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Sample records for reactive dynamics simulations

  1. Computer Simulation of Turbulent Reactive Gas Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn H. Hjertager

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available A simulation procedure capable of handling transient compressible flows involving combustion is presented. The method uses the velocity components and pressure as primary flow variables. The differential equations governing the flow are discretized by integration over control volumes. The integration is performed by application of up-wind differencing in a staggered grid system. The solution procedure is an extension of the SIMPLE-algorithm accounting for compressibility effects.

  2. Massively Parallel Reactive and Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashishta, Priya

    2015-03-01

    In this talk I will discuss two simulations: Cavitation bubbles readily occur in fluids subjected to rapid changes in pressure. We use billion-atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations on a 163,840-processor BlueGene/P supercomputer to investigate chemical and mechanical damages caused by shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water near silica surface. Collapse of an empty nanobubble generates high-speed nanojet, resulting in the formation of a pit on the surface. The gas-filled bubbles undergo partial collapse and consequently the damage on the silica surface is mitigated. Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations are performed on 786,432-processor Blue Gene/Q to study on-demand production of hydrogen gas from water using Al nanoclusters. QMD simulations reveal rapid hydrogen production from water by an Al nanocluster. We find a low activation-barrier mechanism, in which a pair of Lewis acid and base sites on the Aln surface preferentially catalyzes hydrogen production. I will also discuss on-demand production of hydrogen gas from water using and LiAl alloy particles. Research reported in this lecture was carried in collaboration with Rajiv Kalia, Aiichiro Nakano and Ken-ichi Nomura from the University of Southern California, and Fuyuki Shimojo and Kohei Shimamura from Kumamoto University, Japan.

  3. Dynamic Monte Carlo simulation for reactive sputtering of aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.Y. E-mail: chen@uia.ua.ac.be; Bogaerts, A.; Depla, D.; Ignatova, V

    2003-08-01

    We have applied TRIDYN to simulate the transition from the metallic sputtering to the reactive sputtering mode during magnetron sputtering for an Al target when oxygen is added to argon plasma. Changes in the thickness and composition of multicomponent targets are investigated. The results basically confirm the reactive ion implantation mechanism together with chemical reaction in the subsurface. When oxygen mole fraction x<0.14, the target surface never becomes fully oxidized, even for very long sputtering times. When x>0.14 the target surface can be more or less fully oxidized. Furthermore, an abrupt change in the surface erosion rate at x=0.03 is observed. This corresponds to the avalanche phenomenon indicating the sputtering mode transition.

  4. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Reactive Hydrocarbon Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, Steven J.

    2014-02-25

    The research activities in this project consisted of four different sub-projects. Three different accelerated dynamics techniques (parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics, and temperature-accelerated dynamics) were applied to the modeling of pyrolysis of hydrocarbons. In addition, parallel replica dynamics was applied to modeling of polymerization.

  5. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with cysteine in solution: reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Susanna; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Ågren, Hans

    2016-07-14

    The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption.

  6. Parametric Study of ReaxFF Simulation Parameters for Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Reactive Carbon Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D; Bandyopadhyay, Ananyo; Wise, Kristopher E; Odegard, Gregory M

    2012-09-11

    The development of innovative carbon-based materials can be greatly facilitated by molecular modeling techniques. Although the Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) can be used to simulate the chemical behavior of carbon-based systems, the simulation settings required for accurate predictions have not been fully explored. Using the ReaxFF, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to simulate the chemical behavior of pure carbon and hydrocarbon reactive gases that are involved in the formation of carbon structures such as graphite, buckyballs, amorphous carbon, and carbon nanotubes. It is determined that the maximum simulation time step that can be used in MD simulations with the ReaxFF is dependent on the simulated temperature and selected parameter set, as are the predicted reaction rates. It is also determined that different carbon-based reactive gases react at different rates, and that the predicted equilibrium structures are generally the same for the different ReaxFF parameter sets, except in the case of the predicted formation of large graphitic structures with the Chenoweth parameter set under specific conditions.

  7. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with cysteine in solution: reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Susanna; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Ågren, Hans

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption.The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Different views of the AuNP surface coverage. Distance map describing the position of each molecule in relation to the others on the AuNP (alpha carbon distances). See DOI: 10.1039/C

  8. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Silanization of Silica Substrates by Methoxysilanes and Hydroxysilanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, Joshua D; Ngo, Quynh; Faller, Roland

    2016-07-19

    We perform reactive molecular dynamics simulations of monolayer formation by silanes on hydroxylated silica substrates. Solutions composed of alkylmethoxysilanes or alkylhydroxysilanes in hexane are placed in contact with a hydroxylated silica surface and simulated using a reactive force field (ReaxFF). In particular, we have modeled the deposition of butyl-, octyl-, and dodecyltrimethoxysilane to observe the dependence of alkylsilyl chain length on monolayer formation. We additionally modeled silanization using dodecyltrihydroxysilane, which allows for the comparison of two grafting mechanisms of alkoxysilanes: (1) direct condensation of alkoxysilane with surface-bound silanols and (2) a two-step hydrolysis-condensation mechanism. To emulate an infinite reservoir of reactive solution far away from the substrate, we have developed a method in which new precursor molecules are periodically added to a region of the simulation box located away from the surface. It is determined that the contact angle of alkyl tails bound to the surface is dependent on their grafting density. During the early stages of grafting alkoxy- and hydroxysilanes to the substrate, a preference is shown for silanes to condense with silanols further from the substrate surface and also close to neighboring surface-bound silanols. The kinetics of silica silanization by hydroxysilanes was observed to be much faster than for methoxysilanes. However, the as-deposited hydroxysilane monolayers show similar morphological characteristics to those formed by methoxysilanes.

  9. Parametrization of a Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF) for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Si Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcaro, Giovanni; Monti, Susanna; Sementa, Luca; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2017-08-08

    A novel computational approach, based on classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations (RMD) and quantum chemistry (QC) global energy optimizations, is proposed for modeling large Si nanoparticles. The force field parameters, which can describe bond breaking and formation, are derived by reproducing energetic and structural properties of a set of Si clusters increasing in size. These reference models are obtained through a new protocol based on a joint high temperature RMD/low temperature Basin Hopping QC search. The different procedures of estimating optimal force field parameters and their performance are discussed in detail.

  10. Early stage oxynitridation process of Si(001) surface by NO gas: Reactive molecular dynamics simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Haining; Kim, Seungchul; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol, E-mail: krlee@kist.re.kr [Computational Science Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 5, Hwarangno 14-gil, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanomaterial Science and Technology, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Srivastava, Pooja; Choi, Keunsu [Computational Science Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 5, Hwarangno 14-gil, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-28

    Initial stage of oxynitridation process of Si substrate is of crucial importance in fabricating the ultrathin gate dielectric layer of high quality in advanced MOSFET devices. The oxynitridation reaction on a relaxed Si(001) surface is investigated via reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A total of 1120 events of a single nitric oxide (NO) molecule reaction at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1000 K are statistically analyzed. The observed reaction kinetics are consistent with the previous experimental or calculation results, which show the viability of the reactive MD technique to study the NO dissociation reaction on Si. We suggest the reaction pathway for NO dissociation that is characterized by the inter-dimer bridge of a NO molecule as the intermediate state prior to NO dissociation. Although the energy of the inter-dimer bridge is higher than that of the intra-dimer one, our suggestion is supported by the ab initio nudged elastic band calculations showing that the energy barrier for the inter-dimer bridge formation is much lower. The growth mechanism of an ultrathin Si oxynitride layer is also investigated via consecutive NO reactions simulation. The simulation reveals the mechanism of self-limiting reaction at low temperature and the time evolution of the depth profile of N and O atoms depending on the process temperature, which would guide to optimize the oxynitridation process condition.

  11. Reactive wetting properties of TiO2 nanoparticles predicted by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Erik G.; Agosta, Lorenzo; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.

    2016-07-01

    Small-sized wet TiO2 nanoparticles have been investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Chemical and physical adsorption of water on the TiO2-water interface was studied as a function of water content, ranging from dry nanoparticles to wet nanoparticles with monolayer coverage of water. The surface reactivity was shown to be a concave function of water content and driven by surface defects. The local coordination number at the defect was identified as the key factor to decide whether water adsorption proceeds through dissociation or physisorption on the surface. A consistent picture of TiO2 nanoparticle wetting at the microscopic level emerges, which corroborates existing experimental data and gives further insight into the molecular mechanisms behind nanoparticle wetting. These calculations will facilitate the engineering of metal oxide nanoparticles with a controlled catalytic water activity.Small-sized wet TiO2 nanoparticles have been investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Chemical and physical adsorption of water on the TiO2-water interface was studied as a function of water content, ranging from dry nanoparticles to wet nanoparticles with monolayer coverage of water. The surface reactivity was shown to be a concave function of water content and driven by surface defects. The local coordination number at the defect was identified as the key factor to decide whether water adsorption proceeds through dissociation or physisorption on the surface. A consistent picture of TiO2 nanoparticle wetting at the microscopic level emerges, which corroborates existing experimental data and gives further insight into the molecular mechanisms behind nanoparticle wetting. These calculations will facilitate the engineering of metal oxide nanoparticles with a controlled catalytic water activity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Simulation data on equilibration of energies and structures (root-mean-square-deviations and

  12. Water on titanium dioxide surface: a revisiting by reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liangliang; Gubbins, Keith E; Li, Licheng; Lu, Xiaohua

    2014-12-16

    The behavior of surface water, especially the adsorption and dissociation characteristics, is a key to understanding and promoting photocatalytic and biomedical applications of titanium dioxide materials. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the ReaxFF force field, we study the interactions between water and five different TiO2 surfaces that are of interest to both experiments and theoretical calculations. The results show that TiO2 surfaces demonstrate different reactivities for water dissociation [rutile (011) > TiO2-B (100) > anatase (001) > rutile (110)], and there is no water dissociation observed on the TiO2-B (001) surface. The simulations also reveal that the water dissociation and the TiO2 surface chemistry change, and the new surface Ti-OH and O-H functional groups affect the orientation of other near-surface water molecules. On the reactive surface, such as the rutile (110) surface, water dissociated and formed new Ti-OH and O-H bonds on the surface. Those functional groups enhanced the hydrogen bond networking with the near-surface water molecules and their configurations. On the nonreactive TiO2-B (001) surface where no molecular or dissociative water adsorption is observed, near-surface water can also form hydrogen bonds with surface oxygen atoms of TiO2, but their distance to the surface is longer than that on the rutile (011) surface.

  13. Reactive wetting properties of TiO2 nanoparticles predicted by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Erik G; Agosta, Lorenzo; Lyubartsev, Alexander P

    2016-07-21

    Small-sized wet TiO2 nanoparticles have been investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Chemical and physical adsorption of water on the TiO2-water interface was studied as a function of water content, ranging from dry nanoparticles to wet nanoparticles with monolayer coverage of water. The surface reactivity was shown to be a concave function of water content and driven by surface defects. The local coordination number at the defect was identified as the key factor to decide whether water adsorption proceeds through dissociation or physisorption on the surface. A consistent picture of TiO2 nanoparticle wetting at the microscopic level emerges, which corroborates existing experimental data and gives further insight into the molecular mechanisms behind nanoparticle wetting. These calculations will facilitate the engineering of metal oxide nanoparticles with a controlled catalytic water activity.

  14. Reactive molecular dynamics simulation and chemical kinetic modeling of pyrolysis and combustion of n-dodecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Quan-De [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Wang, Jing-Bo; Li, Juan-Qin; Tan, Ning-Xin; Li, Xiang-Yuan [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2011-02-15

    The initiation mechanisms and kinetics of pyrolysis and combustion of n-dodecane are investigated by using the reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF MD) simulation and chemical kinetic modeling. From ReaxFF MD simulations, we find the initiation mechanisms of pyrolysis of n-dodecane are mainly through two pathways, (1) the cleavage of C-C bond to form smaller hydrocarbon radicals, and (2) the dehydrogenation reaction to form an H radical and the corresponding n-C{sub 12}H{sub 25} radical. Another pathway is the H-abstraction reactions by small radicals including H, CH{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, which are the products after the initiation reaction of n-dodecane pyrolysis. ReaxFF MD simulations lead to reasonable Arrhenius parameters compared with experimental results based on first-order kinetic analysis of n-dodecane pyrolysis. The density/pressure effects on the pyrolysis of n-dodecane are also analyzed. By appropriate mapping of the length and time from macroscopic kinetic modeling to ReaxFF MD, a simple comparison of the conversion of n-dodecane from ReaxFF MD simulations and that from kinetic modeling is performed. In addition, the oxidation of n-dodecane is studied by ReaxFF MD simulations. We find that formaldehyde molecule is an important intermediate in the oxidation of n-dodecane, which has been confirmed by kinetic modeling, and ReaxFF leads to reasonable reaction pathways for the oxidation of n-dodecane. These results indicate that ReaxFF MD simulations can give an atomistic description of the initiation mechanism and product distributions of pyrolysis and combustion for hydrocarbon fuels, and can be further used to provide molecular based robust kinetic reaction mechanism for chemical kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon fuels. (author)

  15. Development of reactive force fields using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation minimally biased to experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Arntsen, Christopher; Voth, Gregory A.

    2017-10-01

    Incorporation of quantum mechanical electronic structure data is necessary to properly capture the physics of many chemical processes. Proton hopping in water, which involves rearrangement of chemical and hydrogen bonds, is one such example of an inherently quantum mechanical process. Standard ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) methods, however, do not yet accurately predict the structure of water and are therefore less than optimal for developing force fields. We have instead utilized a recently developed method which minimally biases AIMD simulations to match limited experimental data to develop novel multiscale reactive molecular dynamics (MS-RMD) force fields by using relative entropy minimization. In this paper, we present two new MS-RMD models using such a parameterization: one which employs water with harmonic internal vibrations and another which uses anharmonic water. We show that the newly developed MS-RMD models very closely reproduce the solvation structure of the hydrated excess proton in the target AIMD data. We also find that the use of anharmonic water increases proton hopping, thereby increasing the proton diffusion constant.

  16. Coupling a system code with computational fluid dynamics for the simulation of complex coolant reactivity effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolotto, D.

    2011-11-15

    The current doctoral research is focused on the development and validation of a coupled computational tool, to combine the advantages of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in analyzing complex flow fields and of state-of-the-art system codes employed for nuclear power plant (NPP) simulations. Such a tool can considerably enhance the analysis of NPP transient behavior, e.g. in the case of pressurized water reactor (PWR) accident scenarios such as Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) and boron dilution, in which strong coolant flow asymmetries and multi-dimensional mixing effects strongly influence the reactivity of the reactor core, as described in Chap. 1. To start with, a literature review on code coupling is presented in Chap. 2, together with the corresponding ongoing projects in the international community. Special reference is made to the framework in which this research has been carried out, i.e. the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) project STARS (Steady-state and Transient Analysis Research for the Swiss reactors). In particular, the codes chosen for the coupling, i.e. the CFD code ANSYS CFX V11.0 and the system code US-NRC TRACE V5.0, are part of the STARS codes system. Their main features are also described in Chap. 2. The development of the coupled tool, named CFX/TRACE from the names of the two constitutive codes, has proven to be a complex and broad-based task, and therefore constraints had to be put on the target requirements, while keeping in mind a certain modularity to allow future extensions to be made with minimal efforts. After careful consideration, the coupling was defined to be on-line, parallel and with non-overlapping domains connected by an interface, which was developed through the Parallel Virtual Machines (PVM) software, as described in Chap. 3. Moreover, two numerical coupling schemes were implemented and tested: a sequential explicit scheme and a sequential semi-implicit scheme. Finally, it was decided that the coupling would be single

  17. Development of EEM based silicon-water and silica-water wall potentials for non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghan; Iype, Eldhose; Frijns, Arjan J. H.; Nedea, Silvia V.; van Steenhoven, Anton A.

    2014-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer in gases are computationally expensive when the wall molecules are explicitly modeled. To save computational time, an implicit boundary function is often used. Steele's potential has been used in studies of fluid-solid interface for a long time. In this work, the conceptual idea of Steele's potential was extended in order to simulate water-silicon and water-silica interfaces. A new wall potential model is developed by using the electronegativity-equalization method (EEM), a ReaxFF empirical force field and a non-reactive molecular dynamics package PumMa. Contact angle simulations were performed in order to validate the wall potential model. Contact angle simulations with the resulting tabulated wall potentials gave a silicon-water contact angle of 129°, a quartz-water contact angle of 0°, and a cristobalite-water contact angle of 40°, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  18. Self-propagating exothermic reaction analysis in Ti/Al reactive films using experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Seema; Lake, Markus; Kroppen, Norman; Farber, Peter; Wilden, Johannes; Schaaf, Peter

    2017-02-01

    This study describes the self-propagating exothermic reaction in Ti/Al reactive multilayer foils by using experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulation. The Ti/Al foils with different molar ratios of 1Ti/1Al, 1Ti/2Al and 1Ti/3Al were fabricated by magnetron sputtering method. Microstructural characteristics of the unreacted and reacted foils were analyzed by using electronic and atomic force microscopes. After an electrical ignition, the influence of ignition potentials on reaction propagation has been experimentally investigated. The reaction front propagates with a velocity of minimum 0.68 ± 0.4 m/s and maximum 2.57 ± 0.6 m/s depending on the input ignition potentials and the chemical compositions. Here, the 1Ti/3Al reactive foil exhibits both steady state and unsteady wavelike reaction propagation. Moreover, the numerical computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation shows the time dependent temperature flow and atomic mixing in a nanoscale reaction zone. The CFD simulation also indicates the potentiality for simulating exothermic reaction in the nanoscale Ti/Al foil.

  19. Shock simulations of a single-site coarse-grain RDX model using the dissipative particle dynamics method with reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Michael S.; Lísal, Martin; Schweigert, Igor; Larentzos, James P.; Brennan, John K.

    2017-01-01

    In discrete particle simulations, when an atomistic model is coarse-grained, a tradeoff is made: a boost in computational speed for a reduction in accuracy. The Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) methods help to recover lost accuracy of the viscous and thermal properties, while giving back a relatively small amount of computational speed. Since its initial development for polymers, one of the most notable extensions of DPD has been the introduction of chemical reactivity, called DPD-RX. In 2007, Maillet, Soulard, and Stoltz introduced implicit chemical reactivity in DPD through the concept of particle reactors and simulated the decomposition of liquid nitromethane. We present an extended and generalized version of the DPD-RX method, and have applied it to solid hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Demonstration simulations of reacting RDX are performed under shock conditions using a recently developed single-site coarse-grain model and a reduced RDX decomposition mechanism. A description of the methods used to simulate RDX and its transition to hot product gases within DPD-RX is presented. Additionally, we discuss several examples of the effect of shock speed and microstructure on the corresponding material chemistry.

  20. Shock Simulations of Single-Site Coarse-Grain RDX using the Dissipative Particle Dynamics Method with Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Michael; Lisal, Martin; Schweigert, Igor; Larentzos, James; Brennan, John

    2015-06-01

    In discrete particle simulations, when an atomistic model is coarse-grained, a trade-off is made: a boost in computational speed for a reduction in accuracy. Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) methods help to recover accuracy in viscous and thermal properties, while giving back a small amount of computational speed. One of the most notable extensions of DPD has been the introduction of chemical reactivity, called DPD-RX. Today, pairing the current evolution of DPD-RX with a coarse-grained potential and its chemical decomposition reactions allows for the simulation of the shock behavior of energetic materials at a timescale faster than an atomistic counterpart. In 2007, Maillet et al. introduced implicit chemical reactivity in DPD through the concept of particle reactors and simulated the decomposition of liquid nitromethane. We have recently extended the DPD-RX method and have applied it to solid hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) under shock conditions using a recently developed single-site coarse-grain model and a reduced RDX decomposition mechanism. A description of the methods used to simulate RDX and its tranition to hot product gases within DPD-RX will be presented. Additionally, examples of the effect of microstructure on shock behavior will be shown. Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.

  1. Development of EEM based silicon–water and silica–water wall potentials for non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Junghan; Iype, Eldhose; Frijns, Arjan J.H.; Nedea, Silvia V.; Steenhoven, Anton A. van

    2014-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer in gases are computationally expensive when the wall molecules are explicitly modeled. To save computational time, an implicit boundary function is often used. Steele's potential has been used in studies of fluid–solid interface for a long time. In this work, the conceptual idea of Steele's potential was extended in order to simulate water–silicon and water–silica interfaces. A new wall potential model is developed by using the electronegativity-equalization method (EEM), a ReaxFF empirical force field and a non-reactive molecular dynamics package PumMa. Contact angle simulations were performed in order to validate the wall potential model. Contact angle simulations with the resulting tabulated wall potentials gave a silicon–water contact angle of 129°, a quartz–water contact angle of 0°, and a cristobalite–water contact angle of 40°, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  2. Reactivity of aldehydes at the air-water interface. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Costa, Marilia T C; García-Prieto, Francisco F; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-02-14

    Understanding the influence of solute-solvent interactions on chemical reactivity has been a subject of intense research in the last few decades. Theoretical studies have focused on bulk solvation phenomena and a variety of models and methods have been developed that are now widely used by both theoreticians and experimentalists. Much less attention has been paid, however, to processes that occur at liquid interfaces despite the important role such interfaces play in chemistry and biology. In this study, we have carried out sequential molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanical calculations to analyse the influence of the air-water interface on the reactivity of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde, three simple aldehydes of atmospheric interest. The calculated free-energy profiles exhibit a minimum at the interface, where the average reactivity indices may display large solvation effects. The study emphasizes the role of solvation dynamics, which are responsible for large fluctuations of some molecular properties. We also show that the photolysis rate constant of benzaldehyde in the range 290-308 nm increases by one order of magnitude at the surface of a water droplet, from 2.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) in the gas phase to 2.8 × 10(-4) s(-1) at the air-water interface, and we discuss the potential impact of this result on the chemistry of the troposphere. Experimental data in this domain are still scarce and computer simulations like those presented in this work may provide some insights that can be useful to design new experiments.

  3. Effects of oxidation on tensile deformation of iron nanowires: Insights from reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, Gurcan; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Ogata, Shigenobu; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of oxidation on the mechanical properties of nanostructured metals is rarely explored and remains poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, in this work, we systematically investigate the mechanical properties and changes in the metallic iron (Fe) nanowires (NWs) under various atmospheric conditions of ambient dry O2 and in a vacuum. More specifically, we focus on the effect of oxide shell layer thickness over Fe NW surfaces at room temperature. We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the variable charge ReaxFF force field potential model that dynamically handles charge variation among atoms as well as breaking and forming of the chemical bonds associated with the oxidation reaction. The ReaxFF potential model allows us to study large length scale mechanical atomistic deformation processes under the tensile strain deformation process, coupled with quantum mechanically accurate descriptions of chemical reactions. To study the influence of an oxide layer, three oxide shell layer thicknesses of ˜4.81 Å, ˜5.33 Å, and ˜6.57 Å are formed on the pure Fe NW free surfaces. It is observed that the increase in the oxide layer thickness on the Fe NW surface reduces both the yield stress and the critical strain. We further note that the tensile mechanical deformation behaviors of Fe NWs are dependent on the presence of surface oxidation, which lowers the onset of plastic deformation. Our MD simulations show that twinning is of significant importance in the mechanical behavior of the pure and oxide-coated Fe NWs; however, twin nucleation occurs at a lower strain level when Fe NWs are coated with thicker oxide layers. The increase in the oxide shell layer thickness also reduces the external stress required to initiate plastic deformation.

  4. Atomistic Origin of Brittle Failure of Boron Carbide from Large-Scale Reactive Dynamics Simulations: Suggestions toward Improved Ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.

    2015-09-01

    Ceramics are strong, but their low fracture toughness prevents extended engineering applications. In particular, boron carbide (B4C ), the third hardest material in nature, has not been incorporated into many commercial applications because it exhibits anomalous failure when subjected to hypervelocity impact. To determine the atomistic origin of this brittle failure, we performed large-scale (˜200 000 atoms /cell ) reactive-molecular-dynamics simulations of shear deformations of B4C , using the quantum-mechanics-derived reactive force field simulation. We examined the (0001 )/⟨10 1 ¯ 0 ⟩ slip system related to deformation twinning and the (01 1 ¯ 1 ¯ )/⟨1 ¯ 101 ⟩ slip system related to amorphous band formation. We find that brittle failure in B4C arises from formation of higher density amorphous bands due to fracture of the icosahedra, a unique feature of these boron based materials. This leads to negative pressure and cavitation resulting in crack opening. Thus, to design ductile materials based on B4C we propose alloying aimed at promoting shear relaxation through intericosahedral slip that avoids icosahedral fracture.

  5. Atomistic Origin of Brittle Failure of Boron Carbide from Large-Scale Reactive Dynamics Simulations: Suggestions toward Improved Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2015-09-01

    Ceramics are strong, but their low fracture toughness prevents extended engineering applications. In particular, boron carbide (B(4)C), the third hardest material in nature, has not been incorporated into many commercial applications because it exhibits anomalous failure when subjected to hypervelocity impact. To determine the atomistic origin of this brittle failure, we performed large-scale (∼200,000  atoms/cell) reactive-molecular-dynamics simulations of shear deformations of B(4)C, using the quantum-mechanics-derived reactive force field simulation. We examined the (0001)/⟨101̅0⟩ slip system related to deformation twinning and the (011̅1̅)/⟨1̅101⟩ slip system related to amorphous band formation. We find that brittle failure in B(4)C arises from formation of higher density amorphous bands due to fracture of the icosahedra, a unique feature of these boron based materials. This leads to negative pressure and cavitation resulting in crack opening. Thus, to design ductile materials based on B(4)C we propose alloying aimed at promoting shear relaxation through intericosahedral slip that avoids icosahedral fracture.

  6. Multiscale Reactive Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    as a linear combination of several possible bond- ing topologies ( diabatic states) that are coupled to one an- other through the off-diagonal elements...adapts and dynamically identifies bonding topolo- gies to include as the simulation progresses. These bonding topologies form a basis of diabatic ...the original geometric factor. The diabatic correction term, VCORR , used here was labeled in previous MS-EVB models as a repulsive interaction, VREP

  7. The READY program: Building a global potential energy surface and reactive dynamic simulations for the hydrogen combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogo, César; Brandão, João

    2014-06-30

    READY (REActive DYnamics) is a program for studying reactive dynamic systems using a global potential energy surface (PES) built from previously existing PESs corresponding to each of the most important elementary reactions present in the system. We present an application to the combustion dynamics of a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen using accurate PESs for all the systems involving up to four oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Results at the temperature of 4000 K and pressure of 2 atm are presented and compared with model based on rate constants. Drawbacks and advantages of this approach are discussed and future directions of research are pointed out.

  8. Hybrid approach combining dissipative particle dynamics and finite-difference diffusion model: simulation of reactive polymer coupling and interfacial polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezkin, Anatoly V; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2013-10-21

    A novel hybrid approach combining dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and finite difference (FD) solution of partial differential equations is proposed to simulate complex reaction-diffusion phenomena in heterogeneous systems. DPD is used for the detailed molecular modeling of mass transfer, chemical reactions, and phase separation near the liquid∕liquid interface, while FD approach is applied to describe the large-scale diffusion of reactants outside the reaction zone. A smooth, self-consistent procedure of matching the solute concentration is performed in the buffer region between the DPD and FD domains. The new model is tested on a simple model system admitting an analytical solution for the diffusion controlled regime and then applied to simulate practically important heterogeneous processes of (i) reactive coupling between immiscible end-functionalized polymers and (ii) interfacial polymerization of two monomers dissolved in immiscible solvents. The results obtained due to extending the space and time scales accessible to modeling provide new insights into the kinetics and mechanism of those processes and demonstrate high robustness and accuracy of the novel technique.

  9. Reactive programming of simulations in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussinot, Frédéric; Monasse, Bernard; Susini, Jean-Ferdy

    2015-04-01

    We consider the Reactive Programming (RP) approach to simulate physical systems. The choice of RP is motivated by the fact that RP genuinely offers logical parallelism, instantaneously broadcast events, and dynamic creation/destruction of parallel components and events. To illustrate our approach, we consider the implementation of a system of Molecular Dynamics, in the context of Java with the Java3D library for 3D visualization.

  10. Reactive Programming of Simulations in Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Boussinot, Frédéric; Susini, Jean-Ferdy

    2014-01-01

    We consider the Reactive Programming (RP) approach to simulate physical systems. The choice of RP is motivated by the fact that RP genuinely offers logical parallelism, instantaneously broadcast events, and dynamic creation/destruction of parallel components and events. To illustrate our approach, we consider the implementation of a system of Molecular Dynamics, in the context of Java with the Java3D library for 3D visualisation.

  11. Structure of HI-6*sarin-acetylcholinesterase determined by X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulation: reactivator mechanism and design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Ekström

    Full Text Available Organophosphonates such as isopropyl metylphosphonofluoridate (sarin are extremely toxic as they phosphonylate the catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, an enzyme essential to humans and other species. Design of effective AChE reactivators as antidotes to various organophosphonates requires information on how the reactivators interact with the phosphonylated AChEs. However, such information has not been available hitherto because of three main challenges. First, reactivators are generally flexible in order to change from the ground state to the transition state for reactivation; this flexibility discourages determination of crystal structures of AChE in complex with effective reactivators that are intrinsically disordered. Second, reactivation occurs upon binding of a reactivator to the phosphonylated AChE. Third, the phosphorous conjugate can develop resistance to reactivation. We have identified crystallographic conditions that led to the determination of a crystal structure of the sarin(nonaged-conjugated mouse AChE in complex with [(E-[1-[(4-carbamoylpyridin-1-ium-1-ylmethoxymethyl]pyridin-2-ylidene]methyl]-oxoazanium dichloride (HI-6 at a resolution of 2.2 A. In this structure, the carboxyamino-pyridinium ring of HI-6 is sandwiched by Tyr124 and Trp286, however, the oxime-pyridinium ring is disordered. By combining crystallography with microsecond molecular dynamics simulation, we determined the oxime-pyridinium ring structure, which shows that the oxime group of HI-6 can form a hydrogen-bond network to the sarin isopropyl ether oxygen, and a water molecule is able to form a hydrogen bond to the catalytic histidine residue and subsequently deprotonates the oxime for reactivation. These results offer insights into the reactivation mechanism of HI-6 and design of better reactivators.

  12. Simulations of highly reactive fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Reed, E J

    2005-07-21

    We report density functional molecular dynamics simulations to determine the early chemical events of hot (T = 3000 K) and dense (1.97 g/cm{sup 3}, V/V{sub 0} = 0.68) nitromethane (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}). The first step in the decomposition process is an intermolecular proton abstraction mechanism that leads to the formation of CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}H and the aci ion H{sub 2}CNO{sub 2}{sup -}, in support of evidence from static high-pressure and shock experiments. An intramolecular hydrogen transfer that transforms nitromethane into the aci acid form, CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}H, accompanies this event. This is the first confirmation of chemical reactivity with bond selectivity for an energetic material near the condition of fully reacted specimen. We also report the decomposition mechanism followed up to the formation of H{sub 2}O as the first stable product.

  13. Comparison of oxidation resistance of UHMWPE and POM in H2O2 solution from ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu; Duan, Hai-tao; Hua, Meng; Gu, Ka-li; Shang, Hong-fei; Li, Jian

    2014-08-28

    The oxidation mechanism of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and polyoxymethylene (POM) in hydrogen peroxide solution was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations via reactive force field (ReaxFF) method. MD results from ReaxFF suggested that UHMWPE provided better antioxidation activity at high temperature (>373 K) than its POM counterpart in the same concentration of hydrogen peroxide solution. Furthermore, POM was relatively more susceptible to erosion and swelling because of the infiltration of H2O2 solution. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient at different temperatures permit further understanding of the chemical phenomena involved in the level of oxidation in the course of MD simulations. Results of the simulations are generally consistent with the previous experimental available in literature. The simulations also provide new insights into understanding the mechanism resulting oxidation products among the interested polymers.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation study of conformational changes of transcription factor TFIIS during RNA polymerase II transcriptional arrest and reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsun Eun

    Full Text Available Transcription factor IIS (TFIIS is a protein known for catalyzing the cleavage reaction of the 3'-end of backtracked RNA transcript, allowing RNA polymerase II (Pol II to reactivate the transcription process from the arrested state. Recent structural studies have provided a molecular basis of protein-protein interaction between TFIIS and Pol II. However, the detailed dynamic conformational changes of TFIIS upon binding to Pol II and the related thermodynamic information are largely unknown. Here we use computational approaches to investigate the conformational space of TFIIS in the Pol II-bound and Pol II-free (unbound states. Our results reveal two distinct conformations of TFIIS: the closed and the open forms. The closed form is dominant in the Pol II-free (unbound state of TFIIS, whereas the open form is favorable in the Pol II-bound state. Furthermore, we discuss the free energy difference involved in the conformational changes between the two forms in the presence or absence of Pol II. Additionally, our analysis indicates that hydrophobic interactions and the protein-protein interactions between TFIIS and Pol II are crucial for inducing the conformational changes of TFIIS. Our results provide novel insights into the functional interplay between Pol II and TFIIS as well as mechanism of reactivation of Pol II transcription by TFIIS.

  15. Molecular origin of drug release by water boiling inside carbon nanotubes from reactive molecular dynamics simulation and DFT perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, M Darvish; Mirzaei, Sh; Dalirandeh, Z

    2017-07-05

    Owing to their nanosized hollow cylindrical structure, CNTs hold the promise to be utilized as desired materials for encapsulating molecules which demonstrate wide inferences in drug delivery. Here we evaluate the possibility of drug release from the CNTs with various types and edge chemistry by reactive MD simulation to explain the scientifically reliable relations for proposed process. It was shown that heating of CNTs (up to 750 K) cannot be used for release of incorporated drug (phenylalanine) into water and even carbonated water solvent with very low boiling temperature. This is due to the strong physisorption (π-stacking interaction) between the aromatic of encapsulated drug and CNT sidewall which causes the drug to bind the nanotube sidewall. We have further investigated the interaction nature and release mechanism of water and drug confined/released within/from the CNTs by DFT calculations and the results confirmed our MD simulation findings. The accuracy of DFT method was also validated against the experimental and theoretical values at MP2/CCSD level. Therefore, we find that boiling of water/carbonated water confined within the CNTs could not be a suitable technique for efficient drug release. Our atomistic simulations provide a well-grounded understanding for the release of drug molecules confined within CNTs.

  16. Hypervelocity impact effect of molecules from Enceladus' plume and Titan's upper atmosphere on NASA's Cassini spectrometer from reactive dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; An, Qi; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Goddard, William A; Beegle, Luther W; Hodyss, Robert

    2012-11-21

    The NASA/ESA Cassini probe of Saturn analyzed the molecular composition of plumes emanating from one of its moons, Enceladus, and the upper atmosphere of another, Titan. However, interpretation of this data is complicated by the hypervelocity (HV) flybys of up to ~18 km/sec that cause substantial molecular fragmentation. To interpret this data we use quantum mechanical based reactive force fields to simulate the HV impact of various molecular species and ice clathrates on oxidized titanium surfaces mimicking those in Cassini's neutral and ion mass spectrometer (INMS). The predicted velocity dependent fragmentation patterns and composition mixing ratios agree with INMS data providing the means for identifying the molecules in the plume. We used our simulations to predict the surface damage from the HV impacts on the INMS interior walls, which we suggest acts as a titanium sublimation pump that could alter the instrument's readings. These results show how the theory can identify chemical events from hypervelocity impacts in space plumes and atmospheres, providing in turn clues to the internal structure of the corresponding sources (e.g., Enceladus). This may be valuable in steering modifications in future missions.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopic analysis of cyanopyrazine-2-carboxamide derivatives and investigation of their reactive properties by DFT calculations and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegum, Shargina; Mary, Y. Sheena; Varghese, Hema Tresa; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Zitko, Jan; Dolezal, Martin; Van Alsenoy, C.

    2017-03-01

    Using density functional theory technique in the B3LYP approximation and cc-pVDZ (5D, 7F) basis set, the molecular structural parameters and vibrational wave numbers of two cyanopyrazine-2-carboxamide derivatives have been investigated. On the basis of potential energy distribution detailed vibrational assignments of observed FT-IR and FT-Raman bands have been proposed. Using molecular electrostatic potential map relative reactivities towards electrophilic and nucleophilic attack are predicted. The first and second hyperpolarizabilities are calculated and the first hyperpolarizability of the title compounds are greater than that of the standard NLO material urea. Molecular studies reveal that the predicted binding affinities of the best poses were -8.7 kcal/mol for BACPC, -9.0 kcal/mol for CBACPC, and -8.8 kcal/mol for the original inhibitor. Efforts were made in order to investigate local reactivity properties of title compounds as well. In order to do so we have calculated average local ionization energy (ALIE) surfaces, Fukui functions, bond dissociation energies (BDE) (within the framework of DFT calculations) and radial distribution functions (RDF) (within the molecular dynamics simulations). ALIE surfaces and Fukui functions gave us initial information on the site reactivity towards electrophilic and nucleophilic attacks. BDE indicated locations that might be prone to autoxidation mechanism, while RDF indicated which atoms of title molecules are having pronounced interactions with water.

  18. Computationally Efficient Multiconfigurational Reactive Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takefumi; Peng, Yuxing; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-12-11

    It is a computationally demanding task to explicitly simulate the electronic degrees of freedom in a system to observe the chemical transformations of interest, while at the same time sampling the time and length scales required to converge statistical properties and thus reduce artifacts due to initial conditions, finite-size effects, and limited sampling. One solution that significantly reduces the computational expense consists of molecular models in which effective interactions between particles govern the dynamics of the system. If the interaction potentials in these models are developed to reproduce calculated properties from electronic structure calculations and/or ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, then one can calculate accurate properties at a fraction of the computational cost. Multiconfigurational algorithms model the system as a linear combination of several chemical bonding topologies to simulate chemical reactions, also sometimes referred to as "multistate". These algorithms typically utilize energy and force calculations already found in popular molecular dynamics software packages, thus facilitating their implementation without significant changes to the structure of the code. However, the evaluation of energies and forces for several bonding topologies per simulation step can lead to poor computational efficiency if redundancy is not efficiently removed, particularly with respect to the calculation of long-ranged Coulombic interactions. This paper presents accurate approximations (effective long-range interaction and resulting hybrid methods) and multiple-program parallelization strategies for the efficient calculation of electrostatic interactions in reactive molecular simulations.

  19. Reactive transport codes for subsurface environmental simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steefel, C.I.; Appelo, C.A.J.; Arora, B.; Kalbacher, D.; Kolditz, O.; Lagneau, V.; Lichtner, P.C.; Mayer, K.U.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Molins, S.; Moulton, D.; Shao, D.; Simunek, J.; Spycher, N.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Yeh, G.T.

    2015-01-01

    A general description of the mathematical and numerical formulations used in modern numerical reactive transport codes relevant for subsurface environmental simulations is presented. The formulations are followed by short descriptions of commonly used and available subsurface simulators that conside

  20. Impact of reactive settler models on simulated WWTP performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernaey, K V; Jeppsson, U; Batstone, D J; Ingildsen, P

    2006-01-01

    Including a reactive settler model in a wastewater treatment plant model allows representation of the biological reactions taking place in the sludge blanket in the settler, something that is neglected in many simulation studies. The idea of including a reactive settler model is investigated for an ASM1 case study. Simulations with a whole plant model including the non-reactive Takács settler model are used as a reference, and are compared to simulation results considering two reactive settler models. The first is a return sludge model block removing oxygen and a user-defined fraction of nitrate, combined with a non-reactive Takács settler. The second is a fully reactive ASM1 Takács settler model. Simulations with the ASM1 reactive settler model predicted a 15.3% and 7.4% improvement of the simulated N removal performance, for constant (steady-state) and dynamic influent conditions respectively. The oxygen/nitrate return sludge model block predicts a 10% improvement of N removal performance under dynamic conditions, and might be the better modelling option for ASM1 plants: it is computationally more efficient and it will not overrate the importance of decay processes in the settler.

  1. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Di Tommaso, D.; Du, Z.; de Leeuw, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Calcite–water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity. Fir

  2. Modelling Reactive and Proactive Behaviour in Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Majid, Mazlina Abdul; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated the simulation model behaviour of a traditional and combined discrete event as well as agent based simulation models when modelling human reactive and proactive behaviour in human centric complex systems. A departmental store was chosen as human centric complex case study where the operation system of a fitting room in WomensWear department was investigated. We have looked at ways to determine the efficiency of new management policies for the fitting room operation through simulating the reactive and proactive behaviour of staff towards customers. Once development of the simulation models and their verification had been done, we carried out a validation experiment in the form of a sensitivity analysis. Subsequently, we executed a statistical analysis where the mixed reactive and proactive behaviour experimental results were compared with some reactive experimental results from previously published works. Generally, this case study discovered that simple proactive individual behaviou...

  3. Reactive multiphase flow simulation workshop summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderHeyden, W.B.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on computer simulation of reactive multiphase flow was held on May 18 and 19, 1995 in the Computational Testbed for Industry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Approximately 35 to 40 people attended the workshop. This included 21 participants from 12 companies representing the petroleum, chemical, environmental and consumer products industries, two representatives from the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies and several from Los Alamos. The dialog at the meeting suggested that reactive multiphase flow simulation represents an excellent candidate for government/industry/academia collaborative research. A white paper on a potential consortium for reactive multiphase flow with input from workshop participants will be issued separately.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations and thermochemistry of reactive ion etching of silicon by chlorine, chlorine dimer, bromine, and bromine dimer cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valone, S.M.; Hanson, D.E.; Kress, J.D.

    1998-05-08

    Simulations of Cl plasma etch of Si surfaces with MD techniques agree reasonably well with the available experimental information on yields and surface morphologies. This information has been supplied to a Monte Carlo etch profile resulting in substantial agreement with comparable inputs provided through controlled experiments. To the extent that more recent measurements of etch rates are more reliable than older ones, preliminary MD simulations using bond-order corrections to the atomic interactions between neighboring Si atoms on the surface improves agreement with experiment through an increase in etch rate and improved agreement with XPS measurements of surface stoichiometry. Thermochemical and geometric analysis of small Si-Br molecules is consistent with the current notions of the effects of including brominated species in etchant gases.

  5. Large eddy simulation of reactive pollutants in a deep urban street canyon: Coupling dynamics with O3-NOx-VOC chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bloss, William James

    2017-02-12

    A large eddy simulation (LES) model coupled with O3-NOx-VOC chemistry is implemented to simulate the coupled effects of emissions, mixing and chemical pre-processing within an idealised deep (aspect ratio = 2) urban street canyon under a weak wind condition. Reactive pollutants exhibit significant spatial variations in the presence of two vertically aligned unsteady vortices formed in the canyon. Comparison of the LES results from two chemical schemes (simple NOx-O3 chemistry and a more comprehensive Reduced Chemical Scheme (RCS) chemical mechanism) shows that the concentrations of NO2 and Ox inside the street canyon are enhanced by approximately 30-40% via OH/HO2 chemistry. NO, NOx, O3, OH and HO2 are chemically consumed, while NO2 and Ox (total oxidant) are chemically produced within the canyon environment. Within-canyon pre-processing increases oxidant fluxes from the canyon to the overlying boundary layer, and this effect is greater for deeper street canyons (as found in many traditional European urban centres) than shallower (lower aspect ratio) streets. There is clear evidence of distinct behaviours for emitted chemical species and entrained chemical species, and positive (or negative) values of intensities of segregations are found between pairs of species with similar (or opposite) behaviour. The simplified two-box model underestimated NO and O3 levels, but overestimated NO2 levels for both the lower and upper canyon compared with the more realistic LES-chemistry model. This suggests that the segregation effect due to incomplete mixing reduces the chemical conversion rate of NO to NO2. This study reveals the impacts of nonlinear O3-NOx-VOC photochemical processes in the incomplete mixing environment and provides a better understanding of the pre-processing of emissions within canyons, prior to their release to the urban boundary layer, through the coupling of street canyon dynamics and chemistry.

  6. Modeling and simulation of reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bortoli, De AL; Pereira, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and Simulation of Reactive Flows presents information on modeling and how to numerically solve reactive flows. The book offers a distinctive approach that combines diffusion flames and geochemical flow problems, providing users with a comprehensive resource that bridges the gap for scientists, engineers, and the industry. Specifically, the book looks at the basic concepts related to reaction rates, chemical kinetics, and the development of reduced kinetic mechanisms. It considers the most common methods used in practical situations, along with equations for reactive flows, and va

  7. Mechanical and electrical properties of functionalized graphene nanoribbon: A study of reactive molecular dynamic simulation and density functional tight-binding theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaminpayma, Esmaeil, E-mail: zaminpayma@qiau.ac.ir [Physics Group, Qazvin Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nayebi, Payman [Physics Department, Saveh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Graphene has novel electronic structure, such as unusual transport properties, high carrier mobility and excellent mechanical properties like high Young's modulus. These properties can be modified by many methods, such as functionalized with adding chemical groups, cutting graphene as a nanoribbon and Appling a stress along graphene. In this work, we studied the mechanical and electrical properties of functionalized graphene nanoribbon with –NH{sub 2}, –CH{sub 3}, –OH, –C{sub 5}H{sub 6} groups. In mechanical section, we calculated Young's modulus of functionalized graphene nanoribbon as a function of temperature by method of reactive molecular dynamic simulation. Our results show that Young's modulus decrease by increasing temperature. Also we studied the effect of functionalized groups on Young's modulus. We show that Young's modulus decreases by adding these groups. It is in the order of Y (nanoribbon)>Y (NH{sub 2})>Y (C{sub 6}H{sub 5})>Y (OH)>Y (CH{sub 3}). In electrical section, we calculated current–voltage curve for functionalized nanoribbon with density functional tight-binding method at two different 0% and 5% strain. We found for both strains, the functionalized groups decrease the electrical resistance of nanoribbon and increase its current. The relationship of the current is in the order of I(CH{sub 3}) >I(C{sub 5}H{sub 6}) >I(NH{sub 2}) >I(OH) >I (nanoribbon)

  8. Dynamic reactive astrocytes after focal ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinghua Ding

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are specialized and most numerous glial cell type in the central nervous system and play important roles in physiology. Astrocytes are also critically involved in many neural disor-ders including focal ischemic stroke, a leading cause of brain injury and human death. One of the prominent pathological features of focal ischemic stroke is reactive astrogliosis and glial scar for-mation associated with morphological changes and proliferation. This review paper discusses the recent advances in spatial and temporal dynamics of morphology and proliferation of reactive astrocytes after ischemic stroke based on results from experimental animal studies. As reactive astrocytes exhibit stem cell-like properties, knowledge of dynamics of reactive astrocytes and glial scar formation will provide important insights for astrocyte-based cell therapy in stroke.

