the programs themselves. (author)

  20. Overview of the fast reactors fuels program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Hayward, B.R.; Rice, L.H.; Yoshikawa, H.H.

    1980-04-01

    Each nation involved in LMFBR development has its unique energy strategies which consider energy growth projections, uranium resources, capital costs, and plant operational requirements. Common to all of these strategies is a history of fast reactor experience which dates back to the days of the Manhatten Project and includes the CLEMENTINE Reactor, which generated a few watts, LAMPRE, EBR-I, EBR-II, FERMI, SEFOR, FFTF, BR-1, -2, -5, -10, BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600, JOYO, RAPSODIE, Phenix, KNK-II, DFR, and PFR. Fast reactors under design or construction include PEC, CRBR, SuperPhenix, SNR-300, MONJU, and Madras (India). The parallel fuels and materials evolution has fully supported this reactor development. It has involved cermets, molten plutonium alloy, plutonium oxide, uranium metal or alloy, uranium oxide, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxides and carbides

  1. IAEA Mission Sees High Commitment to Safety at Ghana's Research Reactor After HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team of experts said the operator of Ghana’s research reactor has demonstrated a high commitment to safety following the conversion of the reactor core to use low enriched uranium (LEU) as fuel instead of high enriched uranium (HEU). The team also made recommendations for further safety enhancements. The Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors (INSARR) team concluded a five-day mission today to assess the safety of the GHARR-1 research reactor, originally commissioned in 1994. The 30 kW reactor, operated by the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) at the National Nuclear Research Institute in the capital Accra, is used primarily for trace element analysis for industrial or agricultural purposes, research, education and training. In 2017, the reactor core was converted in a joint effort by Ghana, the United States and China, with assistance from the IAEA. The IAEA supported the operation to eliminate proliferation risks associated with HEU, while maintaining important scientific research. The team made recommendations for improvements to the GAEC, including: • Completing the revision of reactor safety and operating documents to reflect the results of the commissioning of the reactor after the core fuel conversion. • Enhancing the training and qualification programme for operating personnel. • Improving the capability for monitoring operational safety parameters under all conditions. • Strengthening radiation protection by establishing an effective radiation monitoring of workplace. The GAEC said it will request a follow-up INSARR mission by 2020.

  2. The UMR reactor outreach program for expanded educational utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, D.; Bolon, A.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor (UMRR) facility has been under intense financial scrutiny by the university administration; primarily due to ever-tightening budgets and declines in nuclear engineering (NE) enrollment. In response to criticisms of low utilization, the reactor staff has developed and implemented a dynamic outreach program designed to significantly increase the educational role of the facility on campus. The outreach program is based on the principle that the potential to provide service to the UMR community is far in excess of the present level of service. The program is designed to identify and inform potential users of how their courses or programs can be augmented through use of the reactor facility. The net effect of the outreach program is greater campus communication and awareness of the unique capabilities as applied to each discipline. A natural product of the outreach program should be increased research

  3. ECUT (Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies) program: Biocatalysis project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baresi, Larry

    1989-03-01

    The Annual Report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1988 research activities and accomplishments, for the Biocatalysis Project of the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Division. The ECUT Biocatalysis Project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. The Biocatalysis Project is a mission-oriented, applied research and exploratory development activity directed toward resolution of the major generic technical barriers that impede the development of biologically catalyzed commercial chemical production. The approach toward achieving project objectives involves an integrated participation of universities, industrial companies and government research laboratories. The Project's technical activities were organized into three work elements: (1) The Molecular Modeling and Applied Genetics work element includes research on modeling of biological systems, developing rigorous methods for the prediction of three-dimensional (tertiary) protein structure from the amino acid sequence (primary structure) for designing new biocatalysis, defining kinetic models of biocatalyst reactivity, and developing genetically engineered solutions to the generic technical barriers that preclude widespread application of biocatalysis. (2) The Bioprocess Engineering work element supports efforts in novel bioreactor concepts that are likely to lead to substantially higher levels of reactor productivity, product yields and lower separation energetics. Results of work within this work element will be used to establish the technical feasibility of critical bioprocess monitoring and control subsystems. (3) The Bioprocess Design and Assessment work element attempts to develop procedures (via user-friendly computer software) for assessing the energy-economics of biocatalyzed chemical production processes, and initiation of technology transfer for advanced bioprocesses.

  4. Use of multiple on-campus reactors in education and training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlapper, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    In its undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering and health physics, Texas A ampersand M University utilizes two reactors for the training and education of students. The 5-W AGN-201 nuclear training reactor has been in use since the late 1950s, while the 1-MW TRIGA Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) was first utilized in late 1961. Both facilities have been upgraded since initial criticality, the AGN power level being increased from the original 200-mW limit to its 5-W current level and the NSCR undergoing conversion from a 100-kW materials test reactor fueled deign to a 1-MW TRIGA-fueled facility. The AGN reactor is operated by the Department of Nuclear Engineering of the College of Engineering and is almost solely utilized in training and education programs. The NSCR facility is administered by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station and support research efforts of faculty and students of departments within and outside the university in addition to contributing to the education and training programs of the nuclear engineering department

  5. The coupling effect of gas-phase chemistry and surface reactions on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion in ITM reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2015-08-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The effect of the coupling between heterogeneous catalytic reactions supported by an ion transport membrane (ITM) and gas-phase chemistry on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation in ITM reactors is examined. In ITM reactors, thermochemical reactions take place in the gas-phase and on the membrane surface, both of which interact with oxygen permeation. However, this coupling between gas-phase and surface chemistry has not been examined in detail. In this study, a parametric analysis using numerical simulations is conducted to investigate this coupling and its impact on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation rates. A thermochemical model that incorporates heterogeneous chemistry on the membrane surface and detailed chemical kinetics in the gas-phase is used. Results show that fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are strongly influenced by the simultaneous action of both chemistries. It is shown that the coupling somewhat suppresses the gas-phase kinetics and reduces fuel conversion, both attributed to extensive thermal energy transfer towards the membrane which conducts it to the air side and radiates to the reactor walls. The reaction pathway and products, in the form of syngas and C2 hydrocarbons, are also affected. In addition, the operating regimes of ITM reactors in which heterogeneous- or/and homogeneous-phase reactions predominantly contribute to fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are elucidated.

  6. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates. Volume IX is divided into three sections: Chapter 1, Reactor Systems; Chapter 2, Fuel-Cycle Systems; and the Appendixes. Chapter 1 contains the characterizations of the following 12 reactor types: light-water reactor; heavy-water reactor; water-cooled breeder reactor; high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; gas-cooled fast reactor; liquid-metal fast breeder reactor; spectral-shift-controlled reactor; accelerator-driven reactor; molten-salt reactor; gaseous-core reactor; tokamak fusion-fisson hybrid reactor; and fast mixed-spectrum reactor. Chapter 2 contains similar information developed for fuel-cycle facilities in the following categories: mining and milling; conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication; spent fuel reprocessing; waste handling and disposal; and transportation of nuclear materials.

  7. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    The Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates. Volume IX is divided into three sections: Chapter 1, Reactor Systems; Chapter 2, Fuel-Cycle Systems; and the Appendixes. Chapter 1 contains the characterizations of the following 12 reactor types: light-water reactor; heavy-water reactor; water-cooled breeder reactor; high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; gas-cooled fast reactor; liquid-metal fast breeder reactor; spectral-shift-controlled reactor; accelerator-driven reactor; molten-salt reactor; gaseous-core reactor; tokamak fusion-fisson hybrid reactor; and fast mixed-spectrum reactor. Chapter 2 contains similar information developed for fuel-cycle facilities in the following categories: mining and milling; conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication; spent fuel reprocessing; waste handling and disposal; and transportation of nuclear materials

  8. Catalytic and Noncatalytic Conversion of Methane to Olefins and Synthesis Gas in an AC Parallel Plate Discharge Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Khodagholi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct conversion of methane to ethylene, acetylene, and synthesis gas at ambient pressure and temperature in a parallel plate discharge reactor was investigated. The experiments were carried out using a quartz reactor of outer diameter of 9 millimeter and a driving force of ac current of 50 Hz. The input power to the reactor to establish a stable gas discharge varied from 9.6 to maximum 15.3 watts (w. The effects of ZSM5, Fe–ZSM5, and Ni–ZSM5 catalysts combined with corona discharge for conversion of methane to more valued products have been addressed. It was found that in presence or absence of a catalyst in gas discharge reactor, the rate of methane and oxygen conversion increased upon higher input power supplied to the reactor. The effect of Fe–ZSM5 catalyst combined with gas discharge plasma yields C2 hydrocarbons up to 21.9%, which is the highest productions of C2 hydrocarbons in this work. The effect of combined Ni–ZSM5 and gas discharge plasma was mainly production of synthesis gas. The advantage of introducing ZSM5 to the plasma zone was increase in synthesis gas and acetylene production. The highest energy efficiency was 0.22 mmol/kJ, which belongs to lower rate of energy injection to the reactor.

  9. Parametric studies for the nuclear design of high-conversion pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axmann, J.; Oldekop, W.

    1987-01-01

    Undermoderated high-conversion pressurized water reactors with steel canning tubes offer the possibility of high burnup together with a comparatively low consumption of fissionable material; however, they require a relatively large inventory of fissionable material. The effects of different fuel compositions upon the specific consumption of fissionable material are investigated for a fixed burnup and moderator-to-fuel volume ratios varying between 0.5 and 2.0. Moreover, the required inventory of fissionable material is determined and the influence on the costs of electric power generation is shown. Further investigations deal with the neutron-physical effects of decreasing fuel rod diameters and the influence of differing steel additives. It appears that the parasitic neutron absorption by alloying constituents depends on the moderation level in a non-uniform manner and that the contribution of the fissionable material to the electric power generation costs is rather independent of the moderator-to-fuel volume ratio. (orig.) [de

  10. Limitations of power conversion systems under transient loads and impact on the pulsed tokamak power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, G.T.; Wong, C.P.C.; Kapich, D.D.; McDonald, C.F.; Schleicher, R.W.

    1993-11-01

    The impact of cyclic loading of the power conversion system of a helium-cooled, pulsed tokamak power plant is assessed. Design limits of key components of heat transport systems employing Rankie and Brayton thermodynamic cycles are quantified based on experience in gas-cooled fission reactor design and operation. Cyclic loads due to pulsed tokamak operation are estimated. Expected performance of the steam generator is shown to be incompatible with pulsed tokamak operation without load leveling thermal energy storage. The close cycle gas turbine is evaluated qualitatively based on performance of existing industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines. Advances in key technologies which significantly improve prospects for operation with tokamak fusion plants are reviewed

  11. Overview of U.S. Fast Reactor Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Robert

    2013-01-01

    • Concept development studies guide R&D tasks by evaluating system impact for broad variety of technology options: – Small-scale facilities for R&D on key technology; – No near-term plan for demonstration reactor. • Fast reactor R&D is focused on key technologies innovations for performance improvement (cost reduction): – Advanced Structural Materials; – Advanced Energy Conversion; – Advanced Modeling and Simulation. • Other R&D is conducted to address known technology challenges: – Safety and Licensing; – Fuels Development; – Undersodium Viewing

  12. An optimized power conversion system concept of the integral, inherently-safe light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmott, Matthew J.; Wilding, Paul R.; Petrovic, Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Three power conversion systems (PCS) for the I"2S-LWR are presented. • An optimization analyses was performed to evaluate these PCS alternatives. • The ideal PCS consists of 5 turbines, and obtains an overall efficiency of 35.7%. - Abstract: The integral, inherently safe light water reactor (I"2S-LWR) has been developed to significantly enhance passive safety capabilities while maintaining cost competitiveness relative to the current light water reactor (LWR) fleet. The compact heat exchangers of the I"2S-LWR preclude boiling of the secondary fluid, which decreases the probability of heat exchanger failure, but this requires the addition of a flash drum, which negatively affects the overall plant thermodynamic efficiency. A state of the art Rankine cycle is proposed for the I"2S-LWR to increase the thermodynamic efficiency by utilizing a flash drum with optimized operational parameters. In presenting this option for power conversion in the I"2S-LWR power plant, the key metric used in rating the performance is the overall net thermodynamic efficiency of the cycle. In evaluating the flash-Rankine cycle, three basic industrial concepts are evaluated, one without an intermediate pressure turbine, one with an intermediate turbine and one reheat stream, and one with an intermediate turbine and two reheat streams. For each configuration, a single-path multi-variable optimization is undertaken to maximize the thermal efficiency. The third configuration with an intermediate turbine and 2 reheat streams is the most effective concept, with an optimized efficiency of 35.7%.

  13. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed

  14. A program for dynamic noise investigations of reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, N.A.; Yaneva, N.B.

    1980-01-01

    A stochastic process analysis in nuclear reactors is used for the state diagnosis and dynamic characteristic investigation of the reactor system. A program DENSITY adapted and tested on an IBM 360 ES type computer is developed. The program is adjusted for fast processing of long series exploiting a relatively small memory. The testing procedure is discussed and the method of the periodic sequences corresponding to characteristic reactivity perturbations of the reactor systems is considered. The program is written for calculating the auto-power spectral density and the cross-power spectral density, as well as the coherence function of stationary statistical time series using the advantages of the fast Fourier transformation. In particular, it is shown that the multi-frequency binary sequences are very useful with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio and the frequency distribution in view of the frequency reactor test

  15. OSU Reactor Sharing Program FY 1995 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    This is the annual report of the activities supported under the Oregon State University Reactor Sharing Program, award number DE-FG06-NE38137. The beginning date for the award was September, 30, 1995 and the end date was September 29, 1996. Work conducted under this award is internally administered at the Radiation Center through a project tasking system. This allows for excellent quality control for the work which is performed from the point of initial contact, through the reactor application, project report generation and financial accounting. For the current fiscal year, FY95, the total cost of the reactor sharing program, including Radiation Center contributions, was $66,323.20 of which $40,000.00 was supplied by the DOE Reactor Sharing Program. The details of individual project costs is given in Table 1. The work performed for the individual projects are described in the brief work descriptions given in Table 2

  16. Fusion reactor design and technology program in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid reactor program was launched in 1987. The purpose of development of the hybrid reactor is twofold: to solve the problem of nuclear fuel supply for an expected large-scale development of fission reactor plants, and to maintain the momentum of fusion research. The program is described and the activities and progress of the program are presented. Two conceptual designs of an engineering test reactor with tokamak configuration were developed at the Southwestern Institute of Physics and the Institute of Plasma Physics. The results are a tokamak engineering test breeder (TETB) series design and a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design (SSEHR), characterized by a liquid-Li self-cooled blanket and an He-cooled solid tritium breeder blanket respectively. In parallel with the design studies, relevant technological experiments on a small or medium scale have been supported by this program. These include LHCD, ICRH and pellet injection in the area of plasma engineering; neutronics integral experiments with U, Pu, Fe and Be; various irradiation tests of austenitic and ferritic steels, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop experiments using a liquid metal loop; research into permeation barriers for tritium and hydrogen isotopes; solid tritium breeder tests using an in-situ loop in a fission reactor. All these experiments have proceeded successfully. The second step of this program is now starting. It seems reasonable that most of the research carried out in the first step will continue. ((orig.))

  17. Conversion to low-enriched fuel in research reactor aspects of licensing the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, J.

    1985-01-01

    Conversion to low-enriched fuel and usage of new developed highly densified fuel in research-reactors will be an essential alteration in operating the reactor. According to the German Energy Act this has to be licensed. here might be some risk to the licensee of an older research-reactor by suspending his operating license because he cannot meet current requirements to be fulfilled or because of a court decision.Disposal of irradiated fuel elements of the new fuel type is a further significant problem which has to be solved before issuing a new license. (author)

  18. Direct energy conversion in fission reactors: A U.S. NERI project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Seidel, David B.; Polansky, Gary F.; Rochau, Gary E.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Besenbruch, G.; Brown, L.C.; Parish, T.A.; Anghaie, S.; Beller, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    In principle, the energy released by a fission can be converted directly into electricity by using the charged fission fragments. The first theoretical treatment of direct energy conversion (DEC) appeared in the literature in 1957. Experiments were conducted over the next ten years, which identified a number of problem areas. Research declined by the late 1960's due to technical challenges that limited performance. Under the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative the authors are determining if these technical challenges can be overcome with todays technology. The authors present the basic principles of DEC reactors, review previous research, discuss problem areas in detail, and identify technological developments of the last 30 years that can overcome these obstacles. As an example, the fission electric cell must be insulated to avoid electrons crossing the cell. This insulation could be provided by a magnetic field as attempted in the early experiments. However, from work on magnetically insulated ion diodes they know how to significantly improve the field geometry. Finally, a prognosis for future development of DEC reactors will be presented

  19. Computational analysis of supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, Burhanuddin; Suh, Kune Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Computational analysis of S-CO 2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. ► Validation of numerical model with literature data. ► Recompression S-CO 2 Brayton cycle thermal efficiency of 42.44%. ► Reheating concept to enhance the cycle thermal efficiency. ► Higher efficiency achieved by the proposed concept. - Abstract: The Optimized Supercritical Cycle Analysis (OSCA) code is being developed to analyze the design of a supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) driven Brayton cycle for a fusion reactor as part of the Modular Optimal Balance Integral System (MOBIS). This system is based on a recompression Brayton cycle. S-CO 2 is adopted as the working fluid for MOBIS because of its easy availability, high density and low chemical reactivity. The reheating concept is introduced to enhance the cycle thermal efficiency. The helium-cooled lithium lead model AB of DEMO fusion reactor is used as reference in this paper.

  20. Plutonium recycle in PWR reactors (Brazilian Nuclear Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-02-01

    An evaluation is made of the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. It starts from the calculation of a reference reactor and allows the evaluation of demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. For plutonium recycle, the concept of uranium and plutonium homogeneous mixture has been adopted, using self-produced plutonium at equilibrium, in order to get minimum neutronic perturbations in the reactor core. The refueling model studied in the reference reactor was the 'out-in' scheme with a constant number of changed fuel elements (approximately 1/3 of the core). Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5%U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the 5th operation cycle of the thermal reactors. The cumulative amount of fissile plutonium obtained by the Brazilian Nuclear Program of PWR reactors by 1991 should be sufficient for a fast breeder with the same capacity as Angra 2. For the proposed fast breeder programs, the fissile plutonium produced by thermal reactors is sufficient to supply fast breeder initial necessities. Howewer, U 3 O 8 and SWU economy with recycle is not significant when the proposed fast breeder program is considered. (Author) [pt

  1. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  2. Power conversion and balance of plant considerations for the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, K.; Graumann, D.

    1981-01-01

    The power conversion and balance of plant facilities for this tenth-of-a-kind tokamak fusion power plant are a combination of both features common to any large power plant, and elements peculiar to the fusion technology. For example, the steam generators, turbine-generator and main condenser components of the power conversion system and the natural draft cooling towers that are used for heat rejection at sites not close to a large body of water are generic to power plants. The tritium reprocessing facilities that minimize the tritium inventory in the plant, the Electrical and RF Power Supply Building that contains the coil and rf power supplies, the cryogenic facilities that provide liquid helium coolant for the superconducting coils, and the Hot Cell in which fully remote repair and maintenance functions are performed are unique to a fusion power plant. One of the major features of the STARFIRE design is steady state operation that maximizes overall facility reliability and eliminates both thermal storage requirements and potential power fluctuations on the grid. The reference reactor power is 4000 MWt with a gross electric power generation of 1440 MW. For STARFIRE, water is the preferred coolant and is utilized in both the first wall/blanket and limiter cooling circuits. Dual parallel primary coolant loops cool the twenty-four first-wall/blanket sectors. The power deposited in the limiter, approximately 5% of the total thermal power, is removed by the separate limiter/feedwater loop and is used for feedwater heating in the steam power conversion system

  3. Neutronic calculations for the conversion of the University of Florida Training Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, E T; Diaz, N J [Department of Nuclear Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Kniedler, G S [Reactor Analysis Group, TVA, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1983-09-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) is located on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. The reactor is the Argonaut type, heterogeneous in design and currently fueled with 93% enriched, uranium-aluminum alloy MTR plate-type fuel. Investigations are being performed to examine te feasibility of replacing the highly-enriched fuel of the current UFTR with 4.8% enriched, cylindrical pin SPERT fuel. The SPERT fuel is stainless steel clad and contains uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) pellets. On a broad spectrum, training reactor conversion from high enrichment uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fueled facilities has been a continuing concern in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and significant work has been done in this area by the Argonne RERTR Program. The International Atomic Energy Agency cites three reasons for reactor conversion to low-enriched uranium. The main reason is the desire to reduce the proliferation potential of research reactor fuels. The second is to increase the assurance of continued fuel availability in the face of probable restrictions on the supply of highly-enriched uranium. The third reason is the possible reduction in requirements for physical security measures during fabrication, transportation, storage and use. This same IAEA report points out that the three reasons stated for the conversion of the fuel of research reactors are interrelated and cannot be considered individually. The concerns of the Nuclear Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Florida relating to the HEU fuel of the UFTR coincide with those of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The primary reason for going to low-enriched pin-type fuel is the concern with proliferation provoked by the highly-enriched plate fuel which has led to tighter security of nuclear facilities such as the UFTR. A second reason for changing to the pin-type fuel is because of difficulties that are being encountered in the supply of

  4. Neutronic calculations for the conversion of the University of Florida Training Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, E.T.; Diaz, N.J.; Kniedler, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) is located on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. The reactor is the Argonaut type, heterogeneous in design and currently fueled with 93% enriched, uranium-aluminum alloy MTR plate-type fuel. Investigations are being performed to examine te feasibility of replacing the highly-enriched fuel of the current UFTR with 4.8% enriched, cylindrical pin SPERT fuel. The SPERT fuel is stainless steel clad and contains uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) pellets. On a broad spectrum, training reactor conversion from high enrichment uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fueled facilities has been a continuing concern in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and significant work has been done in this area by the Argonne RERTR Program. The International Atomic Energy Agency cites three reasons for reactor conversion to low-enriched uranium. The main reason is the desire to reduce the proliferation potential of research reactor fuels. The second is to increase the assurance of continued fuel availability in the face of probable restrictions on the supply of highly-enriched uranium. The third reason is the possible reduction in requirements for physical security measures during fabrication, transportation, storage and use. This same IAEA report points out that the three reasons stated for the conversion of the fuel of research reactors are interrelated and cannot be considered individually. The concerns of the Nuclear Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Florida relating to the HEU fuel of the UFTR coincide with those of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The primary reason for going to low-enriched pin-type fuel is the concern with proliferation provoked by the highly-enriched plate fuel which has led to tighter security of nuclear facilities such as the UFTR. A second reason for changing to the pin-type fuel is because of difficulties that are being encountered in the supply of the

  5. Materials surveillance program for C-E NSSS reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koziol, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation surveillance programs for light water NSSS reactor vessels provide the means by which the utility can assess the extent of neutron-induced changes in the reactor vessel materials. These programs are conducted to verify, by direct measurement, the conservatism in the predicted radiation-induced changes and hence the operational parameters (i.e., heat-up, cooldown, and pressurization rates). In addition, such programs provide assurance that the scheduled adjustments in the operational parameters are made with ample margin for safe operation of the plant. During the past 3 years, several documents have been promulgated establishing the criteria for determining both the initial properties of the reactor vessel materials as well as measurement of changes in these initial properties as a result of irradiation. These documents, ASTM E-185-73, ''Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels,'' and Appendix H to 10 CFR 50, ''Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements,'' are complementary to each other. They are the result of a change in the basic philosophy regarding the design and analysis of reactor vessels. In effect, the empirical ''transition temperature approach,'' which was used for design, was replaced by the ''analytical fracture mechanics approach.'' The implementation of this technique was described in Welding Research Council Bulletin 1975 and Appendix G to ASME Code Section III. Further definition of requirements appears in Appendix G to 10 CFR 50 published in July 1973. It is the intent of this paper to describe (1) a typical materials surveillance program for the reactor vessel of a Combustion Engineering NSSS, and (2) how the results of such programs, as well as experimental programs provide feed-back for improvement of materials to enhance their radiation resistance and thereby further improve the safety and reliability of future plants. (author)

  6. Accelerating the design and testing of LEU fuel assemblies for conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies proposed geometries and loading specifications of LEU tube-type and pin-type test assemblies that would be suitable for accelerating the conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside of Russia if these fuels are manufactured, qualified by irradiation testing, and made commercially available in Russia. (author)

  7. Safety program considerations for space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cropp, L.O.

    1984-08-01

    This report discusses the necessity for in-depth safety program planning for space nuclear reactor systems. The objectives of the safety program and a proposed task structure is presented for meeting those objectives. A proposed working relationship between the design and independent safety groups is suggested. Examples of safety-related design philosophies are given

  8. Neutronic design of mixed oxide-silicide cores for the core conversion of rsg-gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Tukiran; Pinem surian; Febrianto

    2001-01-01

    The core conversion of rsg-gas reactor from an all-oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) core, through a series of mixed oxide-silicide core, to an all-silicide (U 3 Si 2 -Al) core for the same meat density of 2.96 g U/cc is in progress. The conversion is first step of the step-wise conversion and will be followed by the second step that is the core conversion from low meat density of silicide core, through a series of mixed lower-higher density of silicide core, to an all-higher meat density of 3.55 g/cc core. Therefore, the objectives of this work is to design the mixed cores on the neutronic performance to achieve safety a first full-silicide core for the reactor with the low uranium meat density of 2.96gU/cc. The neutronic design of the mixed cores was performed by means of Batan-EQUIL-2D and Batan-3DIFF computer codes for 2 and 3 dimension diffusion calculation, respectively. The result shows that all mixed oxide-silicide cores will be feasible to achieve safety a fist full-silicide core. The core performs the same neutronic core parameters as those of the equilibrium silicide core. Therefore, the reactor availability and utilization during the core conversion is not changed

  9. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Programe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulyak, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (> 225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) in which all primarycomponents associated with the nuclear steam supply system, including the steam generator and the pressurizer, are housed within the reactor vessel. The Westinghouse SMR utilizes passive safety systems and proven components from the AP1000 plant design with a compact containment that houses the integral reactor vessel and the passive safety systems. This paper describes the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR, the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design drivers include safety, economics, reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR safety system design is passive, is based largely on the passive safety systems used in the AP1000 reactor, and provides mitigation of all design basis accidents without the need for offsite AC electrical power for a period of seven days. The economics of the Westinghouse SMR challenges the established approach of large Light Water Reactors (LWR) that utilized the economies of scale to reach economic competiveness. To serve the market expectation of smaller capital investment and cost competitive energy, a modular design approach is implemented within the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR building layout integrates the three basic design constraints of modularization; transportation, handling and module-joining technology. The integral Westinghouse SMR design eliminates large loop piping, which significantly reduces the flow area of postulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The Westinghouse SMR containment is a high

  10. Upgrading program of the experimental fast reactor Joyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, A.; Yogo, S.