  9. Introduction to Reactive Gas Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    In high energy gas flows, at high velocities and high temperatures, physical and chemical processes such as molecular vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionisation or various reactions take place and deeply influence the structure of the flows. The characteristic times of these processes have the same order of magnitude as aerodynamic characteristic times, so that these reactive media are generally in thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium. This book presents a generalintroductory study of these media. In the first part their fundamental statistical aspects are described, starting from

  10. Voltage equilibration for reactive atomistic simulations of electrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Strachan, Alejandro, E-mail: strachan@purdue.edu [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    We introduce electrochemical dynamics with implicit degrees of freedom (EChemDID), a model to describe electrochemical driving force in reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The method describes the equilibration of external electrochemical potentials (voltage) within metallic structures and their effect on the self-consistent partial atomic charges used in reactive molecular dynamics. An additional variable assigned to each atom denotes the local potential in its vicinity and we use fictitious, but computationally convenient, dynamics to describe its equilibration within connected metallic structures on-the-fly during the molecular dynamics simulation. This local electrostatic potential is used to dynamically modify the atomic electronegativities used to compute partial atomic changes via charge equilibration. Validation tests show that the method provides an accurate description of the electric fields generated by the applied voltage and the driving force for electrochemical reactions. We demonstrate EChemDID via simulations of the operation of electrochemical metallization cells. The simulations predict the switching of the device between a high-resistance to a low-resistance state as a conductive metallic bridge is formed and resistive currents that can be compared with experimental measurements. In addition to applications in nanoelectronics, EChemDID could be useful to model electrochemical energy conversion devices.

  11. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis→trans- and trans→cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work).

  12. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-14

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis→trans- and trans→cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work).

  13. Numerical simulations of buoyant reactive jets with sidewall effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Heping; JIANG Xi; WANG Wei; YANG Yun; XU Liang; FAN Weicheng

    2004-01-01

    The near field dynamics of buoyant reactive jets with adjacent sidewalls is investigated by time-dependent three-dimensional direct simulations. The physical problem is a fuel jet issuing vertically into an oxidant ambient environment in a corner configuration with sidewall boundaries. Simulation results are presented for two cases with different jet nozzle geometries: a corner-round reactive jet and a corner-square reactive jet with the same cross-sectional area on the nozzle plane. Buoyancy-induced large vortical structures evolve spatially in the flow field and transition to turbulence occurs downstream. Calculation of the mean flow properties shows that entrainment of the corner-round jet is stronger than that of the corner-square jet due to the stronger vortex deformation in the corner-round case.

  14. The Reactivity and Structural Dynamics of Supported Metal Nanoclusters Using Electron Microscopy, in situ X-Ray Spectroscopy, Electronic Structure Theories, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judith C. Yang; Ralph G. Nuzzo, Duane Johnson, Anatoly Frenkel

    2008-07-01

    The distinguishing feature of our collaborative program of study is the focus it brings to emergent phenomena originating from the unique structural/electronic environments found in nanoscale materials. We exploit and develop frontier methods of atomic-scale materials characterization based on electron microscopy (Yang) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Frenkel) that are in turn coupled innately with advanced first principles theory and methods of computational modeling (Johnson). In the past year we have made significant experimental advances that have led to important new understandings of the structural dynamics of what are unquestionably the most important classes of heterogeneous catalysts—the materials used to both produce and mitigate the consequences of the use of liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

  15. Reactive molecular dynamics of hypervelocity collisions of PETN molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landerville, A C; Oleynik, I I; White, C T

    2009-11-05

    Born-Oppenheimer direct dynamics classical trajectory simulations of bimolecular collisions of PETN molecules have been performed to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of hypervelocity chemistry relevant to initiating reactions immediately behind the shock wavefront in energetic molecular crystals. The solid-state environment specifies the initial orientations of colliding molecules. The threshold velocities for initiating chemistry for a variety of crystallographic orientations were correlated with available experimental data on anisotropic shock sensitivity of PETN. Collisions normal to the planes (001) and (110) were found to be most sensitive with threshold velocities on the order of characteristic particle velocities in detonating PETN. The production of NO2 is the dominant reaction pathway in most of the reactive cases. The simulations show that the reactive chemistry, driven by dynamics rather than temperature during hypervelocity collisions, can occur at a very short time scale (10(-13) s) under highly nonequilibrium conditions.

  16. High-Temperature and High-Pressure Pyrolysis of Hexadecane: Molecular Dynamic Simulation Based on Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuojun; Sun, Weizhen; Zhao, Ling

    2017-03-07

    As important products of heavy oil pyrolysis, heavier components such as gasoline and diesel supply the vast majority of energy demand through combustion, and lighter components such as ethylene and propylene are the main sources of industrial chemicals and plastic products. In this work, pyrolysis of hexadecane, as the model compound, was studied by reactive force field (ReaxFF) molecular simulation at high temperatures and high pressures. It was confirmed by unimolecular simulations that there exist eight different initial mechanisms all starting with C-C bond dissociation. The biradical mechanism was verified, through which the pyrolysis process can be accomplished within a shorter time. The enthalpy of reaction was calculated by the QM method, which was well consistent with ReaxFF calculation results. Multimolecular simulations showed that there is a strong dependency relationship between products distribution and temperature, as well as that between reaction rates and temperature. The optimal condition for ethylene formation in our work is 11.6 MPa and 2000 K, whereas it is best for hydrogen formation at conditions of 11.6 MPa and 3500 K. Kinetic analysis was performed with the activation energy of 113.03 kJ/mol and pre-exponential factor of 4.55 × 10(12), and it is in good agreement with previous work.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Tarmyshov, Konstantin B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular simulations can provide a detailed picture of a desired chemical, physical, or biological process. It has been developed over last 50 years and is being used now to solve a large variety of problems in many different fields. In particular, quantum calculations are very helpful to study small systems at a high resolution where electronic structure of compounds is accounted for. Molecular dynamics simulations, in turn, are employed to study development of a certain molecular ensemble ...

  18. Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Granino A

    2010-01-01

    Showing you how to use personal computers for modeling and simulation, Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation, Second Edition provides a practical tutorial on interactive dynamic-system modeling and simulation. It discusses how to effectively simulate dynamical systems, such as aerospace vehicles, power plants, chemical processes, control systems, and physiological systems. Written by a pioneer in simulation, the book introduces dynamic-system models and explains how software for solving differential equations works. After demonstrating real simulation programs with simple examples, the author

  19. Dynamical Simulation of Probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-Lipschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices(such as random number generators). Self-orgainizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed. Special attention was focused upon coupled stochastic processes, defined in terms of conditional probabilities, for which joint probability does not exist. Simulations of quantum probabilities are also discussed.

  20. Reactive transport benchmarks for subsurface environmental simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl I.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-06-01

    Over the last 20 years, we have seen firsthand the evolution of multicomponent reactive transport modeling and the expanding range and increasing complexity of subsurface applications it is being used to address. There is a growing reliance on reactive transport modeling (RTM) to address some of the most compelling issues facing our planet: climate change, nuclear waste management, contaminant remediation, and pollution prevention. While these issues are motivating the development of new and improved capabilities for subsurface environmental modeling using RTM (e.g., biogeochemistry from cell-scale physiology to continental-scale terrestrial ecosystems, nonisothermal multiphase conditions, coupled geomechanics), there remain longstanding challenges in characterizing the natural variability of hydrological, biological, and geochemical properties in subsurface environments and limited success in transferring models between sites and across scales. An equally important trend over the last 20 years is the evolution of modeling from a service sought out after data has been collected to a multifaceted research approach that provides (1) an organizing principle for characterization and monitoring activities; (2) a systematic framework for identifying knowledge gaps, developing and integrating new knowledge; and (3) a mechanistic understanding that represents the collective wisdom of the participating scientists and engineers. There are now large multidisciplinary projects where the research approach is model-driven, and the principal product is a holistic predictive simulation capability that can be used as a test bed for alternative conceptualizations of processes, properties, and conditions. Much of the future growth and expanded role for RTM will depend on its continued ability to exploit technological advancements in the earth and environmental sciences. Advances in measurement technology, particularly in molecular biology (genomics), isotope fractionation, and high

  1. Efficient Kinect Sensor-Based Reactive Path Planning Method for Autonomous Mobile Robots in Dynamic Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuvshinjargal, Doopalam; Lee, Deok Jin [Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, an efficient dynamic reactive motion planning method for an autonomous vehicle in a dynamic environment is proposed. The purpose of the proposed method is to improve the robustness of autonomous robot motion planning capabilities within dynamic, uncertain environments by integrating a virtual plane-based reactive motion planning technique with a sensor fusion-based obstacle detection approach. The dynamic reactive motion planning method assumes a local observer in the virtual plane, which allows the effective transformation of complex dynamic planning problems into simple stationary ones proving the speed and orientation information between the robot and obstacles. In addition, the sensor fusion-based obstacle detection technique allows the pose estimation of moving obstacles using a Kinect sensor and sonar sensors, thus improving the accuracy and robustness of the reactive motion planning approach. The performance of the proposed method was demonstrated through not only simulation studies but also field experiments using multiple moving obstacles in hostile dynamic environments.

  2. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouff, Christopher; Clark, Melana; Davenport, Bill; Message, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The Data System Dynamic Simulator (DSDS) is a discrete event simulation tool. It was developed for NASA for the specific purpose of evaluating candidate architectures for data systems of the Space Station era. DSDS provides three methods for meeting this requirement. First, the user has access to a library of standard pre-programmed elements. These elements represent tailorable components of NASA data systems and can be connected in any logical manner. Secondly, DSDS supports the development of additional elements. This allows the more sophisticated DSDS user the option of extending the standard element set. Thirdly, DSDS supports the use of data streams simulation. Data streams is the name given to a technique that ignores packet boundaries, but is sensitive to rate changes. Because rate changes are rare compared to packet arrivals in a typical NASA data system, data stream simulations require a fraction of the CPU run time. Additionally, the data stream technique is considerably more accurate than another commonly-used optimization technique.

  3. Dynamics of reactive collisions by optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña, A. González; Vetter, R.

    This paper reviews recent developments in the study of reactive collisions using optical methods. Although the basic approach is from the experimental viewpoint, attention is paid to the conceptual and theoretical aspects of the physics underlying modern reaction dynamics. After a brief resume of basic concepts and definitions on both scalar and vectorial quantities characterizing the chemical reaction, a significant body of this paper describes the recent achievements using laser techniques, mainly via laser-induced fluorescence, and chemiluminescence. Both high-resolution crossed-beam and high-resolution bulb studies are presented in a complementary fashion, as they provide a detailed picture of reaction dynamics through the measurement of quantum state specific differential cross-sections. Specific examples include the use of Doppler resolved laser-induced fluorescence, multiphoton ionization or Cars studies. Some examples are also included based on the use of product imaging techniques, the novel approach of obtaining quantum state resolved differential cross-sections for chemical reactions. In addition, new data on the collision energy dependence of the collision cross-section, i.e. the excitation function, obtained by highly sensitive collision energy cross-beam techniques is also presented and reviewed. Another part of the paper is dedicated to recent advances in the study of reaction dynamics using electronically excited species. Emphasis is placed not only on the opening of new channels for chemical reactions but also on the possible outcome of the reaction products associated with the different symmetries of the excited potential energy surfaces. Finally, a section is dedicated to recent developments in studies carried out in the area of van der Waals and cluster reactions. The possibility of clocking the chemical act as well as very efficient trapping of reaction intermediates is illustrated with some examples. Throughout the whole paper care is taken to

  4. Biodiesel Production by Reactive Flash: A Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Regalado-Méndez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive flash (RF in biodiesel production has been studied in order to investigate steady-state multiplicities, singularities, and effect of biodiesel quality when the RF system approaches to bubble point. The RF was modeled by an index-2 system of differential algebraic equations, the vapor split (ϕ was computed by modified Rachford-Rice equation and modified Raoult’s law computed bubble point, and the continuation analysis was tracked on MATCONT. Results of this study show the existence of turning points, leading to a unique bubble point manifold, (xBiodiesel,T=(0.46,478.41 K, which is a globally stable flashing operation. Also, the results of the simulation in MATLAB® of the dynamic behavior of the RF show that conversion of triglycerides reaches 97% for a residence time of 5.8 minutes and a methanol to triglyceride molar flow ratio of 5 : 1.

  5. Basic study on dynamic reactive-power control method with PV output prediction for solar inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryunosuke Miyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To effectively utilize a photovoltaic (PV system, reactive-power control methods for solar inverters have been considered. Among the various methods, the constant-voltage control outputs less reactive power compared with the other methods. We have developed a constant-voltage control to reduce the reactive-power output. However, the developed constant-voltage control still outputs unnecessary reactive power because the control parameter is constant in every waveform of the PV output. To reduce the reactive-power output, we propose a dynamic reactive-power control method with a PV output prediction. In the proposed method, the control parameter is varied according to the properties of the predicted PV waveform. In this study, we performed numerical simulations using a distribution system model, and we confirmed that the proposed method reduces the reactive-power output within the voltage constraint.

  6. Reactive molecular dynamics models from ab initio molecular dynamics data using relative entropy minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntsen, Christopher; Chen, Chen; Voth, Gregory A.

    2017-09-01

    We present two new multiscale molecular dynamics (MS-RMD) models for the hydrated excess proton in water developed directly from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation data of the same system. The potential of mean force along the proton transfer reaction coordinate and radial distribution functions for the MS-RMD models are shown to faithfully reproduce those of AIMD. The models are developed using an algorithm based on relative entropy minimization, thus demonstrating the ability of the method to rapidly generate accurate and highly efficient reactive MD force fields.

  7. Impact of reactive settler models on simulated WWTP performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Jeppsson, Ulf; Batstone, Damien J.

    2006-01-01

    Including a reactive settler model in a wastewater treatment plant model allows representation of the biological reactions taking place in the sludge blanket in the settler, something that is neglected in many simulation studies. The idea of including a reactive settler model is investigated for ...

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by lunar simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rickman, Douglas; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2016-05-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and past experiences of Apollo astronauts has rekindled interest into the possible harmful effects of lunar dust on human health. In comparison to the Apollo-era explorations, human explorers may be weeks on the Moon, which will raise the risk of inhalation exposure. The mineralogical composition of lunar dust is well documented, but its effects on human health are not fully understood. With the aim of understanding the reactivity of dusts that may be encountered on geologically different lunar terrains, we have studied Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by a suite of lunar simulants of different mineralogical-chemical composition dispersed in water and Simulated Lung Fluid (SLF). To further explore the reactivity of simulants under lunar environmental conditions, we compared the reactivity of simulants both in air and inert atmosphere. As the impact of micrometeorites with consequent shock-induced stresses is a major environmental factor on the Moon, we also studied the effect of mechanical stress on samples. Mechanical stress was induced by hand crushing the samples both in air and inert atmosphere. The reactivity of samples after crushing was analyzed for a period of up to nine days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water and SLF was analyzed by an in situ electrochemical probe and hydroxyl radical (•OH) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Adenine probe. Out of all simulants, CSM-CL-S was found to be the most reactive simulant followed by OB-1 and then JSC-1A simulant. The overall reactivity of samples in the inert atmosphere was higher than in air. Fresh crushed samples showed a higher level of reactivity than uncrushed samples. Simulant samples treated to create agglutination, including the formation of zero-valent iron, showed less reactivity than untreated simulants. ROS generation in SLF is initially slower than in deionized water (DI), but the ROS formation is sustained for as long as 7

  9. Reactive navigation in dynamic environment using a multisensor predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, K T; Chang, C C

    1999-01-01

    A reactive navigation system for an autonomous mobile robot in unstructured dynamic environments is presented. The motion of moving obstacles is estimated for robot motion planning and obstacle avoidance. A multisensor-based obstacle predictor is utilized to obtain obstacle-motion information. Sensory data from a CCD camera and multiple ultrasonic range finders are combined to predict obstacle positions at the next sampling instant. A neural network, which is trained off-line, provides the desired prediction on-line in real time. The predicted obstacle configuration is employed by the proposed virtual force based navigation method to prevent collision with moving obstacles. Simulation results are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed navigation system in an environment with multiple mobile robots or moving objects. This system was implemented and tested on an experimental mobile robot at our laboratory. Navigation results in real environment are presented and analyzed.

  10. Dynamic response of monolithic and laminate/particulate reactive mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chung-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Two dynamic compression methods were applied to a monolithic metal and reactive mixtures to investigate their responses: (a) Dynamic experiments using a split Hopkinson pressure bar were applied to reactive mixtures densified by explosive consolidation in order to establish their mechanical response and failure mechanisms. (b) Laser compression and release, which can impart high stresses, up to hundreds GPa, in times of nanoseconds and fractions thereof, was applied to establish the spalling ...

  11. IONIC LIQUIDS: RADIATION CHEMISTRY, SOLVATION DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY PATTERNS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WISHART,J.F.

    2007-10-01

    's Laser-Electron Accelerator Facility (LEAF) are used to identify reactive species in ionic liquids and measure their solvation and reaction rates. We and our collaborators (R. Engel (Queens College, CUNY) and S. Lall-Ramnarine, (Queensborough CC, CUNY)) develop and characterize new ionic liquids specifically designed for our radiolysis and solvation dynamics studies. IL solvation and rotational dynamics are measured by TCSPC and fluorescence upconversion measurements in the laboratory of E. W. Castner at Rutgers Univ. Investigations of radical species in irradiated ILs are carried out at ANL by I. Shkrob and S. Chemerisov using EPR spectroscopy. Diffusion rates are obtained by PGSE NMR in S. Greenbaum's lab at Hunter College, CUNY and S. Chung's lab at William Patterson U. Professor Mark Kobrak of CUNY Brooklyn College performs molecular dynamics simulations of solvation processes. A collaboration with M. Dietz and coworkers at ANL is centered around the properties and radiolytic behavior of ionic liquids for nuclear separations. Collaborations with C. Reed (UC Riverside), D. Gabel (U. Bremen) and J. Davis (U. South Alabama) are aimed at characterizing the radiolytic and other properties of borated ionic liquids, which could be used to make fissile material separations processes inherently safe from criticality accidents.

  12. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turboalternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of 1-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propyl]-3-phenylthiourea and assessment of reactive and optoelectronic properties employing DFT calculations and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    War, Javeed Ahmad; Jalaja, K.; Mary, Y. Sheena; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Van Alsenoy, C.

    2017-02-01

    IR and Raman spectra of 1-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propyl]-3-phenylthiourea (HIPPT) have been recorded in the solid phase and the vibrational wave numbers are calculated theoretically by B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) (6D, 7F) method. All the fundamental vibrational modes have been assigned using potential energy distribution values and the molecular structure was analyzed in terms of parameters like bond length, bond angles and dihedral angles. The ring breathing mode of the phenyl ring is observed at 1016 cm-1 in the IR spectrum, 1014 cm-1 in the Raman spectrum and at 1014 cm-1 theoretically. The values of polarizability and hyperpolarizabilities were calculated and nonlinear optical properties are discussed. The HOMO-LUMO plot reveals the charge transfer possibilities in the molecule. The NBO analysis was computed and possible transitions were correlated with the electronic transitions. In the title compound, the imidazole ring and CH2 groups are tilted from each other and the thiourea group is tilted from the phenyl ring. Using MEP plot the electrophilic and nucleophilic regions are identified. Local reactivity properties were investigated by analysis of ALIE surfaces and Fukui functions. Oxidation and degradation properties were initially assessed by calculation of bond dissociation energies of all single acyclic bonds. Determination of atoms with pronounced interactions with water molecules was performed by calculation of radial distribution functions after molecular dynamics simulations. Chargehopping rates were calculated within Marcus semi-empiric approach, employing both DFT calculations and MD simulations. The molecular docking computational predictions were complemented by the in vitro antibacterial activity evaluation.

  14. Coke Reactivity in Simulated Blast Furnace Shaft Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapakangas, Juho; Suopajärvi, Hannu; Iljana, Mikko; Kemppainen, Antti; Mattila, Olli; Heikkinen, Eetu-Pekka; Samuelsson, Caisa; Fabritius, Timo

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that H2 and H2O are always present in the gas atmosphere of a blast furnace shaft, their role in the solution-loss reactions of coke has not been thoroughly examined. This study focuses on how H2 and H2O affect the reaction behavior and whether a strong correlation can be found between reactivity in the conditions of the CRI test (Coke Reactivity Index) and various simulated blast furnace shaft gas atmospheres. Partial replacement of CO/CO2 with H2/H2O was found to significantly increase the reactivity of all seven coke grades at 1373 K (1100 °C). H2 and H2O, however, did not have a significant effect on the threshold temperature of gasification. The reactivity increasing effect was found to be temperature dependent and clearly at its highest at 1373 K (1100 °C). Mathematical models were used to calculate activation energies for the gasification, which were notably lower for H2O gasification compared to CO2 indicating the higher reactivity of H2O. The reactivity results in gas atmospheres with CO2 as the sole gasifying component did not directly correlate with reactivity results in gases also including H2O, which suggests that the widely used CRI test is not entirely accurate for estimating coke reactivity in the blast furnace.

  15. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, H M; Raoof, A; Centler, F; Thullner, M; Regnier, P

    2013-02-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow, their chemical components dilute and react through dispersion. A larger interface and wider mixing zone may provide favorable conditions for the natural attenuation of contaminant plumes. It has been claimed that the extent of this mixing is controlled by both, porous media properties and flow conditions. In this study, the interplay between dispersion and reactive processes in coastal aquifers is investigated by means of numerical experiments. Particularly, the impact of dispersion coefficients, the velocity field induced by density driven flow and chemical component reactivities on reactive transport in such aquifers is studied. To do this, a hybrid finite-element finite-volume method and a reactive simulator are coupled, and model accuracy and applicability are assessed. A simple redox reaction is considered to describe the degradation of a contaminant which requires mixing of the contaminated groundwater and the seawater containing the terminal electron acceptor. The resulting degradation is observed for different scenarios considering different magnitudes of dispersion and chemical reactivity. Three reactive transport regimes are found: reaction controlled, reaction-dispersion controlled and dispersion controlled. Computational results suggest that the chemical components' reactivity as well as dispersion coefficients play a significant role on controlling reactive mixing zones and extent of contaminant removal in coastal aquifers. Further, our results confirm that the dilution index is a better alternative to the second central spatial moment of a plume to describe the mixing of reactive solutes in coastal aquifers.

  16. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: Numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem

    KAUST Repository

    Nick, H.M.

    2013-02-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow, their chemical components dilute and react through dispersion. A larger interface and wider mixing zone may provide favorable conditions for the natural attenuation of contaminant plumes. It has been claimed that the extent of this mixing is controlled by both, porous media properties and flow conditions. In this study, the interplay between dispersion and reactive processes in coastal aquifers is investigated by means of numerical experiments. Particularly, the impact of dispersion coefficients, the velocity field induced by density driven flow and chemical component reactivities on reactive transport in such aquifers is studied. To do this, a hybrid finite-element finite-volume method and a reactive simulator are coupled, and model accuracy and applicability are assessed. A simple redox reaction is considered to describe the degradation of a contaminant which requires mixing of the contaminated groundwater and the seawater containing the terminal electron acceptor. The resulting degradation is observed for different scenarios considering different magnitudes of dispersion and chemical reactivity. Three reactive transport regimes are found: reaction controlled, reaction-dispersion controlled and dispersion controlled. Computational results suggest that the chemical components\\' reactivity as well as dispersion coefficients play a significant role on controlling reactive mixing zones and extent of contaminant removal in coastal aquifers. Further, our results confirm that the dilution index is a better alternative to the second central spatial moment of a plume to describe the mixing of reactive solutes in coastal aquifers. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juanfang LIU; Danling ZENG; Qin LI; Hong GAO

    2008-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation was performed on water to calculate its diffusivity by adopting different potential models. The results show that the potential models have great influence on the simulated results. In addition, the diffusivities obtained by the SPCE model conform well to the experimental values.

  18. Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering: combining simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Tomas; Vlcek, Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has recently been used for preparation of various oxide films with high application potential, such as TiO2, ZrO2, Ta2O5, HfO2, VO2. Using our patented method of pulsed reactive gas flow control with an optimized reactive gas inlet, we achieved significantly higher deposition rates compared to typical continuous dc magnetron depositions. We have developed a time-dependent model of the reactive HiPIMS. The model includes a depth-resolved description of the sputtered target (featuring sputtering, implantation and knock-on implantation processes) and a parametric description of the discharge plasma (dissociation of reactive gas, ionization and return of sputtered atoms and gas rarefaction). The model uses a combination of experimental and simulation data as input. We have calculated the composition of the target and substrate for several deposition conditions. The simulations predict a reduced compound coverage of the target in HiPIMS compared to the continuous dc sputtering regime which explains the increased deposition rate. The simulations show that an increased dissociation of oxygen in a HiPIMS discharge is beneficial to achieve stoichiometric films on the substrate at high deposition rates.

  19. Chemical reactivity of the compressed noble gas atoms and their reactivity dynamics during collisions with protons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Chattaraj; B Maiti; U Sarkar

    2003-06-01

    Attempts are made to gain insights into the effect of confinement of noble gas atoms on their various reactivity indices. Systems become harder, less polarizable and difficult to excite as the compression increases. Ionization also causes similar effects. A quantum fluid density functional technique is adopted in order to study the dynamics of reactivity parameters during a collision between protons and He atoms in different electronic states for various projectile velocities and impact parameters. Dynamical variants of the principles of maximum hardness, minimum polarizability and maximum entropy are found to be operative.

  20. Reactive chemical dynamics through conical intersections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ghosal; B Jayachander Rao; S Mahapatra

    2007-09-01

    Reaction dynamics of prototypical, D + H2 and Cl (2P) + H2, chemical reactions occurring through the conical intersections of the respective coupled multi-sheeted potential energy surfaces is examined here. In addition to the electronic coupling, nonadiabatic effects due to relativistic spin-orbit coupling are also considered for the latter reaction. A time-dependent wave packet propagation approach is undertaken and the quantum dynamical observables viz., energy resolved reaction probabilities, integral reaction cross-sections and thermal rate constants are reported.

  1. Dynamics of inelastic and reactive gas-surface collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoliar, Laura Ann [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The dynamics of inelastic and reactive collisions in atomic beam-surface scattering are presented. The inelastic scattering of hyperthermal rare gaseous atoms from three alkali halide surfaces (LiF, NaCl, GI)was studied to understand mechanical energy transfer in unreactive systems. The dynamics of the chemical reaction in the scattering of H(D) atoms from the surfaces of LIF(001) and the basal plane of graphite were also studied.

  2. Local Dynamic Reactive Power for Correction of System Voltage Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    Distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as local voltage collapse. Local voltage collapse is occurring in part because modern air conditioner compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than 3 cycles (.05s) when a fault, such as on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage to sag to 70 to 60%. The reasons for this susceptibility are discussed in the report. During the local voltage collapse, voltages are depressed for a period of perhaps one or two minutes. There is a concern that these local events are interacting together over larger areas and may present a challenge to system reliability. An effective method of preventing local voltage collapse is the use of voltage regulation from Distributed Energy Resources (DER) that can supply or absorb reactive power. DER, when properly controlled, can provide a rapid correction to voltage dips and prevent motor stall. This report discusses the phenomenon and causes of local voltage collapse as well as the control methodology we have developed to counter voltage sag. The problem is growing because of the use of low inertia, high efficiency air conditioner (A/C) compressor motors and because the use of electric A/C is growing in use and becoming a larger percentage of system load. A method for local dynamic voltage regulation is discussed which uses reactive power injection or absorption from local DER. This method is independent, rapid, and will not interfere with conventional utility system voltage control. The results of simulations of this method are provided. The method has also been tested at the ORNL s Distributed Energy Communications and Control (DECC) Laboratory using our research inverter and synchronous condenser. These systems at the DECC Lab are interconnected to an actual distribution system, the ORNL distribution system, which is fed from TVA s 161kV sub-transmission backbone. The test results

  3. Reactive flow simulations: one-to-one comparison with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Neuville, Amelie; Pedersen, Janne; Jettestuen, Espen; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Hiorth, Aksel

    2014-05-01

    Direct in-situ observations of structural changes in the pore space of porous rocks during reactive flow provide valuable insights into the pore scale mechanisms that govern mineral growth, changes in wetting properties and increased oil recovery. We present simulations of single-phase reactive flow in micrometer sized channels in a calcite (CaCO3) crystal and compare mineralogical and geometrical changes in the numerical results to experimental in-situ observations made with the same flow geometry and reactive fluids. This enables a rigorous test of the numerical model and a method for determining kinetic rate constants that will be used in simulations of reactive flow in chalk geometries. The numerical model is a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that moves a set of chemical basis species through the pore space by advection and diffusion. A chemical solver with general kinetic expressions is coupled to the LBM via mass fluxes at the solid-fluid interface. The mineralogy of the solid is described by scalar fields, each representing a mineral phase. The rate of dissolution or precipitation of a mineral depends on the local chemical disequilibrium and on a kinetic rate constant specific to each mineral.

  4. Alphaherpesvirus Latency: A Dynamic State of Transcription and Reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, David C

    2016-01-01

    Alphaherpesviruses infect a variety of species from sea turtles to man and can cause significant disease in mammals including humans and livestock. These viruses are characterized by a lytic and latent state in nerve ganglia, with the ability to establish a lifelong latent infection that is interrupted by periodic reactivation. Previously, it was accepted that latency was a dominant state and that only during relatively infrequent reactivation episodes did latent genomes within ganglia become transcriptionally active. Here, we review recent data, focusing mainly on Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 which indicate that the latent state is more dynamic than recently appreciated.

  5. Can Ising model and/or QKPZ equation properly describe reactive-wetting interface dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efraim, Yael; Taitelbaum, Haim

    2009-09-01

    The reactive-wetting process, e.g. spreading of a liquid droplet on a reactive substrate is known as a complex, non-linear process with high sensitivity to minor fluctuations. The dynamics and geometry of the interface (triple line) between the materials is supposed to shed light on the main mechanisms of the process. We recently studied a room temperature reactive-wetting system of a small (˜ 150 μm) Hg droplet that spreads on a thin (˜ 4000 Å) Ag substrate. We calculated the kinetic roughening exponents (growth and roughness), as well as the persistence exponent of points on the advancing interface. In this paper we address the question whether there exists a well-defined model to describe the interface dynamics of this system, by performing two sets of numerical simulations. The first one is a simulation of an interface propagating according to the QKPZ equation, and the second one is a landscape of an Ising chain with ferromagnetic interactions in zero temperature. We show that none of these models gives a full description of the dynamics of the experimental reactivewetting system, but each one of them has certain common growth properties with it. We conjecture that this results from a microscopic behavior different from the macroscopic one. The microscopic mechanism, reflected by the persistence exponent, resembles the Ising behavior, while in the macroscopic scale, exemplified by the growth exponent, the dynamics looks more like the QKPZ dynamics.

  6. Preventive and Reactive Cyber Defense Dynamics Is Globally Stable

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ren; Xu, Shouhuai

    2016-01-01

    The recently proposed {\\em cybersecurity dynamics} approach aims to understand cybersecurity from a holistic perspective by modeling the evolution of the global cybersecurity state. These models describe the interactions between the various kinds of cyber defenses and the various kinds of cyber attacks. We study a particular kind of cybersecurity dynamics caused by the interactions between preventive and reactive defenses (e.g., filtering and malware detection) against push- and pull-based cyber attacks (e.g., malware spreading and "drive-by download" attacks). The dynamics was previously shown to be globally stable in a {\\em special} regime of the parameter universe, but little is known beyond this special regime. In this paper, we resolve an open problem in this domain by proving that the dynamics is globally stable in the {\\em entire} parameter universe (i.e., the dynamics always converges to a unique equilibrium). We discuss the cybersecurity meanings and implications of this theoretic result. We also pro...

  7. Vehicle dynamics modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Dieter; Bardini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine in detail the fundamentals and mathematical descriptions of the dynamics of automobiles. In this context different levels of complexity will be presented, starting with basic single-track models up to complex three-dimensional multi-body models. A particular focus is on the process of establishing mathematical models on the basis of real cars and the validation of simulation results. The methods presented are explained in detail by means of selected application scenarios.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of pyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił

    2015-04-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used for the investigation of molecular motions in pyridine in the temperature range 20-480 K under normal pressure. The results obtained are analyzed within the frame of the Mori Zwanzig memory function formalism. An analytical approximation of the first memory function K(t) is applied to predict some dependences on temperature. Experimental results of the Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light from liquid pyridine are used as the main base for the comparison.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił B. J.

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular potentials and a few models of intermolecular interaction in liquid benzene are tested by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones 12-6 (LJ 12-6) potential is too hard, which yields incorrect results. The exp-6 potential with a too hard repulsive term is also often used. Therefore, we took an expa-6 potential with a small Gaussian correction plus electrostatic interactions. This allows to modify the curvature of the potential. The MD simulations are carried out in the temperature range 280-352 K under normal pressure and at experimental density. The Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light is used for comparison. The results of MD simulations are comparable with the experimental values.

  10. Dynamic simulations of tissue welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitland, D.J.; Eder, D.C.; London, R.A.; Glinsky, M.E. [and others

    1996-02-01

    The exposure of human skin to near-infrared radiation is numerically simulated using coupled laser, thermal transport and mass transport numerical models. The computer model LATIS is applied in both one-dimensional and two-dimensional geometries. Zones within the skin model are comprised of a topical solder, epidermis, dermis, and fatty tissue. Each skin zone is assigned initial optical, thermal and water density properties consistent with values listed in the literature. The optical properties of each zone (i.e. scattering, absorption and anisotropy coefficients) are modeled as a kinetic function of the temperature. Finally, the water content in each zone is computed from water diffusion where water losses are accounted for by evaporative losses at the air-solder interface. The simulation results show that the inclusion of water transport and evaporative losses in the model are necessary to match experimental observations. Dynamic temperature and damage distributions are presented for the skin simulations.

  11. Dynamical footprint of cross-reactivity in a human autoimmune T-cell receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Delogu, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    The present work focuses on the dynamical aspects of cross-reactivity between myelin based protein (MBP) self-peptide and two microbial peptides (UL15, PMM) for Hy.1B11 T-cell receptor (TCR). This same TCR was isolated from a patient suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS). The study aims at highlighting the chemical interactions underlying recognition mechanisms between TCR and the peptides presented by Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) proteins, which form a crucial component in adaptive immune response against foreign antigens. Since the ability of a TCR to recognize different peptide antigens presented by MHC depends on its cross-reactivity, we used molecular dynamics methods to obtain atomistic detail on TCR-peptide-MHC complexes. Our results show how the dynamical basis of Hy.1B11 TCR’s cross-reactivity is rooted in a similar bridging interaction pattern across the TCR-peptide-MHC interface. Our simulations confirm the importance of TCR CDR3α E98 residue interaction with MHC and a predominant role of P6 peptide residue in MHC binding affinity. Altogether, our study provides energetic and dynamical insights into factors governing peptide recognition by the cross-reactive Hy.1B11 TCR, found in MS patient. PMID:28195200

  12. Dynamical footprint of cross-reactivity in a human autoimmune T-cell receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Delogu, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The present work focuses on the dynamical aspects of cross-reactivity between myelin based protein (MBP) self-peptide and two microbial peptides (UL15, PMM) for Hy.1B11 T-cell receptor (TCR). This same TCR was isolated from a patient suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS). The study aims at highlighting the chemical interactions underlying recognition mechanisms between TCR and the peptides presented by Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) proteins, which form a crucial component in adaptive immune response against foreign antigens. Since the ability of a TCR to recognize different peptide antigens presented by MHC depends on its cross-reactivity, we used molecular dynamics methods to obtain atomistic detail on TCR-peptide-MHC complexes. Our results show how the dynamical basis of Hy.1B11 TCR’s cross-reactivity is rooted in a similar bridging interaction pattern across the TCR-peptide-MHC interface. Our simulations confirm the importance of TCR CDR3α E98 residue interaction with MHC and a predominant role of P6 peptide residue in MHC binding affinity. Altogether, our study provides energetic and dynamical insights into factors governing peptide recognition by the cross-reactive Hy.1B11 TCR, found in MS patient.

  13. Development of predictive simulation capability for reactive multiphase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderHeyden, W.B.; Kendrick, B.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to develop a self-sustained research program for advanced computer simulation of industrial reactive multiphase flows. The prototype research problem was a three-phase alumina precipitator used in the Bayer process, a key step in aluminum refining. Accomplishments included the development of an improved reaction mechanism of the alumina precipitation growth process, the development of an efficient methods for handling particle size distribution in multiphase flow simulation codes, the incorporation of precipitation growth and agglomeration kinetics in LANL's CFDLIB multiphase flow code library and the evaluation of multiphase turbulence closure models for bubbly flow simulations.

  14. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2011-06-12

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs generally have low volatilities and are combustion-resistant, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of primary radiation chemistry, charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of reactions and product distributions. We study these issues by characterization of primary radiolysis products and measurements of their yields and reactivity, quantification of electron solvation dynamics and scavenging of electrons in different states of solvation. From this knowledge we wish to learn how to predict radiolytic mechanisms and control them or mitigate their effects on the properties of materials used in nuclear fuel processing, for example, and to apply IL radiation chemistry to answer questions about general chemical reactivity in ionic liquids that will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that the slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increase the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alter product distributions and subsequent chemistry. This difference from conventional solvents has profound effects on predicting and controlling radiolytic yields

  15. Human motion simulation predictive dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Malek, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Simulate realistic human motion in a virtual world with an optimization-based approach to motion prediction. With this approach, motion is governed by human performance measures, such as speed and energy, which act as objective functions to be optimized. Constraints on joint torques and angles are imposed quite easily. Predicting motion in this way allows one to use avatars to study how and why humans move the way they do, given specific scenarios. It also enables avatars to react to infinitely many scenarios with substantial autonomy. With this approach it is possible to predict dynamic motion without having to integrate equations of motion -- rather than solving equations of motion, this approach solves for a continuous time-dependent curve characterizing joint variables (also called joint profiles) for every degree of freedom. Introduces rigorous mathematical methods for digital human modelling and simulation Focuses on understanding and representing spatial relationships (3D) of biomechanics Develops an i...

  16. Grand canonical Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fritsch, S; Junghans, C; Ciccotti, G; Site, L Delle; Kremer, K

    2011-01-01

    For simulation studies of (macro-) molecular liquids it would be of significant interest to be able to adjust/increase the level of resolution within one region of space, while allowing for the free exchange of molecules between (open) regions of different resolution/representation. In the present work we generalize the adaptive resolution idea in terms of a generalized Grand Canonical approach. This provides a robust framework for truly open Molecular Dynamics systems. We apply the method to liquid water at ambient conditions.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Reactive Flow in Hot Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leslie

    2004-02-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant expansion in our ability to model systems that involve the interaction of fluid flow, mass transport, heat transfer, and geochemical reaction in porous media. Such scenarios arise in studies of both fundamental science, such as the effects of thermohaline flow and heat transfer in rift basins, and in the solution of applied problems, such as the response of a geothermal reservoir to the re-injection of cool water. Numerical Simulation of Reactive Flow in Hot Aquifers presents the simulation tools that were developed by a team of researchers based in Germany. This group has a long history in analyzing geothermal systems, but the methods presented can be applied far beyond the study of geothermal reservoirs. The heart of the book is a description of the model SHEMAT. The executable code and a graphical user interface are included with the book.

  18. A Dynamic Reactive Power Control for DFIG Wind Turbines and Its Impacts on Distribution Protections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing penetration of distributed generations (DGs) into power grids, the fault ride-through ability of DG is attracting more and more attention. Recent grid codes require a DG to maintain its connection with the grid during grid faults and to play an active role in the recovery of grid voltage. This paper chooses the doubly- fed induction generator (DFIG) as the typical wind turbine for study. Firstly, a dynamic reactive power control strategy is proposed to improve the fault ride-through characteristic of a DFIG. The contributions of a DFIG to the fault current under the dynamic reactive power control and the Crowbar control are analyzed and compared based on the mathematical expressions and control behaviors. The impacts of a DFIG under two control strategies on distribution protections are discussed. Studies show that although a DFIG under the dynamic reactive power control provides more fault current component than one under the Crowbar control, its impacts on distribution protections are acceptable. Finally, a 10 kV distribution network with a DFIG is simulated in PowerFactory DIgSILENT. The simulation results prove the correctness of above theoretical analysis.

  19. Atomistic Simulations of Chemical Reactivity of TATB Under Thermal and Shock Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manaa, M R; Reed, E J; Fried, L E

    2009-09-23

    The study of chemical transformations that occur at the reactive shock front of energetic materials provides important information for the development of predictive models at the grain-and continuum scales. A major shortcoming of current high explosives models is the lack of chemical kinetics data of the reacting explosive in the high pressure and temperature regimes. In the absence of experimental data, long-time scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with reactive chemistry become a viable recourse to provide an insight into the decomposition mechanism of explosives, and to obtain effective reaction rate laws. These rates can then be incorporated into thermo-chemical-hydro codes (such as Cheetah linked to ALE3D) for accurate description of the grain and macro scales dynamics of reacting explosives. In this talk, I will present quantum simulations of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) crystals under thermal decomposition (high density and temperature) and shock compression conditions. This is the first time that condensed phase quantum methods have been used to study the chemistry of insensitive high explosives. We used the quantum-based, self-consistent charge density functional tight binding method (SCC{_}DFTB) to calculate the interatomic forces for reliable predictions of chemical reactions, and to examine electronic properties at detonation conditions for a relatively long time-scale on the order of several hundreds of picoseconds. For thermal decomposition of TATB, we conducted constant volume-temperature simulations, ranging from 0.35 to 2 nanoseconds, at {rho} = 2.87 g/cm{sup 3} at T = 3500, 3000, 2500, and 1500 K, and {rho} = 2.9 g/cm{sup 3} and 2.72 g/cm{sup 3}, at T = 3000 K. We also simulated crystal TATB's reactivity under steady overdriven shock compression using the multi-scale shock technique. We conducted shock simulations with specified shock speeds of 8, 9, and 10 km/s for up to 0.43 ns duration, enabling us to track the

  20. Fast simulation of Brownian dynamics in a crowded environment

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations are an increasingly popular tool for understanding spatially-distributed biochemical reaction systems. Recent improvements in our understanding of the cellular environment show that volume exclusion effects are fundamental to reaction networks inside cells. These systems are frequently studied by incorporating inert hard spheres (crowders) into three-dimensional Brownian dynamics simulations, however these methods are extremely slow owing to the sheer number of possible collisions between particles. Here we propose a rigorous "crowder-free" method to dramatically increase simulation speed for crowded biochemical reaction systems by eliminating the need to explicitly simulate the crowders. We consider both the case where the reactive particles are point particles, and where they themselves occupy a volume. We use simulations of simple chemical reaction networks to confirm that our simplification is just as accurate as the original algorithm, and that it corresponds to a large spee...

  1. Humanoid robot simulator: a realistic dynamics approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, José; Gonçalves, José; Costa, Paulo; Moreira, António

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a humanoid robot simulator with realistic dynamics. As simulation is a powerful tool for speeding up the control software development, the suggested accurate simulator allows to accomplish this goal. The simulator, based on the Open Dynamics Engine and GLScene graphics library, provides instant visual feedback and allows the user to test any control strategy without damaging the real robot in the early stages of the development. The proposed simulator also captures some c...

  2. ESCRIPT-RT: Reactive transport simulation in PYTHON using ESCRIPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, T.; Gross, L.; Georgiev, D.; Cleverley, J.

    2012-08-01

    We present ESCRIPT-RT, a new reactive transport simulation code for fully saturated porous media which is based on a finite element method (FEM) combined with three other components: (i) a Gibbs minimisation solver for equilibrium modelling of fluid-rock interactions, (ii) an equation of state for pure water to calculate fluid properties and (iii) a thermodynamically consistent material database to determine rocks' material properties. Using decoupling of most of the standard governing equations, this code solves sequentially for temperature, pressure, mass transport and chemical equilibrium. In contrast, pressure and Darcy flow velocities are solved as a coupled system. The reactive transport itself is performed using the masses of chemical elements instead of chemical species. In such way it requires less computing memory and time than the majority of other packages. The code is based on ESCRIPT, a parallelised platform which supports efficient stepwise simulation of realistic geodynamic scenarios at multiple scales. It is particularly suitable to analyse hydrothermal systems involving geometrically complex geological structures with strong permeability contrasts and subject to complex fluid-rock chemical interactions. The modular architecture of the code and its high level Python interface also provide flexibility for modellers who can easily modify or add new feedbacks between the different physical processes. In addition, the implemented abstract user interface allows geologists to run the code without knowledge of the underlying numerical implementation. As an example we show the simulation of hydrothermal gold precipitation in a granite-greenstone geological sequence, which illustrates the important coupling between thermal response and mass transfer to the localisation of gold.

  3. SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF STRUCTURE, DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY IN IONIC LIQUIDS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WISHART,J.F.

    2007-11-30

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate

  4. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a ``tulip flame`` in the literature, occurred. The ``tulip flame`` was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  5. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a tulip flame'' in the literature, occurred. The tulip flame'' was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  6. Material Discovery and Design with Dynamic Charge Reactive Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Atomic scale computational simulations of multi-phase systems is increasingly important as our ability to simulate nanometer-sized systems becomes routine. The recently developed charge optimized many body potential (COMB) potentials have significantly enhanced our ability to carry out atomic-scale simulations of heterogeneous material systems. The formalism of this potential combines variable charge electrostatic interactions with a classical analytical bond-order potential. It therefore has the capacity to adaptively model metallic, covalent, ionic, and van der Waals bonding within the same simulation cell and dynamically determine the charges on individual atoms according to the local environment. The utility of the COMB potentials is illustrated for materials design and discovery by exploring the structure, stability, mechanical properties, and thermal properties of intermetallic systems and oxide-metal interfaces. They are also used to address key questions associated with corrosion, thin film growth, and heterogeneous catalysis.

  7. Post-Transition State Dynamics in Gas Phase Reactivity: Importance of Bifurcations and Rotational Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sómer, Ana; Yáñez, Manuel; Hase, William L; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Spezia, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    Beyond the established use of thermodynamic vs kinetic control to explain chemical reaction selectivity, the concept of bifurcations on a potential energy surface (PES) is proving to be of pivotal importance with regard to selectivity. In this article, we studied by means of post-transition state (TS) direct dynamics simulations the effect that vibrational and rotational excitation at the TS may have on selectivity on a bifurcating PES. With this aim, we studied the post-TS unimolecular reactivity of the [Ca(formamide)](2+) ion, for which Coulomb explosion and neutral loss reactions compete. The PES exhibits different kinds of nonintrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) dynamics, among them PES bifurcations, which direct the trajectories to multiple reaction paths after passing the TS. Direct dynamics simulations were used to distinguish between the bifurcation non-IRC dynamics and non-IRC dynamics arising from atomistic motions directing the trajectories away from the IRC. Overall, we corroborated the idea that kinetic selectivity often does not reduce to a simple choice between paths with different barrier heights and instead dynamical behavior after passing the TS may be crucial. Importantly, rotational excitation may play a pivotal role on the reaction selectivity favoring nonthermodynamic products.

  8. Dynamics and reactivity of trapped electrons on supported ice crystallites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähler, Julia; Gahl, Cornelius; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-17

    The solvation dynamics and reactivity of localized excess electrons in aqueous environments have attracted great attention in many areas of physics, chemistry, and biology. This manifold attraction results from the importance of water as a solvent in nature as well as from the key role of low-energy electrons in many chemical reactions. One prominent example is the electron-induced dissociation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Low-energy electrons are also critical in the radiation chemistry that occurs in nuclear reactors. Excess electrons in an aqueous environment are localized and stabilized by the local rearrangement of the surrounding water dipoles. Such solvated or hydrated electrons are known to play an important role in systems such as biochemical reactions and atmospheric chemistry. Despite numerous studies over many years, little is known about the microscopic details of these electron-induced chemical processes, and interest in the fundamental processes involved in the reactivity of trapped electrons continues. In this Account, we present a surface science study of the dynamics and reactivity of such localized low-energy electrons at D(2)O crystallites that are supported by a Ru(001) single crystal metal surface. This approach enables us to investigate the generation and relaxation dynamics as well as dissociative electron attachment (DEA) reaction of excess electrons under well-defined conditions. They are generated by photoexcitation in the metal template and transferred to trapping sites at the vacuum interface of crystalline D(2)O islands. In these traps, the electrons are effectively decoupled from the electronic states of the metal template, leading to extraordinarily long excited state lifetimes on the order of minutes. Using these long-lived, low-energy electrons, we study the DEA to CFCl(3) that is coadsorbed at very low concentrations (∼10(12) cm(-2)). Using rate equations and direct measurement of the change of surface dipole moment, we

  9. Four-dimensional imaging of moisture dynamics during landslide reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Sebastian; Chambers, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Paul; Maurer, Hansruedi; Merritt, Andrew; Meldrum, Philip; Kuras, Oliver; Gunn, David; Smith, Alister; Dijkstra, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Landslides pose significant risks to communities and infrastructure, and mitigating these risks relies on understanding landslide causes and triggering processes. It has been shown that geophysical surveys can significantly contribute to the characterization of unstable slopes. However, hydrological processes can be temporally and spatially heterogeneous, requiring their related properties to be monitored over time. Geoelectrical monitoring can provide temporal and volumetric distributions of electrical resistivity, which are directly related to moisture content. To date, studies demonstrating this capability have been restricted to 2-D sections, which are insufficient to capture the full degree of spatial heterogeneity. This study is the first to employ 4-D (i.e., 3-D time lapse) resistivity imaging on an active landslide, providing long-term data (3 years) highlighting the evolution of moisture content prior to landslide reactivation and showing its decline post reactivation. Crucially, the time-lapse inversion methodology employed here incorporates movements of the electrodes on the unstable surface. Although seasonal characteristics dominate the shallow moisture dynamics during the first 2 years with surficial drying in summer and wetting in winter, in the months preceding reactivation, moisture content increased by more than 45% throughout the slope. This is in agreement with independent data showing a significant rise in piezometric heads and shallow soil moisture contents as a result of prolonged and intense rainfall. Based on these results, remediation measures could be designed and early-warning systems implemented. Thus, resistivity monitoring that can allow for moving electrodes provides a new means for the effective mitigation of landslide risk.

  10. Self-assembling, reactivity and molecular dynamics of fullerenol nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vraneš, Milan; Borišev, Ivana; Tot, Aleksandar; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja; Jović, Danica; Gadžurić, Slobodan; Djordjevic, Aleksandar

    2016-12-21

    In this work structuring of water and insight into intermolecular interactions between water and fullerenol are studied throughout the process of forming nanoagglomerates at different temperatures applying both experimental and computational approaches. The obtained fullerenol nanoparticles (FNPs) are firstly characterized using dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The density, electrical conductivity and dynamic viscosity of aqueous fullerenol solutions are measured in the temperature range of 293.15 to 315.15 K. From the experimental density results other important thermodynamic values, such as apparent molar volumes and the partial molar volumes of water and fullerenol, are also calculated. To support the conclusion derived from the experimental density and calculated volumetric parameters, and to better understand the nature of the interactions with water, molecular dynamics simulations and radial distribution functions are also employed.

  11. Molecular dynamics study to identify the reactive sites of a liquid squalane surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sven P K; Reed, Stewart K; Westacott, Robin E; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2006-06-22

    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid squalane, C30H62, were performed, focusing in particular on the liquid-vacuum interface. These theoretical studies were aimed at identifying potentially reactive sites on the surface, knowledge of which is important for a number of inelastic and reactive scattering experiments. A united atom force field (Martin, M. G.; Siepmann, J. I. J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 4508-4517) was used, and the simulations were analyzed with respect to their interfacial properties. A modest but clearly identifiable preference for methyl groups to protrude into the vacuum has been found at lower temperatures. This effect decreases when going to higher temperatures. Additional simulations tracking the flight paths of projectiles directed at a number of randomly chosen surfaces extracted from the molecular dynamics simulations were performed. The geometrical parameters for these calculations were chosen to imitate a typical abstraction reaction, such as the reaction between ground-state oxygen atoms and hydrocarbons. Despite the preference for methyl groups to protrude further into the vacuum, Monte Carlo tracking simulations suggest, on geometric grounds, that primary and secondary hydrogen atoms are roughly equally likely to react with incoming gas-phase atoms. These geometric simulations also indicate that a substantial fraction of the scattered products is likely to undergo at least one secondary collision with hydrocarbon side chains. These results help to interpret the outcome of previous measurements of the internal and external energy distribution of the gas-phase OH products of the interfacial reaction between oxygen atoms and liquid squalane.

  12. Pore-scale simulation of multicomponent multiphase reactive transport with dissolution and precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Li; Tang, Qing; Robinson, Bruce A; He, Ya-Ling; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent multiphase reactive transport processes with dissolution-precipitation are widely encountered in energy and environment systems. A pore-scale two-phase multi-mixture model based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed for such complex transport processes, where each phase is considered as a mixture of miscible components in it. The liquid-gas fluid flow with large density ratio is simulated using the multicomponent multiphase pseudo-potential LB model; the transport of certain solute in the corresponding solvent is solved using the mass transport LB model; and the dynamic evolutions of the liquid-solid interface due to dissolution-precipitation are captured by an interface tracking scheme. The model developed can predict coupled multiple physicochemical processes including multiphase flow, multicomponent mass transport, homogeneous reactions in the bulk fluid and heterogeneous dissolution-precipitation reactions at the fluid-solid interface, and dynamic evolution of the solid matrix ...

  13. Simulation of reactive processes related to biodegradation in aquifers. 1. Structure of the three-dimensional reactive transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Dirk; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    1998-05-01

    The reactive transport model TBC (transport, biochemistry, and chemistry) numerically solves the equations for reactive transport in three-dimensional saturated groundwater flow. A finite element approximation and a standard Galerkin method are used. Solute transport is coupled to microbially mediated organic carbon degradation. Microbial growth is assumed to follow Monod-type kinetics. Substrate consumption and release of metabolic products is coupled to microbial growth via yield coefficients and stoichiometric relations. Additionally, the effects of microbial activity on selected inorganic chemical species in the aquifer can be considered. TBC allows the user to specify a wide range of possible biochemical and chemical reactions in the input file. This makes TBC a powerful and flexible simulation tool. It was developed to simulate reactive processes related to in situ bioremediation, but further fields of application are laboratory column studies on redox processes coupled to organic carbon degradation, field cases of intrinsic biodegradation, and early diagenetic processes in sediments.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Fire Dynamics Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.; Petersen, Arnkell J.

    2007-01-01

    equations require solution of the issues of combustion and gas radiation to mention a few. This paper performs a sensitivity analysis of a fire dynamics simulation on a benchmark case where measurement results are available for comparison. The analysis is performed using the method of Elementary Effects......In case of fire dynamics simulation requirements to reliable results are most often very high due to the severe consequences of erroneous results. At the same time it is a well known fact that fire dynamics simulation constitutes rather complex physical phenomena which apart from flow and energy...

  15. Lunar Dust Chemical, Electrical, and Mechanical Reactivity: Simulation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    2008-01-01

    Lunar dust is recognized to be a highly reactive material in its native state. Many, if not all Constellation systems will be affected by its adhesion, abrasion, and reactivity. A critical requirement to develop successful strategies for dealing with lunar dust and designing tolerant systems will be to produce similar material for ground-based testing.

  16. Dynamic Simulation for Missile Erection System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to study the dynamic characteristics of the missile erection system, it can be considered as a rigid-flexible coupling multi-body system. Firstly, the actual system is abstracted as an equal and simplified one and then the forces applied to it are analyzed. Secondly, the rigid-flexible coupling dynamic simulation for erection system is accomplished by use of the system simulation software, for example Pro/E, ADAMS, ANSYS, MATLAB/Simulink, etc. Finally, having the aid of simulation results, the kinetic and dynamic characteristics of the flexible bodies in erection system are analyzed.The simulation considering the erection system as a rigid-flexible coupling system can provide valuable results to the research of its kinetic, dynamic and vibrational characteristics.

  17. Simulating protein dynamics: Novel methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishal, V.

    This Ph.D dissertation describes several methodological advances in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Methods like Markov State Models can be used effectively in combination with distributed computing to obtain long time scale behavior from an ensemble of short simulations. Advanced computing architectures like Graphics Processors can be used to greatly extend the scope of MD. Applications of MD techniques to problems like Alzheimer's Disease and fundamental questions in protein dynamics are described.

  18. Dynamic Simulation of EAF on RTDS for Compensation Sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, K. S.

    2017-02-01

    Large sized electric arc furnaces (EAF) causes power quality problems such as flicker, harmonics etc. due to their unbalanced and non-linear behavior characteristics. The rapid swings in real and reactive power of such non-linear loads causes fast repetitive voltage variations with appreciable voltage distortion caused by harmonics and unbalance. Some form of reactive compensation is usually adopted to limit the disturbances caused by EAF in electric power system, in particular the flicker. This paper highlights the results of a case study, where the arc furnace is modelled using statistical dynamic model of the furnace using real time digital simulator which allows more real time simulations tests to be conducted in a shorter time and also provides a more detailed power system representation for the tests. The investigation of the simulation study results showed that static VAR compensators can be successfully used for reduction of flicker levels, compensation of reactive power and for the regulation of voltage levels in the EAF plant under study.

  19. Visualizing Structure and Dynamics of Disaccharide Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of several solvent models on the conformational properties and dynamics of disaccharides such as cellobiose and lactose. Significant variation in timescale for large scale conformational transformations are observed. Molecular dynamics simulation provides enough detail to enable insight through visualization of multidimensional data sets. We present a new way to visualize conformational space for disaccharides with Ramachandran plots.

  20. The Modeling and Simulation of Reactive Distillation for the Esterification Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱建华; 沈复

    2003-01-01

    In this paper,a generalized model of the reactive distillation processes was developed via rate-based approach. The homotopy-continuation method was employed to solve the complicated nonlinear model equations efficiently. The simulation on the reactive distillation processes was carried out with the profiles of stage temperature,composition and flow rate for both vapor and liquid phases obtained. Based on careful analysis of the simulation results, the pitfalls in experimental design were detected. Finally, a software package for the simulation of reactive distillation processes was developed.

  1. Simulating Flexible-Spacecraft Dynamics and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Versatile program applies to many types of spacecraft and dynamical problems. Flexible Spacecraft Dynamics and Control program (FSD) developed to aid in simulation of large class of flexible and rigid spacecraft. Extremely versatile and used in attitude dynamics and control analysis as well as in-orbit support of deployment and control of spacecraft. Applicable to inertially oriented spinning, Earth-oriented, or gravity-gradient-stabilized spacecraft. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahoshi, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  4. Object Oriented Modelling and Dynamical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens; Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin

    1998-01-01

    This report with appendix describes the work done in master project at DTU.The goal of the project was to develop a concept for simulation of dynamical systems based on object oriented methods.The result was a library of C++-classes, for use when both building componentbased models and when...... onduction simulation experiments....

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  6. Multiscale Model Approach for Magnetization Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    De Lucia, Andrea; Tretiakov, Oleg A; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of magnetization dynamics in a multiscale environment enable rapid evaluation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in a mesoscopic sample with nanoscopic accuracy in areas where such accuracy is required. We have developed a multiscale magnetization dynamics simulation approach that can be applied to large systems with spin structures that vary locally on small length scales. To implement this, the conventional micromagnetic simulation framework has been expanded to include a multiscale solving routine. The software selectively simulates different regions of a ferromagnetic sample according to the spin structures located within in order to employ a suitable discretization and use either a micromagnetic or an atomistic model. To demonstrate the validity of the multiscale approach, we simulate the spin wave transmission across the regions simulated with the two different models and different discretizations. We find that the interface between the regions is fully transparent for spin waves with f...

  7. CL20-TNT共晶高温热解的ReaxFF/lg反应力场分子动力学模拟%Pyrolysis of CL20-TNT cocrystal from ReaxFF/lg reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海; 李启楷; 何远航

    2013-01-01

    ReaxFF/lg势函数是在ReaxFF的基础上增加了对范德华引力的描述,因此可以更好地用于描述晶体密度和结构,而含能材料密度很大程度上影响着爆轰的宏观性质(如爆速、反应区宽度、能量输出结构等).本文采用ReaxFF/lg反应力场分析了高温条件下凝聚相CL20-TNT共晶的初始分解情况,并通过简单的指数函数拟合势能演化曲线获得了平衡和诱导期以及整体反应时间,随后通过反应速率方程得到了共晶热解的活化能Ea (185.052 kJ/mol). CL20-TNT共晶热解过程中CL20分子均在TNT之前分解完毕,并且随着温度的升高, TNT的分解速率明显加快,温度越高二者完全分解所需的时间越接近.有限时间步长下的产物识别分析显示主要产物为NO2, NO, CO2, N2, H2O, HON, HNO3. NO2是C−NO2和N−NO2键均裂共同贡献的结果,其产量快速地增加,达到峰值后开始减少,此过程伴随着NO2参与其他反应使得NO2中的N原子进入到其他的含N分子中.次要产物主要为CO, N2O, N2O5, CHO. N2O具有很强的氧化能力,使其分布有着剧烈的波动特征.%ReaxFF/lg reactive force field is the extention of ReaxFF by adding a van der Waals attraction term. It can be used to well describe density and structure of crystal, moreover, the macroscopic property of detonation is significantly influenced by the density of energetic material. We report on the initial thermal decomposition of condensed phase CL20-TNT cocrystal under high temperature here. The time evolution curve of the potential energy can be described reasonably well by a single exponential function from which we obtain the initial equilibration and induction time, overall characteristic time of pyrolysis. Afterward, we also obtain the activation energy Ea (185.052 kJ/mol) from these simulations. All the CL20 molecules are completed before TNT decomposition in our simulations. And as the temperature rises, the TNT decomposition rate is

  8. Prediction of the Chapman–Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V.; An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-01

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman–Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ s...

  9. Large-Scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Shock-induced Initiation Processes in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aidan

    2013-06-01

    Initiation in energetic materials is fundamentally dependent on the interaction between a host of complex chemical and mechanical processes, occurring on scales ranging from intramolecular vibrations through molecular crystal plasticity up to hydrodynamic phenomena at the mesoscale. A variety of methods (e.g. quantum electronic structure methods (QM), non-reactive classical molecular dynamics (MD), mesoscopic continuum mechanics) exist to study processes occurring on each of these scales in isolation, but cannot describe how these processes interact with each other. In contrast, the ReaxFF reactive force field, implemented in the LAMMPS parallel MD code, allows us to routinely perform multimillion-atom reactive MD simulations of shock-induced initiation in a variety of energetic materials. This is done either by explicitly driving a shock-wave through the structure (NEMD) or by imposing thermodynamic constraints on the collective dynamics of the simulation cell e.g. using the Multiscale Shock Technique (MSST). These MD simulations allow us to directly observe how energy is transferred from the shockwave into other processes, including intramolecular vibrational modes, plastic deformation of the crystal, and hydrodynamic jetting at interfaces. These processes in turn cause thermal excitation of chemical bonds leading to initial chemical reactions, and ultimately to exothermic formation of product species. Results will be presented on the application of this approach to several important energetic materials, including pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO). In both cases, we validate the ReaxFF parameterizations against QM and experimental data. For PETN, we observe initiation occurring via different chemical pathways, depending on the shock direction. For PETN containing spherical voids, we observe enhanced sensitivity due to jetting, void collapse, and hotspot formation, with sensitivity increasing with void size. For ANFO, we

  10. Dynamic Harmonic and Reactive Power Compensation with an Adaptive Shunt Active Filter for Variable Speed Induction Motor Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu M R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Variable speed drives are mostly preferred in industries, while considering energy saving, smooth control, flexible operation and fast response. On the other hand, this equipment generates dynamic harmonic distortions in source currents and draws variable reactive power demand depending on variation in load condition. These distortions propagate throughout the system and affect all the loads connected to the point of common coupling. Hence a dynamic harmonic and reactive compensator is necessary to enhance power quality to meet current and voltage distortion limits at point of common coupling as per IEEE standard. The most common choice for adjustable speed drives in industries is three phase voltage source inverter based induction motor drives which uses PWM technique for voltage, frequency and current control. This paper presents harmonic analysis of an induction motor drive in an industrial plant and development of adaptive dynamic harmonic and reactive compensator to improve power quality. A digital controller which is programmed with adaptive Artificial Neural Network (ANN based control algorithm is used for controlling shunt active filter. The simulation and experimental results show that the adaptive shunt active filter provides effective harmonic and reactive compensation in the system under steady state and dynamic load conditions.

  11. Circuit reactivation dynamically regulates synaptic plasticity in neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskal, Peter B.; Li, Lucy; Maclean, Jason N.

    2013-10-01

    Circuit reactivations involve a stereotyped sequence of neuronal firing and have been behaviourally linked to memory consolidation. Here we use multiphoton imaging and patch-clamp recording, and observe sparse and stereotyped circuit reactivations that correspond to UP states within active neurons. To evaluate the effect of the circuit on synaptic plasticity, we trigger a single spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) pairing once per circuit reactivation. The pairings reliably fall within a particular epoch of the circuit sequence and result in long-term potentiation. During reactivation, the amplitude of plasticity significantly correlates with the preceding 20-25 ms of membrane depolarization rather than the depolarization at the time of pairing. This circuit-dependent plasticity provides a natural constraint on synaptic potentiation, regulating the inherent instability of STDP in an assembly phase-sequence model. Subthreshold voltage during endogenous circuit reactivations provides a critical informative context for plasticity and facilitates the stable consolidation of a spatiotemporal sequence.

  12. Spin dynamics simulations at AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    To preserve proton polarization through acceleration, it is important to have a correct model of the process. It has been known that with the insertion of the two helical partial Siberian snakes in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the MAD model of AGS can not deal with a field map with offset orbit. The stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi provides a tool to represent the real electromagnetic fields in the modeling of the optics and spin dynamics for the AGS. Numerical experiments of resonance crossing, including spin dynamics in presence of the snakes and Q-jump, have been performed in AGS lattice models, using Zgoubi. This contribution reports on various results so obtained.

  13. The data system dynamic simulation /DSDS/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, J. W.; Piner, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the development by NASA of the data system dynamic simulation (DSDS) which provides a data system simulation capability for a broad range of programs, with the capability to model and simulate all or any portion of an end-to-end data system to multiple levels of fidelity. Versatility is achieved by specifying parameters which define the performance characteristics of data system components, and by specifying control and data paths in a data system. DSDS helps reduce overall simulation cost and the time required for obtaining a data systems analysis, and helps provide both early realistic representations of data systems and the flexibility to study design changes and operating strategies.

  14. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2004-11-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multibody knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer's CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously.

  15. Dynamic Procedure for Filtered Gyrokinetic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Morel, Pierre; Albrecht-Marc, Michel; Carati, Daniele; Merz, Florian; Görler, Tobias; Jenko, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of gyrokinetic plasma turbulence are investigated as interesting candidates to decrease the computational cost. A dynamic procedure is implemented in the GENE code, allowing for dynamic optimization of the free parameters of the LES models (setting the amplitudes of dissipative terms). Employing such LES methods, one recovers the free energy and heat flux spectra obtained from highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Systematic comparisons are performed for different values of the temperature gradient and magnetic shear, parameters which are of prime importance in Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) driven turbulence. Moreover, the degree of anisotropy of the problem, that can vary with parameters, can be adapted dynamically by the method that shows Gyrokinetic Large Eddy Simulation (GyroLES) to be a serious candidate to reduce numerical cost of gyrokinetic solvers.

  16. High-temperature thermal degradation of polyethylene from reactive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Moore, Nathan W.

    Thermal degradation of polyethylene is studied under extremely high-rate temperature ramp rates from 1014 to 1010 K/s in isochoric, condensed phases. The molecular evolution and macroscopic state variables are extracted as a function of density from reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF potential. These results are used to parameterize a kinetic rate model for the dissociation and coalescence of hydrocarbons as a function of temperature, temperature ramp rate, and density. The results are contrasted to first-order random-scission macrokinetic models often assumed for pyrolysis of linear polyethylene under ambient conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  17. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Investigations of Alkoxysilane Sol-Gel and Surface Coating Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, Joshua David

    The ability to generate nanostructured materials with tailored morphology or chemistry is of great technological interest. One proven method of generating metal-oxide materials, and chemically modifying metal-oxide surfaces is through the reactions of molecular building blocks known as alkoxysilanes. Alkoxysilanes are a class of chemicals which contain one or more organic alkoxy groups bonded to silicon atoms. Alkoxysilane (Si-O-R) chemical groups can undergo reactions to form bridges (Si-O-M) with metal oxides. Due to their ability to "attach" to metal-oxides through condensation reactions, alkoxysilanes have a number of interesting applications, such as: the generation of synthetic siloxane materials through the sol-gel process, and the formation of functionalized surface coatings on metal-oxide surfaces. Despite widespread study of sol-gel and surface coatings processes, it is difficult to predict the morphology of the final products due to the large number of process variables involved, such as precursor molecule structure, solvent effects, solution composition, temperature, and pH. To determine the influence of these variables on the products of sol-gel and coatings processes reactive molecular dynamics simulations are used. A reactive force field was used (ReaxFF) to allow the chemical bonds in simulation to dynamically form and break. The force field parameters were optimized using a parallel optimization scheme with a combination of experimental information, and density functional theory calculations. Polycondensation of alkoxysilanes in mixtures of alcohol and water were studied. Steric effects were observed to influence the rates of hydrolysis and condensation in solutions containing different precursor monomers. By restricting the access of nucleophiles to the central silicon atom, the nucleation rate of siloxanes can be controlled. The influence of solution precursor, water, and methanol composition on reaction rates was explored. It was determined that

  18. Induction generator models in dynamic simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans; Akhmatov, Vladislav

    1999-01-01

    For AC network with large amount of induction generators (windmills) the paper demonstrates a significant discrepancy in the simulated voltage recovery after fault in weak networks when comparing dynamic and transient stability descriptions and the reasons of discrepancies are explained. It is fo......For AC network with large amount of induction generators (windmills) the paper demonstrates a significant discrepancy in the simulated voltage recovery after fault in weak networks when comparing dynamic and transient stability descriptions and the reasons of discrepancies are explained....... It is found to be possible to include a transient model in dynamic stability tools and, then, obtain correct results also in dynamic tools. The representation of the rotating system influences on the voltage recovery shape which is an important observation in case of windmills, where a heavy mill is connected...

  19. Modeling reactive scattering of F(2P) at a liquid squalane interface: a hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radak, Brian K; Yockel, Scott; Kim, Dongwook; Schatz, George C

    2009-07-01

    To better understand the reactivity of gases with liquid surfaces, experimentalists have recently probed the reactive scattering of atomic fluorine at the surface of liquid squalane (C(30)H(62)). In this paper we further this research by simulating this scattering process at collision energies of 0.5 and 1.0 eV using a hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics scheme. To model the structure of the liquid surface, classical molecular dynamics calculations were performed utilizing the OPLS-AA force field. During the F + squalane molecular dynamics simulation, QM/MM calculations are performed at every trajectory step by combining the MSINDO semiempirical Hamiltonian with OPLS-AA and using a dynamic partitioning of the atoms in the QM or MM regions via a "seed atom" method. This computational model provides a type of "on-the-fly" direct dynamics applicable to larger scale chemical processes that include the making/breaking of chemical bonds not available in standard force field models. Our results show that H abstraction is the only reactive scattering pathway and that most trajectories result in reactive scattering. Reaction statistics at the squalane surface are discussed, including variation of the results with incident angle and collision energy, and the probability of reaction as a function of carbon atom type, collision depth, and residence time. Product states, including angular distributions and final translational and rovibrational energies, are also considered and found to be significantly affected by the exothermic reaction energy for H abstraction. The vibrational distributions are in good agreement with recent experiments, but the rotational distributions are dominated by a nonthermal component while the experiments, which involve thermal incident energies, show comparable thermal and nonthermal contributions. Results for O + squalane at 1.0 eV, which we also present, show analogous comparisons with experiment, with OH vibrational distributions which are cold and

  20. A Dynamical Simulation Facility for Hybrid Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Back, A; Myers, M; Back, Allen; Guckenheimer, John; Myers, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: This paper establishes a general framework for describing hybrid dynamical systems which is particularly suitable for numerical simulation. In this context, the data structures used to describe the sets and functions which comprise the dynamical system are crucial since they provide the link between a natural mathematical formulation of a problem and the correct application of standard numerical algorithms. We describe a partial implementation of the design methodology and use this simulation tool for a specific control problem in robotics as an illustration of the utility of the approach for practical applications.

  1. Dynamics modeling and simulation of flexible airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwen

    The resurgence of airships has created a need for dynamics models and simulation capabilities of these lighter-than-air vehicles. The focus of this thesis is a theoretical framework that integrates the flight dynamics, structural dynamics, aerostatics and aerodynamics of flexible airships. The study begins with a dynamics model based on a rigid-body assumption. A comprehensive computation of aerodynamic effects is presented, where the aerodynamic forces and moments are categorized into various terms based on different physical effects. A series of prediction approaches for different aerodynamic effects are unified and applied to airships. The numerical results of aerodynamic derivatives and the simulated responses to control surface deflection inputs are verified by comparing to existing wind-tunnel and flight test data. With the validated aerodynamics and rigid-body modeling, the equations of motion of an elastic airship are derived by the Lagrangian formulation. The airship is modeled as a free-free Euler-Bernoulli beam and the bending deformations are represented by shape functions chosen as the free-free normal modes. In order to capture the coupling between the aerodynamic forces and the structural elasticity, local velocity on the deformed vehicle is used in the computation of aerodynamic forces. Finally, with the inertial, gravity, aerostatic and control forces incorporated, the dynamics model of a flexible airship is represented by a single set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The proposed model is implemented as a dynamics simulation program to analyze the dynamics characteristics of the Skyship-500 airship. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the influence of structural deformation on the aerodynamic forces and the dynamics behavior of the airship. The nonlinear equations of motion are linearized numerically for the purpose of frequency domain analysis and for aeroelastic stability analysis. The results from the latter for the

  2. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Carly W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Goto, D. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  3. Integrating molecular dynamics simulations with chemical probing experiments using SHAPE-FIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Hennelly, Scott P.; Schug, Alexander; Onuchic, Jose N.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2016-01-01

    Integration and calibration of molecular dynamics simulations with experimental data remains a challenging endeavor. We have developed a novel method to integrate chemical probing experiments with molecular simulations of RNA molecules by using a native structure-based model. Selective 2’-hydroxyl acylation by primer extension (SHAPE) characterizes the mobility of each residue in the RNA. Our method, SHAPE-FIT, automatically optimizes the potential parameters of the forcefield according to measured reactivities from SHAPE. The optimized parameter set allows simulations of dynamics highly consistent with SHAPE probing experiments. Such atomistic simulations, thoroughly grounded in experiment, can open a new window on RNA structure-function relations. PMID:25726467

  4. Photoisomerization and photodissociation dynamics of reactive free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bise, Ryan T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-08-01

    The photofragmentation pathways of chemically reactive free radicals have been examined using the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Measurements of the photodissociation cross-sections, product branching ratios, product state energy distributions, and angular distributions provide insight into the excited state potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic processes involved in the dissociation mechanisms. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of the predissociative $\\tilde{A}$2A1 and $\\tilde{B}$2A2 states of CH3S have been investigated. At all photon energies, CH3 + S(3Pj), was the main reaction channel. The translational energy distributions reveal resolved structure corresponding to vibrational excitation of the CH3 umbrella mode and the S(3Pj) fine-structure distribution from which the nature of the coupled repulsive surfaces is inferred. Dissociation rates are deduced from the photofragment angular distributions, which depend intimately on the degree of vibrational excitation in the C-S stretch. Nitrogen combustion radicals, NCN, CNN and HNCN have also been studied. For all three radicals, the elimination of molecular nitrogen is the primary reaction channel. Excitation to linear excited triplet and singlet electronic states of the NCN radical generates resolved vibrational structure of the N2 photofragment. The relatively low fragment rotational excitation suggests dissociation via a symmetric C2V transition state. Resolved vibrational structure of the N2 photofragment is also observed in the photodissociation of the HNCN radical. The fragment vibrational and rotational distributions broaden with increased excitation energy. Simple dissociation models suggest that the HNCN radical isomerizes to a cyclic intermediate (c-HCNN) which then dissociates via a tight cyclic

  5. Photoisomerization and photodissociation dynamics of reactive free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bise, Ryan T.

    2000-08-24

    The photofragmentation pathways of chemically reactive free radicals have been examined using the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Measurements of the photodissociation cross-sections, product branching ratios, product state energy distributions, and angular distributions provide insight into the excited state potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic processes involved in the dissociation mechanisms. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of the predissociative {tilde A}{sup 2}A{sub 1} and {tilde B}{sup 2}A{sub 2} states of CH{sub 3}S have been investigated. At all photon energies, CH{sub 3} + S({sup 3}P{sub j}), was the main reaction channel. The translational energy distributions reveal resolved structure corresponding to vibrational excitation of the CH{sub 3} umbrella mode and the S({sup 3}P{sub j}) fine-structure distribution from which the nature of the coupled repulsive surfaces is inferred. Dissociation rates are deduced from the photofragment angular distributions, which depend intimately on the degree of vibrational excitation in the C-S stretch. Nitrogen combustion radicals, NCN, CNN and HNCN have also been studied. For all three radicals, the elimination of molecular nitrogen is the primary reaction channel. Excitation to linear excited triplet and singlet electronic states of the NCN radical generates resolved vibrational structure of the N{sub 2} photofragment. The relatively low fragment rotational excitation suggests dissociation via a symmetric C{sub 2V} transition state. Resolved vibrational structure of the N{sub 2} photofragment is also observed in the photodissociation of the HNCN radical. The fragment vibrational and rotational distributions broaden with increased excitation energy. Simple dissociation models suggest that the HNCN radical isomerizes to a cyclic intermediate (c-HCNN) which then dissociates via a tight cyclic transition state. In contrast to the radicals mentioned above, resolved

  6. Towards Four-Flavour Dynamical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Herdoiza, Gregorio

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of physical effects from sea quarks has been one of the main advances in lattice QCD simulations over the last few years. We report on recent studies with four flavours of dynamical quarks and address some of the potential issues arising in this new setup. First results for physical observables in the light, strange and charm sectors are presented together with the status of dedicated simulations to perform the non-perturbative renormalisation in mass-independent schemes.

  7. Towards four-flavour dynamical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdoiza, Gregorio [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica e Inst. de Fiscia Teorica

    2011-03-15

    The inclusion of physical effects from sea quarks has been one of the main advances in lattice QCD simulations over the last few years. We report on recent studies with four flavours of dynamical quarks and address some of the potential issues arising in this new setup. First results for physical observables in the light, strange and charm sectors are presented together with the status of dedicated simulations to perform the non-perturbative renormalisation in mass-independent schemes. (orig.)

  8. Testing dynamic stabilisation in complex Langevin simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Attanasio, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Complex Langevin methods have been successfully applied in theories that suffer from a sign problem such as QCD with a chemical potential. We present and illustrate a novel method (dynamic stabilisation) that ensures that Complex Langevin simulations stay close to the SU(3) manifold, which lead to correct and improved results in the framework of pure Yang-Mills simulations and QCD in the limit of heavy quarks.

  9. Dynamic Reactive Power Compensation of Large Scale Wind Integrated Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rather, Zakir Hussain; Chen, Zhe; Thøgersen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Due to progressive displacement of conventional power plants by wind turbines, dynamic security of large scale wind integrated power systems gets significantly compromised. In this paper we first highlight the importance of dynamic reactive power support/voltage security in large scale wind...... integrated power systems with least presence of conventional power plants. Then we propose a mixed integer dynamic optimization based method for optimal dynamic reactive power allocation in large scale wind integrated power systems. One of the important aspects of the proposed methodology is that unlike...... static optimal power flow based approaches, the proposed method considers detailed system dynamics and wind turbine grid code fulfilment while optimizing the allocation of dynamic reactive power sources. We also argue that in large scale wind integrated power systems, i) better utilization of existing...

  10. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  11. Molecular dynamic simulations of ocular tablet dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Qian; Fadda, Hala M; Li, Chung; Paul, Daniel; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Zloh, Mire

    2013-11-25

    Small tablets for implantation into the subconjunctival space in the eye are being developed to inhibit scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). There is a need to evaluate drug dissolution at the molecular level to determine how the chemical structure of the active may correlate with dissolution in the nonsink conditions of the conjunctival space. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissolution process of tablets derived from two drugs that can inhibit fibrosis after GFS, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPi), ilomastat. The dissolution was simulated in the presence of simple point charge (SPC) water molecules, and the liquid turnover of the aqueous humor in the subconjunctival space was simulated by removal of the dissolved drug molecules at regular intervals and replacement by new water molecules. At the end of the simulation, the total molecular solvent accessible surface area of 5-FU tablets increased by 60 times more than that of ilomastat as a result of tablet swelling and release of molecules into solution. The tablet dissolution pattern shown in our molecular dynamic simulations tends to correlate with experimental release profiles. This work indicates that a series of molecular dynamic simulations can be used to predict the influence of the molecular properties of a drug on its dissolution profile and could be useful during preformulation where sufficient amounts of the drug are not always available to perform dissolution studies.

  12. Induction generator models in dynamic simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans; Akhmatov, Vladislav

    1999-01-01

    . It is found to be possible to include a transient model in dynamic stability tools and, then, obtain correct results also in dynamic tools. The representation of the rotating system influences on the voltage recovery shape which is an important observation in case of windmills, where a heavy mill is connected......For AC network with large amount of induction generators (windmills) the paper demonstrates a significant discrepancy in the simulated voltage recovery after fault in weak networks when comparing dynamic and transient stability descriptions and the reasons of discrepancies are explained...

  13. Exploring the conformational and reactive dynamics of biomolecules in solution using an extended version of the glycine reactive force field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monti, Susanna; Corozzi, Alessandro; Fristrup, Peter

    2013-01-01

    reported glycine parameters. This expansion consists of adding to the training set more than five hundred molecular systems, including all the amino acids and some short peptide structures, which have been investigated by means of quantum mechanical calculations. The performance of this ReaxFF protein...... force field on a relatively short time scale (500 ps) is validated by comparison with classical non-reactive simulations and experimental data of well characterized test cases, comprising capped amino acids, peptides, and small proteins, and reaction mechanisms connected to the pharmaceutical sector......In order to describe possible reaction mechanisms involving amino acids, and the evolution of the protonation state of amino acid side chains in solution, a reactive force field (ReaxFF-based description) for peptide and protein simulations has been developed as an expansion of the previously...

  14. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes Two distinguishing features of the discourse are solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty Matlab codes are presented and discussed for a broad...

  15. Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics: Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner. The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming. This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice. There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes. Two distinguishing features of the discourse are: solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty. Matlab codes are presented and discussed for ...

  16. Monte carlo simulation for soot dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo method termed Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is developed to simulate the soot dynamics. Detailed stochastic error analysis is provided. Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is coupled with the gas phase solver Chemkin II to simulate soot formation in a 1-D premixed burner stabilized flame. The simulated soot number density, volume fraction, and particle size distribution all agree well with the measurement available in literature. The origin of the bimodal distribution of particle size distribution is revealed with quantitative proof.

  17. FT-IR, FT-Raman and NMR characterization of 2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexyl quinoline-2-carboxylate and investigation of its reactive and optoelectronic properties by molecular dynamics simulations and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vidya V.; Fazal, Edakot; Mary, Y. Sheena; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Nagarajan, Subban; Van Alsenoy, C.

    2017-01-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of the synthesized compound, 2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexyl quinoline-2-carboxylate is recorded and analyzed. Optimized molecular structure, wave numbers, corresponding assignments regarding 2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexyl quinoline-2-carboxylate has become screened tentatively as well as hypothetically using Gaussian09 program package. Natural bonding orbital assessment has been completed with a reason to clarify charge transfer or conjugative interaction, the intra-molecular re-hybridization and delocalization of electron density within the molecule. The NMR spectral assessment had been made choosing structure property relationship by chemical shifts along with the magnetic shielding effects regarding the title compound. The first and second hyperpolarizabilities were calculated. The calculated first order hyperpolarizability is commensurate with the documented worth of very similar derivatives and could be an interesting object for more experiments on nonlinear optics. Local reactivity properties have been investigated using average local ionization energies and Fukui functions. Investigation of optoelectronic properties encompassed calculations of reorganization energies and hopping rates of charge carriers within the framework of Marcus semi-empiric approach. The docked ligand title compound forms a stable complex with CDK inhibitors and gives a binding affinity value of -9.7 kcal/mol and molecular docking results suggest that the compound might exhibit inhibitory activity against CDK inhibitors.

  18. Reactively and Anticipatory Behaving Agents for Artificial Life Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, Karel; Nahodil, Pavel

    2010-11-01

    Reactive behavior is still considered and the exact opposite for the anticipatory one. Despite the advances on the field of anticipation there are little thoughts on relation with the reactive behavior, the similarities and where the boundary is. In this article we will present our viewpoint and we will try to show that reactive and anticipatory behavior can be combined. This is the basic ground of our unified theory for anticipatory behavior architecture. We still miss such compact theory, which would integrate multiple aspects of anticipation. My multi-level anticipatory behavior approach is based on the current understanding of anticipation from both the artificial intelligence and biology point of view. As part of the explanation we will also elaborate on the topic of weak and strong artificial life. Anticipation is not matter of a single mechanism in a living organism. It was noted already that it happens on many different levels even in the very simple creatures. What we consider to be important for our work and what is our original though is that it happens even without voluntary control. We believe that this is novelty though for the anticipation theory. Naturally research of anticipation was in the beginning of this decade focused on the anticipatory principles bringing advances on the field itself. This allowed us to build on those, look at them from higher perspective, and use not one but multiple levels of anticipation in a creature design. This presents second original though and that is composition of the agent architecture that has anticipation built in almost every function. In this article we will focus only on first two levels within the 8-factor anticipation framework. We will introduce them as defined categories of anticipation and describe them from theory and implementation algorithm point of view. We will also present an experiment conducted, however this experiment serves more as explanatory example. These first two levels may seem trivial

  19. Object Oriented Modelling and Dynamical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens; Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin

    1998-01-01

    This report with appendix describes the work done in master project at DTU.The goal of the project was to develop a concept for simulation of dynamical systems based on object oriented methods.The result was a library of C++-classes, for use when both building componentbased models and when...

  20. Modeling the dynamics of Plasmodium vivax infection and hypnozoite reactivation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeshina I Adekunle

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of Plasmodium vivax infection is characterized by reactivation of hypnozoites at varying time intervals. The relative contribution of new P. vivax infection and reactivation of dormant liver stage hypnozoites to initiation of blood stage infection is unclear. In this study, we investigate the contribution of new inoculations of P. vivax sporozoites to primary infection versus reactivation of hypnozoites by modeling the dynamics of P. vivax infection in Thailand in patients receiving treatment for either blood stage infection alone (chloroquine, or the blood and liver stages of infection (chloroquine + primaquine. In addition, we also analysed rates of infection in a study in Papua New Guinea (PNG where patients were treated with either artesunate, or artesunate + primaquine. Our results show that up to 96% of the P. vivax infection is due to hypnozoite reactivation in individuals living in endemic areas in Thailand. Similar analysis revealed the around 70% of infections in the PNG cohort were due to hypnozoite reactivation. We show how the age of the cohort, primaquine drug failure, and seasonality may affect estimates of the ratio of primary P. vivax infection to hypnozoite reactivation. Modeling of P. vivax primary infection and hypnozoite reactivation provides important insights into infection dynamics, and suggests that 90-96% of blood stage infections arise from hypnozoite reactivation. Major differences in infection kinetics between Thailand and PNG suggest the likelihood of drug failure in PNG.

  1. Surrogate model approach for improving the performance of reactive transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatnieks, Janis; De Lucia, Marco; Sips, Mike; Dransch, Doris

    2016-04-01

    Reactive transport models can serve a large number of important geoscientific applications involving underground resources in industry and scientific research. It is common for simulation of reactive transport to consist of at least two coupled simulation models. First is a hydrodynamics simulator that is responsible for simulating the flow of groundwaters and transport of solutes. Hydrodynamics simulators are well established technology and can be very efficient. When hydrodynamics simulations are performed without coupled geochemistry, their spatial geometries can span millions of elements even when running on desktop workstations. Second is a geochemical simulation model that is coupled to the hydrodynamics simulator. Geochemical simulation models are much more computationally costly. This is a problem that makes reactive transport simulations spanning millions of spatial elements very difficult to achieve. To address this problem we propose to replace the coupled geochemical simulation model with a surrogate model. A surrogate is a statistical model created to include only the necessary subset of simulator complexity for a particular scenario. To demonstrate the viability of such an approach we tested it on a popular reactive transport benchmark problem that involves 1D Calcite transport. This is a published benchmark problem (Kolditz, 2012) for simulation models and for this reason we use it to test the surrogate model approach. To do this we tried a number of statistical models available through the caret and DiceEval packages for R, to be used as surrogate models. These were trained on randomly sampled subset of the input-output data from the geochemical simulation model used in the original reactive transport simulation. For validation we use the surrogate model to predict the simulator output using the part of sampled input data that was not used for training the statistical model. For this scenario we find that the multivariate adaptive regression splines

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of magnetized dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben; Wilms, Jochen

    2012-10-01

    The combination of the electric field that confines a dust cloud with a static magnetic field generally leads to a rotation of the dust cloud. In weak magnetic fields, the Hall component of the ion flow exerts a drag force that sets the dust in rotation. We have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of the dynamics of torus-shaped dust clouds in anodic plasmas. The stationary flow [1] is characterized by a shell structure in the laminar dust flow and by the spontaneous formation of a shear-flow around a stationary vortex. Here we present new results on dynamic phenomena, among them fluctuations due to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear-flow. The simulations are compared with experimental results. [4pt] [1] T. Reichstein, A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 18, 083705 (2011)

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Janus Particle Dynamics in Uniform Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Archereau, Aurelien Y M; Willmott, Geoff R

    2016-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the dynamics of Janus particles, micro- or nanoparticles which are not spherically symmetric, in the uniform flow of a simple liquid. In particular we consider spheres with an asymmetry in the solid-liquid interaction over their surfaces and calculate the forces and torques experienced by the particles as a function of their orientation with respect to the flow. We also examine particles that are deformed slightly from a spherical shape. We compare the simulation results to the predictions of a previously introduced theoretical approach, which computes the forces and torques on particles with variable slip lengths or aspherical deformations that are much smaller than the particle radius. We find that there is good agreement between the forces and torques computed from our simulations and the theoretical predictions, when the slip condition is applied to the first layer of liquid molecules adjacent to the surface.