    2001-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo finished its operation as an irradiation core in June, 2000. Throughout the operation of MK-I (breeder core) and MK-II (irradiation core), the net operation time has exceeded 60,000 hours. During these operations there were no fuel failures or serious plant problems. The MK-III modification program will improve irradiation capability to demonstrate advanced technologies for commercial Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). When the MK-III core is started, it will support irradiation tests in feasibility studies for fast reactor and related fuel cycle research and development in Japan. (authors)

  11. FISS: a computer program for reactor systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamm, H.; Sherman, G.R.; Wright, J.H.; Nieman, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    ΣFISSΣ is a computer code for use in investigating alternative fuel cycle strategies for Canadian and world nuclear programs. The code performs a system simulation accounting for dynamic effects of growing nuclear systems. Facilities in the model include storage for irradiated fuel, mines, plants for enrichment, fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing and heavy water, and reactors. FISS is particularly useful for comparing various reactor strategies and studying sensitivities of resource consumption, capital investment and energy costs with changes in fuel cycle parameters, reactor parameters and financial variables. (author)

  12. Reactor physical experimental program EROS in the frame of the molten salt applying reactor concepts development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, Miloslav; Kyncl, Jan; Mikisek, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    After the relatively broad program of experimental activities, which have been involved in the complex R and D program for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) - SPHINX (SPent Hot fuel Incinerator by Neutron fluX) concept development in the Czech Republic, there has been a next stage (namely large-scale experimental verification of design inputs by use of MSR-type inserted zones into the existing light water moderated experimental reactor LR-0 called EROS project) started, which will be focused to the experimental verification of the rector physical or neutronic properties of other types of reactor concepts applying molten salts in the role of liquid fuel and/or coolant. This tendency is based on the recently accepted decision of the MSR SSC of GIF to consider for further period of its activity two baseline concepts- fast neutron molten salt reactor non-moderated (FMSR-NM) as a long-term alternative to solid fuelled fast neutron reactors and simultaneously, advanced high temperature reactor (AHTR) with pebble bed type solid fuel cooled by liquid salts. There will be a brief description of the prepared and performed experimental programs in these directions (as well as the preliminary results obtained so far) introduced in the paper. (author)

  13. Enhanced arrangement for recuperators in supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle for energy conversion in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, I.P.; Linares, J.I., E-mail: linares@dim.icai.upcomillas.es; Cantizano, A.; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We propose an enhanced power conversion system layout for a Model C fusion reactor. •Proposed layout is based on a modified recompression supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. •New arrangement in recuperators regards to classical cycle is used. •High efficiency is achieved, comparable with the best obtained in complex solutions. -- Abstract: A domestic research program called TECNO{sub F}US was launched in Spain in 2009 to support technological developments related to a dual coolant breeding blanket concept for fusion reactors. This concept of blanket uses Helium (300 °C/400 °C) to cool part of it and a liquid metal (480 °C/700 °C) to cool the rest; it also includes high temperature (700 °C/800 °C) and medium temperature (566 °C/700 °C) Helium cooling circuits for divertor. This paper proposes a new layout of the classical recompression supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle which replaces one of the recuperators (the one with the highest temperature) by another which by-passes the low temperature blanket source. This arrangement allows reaching high turbine inlet temperatures (around 600 °C) with medium pressures (around 225 bar) and achieving high cycle efficiencies (close to 46.5%). So, the proposed cycle reveals as a promising design because it integrates all the available thermal sources in a compact layout achieving high efficiencies with the usual parameters prescribed in classical recompression supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles.

  14. Actinide transmutation using inert matrix fuels versus recycle in a low conversion fast burner reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deinert, M.R.; Schneider, E.A.; Recktenwald, G.; Cady, K.B. [The Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C2200, Austin, 78712 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reducing the disposal burden of the long lived radioisotopes that are contained within spent uranium oxide fuel is essential for ensuring the sustainability of nuclear power. Because of their non-fertile matrices, inert matrix fuels (IMFs) could allow light-water reactors to achieve a significant burn down of plutonium and minor actinides that are that are currently produced as a byproduct of operating light-water reactors. However, the extent to which this is possible is not yet fully understood. We consider a ZrO{sub 2} based IMF with a high transuranic loading and show that the neutron fluence (and the subsequent fuel residence time required to achieve it) present a practical limit for the achievable actinide burnup. The accumulation of transuranics in spent uranium oxide fuel is a major obstacle for the sustainability of nuclear power. While commercial light-water reactors (LWR's) produce these isotopes, they can be used to transmute them. At present, the only viable option for doing this is to partly fuel reactors with mixed oxide fuel (MOX) made using recycled plutonium. However, because of parasitic neutron capture in the uranium matrix of MOX, considerable plutonium and minor actinides are also bred as the fuel is burned. A better option is to entrain the recycled isotopes in a non-fertile matrix such as ZrO{sub 2}. Inert matrices such as these were originally envisioned for burning plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons [1]. However, because they achieve a conversion ratio of zero, they have also been considered as a better alternative to MOX [2-6]. Plutonium and minor actinides dominate the long term heat and radiological outputs from spent nuclear fuel. Recent work has shown that that IMFs can be used to reduce these outputs by at least a factor of four, on a per unit of energy generated basis [6]. The degree of reduction is strongly dependent on IMF burnup. In principle, complete transmutation of the transuranics could be achieved though this

  15. Research and development program in reactor safety for NUCLEBRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, R.B.; Resende Lobo, A.A. de; Horta, J.A.L.; Avelar Esteves, F. de; Lepecki, W.P.S.; Mohr, K.; Selvatici, E.

    1984-01-01

    With technical assistance from the IAEA, it was established recently an analytical and experimental Research and Development Program for NUCLEBRAS in the area of reactor safety. The main objectives of this program is to make possible, with low investments, the active participation of NUCLEBRAS in international PWR safety research. The analytical and experimental activities of the program are described with some detail, and the main results achieved up to now are presented. (Author) [pt

  16. Transient behaviour study program of research reactors fuel elements at the Hydra Pulse Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostionov, V.E.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Malankin, P.V.

    2004-01-01

    Program on behavior study of research reactor Fuel Elements (FE) under transient regimes initiated by excessive reactivity insertion is being presented. Program would be realized at HYDRA pulse reactor at Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (RRC 'K1'). HYDRA uses aqueous solution of uranyl sulfate (UO 2 SO 4 ) as a fuel. Up to 30 MJ of energy can be released inside the core during the single pulse, effective power pulse width varying from 2 to 10 ms. Reactor facility allows to investigate behaviour of FE consisting of different types of fuel composition, being developed according to Russian RERTR. First part of program is aimed at transient behaviour studying of FE MR, IRT-3M, WWR-M5 types containing meats based on dioxide uranium in aluminum matrix. Mentioned FEs use 90% and 36% enriched uranium. (author)

  17. Minor Actinide Transmutation Physics for Low Conversion Ratio Sodium Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdi Asgari; Samuel E. Bays; Benoit Forget; Rodolfo Ferrer

    2007-01-01

    The effects of varying the reprocessing strategy used in the closed cycle of a Sodium Fast Reactor (SNF) prototype are presented in this paper. The isotopic vector from the aqueous separation of transuranic (TRU) elements in Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is assumed to also vary according to the reprocessing strategy of the closed fuel cycle. The decay heat, gamma energy, and neutron emission of the fuel discharge at equilibrium are found to vary depending on the separation strategy. The SFR core used in this study corresponds to a burner configuration with a conversion ratio of ∼0.5 based on the Super-PRISM design. The reprocessing strategies stemming from the choice of either metal or oxide fuel for the SFR are found to have a large impact on the equilibrium discharge decay heat, gamma energy, and neutron emission. Specifically, metal fuel SFR with pyroprocessing of the discharge produces the largest amount of TRU consumption (166 kg per Effective Full Power Year or EFPY), but also the highest decay heat, gamma energy, and neutron emission. On the other hand, an oxide fuel SFR with PUREX reprocessing minimizes the decay heat and related parameters of interest to a minimum, even when compared to thermal Mixed Oxide (MOX) or Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) on a per mass basis. On an assembly basis, however, the metal SFR discharge has a lower decay heat than an equivalent oxide SFR assembly for similar minor actinide consumptions (∼160 kg/EFPY.) Another disadvantage in the oxide PUREX reprocessing scenario is that there is no consumption of americium and curium, since PUREX reprocessing separates these minor actinides (MA) and requires them to be disposed of externally

  18. Improving nuclear safety at international research reactors: The Integrated Research Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (IRRSEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David; Newton, Douglas; Connery, Joyce

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear energy continues to play a major role in the world's energy economy. Research and test reactors are an important component of a nation's nuclear power infrastructure as they provide training, experiments and operating experience vital to developing and sustaining the industry. Indeed, nations with aspirations for nuclear power development usually begin their programs with a research reactor program. Research reactors also are vital to international science and technology development. It is important to keep them safe from both accident and sabotage, not only because of our obligation to prevent human and environmental consequence but also to prevent corresponding damage to science and industry. For example, an incident at a research reactor could cause a political and public backlash that would do irreparable harm to national nuclear programs. Following the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, considerable efforts and resources were committed to improving the safety posture of the world's nuclear power plants. Unsafe operation of research reactors will have an amplifying effect throughout a country or region's entire nuclear programs due to political, economic and nuclear infrastructure consequences. (author)

  19. Behaviour of heavy metals during the thermal conversion of sawdust in an entrained flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klensch, S.; Reimert, R. [Engler-Bunte-Inst., Bereich Gas, Erdoel und Kohle, Univ. Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Since its utilization is nearly CO{sub 2}-neutral, biomass represents a major alternative energy carrier in comparison with fossil fuels in CO{sub 2} reduction scenarios frequently discussed. Decentral generation of power and heat in medium sized plants could develop as a preferred application in future. During thermal conversion (gasification and combustion) of biomass the inorganic matter including the heavy metals will be found in the solid residues, i. e. slags and ashes, and in very low concentrations in the product gas (fuel or flue gas). The ashes should be returned to the forests and the agricultural areas respectively to avoid the use of industrial fertilizers. However, for this purpose the heavy metal concentrations of ashes may not exceed specific limit values, otherwise the returned ashes can lead to harmful effects on the ecological system. In awareness of this problem, in Austria some limit values for the concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in returned ashes are valid since 1997. No danger for the environment can be expected by slags containing heavy metals. The heavy metals are fixed environmentally neutral in the glass matrix as has been proven for coal and for residue gasification many times. Dividing the total of the residues into such two streams (returned ash and slag) avoids the disposal of the ashes. The heavy metal behaviour during the thermal conversion of sawdust was investigated in a bench scale plant. In essence, the plant consists of an entrained flow reactor (length of reaction zone: 2,500 mm; inner diameter: 70 mm) and a candle barrier filter with 6 rigid ceramic filter elements (DIA-Schumalith 10-20). The biomass flow rate is as high as 6 kg/h and the operating pressure is about 0.12 MPa. Experimental results show the influences of the conversion temperature (1100 - 1300 C), of the dedusting temperature (350 - 800 C), and of the gas atmosphere (reducing, oxidising) on the heavy metal concentrations of the slag and of the fly

  20. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Biochemical Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzullo, Leslie [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion Platform Review meeting.

  1. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review. Thermochemical Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabowski, Paul E. [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Thermochemical Conversion Platform Review meeting.

  2. Comparative analysis of power conversion cycles optimized for fast reactors of generation IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Pichel, G. D.

    2011-01-01

    For the study, which is presented here, has been chosen as the specific parameters of each reactor, which are today the three largest projects within generation IV technology development: ESFR for the reactor's sodium, LEADER for the lead reactor's and finally, GoFastR in the case of reactor gas-cooled.

  3. Selection and benchmarking of computer codes for research reactor core conversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Emin [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Jones, Barclay G [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of IL at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1983-09-01

    A group of computer codes have been selected and obtained from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank in France for the core conversion study of highly enriched research reactors. ANISN, WIMSD-4, MC{sup 2}, COBRA-3M, FEVER, THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR were selected for the study. For the final work THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR have been selected and used. A one dimensional thermal hydraulics code also has been used to calculate temperature distributions in the core. THERMOS and CINDER have been modified to serve the purpose. Minor modifications have been made to GAM-2 and EXTERMINATOR to improve their utilization. All of the codes have been debugged on both CDC and IBM computers at the University of IL. IAEA 10 MW Benchmark problem has been solved. Results of this work has been compared with the IAEA contributor's results. Agreement is very good for highly enriched fuel (HEU). Deviations from IAEA contributor's mean value for low enriched fuel (LEU) exist but they are small enough in general. Deviation of k{sub eff} is about 0.5% for both enrichments at the beginning of life (BOL) and at the end of life (EOL). Flux ratios deviate only about 1.5% from IAEA contributor's mean value. (author)

  4. Neutronics Conversion Analyses of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Calzavara, Y. [Inst. Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (France)

    2014-09-30

    The following report describes the neutronics results obtained with the MCNP model of the RHF U7Mo LEU reference design that has been established in 2010 during the feasibility analysis. This work constitutes a complete and detailed neutronics analysis of that LEU design using models that have been significantly improved since 2010 and the release of the feasibility report. When possible, the credibility of the neutronics model is tested by comparing the HEU model results with experimental data or other codes calculations results. The results obtained with the LEU model are systematically compared to the HEU model. The changes applied to the neutronics model lead to better comparisons with experimental data or improved the calculation efficiency but do not challenge the conclusion of the feasibility analysis. If the U7Mo fuel is commercially available, not cost prohibitive, a back-end solution is established and if it is possible to manufacture the proposed element, neutronics analyses show that the performance of the reactor would not be challenged by the conversion to LEU fuel.

  5. Selection and benchmarking of computer codes for research reactor core conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Emin; Jones, Barclay G.

    1983-01-01

    A group of computer codes have been selected and obtained from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank in France for the core conversion study of highly enriched research reactors. ANISN, WIMSD-4, MC 2 , COBRA-3M, FEVER, THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR were selected for the study. For the final work THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR have been selected and used. A one dimensional thermal hydraulics code also has been used to calculate temperature distributions in the core. THERMOS and CINDER have been modified to serve the purpose. Minor modifications have been made to GAM-2 and EXTERMINATOR to improve their utilization. All of the codes have been debugged on both CDC and IBM computers at the University of IL. IAEA 10 MW Benchmark problem has been solved. Results of this work has been compared with the IAEA contributor's results. Agreement is very good for highly enriched fuel (HEU). Deviations from IAEA contributor's mean value for low enriched fuel (LEU) exist but they are small enough in general. Deviation of k eff is about 0.5% for both enrichments at the beginning of life (BOL) and at the end of life (EOL). Flux ratios deviate only about 1.5% from IAEA contributor's mean value. (author)

  6. Selection and benchmarking of computer codes for research reactor core conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, E.; Jones, B.G.

    1983-01-01

    A group of computer codes have been selected and obtained from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank in France for the core conversion study of highly enriched research reactors. ANISN, WIMSD-4, MC 2 , COBRA-3M, FEVER, THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR were selected for the study. For the final work THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR have been selected and used. A one dimensional thermal hydraulics code also has been used to calculate temperature distributions in the core. THERMOS and CINDER have been modified to serve the purpose. Minor modifications have been made to GAM-2 and EXTERMINATOR to improve their utilization. All of the codes have been debugged on both CDC and IBM computers at the University of Illinois. IAEA 10 MW Benchmark problem has been solved. Results of this work has been compared with the IAEA contributor's results. Agreement is very good for highly enriched fuel (HEU). Deviations from IAEA contributor's mean value for low enriched fuel (LEU) exist but they are small enough in general

  7. Supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power conversion cycle for battery optimized reactor integral system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. W.; Kim, N. H.; Suh, K. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO 2 ) promises a high power conversion efficiency of the recompression Brayton cycle due to its excellent compressibility reducing the compression work at the bottom of the cycle and to a higher density than helium or steam decreasing the component size. The SCO 2 Brayton cycle efficiency as high as 45% furnishes small sized nuclear reactors with economical benefits on the plant construction and maintenance. A 23 MWth lead-cooled Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System (BORIS) is being developed as an ultra-long-life, versatile-purpose, fast-spectrum reactor. BORIS is coupled to the SCO 2 Brayton cycle needing less room relative to the Rankine steam cycle because of its smaller components. The SCO 2 Brayton cycle of BORIS consists of a 16 MW turbine, a 32 MW high temperature recuperator, a 14 MW low temperature recuperator, an 11 MW precooler and 2 and 2.8 MW compressors. Entering six heat exchangers between primary and secondary system at 19.9 MPa and 663 K, the SCO 2 leaves the heat exchangers at 19.9 MPa and 823 K. The promising secondary system efficiency of 45% was calculated by a theoretical method in which the main parameters include pressure, temperature, heater power, the turbine's, recuperators' and compressors' efficiencies, and the flow split ratio of SCO 2 going out from the low temperature recuperator. Development of Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System (MOBIS) is being devised as the SCO 2 Brayton cycle energy conversion cycle for BORIS. MOBIS consists of Loop Operating Brayton Optimization Study (LOBOS) for experimental Brayton cycle loop and Gas Advanced Turbine Operation Study (GATOS) for the SCO 2 turbine. Liquid-metal Energy Exchanger Integral System (LEXIS) serves to couple BORIS and MOBIS. LEXIS comprises Physical Aspect Thermal Operation System (PATOS) for SCO 2 thermal hydraulic characteristics, Shell-and-tube Overall Layout Optimization Study (SOLOS) for shell-and-tube heat exchanger, Printed

  8. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  9. Design study on evaluation for power conversion system concepts in high temperature gas cooled reactor with gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minatsuki, Isao; Mizokami, Yorikata

    2007-01-01

    The design studies on High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor with Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) have been performed, which were mainly promoted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and supported by fabricators in Japan. HTGR-GT plant feature is almost determined by selection of power conversion system concepts. Therefore, plant design philosophy is observed characteristically in selection of them. This paper describes the evaluation and analysis of the essential concepts of the HTGR-GT power conversion system through the investigations based on our experiences and engineering knowledge as a fabricator. As a result, the following concepts were evaluated that have advantages against other competitive one, such as the horizontal turbo machine rotor, the turbo machine in an individual vessel, the turbo machine with single shaft, the generator inside the power conversion vessel, and the power conversion system cycle with an intercooler. The results of the study can contribute as reference data when the concepts will be selected. Furthermore, we addressed reasonableness about the concept selection of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor GTHTR300 power conversion system, which has been promoted by JAEA. As a conclusion, we recognized the GTHTR300 would be one of the most promising concepts for commercialization in near future. (author)

  10. Consequences of the conversion of research reactor cores on experimental facilities at the example of a cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Goebs, H.; Stroemich, A.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences for and specifically the potential reduction of the performance of research reactors have been in discussions very often within the last five years as one of the draw-backs which has to be paid for the reduction of the proliferation risk at research reactor plants. Up to now and up to our knowledge the available results are restricted to unperturbated fluxes. Thus, this contribution makes the attempt to demonstrate the consequence of core conversion on an example of a real experimental facility and - at the same time - on one that is going to be used in the next decade a lot, i.e. a cold neutron source (CNS). (author)

  11. EBR-2 [Experimental Breeder Reactor-2], IFR [Integral Fast Reactor] prototype testing programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Sackett, J.I.; Lindsay, R.W.; Planchon, H.P.; Lambert, J.D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) is a sodium cooled power reactor supplying about 20 MWe to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) grid and, in addition, is the key component in the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). EBR-2's testing capability is extensive and has seen four major phases: (1) demonstration of LMFBR power plant feasibility, (2) irradiation testing for fuel and material development. (3) testing the off-normal performance of fuel and plant systems and (4) operation as the IFR prototype, developing and demonstrating the IFR technology associated with fuel and plant design. Specific programs being carried out in support of the IFR include advanced fuels and materials development and component testing. This paper discusses EBR-2 as the IFR prototype and the associated testing programs. 29 refs

  12. In-core fuel management programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In response to the interest shown by Member States, the IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme to develop and make available in the open domain a set of programs to perform in-core fuel management calculations. This report summarizes the work performed in the context of the CRP. As a result of this programme, complete in-core fuel management packages for three types of reactors, namely PWR's, BWR's and PHWR are now available from the NEA Data Bank. For some reactor types, these program packages are available with three levels of sophistication ranging from simple methods for educational purposes to more comprehensive methods that can be used for reactor design and operation. In addition some operating data have been compiled to allow code validation. (author)

  13. EBR-2 [Experimental Breeder Reactor-2] test programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lehto, W.K.; Lindsay, R.W.; Planchon, H.P.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Hill, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) is a sodium cooled power reactor supplying about 20 MWe to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) grid and, in addition, is the key component in the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). EBR-2's testing capability is extensive and has seen four major phases: (1) demonstration of LMFBR power plant feasibility, (2) irradiation testing for fuel and material development, (3) testing the off-normal performance of fuel and plant systems and (4) operation as the IFR prototype, developing and demonstrating the IFR technology associated with fuel and plant design. Specific programs being carried out in support of the IFR include advanced fuels and materials development, advanced control system development, plant diagnostics development and component testing. This paper discusses EBR-2 as the IFR prototype and the associated testing programs. 29 refs

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Monthly Activities Report for August 1966 AEC Division of Reactor Development and Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SL Fawcett

    1966-08-01

    This report has the following sections: Summary; Civilian Power Reactors; Applied and Reactor Physics; Reactor Fuels and Materials; Engineering Development; Plutonium Recycle Program; and Nuclear Safety.