  4. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes span a huge range of length and time scales from the molecular to the near-macroscopic. Understanding how effects on one scale influence, and are themselves influenced by, those on lower and higher scales is a critical issue for the construction of models in Systems Biology....... Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle...... soon be coupled to Mass Action models allowing the parameters in such models to be continuously tuned according to the finer resolution simulation. This will help realize the goal of a computational cellular simulation that is able to capture the dynamics of membrane-associated processes...

  5. Computer simulation of confined liquid crystal dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, R E

    2001-01-01

    are performed of the formation of structures in confined smectic systems where layer tilt is induced by an imposed surface pretilt. Results show that bookshelf, chevron and tilled layer structures are observable in a confined Gay-Berne system. The formation and stability of the chevron structure are shown to be influenced by surface slip. Results are presented from a series of simulations undertaken to determine whether dynamic processes observed in device-scale liquid crystal cells confined between aligning substrates can be simulated in a molecular system using parallel molecular dynamics of the Gay-Berne model. In a nematic cell, on removal of an aligning field, initial near-surface director relaxation can induce flow, termed 'backflow' in the liquid. This, in turn, can cause director rotation, termed 'orientational kickback', in the centre of the cell. Simulations are performed of the relaxation in nematic systems confined between substrates with a common alignment on removal of an aligning field. Results...

  6. Dynamic Ligand Reactivity in a Rhodium Pincer Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Zhou; Otten, Edwin; Reek, Joost N H; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; de Bruin, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Ligand cooperativity provides (transition) metal complexes with new reactivities in substrate activation and catalytic reactions, but usually the ligand acts as an internal (Brønsted) base, while the metal acts as a (Lewis) acid. We describe the synthesis and stepwise activation of a new phosphane-p

  7. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinglong; Feixas, Ferran; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-07-30

    Folding of four fast-folding proteins, including chignolin, Trp-cage, villin headpiece and WW domain, was simulated via accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD). In comparison with hundred-of-microsecond timescale conventional molecular dynamics (cMD) simulations performed on the Anton supercomputer, aMD captured complete folding of the four proteins in significantly shorter simulation time. The folded protein conformations were found within 0.2-2.1 Å of the native NMR or X-ray crystal structures. Free energy profiles calculated through improved reweighting of the aMD simulations using cumulant expansion to the second-order are in good agreement with those obtained from cMD simulations. This allows us to identify distinct conformational states (e.g., unfolded and intermediate) other than the native structure and the protein folding energy barriers. Detailed analysis of protein secondary structures and local key residue interactions provided important insights into the protein folding pathways. Furthermore, the selections of force fields and aMD simulation parameters are discussed in detail. Our work shows usefulness and accuracy of aMD in studying protein folding, providing basic references in using aMD in future protein-folding studies.

  8. Optimal Reactivity and Improved Self-Healing Capability of Structurally Dynamic Polymers Grafted on Janus Nanoparticles Governed by Chain Stiffness and Spatial Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoxi; Huang, Zihan; Chen, Pengyu; Cui, Tianqi; Zhang, Xinghua; Miao, Bing; Yan, Li-Tang

    2017-04-01

    Structurally dynamic polymers are recognized as a key potential to revolutionize technologies ranging from design of self-healing materials to numerous biomedical applications. Despite intense research in this area, optimizing reactivity and thereby improving self-healing ability at the most fundamental level pose urgent issue for wider applications of such emerging materials. Here, the authors report the first mechanistic investigation of the fundamental principle for the dependence of reactivity and self-healing capabilities on the properties inherent to dynamic polymers by combining large-scale computer simulation, theoretical analysis, and experimental discussion. The results allow to reveal how chain stiffness and spatial organization regulate reactivity of dynamic polymers grafted on Janus nanoparticles and mechanically mediated reaction in their reverse chemistry, and, particularly, identify that semiflexible dynamic polymers possess the optimal reactivity and self-healing ability. The authors also develop an analytical model of blob theory of polymer chains to complement the simulation results and reveal essential scaling laws for optimal reactivity. The findings offer new insights into the physical mechanism in various systems involving reverse/dynamic chemistry. These studies highlight molecular engineering of polymer architecture and intrinsic property as a versatile strategy in control over the structural responses and functionalities of emerging materials with optimized self-healing capabilities. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Atomic dynamics of alumina melt: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Jahn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The atomic dynamics of Al2O3 melt are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The particle interactions are described by an advanced ionic interaction model that includes polarization effects and ionic shape deformations. The model has been shown to reproduce accurately the static structure factors S(Q from neutron and x-ray diffraction and the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω from inelastic x-ray scattering. Analysis of the partial dynamic structure factors shows inelastic features in the spectra up to momentum transfers, Q, close to the principal peaks of partial static structure factors. The broadening of the Brillouin line widths is discussed in terms of a frequency dependent viscosity η(ω.

  10. CFD-based turbulent reactive flow simulations of power plant plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, K. Max

    2017-02-01

    This paper examined the capabilities of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques in modeling the transport and chemical transformation of power plant plumes. Based on turbulence characteristics, we divided the plume evolution into two stages. The first stage is referred to as the jet-dominated region (JDR), characterized by a high momentum jet flow of flue gas. The second stage is referred to as the ambient-dominated region (ADR), driven by atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. Then, we compared the three methods in simulating plume transport in the JDR, i.e., Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model with velocity inlet (RANS-VI), RANS with volume source (RANS-VS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The VI method treats the stack exit as a surface inlet to the simulation domain, while the VS method defines a volume region containing the source with a specific emission rate. Our evaluation against a relevant wind tunnel experiment suggested that RANS-VI is most appropriate for power plant plume transport in the JDR. LES can achieve more accurate results, but the improvement in accuracy over RANS-VI may not justify its high computational costs. Nevertheless, LES is still preferable for JDR simulations if computational costs are not a constraint. The VS method requires refined mesh in the source region in order to achieve accurate results, making it no different from the VI method in the JDR. Next, for our ADR evaluation, we simulated plume chemical evolution in a well-characterized 1999 TVA Cumberland aircraft plume transect field study. RANS-VS was adopted, as proper RANS-VI and LES simulations would be exceedingly expensive in terms of computational costs. The overall model performance was satisfactory, evinced by the predicted concentrations of SO2, O3, NOx as well as NO2/NOx ratios fell within the variations in the observed values for large portions of the plume distributions. An indirect JDR evaluation by comparing the predicted plume centerline

  11. Dynamic Simulation of the Harvester Boom Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Shen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the complete dynamic calculation method, the layout, force, and strength of harvester boom cylinders were designed and calculated. Closed simulations for the determination of the dynamic responses of the harvester boom during luffing motion considering the cylinder drive system and luffing angle position control have been realized. Using the ADAMS mechanical system dynamics analysis software, six different arm poses were selected and simulated based on the cylinder as the analysis object. A flexible model of the harvester boom luffing motion has been established. The movement of the oil cylinder under different conditions were analyzed, and the main operation dimensions of the harvester boom and the force condition of the oil cylinder were obtained. The calculation results show that the dynamic responses of the boom are more sensitive to the luffing acceleration, in comparison with the luffing velocity. It is seen that this method is very effective and convenient for boom luffing simulation. It is also reasonable to see that the extension of the distance of the bottom of the boom is shortened by adjusting the initial state of the boom in the working process, which can also effectively reduce the workload of the boom—thus improving the mechanical efficiency.

  12. Mesoscopic Simulation Methods for Polymer Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    We assess the accuracy and efficiency of mesoscopic simulation methods, namely Brownian Dynamics (BD), Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRD) and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD), for polymers in solution at equilibrium and in flows in microfluidic geometries. Both SRD and DPD use solvent ``particles'' to carry momentum, and so account automatically for hydrodynamic interactions both within isolated polymer coils, and with other polymer molecules and with nearby solid boundaries. We assess quantitatively the effects of artificial particle inertia and fluid compressibility and show that they can be made small with appropriate choice of simulation parameters. We then use these methods to study flow-induced migration of polymer chains produced by: 1) hydrodynamic interactions, 2) streamline curvature or stress-gradients, and 3) convection of wall depletion zones. We show that huge concentration gradients can be produced by these mechanisms in microfluidic geometries that can be exploited for separation of polymers by size in periodic contraction-expansion geometries. We also assess the range of conditions for which BD, SRD or DPD is preferable for mesoscopic simulations. Finally, we show how such methods can be used to simulate quantitatively the swimming of micro-organisms such as E. coli. In collaboration with Lei Jiang and Tongyang Zhao, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  13. Anomalous strain effect on the thermal conductivity of borophene: a reactive molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Le, Minh-Quy; Rabczuk, Timon; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.

    2017-09-01

    Borophene, an atomically thin, corrugated, crystalline two-dimensional boron sheet, has been recently synthesized. Here we investigate mechanical properties and lattice thermal conductivity of borophene using reactive molecular dynamics simulations. We performed uniaxial tensile strain simulations at room temperature along in-plane directions, and found 2D elastic moduli of 188 N m-1 and 403 N m-1 along zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. This anisotropy is attributed to the buckling of the borophene structure along the zigzag direction. We also performed non-equilibrium molecular dynamics to calculate the lattice thermal conductivity. Considering its size-dependence, we predict room-temperature lattice thermal conductivities of 75.9 ± 5.0 W m-1 K-1 and 147 ± 7.3 W m-1 K-1, respectively, and estimate effective phonon mean free paths of 16.7 ± 1.7 nm and 21.4 ± 1.0 nm for the zigzag and armchair directions. In this case, the anisotropy is attributed to differences in the density of states of low-frequency phonons, with lower group velocities and possibly shorten phonon lifetimes along the zigzag direction. We also observe that when borophene is strained along the armchair direction there is a significant increase in thermal conductivity along that direction. Meanwhile, when the sample is strained along the zigzag direction there is a much smaller increase in thermal conductivity along that direction. For a strain of 8% along the armchair direction the thermal conductivity increases by a factor of 3.5 (250%), whereas for the same amount of strain along the zigzag direction the increase is only by a factor of 1.2 (20%). Our predictions are in agreement with recent first principles results, at a fraction of the computational cost. The simulations shall serve as a guide for experiments concerning mechanical and thermal properties of borophene and related 2D materials.

  14. Computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics around cations and anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-03-03

    In this paper, we present the first computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics between the first and second solvation shells around different cations and anions. After water, methanol is the most frequently used solvent for ions. Methanol has different structural and dynamical properties than water, so its ion solvation process is different. To this end, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable potential models to describe methanol-methanol and ion-methanol interactions. In particular, we computed methanol exchange rates by employing the transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux approach, and the Grote-Hynes theory. We observed that methanol exchange occurs at a nanosecond time scale for Na+ and at a picosecond time scale for other ions. We also observed a trend in which, for like charges, the exchange rate is slower for smaller ions because they are more strongly bound to methanol. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  15. Modeling Of A Reactive Distillation Column: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (Mtbe Simulation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mohd Saaid Abdul Rahman Mohamed and Subhash Bhatia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A process simulation stage-wise reactive distillation column model formulated from equilibrium stage theory was developed. The algorithm for solving mathematical model represented by sets of differential-algebraic equations was based on relaxation method. Numerical integration scheme based on backward differentiation formula was selected for solving the stiffness of differential-algebraic equations. Simulations were performed on a personal computer (PC Pentium processor through a developed computer program using FORTRAN90 programming language. The proposed model was validated by comparing the simulated results with the published simulation results and with the pilot plant data from the literature. The model was capable of predicting high isobutene conversion for heterogeneous system, as desirable in industrial MTBE production process. The comparisons on temperature profiles, liquid composition profile and operating conditions of reactive distillation column also showed promising results. Therefore the proposed model can be used as a tool for the development and simulation of reactive distillation column.Keywords: Modeling, simulation, reactive distillation, relaxation method, equilibrium stage, heterogeneous, MTBE

  16. Hybrid finite-volume/transported PDF method for the simulation of turbulent reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Venkatramanan

    A novel computational scheme is formulated for simulating turbulent reactive flows in complex geometries with detailed chemical kinetics. A Probability Density Function (PDF) based method that handles the scalar transport equation is coupled with an existing Finite Volume (FV) Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver. The PDF formulation leads to closed chemical source terms and facilitates the use of detailed chemical mechanisms without approximations. The particle-based PDF scheme is modified to handle complex geometries and grid structures. Grid-independent particle evolution schemes that scale linearly with the problem size are implemented in the Monte-Carlo PDF solver. A novel algorithm, in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) is employed to ensure tractability of complex chemistry involving a multitude of species. Several non-reacting test cases are performed to ascertain the efficiency and accuracy of the method. Simulation results from a turbulent jet-diffusion flame case are compared against experimental data. The effect of micromixing model, turbulence model and reaction scheme on flame predictions are discussed extensively. Finally, the method is used to analyze the Dow Chlorination Reactor. Detailed kinetics involving 37 species and 158 reactions as well as a reduced form with 16 species and 21 reactions are used. The effect of inlet configuration on reactor behavior and product distribution is analyzed. Plant-scale reactors exhibit quenching phenomena that cannot be reproduced by conventional simulation methods. The FV-PDF method predicts quenching accurately and provides insight into the dynamics of the reactor near extinction. The accuracy of the fractional time-stepping technique in discussed in the context of apparent multiple-steady states observed in a non-premixed feed configuration of the chlorination reactor.

  17. Dynamics and Kinetics Study of "In-Water" Chemical Reactions by Enhanced Sampling of Reactive Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Y Isaac; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-11-12

    High potential energy barriers and engagement of solvent coordinates set challenges for in silico studies of chemical reactions, and one is quite commonly limited to study reactions along predefined reaction coordinate(s). A systematic protocol, QM/MM MD simulations using enhanced sampling of reactive trajectories (ESoRT), is established to quantitatively study chemical transitions in complex systems. A number of trajectories for Claisen rearrangement in water and toluene were collected and analyzed, respectively. Evidence was found that the bond making and breaking during this reaction are concerted processes in solutions, preferentially through a chairlike configuration. Water plays an important dynamic role that helps stabilize the transition sate, and the dipole-dipole interaction between water and the solute also lowers the transition barrier. The calculated rate coefficient is consistent with the experimental measurement. Compared with water, the reaction pathway in toluene is "narrower" and the reaction rate is slower by almost three orders of magnitude due to the absence of proper interactions to stabilize the transition state. This study suggests that the "in-water" nature of the Claisen rearrangement in aqueous solution influences its thermodynamics, kinetics, as well as dynamics.

  18. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  19. The design and simulation of TCR(thyristor control reactor) reactive power compensation system based on Arene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-fang; ZHANG Li; JIANG Jian-guo; WANG Ru-lin

    2004-01-01

    Inevitably, the question of reactive power compensation was aroused by applied of power electronics. Based on the study of the instantaneous reactive power theory, the designs of TCR(thyristor control reactor) thyristor control reactor reactive power compensation system and TCR single closed loop strategy was proposed. In addition, as digital simulation software, Arene was applied to simulate the Jining coal mine No.2 system. The simulation results validate that the design is effective to improve power factor and stabilization of the system.

  20. Simulation of Gas-Surface Dynamical Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Brenig, Z. Phys. B 36, 81 (1979). [39] J. Böheim and W. Brenig, Z. Phys. B 41, 243 (1981). [40] G. B. Arfken and H. J. Weber, Mathematical Methods for...excitation of the substrate have to be taken into account. In this lecture, the quantum and classical methods required for the simulation of gas-surface...well-defined conditions [2]. In this chapter, I will briefly review the theoretical methods necessary to determine the dynamics of processes at surfaces

  1. Study of Nanowires Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Monk, Joshua D

    2007-01-01

    In this dissertation I present computational studies that focus on the unique characteristics of metallic nanowires. We generated virtual nanowires of nanocrystalline nickel (nc-Ni) and single crystalline silver (Ag) in order to investigate particular nanoscale effects. Three-dimensional atomistic molecular dynamics studies were performed for each sample using the super computer System X located at Virginia Tech. Thermal grain growth simulations were performed on 4 nm grain size nc-Ni by o...

  2. Dynamic simulation of flywheel-type fuses

    OpenAIRE

    Editorial Office

    1996-01-01

    Rounds of ammunition are normally armed with a fuse. In this study, a fuse is developed which uses a flywheel-type mechanism controlled by time or distance. Due to its simplicity of operation and construction, the concept is expected to have high reliabil­ity. The dynamic response of all the components of this flywheel-type fuse is mathematically modelled. Simulation software was developed which connects the mathematical models of the various components. With the definition of boundary value...

  3. IGCC Dynamic Simulator and Training Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitney, S.E.; Erbes, M.R. (Enginomix, LLC)

    2006-10-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is emerging as the technology of choice for providing clean, low-cost electricity for the next generation of coal-fired power plants and will play a central role in the development of high-efficiency, zero-emissions power plants such as FutureGen. Several major utilities and developers recently announced plans to build IGCC plants and other major utilities are evaluating IGCC’s suitability for base-load capacity additions. This recent surge of attention to IGCC power generation is creating a growing demand for experience with the analysis, operation, and control of commercial-scale IGCC plants. To meet this need, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a project to develop a generic, full-scope, IGCC dynamic plant simulator for use in establishing a state-of-the-art simulator training center at West Virginia University’s (WVU) National Research Center for Coal and Energy (NRCCE). The IGCC Dynamic Simulator & Training (DS&T) Center will be established under the auspices of the Collaboratory for Process & Dynamic Systems Modeling (“Collaboratory”) organized between NETL, WVU, the University of Pittsburgh, and Carnegie Mellon University.

  4. SIMULATION OF INTERLINE DYNAMIC VOLTAGE RESTORER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Singaravelan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach for the dynamic control of a current source inverter (CSI using Super Conductive Magnetic energy storage (SMES based Interline DVR. The dynamic voltage restorer (DVR provides a technically advanced and economical solution to voltage-sag problem. As the voltage-restoration process involves the real-power injection into the distribution system, the capability ofa DVR, especially for compensating long-duration voltage sags, it depends on the energy storage capacity of the DVR. The interline DVR proposed in this paper provides a way to replenish Dc-link energy storage dynamically. The IDVR consists of several DVRs connected to different distribution feeders in the power system. The DVRs in the IDVR system shares the common energy storage. When one of the DVRcompensates for voltage sag appearing in that feeder, the other DVRs replenish the energy in the common dc-link dynamically. Thus, one DVR in the IDVR system works in voltage-sag compensation mode whilethe other DVRs in the IDVR system operate in power-flow control mode. The proposed topology is simulated using Matlab/Simulink and total IDVR system is simulated using Matlab/Simulink.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Network Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabold, David A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction and Background * History and use of MD * The role of the potential * Scope of the method * Use of a priori information * Appraising a model * MD Method * Equations of motion * Energy minimization and equilibration * Deeper or global minima * Simulated annealing * Genetic algorithms * Activation-relaxation technique * Alternate dynamics * Modeling infinite systems: Periodic boundary conditions * The Interatomic Interactions * Overview * Empirical classical potentials * Potentials from electronic structure * The tight-binding method * Approximate methods based on tight-binding * First principles * Local basis: "ab initio tight binding" * Plane-waves: Car-Parrinello methods * Efficient ab initio methods for large systems * The need for locality of electron states in real space * Avoiding explicit orthogonalization * Connecting Simulation to Experiment * Structure * Network dynamics * Computing the harmonic modes * Dynamical autocorrelation functions * Dynamical structure factor * Electronic structure * Density of states * Thermal modulation of the electron states * Transport * Applications * g-GeSe2 * g-GexSe1-x glasses * Amorphous carbon surface * Where to Get Codes to Get Started * Acknowledgments * References

  6. Hybrid molecular dynamics simulation for plasma induced damage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukuma, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable further device size reduction (also known as Moore's law) and improved power performance, the semiconductor industry is introducing new materials and device structures into the semiconductor fabrication process. Materials now include III-V compounds, germanium, cobalt, ruthenium, hafnium, and others. The device structure in both memory and logic has been evolving from planar to three dimensional (3D). One such device is the FinFET, where the transistor gate is a vertical fin made either of silicon, silicon-germanium or germanium. These changes have brought renewed interests in the structural damages caused by energetic ion bombardment of the fin sidewalls which are exposed to the ion flux from the plasma during the fin-strip off step. Better control of the physical damage of the 3D devices requires a better understanding of the damage formation mechanisms on such new materials and structures. In this study, the damage formation processes by ion bombardment have been simulated for Si and Ge substrate by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid simulations and compared to the results from the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In our QM/MM simulations, the highly reactive region in which the structural damage is created is simulated with the Density Functional based Tight Binding (DFTB) method and the region remote from the primary region is simulated using classical MD with the Stillinger-Weber and Moliere potentials. The learn on the fly method is also used to reduce the computational load. Hence our QM/MM simulation is much faster than the full QC-MD simulations and the original QM/MM simulations. The amorphous layers profile simulated with QM/MM have obvious differences in their thickness for silicon and germanium substrate. The profile of damaged structure in the germanium substrate is characterized by a deeper tail then in silicon. These traits are also observed in the results from the mass selected ion beam

  7. Dynamic simulator for PEFC propulsion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraide, Masataka; Kaneda, Eiichi; Sato, Takao [Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This report covers part of a joint study on a PEFC propulsion system for surface ships, summarized in a presentation to this Seminar, entitled {open_quote}Study on a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) Propulsion System for Surface Ships{close_quotes}, and which envisages application to a 1,500 DWT cargo vessel. The work presented here focuses on a simulation study on PEFC propulsion plant performance, and particularly on the system response to changes in load. Using a dynamic simulator composed of system components including fuel cell, various simulations were executed, to examine the performance of the system as a whole and of the individual system components under quick and large load changes such as occasioned by maneuvering operations and by racing when the propeller emerges above water in heavy sea.

  8. Nanodrop contact angles from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravipati, Srikanth; Aymard, Benjamin; Yatsyshin, Petr; Galindo, Amparo; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    The contact angle between three phases being in thermodynamic equilibrium is highly sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular forces as well as to various fluctuation effects. Determining the Young contact angle of a sessile drop sitting on a substrate from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is a highly non-trivial task. Most commonly employed methods for finding droplet contact angles from MD simulation data either require large numbers of particles or are system-dependent. We propose a systematic geometry based methodology for extracting the contact angle from simulated sessile droplets by analysing an appropriately coarse-grained density field. To demonstrate the method, we consider Lennard-Jones (LJ) and SPC/E water nanodroplets of different sizes sitting on planar LJ walls. Our results are in good agreement with Young contact angle values computed employing test-area perturbation method.

  9. Classical molecular dynamics simulation on the dynamical properties of H2 on silicene layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casuyac Miqueas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the diffusion of hydrogen molecule physisorbed on the surface of silicene nanoribbon (SiNRusing the classical molecular dynamic (MD simulation in LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator. The interactions between silicon atoms are modeled using the modified Tersoff potential, the Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order (AIREBO potential for hydrogen – hydrogen interaction and the Lennard – Jones potential for the physisorbed H2 on SiNR. By varying the temperatures (60 K Δ 130 K, we observed that the Δxdisplacement of H2 on the surface SiNR shows a Brownian motion on a Lennard-Jones potential and a Gaussian probability distribution can be plotted describing the diffusion of H2. The calculated mean square displacement (MSD was approximately increasing in time and the activation energy barrier for diffusion has been found to be 43.23meV.

  10. Dynamic simulation of regulatory networks using SQUAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenarios Ioannis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ambition of most molecular biologists is the understanding of the intricate network of molecular interactions that control biological systems. As scientists uncover the components and the connectivity of these networks, it becomes possible to study their dynamical behavior as a whole and discover what is the specific role of each of their components. Since the behavior of a network is by no means intuitive, it becomes necessary to use computational models to understand its behavior and to be able to make predictions about it. Unfortunately, most current computational models describe small networks due to the scarcity of kinetic data available. To overcome this problem, we previously published a methodology to convert a signaling network into a dynamical system, even in the total absence of kinetic information. In this paper we present a software implementation of such methodology. Results We developed SQUAD, a software for the dynamic simulation of signaling networks using the standardized qualitative dynamical systems approach. SQUAD converts the network into a discrete dynamical system, and it uses a binary decision diagram algorithm to identify all the steady states of the system. Then, the software creates a continuous dynamical system and localizes its steady states which are located near the steady states of the discrete system. The software permits to make simulations on the continuous system, allowing for the modification of several parameters. Importantly, SQUAD includes a framework for perturbing networks in a manner similar to what is performed in experimental laboratory protocols, for example by activating receptors or knocking out molecular components. Using this software we have been able to successfully reproduce the behavior of the regulatory network implicated in T-helper cell differentiation. Conclusion The simulation of regulatory networks aims at predicting the behavior of a whole system when subject

  11. A simple dynamic model and transient simulation of the nuclear power reactor on microcomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yang Gee; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A simple dynamic model is developed for the transient simulation of the nuclear power reactor. The dynamic model includes the normalized neutron kinetics model with reactivity feedback effects and the core thermal-hydraulics model. The main objective of this paper demonstrates the capability of the developed dynamic model to simulate various important variables of interest for a nuclear power reactor transient. Some representative results of transient simulations show the expected trends in all cases, even though no available data for comparison. In this work transient simulations are performed on a microcomputer using the DESIRE/N96T continuous system simulation language which is applicable to nuclear power reactor transient analysis. 3 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of annealed ZnO surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    The effect of thermally annealing a slab of wurtzite ZnO, terminated by two surfaces, (0001) (which is oxygen-terminated) and (0001{sup ¯}) (which is Zn-terminated), is investigated via molecular dynamics simulation by using reactive force field (ReaxFF). We found that upon heating beyond a threshold temperature of ∼700 K, surface oxygen atoms begin to sublimate from the (0001) surface. The ratio of oxygen leaving the surface at a given temperature increases as the heating temperature increases. A range of phenomena occurring at the atomic level on the (0001) surface has also been explored, such as formation of oxygen dimers on the surface and evolution of partial charge distribution in the slab during the annealing process. It was found that the partial charge distribution as a function of the depth from the surface undergoes a qualitative change when the annealing temperature is above the threshold temperature.

  13. INCORPORATING DYNAMIC 3D SIMULATION INTO PRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R Prescott; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    provide superior results and insights. We also couple the state model with the dynamic 3D simulation analysis representing events (such as flooding) to determine which (if any) components fail. Not only does the simulation take into account any failed items from the state model, but any failures caused by the simulation are incorporated back into the state model and factored into the overall results. Using this method we incorporate accurate 3D simulation results, eliminate static-based PRA issues, and have time ordered failure information.

  14. Monoamine transporters: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eGrouleff

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human monoamine transporters facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the monoamine transporters is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The monoamine transporters are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the monoamine transporters, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors.

  15. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  16. Extensions to Dynamic System Simulation of Fissile Solution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bernardin, John David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Previous reports have documented the results of applying dynamic system simulation (DSS) techniques to model a variety of fissile solution systems. The SUPO (Super Power) aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) was chosen as the benchmark for comparison of model results to experimental data for steadystate operation.1 Subsequently, DSS was applied to additional AHR to verify results obtained for SUPO and extend modeling to prompt critical excursions, ramp reactivity insertions of various magnitudes and rate, and boiling operations in SILENE and KEWB (Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler).2 Additional models for pressurized cores (HRE: Homogeneous Reactor Experiment), annular core geometries, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADAHR) were developed and results reported.3 The focus of each of these models is core dynamics; neutron kinetics, thermal hydraulics, radiolytic gas generation and transport are coupled to examine the time-based evolution of these systems from start-up through transition to steady-state. A common characteristic of these models is the assumption that (a) core cooling system inlet temperature and flow and (b) plenum gas inlet pressure and flow are held constant; no external (to core) component operations that may result in dynamic change to these parameters are considered. This report discusses extension of models to include explicit reference to cooling structures and radiolytic gas handling. The accelerator-driven subcritical generic system model described in References 3 and 4 is used as a basis for this extension.

  17. Voronoi Diagram Based Optimization of Dynamic Reactive Power Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Weihong [University of Tennessee (UT); Sun, Kai [University of Tennessee (UT); Qi, Junjian [University of Tennessee (UT); Xu, Yan [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic var sources can effectively mitigate fault-induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) issues or even voltage collapse. This paper proposes a new approach to optimization of the sizes of dynamic var sources at candidate locations by a Voronoi diagram based algorithm. It first disperses sample points of potential solutions in a searching space, evaluates a cost function at each point by barycentric interpolation for the subspaces around the point, and then constructs a Voronoi diagram about cost function values over the entire space. Accordingly, the final optimal solution can be obtained. Case studies on the WSCC 9-bus system and NPCC 140-bus system have validated that the new approach can quickly identify the boundary of feasible solutions in searching space and converge to the global optimal solution.

  18. Allosteric dynamics of SAMHD1 studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, K. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-10-01

    SAMHD1 is a human cellular enzyme that blocks HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells and non-cycling CD4+T cells. The enzyme is an allosterically regulated triphosphohydrolase that modulates the level of cellular dNTP. The virus restriction is attributed to the lowering of the pool of dNTP in the cell to a point where reverse-transcription is impaired. Mutations in SAMHD1 are also implicated in Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome. A mechanistic understanding of the allosteric activation of the enzyme is still elusive. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the allosteric site dynamics of the protein and to examine the connection between the stability of the tetrameric complex and the Allosite occupancy.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynin, Andrey

    2014-03-01

    Polyelectrolytes are polymers with ionizable groups. In polar solvents, these groups dissociate releasing counterions into solution and leaving uncompensated charges on the polymer backbone. Examples of polyelectrolytes include biopolymers such as DNA and RNA, and synthetic polymers such as poly(styrene sulfonate) and poly(acrylic acids). In this talk I will discuss recent molecular dynamics simulations of static and dynamic properties of polyelectrolyte solutions. These simulations show that in dilute and semidilute polyelectrolyte solutions the electrostatic induced chain persistence length scales with the solution ionic strength as I - 1 / 2. This dependence of the chain persistence length is due to counterion condensation on the polymer backbone. In dilute polyelectrolyte solutions the chain size decreases with increasing the salt concentration as R ~ I- 1 / 5. This is in agreement with the scaling of the chain persistence length on the solution ionic strength, lp ~ I- 1 / 2. In semidilute solution regime at low salt concentrations the chain size decreases with increasing polymer concentration, R ~ cp-1 / 4 . While at high salt concentrations one observes a weaker dependence of the chain size on the solution ionic strength, R ~ I- 1 / 8. Analysis of the simulation data throughout the studied salt and polymer concentration ranges shows that there exist general scaling relations between multiple quantities X (I) in salt solutions and corresponding quantities X (I0) in salt-free solutions, X (I) = X (I0) (I /I0) β . The exponent β = -1/2 for chain persistence length lp , β = 1/4 for solution correlation length, β = -1/5 and β = -1/8 for chain size R in dilute and semidilute solution regimes respectively. Furthermore, the analysis of the spectrum and of the relaxation times of Rouse modes confirms existence of the single length scale (correlation length) that controls both static and dynamic properties of semidilute polyelectrolyte solutions. These findings

  20. Traffic flow dynamics data, models and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Treiber, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This textbook provides a comprehensive and instructive coverage of vehicular traffic flow dynamics and modeling. It makes this fascinating interdisciplinary topic, which to date was only documented in parts by specialized monographs, accessible to a broad readership. Numerous figures and problems with solutions help the reader to quickly understand and practice the presented concepts. This book is targeted at students of physics and traffic engineering and, more generally, also at students and professionals in computer science, mathematics, and interdisciplinary topics. It also offers material for project work in programming and simulation at college and university level. The main part, after presenting different categories of traffic data, is devoted to a mathematical description of the dynamics of traffic flow, covering macroscopic models which describe traffic in terms of density, as well as microscopic many-particle models in which each particle corresponds to a vehicle and its driver. Focus chapters on ...

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of classical stopping power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Paul E; Surh, Michael P; Richards, David F; Graziani, Frank R; Murillo, Michael S

    2013-11-22

    Molecular dynamics can provide very accurate tests of classical kinetic theory; for example, unambiguous comparisons can be made for classical particles interacting via a repulsive 1/r potential. The plasma stopping power problem, of great interest in its own right, provides an especially stringent test of a velocity-dependent transport property. We have performed large-scale (~10(4)-10(6) particles) molecular dynamics simulations of charged-particle stopping in a classical electron gas that span the weak to moderately strong intratarget coupling regimes. Projectile-target coupling is varied with projectile charge and velocity. Comparisons are made with disparate kinetic theories (both Boltzmann and Lenard-Balescu classes) and fully convergent theories to establish regimes of validity. We extend these various stopping models to improve agreement with the MD data and provide a useful fit to our results.

  2. Dynamic p-enrichment schemes for multicomponent reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Michoski, C; Dawson, C; Kubatko, E J; Wirasaet, D; Westerink, J J

    2011-01-01

    We present a family of p-enrichment schemes. These schemes may be separated into two basic classes: the first, called \\emph{fixed tolerance schemes}, rely on setting global scalar tolerances on the local regularity of the solution, and the second, called \\emph{dioristic schemes}, rely on time-evolving bounds on the local variation in the solution. Each class of $p$-enrichment scheme is further divided into two basic types. The first type (the Type I schemes) enrich along lines of maximal variation, striving to enhance stable solutions in "areas of highest interest." The second type (the Type II schemes) enrich along lines of maximal regularity in order to maximize the stability of the enrichment process. Each of these schemes are tested over a pair of model problems arising in coastal hydrology. The first is a contaminant transport model, which addresses a declinature problem for a contaminant plume with respect to a bay inlet setting. The second is a multicomponent chemically reactive flow model of estuary e...

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of graphene bombardment with Si ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xin-Mao; Gao, Ting-Hong; Yan, Wan-Jun; Guo, Xiao-Tian; Xie, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with Tersoff-Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark (Tersoff-ZBL) potential and adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) potential are performed to study the effect of irradiated graphene with silicon ion at several positions and energy levels of 0.1-1000 eV. The simulations reveal four processes: absorption, replacement, transmission and damage. At energies below 110 eV, the dominant process is absorption. For atom in group (a), the process that takes place is replacement, in which the silicon ion removes one carbon atom and occupies the place of the eliminated atom at the incident energy of 72-370 eV. Transmission is present at energies above 100 eV for atom in group (d). Damage is a very important process in current bombardment, and there are four types of defects: single vacancy, replacement-single vacancy, double vacancy and nanopore. The simulations provide a fundamental understanding of the silicon bombardment of graphene, and the parameters required to develop graphene-based devices by controlling defect formation.

  4. Linear interfacial polymerization: theory and simulations with dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezkin, Anatoly V; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2014-11-21

    Step-growth alternating interfacial polymerization between two miscible or immiscible monomer melts is investigated theoretically and by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. In both cases the kinetics for an initially bilayer system passes from the reaction to diffusion control. The polymer composed of immiscible monomers precipitates at the interface forming a film of nearly uniform density. It is demonstrated that the reaction proceeds in a narrow zone, which expands much slower than the whole film, so that newly formed polymer is extruded from the reaction zone. This concept of "reactive extrusion" is used to analytically predict the degree of polymerization and distribution of all components (monomers, polymer, and end groups) within the film in close agreement with the simulations. Increasing the comonomer incompatibility leads to thinner and more uniform films with the higher average degree of polymerization. The final product is considerably more polydisperse than expected for the homogeneous step-growth polymerization. The results extend the previous theoretical reports on interfacial polymerization and provide new insights into the internal film structure and polymer characteristics, which are important for membrane preparation, microencapsulation, and 3D printing technologies. A systematic way of mapping the simulation data onto laboratory scales is discussed.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Predicting Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of wetting of a solid surface by a liquid provides important insights; the contact angle of a liquid droplet on a surface provides a quantitative measurement of this interaction and the degree of attraction or repulsion of that liquid type by the solid surface. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are a useful way to examine the behavior of liquids on solid surfaces on a nanometer scale. Thus, we surveyed the state of this field, beginning with the fundamentals of wetting calculations to an examination of the different MD methodologies used. We highlighted some of the advantages and disadvantages of the simulations, and look to the future of computer modeling to understand wetting and other liquid-solid interaction phenomena.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hypervelocity Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Eli T.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2007-03-01

    Outer space silicon solar cells are exposed to impacts with micro meteors that can destroy the surface leading to device failure. A protective coating of silicon nitride will protect against such failure. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study how silicon/silicon nitride fails due to hypervelocity impacts. Three impactors made of silicon nitride are studied. Their cross-sectional areas, relative to the target, are as follows: the same as the target, half of the target, and a quarter of the target. Impactor speeds from 5 to 11 km/second yield several modes of failure, such as deformation of the target by the impactor and delimitation of the silicon nitride from the silicon at the interface. These simulations will give a much clearer picture of how solar cells composed of a silicon/silicon nitride interface will respond to impacts in outer space. This will ultimately lead to improved devices with longer life spans.

  7. Nano-tribology through molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧; 胡元中; 邹鲲; 冷永胜

    2001-01-01

    The solidification and interfacial slip in nanometer-scale lubricating films as well as the contact and adhesion of metal crystals have been studied via molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that the critical pressure for the solid-liquid transition declines as the film thickness decreases, in-dicating that the lubricant in the thin films may exist in a solid-like state. It is also found that the interfa-cial slip may occur in thin films at relatively low shear rate, and there is a good correlation between the slip phenomenon and the lubricant solidification. The simulations reveal that a micro-scale adhesion may take place due to the atomic jump during the process of approaching or separating of two smooth crystal surfaces, which provides important information for understanding the origin of interfacial friction.

  8. Dynamic simulation of flywheel-type fuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available Rounds of ammunition are normally armed with a fuse. In this study, a fuse is developed which uses a flywheel-type mechanism controlled by time or distance. Due to its simplicity of operation and construction, the concept is expected to have high reliabil­ity. The dynamic response of all the components of this flywheel-type fuse is mathematically modelled. Simulation software was developed which connects the mathematical models of the various components. With the definition of boundary values, the response of the projectile, flywheel and other components can be determined continuously for firing and in-flight conditions.

  9. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Interface Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Cao, Deng; Leonard, Robert H.; Owens, Eli T.; Swan, Wm. Trevor, III; Ducatman, Samuel C.

    2007-03-01

    The mechanical integrity of silicon/silicon nitride interfaces is of great importance in their applications in micro electronics and solar cells. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are an excellent tool to study mechanical and structural failure of interfaces subjected to externally applied stresses and strains. When pulling the system parallel to the interface, cracks in silicon nitride and slip and pit formation in silicon are typical failure mechanisms. Hypervelocity impact perpendicular to the interface plane leads to structural transformation and delamination at the interface. Influence of system temperature, strain rate, impact velocity, and system size on type and characteristics of failure will be discussed.

  11. Schwinger model simulations with dynamical overlap fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, W; Volkholz, J

    2007-01-01

    We present simulation results for the 2-flavour Schwinger model with dynamical overlap fermions. In particular we apply the overlap hypercube operator at seven light fermion masses. In each case we collect sizable statistics in the topological sectors 0 and 1. Since the chiral condensate Sigma vanishes in the chiral limit, we observe densities for the microscopic Dirac spectrum, which have not been addressed yet by Random Matrix Theory (RMT). Nevertheless, by confronting the averages of the lowest eigenvalues in different topological sectors with chiral RMT in unitary ensemble we obtain -- for the very light fermion masses -- values for $\\Sigma$ that follow closely the analytical predictions in the continuum.

  12. Schwinger model simulations with dynamical overlap fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, W. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Shcheredin, S. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Volkholz, J. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2007-11-15

    We present simulation results for the 2-flavour Schwinger model with dynamical overlap fermions. In particular we apply the overlap hypercube operator at seven light fermion masses. In each case we collect sizable statistics in the topological sectors 0 and 1. Since the chiral condensate {sigma} vanishes in the chiral limit, we observe densities for the microscopic Dirac spectrum, which have not been addressed yet by Random Matrix Theory (RMT). Nevertheless, by confronting the averages of the lowest eigenvalues in different topological sectors with chiral RMT in unitary ensemble we obtain - for the very light fermion masses - values for {sigma} that follow closely the analytical predictions in the continuum. (orig.)

  13. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  14. Parallel Monte Carlo Simulation of Aerosol Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient Monte Carlo (MC algorithm is developed for the numerical simulation of aerosol dynamics, that is, nucleation, surface growth, and coagulation. Nucleation and surface growth are handled with deterministic means, while coagulation is simulated with a stochastic method (Marcus-Lushnikov stochastic process. Operator splitting techniques are used to synthesize the deterministic and stochastic parts in the algorithm. The algorithm is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI. The parallel computing efficiency is investigated through numerical examples. Near 60% parallel efficiency is achieved for the maximum testing case with 3.7 million MC particles running on 93 parallel computing nodes. The algorithm is verified through simulating various testing cases and comparing the simulation results with available analytical and/or other numerical solutions. Generally, it is found that only small number (hundreds or thousands of MC particles is necessary to accurately predict the aerosol particle number density, volume fraction, and so forth, that is, low order moments of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD function. Accurately predicting the high order moments of the PSD needs to dramatically increase the number of MC particles.

  15. Parallel Monte Carlo simulation of aerosol dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, K.

    2014-01-01

    A highly efficient Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm is developed for the numerical simulation of aerosol dynamics, that is, nucleation, surface growth, and coagulation. Nucleation and surface growth are handled with deterministic means, while coagulation is simulated with a stochastic method (Marcus-Lushnikov stochastic process). Operator splitting techniques are used to synthesize the deterministic and stochastic parts in the algorithm. The algorithm is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The parallel computing efficiency is investigated through numerical examples. Near 60% parallel efficiency is achieved for the maximum testing case with 3.7 million MC particles running on 93 parallel computing nodes. The algorithm is verified through simulating various testing cases and comparing the simulation results with available analytical and/or other numerical solutions. Generally, it is found that only small number (hundreds or thousands) of MC particles is necessary to accurately predict the aerosol particle number density, volume fraction, and so forth, that is, low order moments of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) function. Accurately predicting the high order moments of the PSD needs to dramatically increase the number of MC particles. 2014 Kun Zhou et al.

  16. The dynamics of Al/Pt reactive multilayer ignition via pulsed-laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Reeves, Robert V.; Yarrington, Cole D.; Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Reactive multilayers consisting of alternating layers of Al and Pt were irradiated by single laser pulses ranging from 100 μs to 100 ms in duration, resulting in the initiation of rapid, self-propagating reactions. The threshold intensities for ignition vary with the focused laser beam diameter, bilayer thickness, and pulse length and are affected by solid state reactions and conduction of heat away from the irradiated regions. High-speed photography was used to observe ignition dynamics during irradiation and elucidate the effects of heat transfer into a multilayer foil. For an increasing laser pulse length, the ignition process transitioned from a more uniform to a less uniform temperature profile within the laser-heated zone. A more uniform temperature profile is attributed to rapid heating rates and heat localization for shorter laser pulses, and a less uniform temperature profile is due to slower heating of reactants and conduction during irradiation by longer laser pulses. Finite element simulations of laser heating using measured threshold intensities indicate that micron-scale ignition of Al/Pt occurs at low temperatures, below the melting point of both reactants.

  17. Reactive Flow Modeling of Liquid Explosives via ALE3D/Cheetah Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, I W; Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2010-03-10

    We carried out reactive flow simulations of liquid explosives such as nitromethane using the hydrodynamic code ALE3D coupled with equations of state and reaction kinetics modeled by the thermochemical code Cheetah. The simulation set-up was chosen to mimic cylinder experiments. For pure unconfined nitromethane we find that the failure diameter and detonation velocity dependence on charge diameter are in agreement with available experimental results. Such simulations are likely to be useful for determining detonability and failure behavior for a wide range of experimental conditions and explosive compounds.

  18. Simulation and reliability analysis of shunt active power filter based on instantaneous reactive power theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Yu-long; LIU Hong; WANG Jing-qin; SUN Shu-guang

    2007-01-01

    This paper first discusses the operating principle ofinstantaneous reactive power theory. Then, the theory is introduced into shunt active power filter and its control scheme is studied. Finally, Matlab/Simulink power system toolbox is used to simulate the system. In the simulation model, as the most common harmonic source, 3-phase thyfistor bridge rectifier circuit is constructed.The simulation results before and after the shunt active filter was switched to the system corresponding to different firing angles of the thyristors are presented and analyzed, which demonstrate the practicability and reliability of the proposed shunt active filter scheme.

  19. Real-Time Reactive Power Distribution in Microgrids by Dynamic Programing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levron, Yoash; Beck, Yuval; Katzir, Liran

    2017-01-01

    combination of reactive powers, by means of dynamic programming. Since every single step involves a one-dimensional problem, the complexity of the solution is only linear with the number of clusters, and as a result, a globally optimal solution may be obtained in real time. The paper includes the results......In this paper a new real-time optimization method for reactive power distribution in microgrids is proposed. The method enables location of a globally optimal distribution of reactive power under normal operating conditions. The method exploits the typical compact structure of microgrids to obtain...... a solution by parts, using the dynamic programming method and Bellman equation. The proposed solution method is based on the fact that the microgrid is designed with a central feeder line to which clusters of generators and loads are connected, and is suitable for microgrids with ring topologies as well...

  20. Dynamic behaviour of reactive distillation tray columns described with a non-equilibrium cell model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, R.; Taylor, R.; Krishna, R.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we develop a generic, dynamic, nonequilibrium (NEQ) cell model for reactive distillation (RD) tray columns. The features of our model are (1) the use of Maxwell–Stefan equations for describing mass transfer between fluid phases, (2) the reaction is assumed to take place in the liquid

  1. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation.

  2. Nano-tribology through molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hui(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Burkert, U., Allinger, N. L., Molecular Mechanics, York: Maple Press Company, 1982.[2]Daw, M. S. , Baskes, M. I., Embedded-atom method: derivation and application to impurities, surface and other defects in metals, Phys. Rev. B, 1984, 29: 6443-6453.[3]Frenke, D., Smit, B., Understanding Molecular Simulation, San Diego: Academic Press, 1996, 60-67, 125-140.[4]Granick, S., Motions and relaxation of confined liquids, Science, 1991, 253: 1374-1379.[5]Koplik, J., Banavar, J., Willemsen, J., Molecular dynamics of Poisewulle flow and moving contact line, Phys. Rev.Lett., 1988, 60: 1282-1285.[6]Hu, Y. Z., Wang, H., Guo, Y. et al., Simulation of lubricant rheology in thin film lubrication, Part I: simulation of Poiseuille flow, Wear, 1996, 196: 243-259.[7]Zou, K., Li, Z. J, Leng, Y. S. et al. , Surface force apparatus and its application in the study of solid contacts, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1999, 44: 268-271.[8]Stevens, M. , Mondello, M., Grest, G. et al. , Comparison of shear flow of hexadecane in a confined geometry and in bulk,J. Chem. Phys., 1997, 106: 7303-7314.[9]Huang, P., Luo, J. B., Wen, S. Z., Theoretical study on the lubrication failure for tthe lubricants with a limiting shear stress, Tribology International, 1999, 32: 421-426.[10]Ryckaert, J. P. , Bellemans. , A molecular dynamics of alkanes, Faraday Soc. , 1978, 66: 95-106.[11]Wang, H. , Hu, Y. Z., A molecular dynamics study on slip phenomenon at solid-liquid interface, in Proceedings of tthe First AICT, Beijing: Tsinghua University Press, 1998, 295-299.[12]Landman, U., Luedtke, W., Burnham, N. et al., Mechanisms and dynamics of adhesion, nanoindentation, and fracture, Science, 1990, 248: 454-461.[13]Leng, Y. S., Hu, Y. Z., Zheng, L. Q., Adhesive contact of flat-ended wedges: theory and computer experiments, Journal of Tribology, 1999, 121: 128-132.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation for mechanical properties of CNT/Polyethylene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jia; Yang Qingsheng [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)], E-mail: jiajia2007@emails.bjut.edu.cn, E-mail: qsyang@bjut.edu.cn

    2009-09-01

    The pull-out process of the carbon nanotube from polyethylene was simulated by molecular dynamics method. A model of a carbon nanotube in polyethylene was established. In the simulation, Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order(ARIEBO) potential was adopted to describe the interaction of C-C and C-H in the carbon nanotube and polymer, and Lennard-Jones pair potential was used to describe the interaction between the carbon nanotube and polymer; NVT ensemble was adopted in the whole simulation and Nose-Hoover method was used to control the temperature at absolute zero, which avoided the influence induced by thermal activation; Verlet algorithm was used to solve molecular dynamics equations in the procedure of simulation. The deformation and forces on interfaces between the carbon nanotube and polymer was analyzed by simulating the process of pulling-out of the carbon nanotube from polyethylene.

  4. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  5. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20 000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  6. Structural modification of the skin barrier by OH radicals: a reactive molecular dynamics study for plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Paal, J.; Verlackt, C. C.; Yusupov, M.; Neyts, E. C.; Bogaerts, A.

    2015-04-01

    While plasma treatment of skin diseases and wound healing has been proven highly effective, the underlying mechanisms, and more generally the effect of plasma radicals on skin tissue, are not yet completely understood. In this paper, we perform ReaxFF-based reactive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of plasma generated OH radicals with a model system composed of free fatty acids, ceramides, and cholesterol molecules. This model system is an approximation of the upper layer of the skin (stratum corneum). All interaction mechanisms observed in our simulations are initiated by H-abstraction from one of the ceramides. This reaction, in turn, often starts a cascade of other reactions, which eventually lead to the formation of aldehydes, the dissociation of ceramides or the elimination of formaldehyde, and thus eventually to the degradation of the skin barrier function.

  7. Theoretical studies of lipid bilayer electroporation using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Zachary Alan

    Computer simulations of physical, chemical, and biological systems have improved tremendously over the past five decades. From simple studies of liquid argon in the 1960s to fully atomistic simulations of entire viruses in the past few years, recent advances in high-performance computing have continuously enabled simulations to bridge the gap between scientific theory and experiment. Molecular dynamics simulations in particular have allowed for the direct observation of spatial and temporal events which are at present inaccessible to experiments. For this dissertation I employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the transient, electric field-induced poration (or electroporation) of phospholipid bilayers at MV/m electric fields. Phospholipid bilayers are the dominant constituents of cell membranes and act as both a barrier and gatekeeper to the cell interior. This makes their structural integrity and susceptibility to external perturbations an important topic for study, especially as the density of electromagnetic radiation in our environment is increasing steadily. The primary goal of this dissertation is to understand the specific physical and biological mechanisms which facilitate electroporation, and to connect our simulated observations to experiments with live cells and to continuum models which seek to describe the underlying biological processes of electroporation. In Chapter 1 I begin with a brief introduction to phospholipids and phospholipid bilayers, followed by an extensive overview of electroporation and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The following chapters will then focus on peer-reviewed and published work we performed, or on existing projects which are currently being prepared for submission. Chapter 2 looks at how external electric fields affect both oxidized and unoxidized lipid bilayers as a function of oxidation concentration and oxidized lipid type. Oxidative damage to cell membranes represents a physiologically relevant

  8. On sequential dynamical systems and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, C.L.; Mortveit, H.S.; Reidys, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The generic structure of computer simulations motivates a new class of discrete dynamical systems that captures this structure in a mathematically precise way. This class of systems consists of (1) a loopfree graph {Upsilon} with vertex set {l_brace}1,2,{hor_ellipsis},n{r_brace} where each vertex has a binary state, (2) a vertex labeled set of functions (F{sub i,{Upsilon}}:F{sub 2}{sup n} {r_arrow} F{sub 2}{sup n}){sub i} and (3) a permutation {pi} {element_of} S{sub n}. The function F{sub i,{Upsilon}} updates the state of vertex i as a function of the states of vertex i and its {Upsilon}-neighbors and leaves the states of all other vertices fixed. The permutation {pi} represents the update ordering, i.e., the order in which the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} are applied. By composing the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} in the order given by {pi} one obtains the dynamical system (equation given in paper) which the authors refer to as a sequential dynamical system, or SDS for short. The authors will present bounds for the number of functionally different systems and for the number of nonisomorphic digraphs {Gamma}[F{sub {Upsilon}},{pi}] that can be obtained by varying the update order and applications of these to specific graphs and graph classes. This will be done using both combinatorial/algebraic techniques and probabilistic techniques. Finally the authors give results on dynamical system properties for some special systems.

  9. Large-eddy simulations of the non-reactive flow in the Sydney swirl burner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yang; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation using large-eddy simulation. Two isothermal cases from the Sydney swirling flame database with different swirl numbers were tested. Rational grid system and mesh details were presented firstly. Validations showed overall good agreement in time averaged...... package in predicting complex flow field and presented the potential of large eddy simulation in understanding dynamics....

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotube-based gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn

    1997-09-01

    We use a molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with 0957-4484/8/3/001/img1. Brenner's reactive hydrocarbon potential is used to model interatomic forces within each molecular gear. A Lennard - Jones 6 - 12 potential or the Buckingham 0957-4484/8/3/001/img2 potential plus electrostatic interaction terms are used for intermolecular interactions between gears. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations are simulated on parallel computers. One gear is powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the nanotube to rotate, and a second gear is allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its nanotube constrained to a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50 - 100 GHz in a vacuum at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering the temperature and/or rotation rate.

  11. Solvent effects on photodegradation of CI Reactive Orange 16 by simulated solar light

    OpenAIRE

    Mijin Dušan Ž.; Zlatić Dragana Z.; Ušćumlić Gordana S.; Jovančić Petar M.

    2008-01-01

    Organic solvents may appear in wastewaters and other industrial waste streams containing dyes, therefore, their photodegradation catalyzed by TiO2 should be investigated. Solvent effect on photodegradation of CI Reactive Orange 16 has been studied using simulated solar light and P-25 TiO2. Methyl, ethyl and isopropyl alcohol as well as acetone were used as solvents. Photodegradation reaction was faster in methyl than in ethyl alcohol while in water was the slowest. RO16 photodegradation effic...

  12. Improvement of the dynamic response of the ITER Reactive Power Compensation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finotti, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.finotti@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Gaio, Elena [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Song, Inho; Tao, Jun; Benfatto, Ivone [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The slow response reasons of the classic ITER Reactive Power Compensation (RPC) control are explained. • The dynamic behaviors of the ac/dc converter and of the RPC are characterized. • New control concept to speed up the RPC response is developed. • Good performance of the new RPC control is verified even during fast transient conditions. - Abstract: The ITER ac/dc conversion system can absorb a total active and reactive power up to 500 MW and 950 Mvar, respectively. The Reactive Power Compensation (RPC) system is rated for a nominal power of 750 Mvar necessary to comply with the allowable reactive power limit value from the grid of 200 Mvar. This system is currently under construction and is based on Static Var Compensation technology with Thyristor Controlled Reactor (TCR) and Tuned Filters. The RPC has to minimize the demand of reactive power from the grid; its control is based on a feed-forward method, where the corrective input is the measurement of the reactive power consumption of the ac/dc converters, derived from the 50 Hz component of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the three-phase voltages and currents. The delay introduced by the FFT calculation and the slow response of the TCR could make the response speed of the RPC not sufficient to face fast variations of the reactive power demand and therefore in this paper a new controller of the RPC able to overcome this shortcoming is proposed and evaluated. It is based on the calculation of the predicted consumption of the reactive power by using the voltage reference signals coming from the Plasma Control System and the measurements of the dc current of the ac/dc converters and of the 66 kV busbar voltage, and on the speed up of the RPC control by introducing a lead–lag transfer function.

  13. CADS:Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffat, Harry K.

    2007-07-01

    This manual describes a library for aerosol kinetics and transport, called CADS (Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator), which employs a section-based approach for describing the particle size distributions. CADS is based upon Cantera, a set of C++ libraries and applications that handles gas phase species transport and reactions. The method uses a discontinuous Galerkin formulation to represent the particle distributions within each section and to solve for changes to the aerosol particle distributions due to condensation, coagulation, and nucleation processes. CADS conserves particles, elements, and total enthalpy up to numerical round-off error, in all of its formulations. Both 0-D time dependent and 1-D steady state applications (an opposing-flow flame application) have been developed with CADS, with the initial emphasis on developing fundamental mechanisms for soot formation within fires. This report also describes the 0-D application, TDcads, which models a time-dependent perfectly stirred reactor.

  14. Simulating the dynamics of complex plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Schwabe, Mierk

    2014-01-01

    Complex plasmas are low-temperature plasmas that contain micrometer-size particles in addition to the neutral gas particles and the ions and electrons that make up the plasma. The microparticles interact strongly and display a wealth of collective effects. Here we report on linked numerical simulations that reproduce many of the experimental results of complex plasmas. We model a capacitively coupled plasma with a fluid code written for the commercial package comsol. The output of this model is used to calculate forces on microparticles. The microparticles are modeled using the molecular dynamics package lammps, which we extended to include the forces from the plasma. Using this method, we are able to reproduce void formation, the separation of particles of different sizes into layers, lane formation, vortex formation, and other effects.

  15. Kinetic Simulations of Plasmoid Chain Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni; Divin, Andrey; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Laure, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of a plasmoid chain is studied with three dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations. The evolution of the system with and without a uniform guide field, whose strength is 1/3 the asymptotic magnetic field, is investigated. The plasmoid chain forms by spontaneous magnetic reconnection: the tearing instability rapidly disrupts the initial current sheet generating several small-scale plasmoids, that rapidly grow in size coalescing and kinking. The plasmoid kink is mainly driven by the coalescence process. It is found that the presence of guide field strongly influences the evolution of the plasmoid chain. Without a guide field, a main reconnection site dominates and smaller reconnection regions are included in larger ones, leading to an hierarchical structure of the plasmoid-dominated current sheet. On the contrary in presence of a guide field, plasmoids have approximately the same size and the hierarchical structure does not emerge, a strong core magnetic field develops in the center of the plasmoid...

  16. Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics via Direct Statistical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Tobias, S M; Marston, J B

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Direct Statistical Simulation (DSS) for astrophysical flows. This technique may be appropriate for problems in astrophysical fluids where the instantaneous dynamics of the flows are of secondary importance to their statistical properties. We give examples of such problems including mixing and transport in planets, stars and disks. The method is described for a general set of evolution equations, before we consider the specific case of a spectral method optimised for problems on a spherical surface. The method is illustrated for the simplest non-trivial example of hydrodynamics and MHD on a rotating spherical surface. We then discuss possible extensions of the method both in terms of computational methods and the range of astrophysical problems that are of interest.

  17. RAFT: A simulator for ReActive Flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chilakapati, A

    1995-07-01

    This report documents the use of the simulator RAFT for the ReActive flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants. RAFT can be used as a predictive tool in the design and analysis of laboratory and field experiments or it can be used for the estimation of model/process parameters from experiments. RAFT simulates the reactive transport of groundwater contaminants in one, two-, or three-dimensions and it can model user specified source/link configurations and arbitrary injection strategies. A suite of solvers for transport, reactions and regression are employed so that a combination of numerical methods best suited for a problem can be chosen. User specified coupled equilibrium and kinetic reaction systems can be incorporated into RAFT. RAFT is integrated with a symbolic computational language MAPLE, to automate code generation for arbitrary reaction systems. RAFT is expected to be used as a simulator for engineering design for field experiments in groundwater remediation including bioremediation, reactive barriers and redox manipulation. As an integrated tool with both the predictive ability and the ability to analyze experimental data, RAFT can help in the development of remediation technologies, from laboratory to field.

  18. In silico FRET from simulated dye dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefling, Martin; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments probe molecular distances on the nanometer scale. In such experiments, distances are recorded from FRET transfer efficiencies via the Förster formula, E=1/(1+(). The energy transfer however also depends on the mutual orientation of the two dyes used as distance reporter. Since this information is typically inaccessible in FRET experiments, one has to rely on approximations, which reduce the accuracy of these distance measurements. A common approximation is an isotropic and uncorrelated dye orientation distribution. To assess the impact of such approximations, we present the algorithms and implementation of a computational toolkit for the simulation of smFRET on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory ensembles. In this study, the dye orientation dynamics, which are used to determine dynamic FRET efficiencies, are extracted from MD simulations. In a subsequent step, photons and bursts are generated using a Monte Carlo algorithm. The application of the developed toolkit on a poly-proline system demonstrated good agreement between smFRET simulations and experimental results and therefore confirms our computational method. Furthermore, it enabled the identification of the structural basis of measured heterogeneity. The presented computational toolkit is written in Python, available as open-source, applicable to arbitrary systems and can easily be extended and adapted to further problems. Catalogue identifier: AENV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPLv3, the bundled SIMD friendly Mersenne twister implementation [1] is provided under the SFMT-License. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 317880 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 54774217 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language

  19. Coarse-grained protein molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-01

    A limiting factor in biological science is the time-scale gap between experimental and computational trajectories. At this point, all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) are clearly too expensive to explore long-range protein motions and extract accurate thermodynamics of proteins in isolated or multimeric forms. To reach the appropriate time scale, we must then resort to coarse graining. Here we couple the coarse-grained OPEP model, which has already been used with activated methods, to MD simulations. Two test cases are studied: the stability of three proteins around their experimental structures and the aggregation mechanisms of the Alzheimer's Aβ16-22 peptides. We find that coarse-grained isolated proteins are stable at room temperature within 50ns time scale. Based on two 220ns trajectories starting from disordered chains, we find that four Aβ16-22 peptides can form a three-stranded β sheet. We also demonstrate that the reptation move of one chain over the others, first observed using the activation-relaxation technique, is a kinetically important mechanism during aggregation. These results show that MD-OPEP is a particularly appropriate tool to study qualitatively the dynamics of long biological processes and the thermodynamics of molecular assemblies.

  20. Long-term reactive transport modelling of stabilized/solidified waste: from dynamic leaching tests to disposal scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windt, Laurent de [Ecole des Mines de Paris, CG-Hydrodynamics and Reaction Group, 35 R. St-Honore, 77300 Fontainebleau (France)]. E-mail: laurent.dewindt@ensmp.fr; Badreddine, Rabia [INERIS, Direction des Risques Chroniques, Unite Dechets et Sites Pollues, Parc Technologique Alata BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Lagneau, Vincent [Ecole des Mines de Paris, CG-Hydrodynamics and Reaction Group, 35 R. St-Honore, 77300 Fontainebleau (France)

    2007-01-31

    Environmental impact assessment of hazardous waste disposal relies, among others, on standardized leaching tests characterized by a strong coupling between diffusion and chemical processes. In that respect, this study shows that reactive transport modelling is a useful tool to extrapolate laboratory results to site conditions characterized by lower solution/solid (L/S) ratios, site specific geometry, infiltration, etc. A cement solidified/stabilized (S/S) waste containing lead is investigated as a typical example. The reactive transport model developed in a previous study to simulate the initial state of the waste as well as laboratory batch and dynamic tests is first summarized. Using the same numerical code (HYTEC), this model is then integrated to a simplified waste disposal scenario assuming a defective cover and rain water infiltration. The coupled evolution of the S/S waste chemistry and the pollutant plume migration are modelled assessing the importance of the cracking state of the monolithic waste. The studied configurations correspond to an undamaged and fully sealed system, a few main fractures between undamaged monoliths and, finally, a dense crack-network in the monoliths. The model considers the potential effects of cracking, first the increase of rain water and carbon dioxide infiltration and, secondly, the increase of L/S ratio and reactive surfaces, using either explicit fracture representation or dual porosity approaches.

  1. Dynamical simulation of tether in orbit deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, N. N.; Demyanov, Yu. A.; Zvyaguin, A. V.; Malashin, A. A.; Luzhin, A. A.

    2010-08-01

    The paper is aimed at studying the peculiarities of dynamical behavior of tether in its deployment in low Earth orbit during YES2 experiment in Foton-M3 mission, and performing flight data analysis with account of these effects. The analysis in the first part of the paper uses as input a pre-provided tension profile for the mission (resulting from a simulation to be independently validated). With this input it then performs an open-loop simulation which explains the sensitivity to the initial parameters. For the actual flight design a feedback mechanism and algorithm was used in order to control the deployment speed along a nominal profile, minimizing sensitivity to conditions such as initial velocity and endmass value. The paper provides solutions accounting for final velocities of wave propagation in tether, which is especially important for such stages of the deployment as sharp changing of the velocity direction and intensive braking. Moreover the YES2 data is used to validate the theoretical derivations.

  2. Modelling the dispersion and transport of reactive pollutants in a deep urban street canyon: using large-eddy simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bloss, William James

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the dispersion and transport of reactive pollutants in a deep urban street canyon with an aspect ratio of 2 under neutral meteorological conditions using large-eddy simulation. The spatial variation of pollutants is significant due to the existence of two unsteady vortices. The deviation of species abundance from chemical equilibrium for the upper vortex is greater than that for the lower vortex. The interplay of dynamics and chemistry is investigated using two metrics: the photostationary state defect, and the inferred ozone production rate. The latter is found to be negative at all locations within the canyon, pointing to a systematic negative offset to ozone production rates inferred by analogous approaches in environments with incomplete mixing of emissions. This study demonstrates an approach to quantify parameters for a simplified two-box model, which could support traffic management and urban planning strategies and personal exposure assessment.

  3. Reactive transport of metal contaminants in alluvium - Model comparison and column simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J.G.; Bassett, R.L.; Glynn, P.D.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative assessment of two reactive-transport models, PHREEQC and HYDROGEOCHEM (HGC), was done to determine the suitability of each for simulating the movement of acidic contamination in alluvium. For simulations that accounted for aqueous complexation, precipitation and dissolution, the breakthrough and rinseout curves generated by each model were similar. The differences in simulated equilibrium concentrations between models were minor and were related to (1) different units in model output, (2) different activity coefficients, and (3) ionic-strength calculations. When adsorption processes were added to the models, the rinseout pH simulated by PHREEQC using the diffuse double-layer adsorption model rose to a pH of 6 after pore volume 15, about 1 pore volume later than the pH simulated by HGC using the constant-capacitance model. In PHREEQC simulation of a laboratory column experiment, the inability of the model to match measured outflow concentrations of selected constituents was related to the evident lack of local geochemical equilibrium in the column. The difference in timing and size of measured and simulated breakthrough of selected constituents indicated that the redox and adsorption reactions in the column occurred slowly when compared with the modeled reactions. MINTEQA2 and PHREEQC simulations of the column experiment indicated that the number of surface sites that took part in adsorption reactions was less than that estimated from the measured concentration of Fe hydroxide in the alluvium.

  4. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilie, Ioana M.; Briels, Wim J. [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Otter, Wouter K. den, E-mail: w.k.denotter@utwente.nl [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Multi Scale Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  5. Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Ioana M; den Otter, Wouter K; Briels, Wim J

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  6. A mesocosm study of oxygen and trace metal dynamics in sediment microniches of reactive organic material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letho, Niklas; Larsen, Morten; Zhang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    simultaneous measurements of dissolved O2 and trace metal dynamics around an aggregate of reactive organic matter placed on the SWI of a sediment mesocosm. The aggregate induced a rapid, highly localized, decrease in O2 concentration, resulting in an anoxic feature at the SWI. Co-located with this feature, we...... observed intense Fe and Mn mobilization, removal of Co, Ni and Zn and found evidence for the concurrent release and precipitation of Pb within a small confined volume. We also identified two small microniches in the anoxic sediment below the SWI, defined by elevated trace metal mobilization. Differences...... mobilization at the SWI. By using a combined planar optode-DGT (diffusive gradient in thin-films) sensor we obtained simultaneous measurements of dissolved O2 and trace metal dynamics around an aggregate of reactive organic matter placed on the SWI of a sediment mesocosm. The aggregate induced a rapid, highly...

  7. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  8. Design to conditioning circuits of dynamic compensation of reactive power in the intelligence voltage controller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The paper introduces one design idea that making use of SCM to control Real-timely the dynamic compensation of reactive power.Firstly,design one Circuit to Sample the voltage and current,and by these datas we can easily calculate the power factor,and Voltage controller in the microcontroller to determine whether input the compensation capacitance according to the size of power factor,the paper also analyzes the principle of capacitance compensation and calculation method. Dynamic compensation for the entire process is quick and accurate.

  9. Experiment investigation for dynamic behavior of hybrid fiber effects on reactive powder concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwen; Pang, Baojun; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2010-03-01

    The influences of different hybrid fibers (steel fibers add polyvinyl-alcohol fibers) mixture rates for reactive power concrete's (RPC) dynamic mechanical behavior after high temperature burnt was investigated by the Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device. A plumbic pulse shaper technique was applied in the experiment, PVDF stress gauge was used to monitor the stress uniformity state within the specimen. The strain rate was between 75~85s-1, base on the stressstrain curves and dynamic modes of concrete specimen, the hybrid fiber effect on the dynamic properties was determined. The results show, dynamic compression strength of specimens which mixed with steel fibers (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.1% PVA fibers is higher than normal reactive powder concrete (NRPC), but the toughness improves unconspicuous; while strength of the one which has both steel fiber (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.2%PVA fiber declines than NRPC but the toughness improves and the plastic behaviors strengthened, stress-strain curve has evident rising and plate portions. It can be deduced that the concrete with mixed two kinds of fibers has improved dynamic mechanical properties after high temperature burnt. By compounding previous literature results, the mechanism of the experimental results can be explained.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL STUDIES ON DYNAMIC COMPRESSIVE BEHAVIOR OF REACTIVE POWDER CONCRETES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonghua Wang; Zhengdao Wang; Xiaoyan Liang; Minzhe An

    2008-01-01

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique is used to determine the dynamic strength of reactive powder concretes (RPCs) with different steel-fiber contents.Two types of pulse shapers with different thicknesses are considered to reduce the high-frequency-oscillation effect and achieve a nearly constant strain rate over a certain deformation range.It is known that the compressive strength of concrete-like materials is hydrostatic-stress-dependent,and the apparent dynamic strength enhancement comes from both the effects of the hydrostatic stress and strain rate.In order to differentiate them,numerical method is used to calculate the contribution of the hydrostatic stress,and then the genuine strain-rate effect on dynamic compressive strength of RPCs is determined.In addition,the effect of steel-fibers on dynamic strength and failure mode of RPCs is discussed.

  11. Effect of simulated gastro-duodenal digestion on the allergenic reactivity of beta-lactoglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossios Apostolos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cow's milk (CM allergy affects about 2% of infants. The allergenicity of dietary proteins, including those from CM, has been related to their digestibility although the generality of the link and its causality remains to be demonstrated. In this study we use an in vitro digestion system, to investigate the digestibility of β-lactoglobulin (blg during gastrointestinal transit and to assess the impact of this process on blg allergenic reactivity in CM allergic children. Methods Blg digesta were prepared using an in vitro digestion protocol simulating either gastric digestion alone or followed by duodenal digestion with or without phosphatidylcholine (PC. Biochemical analysis of blg digesta was performed by SDS-PAGE and their concentration was measured by a sandwich ELISA. Assessment of their allergenic reactivity was done in vitro by EAST inhibition, specific basophil activation (basotest and lymphocyte proliferation (PCNA-flow cytometry assays using sera and cells from patients allergic to blg and in vivo by skin prick testing (SPT of these patients. Results Blg was only broken down to smaller peptides after gastro-duodenal digestion although a sizeable amount of intact protein still remained. Digestion did not modify the IgE binding capacity of blg except for gastro-duodenal digestion performed in the absence of PC. These results are consistent with the quantity of intact blg remaining in the digesta. Overall both gastric and gastroduodenal digestion enhanced activation of sensitized basophils and proliferation of sensitized lymphocytes by blg. However, there was a tendency towards reduction in mean diameter of SPT following digestion, the PC alone during phase 1 digestion causing a significant increase in mean diameter. Conclusions Digestion did not reduce the allergenic reactivity of blg to a clinically insignificant extent, PC inhibiting digestion and thereby protecting blg allergenic reactivity. SPT reactivity was

  12. Dynamics Modeling of Heavy Special Driving Simulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the dynamical characteristic parameters of the real vehicle, the modeling approach and procedure of dynamics of vehicles are expatiated. The layout of vehicle dynamics is proposed, and the sub-models of the diesel engine, drivetrain system and vehicle multi-body dynamics are introduced. Finally, the running characteristic data of the virtual and real vehicles are compared, which shows that the dynamics model is similar closely to the real vehicle system.

  13. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.

  14. Annual Report 1999 Environmental Dynamics and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NS Foster-Mills

    2000-06-28

    This annual report describes selected 1999 research accomplishments for the Environmental Dynamics and Simulation (ED and S) directorate, one of six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). These accomplishments are representative of the different lines of research underway in the ED and S directorate. EMSL is one of US Department of Energy's (DOE) national scientific user facilities and is the centerpiece of DOE's commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems. Capabilities in the EMSL include over 100 major instrument systems for use by the resident research staff, their collaborators, and users of the EMSL. These capabilities are used to address the fundamental science that will be the basis for finding solutions to national environmental issues such as cleaning up contamianted areas at DOE sites across the country and developing green technologies that will reduce or eliminate future pollution production. The capabilities are also used to further the understanding of global climate change and environmental issues relevant to energy production and use and health effects resulting from exposure to contaminated environments.

  15. MOLECULAR DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF PEPTIDE POLYELECTROLYTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Neelov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with investigation of the conformational properties of some charged homopolypeptides in dilute aqueous solutions by computer simulation. A method of molecular dynamics for the full-atomic models of polyaspartic acid and polylysine with explicit account of water and counter-ions is used for this purpose. For systems containing these polypeptides we calculated time trajectories and the size, shape, distribution functions and time correlation functions of inertia radius and the distances between the ends of peptide chains. We have also calculated the solvatation characteristics of considered polyelectrolytes. We have found out that polyaspartic acid in dilute aqueous solution has more compact structure and more spherical shape than polylysine. We have shown that these differences are due to different interaction between the polypeptides and water molecules (in particular, the quality and quantity of hydrogen bonds formed by these peptides with water, and the difference in an amount of ion pairs formed by the charged groups of the peptides and counter-ions. The obtained results should be taken into account for elaboration of new products based on the investigated peptides and their usage in various industrial and biomedical applications.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of vibrated granular gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, Alain; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2002-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of monodisperse or bidisperse inelastic granular gases driven by vibrating walls, in two dimensions (without gravity). Because of the energy injection at the boundaries, a situation often met experimentally, density and temperature fields display heterogeneous profiles in the direction perpendicular to the walls. A general equation of state for an arbitrary mixture of fluidized inelastic hard spheres is derived and successfully tested against numerical data. Single-particle velocity distribution functions with non-Gaussian features are also obtained, and the influence of various parameters (inelasticity coefficients, density, etc.) are analyzed. The validity of a recently proposed random restitution coefficient model is assessed through the study of projected collisions onto the direction perpendicular to that of energy injection. For the binary mixture, the nonequipartition of translational kinetic energy is studied and compared both to experimental data and to the case of homogeneous energy injection ("stochastic thermostat"). The rescaled velocity distribution functions are found to be very similar for both species.

  17. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiron, Yohai [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Spurzem, Rainer, E-mail: ymeiron@pku.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    We present graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of two fast force calculation methods based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One method is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other method is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a 'pure' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took ∼0.1 s (depending on expansion cutoff), making simulations with as many as 10{sup 8} particles fast for a comparatively small number of nodes.

  18. Dynamic Simulation over Long Time Periods with 100% Solar Generation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concepcion, Ricky James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Elliott, Ryan Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This project aimed to identify the path forward for dynamic simulation tools to accommodate these needs by characterizing the properties of power systems (with high PV penetration), analyzing how these properties affect dynamic simulation software, and offering solutions for potential problems.

  19. Reactive force field simulation of proton diffusion in BaZrO{sub 3} using an empirical valence bond approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiteri, Paolo; Gale, Julian D [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Bussi, Giovanni, E-mail: paolo@ivec.org, E-mail: julian@ivec.org [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2011-08-24

    A new reactive force field to describe proton diffusion within the solid oxide fuel cell material BaZrO{sub 3} has been derived. Using a quantum mechanical potential energy surface, the parameters of an interatomic potential model to describe hydroxyl groups within both pure and yttrium-doped BaZrO{sub 3} have been determined. Reactivity is then incorporated through the use of the empirical valence bond model. Molecular dynamics simulations (EVB-MD) have been performed to explore the diffusion of hydrogen using a stochastic thermostat and barostat whose equations are extended to the isostress-isothermal ensemble. In the low concentration limit, the presence of yttrium is found not to significantly influence the diffusivity of hydrogen, despite the proton having a longer residence time at oxygen adjacent to the dopant. This lack of influence is due to the fact that trapping occurs infrequently, even when the proton diffuses through octahedra adjacent to the dopant. The activation energy for diffusion is found to be 0.42 eV, in good agreement with experimental values, though the prefactor is slightly underestimated.

  20. Dynamics of Protonated Peptide Ion Collisions with Organic Surfaces: Consonance of Simulation and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratihar, Subha; Barnes, George L.; Laskin, Julia; Hase, William L.

    2016-08-18

    In this Perspective mass spectrometry experiments and chemical dynamics simulations are described which have explored the atomistic dynamics of protonated peptide ions, peptide-H+, colliding with organic surfaces. These studies have investigated surface-induced dissociation (SID) for which peptide-H+ fragments upon collision with the surface, peptide-H+ physisorption on the surface, soft landing (SL), and peptide-H+ reaction with the surface, reactive landing (RL). The simulations include QM+MM and QM/MM direct dynamics. For collisions with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces there is quite good agreement between experiment and simulation in the efficiency of energy transfer to the peptide-H+ ion’s internal degrees of freedom. Both the experiments and simulations show two mechanisms for peptide-H+ fragmentation, i.e. shattering and statistical, RRKM dynamics. Mechanisms for SL are probed in simulations of collisions of protonated dialanine with a perfluorinated SAM surface. RL has been studied experimentally for a number of peptide-H+ + surface systems, and qualitative agreement between simulation and experiment is found for two similar systems.

  1. Excipient-assisted vinpocetine nanoparticles: experiments and molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai-Xia; Wang, Hao-Bo; Oppong, Daniel; Wang, Jie-Xin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Le, Yuan

    2014-11-03

    Hydrophilic excipients can be used to increase the solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In this work, the conventional water-soluble pharmaceutical excipients hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and lactose (LAC) were used as solid supports to prevent drug nanoparticles from aggregation and enhance drug dissolution. Excipient-assisted vinpocetine (VIN) nanoparticles were prepared by reactive precipitation. The analysis results indicated that HPMC was a suitable excipient to prepare VIN nanoparticles. VIN/HPMC nanoparticles had a mean size of 130 nm within a narrow distribution. The dissolution rate of VIN nanoparticles was significantly faster than those of a physical mixture of VIN/HPMC and raw VIN. VIN/HPMC nanoparticles had a higher dissolution profile than VIN/PVP and VIN/LAC nanoparticles. Besides, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was applied to investigate the molecular interactions between VIN and excipients. The calculated results revealed that VIN interacted with excipients by Coulomb and Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. Few hydrogen bonds were formed between VIN and excipients. The HPMC affording smaller particle size may be a result of the stronger interactions between VIN and HPMC (mainly LJ interaction) and the property of HPMC. These characteristics may greatly influence the adsorption behavior and may be the crucial parameter for the better performance of HPMC.

  2. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Commercial process simulators are increasing interest in the chemical engineer education. In this paper, the use of commercial dynamic simulation software, D-SPICE® and K-Spice®, for three different chemical engineering courses is described and discussed. The courses cover the following topics......: basic chemical engineering, operability and safety analysis and process control. User experiences from both teachers and students are presented. The benefits of dynamic simulation as an additional teaching tool are discussed and summarized. The experiences confirm that commercial dynamic simulators...

  3. The automatic visual simulation of words: A memory reactivated mask slows down conceptual access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Amandine E; Riou, Benoit; Vallet, Guillaume T; Versace, Rémy

    2017-03-01

    How do we represent the meaning of words? The present study assesses whether access to conceptual knowledge requires the reenactment of the sensory components of a concept. The reenactment-that is, simulation-was tested in a word categorisation task using an innovative masking paradigm. We hypothesised that a meaningless reactivated visual mask should interfere with the simulation of the visual dimension of concrete words. This assumption was tested in a paradigm in which participants were not aware of the link between the visual mask and the words to be processed. In the first phase, participants created a tone-visual mask or tone-control stimulus association. In the test phase, they categorised words that were presented with 1 of the tones. Results showed that words were processed more slowly when they were presented with the reactivated mask. This interference effect was only correlated with and explained by the value of the visual perceptual strength of the words (i.e., our experience with the visual dimensions associated with concepts) and not with other characteristics. We interpret these findings in terms of word access, which may involve the simulation of sensory features associated with the concept, even if participants were not explicitly required to access visual properties. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Simulating Food Web Dynamics along a Gradient: Quantifying Human Influence

    OpenAIRE

    Ferenc Jordán; Nerta Gjata; Shu Mei; Yule, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo). The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities) along the river...

  5. Structure and dynamics of proton transfer in liquid imidazole. A molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ailin; Cao, Zhen; Li, Yao; Yan, Tianying; Shen, Panwen

    2012-10-25

    Proton transfer (PT) via the Grotthuss mechanism in liquid imidazole (im) at 393 K is studied with molecular dynamics simulation using a reactive multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) model. It is found that the proton is tightly binded to an imidazole to form an imidazolium (imH(+)), which is solvated in a distorted Eigen-like complex (im-imH(+)-im), whereas the Zundel-like complex (im-H(+)-im) is rare. PT occurs via an Eigen-Zundel-Eigen scenario for switching the identity of imH(+) from an Eigen-like complex to another, intermediated by a Zundel-like complex. Structural and dynamical analyses demonstrate that PT in imidazole can be considered as a local event with very short spatial/temporal correlation, characterized by a few "rattling" or recurrent PT events. At long time scale, the trend of the PT correlation function may be recast with the diffusion model of reversible geminate recombination toward the power-law decay. The formation of the hydrogen bonds (HBs) for the imidazole molecules between the first and second solvation shell of imH(+) is crucial to pave the PT pathway. The above features may be understood by the flexibility of the HBs in liquid imidazole, as a stable HB network is essential for the Grotthuss mechanism.

  6. Fast Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Organic Liquids under Shock Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc; Niklasson, Anders; Manner, Virginia; McGrane, Shawn; Dattelbaum, Dana

    2013-06-01

    The responses of liquid formic acid, acrylonitrile, and nitromethane to shock compression have been studied using quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations with the self-consistent tight-binding code LATTE. Microcanonical Born-Oppenheimer trajectories with precise energy conservation were computed without relying on an iterative self-consistent field optimization of the electronic degrees of freedom at each time step via the Fast Quantum Mechanical Molecular Dynamics formalism. The input shock pressures required to initiate chemistry in our simulations agree very well with recent laser- and flyer-plate-driven shock compression experiments. On-the-fly analysis of the electronic structure of the liquids over hundreds of picoseconds after dynamic compression revealed that their reactivity is strongly correlated with the temperature and pressure dependence of their HOMO-LUMO gap.

  7. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    OpenAIRE

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan; John P Fletcher; Cameron, David

    2012-01-01

    Commercial process simulators are increasing interest in the chemical engineer education. In this paper, the use of commercial dynamic simulation software, D-SPICE® and K-Spice®, for three different chemical engineering courses is described and discussed. The courses cover the following topics: basic chemical engineering, operability and safety analysis and process control. User experiences from both teachers and students are presented. The benefits of dynamic simulation as an additional teac...

  8. A Simulation Program for Dynamic Infrared (IR) Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerb, Matthew C.; Harris, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    A free program for the simulation of dynamic infrared (IR) spectra is presented. The program simulates the spectrum of two exchanging IR peaks based on simple input parameters. Larger systems can be simulated with minor modifications. The program is available as an executable program for PCs or can be run in MATLAB on any operating system. Source…

  9. Simulations of boundary migration during recrystallization using molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Rasmus Brauner; Trautt, Z.T.; Upmanyu, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have applied an atomistic simulation methodology based on molecular dynamics to study grain boundary migration in crystalline materials, driven by the excess energy of dislocation arrangements. This method is used to simulate recrystallization in metals. The simulations reveal that the migration...

  10. Integrating a compressible multicomponent two-phase flow into an existing reactive transport simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Irina; Lagneau, Vincent; Corvisier, Jérôme

    2017-02-01

    This work aims to incorporate compressible multiphase flow into the conventional reactive transport framework using an operator splitting approach. This new approach would allow us to retain the general paradigm of the flow module independent of the geochemical processes and to model complex multiphase chemical systems, conserving the versatile structure of conventional reactive transport. The phase flow formulation is employed to minimize the number of mass conservation nonlinear equations arising from the flow module. Applying appropriate equations of state facilitated precise descriptions of the compressible multicomponent phases, their thermodynamic properties and relevant fluxes. The proposed flow coupling method was implemented in the reactive transport software HYTEC. The entire framework preserves its flexibility for further numerical developments. The verification of the coupling was achieved by modeling a problem with a self-similar solution. The simulation of a 2D CO2-injection problem demonstrates the pertinent physical results and computational efficiency of this method. The coupling method was employed for modeling injection of acid gas mixture in carbonated reservoir.

  11. Decolourisation of simulated reactive dyebath effluents by electrochemical oxidation assisted by UV light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Grimau, V; Gutiérrez, M C

    2006-01-01

    This study is focused on the optimisation of the electrochemical decolourisation of textile effluents containing reactive dyes with the aim of making feasible-technically and economically-this method at industrial scale. Coloured waters were treated in continuous at low current density, to reduce the electrical consumption. Ti/PtO(x) electrodes were used to oxidize simulated dyebaths prepared with an azo/dichlorotriazine reactive dye (C.I. Reactive Orange 4). The decolourisation yield was dependent on the dyeing electrolyte (NaCl or Na(2)SO(4)). Dyeing effluents which contained from 0.5 to 20 gl(-1) of NaCl reached a high decolourisation yield, depending on the current density, immediately after the electrochemical process. These results were improved when the effluents were stored for several hours under solar light. After the electrochemical treatment the effluents were stored in a tank and exposed under different lighting conditions: UV light, solar light and darkness. The evolution of the decolourisation versus the time of storage was reported and kinetic constants were calculated. The time of storage was significantly reduced by the application of UV light. A dye mineralization study was also carried out on a concentrated dyebath. A TOC removal of 81% was obtained when high current density was applied for a prolonged treatment with recirculation. This treatment required a high electrical consumption.

  12. Simulation of Viscous and Reactive Hypersonic Flows Behaviour in a Shock Tube Facility: TVD Schemes and Flux Limiters Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boulahia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Work performed in this study concerns mainly the analysis and the wisely use of TVD type schemes (total variation diminishing for numerical simulation of reactive flows, these schemes are first presented in scalar equation. Their extension to Euler equations for a reactive gas mixture is conducted through the approximate extended solver of Riemann problem. A comparative study of specific variants of TVD schemes has been made in the case of one-dimensional unsteady flow for an inert and reactive gas mixture, which represents the classical instance of a shock tube. The purpose of this investigation is to highlight the general behaviour (order of accuracy and performance of TVD schemes with various flux limiters for the simulation of reactive flows and in particular, to make possible the capture of the shock wave together with waves expansion for choosing the appropriate scheme to apply eventually in simulation of hypersonic viscous flow in chemical non equilibrium.

  13. Dynamic Harmonic and Reactive Power Compensation with an Adaptive Shunt Active Filter for Variable Speed Induction Motor Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhu M R; Aneesh P; Manjula G Nair; T N P Nambiar

    2014-01-01

    Variable speed drives are mostly preferred in industries, while considering energy saving, smooth control, flexible operation and fast response. On the other hand, this equipment generates dynamic harmonic distortions in source currents and draws variable reactive power demand depending on variation in load condition. These distortions propagate throughout the system and affect all the loads connected to the point of common coupling. Hence a dynamic harmonic and reactive compensator is necess...

  14. Mathematical simulation of interactions of protein molecules and prediction of their reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, K. G.; Koshlan, T. V.

    2016-10-01

    A physical model of interactions of protein molecules has been developed. The regularities of their reactivity have been studied using electrostatics methods for two histone dimers H2A-H2B and H3-H4 assembled from monomers. The formation of histone dimers from different monomers has been simulated and their ability to the formation of stable compounds has been investigated by analyzing the potential energy matrix using the condition number. The results of a simulation of the electrostatic interaction in the formation of dimers from complete amino acid sequences of selected proteins and their truncated analogs have been considered. The calculations have been performed taking into account the screening of the electrostatic charge of charged amino acids for different concentrations of the monovalent salt using the Gouy-Chapman theory.

  15. Dynamic simulation of a sodium-cooled fast reactor power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinaishin, M.A.M.

    1976-08-01

    Simulation of the dynamic behavior of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is the subject of this dissertation. The range of transients under consideration extends from a moderate transient, of the type referred to as Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS), to a transient initiated by an unexpected accident followed by reactor scram. The moderate range of transients can be simulated by a digital simulator referred to as the CRBRP ATWS simulator. Two versions of this simulator were prepared; in one, the plant controllers were not included, whereas, in the other, the controllers were incorporated. A simulator referred to as the CRBRP-DCHT simulator was constructed for studying transients due to unexpected accidents followed by reactor scram. In this simulator emphasis was placed on simulating the auxiliary heat removal system, in order to determine its capability to remove the after-shut down fission and decay heat. The transients studied using the two versions of the ATWS simulator include step and ramp reactivity perturbations, and an electrical load perturbation in the controlled plant. An uncontrolled control rod withdrawal followed by reactor scram was studied using the DCHT simulator, although the duration of this transient was restricted to 20 sec. because of computer limitations. The results agree very well with the expected physical behavior of the plant.