  15. Inspection program for U.S. research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an established program for inspection of nuclear research reactors to ensure that systems and techniques are in accordance with regulatory requirements and to provide protection for the health and safety of the public. The inspection program, implemented from the time a facility gets licensed, remains in effect through operations, shutdown, decommissioning, and until the license is terminated. The program establishes inspection methodology for operating, safeguards, and decommissioning activities. Using a performance- based approach, inspectors focus their attention on activities important to safety. Inspection procedures allow the inspectors to assess facility safety and compliance to applicable requirements. A well designed inspection program is an integral part of the mechanism to ensure that the level of performance in the strategic areas of reactor safety, radiation safety, and safeguards is acceptable and provides adequate protection of public health and safety. (author)

  16. US Advanced Light Water Reactor Program; overall objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, N.

    1989-01-01

    The overall objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) program is to perform coordinated programs of the nuclear industry and DOE to insure the availability of licensed, improved, and simplified light water reactor standard plant designs that may be ordered in the 1990's to help meet the US electrical power demand. The discussion includes plans to meet program objectives and the design certification program. DOE is currently supporting the development of conceptual designs, configurations, arrangements, construction methods/plans, and proof test key design features for the General Electric ASBWR and the Westinghouse AP600. Key features of each are summarized. Principal milestones related to licensing of large standard plants, simplified mid-size plant development, and plant lifetime improvement are noted

  17. Fusion Reactor Safety Research Program annual report, FY-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the program is the development, coordination, and execution of activities related to magnetic fusion devices and reactors that will: (a) identify and evaluate potential hazards, (b) assess and disclose potential environmental impacts, and (c) develop design standards and criteria that eliminate, mitigate, or reduce those hazards and impacts. The program will provide a sound basis for licensing fusion reactors. Included in this report are portions of four reports from two outside contractors, discussions of the several areas in which EG and G Idaho is conducting research activities, a discussion of proposed program plan development, mention of special tasks, a review of fusion technology program coordination by EG and G with other laboratories, and a brief view of proposed FY-80 activities

  18. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1991. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R ampersand D

  19. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1992. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

  20. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, J.J.

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1994. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: metal fuel performance; pyroprocess development; safety experiments and analyses; core design development; fuel cycle demonstration; and LMR technology R ampersand D

  1. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1993. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R and D.

  2. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1993. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R and D

  3. Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasiguti, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors is described based on the report to the Nuclear Fusion Council, the project research program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, and other official documents. The alloy development for the first wall and its radiation damage are the main topics discussed in this paper. Materials viewpoints for the Japanese Tokamak facilities and the problems of irradiation facilities are also discussed. (orig.)

  4. Gas-cooled reactor programs. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report, December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Sanders, J.P.

    1984-06-01

    ORNL continues to make significant contributions to the national program. In the HTR fuels area, we are providing detailed statistical information on the fission product retention performance of irradiated fuel. Our studies are also providing basic data on the mechanical, physical, and chemical behavior of HTR materials, including metals, ceramics, graphite, and concrete. The ORNL has an important role in the development of improved HTR graphites and in the specification of criteria that need to be met by commercial products. We are also developing improved reactor physics design methods. Our work in component development and testing centers in the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL), which is being used to evaluate the performance of the HTR core support structure. Other work includes experimental evaluation of the shielding effectiveness of the lower portions of an HTR core. This evaluation is being performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. Researchers at ORNL are developing welding techniques for attaching steam generator tubing to the tubesheets and are testing ceramic pads on which the core posts rest. They are also performing extensive testing of aggregate materials obtained from potential HTR site areas for possible use in prestressed concrete reactor vessels. During the past year we continued to serve as a peer reviewer of small modular reactor designs being developed by GA and GE with balance-of-plant layouts being developed by Bechtel Group, Inc. We have also evaluated the national need for developing HTRs with emphasis on the longer term applications of the HTRs to fossil conversion processes

  5. Gas-cooled reactor programs. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report, December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Sanders, J.P.

    1984-06-01

    ORNL continues to make significant contributions to the national program. In the HTR fuels area, we are providing detailed statistical information on the fission product retention performance of irradiated fuel. Our studies are also providing basic data on the mechanical, physical, and chemical behavior of HTR materials, including metals, ceramics, graphite, and concrete. The ORNL has an important role in the development of improved HTR graphites and in the specification of criteria that need to be met by commercial products. We are also developing improved reactor physics design methods. Our work in component development and testing centers in the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL), which is being used to evaluate the performance of the HTR core support structure. Other work includes experimental evaluation of the shielding effectiveness of the lower portions of an HTR core. This evaluation is being performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. Researchers at ORNL are developing welding techniques for attaching steam generator tubing to the tubesheets and are testing ceramic pads on which the core posts rest. They are also performing extensive testing of aggregate materials obtained from potential HTR site areas for possible use in prestressed concrete reactor vessels. During the past year we continued to serve as a peer reviewer of small modular reactor designs being developed by GA and GE with balance-of-plant layouts being developed by Bechtel Group, Inc. We have also evaluated the national need for developing HTRs with emphasis on the longer term applications of the HTRs to fossil conversion processes.

  6. Users guide to the computer program FURST (FUture Reactor STrategies)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, H.

    1981-01-01

    A program has been written to calculate the future resource requirements for the nuclear portion of an electricity generating system. Starting from a given total energy demand projection the program calculates the required growth of the electrical generating system, the total nuclear system, and the portion provided by reactors using an advanced fuel cycle by successive application of the Fisher/Pry penetration formula. Several options are available. These include the ability to (1) change the growth rates of any part of the system; (2) change the characteristics of the reactors; (3) include the effects of decommissioning reactors at the end of their design lifetimes; (4) vary the date of introduction of advanced reactors; and (5) limit the amount of natural uranium available annually. The output gives the history of the growth of the nuclear system and the uranium mining and fuel reprocessing requirements. The output can be obtained either as tables of numbers or graphs with crossplots to compare reactor systems or total energy scenarios. (author)

  7. Solar Program Assessment: Environmental Factors - Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This report presents the environmental problems which may arise with the further development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, one of the eight Federally-funded solar technologies. To provide a background for this environmental analysis, the history and basic concepts of the technology are reviewed, as are its economic and resource requirements.…

  8. Feasibility study for LEU conversion of the WWR-K reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kazakhstan using a 5-tube fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Liaw, J.R.; Matos, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    A feasibility study by the RERTR program for possible LEU conversion of the 6 MW WWR-K reactor concludes that conversion is feasible using an LEU 5-tube Russian fuel assembly design. This 5-tube design is one of several LEU fuel assembly designs being studied (Ref. 1) for possible use in this reactor. The 5-tube assembly contains 200 g 235 U with an enrichment of 19.7% in four cylindrical inner tubes and an outer hexagonal tube with the same external dimensions as the current HEU (36%) 5-tube fuel assembly, which contains 112.5 g 235 U. The fuel meat material, LEU UO 2 -Al dispersion fuel with ∼ 2.5 g U/cm 3 , has been extensively irradiation tested in a number of reactors with uranium enrichments of 36% and 19.7%. Since the 235 U loading of the LEU assemblies is much larger than the HEU assemblies, a smaller LEU core with five rows of fuel assemblies is possible (instead of six rows of fuel assemblies in the HEU core). This smaller LEU core would consume about 60% as many fuel assemblies per year as the current HEU core and provide thermal neutron fluxes in the inner irradiation channels that are ∼ 17% larger than with the present HEU core. The current 21 day cycle length would be maintained and the average discharge burnup would be ∼ 42%. Neutron fluxes in the five outer irradiation channels would be smaller in the LEU core unless these channels can be moved closer to the LEU fuel assemblies. Results show that the smaller LEU core would meet the reactor's shutdown margin requirements and would have an adequate thermal-hydraulic safety margin to onset of nucleate boiling. (author)

  9. Assessment of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.D.; Saari, L.M.; White, A.S.; Geisendorfer, C.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    This report assesses the job-relatedness of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators. The approach used involved systematically comparing the curriculum of specialized educational programs for college credit, to academic knowledge identified as necessary for carrying out the jobs of licenses reactor operators. A sample of eight programs, including A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework programs were studied. Subject matter experts in the field of nuclear operations curriculum and training determined the extent to which individual program curricula covered the identified job-related academic knowledge. The major conclusions of the report are: There is a great deal of variation among individual programs, ranging from coverage of 15% to 65% of the job-related academic knowledge. Four schools cover at least half, and four schools cover less than one-third of this knowledge content; There is no systematic difference in the job-relatedness of the different types of specialized educational programs, A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework; and Traditional B.S. degree programs in nuclear engineering cover as much job-related knowledge (about one-half of this knowledge content) as most of the specialized educational programs

  10. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.; Hoshi, T.; Ohnishi, N.; Fujishiro, T.; Inabe, T.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental research program, named Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) Program, has been progressing in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using a modified TRIGA-ACPR. This paper is prepared to describe the outline of the NSRR program. The purpose of the NSRR program is to examine the behaviors of fuel rods under various accidental conditions of power reactors so as to establish realistic safety criteria and to develop analytical models for prediction of fuel failures. We expect to contribute finally to the improvement of reactor design and fuel fabrication techniques based on these experimental results. The NSRR experiments will be performed in the large central experimental tube, which is one of the most excellent features of this reactor, using specially designed capsules or loops which can accommodate up to 49 BWR type test fuels. Many types of test fuels in various conditions will be examined by the NSRR program, such as BWR, PWR and FBR type fuels from the beginning of life to the end of life with and without simulated reactor internal structures. The experiments will be continued for more than 10 years divided into three phases. The first phase of the program will be devoted to the experiments pertaining to reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). In these experiments we will make use of the excellent pulsing capability of ACPR, which is expected to generate 100 MW-sec prompt energy release with 1.3 msec of minimum reactor period by 4.7 dollar reactivity insertion and to yield more than 280 cal/g-UO 2 heat deposit even in an approximately 10% enriched BWR type test fuel. (280 cal/g-UO 2 is believed enough heat deposit to cause fuel failure.) In general, heat flow behaviors from fuel meat to clad and from clad to coolant are very complex phenomena, but they are the key point in analyzing transient response of fuels. In the sudden heat transient conditions brought by pulsing, however, it will be possible to examine each phenomenon separately

  11. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, M; Hoshi, T; Ohnishi, N; Fujishiro, T; Inabe, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    1974-07-01

    An experimental research program, named Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) Program, has been progressing in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using a modified TRIGA-ACPR. This paper is prepared to describe the outline of the NSRR program. The purpose of the NSRR program is to examine the behaviors of fuel rods under various accidental conditions of power reactors so as to establish realistic safety criteria and to develop analytical models for prediction of fuel failures. We expect to contribute finally to the improvement of reactor design and fuel fabrication techniques based on these experimental results. The NSRR experiments will be performed in the large central experimental tube, which is one of the most excellent features of this reactor, using specially designed capsules or loops which can accommodate up to 49 BWR type test fuels. Many types of test fuels in various conditions will be examined by the NSRR program, such as BWR, PWR and FBR type fuels from the beginning of life to the end of life with and without simulated reactor internal structures. The experiments will be continued for more than 10 years divided into three phases. The first phase of the program will be devoted to the experiments pertaining to reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). In these experiments we will make use of the excellent pulsing capability of ACPR, which is expected to generate 100 MW-sec prompt energy release with 1.3 msec of minimum reactor period by 4.7 dollar reactivity insertion and to yield more than 280 cal/g-UO{sub 2} heat deposit even in an approximately 10% enriched BWR type test fuel. (280 cal/g-UO{sub 2} is believed enough heat deposit to cause fuel failure.) In general, heat flow behaviors from fuel meat to clad and from clad to coolant are very complex phenomena, but they are the key point in analyzing transient response of fuels. In the sudden heat transient conditions brought by pulsing, however, it will be possible to examine each phenomenon

  12. Critical heat flux experiments for high conversion light water reactor, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Suemura, Takayuki; Hiraga, Fujio; Murao, Yoshio

    1990-03-01

    As a part of the thermal-hydraulic feasibility study of a high conversion light water reactor (HCLWR), critical heat flux (CHF) experiments were performed using triangular array rod bundles under steady-state and flow reduction transient conditions. The geometries of test sections were: rod outer diameter 9.5 mm, number of rods 4∼7, heated length 0.5∼1.0 m, and pitch to diameter ratio (P/D) 1.126∼1.2. The simulated fuel rod was a stainless steel tube and uniformly heated electrically with direct current. In the steady-state tests, pressures ranged: 1.0∼3.9 Mpa, mass velocities: 460∼4270 kg/s·m 2 , and exit qualities: 0.02∼0.35. In the transient tests, the times to CHF detection ranged from 0.5 to 25.4 s. The steady-state CHF's for the 4-rod test sections were higher than those for the 7-rod test sections with respect to the bundle averaged flow conditions. The measured CHF's increased with decreasing the heated length and decreased with decreasing the P/D. Based on the local flow conditions obtained with the subchannel analysis code COBRA-IV-I, KfK correlation agreed with the CHF data within 20 %, while WSC-2, EPRI-B and W, EPRI-Columbia and Kattor correlations failed to give satisfactory agreements. Under flow reduction rates less than 6 %/s, no significant difference in the onset conditions of DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) was recognized between the steady-state and transient conditions. At flow reduction rates higher than 6 %/s, on the other hand, the DNB occurred earlier than the DNB time predicted with the steady-state experiments. (author)

  13. Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

    2012-09-30

    Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

  14. Towards the reanalysis of void coefficients measurements at proteus for high conversion light water reactor lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hursin, M.; Koeberl, O.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    High Conversion Light Water Reactors (HCLWR) allows a better usage of fuel resources thanks to a higher breeding ratio than standard LWR. Their uses together with the current fleet of LWR constitute a fuel cycle thoroughly studied in Japan and the US today. However, one of the issues related to HCLWR is their void reactivity coefficient (VRC), which can be positive. Accurate predictions of void reactivity coefficient in HCLWR conditions and their comparisons with representative experiments are therefore required. In this paper an inter comparison of modern codes and cross-section libraries is performed for a former Benchmark on Void Reactivity Effect in PWRs conducted by the OECD/NEA. It shows an overview of the k-inf values and their associated VRC obtained for infinite lattice calculations with UO{sub 2} and highly enriched MOX fuel cells. The codes MCNPX2.5, TRIPOLI4.4 and CASMO-5 in conjunction with the libraries ENDF/B-VI.8, -VII.0, JEF-2.2 and JEFF-3.1 are used. A non-negligible spread of results for voided conditions is found for the high content MOX fuel. The spread of eigenvalues for the moderated and voided UO{sub 2} fuel are about 200 pcm and 700 pcm, respectively. The standard deviation for the VRCs for the UO{sub 2} fuel is about 0.7% while the one for the MOX fuel is about 13%. This work shows that an appropriate treatment of the unresolved resonance energy range is an important issue for the accurate determination of the void reactivity effect for HCLWR. A comparison to experimental results is needed to resolve the presented discrepancies. (authors)

  15. Status of Away From Reactor spent fuel storage program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.D.

    1979-07-01

    The Away From Reactor (AFR) Spent Fuel Program that the US Department of Energy established in 1977 is intended to preclude the shutting down of commercial nuclear power reactors because of lack of storage space for spent fuel. Legislation now being considered by Congress includes plans to provide storage space for commercial spent fuel beginning in 1983. Utilities are being encouraged to provide as much storage space as possible in their existing storage facilities, but projections indicate that a significant amount of AFR storage will be required. The government is evaluating the use of both existing and new storage facilities to solve this forecasted storage problem for commercial spent fuel

  16. Ageing management program for reactor components in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yeong-Garp; Wu, Sang-Ik; Lee, Jung-Hee; Ryu, Jeong-Soo; Park, Yong-Chul; Wu, Jong-Sup; Jun, Byung Jin

    2003-01-01

    The HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor of 30MWth power in Korea, has operated for 8 years since its initial criticality in February of 1995. The reactor power has been gradually increased to 24 MWth through the service period. Therefore the reactor age is very young from the viewpoint of the ageing effect on the reactor structure and components by neutron irradiation considering the expected reactor lifetime. But, we have a few programs to manage the ageing from the aspect of design lifetime of reactor components. This paper summarizes the overall progress and plan for the ageing management for the reactor components including lifetime extension and design improvement, remote measurements and in-service inspections. The shutoff units and control absorber units have aged more rapidly than other structures or components because the number of rod drop cycles was higher than expected at the design stage. The system commissioning tests, periodic performance tests, and weekly operation for the stable supply of medical radioisotopes overriding the normal cycle operation have contributed to the high frequency of rod drop. Therefore, we have instituted a program to extend the lifetime of the shutoff units and the control absorber units. This program includes an endurance test to verify the performance for the extended number of drops and the management of shutdown methods to minimize the drop cycles for both the shutoff units and the control absorber units. The program also includes the design improvement of the damper mechanism of the control absorber units to reduce the impact force caused by rod drop. The inner shell of the reflector vessel surrounding the core is the most critical part from the viewpoint of neutron irradiation. The periodic measurement of the dimensional change in the vertical straightness of the inner shell is considered as one of the in-service inspections. We developed a few tools and verified the performance to measure the

  17. Adoption of nitrogen power conversion system for small scale ultra-long cycle fast reactor eliminating intermediate sodium loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • N 2 power conversion system for both safety and thermal performance aspects. • Sensitivity studies of several controlled parameters on N 2 power conversion system. • The elimination of the intermediate loop increased the cycle thermal efficiency. • The elimination of the intermediate loop expects economic advantages. - Abstract: As one of SFRs, the ultra-long cycle fast reactor with a power rating of 100 MW e (UCFR-100) was introduced for a 60-year operation. As an alternative to the traditional steam Rankine cycle for the power conversion system, gas based Brayton cycle has been considered for UCFR-100. Among Supercritical CO 2 (S-CO 2 ), Helium (He), Nitrogen (N 2 ) as candidates for the power conversion system for UCFR-100, an N 2 power conversion system was chosen considering both safety and thermal performance aspects. The elimination of the intermediate sodium loop could be achieved due to the safety and stable characteristics of nitrogen working fluid. In this paper, sensitivity studies with respect to several controlled parameters on N 2 power conversion system were performed to optimize the system. Furthermore, the elimination of the intermediate loop was evaluated with respect to its impact on the thermodynamic performance and other aspects.

  18. Evaluation for reasonableness of power conversion system concepts in the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minatsuki, I.; Mizokami, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual design study for the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300) was completed in 2004. In GTHTR300, SECO (Simple, Economical Competitiveness and Originality) is advocated as design philosophy in order to minimize technical and economical requirement. Furthermore the design of the GTHTR300 was developed with reflecting various view points from utilities, manufacturers and research organizations. In GTHTR300, the horizontal turbo machine rotor, the turbo machine in a separated vessel, the turbo machine with single rotor, the generator inside the power conversion vessel, and the power conversion system without inter-coolers were selected as major power conversion system concepts. This paper describes the investigation and analysis about the major concepts of GTHTR300 power conversion system in order to evaluate reasonableness of GTHTR300 design approach and acceptability with using experience and engineering knowledge of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., which were accumulated through the activities of HTGR-GT and HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) designing, manufacturing, fabricating and testing. From the result of the evaluation, it was concluded that the selection of each concept in GTHTR300 was reasonable as based on the original design philosophy SECO. As a conclusion, we expect the GTHTR300 to become one of the most promising concepts for commercialization in near future. (authors)

  19. Expert system for control rod programming of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzaki, T.; Yoshida, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Matsuura, H.; Hoshi, K.

    1986-01-01

    Control rod programming, one of the main tasks in reactor core management of boiling water reactors (BWRs), can be successfully accomplished by well-experienced engineers. By use of core performance evaluation codes, their knowledge plays the main role in searching through optimal control rod patterns and exposure points for adjusting notch positions and exchanging rod patterns. An expert system has been developed, based on a method of knowledge engineering, to lighten the engineer's load in control rod programming. This system utilizes an inference engine suited for planning/designing problems, and stores the knowledge of well-experienced engineers in its knowledge base. In this report, the inference engine, developed considering the characteristics of the control rod programming, is introduced. Then the constitution and function of the expert system are discussed

  20. A design study of reactor core optimization for direct nuclear heat-to-electricity conversion in a space power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Takeoka, Satoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Nakagawa, Masayuki; Kugo, Teruhiko

    1998-01-01

    To propose a new design concept of a nuclear reactor used in the space, research has been conducted on the conceptual design of a new nuclear reactor on the basis of the following three main concepts: (1) Thermionic generation by thermionic fuel elements (TFE), (2) reactivity control by rotary reflector, and (3) reactor cooling by liquid metal. The outcomes of the research are: (1) A calculation algorithm was derived for obtaining convergent conditions by repeating nuclear characteristic calculation and thermal flow characteristic calculation for the space nuclear reactor. (2) Use of this algorithm and the parametric study established that a space nuclear reactor using 97% enriched uranium nitride as the fuel and lithium as the coolant and having a core with a radius of about 25 cm, a height of about 50 cm and a generation efficiency of about 7% can probably be operated continuously for at least more than ten years at 100 kW only by reactivity control by rotary reflector. (3) A new CAD/CAE system was developed to assist design work to optimize the core characteristics of the space nuclear reactor comprehensively. It is composed of the integrated design support system VINDS using virtual reality and the distributed system WINDS to collaboratively support design work using Internet. (N.H.)

  1. A quality assurance program for nuclear power reactor materials tests at the Ford nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Michigan Nuclear Reactor Laboratory Quality Assurance Program has been established to assure that materials testing services provided to electric utilities produce accurate results in accordance with industry standards, sound engineering practice, and customer requirements. The program was prepared to comply with applicable requirements of 10CFR50, Appendix B, of the Code of Federal Regulations and a standard of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), N45.2. The paper discusses the quality assurance program applicability, organization, qualification and training of personnel, material identification and control, examination and testing, measuring and test equipment, nonconforming test equipment, records, audits, and distribution

  2. The reactor engineer program: creating a new workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, R.

    1993-01-01

    As the number of nuclear engineering schools continues to shrink across the U.S., talented professional engineers for the nuclear energy community must increasingly be found elsewhere. To meet its needs, therefore, the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) established an Intern Program to bring new talent into the NRC. The two-year program includes 17 weeks of technical training, and 4 or 5 rotational assignments, including at least 4 months at a commercial nuclear power plant site. The key to the success of the program is the full support of NRR high-level management

  3. Development of conversion programs for formats of thermodynamic databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yasushi; Yui, Mikazu

    2003-02-01

    Programs which enable to convert the database format from PHREEQE code to PHREEQC, EQ3/6 and Geochemist's Workbench code were developed and quality of these programs was checked. As a result, it was confirmed that these programs converted the database format correctly except for specific conditions which lead errors. (author)

  4. Space reactor system and subsystem investigations: assessment of technology issues for the reactor and shield subsystem. SP-100 Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, D.F.; Lillie, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    As part of Rockwell's effort on the SP-100 Program, preliminary assessment has been completed of current nuclear technology as it relates to candidate reactor/shield subsystems for the SP-100 Program. The scope of the assessment was confined to the nuclear package (to the reactor and shield subsystems). The nine generic reactor subsystems presented in Rockwell's Subsystem Technology Assessment Report, ESG-DOE-13398, were addressed for the assessment

  5. The reactor physics computer programs in PC's era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nainer, O.; Serghiuta, D.