  16. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  17. A Modular Computer Code for Simulating Reactive Multi-Species Transport in 3-Dimensional Groundwater Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TP Clement

    1999-06-24

    RT3DV1 (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is computer code that solves the coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in three-dimensional saturated groundwater systems. RT3D is a generalized multi-species version of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) transport code, MT3D (Zheng, 1990). The current version of RT3D uses the advection and dispersion solvers from the DOD-1.5 (1997) version of MT3D. As with MT3D, RT3D also requires the groundwater flow code MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. The RT3D code was originally developed to support the contaminant transport modeling efforts at natural attenuation demonstration sites. As a research tool, RT3D has also been used to model several laboratory and pilot-scale active bioremediation experiments. The performance of RT3D has been validated by comparing the code results against various numerical and analytical solutions. The code is currently being used to model field-scale natural attenuation at multiple sites. The RT3D code is unique in that it includes an implicit reaction solver that makes the code sufficiently flexible for simulating various types of chemical and microbial reaction kinetics. RT3D V1.0 supports seven pre-programmed reaction modules that can be used to simulate different types of reactive contaminants including benzene-toluene-xylene mixtures (BTEX), and chlorinated solvents such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). In addition, RT3D has a user-defined reaction option that can be used to simulate any other types of user-specified reactive transport systems. This report describes the mathematical details of the RT3D computer code and its input/output data structure. It is assumed that the user is familiar with the basics of groundwater flow and contaminant transport mechanics. In addition, RT3D users are expected to have some experience in

  18. Effect of the Longitudinal Contact Location on Vehicle Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Burgelman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of the calculation of the longitudinal location of a wheel rail contact point on the wheelset’s motion in a vehicle dynamic simulation. All current vehicle dynamic software programs assume that the contact between wheel and rail takes place in the vertical plane through the wheelset’s rolling axis. However, when the yaw angle of the wheelset is nonzero, the contact point is situated up to 10 mm from that plane. This difference causes a difference in the yaw moment on the wheelset which is used in the vehicle dynamic simulation. To such an end, an existing analytical method to determine the longitudinal method was validated using a numerical approach. Then vehicle dynamic simulations with both the classic and the new contact location were performed, concluding that using a more accurate contact point location results in a smaller wheelset yaw angle in a vehicle dynamic simulation, although the effect is small.

  19. Application of a Static Reactive Power Compensator (STATCOM) and a Dynamic Braking Resistor (DBR) for the stability enhancement of a large wind farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, X.; Arulampalam, A.; Zhan, C.; Jenkins, N.

    2003-03-01

    A control strategy to improve the stability of a large wind farm using a Static Reactive Power Compensator (STATCOM) and Dynamic Braking Resistor (DBR) is proposed and investigated. The STATCOM supplies the reactive power demand of the wind farm dynamically in order to maintain the network voltage. The DBR is controlled by Liapunov's stability criterion to absorb the active power of the wind farm during the network fault. The performance of the STATCOM and DBR, applied to a large wind farm (60MW), is studied in PSCAD/EMTDC. The simulation results show that effective control of the STATCOM and DBR together can enhance the stability of large wind farms. (author)

  20. Amaranth peptides from simulated gastrointestinal digestion: antioxidant activity against reactive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, María C Orsini; Galleano, Mónica; Añón, María C; Tironi, Valeria A

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the capacity of simulated gastrointestinal digests or alcalase hydrolysates of protein isolates from amaranth to scavenge diverse physiologically relevant reactive species. The more active hydrolysate was obtained with the former method. Moreover, a prior alcalase treatment of the isolate followed by the same simulated gastrointestinal digestion did not improve the antioxidant capacity in any of the assays performed and even produced a negative effect under some conditions. Gastrointestinal digestion produced a strong increment in the scavenging capacity against peroxyl radicals (ORAC assay), hydroxyl radicals (ESR-OH assay), and peroxynitrites; thus decreasing the IC50 values to approximately 20, 25, and 20%, respectively, of the levels attained with the nonhydrolyzed proteins. Metal chelation (HORAC assay) also enhanced respect to isolate levels, but to a lesser extent (decreasing IC50 values to only 50%). The nitric-oxide- and superoxide-scavenging capacities of the digests were not relevant with respect to the methodologies used. The gastrointestinal digests from amaranth proteins acted against reactive species by different mechanisms, thus indicating the protein isolate to be a potential polyfunctional antioxidant ingredient.

  1. Comparison of numerical simulations of reactive transport and chemostat-like models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Haidar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to evaluate the ability of reactive transport models and their numerical implementations (such as MIN3P to simulate simple microbial transformations in conditions of chemostat or gradostat models, that are popular in microbial ecology and waste treatment ecosystems. To make this comparison, we first consider an abstract ecosystem composed of a single limiting resource and a single microbial species that are carried by advection. In a second stage, we consider another microbial species in competition for the same limiting resource. Comparing the numerical solutions of the two models, we found that the numerical accuracy of simulations of advective transport models performed with MIN3P depends on the evolution of the concentrations of the microbial species: when the state of the system is close to a non-hyperbolic equilibrium, we observe a numerical inaccuracy that may be due to the discretization method used in numerical approximations of reactive transport equations. Therefore, one has to be cautious about the predictions given by the models.

  2. Two Dynamic Discrete Choice Estimation Problems and Simulation Method Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Stern

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers two problems that frequently arise in dynamic discrete choice problems but have not received much attention with regard to simulation methods. The first problem is how to simulate unbiased simulators of probabilities conditional on past history. The second is simulating a discrete transition probability model when the underlying dependent variable is really continuous. Both methods work well relative to reasonable alternatives in the application discussed. However, in bot...

  3. Quasimolecular Dynamic Simulation for Bending Fracture of Laminar Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Recently, quasimolecular dynamics has been successfully used to simulate the deformation characteristics of actual size solid materials. In quasimolecular dynamics, which is an attempt to bridge the gap between atomistic and continuum simulations, molecules are aggregated into large units, called quasimolecules, to evaluate large scale material behavior. In this paper, a 2-dimensional numerical simulation using quasimolecular dynamics was performed to investigate laminar composite material fractures and crack propagation behavior in the uniform bending of laminar composite materials. It was verified that under bending deformation laminar composite materials deform quite differently from homogeneous materials

  4. Voltage Stability Impact of Grid-Tied Photovoltaic Systems Utilizing Dynamic Reactive Power Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omole, Adedamola

    Photovoltaic (PV) DGs can be optimized to provide reactive power support to the grid, although this feature is currently rarely utilized as most DG systems are designed to operate with unity power factor and supply real power only to the grid. In this work, the voltage stability of a power system embedded with PV DG is examined in the context of the high reactive power requirement after a voltage sag or fault. A real-time dynamic multi-function power controller that enables renewable source PV DGs to provide the reactive power support necessary to maintain the voltage stability of the microgrid, and consequently, the wider power system is proposed. The loadability limit necessary to maintain the voltage stability of an interconnected microgrid is determined by using bifurcation analysis to test for the singularity of the network Jacobian and load differential equations with and without the contribution of the DG. The maximum and minimum real and reactive power support permissible from the DG is obtained from the loadability limit and used as the limiting factors in controlling the real and reactive power contribution from the PV source. The designed controller regulates the voltage output based on instantaneous power theory at the point-of-common coupling (PCC) while the reactive power supply is controlled by means of the power factor and reactive current droop method. The control method is implemented in a modified IEEE 13-bus test feeder system using PSCADRTM power system analysis software and is applied to the model of a Tampa ElectricRTM PV installation at Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, FL. This dissertation accomplishes the systematic analysis of the voltage impact of a PV DG-embedded power distribution system. The method employed in this work bases the contribution of the PV resource on the voltage stability margins of the microgrid rather than the commonly used loss-of-load probability (LOLP) and effective load-carrying capability (ELCC) measures. The results of

  5. Dynamic fault simulation of wind turbines using commercial simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torsten; Eek, Jarle; Uski, Sanna

    2005-01-01

    . The deviations and the reasons for the deviations between the tools are stated. The simulation models are imple-mented using the built-in library components of the simulation tools with exception of the mechanical drive-train model, which had to be user-modeled in PowerFactory and PSS/E.......This paper compares the commercial simulation tools: PSCAD/EMTDC, PowerFactory, SIMPOW and PSS/E for analysing fault sequences defined in the Danish grid code requirements for wind turbines connected to a voltage level below 100 kV. Both symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults are analysed...

  6. Kinematics and dynamics analysis of a novel serial-parallel dynamic simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Lian Dong; Yu, Jingjing [Parallel Robot and Mechatronic System Laboratory of Hebei Province, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei (China)

    2016-11-15

    A serial-parallel dynamics simulator based on serial-parallel manipulator is proposed. According to the dynamics simulator motion requirement, the proposed serial-parallel dynamics simulator formed by 3-RRS (active revolute joint-revolute joint-spherical joint) and 3-SPR (Spherical joint-active prismatic joint-revolute joint) PMs adopts the outer and inner layout. By integrating the kinematics, constraint and coupling information of the 3-RRS and 3-SPR PMs into the serial-parallel manipulator, the inverse Jacobian matrix, velocity, and acceleration of the serial-parallel dynamics simulator are studied. Based on the principle of virtual work and the kinematics model, the inverse dynamic model is established. Finally, the workspace of the (3-RRS)+(3-SPR) dynamics simulator is constructed.

  7. Drop Dynamics and Speciation in Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes by Reactive Scavenging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arne J. Pearlstein; Alexander Scheeline

    2002-08-30

    Computational and experimental studies of the motion and dynamics of liquid drops in gas flows were conducted with relevance to reactive scavenging of metals from atomized liquid waste. Navier-Stoke's computations of deformable drops revealed a range of conditions from which prolate drops are expected, and showed how frajectiones of deformable drops undergoing deceleration can be computed. Experimental work focused on development of emission fluorescence, and scattering diagnostics. The instrument developed was used to image drop shapes, soot, and nonaxisymmetric departures from steady flow in a 22kw combustor

  8. Melt focusing and CO2 extraction at mid-ocean ridges: simulations of reactive two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, T.; Katz, R. F.; Hirschmann, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    The deep CO2 cycle is the result of fluxes between near-surface and mantle reservoirs. Outgassing from mid-ocean ridges is one of the primary fluxes of CO2 from the asthenosphere into the ocean-atmosphere reservoir. Focusing of partial melt to the ridge axis crucially controls this flux. However, the role of volatiles, in particular CO2 and H2O, on melt transport processes beneath ridges remains poorly understood. We investigate this transport using numerical simulations of two-phase, multi-component magma/mantle dynamics. The phases are solid mantle and liquid magma; the components are dunite, MORB, hydrated basalt, and carbonated basalt. These effective components capture accepted features of mantle melting with volatiles. The fluid-dynamical model is McKenzie's formulation [1], while melting and reactive transport use the R_DMC method [2,3]. Our results indicate that volatiles cause channelized melt transport, which leads to significant variability in volume and composition of focused melt. The volatile-induced expansion of the melting regime at depth, however, has no influence on melt focusing; distal volatile-rich melts are not focused to the axis. Up to 50% of these melts are instead emplaced along the oceanic LAB. There, crystallization of accumulated melt leads to enrichment of CO2 and H2O in the deep lithosphere, which has implications for LAB rheology and volatile recycling by subduction. Results from a suite of simulations, constrained by catalogued observational data [4,5,6] enable predictions of global MOR CO2 output. By combining observational constraints with self-consistent numerical simulations we obtain a range of CO2 output from the global ridge system of 28-110 Mt CO2/yr, corresponding to mean CO2 contents of 50-200 ppm in the mantle. REFERENCES[1] McKenzie (1984), doi:10.1093/petrology/25.3.713.[2] Rudge, Bercovici & Spiegelman (2011), doi:10.1111/j.1365-246X.2010.04870.x.[3] Keller & Katz (2016), doi:10.1093/petrology/egw030.[4] Dalton

  9. Development Of Dynamic Probabilistic Safety Assessment: The Accident Dynamic Simulator (ADS) Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.H.; Mosleh, A.; Dang, V.N

    2003-03-01

    The development of a dynamic methodology for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) addresses the complex interactions between the behaviour of technical systems and personnel response in the evolution of accident scenarios. This paper introduces the discrete dynamic event tree, a framework for dynamic PSA, and its implementation in the Accident Dynamic Simulator (ADS) tool. Dynamic event tree tools generate and quantify accident scenarios through coupled simulation models of the plant physical processes, its automatic systems, the equipment reliability, and the human response. The current research on the framework, the ADS tool, and on Human Reliability Analysis issues within dynamic PSA, is discussed. (author)

  10. Simulation Of Groundwater Flow And Reactive Transport In A Tidally Influenced Estuarine Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, X.; Barry, D. A.; Enot, P.; Li, L.

    2003-12-01

    Existing groundwater monitoring data from an estuarine sandy aquifer situated below an old industrial landfill (Scotland) showed that (1) leaching from sulphurous waste located in the landfill has generated an acidic plume; (2) associated with the low pH, metal contaminants within the acidic plume are slowly migrating towards the estuary; and (3) the groundwater fluctuations are influenced by the tidal oscillations of the estuary. In order to test the possible influence of rainfall/precipitation, tidal fluctuation and salt water intrusion on the groundwater flow and reactive chemical transport, a model for multi-component reactive transport with density dependent flow was developed and applied to the site. The groundwater flow and chemical transport in this coastal aquifer were simulated. Both the field observations and numerical simulations showed that the tidal influence on the groundwater table fluctuations was great even far inland. This influence could not be explained by standard analytical solutions. It is expected that the local morphology and hydro-geological conditions cause this behaviour. The simulation performed with a conservative tracer showed that it took much less time to reach the estuary than the acidic plume originating from the landfill, with the rate of movement influenced by recharge and tidal oscillations. Due to buffering reactions occurring in the geochemical system during the migration of the contaminants (ion exchange, mineral precipitation/dissolution and oxidation/reduction), the movement of the acidic plume and associated metals is strongly retarded. Sharp differences are apparent in chemical concentrations, pH and pe, between the plume location and unaffected areas.

  11. Rare event simulation for dynamic fault trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijters, Enno Jozef Johannes; Reijsbergen, D.P.; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    Fault trees (FT) are a popular industrial method for reliability engineering, for which Monte Carlo simulation is an important technique to estimate common dependability metrics, such as the system reliability and availability. A severe drawback of Monte Carlo simulation is that the number of

  12. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Takahashi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD simulations are increasingly being used to analyze the behaviors of biological systems. When appropriately used, CGMD can simulate the behaviors of molecular systems several hundred times faster than elaborate all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with similar accuracy. CGMD parameters for lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and some artificial substances such as carbon nanotubes have been suggested. Here we briefly discuss a method for CGMD system configuration and the types of analysis and perturbations that can be performed with CGMD simulations. We also describe specific examples to show how CGMD simulations have been applied to various situations, and then describe experimental results that were used to validate the simulation results. CGMD simulations are applicable to resolving problems for various biological systems.

  13. Mosquito population dynamics from cellular automata-based simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafarina, Inna; Sadikin, Rifki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative model for simulating mosquito-vector population dynamics. The simulation consist of two stages: demography and dispersal dynamics. For demography simulation, we follow the existing model for modeling a mosquito life cycles. Moreover, we use cellular automata-based model for simulating dispersal of the vector. In simulation, each individual vector is able to move to other grid based on a random walk. Our model is also capable to represent immunity factor for each grid. We simulate the model to evaluate its correctness. Based on the simulations, we can conclude that our model is correct. However, our model need to be improved to find a realistic parameters to match real data.

  14. The effect of aging on the dynamics of reactive and proactive cognitive control of response interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A prime-target interference task was used to investigate the effects of cognitive aging on reactive and proactive control in which frequency confounds and feature repetitions were eliminated from the cognitive control measures. We used distributional analyses to explore the dynamics of the two control functions by distinguishing the strength of incorrect response capture and the efficiency of suppression control. For reactive control, within-trial conflict control and between-trial conflict adaption were analyzed. The statistical analysis showed that there were no reliable between-trial conflict adaption effects for both young and older adults. For within-trial conflict control, the results revealed that older adults showed larger interference effects on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that the decline mainly stemmed from inefficient suppression rather than from stronger incorrect responses. For proactive control, older adults showed comparable proactive conflict resolution than young adults on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed older adults were as effective as younger adults in adjusting their responses to minimize automatic response capture and actively suppress the direct response activation based on congruency proportion information. The results suggest that older adults were less proficient at suppressing interference after conflict was detected but can anticipate and prevent inference in response to congruency proportion manipulation. The results challenge earlier views that older adults have selective deficits in proactive control but are spared in reactive control.

  15. Unified Nonlinear Flight Dynamics and Aeroelastic Simulator Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. (ZONA) proposes a R&D effort to develop a Unified Nonlinear Flight Dynamics and Aeroelastic Simulator (UNFDAS) Tool that will combine...

  16. The framework for simulation of dynamics of mechanical aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Ivankov, Petr R.; Ivankov, Nikolay P.

    2007-01-01

    A framework for simulation of dynamics of mechanical aggregates has been developed. This framework enables us to build model of aggregate from models of its parts. Framework is a part of universal framework for science and engineering.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and XAFS (MD-XAFS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenter, Gregory K.; Fulton, John L.

    2017-01-20

    MD-XAFS (Molecular Dynamics X-ray Adsorption Fine Structure) makes the connection between simulation techniques that generate an ensemble of molecular configurations and the direct signal observed from X-ray measurement.

  18. Dynamical simulations of strongly correlated electron materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Joel; Barros, Kipton; Batista, Cristian; Chern, Gia-Wei; Kotliar, Gabriel

    We present a formulation of quantum molecular dynamics that includes electron correlation effects via the Gutzwiller method. Our new scheme enables the study of the dynamical behavior of atoms and molecules with strong electron interactions. The Gutzwiller approach goes beyond the conventional mean-field treatment of the intra-atomic electron repulsion and captures crucial correlation effects such as band narrowing and electron localization. We use Gutzwiller quantum molecular dynamics to investigate the Mott transition in the liquid phase of a single-band metal and uncover intriguing structural and transport properties of the atoms.

  19. Reactive molecular dynamics of the initial oxidation stages of Ni111 in pure water: effect of an applied electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assowe, O; Politano, O; Vignal, V; Arnoux, P; Diawara, B; Verners, O; van Duin, A C T

    2012-12-01

    Corrosion processes occurring in aqueous solutions are critically dependent upon the interaction between the metal electrode and the solvent. In this work, the interaction of a nickel substrate with water molecules has been investigated using reactive force field (ReaxFF) molecular dynamics simulations. This approach was originally developed by van Duin and co-workers to study hydrocarbon chemistry and the catalytic properties of organic compounds. To our knowledge, this method has not previously been used to study the corrosion of nickel. In this work, we studied the interaction of 480 molecules of water (ρ = 0.99 g·cm(-3)) with Ni(111) surfaces at 300 K. The results showed that a water "bilayer" was adsorbed on the nickel surface. In the absence of an applied electric field, no dissociation of water was observed. However, the nickel atoms at the surface were charged positively, whereas the first water layer was charged negatively, indicating the formation of an electric double layer. To study the corrosion of nickel in pure water, we introduced an external electric field between the metal and the solution. The electric field intensity varied between 10 and 20 MeV/cm. The presence of this electric field led to oxidation of the metal surface. The structural and morphological differences associated with the growth of this oxide film in the presence of the electric field were evaluated. The simulated atomic trajectories were used to analyze the atomic displacement during the reactive process. The growth of the oxide scale on the nickel surface was primarily due to the movement of anions toward the interior of the metal substrate and the migration of nickel toward the free surface. We found that increasing the electric field intensity sped up the corrosion of nickel. The results also showed that the oxide film thickness increased linearly with increasing electric field intensity.

  20. Visual Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Zhangjiuhe Diversion Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Denghua; LIU Jianmin; XIONG Kaizhi; FU Jinqiang

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of visualizing the real-time simulation calculation of water delivery system (WDS), a structural drawing-oriented (SDO) simulation technique was presented, and applied to Zhangjiuhe Diversion Project, which is a long-distance water delivery system constructed for drawing water from the Zhangjiuhe River to Kunming city. Taking SIMULINK software as simulating platform, the technique established a visual dynamic simulation model for the system. The simulation procedure of the system was simplified, and the efficiency of modeling was also enhanced according to the modularization and reutilization of the simulation program. Furthermore, a selfoptimization model was presented. Based on the digital simulation models, the on line controlled optimization link was added, and the input data can be continually optimized according to the feedback information of simulating output. The system was thus optimized automatically. Built upon MATLAB software, simulation optimization of the Zhangjiuhe Diversion Project was achieved, which provides a new way for the research of optimal operation of WDS.

  1. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elber, Ron [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-02-14

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances.

  2. Neutron Star Crust and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J; Schneider, A; Berry, D K

    2011-01-01

    In this book chapter we review plasma crystals in the laboratory, in the interior of white dwarf stars, and in the crust of neutron stars. We describe a molecular dynamics formalism and show results for many neutron star crust properties including phase separation upon freezing, diffusion, breaking strain, shear viscosity and dynamics response of nuclear pasta. We end with a summary and discuss open questions and challenges for the future.

  3. Electrocoagulation of simulated reactive dyebath effluent with aluminum and stainless steel electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Kabdaşli, Işik; Vardar, Burcu; Tünay, Olcay

    2009-05-30

    Reactive dyebath effluents are ideal candidates for electrocoagulation due to their intensive color, medium strength, recalcitrant COD and high electrolyte (NaCl) content. The present study focused on the treatability of simulated reactive dyebath effluent (COD(o)=300 mg/L; color in terms of absorbance values A(o,436)=0.532 cm(-1), A(o,525)=0.693 cm(-1) and A(o,620)=0.808 cm(-1)) employing electrocoagulation with aluminum and stainless steel electrodes. Optimization of critical operating parameters such as initial pH (pH(o) 3-11), applied current density (J(c)=22-87 mA/cm(2)) and electrolyte type (NaCl or Na(2)SO(4)) improved the overall treatment efficiencies resulting in effective decolorization (99% using stainless steel electrodes after 60 min, 95% using aluminum electrodes after 90 min electrocoagulation) and COD abatement (93% with stainless steel electrodes after 60 min, 86% with aluminum electrodes after 90 min of reaction time). Optimum electrocoagulation conditions were established as pH(o) 5 and J(c)=22 mA/cm(2) for both electrode materials. The COD and color removal efficiencies also depended on the electrolyte type. No in situ, surplus adsorbable organically bound halogens (AOX) formation associated with the use of NaCl as the electrolyte during electrocoagulation was detected. An economical evaluation was also carried out within the frame of the study. It was demonstrated that electrocoagulation of reactive dyebath effluent with aluminum and stainless steel electrodes was a considerably less electrical energy-intensive, alternative treatment method as compared with advanced chemical oxidation techniques.

  4. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehere, Prajwalini; Han, Qian; Lemkul, Justin A; Vavricka, Christopher J; Robinson, Howard; Bevan, David R; Li, Jianyong

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using α-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  5. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  6. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  7. Simulating food web dynamics along a gradient: quantifying human influence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Jordán

    Full Text Available Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo. The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities along the river. Along the river, the relative importance of grazers, filterers and shredders decreases with increasing disturbance downstream, while predators become more dominant in governing eco-dynamics. Human activity led to increased turbidity and sedimentation which adversely impacts primary productivity. Since the main difference between the study sites was not the composition of the food webs (structure is quite similar but the strengths of interactions and the abundance of the trophic groups, a dynamical simulation approach seemed to be useful to better explain human influence. In the pristine river (study site 1, when comparing a structural version of our model with the dynamical model we found that structurally central groups such as omnivores and carnivores were not the most important ones dynamically. Instead, primary consumers such as invertebrate grazers and shredders generated a greater dynamical response. Based on the dynamically most important groups, bottom-up control is replaced by the predominant top-down control regime as distance downstream and human disturbance increased. An important finding, potentially explaining the poor structure to dynamics relationship, is that indirect effects are at least as important as direct ones during the simulations. We suggest that our approach and this simulation framework could serve systems-based conservation efforts. Quantitative indicators on the relative importance of trophic groups and the mechanistic modeling

  8. Simulating food web dynamics along a gradient: quantifying human influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán, Ferenc; Gjata, Nerta; Mei, Shu; Yule, Catherine M

    2012-01-01

    Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo). The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities) along the river. Along the river, the relative importance of grazers, filterers and shredders decreases with increasing disturbance downstream, while predators become more dominant in governing eco-dynamics. Human activity led to increased turbidity and sedimentation which adversely impacts primary productivity. Since the main difference between the study sites was not the composition of the food webs (structure is quite similar) but the strengths of interactions and the abundance of the trophic groups, a dynamical simulation approach seemed to be useful to better explain human influence. In the pristine river (study site 1), when comparing a structural version of our model with the dynamical model we found that structurally central groups such as omnivores and carnivores were not the most important ones dynamically. Instead, primary consumers such as invertebrate grazers and shredders generated a greater dynamical response. Based on the dynamically most important groups, bottom-up control is replaced by the predominant top-down control regime as distance downstream and human disturbance increased. An important finding, potentially explaining the poor structure to dynamics relationship, is that indirect effects are at least as important as direct ones during the simulations. We suggest that our approach and this simulation framework could serve systems-based conservation efforts. Quantitative indicators on the relative importance of trophic groups and the mechanistic modeling of eco-dynamics

  9. Comparison of OH reactivity instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    OH reactivity measurement has become an important measurement to constrain the total OH loss frequency in field experiments. Different techniques have been developed by various groups. They can be based on flow-tube or pump and probe techniques, which include direct OH detection by fluorescence, or on a comparative method, in which the OH loss of a reference species competes with the OH loss of trace gases in the sampled air. In order to ensure that these techniques deliver equivalent results, a comparison exercise was performed under controlled conditions. Nine OH reactivity instruments measured together in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (volume 270 m3) during ten daylong experiments in October 2015 at ambient temperature (5 to 10° C) and pressure (990-1010 hPa). The chemical complexity of air mixtures in these experiments varied from CO in pure synthetic air to emissions from real plants and VOC/NOx mixtures representative of urban atmospheres. Potential differences between measurements were systematically investigated by changing the amount of reactants (including isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes), water vapour, and nitrogen oxides. Some of the experiments also included the oxidation of reactants with ozone or hydroxyl radicals, in order to elaborate, if the presence of oxidation products leads to systematic differences between measurements of different instruments. Here we present first results of this comparison exercise.

  10. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  11. Simulation of capillary flow with a dynamic contact angle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mourik, S; Veldman, AEP; Dreyer, ME

    2005-01-01

    A number of theoretical and empirical dynamic contact angle (DCA) models have been tested in a numerical simulation of liquid reorientation in microgravity for which experimental validation data are available. It is observed that the DCA can have a large influence on liquid dynamics in microgravity.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of a polysorbate 80 micelle in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amani, Amir; York, Peter; de Waard, Hans; Anwar, Jamshed

    2011-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of a single molecule of the nonionic surfactant polysorbate 80 (POE (20) sorbitan monooleate; Tween 80 (R)) as well as a micelle comprising sixty molecules of polysorbate 80 in water have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. In its free state in water the po

  13. Simulating market dynamics : Interactions between consumer psychology and social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, MA; Jager, W

    2003-01-01

    Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. in a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation model

  14. Effect of the Longitudinal Contact Location on Vehicle Dynamics Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgelman, N.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of the calculation of the longitudinal location of a wheel rail contact point on the wheelset’s motion in a vehicle dynamic simulation. All current vehicle dynamic software programs assume that the contact between wheel and rail takes place in the vertical plane th

  15. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete “Verlet” algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence...

  16. A Process for Comparing Dynamics of Distributed Space Systems Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cures, Edwin Z.; Jackson, Albert A.; Morris, Jeffery C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a process that was developed for comparing the primary orbital dynamics behavior between space systems distributed simulations. This process is used to characterize and understand the fundamental fidelities and compatibilities of the modeling of orbital dynamics between spacecraft simulations. This is required for high-latency distributed simulations such as NASA s Integrated Mission Simulation and must be understood when reporting results from simulation executions. This paper presents 10 principal comparison tests along with their rationale and examples of the results. The Integrated Mission Simulation (IMSim) (formerly know as the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)) is a NASA research and development project focusing on the technologies and processes that are related to the collaborative simulation of complex space systems involved in the exploration of our solar system. Currently, the NASA centers that are actively participating in the IMSim project are the Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Kennedy Space Center, the Langley Research Center and the Marshall Space Flight Center. In concept, each center participating in IMSim has its own set of simulation models and environment(s). These simulation tools are used to build the various simulation products that are used for scientific investigation, engineering analysis, system design, training, planning, operations and more. Working individually, these production simulations provide important data to various NASA projects.

  17. A parallelization scheme to simulate reactive transport in the subsurface environment with OGS#IPhreeqc

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Beyer, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Jang, E.; Kolditz, O.; Naumov, D.; Kalbacher, T.

    2015-03-01

    This technical paper presents an efficient and performance-oriented method to model reactive mass transport processes in environmental and geotechnical subsurface systems. The open source scientific software packages OpenGeoSys and IPhreeqc have been coupled, to combine their individual strengths and features to simulate thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical coupled processes in porous and fractured media with simultaneous consideration of aqueous geochemical reactions. Furthermore, a flexible parallelization scheme using MPI (Message Passing Interface) grouping techniques has been implemented, which allows an optimized allocation of computer resources for the node-wise calculation of chemical reactions on the one hand, and the underlying processes such as for groundwater flow or solute transport on the other hand. The coupling interface and parallelization scheme have been tested and verified in terms of precision and performance.

  18. Solvent effects on photodegradation of CI Reactive Orange 16 by simulated solar light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijin Dušan Ž.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic solvents may appear in wastewaters and other industrial waste streams containing dyes, therefore, their photodegradation catalyzed by TiO2 should be investigated. Solvent effect on photodegradation of CI Reactive Orange 16 has been studied using simulated solar light and P-25 TiO2. Methyl, ethyl and isopropyl alcohol as well as acetone were used as solvents. Photodegradation reaction was faster in methyl than in ethyl alcohol while in water was the slowest. RO16 photodegradation efficiency and reaction rate decreased in the presence of small concentration of ethanol. Higher photodegradation efficiency was observed for higher ethanol concentration. For acetone, photodegradation decreased as concentration of acetone increased. It seems that protic solvents at higher concentrations promote reaction, while at low concentrations slow down reaction. Aprotic solvents slow down reaction.

  19. First principle basis of the direct numerical simulation for turbulence of inert and reactive gases

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuge, S

    1997-01-01

    An open question of whether phenomenological fluid equations to be used for direct numerical simulation of turbulence are warranted on `first principles' is addressed, and the problem is posed using Klimontovich microscopic density to replace the Boltzmann function of the classical statistical mechanics. For inert monatomic gases, it is shown that all the gasdynamic equations, namely, the three conservation equations plus the Navier-Stokes stress law and the Fourier heat conduction law are retrieved as governing instantaneous quantities, without having recourse to any concepts of averaging or statistical equilibrium. For reactive gases, however, the Arrhenius reaction rate law written in terms of the fluctuating temperature is not justified, reflecting the fact that this rate law hinges crucially on these concepts.

  20. A parallelization scheme to simulate reactive transport in the subsurface environment with OGS#IPhreeqc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. He

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This technical paper presents an efficient and performance-oriented method to model reactive mass transport processes in environmental and geotechnical subsurface systems. The open source scientific software packages OpenGeoSys and IPhreeqc have been coupled, to combine their individual strengths and features to simulate thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical coupled processes in porous and fractured media with simultaneous consideration of aqueous geochemical reactions. Furthermore, a flexible parallelization scheme using MPI (Message Passing Interface grouping techniques has been implemented, which allows an optimized allocation of computer resources for the node-wise calculation of chemical reactions on the one hand, and the underlying processes such as for groundwater flow or solute transport on the other hand. The coupling interface and parallelization scheme have been tested and verified in terms of precision and performance.

  1. N-body simulations in modified Newtonian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipoti, C.; Londrillo, P.; Ciotti, L.

    2011-01-01

    We describe some results obtained with N-MODY, a code for N-body simulations of collisionless stellar systems in modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). We found that a few fundamental dynamical processes are profoundly different in MOND and in Newtonian gravity with dark matter. In particular, violent relaxation, phase mixing and galaxy merging take significantly longer in MOND than in Newtonian gravity, while dynamical friction is more effective in a MOND system than in an equivalent Newtonian system with dark matter.

  2. Active site modeling in copper azurin molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzuti, B; Swart, M; Sportelli, L; Guzzi, R

    2004-01-01

    Active site modeling in molecular dynamics simulations is investigated for the reduced state of copper azurin. Five simulation runs (5 ns each) were performed at room temperature to study the consequences of a mixed electrostatic/constrained modeling for the coordination between the metal and the po

  3. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilie, I.M.; Otter, den W.K.; Briels, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assem

  4. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilie, Ioana Mariuca; den Otter, Wouter K.; Briels, Willem J.

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the

  5. Determining Equilibrium Constants for Dimerization Reactions from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Djurre H.; Schafer, Lars V.; De Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Berendsen, Herman J. C.; Grubmueller, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices c

  6. The use of system dynamics for EROI simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlason, Reynir Smari

    to construct a systems dynamics model to represent a geothermal power plant and calculate the EROI3,i. The benefits of such models are their simplicity, and simulation power. The system simulated is adapted from Atlason et al. (2013) where the EROI for the Nesjavellir geothermal power plant was calculated...

  7. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Turbulent Reactive Plume on a Parallel Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Andrew W.; Riley, James J.

    1996-12-01

    A computational algorithm is described for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a reactive plume in spatially evolving grid turbulence. The algorithm uses sixth-order compact differencing in conjunction with a fifth-order compact boundary scheme which has been developed and found to be stable. A compact filtering method is discussed as a means of stabilizing calculations where the viscous/diffusive terms are differenced in their conservative form. This approach serves as an alternative to nonconservative differencing, previously advocated as a means of damping the 2δ waves. In numerically solving the low Mach number equations the time derivative of the density field in the pressure Poisson equation was found to be the most destabilizing part of the calculation. Even-ordered finite difference approximations to this derivative were found to be more stable (allow for larger density gradients) than odd-ordered approximations. Turbulence at the inlet boundary is generated by scanning through an existing three-dimensional field of fully developed turbulence. In scanning through the inlet field, it was found that a high order interpolation, e.g., cubic-spline interpolation, is necessary in order to provide continuous velocity derivatives. Regarding pressure, a Neumann inlet condition combined with a Dirichlet outlet condition was found to work well. The chemistry follows the single-step, irreversible, global reaction: Fuel + ( r) Oxidizer → (1 + r)Product + Heat, with parameters chosen to match experimental data as far as allowed by resolution constraints. Simulation results are presented for four different cases in order to examine the effects of heat release, Damköhler number, and Arrhenius kinetics on the flow physics. Statistical data from the DNS are compared to theory and wind tunnel data and found in reasonable agreement with regard to growth of turbulent length scales, decay of turbulent kinetic energy, decay of centerline scalar concentration, decrease in

  8. Dynamic Simulation of Batch Photocatalytic Reactor (BPR) for Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suman

    2012-08-01

    Reactive dyes discharged from dyehouse causes a serious environmental problem. UV/TiO2 photocatalysis has been employed effectively for these organic dyes removal from dye-house effluent. This process produces less amount of non-toxic final product. In this paper a photocatalytic reactor has been designed for Reactive red 198 (RR198) removal from aqueous solution. The reactor is operating in batch mode. After each batch, TiO2 catalyst has been separated and recycled in the next batch. Mathematical model equation of this batch photocatalytic reactor (BPR) has been developed considering Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics. Simulation of BPR has been carried out using fourth order Runge-Kutta (RK) method and fifth order RK method (Butcher method). This simulation results can be used to develop an automatic photocatlytic reactor for industrial wastewater treatment. Catalyst activity decay and its effect on each batch have been incorporated in this model.

  9. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to the basic theory of fluid mechanics and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical computation. Methods of scientific computing are introduced alongside with theoretical analysis and MATLAB® codes are presented and discussed for a broad range of topics: from interfacial shapes in hydrostatics, to vortex dynamics, to viscous flow, to turbulent flow, to panel methods for flow past airfoils. The third edition includes new topics, additional examples, solved and unsolved problems, and revised images. It adds more computational algorithms and MATLAB programs. It also incorporates discussion of the latest version of the fluid dynamics software library FDLIB, which is freely available online. FDLIB offers an extensive range of computer codes that demonstrate the implementation of elementary and advanced algorithms and provide an invaluable resource for research, teaching, classroom instruction, and self-study. This ...

  10. Preparation and Dynamic Tensile Behavior of C200 Green Reactive Powder Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yunsheng; SUN Wei; LIU Sifeng; JIAO Chujie; LAI Jianzhong

    2006-01-01

    A new type of green reactive powder concrete (GRPC) with compressive strength of 200 MPa is prepared by utilizing composite mineral admixtures,natural fine aggregates,and short and fine steel fibers.The quasi-static mechanical properties (mechanical strength,toughness,fracture energy and interracial bonding strength) of GRPC specimens,cured in three different types of regimes,are investigated.The experimental results show that the mechanical properties of the C200 GRPC made with the powder binders that is composed of 40% of Portland cement,25% of ultra fine slag,25% of ultra fine fly ash and 10% of silica fume are better than the others'.The corresponding compressive strength,flexural strength and fracture energy are more than 200 MPa,and 30 000 J/m2 respectively.The dynamic tensile behavior of the C200 GRPC is also investigated through the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) according to the spalling phenomenon.The dynamic testing results demonstrate that strain rate has an important effect on the dynamic tensile behavior of GRPC.With the increase of strain rate,its peak stress and relevant strain increase.The GRPC exhibits an excellent strain ratio stiffening effect under the dynamic tensile Ioad with high strain ratio,resulting in a significant change of the fracture pattern.

  11. Generator dynamics in aeroelastic analysis and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben J.; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Iov, F.

    2003-01-01

    This report contains a description of a dynamic model for a doubly-fed induction generator. The model has physical input parameters (voltage, resistance, reactance etc.) and can be used to calculate rotor and stator currents, hence active and reactivepower. A perturbation method has been used...... to reduce the original generator model equations to a set of equations which can be solved with the same time steps as a typical aeroelastic code. The method is used to separate the fast transients of the modelfrom the slow variations and deduce a reduced order expression for the slow part. Dynamic effects...

  12. Long-term dynamics simulation: Modeling requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morched, A.S.; Kar, P.K.; Rogers, G.J.; Morison, G.K. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1989-12-01

    This report details the required performance and modelling capabilities of a computer program intended for the study of the long term dynamics of power systems. Following a general introduction which outlines the need for long term dynamic studies, the modelling requirements for the conduct of such studies is discussed in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on models for system elements not normally modelled in power system stability programs, which will have a significant impact in the long term time frame of minutes to hours following the initiating disturbance. The report concludes with a discussion of the special computational and programming requirements for a long term stability program. 43 refs., 36 figs.

  13. Multiscale mathematical modeling and simulation of cellular dynamical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions among molecules and cells at different spatiotemporal scales. Mathematical modeling and simulation is expected to provide clear understanding and precise description of multiscaleness in tissue homeostasis under systems perspective. We introduce a stochastic process-based description of multiscale dynamics. Agent-based modeling as a framework of multiscale modeling to achieve consistent integration of definitive subsystems is proposed. A newly developed algorithm that particularly aims to perform stochastic simulations of cellular dynamical process is introduced. Finally we review applications of multiscale modeling and quantitative study to important aspects of epidermal and epithelial homeostasis.

  14. An attempt toward the generalized Langevin dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Kim

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An attempt to generalize the Langevin dynamics simulation method is presented based on the generalized Langevin theory of liquids, in which the dynamics of both solute and solvent is treated by the generalized Langevin equations, but the integration of the equation of motion of solute is made in the manner similar to the ordinary molecular dynamics simulation with discretized time steps along a trajectory. A preliminary result is derived based on an assumption of the uniform solvent density. The result is regarded to be a microscopic generalization of the phenomenological Langevin theory for the harmonic oscillator immersed in a continuum solvent developed by Wang and Uhlenbeck.

  15. Modular simulation of reefer container dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kresten Kjær; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The amount of food transported long distances in reefer containers is constantly increasing and so is the cost per mile because of rising fuel prices. One way to reduce the cost is to minimize the energy consumed by reefer containers through a better controller but in order to achieve this a fast...... and flexible simulation model is needed for controller development. The simulation model may also be used for developing fault diagnosis methods for the reefer container and thereby further lowering costs by reducing the amount of functioning spare parts that is replaced and by providing early warning...... that ensures numerical stability and that the error is bounded using a minimum of calculations. The reefer container model is simulated using both ode15s and the proposed method both in multi-rate and monolithic configurations. The results are analyzed and compared with respect to speed and accuracy....

  16. Dynamic modeling and simulation of power transformer maintenance costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Olga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the dynamic model of maintenance costs of the power transformer functional components. Reliability is modeled combining the exponential and Weibull's distribution. The simulation was performed with the aim of corrective maintenance and installation of the continuous monitoring system of the most critical components. Simulation Dynamic System (SDS method and VENSIM PLE software was used to simulate the cost. In this way, significant savings in maintenance costs will be achieved with a small initial investment. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41025 i br. OI 171007

  17. Reactive transport simulations of the evolution of a cementitious repository in clay-rich host rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosakowski, Georg; Berner, Urs; Kulik, Dmitrii A.

    2010-05-01

    In Switzerland, the deep geological disposal in clay-rich rocks is foreseen not only for high-level radioactive waste, but also for intermediate-level (ILW) and low-level (LLW) radioactive waste. Typically, ILW and LLW repositories contain huge amounts of cementitious materials used for waste conditioning, confinement, and as backfill for the emplacement caverns. We are investigating the interactions of such a repository with the surrounding clay rocks and with other clay-rich materials such as sand/bentonite mixtures that are foreseen for backfilling the access tunnels. With the help of a numerical reactive transport model, we are comparing the evolution of cement/clay interfaces for different geochemical and transport conditions. In this work, the reactive transport of chemical components is simulated with the multi-component reactive transport code OpenGeoSys-GEM. It employs the sequential non-iterative approach to couple the mass transport code OpenGeoSys (http://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=18345) with the GEMIPM2K (http://gems.web.psi.ch/) code for thermodynamic modeling of aquatic geochemical systems which is using the Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM) method. Details regarding code development and verification can be found in Shao et al. (2009). The mineral composition and the pore solution of a CEM I 52.5 N HTS hydrated cement as described by Lothenbach & Wieland (2006) are used as an initial state of the cement compartment. The setup is based on the most recent CEMDATA07 thermodynamic database which includes several ideal solid solutions for hydrated cement minerals and is consistent with the Nagra/PSI thermodynamic database 01/01. The smectite/montmorillonite model includes cation exchange processes and amphotheric≡SOH sites and was calibrated on the basis of data by Bradbury & Baeyens (2002). In other reactive transport codes based on the Law of Mass Action (LMA) for solving geochemical equilibria, cation exchange processes are usually calculated assuming

  18. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    . But these models struggle to represent processes that are localized in space and time or involve the transport of material through a crowded environment. A novel class of mesoscopic simulation techniques are now able to span length and time scales from nanometers to microns for hundreds of microseconds, and may......-based simulation techniques cannot capture such a broad range. Consequently, at long length scales, models have often been of the Mass Action variety, in which molecular constituents are represented by density fields that vary continuously in space and time, rather than involving discrete molecules...

  19. Simulation of dynamic behavior in bubbling fluidization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Both the behavior of bubbles in the distributor with several orifices and the sensitive dependence of bubbling fluidization on initial condition have been simulated by particle-motion-resolved discrete model in which the gas flow is obtained by solving the Navier-Stokes equation including two-phase interaction, and the motion of solid phase is obtained by decomposing the motion of each particle into collision process and suspension process. Compared with the pseudo-fluid models and previous discrete models, this model is authentic and can be widely used for simulating bubbling fluidization.

  20. Topology in dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Florian

    2012-08-20

    Lattice simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field theory which describes the interaction between quarks and gluons, have reached a point were contact to experimental data can be made. The underlying mechanisms, like chiral symmetry breaking or the confinement of quarks, are however still not understood. This thesis focuses on topological structures in the QCD vacuum. Those are not only mathematically interesting but also closely related to chiral symmetry and confinement. We consider methods to identify these objects in lattice QCD simulations. Based on this, we explore the structures resulting from different discretizations and investigate the effect of a very strong electromagnetic field on the QCD vacuum.

  1. Computer simulation of multiple dynamic photorefractive gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben

    1998-01-01

    The benefits of a direct visualization of space-charge grating buildup are described. The visualization is carried out by a simple repetitive computer program, which simulates the basic processes in the band-transport model and displays the result graphically or in the form of numerical data. The....... The simulation sheds light on issues that are not amenable to analytical solutions, such as the spectral content of the wave forms, cross talk in three-beam interaction, and the range of applications of the band-transport model. (C) 1998 Optical Society of America....

  2. Ensemble simulations with discrete classical dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2013-01-01

    For discrete classical Molecular dynamics (MD) obtained by the "Verlet" algorithm (VA) with the time increment $h$ there exist a shadow Hamiltonian $\\tilde{H}$ with energy $\\tilde{E}(h)$, for which the discrete particle positions lie on the analytic trajectories for $\\tilde{H}$. $\\tilde...

  3. NVU dynamics. III. Simulating molecules at constant potential energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    This is the final paper in a series that introduces geodesic molecular dynamics at constant potential energy. This dynamics is entitled NVU dynamics in analogy to standard energy-conserving Newtonian NVE dynamics. In the first two papers [T. S. Ingebrigtsen, S. Toxvaerd, O. J. Heilmann, T. B....... In this paper, the NVU algorithm for atomic systems is extended to be able to simulate the geodesic motion of molecules at constant potential energy. We derive an algorithm for simulating rigid bonds and test this algorithm on three different systems: an asymmetric dumbbell model, Lewis-Wahnström o......-terphenyl (OTP) and rigid SPC/E water. The rigid bonds introduce additional constraints beyond that of constant potential energy for atomic systems. The rigid-bond NVU algorithm conserves potential energy, bond lengths, and step length for indefinitely long runs. The quantities probed in simulations give results...

  4. Approximation of quantum observables by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sandberg, Mattias

    2016-01-06

    In this talk I will discuss how to estimate the uncertainty in molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics is a computational method to study molecular systems in materials science, chemistry, and molecular biology. The wide popularity of molecular dynamics simulations relies on the fact that in many cases it agrees very well with experiments. If we however want the simulation to predict something that has no comparing experiment, we need a mathematical estimate of the accuracy of the computation. In the case of molecular systems with few particles, such studies are made by directly solving the Schrodinger equation. In this talk I will discuss theoretical results on the accuracy between quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, to be used for systems that are too large to be handled computationally by the Schrodinger equation.

  5. Quantum and classical dynamics of reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Geert-Jan; Díaz, Cristina

    2016-06-27

    We review the state-of-the art in dynamics calculations on the reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces, which is an important model system of an elementary reaction that is relevant to heterogeneous catalysis. In many applications, quantum dynamics and classical trajectory calculations are performed within the Born-Oppenheimer static surface model. However, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) is finding increased use in applications aimed at modeling the effect of surface phonons on the dynamics. Molecular dynamics with electronic friction has been used to model the effect of electron-hole pair excitation. Most applications are still based on potential energy surfaces (PESs) or forces computed with density functional theory (DFT), using a density functional within the generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation energy. A new development is the use of a semi-empirical version of DFT (the specific reaction parameter (SRP) approach to DFT). We also discuss the accurate methods that have become available to represent electronic structure data for the molecule-surface interaction in global PESs. It has now become possible to describe highly activated H2 + metal surface reactions with chemical accuracy using the SRP-DFT approach, as has been shown for H2 + Cu(111) and Cu(100). However, chemical accuracy with SRP-DFT has yet to be demonstrated for weakly activated systems like H2 + Ru(0001) and non-activated systems like H2 + Pd(111), for which SRP DFs are not yet available. There is now considerable evidence that electron-hole pair (ehp) excitation does not need to be modeled to achieve the (chemically) accurate calculation of dissociative chemisorption and scattering probabilities. Dynamics calculations show that phonons can be safely neglected in the chemically accurate calculation of sticking probabilities on cold metal surfaces for activated systems, and in the calculation of a number of other observables. However, there is now sufficient

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid Beta Dimer Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanc, B; Ding, F; Sammond, D; Khare, S; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Dokholyan, N V

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide suggest that formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depends on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. Due to limitations of current experimental techniques, a detailed knowledge of oligomer structure at the atomic level is missing. We introduce a molecular dynamics approach to study Abeta dimer formation: (1) we use discrete molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model to identify a variety of dimer conformations, and (2) we employ all-atom molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the thermodynamic stability of all dimer conformations. Our simulations of a coarse-grained Abeta peptide model predicts ten different planar beta-strand dimer conformations. We then estimate the free energies of all dimer conformations in all-atom molecular mechanics simulations with explicit water. We compare the free energies of Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40...

  7. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  8. Dynamic Process Simulation for Analysis and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Herbert E., Jr.; Himmelblau, David M.

    A computer program for the simulation of complex continuous process in real-time in an interactive mode is described. The program is user oriented, flexible, and provides both numerical and graphic output. The program has been used in classroom teaching and computer aided design. Typical input and output are illustrated for a sample problem to…

  9. New ways to boost molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieger, E.; Vriend, G.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a set of algorithms that allow to simulate dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, a common benchmark) with the AMBER all-atom force field at 160 nanoseconds/day on a single Intel Core i7 5960X CPU (no graphics processing unit (GPU), 23,786 atoms, particle mesh Ewald (PME), 8.0 A cutoff, correct

  10. Classical trajectory simulations of post-transition state dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourderaj, Upakarasamy; Park, Kyoyeon; Hase, William L.

    Classical chemical dynamics simulations of post-transition state dynamics are reviewed. Most of the simulations involve direct dynamics for which the potential energy and gradient are obtained directly from an electronic structure theory. The chemical reaction attributes and chemical systems presented are product energy partitioning for Cl- ··· CH3Br → ClCH3 + Br- and C2H5F → C2H4 + HF dissociation, non-RRKM dynamics for cyclopropane stereomutation and the Cl- ··· CH3Cl complexes mediating the Cl- + CH3Cl SN2 nucleophilic substitution reaction, and non-IRC dynamics for the OH- + CH3F and F- + CH3OOH chemical reactions. These studies illustrate the important role of chemical dynamics simulations in understanding atomic-level reaction dynamics and interpreting experiments. They also show that widely used paradigms and model theories for interpreting reaction kinetics and dynamics are often inaccurate and are not applicable.

  11. Dynamical Transition of Myoglobin and Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉莉; 张建华; 周林祥

    2002-01-01

    We have carried out parallel molecular dynamics simulations of solvated and non-solvated myoglobin and solvated Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase at different temperatures. By analysis of several methods, the simulations reproduce the quasielastic neutron scattering experimental results. Below 200 K these two proteins behave as harmonic solids with essentially only vibrational motion, while above this temperature, there is a striking dynamic transition into anharmonic motion. Moreover, the simulations further show that water molecules play an important role for this dynamical transition. There is no such sharp dynamical transition in non-solvated proteins and the higher the solvate density is, the steeper at transition point the curve of mean square displacement versus temperature will be. The simulations also display that the dynamical transition is a general property for globular protein and this transition temperature is a demarcation of enzyme activity.

  12. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gottwald, Fabian; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation (GLE), which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection (LP) technique. Within this framework a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here we discuss that this task is most naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importa...

  13. Communication: Ro-vibrational control of chemical reactivity in H+CH₄→ H₂+CH₃: full-dimensional quantum dynamics calculations and a sudden model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Ralph; Manthe, Uwe

    2014-08-07

    The mode-selective chemistry of the title reaction is studied by full-dimensional quantum dynamics simulation on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface for vanishing total angular momentum. Using a rigorous transition state based approach and multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree wave packet propagation, initial state-selected reaction probabilities for many ro-vibrational states of methane are calculated. The theoretical results are compared with experimental trends seen in reactions of methane. An intuitive interpretation of the ro-vibrational control of the chemical reactivity provided by a sudden model based on the quantum transition state concept is discussed.

  14. Stereochemical errors and their implications for molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddolino Peter L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological molecules are often asymmetric with respect to stereochemistry, and correct stereochemistry is essential to their function. Molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules have increasingly become an integral part of biophysical research. However, stereochemical errors in biomolecular structures can have a dramatic impact on the results of simulations. Results Here we illustrate the effects that chirality and peptide bond configuration flips may have on the secondary structure of proteins throughout a simulation. We also analyze the most common sources of stereochemical errors in biomolecular structures and present software tools to identify, correct, and prevent stereochemical errors in molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules. Conclusions Use of the tools presented here should become a standard step in the preparation of biomolecular simulations and in the generation of predicted structural models for proteins and nucleic acids.

  15. Strong Analog Classical Simulation of Coherent Quantum Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    A strong analog classical simulation of general quantum evolution is proposed, which serves as a novel scheme in quantum computation and simulation. The scheme employs the approach of geometric quantum mechanics and quantum informational technique of quantum tomography, which applies broadly to cases of mixed states, nonunitary evolution, and infinite dimensional systems. The simulation provides an intriguing classical picture to probe quantum phenomena, namely, a coherent quantum dynamics can be viewed as a globally constrained classical Hamiltonian dynamics of a collection of coupled particles or strings. Efficiency analysis reveals a fundamental difference between the locality in real space and locality in Hilbert space, the latter enables efficient strong analog classical simulations. Examples are also studied to highlight the differences and gaps among various simulation methods. Funding support from NSERC of Canada and a research fellowship at Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia are acknowledged

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  17. Gas dynamics for accretion disk simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, R.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of accretion disks can largely be understood in terms of the basic physical processes of mass, energy, and momentum conservation. Despite this, detailed modeling of these systems using modern computational techniques is challenging and controversial. Disturbing differences exist between methods used widely in astrophysics, namely Eulerian finite-difference techniques and particle codes such as SPH. Therefore neither technique is fully satisfactory for accretion disk simulations. This paper describes a new fully Lagrangian method designed to resolve these difficulties.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  19. Dynamic interfacial tension of finite reactive systems related to enhanced oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiwetelu, C.I.

    1988-01-01

    In enhanced oil recovery by caustic flooding, carboxylic acids in the crude oil react with the caustic reagents to form active soap species, which form at the interface and desorb to the bulk oleic and aqueous phases. Such reactive systems exhibit the dynamic interfacial tension phenomenon. In order to understand the mechanisms of carboxylic acid/caustic reagent interaction, a novel experimental scheme called photo-micropendography has been developed to measure dynamic interfacial tension. This method has been shown to give more reliable and consistent results than those obtained by spinning drop and ring tensiometries. An equilibrium model is proposed for interaction of single acids with various caustic solutions to enable important ionization properties to be determined with the aid of regression analysis. A diffusive kinetic model is also proposed to explain the dynamic interfacial behavior associated with single acids reacting with a range of aqueous caustic solutions. Good estimates of the adsorption rate constants which were the model parameters were obtained by correlating the experimental interfacial tension data with the aid of a sensitivity analysis of the problem. A generalized dynamic model has been advanced in order to rationalize the interaction of a multicomponent acid mixture contacting a spectrum of NaOH solutions. A detailed analysis for binary oleic/lauric acid mixtures was carried out to demonstrate the model's validity. Using parameter values for each acid determined from separate single-component studies, it was possible to obtain theoretical values for dynamic interfacial tension of the mixture. Generally satisfactory agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental data. 115 refs., 89 figs., 91 tabs.

  20. Dynamic Factor Method of Computing Dynamic Mathematical Model for System Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    老大中; 吴娟; 杨策; 蒋滋康

    2003-01-01

    The computational methods of a typical dynamic mathematical model that can describe the differential element and the inertial element for the system simulation are researched. The stability of numerical solutions of the dynamic mathematical model is researched. By means of theoretical analysis, the error formulas, the error sign criteria and the error relationship criterion of the implicit Euler method and the trapezoidal method are given, the dynamic factor affecting the computational accuracy has been found, the formula and the methods of computing the dynamic factor are given. The computational accuracy of the dynamic mathematical model like this can be improved by use of the dynamic factor.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of Ni3Al melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongshan Wang; Huaiyu Hou; Xiaodong Ni; Guoliang Chen

    2008-01-01

    With the Voter-Chert version of embedded-atom model (EAM) potential and molecular dynamics, the melting of Ni3A1 alloy was simulated by one-phase (conventional) and two-phase approaches. It is shown that the simulated melting point is dependent on the potential and the simulation method. The structures of the melts obtained by different simulation methods were analyzed by the pair correlation function, the coordination number, and the distribution of atom pair type (indexed by the Honeycutt-Andersen pair analysis technique). The results show that the structures are very similar.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Glass Transition Behavior of Polyimide Ensemble

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of chromophores to the glass transition temperature of polyimide ensemble has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulation in conjunction with barrier analysis. Simulated Tg results indicated a good agreement with experimental value. This study showed the MD simulation could estimate the effect of chromophores to the Tg of polyimide ensemble conveniently and an estimation approach method had a surprising deviation of Tg from experiment. At the same time, a polyimide structure with higher barrier energy was designed and validated by MD simulation.

  3. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations for computational protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Daggett, Valerie

    2017-02-01

    A grand challenge in the field of structural biology is to design and engineer proteins that exhibit targeted functions. Although much success on this front has been achieved, design success rates remain low, an ever-present reminder of our limited understanding of the relationship between amino acid sequences and the structures they adopt. In addition to experimental techniques and rational design strategies, computational methods have been employed to aid in the design and engineering of proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) is one such method that simulates the motions of proteins according to classical dynamics. Here, we review how insights into protein dynamics derived from MD simulations have influenced the design of proteins. One of the greatest strengths of MD is its capacity to reveal information beyond what is available in the static structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. In this regard simulations can be used to directly guide protein design by providing atomistic details of the dynamic molecular interactions contributing to protein stability and function. MD simulations can also be used as a virtual screening tool to rank, select, identify, and assess potential designs. MD is uniquely poised to inform protein design efforts where the application requires realistic models of protein dynamics and atomic level descriptions of the relationship between dynamics and function. Here, we review cases where MD simulations was used to modulate protein stability and protein function by providing information regarding the conformation(s), conformational transitions, interactions, and dynamics that govern stability and function. In addition, we discuss cases where conformations from protein folding/unfolding simulations have been exploited for protein design, yielding novel outcomes that could not be obtained from static structures.

  4. Enhanced sampling techniques in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Rafael C; Melo, Marcelo C R; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reducing the Matrix Effect in Organic Cluster SIMS Using Dynamic Reactive Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic reactive ionization (DRI) utilizes a reactive molecule, HCl, which is doped into an Ar cluster projectile and activated to produce protons at the bombardment site on the cold sample surface with the presence of water. The methodology has been shown to enhance the ionization of protonated molecular ions and to reduce salt suppression in complex biomatrices. In this study, we further examine the possibility of obtaining improved quantitation with DRI during depth profiling of thin films. Using a trehalose film as a model system, we are able to define optimal DRI conditions for depth profiling. Next, the strategy is applied to a multilayer system consisting of the polymer antioxidants Irganox 1098 and 1010. These binary mixtures have demonstrated large matrix effects, making quantitative SIMS measurement not feasible. Systematic comparisons of depth profiling of this multilayer film between directly using GCIB, and under DRI conditions, show that the latter enhances protonated ions for both components by 4- to 15-fold, resulting in uniform depth profiling in positive ion mode and almost no matrix effect in negative ion mode. The methodology offers a new strategy to tackle the matrix effect and should lead to improved quantitative measurement using SIMS.

  6. Visualizing the enhanced chemical reactivity of mesoporous ceria; simulating templated crystallization in silica scaffolds at the atomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayle, Thi X T; Sayle, Dean C

    2014-03-12

    Unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties can be engineered into functional nanomaterials via structural control. However, as the hierarchical structural complexity of a nanomaterial increases, so do the challenges associated with generating atomistic models, which are sufficiently realistic that they can be interrogated to reliably predict properties and processes. The structural complexity of a functional nanomaterial necessarily emanates during synthesis. Accordingly, to capture such complexity, we have simulated each step in the synthetic protocol. Specifically, atomistic models of mesoporous ceria were generated by simulating the infusion and confined crystallization of ceria in a mesoporous silica scaffold. After removing the scaffold, the chemical reactivity of the templated mesoporous ceria was calculated and predicted to be more reactive compared to mesoporous ceria generated without template; visual "reactivity fingerprints" are presented. The strategy affords a general method for generating atomistic models, with hierarchical structural complexity, which can be used to predict a variety of properties and processes enabling the nanoscale design of functional materials.

  7. Dynamic computer simulations of electrophoresis: three decades of active research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Wolfgang; Caslavska, Jitka; Breadmore, Michael C; Mosher, Richard A

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic models for electrophoresis are based upon model equations derived from the transport concepts in solution together with user-inputted conditions. They are able to predict theoretically the movement of ions and are as such the most versatile tool to explore the fundamentals of electrokinetic separations. Since its inception three decades ago, the state of dynamic computer simulation software and its use has progressed significantly and Electrophoresis played a pivotal role in that endeavor as a large proportion of the fundamental and application papers were published in this periodical. Software is available that simulates all basic electrophoretic systems, including moving boundary electrophoresis, zone electrophoresis, ITP, IEF and EKC, and their combinations under almost exactly the same conditions used in the laboratory. This has been employed to show the detailed mechanisms of many of the fundamental phenomena that occur in electrophoretic separations. Dynamic electrophoretic simulations are relevant for separations on any scale and instrumental format, including free-fluid preparative, gel, capillary and chip electrophoresis. This review includes a historical overview, a survey of current simulators, simulation examples and a discussion of the applications and achievements of dynamic simulation.

  8. Localized reactive flow in carbonate rocks: Core-flood experiments and network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyue; Bernabé, Yves; Mok, Ulrich; Evans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We conducted four core-flood experiments on samples of a micritic, reef limestone from Abu Dhabi under conditions of constant flow rate. The pore fluid was water in equilibrium with CO2, which, because of its lowered pH, is chemically reactive with the limestone. Flow rates were between 0.03 and 0.1 mL/min. The difference between up and downstream pore pressures dropped to final values ≪1 MPa over periods of 3-18 h. Scanning electron microscope and microtomography imaging of the starting material showed that the limestone is mostly calcite and lacks connected macroporosity and that the prevailing pores are few microns large. During each experiment, a wormhole formed by localized dissolution, an observation consistent with the decreases in pressure head between the up and downstream reservoirs. Moreover, we numerically modeled the changes in permeability during the experiments. We devised a network approach that separated the pore space into competing subnetworks of pipes. Thus, the problem was framed as a competition of flow of the reactive fluid among the adversary subnetworks. The precondition for localization within certain time is that the leading subnetwork rapidly becomes more transmissible than its competitors. This novel model successfully simulated features of the shape of the wormhole as it grew from few to about 100 µm, matched the pressure history patterns, and yielded the correct order of magnitude of the breakthrough time. Finally, we systematically studied the impact of changing the statistical parameters of the subnetworks. Larger mean radius and spatial correlation of the leading subnetwork led to faster localization.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiscale simulation of microbe structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harshad; Singharoy, Abhishek; Sereda, Yuriy V; Cheluvaraja, Srinath C; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    A multiscale mathematical and computational approach is developed that captures the hierarchical organization of a microbe. It is found that a natural perspective for understanding a microbe is in terms of a hierarchy of variables at various levels of resolution. This hierarchy starts with the N -atom description and terminates with order parameters characterizing a whole microbe. This conceptual framework is used to guide the analysis of the Liouville equation for the probability density of the positions and momenta of the N atoms constituting the microbe and its environment. Using multiscale mathematical techniques, we derive equations for the co-evolution of the order parameters and the probability density of the N-atom state. This approach yields a rigorous way to transfer information between variables on different space-time scales. It elucidates the interplay between equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium processes underlying microbial behavior. It also provides framework for using coarse-grained nanocharacterization data to guide microbial simulation. It enables a methodical search for free-energy minimizing structures, many of which are typically supported by the set of macromolecules and membranes constituting a given microbe. This suite of capabilities provides a natural framework for arriving at a fundamental understanding of microbial behavior, the analysis of nanocharacterization data, and the computer-aided design of nanostructures for biotechnical and medical purposes. Selected features of the methodology are demonstrated using our multiscale bionanosystem simulator DeductiveMultiscaleSimulator. Systems used to demonstrate the approach are structural transitions in the cowpea chlorotic mosaic virus, RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus, virus-like particles related to human papillomavirus, and iron-binding protein lactoferrin.

  11. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D.; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  12. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D., E-mail: sergei.ivanov@uni-rostock.de; Kühn, Oliver [Institute of Physics, Rostock University, Universitätsplatz 3, 18055 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-06-28

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  13. Linking somatic and symbolic representation in semantic memory: the dynamic multilevel reactivation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jamie; Peelle, Jonathan E; Garcia, Amanda; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2016-08-01

    Biological plausibility is an essential constraint for any viable model of semantic memory. Yet, we have only the most rudimentary understanding of how the human brain conducts abstract symbolic transformations that underlie word and object meaning. Neuroscience has evolved a sophisticated arsenal of techniques for elucidating the architecture of conceptual representation. Nevertheless, theoretical convergence remains elusive. Here we describe several contrastive approaches to the organization of semantic knowledge, and in turn we offer our own perspective on two recurring questions in semantic memory research: (1) to what extent are conceptual representations mediated by sensorimotor knowledge (i.e., to what degree is semantic memory embodied)? (2) How might an embodied semantic system represent abstract concepts such as modularity, symbol, or proposition? To address these questions, we review the merits of sensorimotor (i.e., embodied) and amodal (i.e., disembodied) semantic theories and address the neurobiological constraints underlying each. We conclude that the shortcomings of both perspectives in their extreme forms necessitate a hybrid middle ground. We accordingly propose the Dynamic Multilevel Reactivation Framework-an integrative model predicated upon flexible interplay between sensorimotor and amodal symbolic representations mediated by multiple cortical hubs. We discuss applications of the dynamic multilevel reactivation framework to abstract and concrete concept representation and describe how a multidimensional conceptual topography based on emotion, sensation, and magnitude can successfully frame a semantic space containing meanings for both abstract and concrete words. The consideration of 'abstract conceptual features' does not diminish the role of logical and/or executive processing in activating, manipulating and using information stored in conceptual representations. Rather, it proposes that the materials upon which these processes operate

  14. Computational fluid dynamics for sport simulation

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    All over the world sport plays a prominent role in society: as a leisure activity for many, as an ingredient of culture, as a business and as a matter of national prestige in such major events as the World Cup in soccer or the Olympic Games. Hence, it is not surprising that science has entered the realm of sports, and, in particular, that computer simulation has become highly relevant in recent years. This is explored in this book by choosing five different sports as examples, demonstrating that computational science and engineering (CSE) can make essential contributions to research on sports topics on both the fundamental level and, eventually, by supporting athletes’ performance.

  15. Hugoniot curve calculation of nitromethane decomposition mixtures:A reactive force field molecular dynamics approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭峰; 张红; 胡海泉; 程新路; 张利燕

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Hugoniot curve, shock–particle velocity relations, and Chapman–Jouguet conditions of the hot dense system through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The detailed pathways from crystal nitromethane to reacted state by shock compression are simulated. The phase transition of N2 and CO mixture is found at about 10 GPa, and the main reason is that the dissociation of the C–O bond and the formation of C–C bond start at 10.0–11.0 GPa. The unreacted state simulations of nitromethane are consistent with shock Hugoniot data. The complete pathway from unreacted to reacted state is discussed. Through chemical species analysis, we find that the C–N bond breaking is the main event of the shock-induced nitromethane decomposition.

  16. Numerical simulations of blobs with ion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, A. H.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Madsen, J.; Xu, G. S.; Naulin, V.; Olsen, J. M. B.; Løiten, M.; Hansen, S. K.; Yan, N.; Tophøj, L.; Wan, B. N.

    2017-02-01

    The transport of particles and energy into the scrape-off layer (SOL) region at the outboard midplane of medium-sized tokamaks, operating in low confinement mode, is investigated by applying the first-principle HESEL (hot edge-sol-electrostatic) model. HESEL is a four-field drift-fluid model including finite electron and ion temperature effects, drift wave dynamics on closed field lines, and sheath dynamics on open field lines. Particles and energy are mainly transported by intermittent blobs. Therefore, blobs have a significant influence on the corresponding profiles. The formation of a ‘shoulder’ in the SOL density profile can be obtained by increasing the collisionality or connection length, thus decreasing the efficiency of the SOL’s ability to remove plasma. As the ion pressure has a larger perpendicular but smaller parallel dissipation rate compared to the electron pressure, ion energy is transported far into the SOL. This implies that the ion temperature in the SOL exceeds the electron temperature by a factor of 2-4 and significantly broadens the power deposition profile.

  17. Stability of molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a shadow Hamiltonian for discrete classical dynamics, obtained by an asymptotic expansion for a discrete symplectic algorithm, is employed to determine the limit of stability for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with respect to the time-increment h of the discrete dynamics....... The investigation is based on the stability of the shadow energy, obtained by including the first term in the asymptotic expansion, and on the exact solution of discrete dynamics for a single harmonic mode. The exact solution of discrete dynamics for a harmonic potential with frequency ω gives a criterion...... an improved stability with a factor of , but the overhead of computer time is a factor of at least two. The conclusion is that the second-order “Verlet”-algorithm, most commonly used in MD, is superior. It gives the exact dynamics within the limit of the asymptotic expansion and this limit can be estimated...

  18. Dynamical simulation of non-abelian cosmic strings

    CERN Document Server

    McGraw, P

    1996-01-01

    We describe a method for simulating the dynamics of an S_3 cosmic string network. We use a lattice Monte Carlo to generate initial conditions for the network, which subsequently is allowed to relax continuously according to a simplified model of string dynamics. The dynamics incorporates some novel features which, to our knowledge, have not been studied in previous numerical simulations: The existence of two types of string which may have different tensions, and the possibility that two non-commuting strings may intersect. Simulation of the non-commuting fluxes presents a computational challenge as it requires a rather complex gauge-fixing procedure. The flux definitions change as strings change their positions and orientations relative to each other and must be carefully updated as the network evolves. The method is described here in some detail, with results to be presented elsewhere.

  19. A dynamic simulation model of desertification in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rasmy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a system dynamic model to simulate and analyze potential future state of desertification in Egypt. The presented model enhances the MEDALUS methodology developed by European Commission. It illustrates the concept of desertification through different equations and simulation output graphs. It is supplemented with a causal loop diagram showing the feedback between different variables. For the purpose of testing and measuring the effect of different policy scenarios on desertification in Egypt, a simulation model using stock and flow diagram was designed. Multi-temporal data were used to figure out the dynamic changes in desertification sensitivity related to the dynamic nature of desert environment. The model was applied to Al Bihira governorate in western Nile Delta, Egypt, as the study area, and the results showed that the urban expansion, salinization, and not applying the policy enforcement are considered the most variables provoking the desertification.

  20. Simulation of nanofractal dynamics with MBN Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2013-06-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is the development of controlled, reproducible, and industrially transposable nanostructured materials. In this context, controlling of the final architecture of such materials by tuneable parameters is one of the fundamental problems. Post-growth processes occurring in patterns grown on a surface were studied using a multi-purpose computer code MBN EXPLORER introduced in the present paper. The package allows to model molecular systems of varied level of complexity, and in the present paper was used, in particular, to study dynamics of silver nanofractal formation and fragmentation on graphite surface. We demonstrate that the detachment of particles from the fractal and their diffusion within the fractal and over the surface determines the shape of the islands remaining on a surface after the fractal fragmentation.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  2. Dynamics modeling and simulation of mechanism with joint clearance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Zheng-feng; TIAN Hao; ZHAO Yang

    2010-01-01

    The existence of clearance in the joints of mechanisms system is inevitable.The movements of the real mechanism are deftection from the ideal mechanism due to the clearances and the motion accuracv is decreased.The effects of the hinge clearance on the crank and rocker mechanism system are studied.The svstem dynamics equation with clearance is presented.The contact dynamics model is established using the nonlinear equivalent spring-damp model and the friction effect is considered by using Coulomb friction model.Then the models are incorporated into ADAMS,and based on the model,large numbers numeric simulations are made.The regularity of contact forces in clearance are studied in detail.And the effects of clearance size.clearance friction on the mechanism dynamics characteristic are analyzed.The simulation resuhs Can predict the effects of clearance on the mechanism dynamics characteristic preferably.

  3. A dynamic skull model for simulation of cerebral cortex folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanbo; Guo, Lei; Nie, Jingxin; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Liu, Tianming

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of human cerebral cortex folding and their interactions during brain development are largely unknown, partly due to the difficulties in biological experiments and data acquisition for the developing fetus brain. Computational modeling and simulation provide a novel approach to the understanding of cortex folding processes in normal or aberrant neurodevelopment. Based on our recently developed computational model of the cerebral cortex folding using neuronal growth model and mechanical skull constraint, this paper presents a computational dynamic model of the brain skull that regulates the cortical folding simulation. Our simulation results show that the dynamic skull model is more biologically realistic and significantly improves our cortical folding simulation results. This work provides further computational support to the hypothesis that skull is an important regulator of cortical folding.

  4. Dynamic Multiscale Quantum Mechanics/Electromagnetics Simulation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingyi; Yam, ChiYung; Koo, SiuKong; Chen, Quan; Wong, Ngai; Chen, GuanHua

    2012-04-10

    A newly developed hybrid quantum mechanics and electromagnetics (QM/EM) method [Yam et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.2011, 13, 14365] is generalized to simulate the real time dynamics. Instead of the electric and magnetic fields, the scalar and vector potentials are used to integrate Maxwell's equations in the time domain. The TDDFT-NEGF-EOM method [Zheng et al. Phys. Rev. B2007, 75, 195127] is employed to simulate the electronic dynamics in the quantum mechanical region. By allowing the penetration of a classical electromagnetic wave into the quantum mechanical region, the electromagnetic wave for the entire simulating region can be determined consistently by solving Maxwell's equations. The transient potential distributions and current density at the interface between quantum mechanical and classical regions are employed as the boundary conditions for the quantum mechanical and electromagnetic simulations, respectively. Charge distribution, current density, and potentials at different temporal steps and spatial scales are integrated seamlessly within a unified computational framework.

  5. Simulation of Naval Guns' Breechblock System Dynamics Based on ADAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bo; Liu, Hui-Min; Liu, Kai

    In order to study the dynamical characteristics of the breechblock system during gun firing, a virtual prototype model was established based on ADAMS, in which motion and force transmission among mechanisms are realized by collision. By simulation, kinematics and dynamics properties of main components are obtained, and the relationships between the motion of breechblock and the position of breechblock opening plate are analyzed. According to the simulation results, the collision among the breechblock opening plate and the roller is discontinuous, which may make the breechblock system fail to hitch the breechblock reliably. And within allowable scope of the structure, the breechblock opening template should be installed near the upside as much as possible.

  6. Simulation of Dynamic Recrystallization Using Cellular Automaton Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Hong; XIE Hong-biao; YAN Yan-hong; Jun YANAGIMOTO

    2004-01-01

    A new modeling approach that couples fundamental metallurgical principles of dynamical recrystallization with the cellular automaton method was developed to simulate the microstructural evolution linking with the plastic flow behavior during thermomechanical processing. The driving force for the nucleation and growth of dynamically recrystallized grain is the volume free energy due to the stored dislocation density of a deformation matrix. The growth terminates the impingement. The model is capable of simulating kinetics, microstructure and texture evolution during recrystallization. The predictions of microstructural evolution agree with the experimental results.

  7. Dynamic Simulation Analysis of Forest-fruit Vibratory Harvester Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For obtaining excellent properties of vibration type picking machine of oil tea fruit, two and three dimensional virtual prototype of forest-fruit vibratory harvester was established by CAD and Pro/E software, then the dynamic prototype was converted and the dynamics simulation was worked out by the Adams system simulation software for the arm. The mechanical characteristics of arm were measured during positioning and vibrating the end of arm and they provide a theoretical references to optimize the physical prototype.

  8. Dynamic modeling, simulation and control of energy generation

    CERN Document Server

    Vepa, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the core issues involved in the dynamic modeling, simulation and control of a selection of energy systems such as gas turbines, wind turbines, fuel cells and batteries. The principles of modeling and control could be applied to other non-convention methods of energy generation such as solar energy and wave energy.A central feature of Dynamic Modeling, Simulation and Control of Energy Generation is that it brings together diverse topics in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, electro-chemistry, electrical networks and electrical machines and focuses on their appli

  9. Neutron Scattering and Computer Simulation Studies of Ice Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shunle; YU Xinsheng

    2002-01-01

    In this article we describe a range of simulations (lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics) of the inelastic inco-herent neutron scattering spectra of ices (normal ice, ice Ⅱ and ice Ⅷ ). These simulations use a variety of different inter-molecular potentials from simple classic pair-wise (rigid and non-rigid molecule) potentials to sophisticated polarisable poten-tials. It was found that MCY makes stretching and bending interactions too weak while others do them well. We demon-strate that in order to reproduce the measured neutron spectrum, greater anisotropy (or orientational variation) is requiredthan these potentials presently provide.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation on thermodynamic Properties and Transport Coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.X.Xiong

    1996-01-01

    Moecular dynamics simulation (MDS) is used to study the thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of an argon system with Lennend-Jones potential.The results on the velocity distribution,mean free path,mean collison time,specific heat and self0diffusion coefficient agree well with the existing theoretical /experimental data,It shows that molecular dynamics method is another bridge to connect microworld and macreoworld.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of peptides on calcite surface

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Mingjun; Rodger, Mark; Harding, John; Stipp, Susan S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A series of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations has been carried out to investigate the interaction between peptides and a calcite (1 0 -1 4) surface in water. A 16-amino acid and a 17-amino acid peptide have been built and three different configurations for each peptide are used as starting configurations. The dynamic behaviour of these peptides has been investigated by calculating their radii of gyration and distribution of dihedral angles. For comparison, the simulatio...

  14. Simulation of the Production Process Dynamics using Vensim and Stella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina SBUGHEA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to make a brief presentation of the principles of dynamic systems and to analyze two applications support for modeling and simulation of the evolution of these systems. For illustration, we chose a classic model of the dynamics of the production process, which we have implemented in Vensim and Stella, in order to obtain evolutionary trajectories of the endogenous variables and analyze the behavior of the system.

  15. Dynamic Garment Simulation based on Hybrid Bounding Volume Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Dongyong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the computing speed and efficiency problem of existing dynamic clothing simulation, this paper presents a dynamic garment simulation based on a hybrid bounding volume hierarchy. It firstly uses MCASG graph theory to do the primary segmentation for a given three-dimensional human body model. And then it applies K-means cluster to do the secondary segmentation to collect the human body’s upper arms, lower arms, upper legs, lower legs, trunk, hip and woman’s chest as the elementary units of dynamic clothing simulation. According to different shapes of these elementary units, it chooses the closest and most efficient hybrid bounding box to specify these units, such as cylinder bounding box and elliptic cylinder bounding box. During the process of constructing these bounding boxes, it uses the least squares method and slices of the human body to get the related parameters. This approach makes it possible to use the least amount of bounding boxes to create close collision detection regions for the appearance of the human body. A spring-mass model based on a triangular mesh of the clothing model is finally constructed for dynamic simulation. The simulation result shows the feasibility and superiority of the method described.

  16. Research of Steward Dynamic Platform Simulation Numerical Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Mingwei; Hu Deji

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve attitude control of the six degrees of freedom Steward dynamic platform, as well as the real time simulation cockpit attitude, Washout Filtering method was adopted in this paper as the simulation algorithm to derive Washout Filter high-pass, low-pass filter transfer function into a differential equation algorithm and longitudinal acceleration tilt strategy, pitching strategies etc. Experimental examples are used to verify correctness of the algorithm.

  17. Caloric Effects in Methylammonium Lead Iodide from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shi; Cohen, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite architecture could serve as a robust platform for materials design to realize functionalities beyond photovoltaic applications. We explore caloric effects in organometal halide perovskites, taking methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI$_3$) as an example, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with a first-principles based interatomic potential. The adiabatic thermal change is estimated directly by introducing different driving fields in the simulations. ...

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Shear Moduli for Coulomb Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J

    2008-01-01

    Torsional (shear) oscillations of neutron stars may have been observed in quasiperiodic oscillations of Magnetar Giant Flares. The frequencies of these modes depend on the shear modulus of neutron star crust. We calculate the shear modulus of Coulomb crystals from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that electron screening reduces the shear modulus by about 10% compared to previous Ogata et al. results. Our MD simulations can be extended to calculate the effects of impurities and or polycrystalline structures on the shear modulus.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of DNA Translocation through a biological Nanopore

    OpenAIRE

    Barder, Simen Eidsmo

    2012-01-01

    Experimental and simulation studies of nucleic acid transport through nanosized channels, both biological and synthetic, has become a rapidly growing research area over the last decade. While the utilization of the alpha-hemolysin channel as a sequencing device is soon to be realized, other biological nanochannels may hold advantages that are yet unknown. Motivated by this, the first reported molecular dynamics simulations of DNA translocation through a connexon 26 channel were accomplished, ...

  20. A Dynamic Visual Simulation Environment for Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Lavirotte, Stéphane; Tigli, Jean-Yves; Rocher, Gérald; El Beze, Léa; Palma, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Research report on works done on simulation framework for Internet and Web of Things; The development of living labs or smart spaces is a complex and challenging task. The choice of suitable sensors and actuators to deploy in these physical testbeds is difficult without experimentation. Moreover, several challenges still remain in improving and testing new fields of application based on Internet of Things (IoT). In this paper, we present UbiUnity, a dynamic visual simulator environment which ...

  1. Prototyping Bio-Nanorobots using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdi, Mustapha; Sharma, Gaurav; Ferreira, A.; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2005-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDA Publishing Association (http://irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/5920); International audience; This paper presents a molecular mechanics study using a molecular dynamics software (NAMD) coupled to virtual reality (VR) techniques for intuitive Bio-NanoRobotic prototyping. Using simulated Bio-Nano environments in VR, the operator can design and characterize through physical simulation and 3-D visualization the behavior of Bio-NanoRobotic components and structures. The mai...

  2. Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A.; Jauch, Clemens; Soerensen, P.

    The present report describes the dynamic wind turbine models implemented in the power system simulation tool DIgSILENT. The developed models are a part of the results of a national research project, whose overall objective is to create a model database in different simulation tools. The report...... provides a description of the wind turbine modelling, both at a component level and at a system level....

  3. Prototyping Bio-Nanorobots using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdi, Mustapha; Sharma, Gaurav; Ferreira, A.; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2005-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDA Publishing Association (http://irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/5920); International audience; This paper presents a molecular mechanics study using a molecular dynamics software (NAMD) coupled to virtual reality (VR) techniques for intuitive Bio-NanoRobotic prototyping. Using simulated Bio-Nano environments in VR, the operator can design and characterize through physical simulation and 3-D visualization the behavior of Bio-NanoRobotic components and structures. The mai...

  4. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N [ORNL; Yin, Junqi [ORNL; Landau, David P [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Brown, Greg [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  5. Spectroscopic and reactive properties of a newly synthesized quinazoline derivative: Combined experimental, DFT, molecular dynamics and docking study

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Azab, Adel S.; Mary, Y. Shyma; Mary, Y. Sheena; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Abdel-Aziz, Alaa A.-M.; Mohamed, Menshawy A.; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Van Alsenoy, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The molecular geometry, the normal mode wavenumbers and corresponding vibrational assignments, natural bond orbital analysis and the HOMO-LUMO analysis of 3-(4-oxo-phenethyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolin-2-ylthio)-N-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)propanamide were performed by B3LYP level of theory using the 6-311++G(d,p)(5D,7F) basis set. The experimentally obtained wavenumbers are in agreement with the theoretically predicted wavenumbrs. From the MEP plot it is evident that the negative charge covers carbonyl group, mono substituted phenyl ring, O59 atom and the positive region is over the nitrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms. NLO behavior of the title molecule was investigated by the determination of the first and second order hyperpolarizabilities. The molecular orbitals and molecular electrostatic potential map are also reported. The NMR spectra and Fukui indices are also analyzed. Molecule sites important from the aspect of reactivity have been determined by calculations of average local ionization energy (ALIE), Fukui functions and bond dissociation energies (BDE). BDE for hydrogen abstraction served us to investigate the possibility for autoxidation mechanism of the investigated molecule. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used in order to investigate which atoms of the title molecule have the most pronounced interactions with water molecules. Molecular docking studies reveal that the inhibitor forms a stable complex with HNE as is evident from the binding affinity -10.9 kcal/mol and the results suggest that the compound exhibit inhibitory activity against HNE.

  6. Expansion Techniques for Collisionless Stellar Dynamical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Meiron, Yohai; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We present GPU implementations of two fast force calculation methods, based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One is the Self-Consistent Field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other is the Multipole Expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field method and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a "pure" expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; it is thus capable of capturing radial structure easily, where SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took...

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of flow in pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blömer, Jan

    2001-08-01

    The gaseous flow in nano-scale pores is of wide interest for many today's industrial applications, e.g., in microelectronics, nano-mechanical devices (Knudsen compressor) and reaction and adsorption at porous surfaces. This can be seen from a variety of papers of recent RGD Symposia. Furthermore it is possible to separate gases by porous membranes. Although the fundamental problem of all these applications is same, namely the important role of the gas-surface interaction in such small structures, we will primarily concentrate on the separation of different gas species by porous membranes. These membranes are typically very robust (temperature, chemical resistance) because they are made from ceramics which offers new application fields. Porous flow can roughly be divided in several flow regimes by the Knudsen number: From viscous flow to Knudsen diffusion to surface diffusion and up to capillary condensation. A Molecular Dynamics (MD) model for the gas as well as the surface is formulated to investigate the interaction of gas atoms or molecules with internal degrees of freedom and the pore. The MD method seems to be well suited to study these phenomena because it can deal with the high density and the many-body-interactions, which occur during the multilayer adsorption and condensation at the surface, although it is clear that it is limited to a small physical space because of its high computational consumption.

  8. Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation of colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Safa; Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2014-03-01

    DPD as a mesoscale method was firstly proposed to study dynamics of suspensions under flow condition. However the proposed method failed to capture shear properties of suspensions because it lacked: first a potential to reproduce lubrication forces and second a clear definition for the colloid surface. Recently we reported a modified DPD method which defines colloidal particles as particles with hard core and a dissipative coat. An additional lubrication force was introduced to include the short-range hydrodynamics that are not captured in original DPD. The model was found to be able to reproduce shear properties of suspensions for a wide range of different systems, from monodisperse to bimodal with different volume fractions, compositions and size ratios. In present work our modified DPD method is employed to study both equilibrium and flow properties of colloidal suspension. Zero shear viscosity of suspension is measured using Green-Kubo expressions and the results are compared to theoretical predictions. Furthermore, structure formation in suspensions is studied in respect to energy landscape of the fluid both at rest and under flow.

  9. Dynamic Hybrid Simulation of the Lunar Wake During ARTEMIS Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Angelopoulos, V.; Auster, H.; Glassmeier, K.; Kriegel, H.; Motschmann, U. M.; Mueller, J.

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of the highly dynamic solar wind with the Moon is simulated with the A.I.K.E.F. (Adaptive Ion Kinetic Electron Fluid) code for the ARTEMIS P1 flyby on February 13, 2010. The A.I.K.E.F. hybrid plasma simulation code is the improved version of the Braunschweig code. It is able to automatically increase simulation grid resolution in areas of interest during runtime, which greatly increases resolution as well as performance. As the Moon has no intrinsic magnetic field and no ionosphere, the solar wind particles are absorbed at its surface, resulting in the formation of the lunar wake at the nightside. The solar wind magnetic field is basically convected through the Moon and the wake is slowly filled up with solar wind particles. However, this interaction is strongly influenced by the highly dynamic solar wind during the flyby. This is considered by a dynamic variation of the upstream conditions in the simulation using OMNI solar wind measurement data. By this method, a very good agreement between simulation and observations is achieved. The simulations show that the stationary structure of the lunar wake constitutes a tableau vivant in space representing the well-known Friedrichs diagram for MHD waves.

  10. Can cerebrovascular reactivity be assessed by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthezene, Y.; Meyer, R.; Froment, J.C. [Department of Radiology, Creatis UMR CNRS 5515, Neurological Hospital, Lyon (France); Nighoghossian, N.; Trouillas, P. [Neurology, Cerebrovascular Disease and Ataxia Research Center, Neurological Hospital, Lyon (France); Damien, J.; Cinotti, L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Neurological Hospital, Lyon (France); Adeleine, P. [Medical Informatics Laboratory, UFR Alexis Carrel, Lyon (France)

    1998-01-01

    s The acetazolamide (ACZ) test is performed to evaluate the decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by investigation of vasomotor reactivity (VMR). Our aim was to study cerebral blood flow and blood volume changes induced by the ACZ test in healthy control subjects using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced gradient-echo MRI (DSC-MRI). A FLASH sequence was used to produce susceptibility-weighted images during an intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA). After the first dynamic study, 1 g acetazolamide was given intravenously and 10 min later a second bolus of Gd-DTPA was injected. Using the indicator-dilution theory, relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow were estimated. In healthy subjects the ACZ test induced a significant increase in relative blood volume (from 80.5 {+-} 10.7 to 113.4 {+-} 11.9) and relative blood flow (from 5.73 {+-} 0.96 to 7.5 {+-} 0.97), symmetrically in the cerebral hemispheres. This approach might be promising in the understanding of cerebral haemodynamics in patients with vascular disorders. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 tabs., 24 refs.

  11. Hierarchical Testing with Automated Document Generation for Amanzi, ASCEM's Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, J. D.; Steefel, C. I.; Yabusaki, S.; Castleton, K.; Scheibe, T. D.; Keating, E. H.; Freedman, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Simulation Capabililty for Environmental Management (ASCEM) program is developing an approach and open-source tool suite for standardized risk and performance assessments at legacy nuclear waste sites. These assessments use a graded and iterative approach, beginning with simplified highly abstracted models, and adding geometric and geologic complexity as understanding is gained. To build confidence in this assessment capability, extensive testing of the underlying tools is needed. Since the tools themselves, such as the subsurface flow and reactive-transport simulator, Amanzi, are under active development, testing must be both hierarchical and highly automated. In this presentation we show how we have met these requirements, by leveraging the python-based open-source documentation system called Sphinx with several other open-source tools. Sphinx builds on the reStructured text tool docutils, with important extensions that include high-quality formatting of equations, and integrated plotting through matplotlib. This allows the documentation, as well as the input files for tests, benchmark and tutorial problems, to be maintained with the source code under a version control system. In addition, it enables developers to build documentation in several different formats (e.g., html and pdf) from a single source. We will highlight these features, and discuss important benefits of this approach for Amanzi. In addition, we'll show that some of ASCEM's other tools, such as the sampling provided by the Uncertainty Quantification toolset, are naturally leveraged to enable more comprehensive testing. Finally, we will highlight the integration of this hiearchical testing and documentation framework with our build system and tools (CMake, CTest, and CDash).