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of reactor physics analysis is the evaluation of flux and power distribution over the reactor core. For CANDU reactors sophisticated computer programs, such as FMDP and RFSP, were developed 20 years ago for mainframe computers. These programs were adapted to work on workstations with UNIX or DOS, but they lack a feature that could improve their use and that is 'user friendly'. For using these programs the users need to deal with a great amount of information contained in sophisticated files. To modify a model is a great challenge. First of all, it is necessary to bear in mind all the geometrical dimensions and accordingly, to modify the core model to match the new requirements. All this must be done in a line input file. For a DOS platform, using an average performance PC system, could it be possible: to represent and modify all the geometrical and physical parameters in a meaningful way, on screen, using an intuitive graphic user interface; to reduce the real time elapsed in order to perform complex fuel-management analysis 'at home'; to avoid the rewrite of the mainframe version of the program? The author's answer is a fuel-management computer package operating on PC, 3 time faster than on a CDC-Cyber 830 mainframe one (486DX/33MHz/8MbRAM) or 20 time faster (Pentium-PC), respectively. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  6. Training and research reactor facility longevity extension program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriveau, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1943, over 550 training and research reactors have been in operation. According to statistics from the International Atomic Energy Agency, ∼325 training and research reactors are currently in service. This total includes a wide variety of designs covering a range of power and research capabilities located virtually around the world. A program has been established at General Atomics (GA) that is dedicated to the support of extended longevity of training and research reactor facilities. Aspects of this program include the following: (1) new instrumentation and control systems; (2) improved and upgraded nuclear monitoring and control channels; (3) facility testing, repair and upgrade services that include (a) pool or tank integrity, (b) cooling system, and (c) water purification system; (4) fuel element testing procedures and replacement; (5) control rod drive rebuilding and upgrades; (6) control and monitoring system calibration and repair service; (7) training services, including reactor operations, maintenance, instrumentation calibration, and repair; and (8) expanded or new uses such as neutron radiography and autoradiography, isotope production, nuclear medicine, activation analysis, and material properties modification

  7. The Canadian R and D program targeted at CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeck, E.O.

    1988-01-01

    CANDU reactors produce electricity cheaply and reliably, with miniscule risk to the population and minimal impact on the environment. About half of Ontario's electricity and a third of New Brunswick's are generated by CANDU power plants. Hydro Quebec and utilities in Argentina, India, Pakistan, and the Republic of Korea also successfully operate CANDU reactors. Romania will soon join their ranks. The proven record of excellent performance of CANDUs is due in part to the first objective of the vigorous R and D program: namely, to sustain and improve existing CANDU power-plant technology. The second objective is to develop improved nuclear power plants that will remain competitive compared with alternative energy supplies. The third objective is to continue to improve our understanding of the processes underlying reactor safety and develop improved technology to mitigate the consequences of upset conditions. These three objectives are addressed by individual R and D programs in the areas of CANDU fuel channels, reduced operating costs, reduced capital costs, reactor safety research, and IAEA safeguards. The work is carried out mainly at three centres of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited--the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, and the Sheridan Park Engineering Laboratories--and at Ontario Hydro's Research Laboratories. Canadian universities, consultants, manufacturers, and suppliers also provide expertise in their areas of specialization

  8. Program Design of JSON to Structured Data Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Zhongyue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the maturity of structured data storage technology and the increasing demand for enterprise information development, some enterprises need to convert the data storage model of application system from JSON to structured data. A file management system is token as an example to explain how to convert. In this article, it is achieved through the following three parts. First, the structure diagram of data transformation is built. Then, JSON model and structured data model are built. Finally, the conversion of data from JSON to MySQL is realized by using java language.

  9. Influence on moisture and hydrocarbons on conversion rate of tritium in catalytic reactors of fusion-DEMO detritiation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edao, Yuki; Sato, Katsumi; Iwai, Yasunori; Hayashi, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    Thoughtful consideration of abnormal events such as fire is required to design and qualify a detritiation system (DS) of a nuclear fusion facility. Since conversion of tritium to tritiated vapor over catalyst is the key process of the DS, it is indispensable to evaluate the effect of excess moisture and hydrocarbons produced by combustion of cables on tritium conversion rate considering fire events. We conducted demonstration tests on tritium conversion under the following representative conditions: (I) leakage of tritium, (II) leakage of tritium plus moisture, and (III) leakage of tritium plus hydrocarbons. Detritiation behavior in the simulated room was assessed, and the amount of catalyst to fulfill the requirement on tritium conversion rate was evaluated. The dominant parameters for detritiation are the concentration of hydrogen in air and catalyst temperature. The tritium in the simulated room was decreased for condition (I) following ventilation theory. An initial reduction in conversion rate was measured for condition (II). To recover the reduction smoothly, it is suggested to optimize the power of preheater. An increase in catalyst temperature by heat of reaction of hydrocarbon combustion was evaluated for condition (III). The heat balance of catalytic reactor is a point to be carefully investigated to avoid runaway of catalyst temperature. (author)

  10. Computer code qualification program for the Advanced CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.K.; Wren, D.J.; Snell, V.G.; White, A.J.; Boczar, P.G.

    2003-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) has developed and implemented a Software Quality Assurance program (SQA) to ensure that its analytical, scientific and design computer codes meet the required standards for software used in safety analyses. This paper provides an overview of the computer programs used in Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) safety analysis, and assessment of their applicability in the safety analyses of the ACR design. An outline of the incremental validation program, and an overview of the experimental program in support of the code validation are also presented. An outline of the SQA program used to qualify these computer codes is also briefly presented. To provide context to the differences in the SQA with respect to current CANDUs, the paper also provides an overview of the ACR design features that have an impact on the computer code qualification. (author)

  11. Modification of reference temperature program in reactor regulating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sung Sik; Lee, Byung Jin; Kim, Se Chang; Cheong, Jong Sik [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji In; Doo, Jin Yong [Korea Electric Power Cooperation, Yonggwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    In Yonggwang nuclear units 3 and 4 currently under commercial operation, the cold temperature was very close to the technical specification limit of 298 deg C during initial startup testing, which was caused by the higher-than-expected reactor coolant system flow. Accordingly, the reference temperature (Tref) program needed to be revised to allow more flexibility for plant operations. In this study, the method of a specific test performed at Yonggwang nuclear unit 4 to revise the Tref program was described and the test results were discussed. In addition, the modified Tref program was evaluated on its potential impacts on system performance and safety. The methods of changing the Tref program and the associated pressurizer level setpoint program were also explained. Finally, for Ulchin nuclear unit 3 and 4 currently under initial startup testing, the effects of reactor coolant system flow rate on the coolant temperature were evaluated from the thermal hydraulic standpoint and an optimum Tref program was recommended. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  12. Modification of reference temperature program in reactor regulating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sung Sik; Lee, Byung Jin; Kim, Se Chang; Cheong, Jong Sik [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji In; Doo, Jin Yong [Korea Electric Power Cooperation, Yonggwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In Yonggwang nuclear units 3 and 4 currently under commercial operation, the cold temperature was very close to the technical specification limit of 298 deg C during initial startup testing, which was caused by the higher-than-expected reactor coolant system flow. Accordingly, the reference temperature (Tref) program needed to be revised to allow more flexibility for plant operations. In this study, the method of a specific test performed at Yonggwang nuclear unit 4 to revise the Tref program was described and the test results were discussed. In addition, the modified Tref program was evaluated on its potential impacts on system performance and safety. The methods of changing the Tref program and the associated pressurizer level setpoint program were also explained. Finally, for Ulchin nuclear unit 3 and 4 currently under initial startup testing, the effects of reactor coolant system flow rate on the coolant temperature were evaluated from the thermal hydraulic standpoint and an optimum Tref program was recommended. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  13. The analysis of reactor vessel surveillance program data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, E.B.

    1979-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power reactor vessel surveillance programs are provided by the reactor supplier and are designed to meet the requirements of ASTM Method E 185. (3). Each surveillance capsule contains sets of Charpy V-notch (Csub(v)) specimens representing selected materials from the vessel beltline region and some reference steel, tension test specimens machined from selected beltline materials, temperature monitors, and neutron flux dosimeters. Surveillance capsules may also contain fracture mechanics specimens machined from selected vessel beltline materials. The major steps in the conduct of a surveillance program include (1) the testing of the surveillance specimens to determine the exposure conditions at the capsule location and the resulting embrittlement of the vessel steel, (2) the extrapolation of the capsule results to the pressure vessel wall, and (3) the determination of the heatup and cooldown limits for normal, upset, and test operation. This paper will present data obtained from commercial light water reactor surveillance programs to illustrate the methods of analysis currently in use at Southwest Research Institute and to demonstrate some of the limitations imposed by the data available. Details concerning the procedures for testing the surveillance capsule specimens will not be included because they are considered to be outside of the scope of this paper

  14. Evaluation of the performance of high temperature conversion reactors for compound-specific oxygen stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2017-05-01

    In this study conversion conditions for oxygen gas chromatography high temperature conversion (HTC) isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) are characterised using qualitative mass spectrometry (IonTrap). It is shown that physical and chemical properties of a given reactor design impact HTC and thus the ability to accurately measure oxygen isotope ratios. Commercially available and custom-built tube-in-tube reactors were used to elucidate (i) by-product formation (carbon dioxide, water, small organic molecules), (ii) 2nd sources of oxygen (leakage, metal oxides, ceramic material), and (iii) required reactor conditions (conditioning, reduction, stability). The suitability of the available HTC approach for compound-specific isotope analysis of oxygen in volatile organic molecules like methyl tert-butyl ether is assessed. Main problems impeding accurate analysis are non-quantitative HTC and significant carbon dioxide by-product formation. An evaluation strategy combining mass spectrometric analysis of HTC products and IRMS 18 O/ 16 O monitoring for future method development is proposed.

  15. Basic policy of maintenance for the power conversion system of the gas turbine high temperature reactor 300 (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Yan, Xing; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji

    2003-01-01

    Basic policy of maintenance was determined for major equipment in the power conversion system of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300). It was developed based on the current maintenance practice in Light Water Reactors (LWRs), High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and conventional combined cycle power plants while taking into account of unique design features of GTHTR300. First, potential degradation phenomena in operations were identified and corresponding maintenance approaches were proposed for the equipment. Such degradations encountered typically in LWRs as corrosion, erosion and stress corrosion cracking are unlikely to occur since the working fluid of GTHTR300 is inert helium. Main causes of the degradations are high operating temperature and pressure. The gas turbine, compressor, generator, control valves undergo opening and dismantling maintenance in a suitable time interval. The power conversion vessel, heat exchanger vessel, primary system piping and heat exchanging tubes of precooler are subjected to in-service inspections similar to those done in LWRs. As turbine blades represent the severest material degradation because of their high-temperature and high-stress operating conditions, a lifetime management scheme was suggested for them. The longest interval of open-casing maintenance of the gas turbine is estimated to be six to seven years from technical point of view. Present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  16. Neutronic analysis for core conversion (HEU–LEU of the low power research reactor using the MCNP4C code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldawahra Saadou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies for conversion of the fuel from HEU to LEU in the miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR have been performed using the MCNP4C code. The HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched with Al clad and LEU (UO2 12.6% enriched with zircaloy-4 alloy clad cores have been analyzed in this study. The existing HEU core of MNSR was analyzed to validate the neutronic model of reactor, while the LEU core was studied to prove the possibility of fuel conversion of the existing HEU core. The proposed LEU core contained the same number of fuel pins as the HEU core. All other structure materials and dimensions of HEU and LEU cores were the same except the increase in the radius of control rod material from 0.195 to 0.205 cm and keeping the outer diameter of the control rod unchanged in the LEU core. The effective multiplication factor (keff, excess reactivity (ρex, control rod worth (CRW, shutdown margin (SDM, safety reactivity factor (SRF, delayed neutron fraction (βeff and the neutron fluxes in the irradiation tubes for the existing and the potential LEU fuel were investigated. The results showed that the safety parameters and the neutron fluxes in the irradiation tubes of the LEU fuels were in good agreements with the HEU results. Therefore, the LEU fuel was validated to be a suitable choice for fuel conversion of the MNSR in the future.

  17. Nuclear data needs for US fast reactor programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughtry, J.W.; Rawlins, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Recent developments in US Fast Reactor Programs are reviewed to provide a background for the nuclear data needs of these programs. Innovative designs, inherent safety, and space nuclear power are receiving increased emphasis. Longstanding and newly-identified nuclear data requirements are reviewed. These requirements are based on information obtained early in 1985 in response to an inquiry sent out by the authors. Finally, plans are outlined for development of an adjusted cross section set for FFTF reload design. The adjustment process suggests some possible changes in ENDF/B-V nuclear data

  18. Preventive maintenance program for a research and production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rico, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    This program proposes a simple, rapid and efficient methodology for the task of developing a really preventive maintenance discipline. Moreover, the lower cost of its application -since it must satisfy the plant's budget-. To this purpose, an extremely economical and easily obtainable infrastructure is proposed. The following stage is referred to the commissioning system, subsequent supervision and follow-up. The experience gained from the two reactors as RA-6 (Bariloche Atomic Center) and NUR (RAE) of Argelia. Finally, the interacting characteristic of this program, since it may be rapidly adapted to different dimensions of plants, laboratories, etc., must be pointed out. (Author) [es

  19. New initiatives in the U.S. Reactor Inspection Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volgenau, Ernst.

    1977-01-01

    Recently, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has initiated a revised inspection approach that will involve placing inspectors full time onsite at all reactor sites. These resident inspectors will be supplemented by a performance appraisal inspection program that will incorporate thorough critical reviews of licensee facilities and an increased program of specific technical measurements to independently verify the accuracy and completeness of licensee work. To complement the inspection initiatives, the NRC is examining ways to expand its enforcement sanctions and to motivate safe licensee performance. (Auth.) [fr

  20. Treatment of spent fuels from research reactors and reactor development programs in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closs, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    Quite a great number of different types of spent fuel from research reactors and development programs exists in Germany. The general policy is to send back to the USA as long as possible fuel from MTRs and TRIGAs of USA origin. An option is reprocessing in Great Britain or France. This option is pursued as long as reprocessing and reuse of the recovered material is economically justifiable. For those fuels which cannot be returned to the USA or which will not be reprocessed, a domestic back-up solution of spent fuel management has been developed in Germany, compatible with the management of spent fuel from power reactors. It consists in dry storage in special casks and, later on, direct disposal. Preliminary results from experimental R and D investigations with research reactor fuel and experience from LWR fuel lead to the conclusion that the direct disposal option even for research reactor fuel or exotic fuel does not impose major technical difficulties for the German waste management and disposal concept. (author)

  1. Planned Scientific programs around the Triga Mark 2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majah, M Ibn.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear techniques have been introduced to Morocco since the sixties. After the energy crisis of 1973, Morocco decides to create the National Center for Energy Sciences and Nuclear Techniques (CNESTEN) under the supervision of the Ministry of high Education and Research, with a research commercial and support vocation. CNESTEN is in charge of promoting nuclear application, to act as technical support for the authorities and to prepare the technological basis for nuclear power option. In 1998, CNESTEN started the construction of Nuclear Research Centre. The on going activities cover many sectors : earth and environmental sciences, high energy physics, safety and security, waste management. In 2001, CNESTEN started the construction of a 2MW TRiga Mark 2 Reactor, with the possibility to increase the power to 3 MW. The construction was achieved in January 2007. The operation of the reactor is expected for April 2007. The program of the utilization of the reactor was established with th contribution of the university and with the assistance of IAEA. Some of the experimental set-up installed around the reactor have been designed. CNESTEN has developed cooperation with Nuclear research centres from other countries and is receiving visitors and trainees mainly through the IAEA [fr

  2. Criticality safety assessment on the RSG-GAS spent fuel storage for anticipating the next core conversion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Kuntoro, Iman; Zuhair; Liem, Peng Hong

    2003-01-01

    Criticality assessment on the spent fuel storage racks of the RSG-GAS multipurpose reactor has been conducted to support the undergoing core conversion program, in which higher uranium fuel densities of silicide (up to 4.8 gU.cm -3 ) and molybdenum (up to 8.3 gU.cm -3 ) fuel elements are adopted to enhance the reactor performance, core cycle length and reactor utilization. In the assessment, the k eff of the rack as a function of fuel density is calculated for fresh fuel elements which is a very conservative approach recommended by IAEA. Besides fuel densities, effects of water densities due to pool water temperature variation, and the fuel elements' orientation on the k eff are analyzed as well. The criticality calculations are all carried out by using MNCP4B2 Monte Carlo code with ENDF/B-VI library. For the library sensitivity, JENDL-3.3 library is also used and compared. The calculation results show the most reactive condition is for the case when the spent fuel racks are filled with fresh U-6Mo fuel element with meat density of 8.30 gU.cm -3 . For all fuel types, density and operating condition, the calculated k eff with 3 times standard deviations are confirmed less than the allowable value of 0.95. It can be concluded that the existing spent fuel storage racks can be safely used for storing the planned high density uranium fuels. (author)

  3. Theoretical studies aiming at the IEA-R1 reactor core conversion from high U-235 enrichment to low U-235 enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajndlich, R.

    1982-01-01

    The research reactors, of which the fuel elements are of MTR type, functions presently, almost in their majority with high U-235 enrichment. The fear that those fuel elements might generate a considerabLe proliferation of nuclear weapons rendered almost mandatory the conversion of highly enriched fuel elements to a low U-235 enrichment. As the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN is operating with highly enriched fuel elements a study aiming at this conversion was done. The problems related to the conversion and the results obtained, demonstrated the technical viabilty for its realization. (E.G.) [pt

  4. Interactive programs with preschool children bring smiles and conversation to older adults: time-sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Minako

    2013-10-18

    Keeping older adults healthy and active is an emerging challenge of an aging society. Despite the importance of personal relationships to their health and well-being, changes in family structure have resulted in a lower frequency of intergenerational interactions. Limited studies have been conducted to compare different interaction style of intergenerational interaction. The present study aimed to compare the changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation in older adults brought about by a performance-based intergenerational (IG) program and a social-oriented IG program to determine a desirable interaction style for older adults. The subjects of this study were 25 older adults who participated in intergenerational programs with preschool children aged 5 to 6 years at an adult day care centre in Tokyo. We used time sampling to perform a structured observation study. The 25 older participants of intergenerational programs were divided into two groups based on their interaction style: performance-based IG program (children sing songs and dance) and social-oriented IG program (older adults and children play games together). Based on the 5-minute video observation, we compared changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation between the performance-based and social-oriented IG programs. Constructive behaviour and intergenerational conversation were significantly higher in the social-oriented IG programming group than the performance-based IG programming group (pprogramming group than the performance-based IG programming (pprogramming group than the social-oriented IG programming group (pprograms with preschool children brought smiles and conversation to older adults. The social-oriented IG program allowed older adults to play more roles than the performance-based IG program. The intergenerational programs provide opportunities to fulfil basic human needs and

  5. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Kalcheva, S [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Sikik, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water. The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident. A feasibility study for the conversion of the BR2 reactor from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel was previously performed to verify it can operate safely at the same maximum nominal steady-state heat flux. An assessment was also performed to quantify the heat fluxes at which the onset of flow instability and critical heat flux occur for each fuel type. This document updates and expands these results for the current representative core configuration (assuming a fresh beryllium matrix) by evaluating the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), onset of fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), onset of flow instability (OFI) and critical heat flux (CHF).

  6. Plasmon-induced selective carbon dioxide conversion on earth-abundant aluminum-cuprous oxide antenna-reactor nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robatjazi, Hossein; Zhao, Hangqi; Swearer, Dayne F; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Zhou, Linan; Alabastri, Alessandro; McClain, Michael J; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2017-06-21

    The rational combination of plasmonic nanoantennas with active transition metal-based catalysts, known as 'antenna-reactor' nanostructures, holds promise to expand the scope of chemical reactions possible with plasmonic photocatalysis. Here, we report earth-abundant embedded aluminum in cuprous oxide antenna-reactor heterostructures that operate more effectively and selectively for the reverse water-gas shift reaction under milder illumination than in conventional thermal conditions. Through rigorous comparison of the spatial temperature profile, optical absorption, and integrated electric field enhancement of the catalyst, we have been able to distinguish between competing photothermal and hot-carrier driven mechanistic pathways. The antenna-reactor geometry efficiently harnesses the plasmon resonance of aluminum to supply energetic hot-carriers and increases optical absorption in cuprous oxide for selective carbon dioxide conversion to carbon monoxide with visible light. The transition from noble metals to aluminum based antenna-reactor heterostructures in plasmonic photocatalysis provides a sustainable route to high-value chemicals and reaffirms the practical potential of plasmon-mediated chemical transformations.Plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis holds promise for the control of chemical reactions. Here the authors report an Al@Cu 2 O heterostructure based on earth abundant materials to transform CO 2 into CO at significantly milder conditions.

  7. Gas Turbine Energy Conversion Systems for Nuclear Power Plants Applicable to LiFTR Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    This panel plans to cover thermal energy and electric power production issues facing our nation and the world over the next decades, with relevant technologies ranging from near term to mid-and far term.Although the main focus will be on ground based plants to provide baseload electric power, energy conversion systems (ECS) for space are also included, with solar- or nuclear energy sources for output power levels ranging tens of Watts to kilo-Watts for unmanned spacecraft, and eventual mega-Watts for lunar outposts and planetary surface colonies. Implications of these technologies on future terrestrial energy systems, combined with advanced fracking, are touched upon.Thorium based reactors, and nuclear fusion along with suitable gas turbine energy conversion systems (ECS) will also be considered by the panelists. The characteristics of the above mentioned ECS will be described, both in terms of their overall energy utilization effectiveness and also with regard to climactic effects due to exhaust emissions.

  8. Athabasca University: Conversion from Traditional Distance Education to Online Courses, Programs and Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Davis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In its 30 years of operation, Athabasca University has witnessed the full impact of the growth of online distance education. Its conversion from mixed media course production and telephone/ mail tutoring to a variety of electronic information and communication technologies has been heterogeneous across disciplines and programs. Undergraduate programs in business, computing, and some social science programs have largely led the conversion, and all graduate programs have, since their inception, employed various features of online delivery. The parallel conversion of student services has been equally important to the effectiveness of these processes. The implications of this approach for the quality of offerings, support systems, costing, and the primary mandate of the University (which is to remove barriers, not create them are discussed.

  9. Apollo-L2, an advanced fuel tokamak reactor utilizing direct conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Blanchard, J.P.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Witt, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A scoping study of a tokamak reactor fueled by a D- 3 He plasma is presented. The Apollo D- 3 He tokamak capitalizes on recent advances in high field magnets (20 T) and utilizes rectennas to convert the synchrotron radiation directly to electricity. The low neutron wall loading (0.1 MW/m 2 ) permits a first wall lasting the life of the plant and enables the reactor to be classified as inherently safe. The cost of electricity is less than that from a similar power level DT reactor. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  10. Reactor materials program process water component failure probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W. L.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum rate loss of coolant accident for the Savannah River Production Reactors is presently specified as the abrupt double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a large process water pipe. This accident is not considered credible in light of the low applied stresses and the inherent ductility of the piping materials. The Reactor Materials Program was initiated to provide the technical basis for an alternate, credible maximum rate LOCA. The major thrust of this program is to develop an alternate worst case accident scenario by deterministic means. In addition, the probability of a DEGB is also being determined; to show that in addition to being mechanistically incredible, it is also highly improbable. The probability of a DEGB of the process water piping is evaluated in two parts: failure by direct means, and indirectly-induced failure. These two areas have been discussed in other reports. In addition, the frequency of a large bread (equivalent to a DEGB) in other process water system components is assessed. This report reviews the large break frequency for each component as well as the overall large break frequency for the reactor system

  11. Conversion of the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolon, A.E.; Straka, M.; Freeman, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to convert the UMR Reactor fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and to ship the HEU fuel back to the Department of Energy Savannah River Site. The actual core conversion was completed in the summer of 1992. The HEU fuel was offloaded to an onsite storage pit where it remained until July, 1996. In July, 1996, the HEU fuel was shipped to the DOE Savannah River Site. The objectives of the project have been achieved. DOE provided the following funding for the project. Several papers were published regarding the conversion project and are listed in the Attachment. In retrospect, the conversion project required much more time and effort than originally thought. Several difficulties were encountered including the unavailability of a shipping cask for several years. The authors are grateful for the generous funding provided by DOE for this project but wish to point out that much of their efforts on the conversion project went unfunded

  12. Conversion of a wet waste feedstock to biocrude by hydrothermal processing in a continuous-flow reactor: grape pomace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Hart, Todd R.; Billing, Justin M.

    2017-05-13

    Wet waste feedstocks present an apt opportunity for biomass conversion to fuels by hydrothermal processing. In this study, grape pomace slurries from two varieties, Montepulciano and cabernet sauvignon, have been converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) in a bench-scale, continuous-flow reactor system. Carbon conversion to gravity-separable biocrude product up to 56 % was accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 C) in a pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa) when using grape pomace feedstock slurry with a 16.8 wt% concentration of dry solids processed at a liquid hourly space velocity of 2.1 h-1. Direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup using a Ru on C catalyst in a fixed bed producing a gas composed of methane and carbon dioxide from water soluble organics. Conversion of 99.8% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) left in the aqueous phase was demonstrated. As a result, high conversion of grape pomace to liquid and gas fuel products was found with residual organic contamination in byproduct water reduced to <150 mg/kg COD.

  13. Participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, R. U.; Benneche, P. E.; Hosticka, B.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these users institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities

  14. The RERTR [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor] Program: Progress and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1987-01-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U 3 Si 2 -Al and U 3 Si-Al fuels, was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm 3 was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40% average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission 99 Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U 3 Si-Al with 19.75% enrichment and U 3 Si 2 -Al with 45% enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR Program

  15. Advanced CANDU reactor development: a customer-driven program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) product development program is well under way. The development approach for the ACR is to ensure that all activities supporting readiness for the first ACR project are carded out in parallel, as parts of an integrated whole. In this way design engineering, licensing, development and testing, supply chain planning, construct ability and module strategy, and planning for commissioning and operations, all work in synergy with one another. Careful schedule management :ensures that program focus stays on critical path priorities.'This paper provides an overview of the program, with an emphasis on integration to ensure maximum project readiness, This program management approach is important now that AECL is participating as the reactor vendor in Dominion Energy's DOE-sponsored Combined Construction/Operating License (COL) program. Dominion Energy selected the ACR-700 as their reference reactor technology for purposes of demonstrating the COL process. AECL's development of the ACR is unique in that pre-licensing activities are being carded out parallel in the USA and Canada, via independent, but well-communicated programs. In the short term, these programs are major drivers of ACR development. The ACR design approach has been to optimize to achieve major design objectives: capital cost reduction, robust design with ample margins, proveness by using evolutionary change from existing :reference plants, design for ease :of operability. The ACR development program maintains these design objectives for each of the program elements: Design: .Carefully selected design innovations based on the SEU fuel/light water coolant:/heavy water moderator approach. Emphasis on lessons-learned review from operating experience and customer feedback Licensing: .Safety case based on strengths of existing CANDU plus benefits of optimised design Development and Test: Choice of materials, conditions to enable incremental testing building on existing CANDU and LWR

  16. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report: German Pebble Bed Reactor design and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    This report describes and evaluates several gas-cooled reactor plant concepts under development within the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The concepts, based upon the use of a proven Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) fuel element design, include nuclear heat generation for chemical processes and electrical power generation. Processes under consideration for the nuclear process heat plant (PNP) include hydrogasification of coal, steam gasification of coal, combined process, and long-distance chemical heat transportation. The electric plant emphasized in the report is the steam turbine cycle (HTR-K), although the gas turbine cycle (HHT) is also discussed. The study is a detailed description and evaluation of the nuclear portion of the various plants. The general conclusions are that the PBR technology is sound and that the HTR-K and PNP plant concepts appear to be achievable through appropriate continuing development programs, most of which are either under way or planned

  17. Research reactor core conversion guidebook. V. 3: Analytical verification (Appendices G and H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Volume 3 consists of Appendix G which contains detailed results of a safety-related benchmark problem for an idealized reactor and Appendix H which contains detailed comparisons of calculated and measured data for actual cores with moderately enriched uranium and low enriched uranium fuels. The results of the benchmark calculations in Appendix G are summarized in Chapter 7 of Volume 1 and the results of the comparisons between calculations and measurements are summarized in Chapter 8 of Volume 1. Both the approaches described in these appendices are very useful in ensuring that the calculational methods employed in the preparation of a Safety Report are accurate. As a first step, it is recommended that reactor operators/physicists use their own methods and codes to first calculate the benchmark problem, and then compare the results of calculations with measurements in their own reactor or in one of the reactors for which measured data is available in Appendix H. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  18. A neutronics feasibility study for the LEU conversion of Poland's Maria research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    The MARIA reactor is a high-flux multipurpose research reactor which is water-cooled and moderated with both beryllium and water. Standard HEU (80% 235 U)fuel assemblies consist of six concentric fuel tubes of a U-Al alloy clad in aluminum. Although the inventory of HEU (80%) fuel is nearly exhausted, a supply of highly-loaded 36%-enriched fuel assemblies is available at the reactor site. Neutronic equilibrium studies have been made to determine the relative performance of fuels with enrichments of 80%, 36% and 19.7%. These studies indicate that LEU (19.7%) densities of about 2.5 gU/cm 3 and 3.8 gU/cm 3 are required to match the performance of the MARIA reactor with 80%-enriched and with 36%-enriched fuels, respectively

  19. The United States advanced light water reactor (USALWR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Devine, J.C. Jr.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    For the United States Nuclear Power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for a new generation capacity in the late 90s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with revolutionary changes to current LWR systems through simplification and re-evaluation of safety and operational design margins. In addition, the grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate the smaller light water reactors (600 MWe) may play an important role in the next generation. A cooperative and coordinated program between EPRI, U.S. DOE, the major architect engineers, nuclear steam supply vendors, and the NRC in the U.S. has been undertaken with four major goals in mind

  20. The United States Advanced Light Water reactor (USALWR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Devine, Jr.J.C.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    For the United States Nuclear power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for a new generation capacity in the late 90s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with revolutionary changes to current LWR systems through simplification and re-evaluation of safety and operational design margins. In addition, the grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate the smaller light water reactors (600 MWe) may play an important role in the next generation. A cooperative and coordinated program between EPRI, U.S. DOE, the major architect engineers, nuclear steam supply vendors, and the NRC in the U.S. has been undertaken with four major goals in mind. (author)

  1. The US Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brolin, E.C.

    1992-01-01

    Based on National Energy Strategy projections, utilities will be required to substantially increase electric generating capacity over the next 40 yr to meet economic growth requirements and replace retiring capacity. Although aggressive conservation measures can save up to 85 GW(electric), ∼195 GW(electric) of additional generating capcity will still be needed by 2010. Assuming startup of new plants around 2000, US Department of Energy (DOE) analyses show that nuclear power can contribute 195 GW(electric) of capacity by 2030, or ∼20% of total electric generation. The DOE is involved in a number of strategies designed to revitalize the nuclear power industry and enable it to meet this projected need for additional capacity. Among these is an integrated overall strategy for advanced reactor development and high-level waste management. A high priority in pursuit of this strategy is the Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor (ALMR) Program

  2. Japanese Fast Reactor Program for Homogeneous Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Nagata, Takashi; Kondo, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    In the present report, the homogeneous actinide recycling scenario of Fast Reactor (FR) Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT) is summarized. First, the scenario of nuclear energy policy in Japan are briefly reviewed. Second, the basic plan of Japan to manage all minor actinide (MA) by recycling is summarized objectives of which are the efficiency increase of uranium resources, the environmental burden reduction, and the increase of nuclear non-proliferation potential. Third, recent results of reactor physics study related to MA-loaded FR cores are briefly described. Fourth, typical nuclear design of MA-loaded FR cores in the FaCT project and their main features are demonstrated with the feasibility to recycle all MA in the future FR equilibrium society. Finally, the research and development program to realize the MA recycling in Japan is introduced, including international cooperation projects. (authors)

  3. Program of RA reactor start-up to nominal power; Program dizanja reaktora 'RA' na nominalnu snagu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-01

    The zero start-up program is followed by the program of RA reactor start-up to nominal power. This program is desed in detail and includes the following measurements: radiation characteristics at the exit of the channels; gamma and fast neutron dose distribution in the reactor; influence of absorbers on the reactivity; temperature effect; absolute flux and calibration of ionization chambers; xenon effect; thermal and hydraulics; dosimetry around the reactor; neutron flux in the reactor core and in the reactor hall; heavy water level; thermal characteristics after shutdown. A list of measuring devices and instrumentation is included with the detailed action plan and list of responsible staff members.

  4. Design of a power conversion system for an indirect cycle, helium cooled pebble bed reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Ballinger, R.G.; Stahle, P.W.; Demetri, E.; Koronowski, M.

    2002-01-01

    A design is presented for the turbomachinery for an indirect cycle, closed, helium cooled modular pebble bed reactor system. The design makes use of current technology and will operate with an overall efficiency of 45%. The design uses an intermediate heat exchanger which isolated the reactor cycle from the turbomachinery. This design excludes radioactive fission products from the turbomachinery. This minimizes the probability of an air ingress accident and greatly simplifies maintenance. (author)

  5. Conversion (Utilizing LEU instead HEU) of research reactors in Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.; Listik, E.; Ernest, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper shortly describes some advantages on the RERTR-programme in the Czech Republic. Further calculations and experimental measurements finished on the VR-1 training reactor Sparrow. Paper brings results and its evaluation as well as one-year operation experiences with the Russian fuel assemblies IRT-3M and also operation experiments with mixed Core configuration (the Russian fuel assemblies IRT-2M with enrichment 80% 235 U and 36% 235 U) on the LVR-15 research reactor. (author)

  6. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  7. Computer program for diagnostic X-ray exposure conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    Presented is a computer program designed to convert any given set of diagnostic X-ray exposure factors sequentially into another, yielding either an equivalent photographic density or one increased or decreased by a specifiable proportion. In addition to containing the wherewithal with which to manipulate a set of exposure factors, the facility to print hard (paper) copy is included enabling the results to be pasted into a notebook and used at any time. This program was originally written as an investigative exercise into examining the potential use of computers for practical radiographic purposes as conventionally encountered. At the same time, its possible use as an educational tool was borne in mind. To these ends, the current version of this program may be used as a means whereby exposure factors used in a diagnostic department may be altered to suit a particular requirement or may be used in the school as a mathematical model to describe the behaviour of exposure factors under manipulation without patient exposure. (author)

  8. Turbostar: an ICF reactor using both direct and thermal power conversion. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Combining direct and thermal power conversion results in a 52% gross plant efficiency with DT fuel and 68% with advanced DD fuel. We maximize the fraction of fusion-yield energy converted to kinetic energy in a liquid-lithium blanket, and use this energy directly with turbine generators to produce electricity. We use the remainder of the energy to produce electricity in a standard Rankine thermal power conversion cycle

  9. Syngas Production By Thermochemical Conversion Of H2o And Co2 Mixtures Using A Novel Reactor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearlman, Howard [Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc, Lancaster, PA (United States); Chen, Chien-Hua [Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc, Lancaster, PA (United States)

    2014-08-27

    The Department of Energy awarded Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) an SBIR Phase II contract (#DE-SC0004729) to develop a high-temperature solar thermochemical reactor for syngas production using water and/or carbon dioxide as feedstocks. The technology aims to provide a renewable and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, promote energy independence and mitigate adverse issues associated with climate change by essentially recycling carbon from carbon dioxide emitted by the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. To commercialize the technology and drive down the cost of solar fuels, new advances are needed in materials development and reactor design, both of which are integral elements in this program.

  10. Status of the conversion working plan in the High Flux Reactor (Petten, The Netherlands)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, J.A.; Thijssen, P.J.M.; Wijtsma, F.J.; Gevers, A.; Guidez, J.

    2000-01-01

    The conversion from HEU to LEU has often many disadvantages: flux penalties, increase of fuel consumption, cost and delay to obtain a new license etc. But to fulfill the non-proliferation programme, and to simplify the future fuel supply, the HFR renewed in 1998 studies on conversion possibilities. To minimize the conversion costs, these studies were made with a progressive conversion that avoids the need of one new core and permits to begin the conversion with a replacement of 5 elements at each cycle. Hence the conversion can be made in 7 cycles, without special elements and with a normal bum-up for each element. To avoid an increase of fuel consumption, an increase of the fuel cycle length from 24.7 to 28.3 days was also considered. This point allows reducing the number of annual cycles from 1 to 10 and enables in one cycle to have the possibility of four successive irradiations for Molybdenum production (7 days) in one irradiation position. A working plan for fuel licensing has been sent to the safety authorities and is presented in the paper. (author)

  11. SYNBURN: fast-reactor fuel-cycle program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzica, P.A.; Meneley, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    The SYNBURN computer program for fast reactors will calculate all the neutronics necessary to completely characterize the equilibrium cycle as well as the startup to equilibrium cycles. The program's run time is very short and this makes the program suitable for survey of parametric studies. It can search on the cycle time for a specified burnup, for the shim control necessary for criticality as well as feed enrichments and the enrichment ratio among core zones. SYNBURN synthesizes in a very simple fashion the one-dimensional fluxes in radial and axial geometry to achieve an approximate two-dimensional solution which agrees very well with the exact two-dimensional solution when measuring regional integrated quantities

  12. German Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seipel, H.G.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rittig, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program, which is part of the energy program of the Federal Republic of Germany, is presented in this article. The program, for which the Federal Minister of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany is responsible, is subdivided into the following four main problem areas, which in turn are subdivided into projects: (1) improvement of the operational safety and reliability of systems and components (projects: quality assurance, component safety); (2) analysis of the consequences of accidents (projects: emergency core cooling, containment, external impacts, pressure-vessel failure, core meltdown); (3) analysis of radiation exposure during operation, accident, and decommissioning (project: fission-product transport and radiation exposure); and (4) analysis of the risk created by the operation of nuclear power plants (project: risk and reliability). Various problems, which are included in the above-mentioned projects, are concurrently studied within the Heiss-Dampf Reaktor experiments

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Reactor Safety Technologies Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Peko, D. [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Farmer, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rempe, J. [Rempe and Associates LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Humrickhouse, P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Brien, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Robb, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauntt, R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Osborn, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    In the aftermath of the March 2011 multi-unit accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Fukushima), the nuclear community has been reassessing certain safety assumptions about nuclear reactor plant design, operations and emergency actions, particularly with respect to extreme events that might occur and that are beyond each plant’s current design basis. Because of our significant domestic investment in nuclear reactor technology (99 operating reactors in the fleet of commercial LWRs with five under construction), the United States has been a major leader internationally in these activities. The U.S. nuclear industry is voluntarily pursuing a number of additional safety initiatives. The NRC continues to evaluate and, where deemed appropriate, establish new requirements for ensuring adequate protection of public health and safety in the occurrence of low probability events at nuclear plants; (e.g., mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events initiated by external events like seismic or flooding initiators). The DOE has also played a major role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident. Initially, DOE worked with the Japanese and the international community to help develop a more complete understanding of the Fukushima accident progression and its consequences, and to respond to various safety concerns emerging from uncertainties about the nature of and the effects from the accident. DOE R&D activities are focused on providing scientific and technical insights, data, analyses methods that ultimately support industry efforts to enhance safety. These activities are expected to further enhance the safety performance of currently operating U.S. nuclear power plants as well as better characterize the safety performance of future U.S. plants. In pursuing this area of R&D, DOE recognizes that the commercial nuclear industry is ultimately responsible for the safe operation of licensed nuclear facilities. As such, industry is considered the primary

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Reactor Safety Technologies Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In the aftermath of the March 2011 multi-unit accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Fukushima), the nuclear community has been reassessing certain safety assumptions about nuclear reactor plant design, operations and emergency actions, particularly with respect to extreme events that might occur and that are beyond each plant’s current design basis. Because of our significant domestic investment in nuclear reactor technology (99 operating reactors in the fleet of commercial LWRs with five under construction), the United States has been a major leader internationally in these activities. The U.S. nuclear industry is voluntarily pursuing a number of additional safety initiatives. The NRC continues to evaluate and, where deemed appropriate, establish new requirements for ensuring adequate protection of public health and safety in the occurrence of low probability events at nuclear plants; (e.g., mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events initiated by external events like seismic or flooding initiators). The DOE has also played a major role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident. Initially, DOE worked with the Japanese and the international community to help develop a more complete understanding of the Fukushima accident progression and its consequences, and to respond to various safety concerns emerging from uncertainties about the nature of and the effects from the accident. DOE R&D activities are focused on providing scientific and technical insights, data, analyses methods that ultimately support industry efforts to enhance safety. These activities are expected to further enhance the safety performance of currently operating U.S. nuclear power plants as well as better characterize the safety performance of future U.S. plants. In pursuing this area of R&D, DOE recognizes that the commercial nuclear industry is ultimately responsible for the safe operation of licensed nuclear facilities. As such, industry is considered the primary

  15. SEGY to ASCII Conversion and Plotting Program 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION SEGY has long been a standard format for storing seismic data and header information. Almost every seismic processing package can read and write seismic data in SEGY format. In the data processing world, however, ASCII format is the 'universal' standard format. Very few general-purpose plotting or computation programs will accept data in SEGY format. The software presented in this report, referred to as SEGY to ASCII (SAC), converts seismic data written in SEGY format (Barry et al., 1975) to an ASCII data file, and then creates a postscript file of the seismic data using a general plotting package (GMT, Wessel and Smith, 1995). The resulting postscript file may be plotted by any standard postscript plotting program. There are two versions of SAC: one version for plotting a SEGY file that contains a single gather, such as a stacked CDP or migrated section, and a second version for plotting multiple gathers from a SEGY file containing more than one gather, such as a collection of shot gathers. Note that if a SEGY file has multiple gathers, then each gather must have the same number of traces per gather, and each trace must have the same sample interval and number of samples per trace. SAC will read several common standards of SEGY data, including SEGY files with sample values written in either IBM or IEEE floating-point format. In addition, utility programs are present to convert non-standard Seismic Unix (.sux) SEGY files and PASSCAL (.rsy) SEGY files to standard SEGY files. SAC allows complete user control over all plotting parameters including label size and font, tick mark intervals, trace scaling, and the inclusion of a title and descriptive text. SAC shell scripts create a postscript image of the seismic data in vector rather than bitmap format, using GMT's pswiggle command. Although this can produce a very large postscript file, the image quality is generally superior to that of a bitmap image, and commercial programs such as Adobe Illustrator

  16. Review and analysis of the 1980-1989 biomass thermochemical conversion program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    In the period between 1980 and 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research and development projects through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion (BTC) Program. Thermochemical conversion technologies use elevated temperatures to convert biomass into more useful forms of energy such as fuel gases or transportation fuels. The BTC Program included a wide range of biomass conversion projects in the areas of gasification, pyrolysis, liquefaction, and combustion. This work formed the basis of the present DOE research and development efforts on advanced liquid fuel and power generation systems. At the beginning of Fiscal Year 1989, the management of the BTC Program was transferred from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, formerly Solar Energy Research Institute). This document presents a summary of the research which was performed under the BTC Program during the 1981-1989 time frame. The document consists of an analysis of the research projects which were funded by the BTC Program and a bibliography of published documents. This work will help ensure that information from PNL`s BTC Program is available to those interested in biomass conversion technologies. The background of the BTC Program is discussed in the first chapter of this report. In addition, a brief summary of other related biomass research and development programs funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and others is presented with references where additional information can be found. The remaining chapters of the report present a detailed summary of the research projects which were funded by the BTC Program. The progress which was made on each project is summarized, the overall impact on biomass conversion is discussed, and selected references are provided.

  17. The RERTR demonstration experiments program at the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehe, D K; King, J S [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan (United States)

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight a major part of the experimental work which is being carried out at the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) in conjunction with the RERTR program. A demonstration experiments program has been developed to: 1) characterize the FNR in sufficient detail to discern and quantify neutronic differences between the high and low enriched cores; 2) provide the theoretical group with measurements to benchmark their calculations. As with any experimental program associated with a reactor, stringent constraints limit the experiments which can be performed. Some experiments are performed routinely on the FNR (such as control rod calibrations), and much data is already available. Unfortunately, the accuracy we demand precludes using much of this earlier data. And in many cases, the requirement of precise (and copious) data has led to either developing new techniques (as in the case of rhodium mapping and neutron diffraction) or to further refinements on existing methods (as in the case of spectral unfolding). Nevertheless, we have tried to stay within the realm of recognized, well-established experimental methods in order to assuage any doubts about measured differences between HEU and LEU core parameters. This paper describes the principal results of the experiments performed so far.

  18. Seismic behaviour of LMFBR reactor cores. The SYMPHONY program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive program on the seismic behaviour of the LMFBR reactor cores, the SYMPHONY experimental program, performed at the CEA Saclay, is carried out from 1993 up to now. LMFBR reactor cores are composed of fuel assemblies and neutronic shields, immersed in sodium (the primary coolant) or water (for the experimental tests). The main objective of the seismic studies is to evaluate the assembly motions, with consequences on the reactivity and the control rod insertability, and to verify the structural integrity of the assemblies under the impact forces. The experimental program has reached its objectives. Tests have been performed in a satisfying way. Instrumentation allowed to collect displacements, accelerations, and shock forces. All the results constitute a comprehensive base of valuable and reliable data. The interpretation of the tests is based on beam models, taking into account the Fluid Structure Interaction, and the shocks between the assemblies. Theoretical results are in a quite good agreement with the experimental ones. The interpretation of the hexagonal tests in water pointed out very strong coupling between the assemblies and lead to the development of a specific Fluid Structure Interaction, taking into account not only inertial effects, but dissipative effects also. (author)

  19. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of

  20. Conversion of Tobacco Biomass to Flavor Components by Means of Microwave and Parr Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara Katayoun Mahdavi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, microwave and Parr reactors were utilized for synthesis of pyrazines from plant-based biomass in the presence of ammonia and different amino acids. Using these techniques led to synthesis of a relatively wide range of pyrazines with sweet odor and chocolate-like smell. The optimum synthetic conditions to have maximum pyrazine yield for both the microwave and Parr reactions were 41 g of fructose/glucose syrup derived from cellulosic biomass, 28 mL NH4OH (30%, and 0.96 g L-threonine, 0.56 g L-valine, 0.5 g L-leucine, and 0.5 g L-isoleucine at 120 °C for 30 min. Quantitative results obtained via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS using the traditional open-heated oil bath method have been compared with data obtained via microwave and Parr reactors. In these two latter methods, sealed vessels under high pressure and higher temperature were used. The yield of synthesized pyrazines increased dramatically with both microwave and Parr reactors. Surprisingly, the yield of synthesized pyrazines was both reproducible and nearly two times higher via the Parr reactor than that observed with the microwave reactor under comparable conditions.

  1. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm 3 in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept. (author)

  2. Programs with societal benefits at the Cornell University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.; Aderhold, H.C.; Hossain, T.Z.

    1993-01-01

    In its 30 yr of operation, the Cornell TRIGA reactor has been used for many educational and research programs that provide general benefits to society. In addition to supporting graduate-level education of nuclear scientists and engineers, it has been extensively used in undergraduate and graduate courses and research by nonspecialists and, through the medium of tours, in education of the general public. Some educational functions have been described previously. In this paper, examples are presented of research of societal interest in nonnuclear fields. The first two rely mainly on radiography, and the remaining five on neutron activation analysis (NAA)

  3. Severe accident sequence assessment for boiling water reactors: program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.H.

    1980-10-01

    The Severe Accident Sequence Assessment (SASA) Program was started at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in June 1980. This report documents the initial planning, specification of objectives, potential uses of the results, plan of attack, and preliminary results. ORNL was assigned the Brown's Ferry Unit 1 Plant with the station blackout being the initial sequence set to be addressed. This set includes: (1) loss of offsite and onsite ac power with no coolant injection; and (2) loss of offsite and onsite ac power with high pressure coolant injection (HPCI) and reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) as long as dc power supply lasts. This report includes representative preliminary results for the former case

  4. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's research reactor inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constable, George L.

    1977-01-01

    The Division of Reactor Inspection Program's functional responsibilities are presented. The include (a) inspections and investigations necessary to determine whether licensees are complying with license provisions and rules, and to ascertain whether licensed operations are being conducted safely; (b) establishment of bases for the issuance or denial of a construction permit or license; (c) investigation of accidents, incidents, and theft or diversion of special nuclear materials; (d) enforcement actions; and (e) evaluation of licensed operations as a basis for recommending changes to standards and license conditions and for issuance of reports to the nuclear industry and the public

  5. High-Power Microwave Transmission and Mode Conversion Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, Ronald J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-08-14

    This is a final technical report for a long term project to develop improved designs and design tools for the microwave hardware and components associated with the DOE Plasma Fusion Program. We have developed basic theory, software, fabrication techniques, and low-power measurement techniques for the design of microwave hardware associated gyrotrons, microwave mode converters and high-power microwave transmission lines. Specifically, in this report we discuss our work on designing quasi-optical mode converters for single and multiple frequencies, a new method for the analysis of perturbed-wall waveguide mode converters, perturbed-wall launcher design for TE0n mode gyrotrons, quasi-optical traveling-wave resonator design for high-power testing of microwave components, and possible improvements to the HSX microwave transmission line.

  6. The Effect of non-Newtonian Behavior of Fluid on the Tubular Reactor Performance and Studying Different Variables in Relation to the Degree of Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Shayesteh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In tubular reactors, there are different parameters which can affect the degree of conversion. The type of fluid motion and velocity profile of substances in the reactor are of most central measures. Different rheological models can be employed to study the behavior of fluids; power law model is one of the most commonly used models. In this study, the rheological behaviour of polymerization reaction of methyl methacrylate was examined. Due to the similarity function of tubular and batch reactors, the number of test tubes are used to prepare the solution. After preparation of the reactor solution, the n value of power law model was estimated within the span of 0.3492 to 0.9889 by curve fitting. Employing these rheological data, a reactor has been designed. Moreover, the effects of parameters such as reaction temperature, initiator wt%, the concentration of monomer and reactor’s radius on the degree of conversion have been studied. The obtained results in the research indicate a direct proportionality of conversion with the reaction temperature, initiator wt% and the concentration of monomer and also an inverse proportionality of conversion with reactor’s radius. Finally, the amount of conversion was obtained equal to 56.47% and according to its laboratory proportion which was 55.88% we have reached the conclusion that the modeling duly undertaken is applicable and valid.

  7. Conversion of Methane to C2 Hydrocarbons and Hydrogen Using a Gliding Arc Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shuanghui; Wang Baowei; Lv Yijun; Yan Wenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Methane conversion has been studied using gliding arc plasma in the presence of argon. The process was conducted at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The focus of this research was to develop a process of converting methane to C 2 hydrocarbons and hydrogen. The main parameters, including the CH 4 /Ar mole ratio, the CH 4 flow rate, the input voltage, and the minimum electrode gap, were varied to investigate their effects on methane conversion rate, product distribution, energy consumption, carbon deposit, and reaction stability. The specific energy requirement (SER) was used to express the energy utilization efficiency of the process and provided a practical guidance for optimizing reaction conditions for improving energy efficiency. It was found that the carbon deposition was not conducive to methane conversion, and the gliding arc plasma discharge reached a stable state twelve minutes later. Optimum conditions for methane conversion were suggested. The maximum methane conversion rate of 43.39% was obtained under the optimum conditions. Also, C 2 hydrocarbons selectivity, C 2 hydrocarbons yield, H 2 selectivity, H 2 yield and SER were 87.20%, 37.83%, 81.28%, 35.27%, and 2.09 MJ/mol, respectively.

  8. Technical challenges in support of the plutonium materials conversion program in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, C.F.V.; Zygmunt, S.J.; Hahn, W.K.; James, C.A.; Costa, D.A.; Smith, W.H.; Yarbro, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Plutonium Materials Conversion Program for Russia is designed to assist Russia in defining a path for the destruction of weapons grade plutonium. A similar program is currently defining a program for destruction of US weapons grade plutonium. These two sister programs arose from the September 1998 meeting between President Yeltsin and President Clinton, after which they issued a 'Joint statement of principles for management and disposition of plutonium designated as no longer required for defense purposes'. The US and Russia have each committed to convert 50 metric tons of plutonium from nuclear weapons programs to forms which are unusable for weapons

  9. Contribution to the study of the conversion PWR type reactors to the thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins Filho, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of the thorium cycle in PWR reactors is discussed. The fuel has been calculated in the equilibrium condition for a economic comparison with the uranium cycle (in the same condition). First of all, a code named EQUILIBRIO has been developed for the fuel equilibrium calculation. The results gotten by this code, were introduced in the LEOPARD code for the fuel depletion calculation (in the equilibrium cycle). Same important physics details of fuel depletion are studied, for instance: the neutron balance, power sharing, fuel burnup, etc. The calculations have been done taking as reference the Angra-1 PWR reactor. (Author) [pt

  10. Reflooding phase after loss of coolant of an advanced pressurized water reactor with high conversion ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, S.

    1984-01-01

    The emergency core cooling behaviour of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR) during the reflooding phase of the LOCA with double-ended break is analysed and compared to a common pressurized water reactor (PWR). The code FLUT-BS, its models and correlations are explained in detail and have been verified by numerous PWR-reflood experiments with large parameter range. The influence of core-design on ECC-behaviour as well as the influences of initial and boundary values are examined. The results show the essential differences of ECC-behaviour between PWR and APWR. (orig.) [de

  11. Corrosion study of heat exchanger tubes in pressurized water cooled nuclear reactors by conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homonnay, Z.; Kuzmann, E.; Varga, K.; Nemeth, Z.; Szabo, A.; Rado, K.; Schunk, J.; Tilky, P.; Patek, G.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear energy production tends to return into the focus of interest because of the constantly increasing energy need of the world and the green house effect problems of the strongest competitor oil or gas based power plants. In addition to the construction of new nuclear power plants, lifetime extension of the existing ones is the most cost effective investment in the energy business. However, feasibility and safety issues become very important at this point, and corrosion of the construction materials should be carefully investigated before decision on a potential lifetime extension of a reactor. 57 Fe-Conversion Electron Moessbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS) is a sensitive tool to analyze the phase composition of corrosion products on the surface of stainless steel. The upper ∼300 nm can be investigated due to the penetration range of conversion electrons. The corrosion state of heat exchanger tubes from the four reactor units of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary, were analyzed by several methods including CEMS. The primary circuit side of the tubes was studied on selected samples cut out from the heat exchangers during regular maintenance. Cr- and Ni-substituted magnetite, sometimes hematite, amorphous Fe-oxides/oxyhydroxides as well as the signal of bulk austenitic steel of the tubes were detected. The level of Cr- and Ni-substitution in the magnetite phase could be estimated from the Moessbauer spectra. Correlation between earlier decontamination cycles and the corrosion state of the heat exchangers was sought. In combination with other methods, a hybrid structure of the surface oxide layer of several microns was established. It is suggested that previous AP-CITROX decontamination cycles can be responsible for this structure which makes the oxide layer mobile. This mobility may be responsible for unwanted corrosion product transport into the reactor vessel by the primary coolant.

  12. A review of fast reactor program in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with the Long-term Program for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy defined by the Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC), Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) is playing the key role in the development of a plutonium utilization system by fast breeder reactor (FBR), which is superior to the uranium utilization system by light water reactor, aiming to achieve future stable long-term energy supply and energy security of Japan. The experimental reactor Joyo, located in the O-arai Engineering Center (OEC) of PNC, has provided abundant experimental data and excellent operational records attaining 43,500 hours operation in total by the end of 1991, since its first criticality in 1977. On the prototype reactor Monju, 97.6% of construction works has already been completed and the function tests are in progress aiming at the initial criticality by the end of FY 1992. As for the demonstration fast breeder reactor (DFBR) of Japan, the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) is promoting design study under the contracts with several leading Japanese fabricators, including Toshiba, Hitachi and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, for selection of the basic specifications of DFBR. The related research and development (R and D) works are underway at several organizations under the discussion and coordination of the Japanese FBR R and D Steering Committee, which was established by the JAPAC, PNC, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI). Progress of the design study and the related R and D are reported to the Subcommittee on FBR Development Program of JAEC. Recent major emphases on the PNC R and D are placed on the integrated feedback of all existing R and D results and experiences to the development of demonstration reactor. Furthermore, the overall functional and performance tests of Monju, is another important key role to attain further excellency of FBR technology, with

  13. A review of fast reactor program in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    In accordance with the Long-term Program for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy defined by the Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC), Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) is playing the key role in the development of a plutonium utilization system by fast breeder reactor (FBR), which is superior to the uranium utilization system by light water reactor, aiming to achieve future stable long-term energy supply and energy security of Japan. The experimental reactor Joyo, located in the O-arai Engineering Center (OEC) of PNC, has provided abundant experimental data and excellent operational records attaining 43,500 hours operation in total by the end of 1991, since its first criticality in 1977. On the prototype reactor Monju, 97.6% of construction works has already been completed and the function tests are in progress aiming at the initial criticality by the end of FY 1992. As for the demonstration fast breeder reactor (DFBR) of Japan, the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) is promoting design study under the contracts with several leading Japanese fabricators, including Toshiba, Hitachi and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, for selection of the basic specifications of DFBR. The related research and development (R and D) works are underway at several organizations under the discussion and coordination of the Japanese FBR R and D Steering Committee, which was established by the JAPAC, PNC, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI). Progress of the design study and the related R and D are reported to the Subcommittee on FBR Development Program of JAEC. Recent major emphases on the PNC R and D are placed on the integrated feedback of all existing R and D results and experiences to the development of demonstration reactor. Furthermore, the overall functional and performance tests of Monju, is another important key role to attain further excellency of FBR technology, with

  14. Study on high conversion type core of innovative water reactor for flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) for minor actinide (MA) recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Yuji; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    In order to ensure sustainable energy supplies in the future based on the well-established light water reactor (LWR) technologies, conceptual design studies have been performed on the innovative water reactor for flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) with the high conversion ratio core. For early introduction of FLWR without a serious technical gap from the LWR technologies, the conceptual design of the high conversion type one (HC-FLWR) was constructed to recycle reprocessed plutonium. Furthermore, an investigation of minor actinide (MA) recycling based on the HC-FLWR core concept has been performed and is presented in this paper. Because HC-FLWR is a near-term technology, it would be a good option in the future if HC-FLWR can recycle MAs. In order to recycle MAs in HC-FLWR, it has been found that the core design should be changed, because the loaded MA makes the void reactivity coefficient worse and decreases the discharge burn-up. To find a promising core design specification, the investigation on the core characteristics were performed using the results from parameter surveys with core burn-up calculations. The final core designs were established by coupled three dimensional neutronics and thermal-hydraulics core calculations. The major core specifications are as follows. The plutonium fissile (Puf) content is 13 wt%. The discharge burn-up is about 55 GWd/t. Around 2 wt% of Np or Am can be recycled. The MA conversion ratios are around unity. In particular, it has been found that loaded Np can be transmuted effectively in this core concept. Therefore, these concepts would be a good option to reduce environmental burdens.

  15. Thermal conversion of waste polyolefins to the mixture of hydrocarbons in the reactor with molten metal bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelmachowski, M. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Process and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Lodz, 90-924 Lodz, Wolczanska 213 (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    Energy crisis and environmental degradation by polymer wastes have been imperative to find and propose technologies for recovery of raw materials and energy from non-conventional sources like organic wastes, plastic wastes, scrap tires, etc. A variety of methods and processes connected with global or national policies have been proposed worldwide. A new type of a tubular reactor with the molten metal bed is proposed for conversion of waste plastics to fuel-like mixture of hydrocarbons. The results of the thermal degradation of polyolefins in the laboratory scale set-up based on this reactor are presented in the paper. The melting and cracking processes were carried out in a single apparatus at the temperature 390-420 C. The problems with: disintegration of wastes, heat transfer from the wall to the particles of polymers, cooking at the walls of reactor, and mixing of the molten volume of wastes were significantly reduced. The final product consisted of gaseous stream (8-16 wt% of the input) and liquid (84-92 wt%) stream. No solid products were produced. The light, ''gasoline'' fraction of the liquid hydrocarbons mixture (C{sub 4}-C{sub 10}) made over 50% of the liquid product. It may by used for fuel production or electricity generation. (author)

  16. Thermal conversion of waste polyolefins to the mixture of hydrocarbons in the reactor with molten metal bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelmachowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Energy crisis and environmental degradation by polymer wastes have been imperative to find and propose technologies for recovery of raw materials and energy from non-conventional sources like organic wastes, plastic wastes, scrap tires, etc. A variety of methods and processes connected with global or national policies have been proposed worldwide. A new type of a tubular reactor with the molten metal bed is proposed for conversion of waste plastics to fuel like mixture of hydrocarbons. The results of the thermal degradation of polyolefins in the laboratory scale set-up based on this reactor are presented in the paper. The melting and cracking processes were carried out in a single apparatus at the temperature 390-420 deg. C. The problems with: disintegration of wastes, heat transfer from the wall to the particles of polymers, cooking at the walls of reactor, and mixing of the molten volume of wastes were significantly reduced. The final product consisted of gaseous stream (8-16 wt% of the input) and liquid (84-92 wt%) stream. No solid products were produced. The light, 'gasoline' fraction of the liquid hydrocarbons mixture (C 4 -C 10 ) made over 50% of the liquid product. It may by used for fuel production or electricity generation.

  17. Pretreated Landfill Gas Conversion Process via a Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Renewable Combined Fuel Cell-Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ziaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new landfill gas-based reforming catalytic processing system for the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons, such as incoming methane to hydrogen and carbon oxide mixtures, is described and analyzed. The exit synthesis gas (syn-gas is fed to power effectively high-temperature fuel cells such as SOFC types for combined efficient electricity generation. The current research work is also referred on the description and design aspects of permreactors (permeable reformers carrying the same type of landfill gas-reforming reactions. Membrane reactors is a new technology that can be applied efficiently in such systems. Membrane reactors seem to perform better than the nonmembrane traditional reactors. The aim of this research includes turnkey system and process development for the landfill-based power generation and fuel cell industries. Also, a discussion of the efficient utilization of landfill and waste type resources for combined green-type/renewable power generation with increased processing capacity and efficiency via fuel cell systems is taking place. Moreover, pollution reduction is an additional design consideration in the current catalytic processors fuel cell cycles.

  18. The United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program: Proposal to modify the program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. The policy was slated to expire in May 2009. However, in October 2003, a petition requesting a program extension was delivered to the United States Secretary of Energy from a group of research reactor operators from foreign countries. In April 2004, the Secretary directed DOE undertake an analysis, as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to consider potential extension of the Program. On December 1, 2004, a Federal Register Notice was issued approving the program extension. This paper discusses the findings from the NEPA analysis and the potential changes in the program that may result from implementation of the proposed changes. (author)

  19. Quality assurance program plan for the Reactor Research Experiment Programs (RREP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipher, D.G.

    1982-05-01

    This document describes the Quality Assurance Program plans which will be applied to tasks on Reactor Research Experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories' reactors. The program provides for individual project or experiment quality plan development and allows for reasonable plan flexibility and maximum plan visibility. Various controls and requirements in this program plan are considered mandatory on all features which are identified as important to public health and safety (Level I). It is the intent of this document that the Quality Assurance program comprise those elements which will provide adequate assurance that all components, equipment, and systems of the experiments will perform as designed, and hence prevent delays and costs due to rejections or failures

  20. Direct energy conversion and neutral beam injection for catalyzed D and D-3He tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, A.S.; Moir, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The calculated performance of single stage and Venetian blind direct energy converters for Catalyzed D and D- 3 He Tokamak reactors are discussed. Preliminary results on He pumping are outlined. The efficiency of D and T neutral beam injection is reviewed

  1. Characterization of the fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor after core conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.G.; Sousa, M.; Santos, J.P.; Fernandes, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    The fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor was characterized after the reduction in uranium enrichment and rearrangement of the core configuration. In this work we report on the determination of the hardness parameter and the 1 MeV equivalent neutron flux along the facility, in the new irradiation conditions, following ASTM E722 standard.

  2. Conversion and start up of Tehran Research Reactor with LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaker, M.

    2004-01-01

    The MW Tehran Research Reactor, Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel has been converted to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using U 3 0 8 -Al with less than 20% enriched uranium. Measured value of excess reactivity, control rod worth and other parameters indicate good agreement with computational predictions. (author)

  3. Experience in reactor research and development programs as educational system for thermohydraulic engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, G.M.; Fikry, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    A reactor development program within a research reactor facility can be used for personnel training on the operation of power reactors and research in the different fields of nuclear science and engineering. A training program is proposed where reactor maintenance and operation, in addition to conducting development programs and executing projects, are utilized for forming specialized groups. The paper gives a short survey of a heat transfer program where out of pile and in-core studies are conducted along with two-phase flow investigations. This program covers the main requirements for WWR (water cooled and moderated reactor) power uprating and furnishes basic knowledge on power reactor thermal parameters. The major facilities for conducting similar programs devoted to education are mentioned

  4. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program: Argonne facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, S.V.

    1976-09-01

    The objective of the document is to present in one volume an overview of the Argonne National Laboratory test facilities involved in the conduct of the national LMFBR research and development program. Existing facilities and those under construction or authorized as of September 1976 are described. Each profile presents brief descriptions of the overall facility and its test area and data relating to its experimental and testing capability. The volume is divided into two sections: Argonne-East and Argonne-West. Introductory material for each section includes site and facility maps. The profiles are arranged alphabetically by title according to their respective locations at Argonne-East or Argonne-West. A glossary of acronyms and letter designations in common usage to describe organizations, reactor and test facilities, components, etc., involved in the LMFBR program is appended

  5. Prioritization of R and D programs on probabilistic reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husseiny, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    An interactive computer code based on the multiattribute utility theory has been developed with graphic capabilities to use in selection of probabilistic reactor safety RandD programs. Utility values and proper graphic representation are made through lottery games on the computer terminal. The code is applied to prioritize a set of RandD programs on LWR safety based on attributes including regulatory issues, institutional issues and operation problems. The methodology is described here in detail with its applications. Some of the input includes statistical distributions and subjective judgments on institutional issues. The flexibility of the approach provides a tool for decision makers whether on individual or group level to assess LWR safety priorities and continuously update their strategies

  6. Program for studying fundamental interactions at the PIK reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Varlamov, V. E.; Geltenbort, P.; Gridnev, K. A.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Egorov, A. I.; Ezhov, V. F.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ivanov, S. A.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Konoplev, K. A.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Martemyanov, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    A research program aimed at studying fundamental interactions by means of ultracold and polarized cold neutrons at the GEK-4-4′ channel of the PIK reactor is presented. The apparatus to be used includes a source of cold neutrons in the heavy-water reflector of the reactor, a source of ultracold neutrons based on superfluid helium and installed in a cold-neutron beam extracted from the GEK-4 channel, and a number of experimental facilities in neutron beams. An experiment devoted to searches for the neutron electric dipole moment and an experiment aimed at a measurement the neutron lifetime with the aid of a large gravitational trap are planned to be performed in a beam of ultracold neutrons. An experiment devoted to measuring neutron-decay asymmetries with the aid of a superconducting solenoid is planned in a beam of cold polarized neutrons from the GEK-4′ channel. The second ultracold-neutron source and an experiment aimed at measuring the neutron lifetime with the aid of a magnetic trap are planned in the neutron-guide system of the GEK-3 channel. In the realms of neutrino physics, an experiment intended for sterile-neutrino searches is designed. The state of affairs around the preparation of the experimental equipment for this program is discussed.

  7. The Program Planned for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, Paul N.

    1967-01-01

    This document outlines the program planned for the MSRE in fiscal years 1968 and 1969. It includes a bar diagram of the program, a critical-path type diagram of the operations, and a brief description of each task. In addition to the work at the reactor site, the outline also covers activities elsewhere at ORNL and by the AEC that directly affect the reactor schedule. The amount of detail and the accuracy with which we can estimate times varies considerably among the different items on the schedule. Some items, such as annual checkouts and core sample replacement, have been done before and our time estimates do not include any contingency, In the case of such tasks as planning, reviewing, and preparing for experiments or operations, we have set target dates that appear reasonable and we fully expect to meet these. Processing the salt is a different matter. If there are no unforeseen difficulties we should finish easily in the time shown, but the operation is in part a shakedown, so delays would not be too surprising, The time for modifying the system and adding fluoroborate is, of course, uncertain because the requirements are not yet known. As the requirements develop in more detail the estimate will be updated, but we do not foresee any major dislocation in the schedule, The scheduled time for preparation of enriching salt is becoming tight because of delays in facility construction. Should there be further delays in this key item, the entire schedule would have to be reconsidered.

  8. Program for studying fundamental interactions at the PIK reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebrov, A. P., E-mail: serebrov@pnpi.spb.ru; Vassiljev, A. V.; Varlamov, V. E. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Geltenbort, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin (France); Gridnev, K. A. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Egorov, A. I.; Ezhov, V. F.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ivanov, S. A.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Konoplev, K. A.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Martemyanov, V. P. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); and others

    2016-05-15

    A research program aimed at studying fundamental interactions by means of ultracold and polarized cold neutrons at the GEK-4-4′ channel of the PIK reactor is presented. The apparatus to be used includes a source of cold neutrons in the heavy-water reflector of the reactor, a source of ultracold neutrons based on superfluid helium and installed in a cold-neutron beam extracted from the GEK-4 channel, and a number of experimental facilities in neutron beams. An experiment devoted to searches for the neutron electric dipole moment and an experiment aimed at a measurement the neutron lifetime with the aid of a large gravitational trap are planned to be performed in a beam of ultracold neutrons. An experiment devoted to measuring neutron-decay asymmetries with the aid of a superconducting solenoid is planned in a beam of cold polarized neutrons from the GEK-4′ channel. The second ultracold-neutron source and an experiment aimed at measuring the neutron lifetime with the aid of a magnetic trap are planned in the neutron-guide system of the GEK-3 channel. In the realms of neutrino physics, an experiment intended for sterile-neutrino searches is designed. The state of affairs around the preparation of the experimental equipment for this program is discussed.

  9. Radical tar removal : numerical modeling of tar conversion in a partial combustion reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    In our current society, society is more than ever aware that fossil fuel stocks are finite. As a result, the interest in alternative sustainable energy sources has increased significantly. A promising renewable conversion technique is biomass gasification. Gasification can be defined as thermal

  10. A single step methane conversion into synthetic fuels using microplasma reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Agiral, A.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Yuzawa, Shuhei; Okazaki, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Direct conversion of natural gas into synthetic fuels such as methanol attracts keen attention because direct process can reduce capital and operating costs of high temperature, energy intensive, multi-step processes. We report a direct and selective synthesis of organic oxygenates such as methanol,

  11. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eOhtomo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in situ pressure (0–100 MPa and temperature (0–70°C conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 mL/min, respectively were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ13Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to

  12. SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-02-03

    solved by finite difference method. The solution of the model equations is complicated by the coupled reactions. At the inlet, if there is no hydrogen, rate expressions become singular. To overcome this problem, the first element of the reactor was treated as a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Several alternative numerical schemes were implemented in the solution algorithm to get a converged, stable solution. The model was also capable of handling steam-methane reforming reactions under non-membrane condition and equilibrium reaction conversions. Some of the numerical results were presented in the previous report. To test the membrane reactor model, we fabricated Pd-stainless steel membranes in tubular configuration using electroless plating method coupled with osmotic pressure. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) were used to characterize the fabricated Pd-film composite membranes. Gas-permeation tests were performed to measure the permeability of hydrogen, nitrogen and helium using pure gas. The membranes showed excellent perm-selectivity for hydrogen. This makes the Pd-composite membrane attractive for selective separation and recovery of H{sub 2} from mixed gases at elevated temperature.

  13. BAESNUM, a conversational computer program for the Bayesian estimation of a parameter by a numerical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, A.G.; Jaarsma, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a conversational computer program which, via Bayes' theorem, numerically combines the prior distribution of a parameter with a likelihood function. Any type of prior and likelihood function can be considered. The present version of the program includes six types of prior and employs the binomial likelihood. As input the program requires the law and parameters of the prior distribution and the sample data. As output it gives the posterior distribution as a histogram. The use of the program for estimating the constant failure rate of an item is briefly described

  14. A solid-breeder blanket and power conversion system for the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullis, R.; Clarkson, I.

    1983-01-01

    A solid-breeder blanket has been designed for a commercial fusion power reactor based on the tandem mirror concept (MARS). The design utilizes lithium oxide, cooled by helium which powers a conventional steam electric generating cycle. Maintenance and fabricability considerations led to a modular configuration 6 meters long which incorporates two magnets, shield, blanket and first wall. The modules are arranged to form the 150 meter long reactor central cell. Ferritic steel is used for the module primary structure. The lithium oxide is contained in thin-walled vanadium alloy tubes. A tritium breeding ratio of 1.25 and energy multiplication of 1.1 is predicted. The blanket design appears feasible with only a modest advance in current technology

  15. Core conversion from rod to plate type fuel elements in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.S.; Mina, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Core thermalhydraulic analysis have been performed for rod and plate types fuel elements without altering the core bundles square grid spacer (68 mm, side) and coolant mass flow rate. The U O 2 -Mg, 10% enrichment rod type fuel elements are replaced by the MTR plate type, U-Al alloy of 20% enrichment. Coolant mass flux increased from 2000 kg/m 2 S to 5000 kg/m 2 S. Reactor power could be upgraded from 2 to 10 MW without significantly altering the steady state, thermal-hydraulic safety margins. Fuel, clad and coolant transient temperatures are determined inside the core hot channel during flow coast down using paret code. Residual heat removal system of 20% coolant capacity is necessary for upgrading reactor power to encounter the case of pumps off at 10 MW nominal operation. 6 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Progress and status of the integral fast reactor (IFR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, in which the entire reactor system - reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. Detailed discussions on the present status of the IFR technology development activities in the areas of fuels, pyroprocessing, safety, core design, and fuel cycle demonstration are also presented

  17. Summary of ORNL high-temperature gas-cooled reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) efforts on the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Program have been on HTGR fuel development, fission product and coolant chemistry, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) studies, materials studies, graphite development, reactor physics and shielding studies, application assessments and evaluations and selected component testing

  18. Study of the reduced enrichment fuel conversion at the University of Missouri-Rolla reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straka, M.; Bolon, A.; Covington, L.

    1987-01-01

    The method used to analyze the low-enriched uranium core which has been proposed for the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor is described. Results of calculations for the high-enriched uranium core have been compared with the measured data whenever possible in order to verify this method. For most of the cases that were analyzed the proposed method is adequate and the results obtained for the low-enriched uranium core can be used in revising the licensing documents. (Author)

  19. AFRRI's conversion to a microprocessor-based reactor instrumentation and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Mark L.; Hodgdon, Kenneth M.

    1986-01-01

    The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is procuring a state-of- the-art microprocessor-based instrumentation and control system to operate AFRRI's 1 MW (steady-state), 3000 MW (pulse) TRIGA Mark-F reactor. This system will replace the current control console while improving or maintaining the existing operational capabilities and safety characteristics. The new unit will have a 15-year design life using state-of-the-art components

  20. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the WWR-M reactor at Gatchina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Erykalov, A.N.; Onegin, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    In this report we present the results of computations of the full scale reactor core with HEU (90%), MEU (36%) and LEU (19.75%) fuel. The reactor computer model for the MCU RFFI Monte Carlo code includes all peculiarities of the core. Calculations show that a uranium density of 3.3gU/cm 3 of MEU (36%) fuel and 8/25gU/cm 3 of LEU (19.75%) in WWR-M5 fuel assembly (FA) geometry is required to match the fuel cycle length of the HEU (90%) case with the same end of cycle (EOEC) excess reactivity. For the equilibrium fuel cycle the fuel burnup and poisoning, the fast and thermal neutron fluxes, the reactivity worth of control rods were calculated for the reference case with HEU (90%) FA and for the MEU and LEU FA. The relative accuracy of this neutronic feasibility study of fuel enrichment reduction of the WWR-M reactor in Gatchina is sufficient to start the fabrication feasibility study of MEU (36%) WWR-M5 fuel assemblies. At the present stage of technology it seems hardly possible to manufacture LEU (19.75%) fuel elements in WWR-M5 geometry due to too high uranium density. Only a future R and D can solve the problem. (author)

  1. Tritium conversion and its influence on personnel protection at a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.E.; Phillips, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Tritium gas is less hazardous than tritiated water. The difference appears to be on the order of 10 4 rather than the previously used figure of 10 2 . With an additional factor of 10 2 for protective clothing, a potential difference of 10 6 in the relative HTO to HT hazard results. The mechanisms for conversion of HT to HTO are not fully known but models presented strongly link the presence of H and OH radicals with the ultimate formation of water. Therefore a hindrance of this conversion may be possible by using specific quencher materials. The maintenance of tritium in the gaseous form then allows for a wider variety of tritium management schemes

  2. U.S. fast reactor materials and structures program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, W.O.; Purdy, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. DOE has sponsored a vigorous breeder reactor materials and structures program for 15 years. Important contributions have resulted from this effort in the areas of design (inelastic rules, verified methods, seismic criteria, mechanical properties data); resolution of licensing issues (technical witnessing, confirmatory testing); construction (fabrication/welding procedures, nondestructive testing techniques); and operation (sodium purification, instrumentation and chemical analysis, radioactivity control, and in-service inspection. The national LMFBR program currently is being restructured. The Materials and Structures Program will focus its efforts in the following areas: (1) removal of anticipated licensing impediments through confirmation of the adequacy of structural design methods and criteria for components containing welds and geometric discontinuities, the generation of mechanical properties for stainless steel castings and weldments, and the evaluation of irradiation effects; (2) qualification of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and tribological coatings for design flexibility; (3) development of improved inelastic design guidelines and procedures; (4) reform of design codes and standards and engineering practices, leading to simpler, less conservative rules and to simplified design analysis methods; and (5) incorporation of information from foreign program

  3. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  4. Progress report on reactor physics research program, January 1963 - February 1964

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-02-01

    This progress report is a part of the annual report of the department of reactor physics prepared for the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences. It is a review of research activities in the field of theoretical and experimental reactor physics in the year 1973. A part of this program was included in the NPY Cooperative program in reactor physics. The topics covered by this report are as follows: Calculations of the thermal neutron distribution and reaction rate in a reactor cell and comparison with experiments; buckling measurements; thermalization and slowing down of neutrons; pulsed neutron source techniques; and reactor kinetics

  5. Progress report on reactor physics research program, January 1963 - February 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1964-02-15

    This progress report is a part of the annual report of the department of reactor physics prepared for the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences. It is a review of research activities in the field of theoretical and experimental reactor physics in the year 1973. A part of this program was included in the NPY Cooperative program in reactor physics. The topics covered by this report are as follows: Calculations of the thermal neutron distribution and reaction rate in a reactor cell and comparison with experiments; buckling measurements; thermalization and slowing down of neutrons; pulsed neutron source techniques; and reactor kinetics.

  6. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992-March 31, 1993). The major Department's programs promoted in the year are the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor, the design activities of advanced reactor system and development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the engineering applications including TRU incineration. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on the nuclear data and group constants, the developments of theoretical methods and codes, the reactor physics experiments and their analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project were also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  7. Reactor engineering department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1989 (April 1, 1989 - March 31, 1990). One of major Department's programs is the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor and the design activities of advanced reactor system. Development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the nuclear engineering including is also TRU incineration promoted. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, on reactor physics experiments and analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics, technology assessment of nuclear energy and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  8. Conversion of actinide solutions for the production of MA bearing fuels for Gen IV fast reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.

    2008-01-01

    The conversion of the solution to solid for fuels containing minor actinides for accelerator driven systems or Gen IV fast reactors cannot be made by conventional ammonia or oxalate precipitation as is the case in today's reprocessing plant. The small particle size and concomitant dust that is produced in subsequent processing steps will not permit use of these processes on industrial scale. Innovation is needed to avoid dust generating powders, and indeed to simplify the processes themselves. Two such processing routes have been developed at the JRC-ITU. The sol gel route has been used to produce fuel containing Am and Np for the SUPERFACT, TRABANT and other irradiation experiments. The infiltration process has also been established and fuels have been produced for the FUTURIX and HELIOS experiments. (authors)

  9. Conversion of actinide solutions for the production of MA bearing fuels for Gen IV fast reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements P.O.Box 2340, Karlsruhe, D-76125 (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The conversion of the solution to solid for fuels containing minor actinides for accelerator driven systems or Gen IV fast reactors cannot be made by conventional ammonia or oxalate precipitation as is the case in today's reprocessing plant. The small particle size and concomitant dust that is produced in subsequent processing steps will not permit use of these processes on industrial scale. Innovation is needed to avoid dust generating powders, and indeed to simplify the processes themselves. Two such processing routes have been developed at the JRC-ITU. The sol gel route has been used to produce fuel containing Am and Np for the SUPERFACT, TRABANT and other irradiation experiments. The infiltration process has also been established and fuels have been produced for the FUTURIX and HELIOS experiments. (authors)

  10. Modeling the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor process heat plant: a nuclear to chemical conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfremmer, R.D.; Openshaw, F.L.

    1982-05-01

    The high-temperature heat available from the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) makes it suitable for many process applications. One of these applications is a large-scale energy production plant where nuclear energy is converted into chemical energy and stored for industrial or utility applications. This concept combines presently available nuclear HTGR technology and energy conversion chemical technology. The design of this complex plant involves questions of interacting plant dynamics and overall plant control. This paper discusses how these questions were answered with the aid of a hybrid computer model that was developed within the time-frame of the conceptual design studies. A brief discussion is given of the generally good operability shown for the plant and of the specific potential problems and their anticipated solution. The paper stresses the advantages of providing this information in the earliest conceptual phases of the design

  11. Nuclear reactor safety program in US department of energy and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.T.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes policy, issues orders, and assures compliance with requirements. The contractors who design, construct, modify, operate, maintain and decommission DOE reactors, set forth the assessment of the safety of cognizant reactors and implement DOE orders. Teams of experts in the Department, through scheduled and unscheduled review programs, reassess the safety of reactors in every phases of their lives. As new technology develops, the safety programs are reevaluated and policies are modified to accommodate these new technologies. The diagnostic capabilities of the computer using multiple alarms to enhance detection of defects and control of a reactor have been greatly utilized in reactor operating systems. The Application of artificial intelligence technologies for diagnostic and even for the decision making process in the event of reactor accidents would be one of the future trends in reactor safety programs

  12. Nuclear reactor safety program in U.S. Department of Energy and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.T.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) establishes policy, issues orders, and assures compliance with requirements. The contractors who design, construct, modify, operate, maintain and decommission DOE reactors, set forth the assessment of the safety of cognizant reactors and impliment DOE orders. Teams of experts in the Depatment, through scheduled and unscheduled review programs, reassess the safety of reactors in every phases of their lives. As new technology develops, the safety programs are reevaluated and policies are modified to accommodate these new technologies. The diagnostic capabilities of the computer using multiple alarms to enhance detection of defects and control of a reactor have been greatly utilized in reactor operating systems. The application of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for diagnostic and even for the decision making process in the event of reactor accidents would be one of the future trends in reactor safety programs. (author)

  13. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program. Final technical report for 1996--1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappas, W.J.; Adams, V.G.

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) has, once again, stimulated a broad use of the reactor and radiation facilities by undergraduate and graduate students, visitors, and professionals. Participants are exposed to topics such as nuclear engineering, radiation safety, and nuclear reactor operations. This information is presented through various means including tours, slide presentations, experiments, and discussions. Student research using the MUTR is also encouraged. In addition, the Reactor Sharing Program here at the University of Maryland does not limit itself to the confines of the TRIGA reactor facility. Incorporated in the program are the Maryland University Radiation Effects Laboratory, and the UMCP 2 x 4 Thermal Hydraulic Loop. These facilities enhance and give an added dimension to the tours and experiments. The Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR) and the associated laboratories are made available to any interested institution six days a week on a scheduled basis. Most institutions are scheduled at the time of their first request--a reflection of their commitment to the Reactor Sharing Program. The success of the past years by no means guarantees future success. Therefore, the reactor staff is more aggressively pursuing its outreach program, especially with junior colleges and universities without reactor or radiation facilities; more aggressively developing demonstration and training programs for students interested in careers in nuclear power and radiation technology; and more aggressively up-grading the reactor facilities--not only to provide a better training facility but to prepare for relicensing in the year 2000

  14. MIT nuclear reactor laboratory high school teaching program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmez, I.

    1991-01-01

    For the last 6 years, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory's academic and scientific staff a have been conducting evening seminars for precollege science teachers, parents, and high school students from the New England area. These seminars, as outlined in this paper, are intended to give general information on nuclear technologies with specific emphasis on radiation physics, nuclear medicine, nuclear chemistry, and ongoing research activities at the MIT research reactor. The ultimate goal is to create interest or build on the already existing interest in science and technology by, for example, special student projects. Several small projects have already been completed ranging from environmental research to biological reactions with direct student involvement. Another outcome of these seminars was the change in attitudes of science teachers toward nuclear technology. Numerous letters have been received from the teachers and parents stating their previous lack of knowledge on the beneficial aspects of nuclear technologies and the subsequent inclusion of programs in their curriculum for educating students so that they may also develop a more positive attitude toward nuclear power

  15. Capture programs, analysis, data graphication for the study of the thermometry of the TRIGA Mark III reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.

    1991-05-01

    This document covers the explanation of the capture programs, analysis and graphs of the data obtained during the measurement of the temperatures of the instrumented fuel element of the TRIGA Mark III reactor and of the coolant one near to this fuel, using the conversion card from Analogic to Digital of 'Data Translation', and using a signal conditioner for five temperature measurers with the help of thermo par type K, developed by the Simulation and Control of the nuclear systems management department, which gives a signal from 0 to 10 Vcd for an interval of temperature of 0 to 1000 C. (Author)

  16. Selection of fuel design for conversion and upgradation of Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) is being converted from the use of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel and its power is also being upgraded. In order to select new fuel for the converted and upgraded core ten different fuel element designs were analyzed and their relative performance was compared. Results of this study were later used to select appropriate design of the new fuel for PARR-1. This paper describes the computational methodology utilized for the analysis of various fuel element designs. Criteria for selecting the new fuel element are discussed and guidelines forming the selection basis of the new fuel design are given. (author)

  17. TERRAPOWER, LLC TRAVELING WAVE REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVEL HEJZLAR

    2013-11-01

    burden. This paper describes the origins and current status of the TWR development program at TerraPower, LLC. Some of the areas covered include the key TWR design challenges and brief descriptions of TWR-Prototype (TWR-P reactor. Selected information on the TWR-P core designs are also provided in the areas of neutronic, thermal hydraulic and fuel performance. The TWR-P plant design is also described in such areas as; system design descriptions, mechanical design, and safety performance.

  18. Civilian Power Program. Part 1, Summary, Current status of reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Author, Not Given

    1959-09-01

    This study group covered the following: delineation of the specific objectives of the overall US AEC civilian power reactor program, technical objectives of each reactor concept, preparation of a chronological development program for each reactor concept, evaluation of the economic potential of each reactor type, a program to encourage the the development, and yardsticks for measuring the development. Results were used for policy review by AEC, program direction, authorization and appropriation requests, etc. This evaluation encompassed civilian power reactors rated at 25 MW(e) or larger and related experimental facilities and R&D. This Part I summarizes the significant results of the comprehensive effort to determine the current technical and economic status for each reactor concept; it is based on the 8 individual technical status reports (Part III).

  19. Modeling and sizing of the heat exchangers of a new supercritical CO2 Brayton power cycle for energy conversion for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, I.P.; Cantizano, A.; Linares, J.I.; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We propose a procedure to model the heat exchangers of a S-CO2 Brayton power cycle. •Discretization in sub-heat exchangers is performed due to complex behavior of CO 2 . •Different correlations have been tested, verifying them with CFD when necessary. •Obtained sizes are agree with usual values of printed circuit heat exchangers. -- Abstract: TECNO F US is a research program financed by the Spanish Government to develop technologies related to a dual-coolant (He/Pb–Li) breeding blanket design concept including the auxiliary systems for a future power reactor (DEMO). One of the main issues of this program is the optimization of heat recovery from the reactor and its conversion into electrical power. This paper is focused on the methodology employed for the design and sizing of all the heat exchangers of the supercritical CO 2 Brayton power cycle (S-CO2) proposed by the authors. Due to the large pressure difference between the fluids, and also to their compactness, Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHE) are suggested in literature for these type of cycles. Because of the complex behavior of CO 2 , their design is performed by a numerical discretization into sub-heat exchangers, thus a higher precision is reached when the thermal properties of the fluids vary along the heat exchanger. Different empirical correlations for the pressure drop and the Nusselt number have been coupled and assessed. The design of the precooler (PC) and the low temperature recuperator (LTR) is also verified by simulations using CFD because of the near-critical behavior of CO 2 . The size of all of the heat exchangers of the cycle have been assessed

  20. Modeling and sizing of the heat exchangers of a new supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle for energy conversion for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, I.P.; Cantizano, A.; Linares, J.I., E-mail: linares@upcomillas.es; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We propose a procedure to model the heat exchangers of a S-CO2 Brayton power cycle. •Discretization in sub-heat exchangers is performed due to complex behavior of CO{sub 2}. •Different correlations have been tested, verifying them with CFD when necessary. •Obtained sizes are agree with usual values of printed circuit heat exchangers. -- Abstract: TECNO{sub F}US is a research program financed by the Spanish Government to develop technologies related to a dual-coolant (He/Pb–Li) breeding blanket design concept including the auxiliary systems for a future power reactor (DEMO). One of the main issues of this program is the optimization of heat recovery from the reactor and its conversion into electrical power. This paper is focused on the methodology employed for the design and sizing of all the heat exchangers of the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle (S-CO2) proposed by the authors. Due to the large pressure difference between the fluids, and also to their compactness, Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHE) are suggested in literature for these type of cycles. Because of the complex behavior of CO{sub 2}, their design is performed by a numerical discretization into sub-heat exchangers, thus a higher precision is reached when the thermal properties of the fluids vary along the heat exchanger. Different empirical correlations for the pressure drop and the Nusselt number have been coupled and assessed. The design of the precooler (PC) and the low temperature recuperator (LTR) is also verified by simulations using CFD because of the near-critical behavior of CO{sub 2}. The size of all of the heat exchangers of the cycle have been assessed.

  1. A fast-running fuel management program for a CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok

    2000-01-01

    A fast-running fuel management program for a CANDU reactor has been developed. The basic principle of this program is to select refueling channels such that the reference reactor conditions are maintained by applying several constraints and criteria when selecting refueling channels. The constraints used in this program are the channel and bundle power and the fuel burnup. The final selection of the refueling channel is determined based on the priority of candidate channels, which enhances the reactor power distribution close to the time-average model. The refueling simulation was performed for a natural uranium CANDU reactor and the results were satisfactory

  2. Conversion of the core of the TRIGA Mark III reactor at the Mexican Nuclear Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran Lopez, J.M.; Lucatero, M.A.; Reyes Andrade, B.; Rivero Gutierrez, T.; Sainz Mejia, E.

    1990-01-01

    It was decided to convert the core of the TRIGA MARK III reactor at the Mexican Nuclear Centre run by the National Nuclear Institute because of problems detected during the operation, such as a lack of excess reactivity for operation at nominal power over long periods and difficulties in the maintenance and calibration of the control panel. In order to compensate for the lack of excess reactivity the fuel elements taken to the highest burnup were replaced by fresh elements acquired for this purpose. The latter, however, had a different enrichment, and this necessitated a detailed analysis of the neutronic and thermohydraulic behaviour of the reactor with a view to determining a mixed core configuration which would meet safe operation requirements. In conducting the thermohydraulic analysis, a natural convection coolant flow model was developed to determine coolant velocity and pressure drop patterns within the core. The heat transfer equations were solved and it was found that the hottest fuel element did not attain critical heat flux conditions. In loading this core it was also necessary to analyse procedures and to consider the possible effects of reaching criticality with fuel elements having different enrichments. The loading procedure is described, as is the measurement system and the results obtained. In order to resolve the calibration and maintenance problems, a new, more advanced control panel was designed with conventional and nuclear detection systems and modern components

  3. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Nasonov, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons for the IR-8 research reactor were made for HEU (90%), HEU (36%), and LEU (19.75%) fuel assembly (FA) designs using three dimensional multi-group diffusion theory models benchmarked to detailed Monte Carlo models of the reactor. Comparisons were made of changes in reactivity, cycle length, average 235 U discharge burnup, thermal neutron flux, and control rod worths for the 90% and 36% enriched IRT-3M fuel assembly and the 19.75% enriched IRT-4M fuel assembly with the same fuel management strategy. The results of these comparisons showed that a uranium density of 3.5 g/cm 3 in the fuel meat would be required in the LEU IRT-4M fuel assembly to match the cycle length of the HEU (90%) IRT-3M FA and an LEU density of 3.7 g/cm 3 is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU (36%) IRT-3M FA. (author)

  4. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the SAFARI-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.; Ball, G.

    2000-01-01

    A neutronic feasibility study to convert the SAFARI-1 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with NECSA. Comparisons were made of the reactor performance with the current 90% enriched HEU fuel type (UAl) and two 19.75% enriched LEU fuel types (U 3 Si 2 and U7Mo). The thermal fluxes with the LEU fuels were 3 - 9% lower than with the current HEU fuel. For the same fuel assembly design, a uranium density of approximately 4.5 g/cm 3 was required with U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel and a uranium density of about 4.6 g/cm 3 was required with U7Mo-Al fuel to match the 24.6-day cycle of the UAl-alloy fuel with 0.92 gU/cm 3 . The selection of a suitable LEU fuel and the decision to convert SAFARI-1 will be an economic matter that depends upon the fuel type, fuel assembly design, experiment performance and fuel cycle costs. (author)

  5. Conversion of highly enriched uranium in thorium-232 based oxide fuel for light water reactors: MOX-T fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vapirev, E I; Jordanov, T; Christoskov, I [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1994-12-31

    The idea of conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from warheads without mixing it with natural uranium as well as the utilization of plutonium as fuel component is discussed. A nuclear fuel which is a mixture of 4% {sup 235}U (HEU) as a fissile isotope and 96 % {sup 232}Th (ThO{sub 2}) as a non-fissile isotope in a mixed oxide with thorium fuel is proposed. It is assumed that plutonium can also be used in the proposed fuel in a mixture with {sup 235}U. The following advantages of the use of HEU in LWRs in mixed {sup 235}U - Th fuel are pointed out: (1) No generation of long-living plutonium and americium isotopes (in case of reprocessing the high level radioactive wastes will contain only fission fragments and uranium); (2) The high conversion ratio of Th extends the expected burnup by approximately 1/3 without higher initial enrichment (the same initial enrichment simplifies the problem for compensation of the excess reactivity in the beginning with burnable poison and boric acid); (3) The high conversion ratio of Th allows the fuel utilization with less initial enrichment (by approx. 1/3) for the same burnup; thus less excess reactivity has to be compensated after reloading; in case of fuel reprocessing all fissile materials ({sup 235}U + {sup 233}U) could be chemically extracted. Irrespectively to the optimistic expectations outlined, further work including data on optimal loading and reloading schemes, theoretical calculations of thermal properties of {sup 235}U + Th fuel rods, manufacturing of several test fuel assemblies and investigations of their operational behaviour in a reactor core is still needed. 1 fig., 7 refs.

  6. Study on the conversion of H2 and CO from the helium carrier gas of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Cuiping; Zheng Zhenhong; Shi Fuen

    1995-01-01

    The conversions of hydrogen and carbon monoxide into water vapor and carbon dioxide on CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 catalyst are studied. The effects of different temperature, system atmospheric pressure, impurity gas concentration, flow and dew point on properties of cupric oxide bed are investigated. The conversion characteristics curves of H 2 and CO are given. Experimental data of conversion capacity, action period and conversion efficiency of CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 are obtained and the optimal parameters are determined. The results show that the concentration of H 2 and CO of the effluent gas after purification can reach below 2 x 10 -6 , respectively. So it can meet the demands of high temperature gas-cooled reactor and also provide optimal design parameters and reliable data for conversion of H 2 and CO on CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 catalyst

  7. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program: Program management and staff review methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    This report summarizes the NRC/EPRI coordinated effort to develop design requirements for a standardized advanced light water reactor (ALWR) and the procedures for screening and applying new generic safety issues to this program. The end-product will be an NRC-approved ALWR Requirements Document for use by the nuclear industry in generating designs of LWRs to be constructed for operation in the 1990s and beyond

  8. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-01-14

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two possible LEU cores were identified that would provide nearly the same neutron flux and spectrum as the present HEU core at irradiation facilities that are used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and for animal research. One core has 17 and the other has 18 LEU MTR-type fuel assemblies with uranium densities of 2.5g U/cm{sup 3} or less in the fuel meat. This LEU fuel is fully-qualified for routine use. Thermal hydraulics and safety analyses need to be performed to complete the feasibility study.

  9. Conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for a mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor. 12-month progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.; Baxi, C.B.; Rao, R.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents the conceptual design and preliminary feasibility assessment for the hybrid blanket and power conversion system of the Mirror Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactor. Existing gas-cooled fission reactor technology is directly applicable to the Mirror Hybrid Reactor. There are a number of aspects of the present conceptual design that require further design and analysis effort. The blanket and power conversion system operating parameters have not been optimized. The method of supporting the blanket modules and the interface between these modules and the primary loop helium ducting will require further design work. The means of support and containment of the primary loop components must be studied. Nevertheless, in general, the conceptual design appears quite feasible

  10. GENP-2, Program System for Integral Reactor Perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boioli, A.; Cecchini, G.P.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: GENP-2 is a system of programs that use 'generalized perturbation theory' to calculate the perturbations of reactor integral characteristics which can be expressed by means of ratios between linear or bilinear functionals of the real and/or adjoint fluxes (e.g. reaction rate ratios), due to cross section perturbations. 2 - Method of solution: GENP-2 consists of the following codes: DDV, SORCI, CIAP-PMN and GLOBP-2D. DDV calculates the real or adjoint fluxes and power distribution using multigroup diffusion theory in 2-dimensions. SORCI uses the fluxes from DDV to calculate the real and/or adjoint general perturbation sources. CIAP-PMN reads the sources from SORCI and uses them in the real or adjoint generalised importance calculations (2 dimensions, multi- group diffusion). GLOBP-2D uses the importance calculated by CIAP-PMN, and the fluxes calculated by DDV, in generalised perturbation expressions to calculate the perturbation in the quantity of interest. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: DDV although variably dimensioned has the following restrictions: - max. number of mesh points 6400; - max. number of mesh points in 1-dimension 81; - max. number of regions 6400; - max. number of energy groups 100; - if power distribution calculated, product of number of groups and number of regions 2500. The other programs have the same restrictions if applicable

  11. Fast reactor development program in France in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langrand, J.C.; Hubert, G.; Marmonier, P.; Del Negro, R.; Saint-Arroman, G.; Coulon, P.; Mesnage, B.; Pillon, S.; Lefevre, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    , in spite of the availability of one and half core. This decision leads to drop the >. The Capra program was reoriented. Now, emphasis is put on burning the minor actinides (MA) and long-lived fusion products (LLFP), which answers the French 1991 law on radioactive wastes; as a consequence, the experimental programme proposed for Phenix is mainly devoted to this objective. This report presents also the status of Rapsodie, and the main achievements on the R and D programme on fast reactors. (author)

  12. Recommended methods for evaluating the benefits of ECUT Program outputs. [Energy Conversion and Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, L.O.; Winter, C.

    1986-03-01

    This study was conducted to define and develop techniques that could be used to assess the complete spectrum of positive effects resulting from the Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Program activities. These techniques could then be applied to measure the benefits from past ECUT outputs. In addition, the impact of future ECUT outputs could be assessed as part of an ongoing monitoring process, after sufficient time has elapsed to allow their impacts to develop.

  13. Factors influencing success of metal to plastic conversion programs for under-hood applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Male, L.J. [Amoco Chemicals Polymers Business Group, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Desai, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper compares high performance engineering polymers available today for under-hood applications. It includes an example of an end cap showing value-added capabilities such as design for machining and assembly (DFMA), team approach and computer aided engineering being used for a most cost-effective custom molding solution. These techniques should be part of standard design procedure for conversion programs to cope with the challenges of today and tomorrow. (orig./HW)

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Digital Architecture Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Digital Architecture effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The LWRS program is performed in close collaboration with industry research and development (R&D) programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Therefore, a major objective of the LWRS program is the development of a seamless digital environment for plant operations and support by integrating information from plant systems with plant processes for nuclear workers through an array of interconnected technologies. In order to get the most benefits of the advanced technology suggested by the different research activities in the LWRS program, the nuclear utilities need a digital architecture in place to support the technology. A digital architecture can be defined as a collection of information technology (IT) capabilities needed to support and integrate a wide-spectrum of real-time digital capabilities for nuclear power plant performance improvements. It is not hard to imagine that many processes within the plant can be largely improved from both a system and human performance perspective by utilizing a plant wide (or near plant wide) wireless network. For example, a plant wide wireless network allows for real time plant status information to easily be accessed in the control room, field workers’ computer-based procedures can be updated based on the real time plant status, and status on ongoing procedures can be incorporated into smart schedules in the outage command center to allow for more accurate planning of critical tasks. The goal

  15. Uncertainties for industrial suppliers in view to conversions and designs of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.J.; Stroemich, A.

    1991-01-01

    The different national RERTR-programs have had substantial results and offer clear potential for LEU-fuel. Nevertheless there are still attempts, papers and political actions based on future developments of LEU-fuel. They may create the same uncertainty as 10 years ago again, depending on what plant the industry has to supply. Only one conclusion can be drawn: There has to be an agreement on the results of the RERTR-programs binding for all parties and the industry has a right to demand such agreement after 10 years of heavily subsidised fuel development. (orig.)

  16. Conversion of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute nuclear reactor to low enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.H. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Training Reactor was converted to Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) aluminide fuel in 1988 and 1989. Tests on the Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU) core and LEU cores were performed and comparisons made. The testing consisted of critical loading, thermal neutron flux distribution, excess reactivity, regulating blade reactivity worth, and temperature coefficient of reactivity measurement. Comparisons between the LEU and HEU showed that the critical loading configurations were somewhat different with the HEU core consisting of 24 elements and the LEU core consisting of 21 1/3 elements with excess reactivities of 0.24% ΔK/K for the HEU and 0.16% for the LEU. Thermal neutron flux distributions showed similar trends in both the LEU and HEU cores. The regulating blade worth showed a larger LEU value due to thermal peaking in the blade region and temperature coefficients showed a more negative LEU value due to Doppler broadening. Low induced activity of the HEU fuel permitted shipment to the Westinghouse Savannah River Facility using DOT-6M type B containers on 8 August, 1989. (orig.)

  17. Maintenance for power conversion system of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300). Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Takada, Shoji; Katanishi, Shoji; Yan, Xing; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    In order to be a suitable next generation nuclear power plant from reliable and economical points of view, it is necessary for GTHTR300 to have good maintenability and inspectability. Appropriate maintenance concept for the power conversion system of GTHTR300 consisting of a gas turbine, a compressor, a generator, a recuperator, a precooler and so on was studied based on results of the basic design of GTHTR300 in fiscal 2001. Considering degradation phenomena which could occur on each objective equipment, it is technically possible to reduce several maintenance items and extend maintenance interval for some equipment compared to those for existing LWR power plants and combined cycle fossil power plants. But owing to structural feature and installed location of each equipment, and fission product plate-out on each equipment, it became clear that some problems must be solved for making the maintenance works realistic and efficient. Solving the problems and confirming appropriateness of the proposed maintenance concept and plans will be done in coming detailing work of GTHTR300 design. (author)

  18. Thermoelectric conversion at the divertor plates and the first wall of a fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Sagara, A. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Komori, A. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Tazima, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Motojima, O. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Iiyoshi, A. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Matsubara, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)]|[Yamaguchi Univ. (Japan); Onozuka, M. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)]|[Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan); Koganezawa, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)]|[Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan); Matsuda, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)]|[Toyo Tanso Co. Ltd. (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    We investigated thermoelectric conversion on the first wall and the divertor plates. Carbon, B{sub 4}C, and other carbon-based materials were tested as components of a thermoelectric element. The heat flux from the plasma was assumed to be 400 kW/m{sup 2}, and the cooling side temperature the fixed design parameter of either 350 K or 650 K. While differential radiation cooling was not considered in this study, a computer programme was used to estimate the distribution of temperature and thermal stress over the thermoelectric element. The three-legged element was conceived to be 20 cm long and 12 cm wide. The temperature in its arches reached almost 2500 K, and the maximal thermal stress was 80 MPa - still within the acceptable range for the ITER design parameter. The high thermoelectric power of B{sub 4}C accounts for the thermal efficiency of 2.8% (for 650 K) or 3.3% (for 350 K). If we find an N-type semi-conductor material with the same high absolute value as B{sub 4}C to replace carbon, the efficiency will improve to 9.4% (for 650 K) or 11% (for 350 K). Since plasma is a current-conducting medium, we discuss aspects of a plasma-connected thermoelectric element. Its efficiency would depend on the connection length of magnetic field and plasma parameters near the wall. (orig.).

  19. The effects of China's Sloping Land Conversion Program on agricultural households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen; Henningsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1990s, China aimed to mitigate environmental degradation from agricultural production activities by introducing the world's largest "Payments for Environmental Services" program: the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP). We develop a microeconomic Agricultural Household Model, which...... nonfarm labor supply and total consumption in some regions, these effects could not be observed in others. The recent reduction of the SLCP compensation payment rates generally had negligible effects on agricultural production and off-farm work and only very small effects on household consumption....

  20. A conversion development program to LEU targets for medical isotope production in the MAPLE Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). The molybdenum extraction process from the HEU targets provided predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. A reliable supply of HEU for the NRU research reactor targets has enabled MDS Nordion to develop a secure chain of medical isotope supply for the international nuclear medicine community. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to patient application, has been established on a proven method of HEU target irradiation and processing. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, the design of the MAPLE facilities was based on our established process - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a program to convert the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets. An initial feasibility study was initiated to identify the technical issues to convert the MAPLE targets from HEU to LEU. This paper will present the results of the feasibility study. It will also describe future challenges and opportunities in converting the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets for large scale, commercial medical isotope production. (author)

  1. TEMP-M program for thermal-hydraulic calculation of fast reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogoslovskaya, C.P.; Sorokin, A.P.; Tikhomirov, B.B.; Titov, P.A.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    TEMP-M program (Fortran, BESM-6 computer) for thermal-hydraulic calculation of fast reactor fuel assemblies is described. Results of calculation of temperature field in a 127 fuel element assembly of BN-600, reactor accomplished according to TEMP-N program are considered as an example. Algorithm, realized in the program, enables to calculate the distributions of coolant heating, fuel element temperature (over perimeter and length) and assembly shell temperature. The distribution of coolant heating in assembly channels is determined from a solution of the balance equation system which accounts for interchannel exchange, nonadiabatic conditions on the assembly shell. The TEMP-M program gives necessary information for calculation of strength, seviceability of fast reactor core elements, serves an effective instrument for calculations when projecting reactor cores and analyzing thermal-hydraulic characteristics of operating reactor fuel assemblies

  2. US/DOE Man-Machine Integration program for liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Zmura, A.P.; Seeman, S.E.

    1985-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Man-Machine Integration program was started in 1980 as an addition to the existing Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor safety base technology program. The overall goal of the DOE program is to enhance the operational safety of liquid metal reactors by optimum integration of humans and machines in the overall reactor plant system and by application of the principles of human-factors engineering to the design of equipment, subsystems, facilities, operational aids, procedures and environments. In the four years since its inception the program has concentrated on understanding the control process for Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) and on applying advanced computer concepts to this process. This paper describes the products that have been developed in this program, present computer-related programs, and plans for the future

  3. Neutronic feasibility studies using U-Mo dispersion fuel (9 Wt % Mo, 5.0 gU/cm3) for LEU conversion of the MARIA (Poland), IR-8 (Russia), and WWR-SM (Uzbekistan) research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Deen, J.R.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, E.

    2000-01-01

    U-Mo alloys dispersed in an Al matrix offer the potential for high-density uranium fuels needed for the LEU conversion of many research reactors. On-going fuel qualification tests by the US RERTR Program show good irradiation properties of U-Mo alloy dispersion fuel containing 7-10 weight percent molybdenum. For the neutronic studies in this paper the alloy was assumed to contain 9 wt % Mo (U-9Mo) with a uranium density in the fuel meat of 5.00 gU/cm 3 which corresponds to 32.5 volume % U-9Mo. Fuels containing U-9Mo have been used in Russian reactors since the 1950's. For the three research reactors analyzed here, LEU fuel element thicknesses are the same as those for the Russian-fabricated HEU reference fuel elements. Relative to the reference fuels containing 80-90% enriched uranium, LEU U-9Mo Al-dispersion fuel with 5.00 gU/cm 3 doubles the cycle length of the MARIA reactor and increases the IR-8 cycle length by about 11%. For the WWR-SM reactor, the cycle length, and thus the number of fuel assemblies used per year, is nearly unchanged. To match the cycle length of the 36% enriched fuel currently used in the WWR-SM reactor will require a uranium density in the LEU U-9Mo Al-dispersion fuel of about 5.4 gU/cm 3 . The 5.00 gU/cm 3 LEU fuel causes thermal neutron fluxes in water holes near the edge of the core to decrease by (6-8)% for all three reactors. (author)

  4. Reactor Materials Program probability of indirectly--induced failure of L and P reactor process water piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The design basis accident for the Savannah River Production Reactors is the abrupt double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a large process water pipe. This accident is not considered credible in light of the low applied stresses and the inherent ductility of the piping material. The Reactor Materials Program was initiated to provide the technical basis for an alternate credible design basis accident. One aspect of this work is to determine the probability of the DEGB; to show that in addition to being incredible, it is also highly improbable. The probability of a DEGB is broken into two parts: failure by direct means, and indirectly-induced failure. Failure of the piping by direct means can only be postulated to occur if an undetected crack grows to the point of instability, causing a large pipe break. While this accident is not as severe as a DEGB, it provides a conservative upper bound on the probability of a direct DEGB of the piping. The second part of this evaluation calculates the probability of piping failure by indirect causes. Indirect failure of the piping can be triggered by an earthquake which causes other reactor components or the reactor building to fall on the piping or pull it from its supports. Since indirectly-induced failure of the piping will not always produce consequences as severe as a DEGB, this gives a conservative estimate of the probability of an indirectly- induced DEGB. This second part, indirectly-induced pipe failure, is the subject of this report. Failure by seismic loads in the piping itself will be covered in a separate report on failure by direct causes. This report provides a detailed evaluation of L reactor. A walkdown of P reactor and an analysis of the P reactor building provide the basis for extending the L reactor results to P reactor

  5. The plutonium recycle for PWR reactors from brazilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. The study starts with the calculation of a reference reactor and has flexibility to evaluate the demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): Without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5% U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the fifth operation cycle of the thermal reactors. (author)

  6. Education program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactor for pre-college science teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.R.; Fecych, W.; Harling, O.K.

    1989-01-01

    A Pre-College Science Teacher (PCST) Seminar program has been in place at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory for 4 yr. The purpose of the PCST program is to educate teachers in nuclear technology and to show teachers, and through them the community, the types of activities performed at research reactors. This paper describes the background, content, and results of the MIT PCST program

  7. Participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1997-03-01

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these user institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities. Several methods have been used by the UVA Reactor Facility to achieve this objective. First, many college and secondary school groups toured the Reactor Facility and viewed the UVAR reactor and associated experimental facilities. Second, advanced undergraduate and graduate classes from area colleges and universities visited the facility to perform experiments in nuclear engineering and physics which would not be possible at the user institution. Third, irradiation and analysis services at the Facility have been made available for research by faculty and students from user institutions. Fourth, some institutions have received activated material from UVA for use at their institutions. These areas are discussed here

  8. PODESY program for flux mapping of CNA II reactor:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio

    1988-01-01

    The PODESY program, developed by KWU, calculates the spatial flux distribution of CNA II reactor through a three-dimensional expansion of 90 incore detector measurements. The calculation is made in three steps: a) short-term calculation which considers the control rod positions and it has to be done each time the flux mapping is calculated; b) medium-term calculation which includes local burn-up dependent calculation made by diffusion methods in macro-cell configurations (seven channels in hexagonal distribution), and c) long-term calculation, or macroscopic flux determination, that is a fitting and expansion of measured fluxes, previously corrected by local effects, using the eigen functions of the modified diffusion equation. The paper outlines development of step (c) of the calculation. The incore detectors have been located in the central zone of the core. In order to obtain low errors in the expansion procedure it is necessary to include additional points, whose flux values are assumed to be equivalent to detector measurements. These flux values are calculated with detector measurements and a spatial flux distribution calculated by a PUMA code. This PUMA calculation employs a smooth burn-up distribution (local burn-up variations are considered in step (b) of the whole calculation) representing the state of core evolution at the calculation time. The core evolution referred to ends when the equilibrium core condition is reached. Additionally, a calculation method to be employed in the plant in case of incore detector failures, is proposed. (Author) [es

  9. Design reliability assurance program for Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Beom-Su; Han, Jin-Kyu; Na, Jang Hwan; Yoo, Kyung Yeong

    1997-01-01

    The Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) project is to develop standardized nuclear power plant design for the construction of future nuclear power plants in Korea. The main purpose of the KNGR project is to develop the advanced nuclear power plants, which enhance safety and economics significantly through the incorporation of design concepts for severe accident prevention and mitigation, supplementary passive safety concept, simplification and application of modularization and so on. For those, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) and availability study will be performed at the early stage of the design, and the Design Reliability Assurance Program (D-RAP) is applied in the development of the KNGR to ensure that the safety and availability evaluated in the PSA and availability study at the early phase of the design is maintained through the detailed design, construction, procurement and operation of the plants. This paper presents the D-RAP concept that could be applied at the stage of the basic design of the nuclear power plants, based on the models for the reference plants and/or similar plants. 4 refs., 1 fig

  10. Progress of the United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors conference 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapper, Maureen

    2002-01-01

    Foreign Research Reactor Spent nuclear fuel Acceptance Program is actively working with research reactors to accept eligible material before the Acceptance Policy proper expires in 2006. Reactors/governments wishing to participate should contact US immediately if they have not done so already. Program operations are changing to adapt to new challenges. We continue to promote the importance of this Program to senior management in the Department of Energy

  11. The U.S. DOE new production reactor/heavy water reactor facility pollution prevention/waste minimization program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczmarsky, Myron M.; Tsang, Irving; Stepien, Walter P.

    1992-01-01

    A Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization Program was established during the early design phase of the U.S. DOE's New Production Reactor/Heavy Water Reactor Facility (NPR/HWRF) to encompass design, construction, operation and decommissioning. The primary emphasis of the program was given to waste elimination, source reduction and/or recycling to minimize the quantity and toxicity of material before it enters the waste stream for treatment or disposal. The paper discusses the regulatory and programmatic background as it applies to the NPR/HWRF and the waste assessment program developed as a phased approach to pollution prevention/waste minimization for the NPR/HWRF. Implementation of the program will be based on various factors including life cycle cost analysis, which will include costs associated with personnel, record keeping, transportation, pollution control equipment, treatment, storage, disposal, liability, compliance and oversight. (author)

  12. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, John A

    2003-01-21

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants.

  13. Russian RERTR program as a part of Joint US DOE-RF MINATOM collaboration on elimination of the threat connected to the use of HEU in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangelsky, N.

    2002-01-01

    achieved when the fresh fuel from research reactor in Yugoslavia was shipped to Russia for the safe storage and subsequent blending. The future plans include: continuation of the development of pin type fuel on the base of U-Mo fuel; conversion of reactor in Uzbekistan and shipment of SNF from the site of this reactor to Russia; conversion of other Russian design reactors to LEU; Continuation of investigations of the possibility of conversion of Russian domestic reactors to LEU; consecutive implementation of the take-back program of Russian origin fuel; study of other aspects of elimination of the use of HEU in research reactors. Russian RERTR program has reached the definite progress but its main goal is not yet achieved. Recent successes in the development and qualification of WWR-M2 fuel elements allows to begin delivery of fuel elements with LEU

  14. Radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor core (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, B.G.

    1979-05-01

    A description is presented of the radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core. Included are the radiological control criteria applied for the design and use of fabrication facilities, the controls and limits imposed to minimize radiaion exposure to personnel, and an evaluation of the applied radiological program in meeting the program objectives. The goal of the LWBR program is to develop the technology to breed in light water reactors so that nuclear fuel may be used significantly more efficiently in these reactors. This technology is being developed by designing and fabricating a breeder reactor core, utilizing thoria (ThO 2 ) and binary thoria--urania (ThO 2 - 233 UO 2 ) fuel, to be operated in the existing pressurized water reactor plant owned by the Department of Energy at Shippingport, Pennsylvania

  15. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoczy, G.; Hudina, M.; Richmond, R.; Wydler, P.; Stratton, R.W.; Burgsmueller, P.

    1980-03-01

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, steam generator research and development, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1979 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  16. University Reactor Sharing Program. Final report, September 30, 1992--September 29, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehring, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the number of nuclear reactors on university campuses in the US declined from more than 70 to less than 40. Contrary to this trend, The University of Texas at Austin constructed a new reactor facility at a cost of $5.8 million. The new reactor facility houses a new TRIGA Mark II reactor which replaces an in-ground TRIGA Mark I reactor located in a 50-year old building. The new reactor facility was constructed to strengthen the instruction and research opportunities in nuclear science and engineering for both undergraduate and graduate students at The University of Texas. On January 17, 1992, The University of Texas at Austin received a license for operation of the new reactor. Initial criticality was achieved on March 12, 1992, and full power operation, on March 25, 1992. The UT-TRIGA research reactor provides hands-on education, multidisciplinary research and unique service activities for academic, medical, industrial, and government groups. Support by the University Reactor Sharing Programs increases the availability of The University of Texas reactor facility for use by other educational institutions which do not have nuclear reactors

  17. Standard guide for establishing a quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides guidance and recommended practices for establishing a comprehensive quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate health and safety practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.3 The basic elements of a quality assurance program appear in the following order: FUNCTION SECTION Organization 5 Quality Assurance Program 6 Design Control 7 Instructions, Procedures & Drawings 8 Document Control 9 Procurement 10 Identification and Traceability 11 Processes 12 Inspection 13 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment 14 Handling, Storage and Shipping 15 Inspection, Test and Operating Status 16 Control of Nonconforming Items 17 Corrective Actions 18 Quality Assurance Records 19 Audits 20 TABLE 1 NQA-1 Basic Requirements Relat...

  18. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes the progress made during the September 2001-March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program''. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate a modular SOFC system that can be configured to create highly efficient, cost-competitive, and environmentally benign power plants tailored to specific markets. When fully developed, the system will meet the efficiency, performance, life, and cost goals for future commercial power plants.

  19. A review of fast reactor program in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuno, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The fast breeder reactor development project in Japan has been in progress for the past twelve months and will be continued this fiscal year, from April 1982 through March 1983, at a similar scale of effort both in budget and personnel to those of the fiscal year of 1981. The 1982 year budget for R and D work and for construction of a prototype fast breeder reactor MONJU is approximately 20 and 27 billion yen respectively, excluding wages for the personnel of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, PNC. The number of the technical people currently engaged in the fast breeder reactor development in the PNC is approximately 530, excluding those working for plutonium fuel fabrication. Concerning the experimental fast reactor JOYO, power increase from 50 MWt to 75 MWt was made in July 1979 and six operational cycles at 75 MWt were completed in December 1981. With respect to the prototype reactor MONJU, progress toward construction has been made and an environmental impact statement of the reactor was approved by the authorities concerned, and the licensing of the first step was completed at the end of 1981. Preliminary design studies of a large LMFBR are being made by PNC and also by utilities. A design study being conducted by PNC is on a 1000 MWe plant of loop type by extrapolating the technology to be developed by the time of commissioning of MONJU. A group of utilities is conducting a similar study, but covering somewhat wider range of parameters and options of design. Close contact between the group and PNC has been kept. In the future, those design efforts will be combined as a single design effort, when a major effort for developing a large demonstration reactor will be initiated at around the commencement of construction of the prototype reactor MONJU

  20. Developing a framework for a sustainable research reactor program in the UAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almarri, Khalid [Senate Member and Representative of Students of PhD Program in Project Management, Ajman (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-07-01

    In 2009, the UAE passed a milestone of preparations for the involvement in the nuclear area by awarding its first nuclear power plant. And to maximise its nuclear benefits, the country needs to develop a research reactor program. This paper's objectives are: a) Selecting and analysing model case studies from other nations to establish the success factors of research reactors in the UAE, and the preparedness of local industries to maximise the potential of the reactors. b) Establishing how the UAE's research reactors will contribute to the coalition and sharing of good practices with other countries as promoted by IAEA.