  12. Selecting a Dynamic Simulation Modeling Method for Health Care Delivery Research—Part 2: Report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Crown, William; Padula, William V.; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Osgood, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling

  13. Selecting a Dynamic Simulation Modeling Method for Health Care Delivery Research—Part 2: Report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Crown, William; Padula, William V.; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Osgood, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling c

  14. Accelerating moderately stiff chemical kinetics in reactive-flow simulations using GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Niemeyer, Kyle E

    2014-01-01

    The chemical kinetics ODEs arising from operator-split reactive-flow simulations were solved on GPUs using explicit integration algorithms. Nonstiff chemical kinetics of a hydrogen oxidation mechanism (9 species and 38 irreversible reactions) were computed using the explicit fifth-order Runge-Kutta-Cash-Karp method, and the GPU-accelerated version performed faster than single- and six-core CPU versions by factors of 126 and 25, respectively, for 524,288 ODEs. Moderately stiff kinetics, represented with mechanisms for hydrogen/carbon-monoxide (13 species and 54 irreversible reactions) and methane (53 species and 634 irreversible reactions) oxidation, were computed using the stabilized explicit second-order Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (RKC) algorithm. The GPU-based RKC implementation demonstrated an increase in performance of nearly 59 and 10 times, for problem sizes consisting of 262,144 ODEs and larger, than the single- and six-core CPU-based RKC algorithms using the hydrogen/carbon-monoxide mechanism. With the met...

  15. Numerical Simulation of Reactive Flows in Overexpanded Supersonic Nozzle with Film Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sellam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reignition phenomena occurring in a supersonic nozzle flow may present a crucial safety issue for rocket propulsion systems. These phenomena concern mainly rocket engines which use H2 gas (GH2 in the film cooling device, particularly when the nozzle operates under over expanded flow conditions at sea level or at low altitudes. Consequently, the induced wall thermal loads can lead to the nozzle geometry alteration, which in turn, leads to the appearance of strong side loads that may be detrimental to the rocket engine structural integrity. It is therefore necessary to understand both aerodynamic and chemical mechanisms that are at the origin of these processes. This paper is a numerical contribution which reports results from CFD analysis carried out for supersonic reactive flows in a planar nozzle cooled with GH2 film. Like the experimental observations, CFD simulations showed their ability to highlight these phenomena for the same nozzle flow conditions. Induced thermal load are also analyzed in terms of cooling efficiency and the results already give an idea on their magnitude. It was also shown that slightly increasing the film injection pressure can avoid the reignition phenomena by moving the separation shock towards the nozzle exit section.

  16. Morphology change of rock-like oxide fuels in reactivity-initiated-accident simulation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Sasajima, H.; Yamashita, T.; Uetsuka, H.

    2003-06-01

    Pulse irradiation tests under simulated reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions were performed with three types of rock-like oxide (ROX) fuels. Single phase yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), homogeneous mixture of YSZ/spinel and YSZ particle dispersed in spinel type ROX fuels were pulse irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR). Mode and threshold of the fuel rod failure including its consequences were investigated under the RIA conditions. The cladding failure occurred in a burst type mode in all the three types of ROX fuel tests with considerable fuel melting. Even though the mode was quite different from those of UO 2 fuel, failure threshold enthalpies of the ROX fuels were close to that of UO 2 fuel at about 10 GJ m -3. The consequence of the failure of the ROX fuels rods was different from the one of UO 2 fuel rods, because molten fuel dispersal occurred at lower enthalpies in the ROX fuel tests. Change of the fuel structure and material interaction in the transient heating conditions were examined through optical and secondary electron microscopy, and electron probe micro analysis.

  17. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Equilibrium and dynamic simulations of bidisperse suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Charles Andrew

    Monte Carlo simulations are being used to investigate the structural behavior of bidisperse colloidal (silica) liquids. The solids volume fraction is 40%, and the bidispersity is characterized by two parameters: alpha, the particle size ratio, and beta, the relative volume fraction of small particles over the total volume fraction of solids. Four different size ratios are used (two, three, four, and five-to-one). The largest particle size is 0.6 mum, while the smallest is 0.12 mum. The variables (electrolyte concentration, surface potential, etc.) of the potential are set to ensure the system is stable and non-flocculating. The radial distribution function g(r) for all combinations (small-small, small-large, and large-large) of particles along with the osmotic compressibility is calculated for the various size ratios at different beta values. There are two interesting changes between the monodisperse and bidisperse suspensions. First, g(r) for the large-large particles shows an interesting structural change in that the HCP (hexagonal close packing) structure for the monodisperse large particles evolves to a BCC-like (body centered cubic) structure as beta is increased. There is also an indication of phase separation which may be a consequence of depletion flocculation. These changes appear to occur for all size ratios that have been investigated. Also, the HCP (hexagonal close packing) structure for the monodisperse small particles is completely broken up when added to the large particle system. Second, the structural change appears approximately at the beta value corresponding to the minimum in the osmotic compressibility. The structure factor is also calculated from the Fourier transform of the radial distribution function. It is suggested as future work to obtain an effective potential between large particle potentials, treating the small particle-laden fluid as a continuum. This effective potential, which can be obtained using an inversion scheme, may indicate

  19. Thermal transport properties of uranium dioxide by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Taku; Sinnott, Susan B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tulenko, James S. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Grimes, Robin W. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Schelling, Patrick K. [AMPAC and Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: sphil@mse.ufl.edu

    2008-04-30

    The thermal conductivities of single crystal and polycrystalline UO{sub 2} are calculated using molecular dynamics simulations, with interatomic interactions described by two different potential models. For single crystals, the calculated thermal conductivities are found to be strongly dependent on the size of the simulation cell. However, a scaling analysis shows that the two models predict essentially identical values for the thermal conductivity for infinite system sizes. By contrast, simulations with the two potentials for identical fine polycrystalline structures yield estimated thermal conductivities that differ by a factor of two. We analyze the origin of this difference.

  20. Acoustic Simulation with Dynamic Mechanisms in Virtual Reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琼; 石教英

    1998-01-01

    Although most investigators have realized the importance of acoustic simulation in sophisticated VR systems,large computational load involved in this process often contradicts the requirements of real-time interaction,which in return bring on applying the expensive hardware or VR-specific workstations to this area.In order to reduce the computational cost and try to realize the real-time acoustic simulation in software with (or even without)some low-cost hardware,this paper proposes some dynamic mechanisms which can be used as possible strategies embedded into acoustic simulation in VR.Preliminary implementation of those mechanisms has proved to be fairly effective.

  1. Dynamic simulator of helium refrigeration system; Hemiumu reitoki doteki shumyureta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, H.; Mori, M.; Miyake, A. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-06-07

    The helium refrigerator has various operation modes. Therefore, it is insufficient for developing the refrigerating machine only by the static simulator, which simulates only one design point. It is necessary to carry out the design, which can deal with the change of the operation mode and construction of the appropriate controllability of the system. The construction of the dynamic simulator is required in the reason. This time, the heat exchanger in the helium refrigerator cool-down was unsteadily analyzed, and it was compared with the measured value. (NEDO)

  2. Development and verification of a dynamic underbalanced drilling simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.; Vefring, E.H.; Rommetveit, R. [RF-Rogaland Research, Bergen (Norway); Bieseman, T. [Shell RTS, Rijswijk (Netherlands); Maglione, R. [Agip Spa, Milano (Italy); Lage, A.C.; Nakagawa, E. [Petrobras/CENPES, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1997-07-01

    A dynamic underbalanced drilling (UBD) simulator has been developed in a joint industry project. The simulator incorporates models for multiphase flow, well-reservoir interaction, gas/oil solubility and gas injection systems. The fluid components in the system include injected gases, mud, produced gas, produced oil and water and drilled cuttings. Both coiled tubing and conventional jointed pipe can be simulated. The primary use of the simulator is in the planning phase of an UBD operation. An UBD operation is very dynamic due to the changes in flow conditions and other operations. The importance of the dynamic effects is illustrated by a field example. The dynamic simulator allows for the analysis of various operations that cannot be analyzed with a steady state simulator. Some of these operations include starting/stopping circulation; various gas injection techniques, e.g.: parasitic string, parasitic casing, through completion, and drill string injection; drilling operations: drilling, tripping, pipe connections, and BHA deployment. To verify the simulator, two phase flow tests in near-horizontal annulus were performed in order to provide data for validation. Field data are actively collected for this purpose. In this paper, two field cases are presented. One is a coiled tubing drilling operation in Dalen field in the Netherlands where a Nitrogen lift test was performed in a through completion configuration. The second case is a UBD operation in Candeias field in Brazil. In this case, drillstring gas injection tests were performed in a cemented 9-5/8-in. casing at 1,800 m.

  3. A Fault Evolution Model Including the Rupture Dynamic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a preliminary numerical simulation of seismicity and stress evolution along a strike-slip fault in a 3D elastic half space. Following work of Ben-Zion (1996), the fault geometry is devised as a vertical plane which is about 70 km long and 17 km wide, comparable to the size of San Andreas Fault around Parkfield. The loading mechanism is described by "backslip" method. The fault failure is governed by a static/kinetic friction law, and induced stress transfer is calculated with Okada's static solution. In order to track the rupture propagation in detail, we allow induced stress to propagate through the medium at the shear wave velocity by introducing a distance-dependent time delay to responses to stress changes. Current simulation indicates small to moderate earthquakes following the Gutenberg-Richter law and quasi-periodical characteristic large earthquakes, which are consistent with previous work by others. Next we will consider introducing a more realistic friction law, namely, the laboratory-derived rate- and state- dependent law, which can simulate more realistic and complicated sliding behavior such as the stable and unstable slip, the aseismic sliding and the slip nucleation process. In addition, the long duration of aftershocks is expected to be reproduced due to this time-dependent friction law, which is not available in current seismicity simulation. The other difference from previous work is that we are trying to include the dynamic ruptures in this study. Most previous study on seismicity simulation is based on the static solution when dealing with failure induced stress changes. However, studies of numerical simulation of rupture dynamics have revealed lots of important details which are missing in the quasi-static/quasi- dynamic simulation. For example, dynamic simulations indicate that the slip on the ground surface becomes larger if the dynamic rupture process reaches the free surface. The concentration of stress on the propagating crack

  4. Determining equilibrium constants for dimerization reactions from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, Djurre H; Schäfer, Lars V; De Vries, Alex H; Marrink, Siewert J; Berendsen, Herman J C; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-07-15

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices covers sufficiently many dimerization and dissociation events, their binding free energy is readily derived from the fraction of time during which the two helices are observed in dimeric form. Exactly how the correct value for the free energy is to be calculated, however, is unclear, and indeed several different and contradictory approaches have been used. In particular, results obtained via Boltzmann statistics differ from those determined via the law of mass action. Here, we develop a theory that resolves this discrepancy. We show that for simulation systems containing two molecules, the dimerization free energy is given by a formula of the form ΔG ∝ ln(P(1) /P(0) ). Our theory is also applicable to high concentrations that typically have to be used in molecular dynamics simulations to keep the simulation system small, where the textbook dilute approximations fail. It also covers simulations with an arbitrary number of monomers and dimers and provides rigorous error estimates. Comparison with test simulations of a simple Lennard Jones system with various particle numbers as well as with reference free energy values obtained from radial distribution functions show full agreement for both binding free energies and dimerization statistics.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Macromolecules Using Graphics Processing Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Ji; Ge, Wei; Yu, Xiang; Yang, Xiaozhen; Li, Jinghai

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful computational tool to study the behavior of macromolecular systems. But many simulations of this field are limited in spatial or temporal scale by the available computational resource. In recent years, graphics processing unit (GPU) provides unprecedented computational power for scientific applications. Many MD algorithms suit with the multithread nature of GPU. In this paper, MD algorithms for macromolecular systems that run entirely on GPU are presented. Compared to the MD simulation with free software GROMACS on a single CPU core, our codes achieve about 10 times speed-up on a single GPU. For validation, we have performed MD simulations of polymer crystallization on GPU, and the results observed perfectly agree with computations on CPU. Therefore, our single GPU codes have already provided an inexpensive alternative for macromolecular simulations on traditional CPU clusters and they can also be used as a basis to develop parallel GPU programs to further spee...

  6. Effective grid-dependent dispersion coefficient for conservative and reactive transport simulations in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinez, J. M.; Valocchi, A. J.; Herrera, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the finite size of numerical grids, it is very difficult to correctly account for processes that occur at different spatial scales to accurately simulate the migration of conservative and reactive compounds dissolved in groundwater. In one hand, transport processes in heterogeneous porous media are controlled by local-scale dispersion associated to transport processes at the pore-scale. On the other hand, variations of velocity at the continuum- or Darcy-scale produce spreading of the contaminant plume, which is referred to as macro-dispersion. Furthermore, under some conditions both effects interact, so that spreading may enhance the action of local-scale dispersion resulting in higher mixing, dilution and reaction rates. Traditionally, transport processes at different spatial scales have been included in numerical simulations by using a single dispersion coefficient. This approach implicitly assumes that the separate effects of local-dispersion and macro-dispersion can be added and represented by a unique effective dispersion coefficient. Moreover, the selection of the effective dispersion coefficient for numerical simulations usually do not consider the filtering effect of the grid size over the small-scale flow features. We have developed a multi-scale Lagragian numerical method that allows using two different dispersion coefficients to represent local- and macro-scale dispersion. This technique considers fluid particles that carry solute mass and whose locations evolve according to a deterministic component given by the grid-scale velocity and a stochastic component that corresponds to a block-effective macro-dispersion coefficient. Mass transfer between particles due to local-scale dispersion is approximated by a meshless method. We use our model to test under which transport conditions the combined effect of local- and macro-dispersion are additive and can be represented by a single effective dispersion coefficient. We also demonstrate that for

  7. Simulation of reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady flows in solid rocket motors: Efficient strategy using Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibra, A.; Dupays, J.; Murrone, A.; Laurent, F.; Massot, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we tackle the issue of the accurate simulation of evaporating and reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady gaseous flows. In solid propulsion, aluminum particles are included in the propellant to improve the global performances but the distributed combustion of these droplets in the chamber is suspected to be a driving mechanism of hydrodynamic and acoustic instabilities. The faithful prediction of two-phase interactions is a determining step for future solid rocket motor optimization. When looking at saving computational ressources as required for industrial applications, performing reliable simulations of two-phase flow instabilities appears as a challenge for both modeling and scientific computing. The size polydispersity, which conditions the droplet dynamics, is a key parameter that has to be accounted for. For moderately dense sprays, a kinetic approach based on a statistical point of view is particularly appropriate. The spray is described by a number density function and its evolution follows a Williams-Boltzmann transport equation. To solve it, we use Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods, based on a continuous discretization of the size phase space into sections, which offer an accurate treatment of the polydispersion. The objective of this paper is threefold: first to derive a new Two Size Moment Multi-Fluid model that is able to tackle evaporating polydisperse sprays at low cost while accurately describing the main driving mechanisms, second to develop a dedicated evaporation scheme to treat simultaneously mass, moment and energy exchanges with the gas and between the sections. Finally, to design a time splitting operator strategy respecting both reactive two-phase flow physics and cost/accuracy ratio required for industrial computations. Using a research code, we provide 0D validations of the new scheme before assessing the splitting technique's ability on a reference two-phase flow acoustic case. Implemented in the industrial

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker

    2015-11-01

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide.

  9. Improved Angle Potentials for Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulacu, Monica; Goga, Nicolae; Zhao, Wei; Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca; Periole, Xavier; Tieleman, D. Peter; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Potentials routinely used in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are not always suitable for modeling systems at coarse-grained resolution. For example, in the calculation of traditional torsion angle potentials, numerical instability is often encountered in the case of very flexible molecules.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.sternberg@partner.kit.edu; Witter, Raiker [Tallinn University of Technology, Technomedicum (Estonia)

    2015-11-15

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide.

  11. Efficient dynamic simulation of flexible link manipulators with PID control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Jonker, Jan B.; Mook, D.T.; Balachandran, B.

    2001-01-01

    For accurate simulations of the dynamic behavior of flexible manipulators the combination of a perturbation method and modal analysis is proposed. First, the vibrational motion is modeled as a first-order perturbation of a nominal rigid link motion. The vibrational motion is then described by a set

  12. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of laser melting of silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1996-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite temperature density functional theory, is used to simulate laser heating of crystal silicon. We have found that a high concentration of excited electrons dramatically weakens the covalent bond. As a result, the system undergoes a melting tr

  13. Simulating Poverty and Inequality Dynamics in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansoms, An; Geenen, Sara

    2012-01-01

    This article considers how the simulation game of DEVELOPMENT MONOPOLY provides insight into poverty and inequality dynamics in a development context. It first discusses how the game is rooted in theoretical and conceptual frameworks on poverty and inequality. Subsequently, it reflects on selected playing experiences, with special focus on the…

  14. Benchmark of Schemes for Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goga, N.; Melo, M. N.; Rzepiela, A. J.; de Vries, Alex; Hadar, A.; Marrink, S. J.; Berendsen, Herman

    2015-01-01

    In multiscale molecular dynamics simulations the accuracy of detailed models is combined with the efficiency of a reduced representation. For several applications - namely those of sampling enhancement - it is desirable to combine fine-grained (FG) and coarse-grained (CG) approaches into a single hy

  15. Brownian dynamics simulations of nanosheet solutions under shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yueyi; Green, Micah J

    2014-07-14

    The flow-induced conformation dynamics of nanosheets are simulated using a Brownian Dynamics (BD) formulation applied to a bead-rod sheetlike molecular model. This is the first-ever use of BD to simulate flow-induced dynamics of two-dimensional structures. Using this framework, we simulate dilute suspensions of coarse-grained nanosheets and compute conformation dynamics for simple shear flow. The data show power law scaling relationships between nanosheet parameters (such as bending moduli and molecular weight) and the resulting intrinsic viscosity and conformation. For nonzero bending moduli, an effective dimension of 2.77 at equilibrium is calculated from the scaling relationship between radius of gyration and molecular weight. We also find that intrinsic viscosity varies with molecular weight with an exponent of 2.12 ± 0.23; this dependence is significantly larger than those found for linear polymers. Weak shear thinning is observed at high Weissenberg number (Wi). This simulation method provides a computational basis for developing manufacturing processes for nanosheet-derived materials by relating flow forces and nanosheet parameters to the resulting material morphology.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of barrier crossings in the condensed phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Otter, Wouter K.

    1998-01-01

    The isomerisation rates of a calix[4]arene in vacuo and in two solvents have been computed by means of molecular dynamics simulations (MD). In MD the equations of classical mechanics are used to calculate the motion of the reacting molecule and the surrounding solvent molecules. Thus, the intricate

  17. A Dynamic Simulation Game (UNIGAME) for Strategic University Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, Yaman; Diker, Vedat Guclu

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interactive simulation model on which the academic aspects of university management can be analyzed and alternative management strategies tested. Focuses specifically on long-term, dynamic, strategic management problems and yields performance measures about the fundamental activities in a university that can support strategic…

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Tryggvason, T.

    1998-01-01

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of lipid vesicle fusion in atomic detail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knecht, Volker; Marrink, Siewert-Jan

    The fusion of a membrane-bounded vesicle with a target membrane is a key step in intracellular trafficking, exocytosis, and drug delivery. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the fusion of small unilamellar vesicles composed of a dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitic

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory flows in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply the direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to oscillatory flows of fluids in microscopic channels. Initially, we show that the microscopic simulations resemble the macroscopic predictions based on the Navier–Stokes equation very well for large channel width, high...

  1. Using Simulation to Assess the Opportunities of Dynamic Waste Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.

    In this paper, we illustrate the use of discrete event simulation to evaluate how dynamic planning methodologies can be best applied for the collection of waste from underground containers. We present a case study that took place at the waste collection company Twente Milieu, located in The

  2. Using simulation to assess the opportunities of dynamic waste collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.; Bangsow, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we illustrate the use of discrete event simulation to evaluate how dynamic planning methodologies can be best applied for the collection of waste from underground containers. We present a case study that took place at the waste collection company Twente Milieu, located in The

  3. Simulation study of water and sugar dynamics in supercooled mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Valeria; Cagin, Tahir; Goddard, William A.

    2003-03-01

    Water dynamics in concentrated carbohydrate solutions is of utmost importance in food and pharmaceutical technology, where low water mobility is desirable to slow down chemical degradation and preserve biomolecules. We have studied the microscopic mechanism of water diffusion in binary and polydisperse malto-oligosaccharides and water mixtures by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The computations were performed with a coarse grain model (M3B), derived from atomistic simulations of water and malto-oligosaccharides. The use of the M3B model permits simulations of the order of 0.1 microsecond, thus allowing us to explore water dynamics from the liquid to the deep supercooled regime. The dynamics of water confined in the sugar matrix is slowed down with respect to bulk water. We found that at low moisture content and low temperature, ranslational diffusion of water and glucose rotation proceed through a hopping-diffusion mechanism. Moreover, we found water mobility to be heterogeneous: there is a broad distribution of time scales for different water molecules in the mixtures. We discuss whether there is a relationship between the heterogeneous structure of these mixtures in the sub-nanometer scale and the heterogeneous dynamics of water molecules.

  4. Dynamic simulation for effective workforce management in new product development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mutingi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective planning and management of workforce for new product development (NPD projects is a great challenge to many organisations, especially in the presence of engineering changes during the product development process. The management objective in effective workforce management is to recruit, develop and deploy the right people at the right place at the right time so as to fulfill organizational objectives. In this paper, we propose a dynamic simulation model to address the workforce management problem in a typical NPD project consisting of design, prototyping, and production phases. We assume that workforce demand is a function of project work remaining and the current available skill pool. System dynamics simulation concepts are used to capture the causality relationships and feedback loops in the workforce system from a systems thinking. The evaluation of system dynamics simulation reveals the dynamic behaviour in NPD workforce management systems and shows how adaptive dynamic recruitment and training decisions can effectively balance the workforce system during the NPD process.

  5. Nonadiabatic Renner-Teller quantum dynamics of OH(X(2)Π) + H(+) reactive collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamallo, Pablo; Akpinar, Sinan; Defazio, Paolo; Petrongolo, Carlo

    2017-02-08

    Following previous studies on the O((3)P) + H2(+)(X(2)Σg(+)) collisions, we present the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics of the reactions OH(X(2)Π) + H'(+) → OH'(X(2)Π) + H(+), exchange (e), → OH(+)(X(3)Σ(-)) + H'((2)S), quenching (q), and → OH'(+) (X(3)Σ(-)) + H((2)S), exchange-quenching (eq). The reactants and products correlate via the ground X[combining tilde](2)A'' and first excited Ã(2)A' electronic states of OH2(+), which are the degenerate components of linear (2)Π species. Therefore, they are strongly perturbed by nonadiabatic Renner-Teller (RT) effects, opening the (q) and (eq) channels that are closed in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Using accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) and RT matrix elements, initial-state-resolved reaction probabilities, real-time dynamics, cross sections, and rate constants of the product channels are obtained through the time-dependent real wavepacket (WP) method and full coupled-channel calculations. Owing to the nonadiabatic couplings, the WP jumps from the excited Ã(2)A' surface to the X[combining tilde](2)A'' ground PES, avoiding any barrier, opening the quenching channels, and giving many collision complexes into the deep minima of both PESs, as it is clearly shown by the oscillations of the reaction probabilities and by the time-dependent WP dynamics. All the results show that the nonadiabatic-RT channels (q) and (eq) are highly reactive, much more than the adiabatic one (e), pointing out large RT effects. The reactivity of the quenching channels is similar, accounting for 97% of the overall reactivity. In fact, the maximum values of the (q) and (eq) cross sections σq and σeq are equal to 31.6 Å(2), whereas the maximum σe value equals 1.34 Å(2), and the maximum values of the rate constants kq, keq, and ke are 2.07 × 10(-10), 2.45 × 10(-10), and 0.23 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). Some calculations show that the centrifugal-sudden and the truncated coupled-channel approximations cannot be employed for

  6. Dynamic simulation of sustainable farm development scenarios using cognitive modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuzhyk Kateryna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic simulation of sustainable farm development scenarios using cognitive modeling. The paper presents a dynamic simulation system of sustainable development scenarios on farms using cognitive modeling. The system incorporates relevant variables which affect the sustainable development of farms. Its user provides answers to strategic issues connected with the level of farm sustainability over a long-term perspective of dynamic development. The work contains a description of the model structure as well as the results of simulations carried out on 16 farms in northern Ukraine. The results show that the process of sustainability is based mainly on the potential for innovation in agricultural production and biodiversity. The user is able to simulate various scenarios for the sustainable development of a farm and visualize the influence of factors on the economic and social situation, as well as on environmental aspects. Upon carrying out a series of simulations, it was determined that the development of farms characterized by sustainable development is based on additional profit, which serves as the main motivation for transforming a conventional farm into a sustainable one. Nevertheless, additional profit is not the only driving force in the system of sustainable development. The standard of living, market condition, and legal regulations as well as government support also play a significant motivational role.

  7. Acoustic properties in glycerol glass-former: Molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busselez, Remi; Pezeril, Thomas; Institut des Materiaux et Molecules du Mans Team

    2013-03-01

    Study of high-frequency collective dynamics around TeraHertz region in glass former has been a subject of intense investigations and debates over the past decade. In particular, the presence of the Boson peak characteristic of glassy material and its relation to other glass anomalies. Recently, experiments and simulations have underlined possible relation between Boson peak and transverse acoustic modes in glassy materials. In particular, simulations of simple Lennard Jones glass former have shown a relation between Ioffe-Regel criterion in transverse modes and Boson peak. We present here molecular dynamics simulation on high frequency dynamics of glycerol. In order to study mesoscopic order (0.5-5nm-1), we made use of large simulation box containing 80000 atoms. Analysis of collective longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes shows striking similarities in comparison with simulation of Lennard-Jones particles. In particular, it seems that a connection may exist between Ioffe-Regel criterion for transverse modes and Bose Peak frequency. However,in our case we show that this connection may be related with structural correlation arising from molecular clusters.

  8. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Yechun; SHEN; Jianhua; LUO; Xiaomin; SHEN; Xu; CHEN; Ka

    2004-01-01

    Studies of protein-ligand interactions are helpful to elucidating the mechanisms of ligands, providing clues for rational drug design. The currently developed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) is a complementary approach to experimental techniques in investigating the biochemical processes occurring at microsecond or second time scale, thus SMD may provide dynamical and kinetic processes of ligand-receptor binding and unbinding, which cannot be accessed by the experimental methods. In this article, the methodology of SMD is described, and the applications of SMD simulations for obtaining dynamic insights into protein-ligand interactions are illustrated through two of our own examples. One is associated with the simulations of binding and unbinding processes between huperzine A and acetylcholinesterase, and the other is concerned with the unbinding process of α-APA from HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  9. Quantum Dynamics Simulations for Modeling Experimental Pump-Probe Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brett; Nayyar, Sahil; Liss, Kyle; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved studies of quantum dynamics have benefited greatly from developments in ultrafast table-top and free electron lasers. Advances in computer software and hardware have lowered the barrier for performing calculations such that relatively simple simulations allow for direct comparison with experimental results. We describe here a set of quantum dynamics calculations in low-dimensional molecular systems. The calculations incorporate coupled electronic-nuclear dynamics, including two interactions with an applied field and nuclear wave packet propagation. The simulations were written and carried out by undergraduates as part of a senior research project, with the specific goal of allowing for detailed interpretation of experimental pump-probe data (in additional to the pedagogical value).

  10. Understanding diabetes population dynamics through simulation modeling and experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew P; Homer, Jack B; Murphy, Dara L; Essien, Joyce D K; Milstein, Bobby; Seville, Donald A

    2006-03-01

    Health planners in the Division of Diabetes Translation and others from the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention used system dynamics simulation modeling to gain a better understanding of diabetes population dynamics and to explore implications for public health strategy. A model was developed to explain the growth of diabetes since 1980 and portray possible futures through 2050. The model simulations suggest characteristic dynamics of the diabetes population, including unintended increases in diabetes prevalence due to diabetes control, the inability of diabetes control efforts alone to reduce diabetes-related deaths in the long term, and significant delays between primary prevention efforts and downstream improvements in diabetes outcomes.

  11. Thermochemistry and Dynamics of Reactive Species: Nitrogen-rich Compounds, Metals and SiC Clusters in Free and Solvated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-31

    of Reactive Species : Nitrogen-rich F49620-02-1-0371 Compounds, Metals and SiC clusters in Free and Solvated Environments Sb. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...F49620-02-1-0371 Thermochemistry and Dynamics of Reactive Species : Nitrogen-rich Compounds, Metals, and SiC clusters in Free and Solvated Environments...research program remain the same as before: obtaining fundamental thermochemical and dynamical data on reactive species Status of Effort This report

  12. Implementing fluid dynamics obtained from GeoPET in reactive transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna; Eichelbaum, Sebastian; Kulenkampff, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Flow and transport simulations in geomaterials are commonly conducted on high-resolution tomograms (μCT) of the pore structure or stochastic models that are calibrated with measured integral quantities, like break through curves (BTC). Yet, there existed virtually no method for experimental verification of the simulated velocity distribution results. Positron emission tomography (PET) has unrivaled sensitivity and robustness for non-destructive, quantitative, spatio-temporal measurement of tracer concentrations in body tissue. In the past decade, we empowered PET for its applicability in opaque/geological media - GeoPET (Kulenkampff et al.; Kulenkampff et al., 2008; Zakhnini et al., 2013) and have developed detailed correction schemes to bring the images into sharp focus. Thereby it is the appropriate method for experimental verification and calibration of computer simulations of pore-scale transport by means of the observed propagation of a tracer pulse, c_PET(x,y,z,t). In parallel, we aimed at deriving velocity and porosity distributions directly from our concentration time series of fluid flow processes in geomaterials. This would allow us to directly benefit from lab scale observations and to parameterize respective numerical transport models. For this we have developed a robust spatiotemporal (3D+t) parameter extraction algorithm. Here, we will present its functionality, and demonstrate the use of obtained velocity distributions in finite element simulations of reactive transport processes on drill core scale. Kulenkampff, J., Gruendig, M., Zakhnini, A., Gerasch, R., and Lippmann-Pipke, J.: Process tomography of diffusion with PET for evaluating anisotropy and heterogeneity, Clay Minerals, in press. Kulenkampff, J., Gründig, M., Richter, M., and Enzmann, F.: Evaluation of positron emission tomography for visualisation of migration processes in geomaterials, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 33, 937-942, 2008. Zakhnini, A., Kulenkampff, J., Sauerzapf, S

  13. Parallel alternating direction preconditioner for isogeometric simulations of explicit dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Łoś, Marcin

    2015-04-27

    In this paper we present a parallel implementation of the alternating direction preconditioner for isogeometric simulations of explicit dynamics. The Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) algorithm, belongs to the category of matrix-splitting iterative methods, was proposed almost six decades ago for solving parabolic and elliptic partial differential equations, see [1–4]. The new version of this algorithm has been recently developed for isogeometric simulations of two dimensional explicit dynamics [5] and steady-state diffusion equations with orthotropic heterogenous coefficients [6]. In this paper we present a parallel version of the alternating direction implicit algorithm for three dimensional simulations. The algorithm has been incorporated as a part of PETIGA an isogeometric framework [7] build on top of PETSc [8]. We show the scalability of the parallel algorithm on STAMPEDE linux cluster up to 10,000 processors, as well as the convergence rate of the PCG solver with ADI algorithm as preconditioner.

  14. Software life cycle dynamic simulation model: The organizational performance submodel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausworthe, Robert C.

    1985-01-01

    The submodel structure of a software life cycle dynamic simulation model is described. The software process is divided into seven phases, each with product, staff, and funding flows. The model is subdivided into an organizational response submodel, a management submodel, a management influence interface, and a model analyst interface. The concentration here is on the organizational response model, which simulates the performance characteristics of a software development subject to external and internal influences. These influences emanate from two sources: the model analyst interface, which configures the model to simulate the response of an implementing organization subject to its own internal influences, and the management submodel that exerts external dynamic control over the production process. A complete characterization is given of the organizational response submodel in the form of parameterized differential equations governing product, staffing, and funding levels. The parameter values and functions are allocated to the two interfaces.

  15. Simulation of stochastic network dynamics via entropic matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Tiago; Selig, Marco; Gerland, Ulrich; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2013-02-01

    The simulation of complex stochastic network dynamics arising, for instance, from models of coupled biomolecular processes remains computationally challenging. Often, the necessity to scan a model's dynamics over a large parameter space renders full-fledged stochastic simulations impractical, motivating approximation schemes. Here we propose an approximation scheme which improves upon the standard linear noise approximation while retaining similar computational complexity. The underlying idea is to minimize, at each time step, the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the true time evolved probability distribution and a Gaussian approximation (entropic matching). This condition leads to ordinary differential equations for the mean and the covariance matrix of the Gaussian. For cases of weak nonlinearity, the method is more accurate than the linear method when both are compared to stochastic simulations.

  16. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies.

  17. Ultrascale simulations of non-smooth granular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preclik, Tobias; Rüde, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    This article presents new algorithms for massively parallel granular dynamics simulations on distributed memory architectures using a domain partitioning approach. Collisions are modelled with hard contacts in order to hide their micro-dynamics and thus to extend the time and length scales that can be simulated. The global multi-contact problem is solved using a non-linear block Gauss-Seidel method that is conforming to the subdomain structure. The parallel algorithms employ a sophisticated protocol between processors that delegate algorithmic tasks such as contact treatment and position integration uniquely and robustly to the processors. Communication overhead is minimized through aggressive message aggregation, leading to excellent strong and weak scaling. The robustness and scalability is assessed on three clusters including two peta-scale supercomputers with up to 458,752 processor cores. The simulations can reach unprecedented resolution of up to ten billion () non-spherical particles and contacts.

  18. Ultrascale Simulations of Non-smooth Granular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Preclik, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    This article presents new algorithms for massively parallel granular dynamics simulations on distributed memory architectures using a domain partitioning approach. Collisions are modelled with hard contacts in order to hide their micro-dynamics and thus to extend the time and length scales that can be simulated. The multi-contact problem is solved using a non-linear block Gauss-Seidel method that is conforming to the subdomain structure. The parallel algorithms employ a sophisticated protocol between processors that delegate algorithmic tasks such as contact treatment and position integration uniquely and robustly to the processors. Communication overhead is minimized through aggressive message aggregation, leading to excellent strong and weak scaling. The robustness and scalability is assessed on three clusters including two peta-scale supercomputers with up to 458752 processor cores. The simulations can reach unprecedented resolution of up to ten billion non-spherical particles and contacts.

  19. Ice Formation on Kaolinite: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even via state-of-the-art experimental techniques. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long timescales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaol...

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of triclinic lysozyme in a crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowski, Pawel A; Liu, Chunmei; Deckman, Jason; Case, David A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of crystals can enlighten interpretation of experimental X-ray crystallography data and elucidate structural dynamics and heterogeneity in biomolecular crystals. Furthermore, because of the direct comparison against experimental data, they can inform assessment of molecular dynamics methods and force fields. We present microsecond scale results for triclinic hen egg-white lysozyme in a supercell consisting of 12 independent unit cells using four contemporary force fields (Amber ff99SB, ff14ipq, ff14SB, and CHARMM 36) in crystalline and solvated states (for ff14SB only). We find the crystal simulations consistent across multiple runs of the same force field and robust to various solvent equilibration schemes. However, convergence is slow compared with solvent simulations. All the tested force fields reproduce experimental structural and dynamic properties well, but Amber ff14SB maintains structure and reproduces fluctuations closest to the experimental model: its average backbone structure differs from the deposited structure by 0.37Å; by contrast, the average backbone structure in solution differs from the deposited by 0.65Å. All the simulations are affected by a small progressive deterioration of the crystal lattice, presumably due to imperfect modeling of hydrogen bonding and other crystal contact interactions; this artifact is smallest in ff14SB, with average lattice positions deviating by 0.20Å from ideal. Side-chain disorder is surprisingly low with fewer than 30% of the nonglycine or alanine residues exhibiting significantly populated alternate rotamers. Our results provide helpful insight into the methodology of biomolecular crystal simulations and indicate directions for future work to obtain more accurate energy models for molecular dynamics.

  1. Reactive and Inelastic Scattering Dynamics of Hyperthermal Oxygen Atoms on a Liquid Hydrocarbon Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Timothy K.

    2004-03-01

    The saturated hydrocarbon liquid, squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane), was used as a target surface for model studies of hyperthermal O-atom reactions with a hydrocarbon surface. Beams containing hyperthermal O(^3P) atoms at average translational energies of 3.0 or 5.2 eV were directed at a continuously refreshed squalane surface, and products that scattered from the surface were monitored with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Inelastically scattered O and reactively scattered OH and H_2O have been detected, and the dynamical behavior of these products has been characterized. Both the reactive and nonreactive channels were found to occur through thermal and nonthermal processes, with the nonthermal processes dominating. The initial step leading to formation of OH and H_2O products is believed to be H-atom abstraction to form OH. The direct inelastic scattering of O and the direct H-atom abstraction to form OH occur through gas-phase-like collisions, which may be described by a kinematic picture similar to that used to describe scattering in crossed-beams experiments. This kinematic picture allows the determination of the effective surface mass encountered by the incident O atom, the atom-surface collision energy in the center-of-mass (c.m.) frame, and the fraction of the c.m. collision energy that goes into translation of the scattered gaseous product and the recoiling surface fragment. Center-of-mass velocity-flux maps for scattered OH indicate either single-collision events through a largely collinear O-H-C transition state or multiple-collision events in which OH, likely formed by a stripping mechanism, scatters inelastically from the surface. Further studies are underway to investigate experimentally the dynamics of a possible carbon-containing product (OCH_3) that is predicted by theory to be formed (in addition to OH and H_2O) in the hyperthermal reaction of O(^3P) with a hydrocarbon surface.

  2. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  3. Molecular dynamic simulations of protein/RNA complexes: CRISPR/Csy4 endoribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estarellas, Carolina; Otyepka, Michal; Koča, Jaroslav; Banáš, Pavel; Krepl, Miroslav; Šponer, Jiří

    2015-05-01

    Many prokaryotic genomes comprise Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) offering defense against foreign nucleic acids. These immune systems are conditioned by the production of small CRISPR-derived RNAs matured from long RNA precursors. This often requires a Csy4 endoribonuclease cleaving the RNA 3'-end. We report extended explicit solvent molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of Csy4/RNA complex in precursor and product states, based on X-ray structures of product and inactivated precursor (55 simulations; ~3.7μs in total). The simulations identify double-protonated His29 and deprotonated terminal phosphate as the likely dominant protonation states consistent with the product structure. We revealed potential substates consistent with Ser148 and His29 acting as the general base and acid, respectively. The Ser148 could be straightforwardly deprotonated through solvent and could without further structural rearrangements deprotonate the nucleophile, contrasting similar studies investigating the general base role of nucleobases in ribozymes. We could not locate geometries consistent with His29 acting as general base. However, we caution that the X-ray structures do not always capture the catalytically active geometries and then the reactive structures may be unreachable by the simulation technique. We identified potential catalytic arrangement of the Csy4/RNA complex but we also report limitations of the simulation technique. Even for the dominant protonation state we could not achieve full agreement between the simulations and the structural data. Potential catalytic arrangement of the Csy4/RNA complex is found. Further, we provide unique insights into limitations of simulations of protein/RNA complexes, namely, the influence of the starting experimental structures and force field limitations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the pos......In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us...... simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations....

  5. Micron-scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Void Collapse and Hotspot Growth in PETN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aidan; Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    Material defects and other heterogeneities such as dislocations, micro-porosity, and grain boundaries play key roles in the shock-induced initiation of detonation in energetic materials. We performed non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of nanoscale voids on hotspot growth and initiation in micron-scale pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) crystals under weak shock loading (Up = 1.25 km/s; Us = 4.5 km/s). We used the ReaxFF potential implemented in LAMMPS. We built a pseudo-2D PETN crystal with dimensions 0.3 μm × 0.22 μm × 1.3 nm containing a 20 nm cylindrical void. Once the initial shockwave traversed the entire sample, the shock-front absorbing boundary condition was applied, allowing the simulation to continue beyond 1 nanosecond. Results show an exponentially increasing hotspot growth rate. The hotspot morphology is initially symmetric about the void axis, but strong asymmetry develops at later times, due to strong coupling between exothermic chemistry, temperature, and divergent secondary shockwaves emanating from the collapsing void. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Research on hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dandan; Liu, Fang; Gao, Jiaobo; Sun, Kefeng; Hu, Yu; Li, Yu; Xie, Junhu; Zhang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation method of hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence for hyperspectral equipment evaluation and target detection algorithm. Because of high spectral resolution, strong band continuity, anti-interference and other advantages, in recent years, hyperspectral imaging technology has been rapidly developed and is widely used in many areas such as optoelectronic target detection, military defense and remote sensing systems. Digital imaging simulation, as a crucial part of hardware in loop simulation, can be applied to testing and evaluation hyperspectral imaging equipment with lower development cost and shorter development period. Meanwhile, visual simulation can produce a lot of original image data under various conditions for hyperspectral image feature extraction and classification algorithm. Based on radiation physic model and material characteristic parameters this paper proposes a generation method of digital scene. By building multiple sensor models under different bands and different bandwidths, hyperspectral scenes in visible, MWIR, LWIR band, with spectral resolution 0.01μm, 0.05μm and 0.1μm have been simulated in this paper. The final dynamic scenes have high real-time and realistic, with frequency up to 100 HZ. By means of saving all the scene gray data in the same viewpoint image sequence is obtained. The analysis results show whether in the infrared band or the visible band, the grayscale variations of simulated hyperspectral images are consistent with the theoretical analysis results.

  7. The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem: Simulation and modern dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissert, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    In 1952, Enrico Fermi, John Pasta and Stanislaw Ulam (FPU) simulated the loaded string model, perturbed with small, nonlinear interaction terms. Because Poincare's theorem guarantees the non-existence of a complete set of integrals for three-body problem, they expected to see the diffusion of energy from its single-mode initial condition to all other modes of the string. But for every combination of initial conditions, the energy remained bounded within the lowest few modes. No theoretical explanation existed for this failure of the underlying hypothesis that erogidicity follows from the lack of a complete set of integrals of the motion in a Hamiltonian model. The author traces the history of this problem from the FPU simulation to the point that a consensus was reached concerning its solution twenty years later. During this period, the simulation of nonlinearly-perturbed integral models became the methodology for a new era in dynamics. Through the use of simulation, dynamicists discovered deterministic chaos, in which the exponential separation of pair orbits generate randomness in deterministic macroscopic systems, and a new kind of structure-related to the KAM theorem-that provides limited order in the absence of analytic integrals of the motions. The author maps the set of conceptually-related journal articles into a chronological inference topology that tracks the understanding of this problem of dynamics. Simulating non-integrable models on a digital computer requires the discretization of time and space. These approximations affect what the simulation can reveal about the model, and the model about reality. Simulations play the role of experiments on mathematical models. A discussion is presented of the issues that emerge with the use of simulation as a heuristic device and the groundwork is laid for an epistemology of simulation.

  8. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  9. Coupling all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of ions in water with Brownian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Erban, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of ions (K$^+$, Na$^+$, Ca$^{2+}$ and Cl$^-$) in aqueous solutions are investigated. Water is described using the SPC/E model. A stochastic coarse-grained description for ion behaviour is presented and parameterized using MD simulations. It is given as a system of coupled stochastic and ordinary differential equations, describing the ion position, velocity and acceleration. The stochastic coarse-grained model provides an intermediate description between all-atom MD simulations and Brownian dynamics (BD) models. It is used to develop a multiscale method which uses all-atom MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) BD simulations in the remainder of the domain.

  10. REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING USING A PARALLEL FULLY-COUPLED SIMULATOR BASED ON PRECONDITIONED JACOBIAN-FREE NEWTON-KRYLOV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luanjing Guo; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang; Derek R. Gaston

    2012-06-01

    Systems of multicomponent reactive transport in porous media that are large, highly nonlinear, and tightly coupled due to complex nonlinear reactions and strong solution-media interactions are often described by a system of coupled nonlinear partial differential algebraic equations (PDAEs). A preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solution approach is applied to solve the PDAEs in a fully coupled, fully implicit manner. The advantage of the JFNK method is that it avoids explicitly computing and storing the Jacobian matrix during Newton nonlinear iterations for computational efficiency considerations. This solution approach is also enhanced by physics-based blocking preconditioning and multigrid algorithm for efficient inversion of preconditioners. Based on the solution approach, we have developed a reactive transport simulator named RAT. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and massive scalability of the simulator for reactive transport problems involving strong solution-mineral interactions and fast kinetics. It has been applied to study the highly nonlinearly coupled reactive transport system of a promising in situ environmental remediation that involves urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation.

  11. Compression of Carbon Nanotubes Filled with C60, CH4, or Ne: Predictions from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boris; Sinnott, Susan B.; Mikulski, Paul T.; Harrison, Judith A.

    2002-05-01

    The effect of filling nanotubes with C60, CH4, or Ne on the mechanical properties of the nanotubes is examined. The approach is classical molecular dynamics using the reactive empirical bond order (REBO) and the adaptive intermolecular REBO potentials. The simulations predict that the buckling force of filled nanotubes can be larger than that of empty nanotubes, and the magnitude of the increase depends on the density of the filling material. In addition, these simulations demonstrate that the buckling force of empty nanotubes depends on temperature. Filling the nanotube disrupts this temperature effect so that it is no longer present in some cases.

  12. Importance of thermal reactivity for hexamethylenetetramine formation from simulated interstellar ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Duvernay, F.; Briani, G.; Danger, G.; Cottin, H.; Theulé, P.; Chiavassa, T.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Complex organic molecules are observed in a broad variety of astrophysical objects, but little is known about their formation mechanism. Laboratory simulations on interstellar ice analogues are therefore crucial for understanding the origin of these complex organic molecules. In this context, we focus on the thermal reactivity for the formation of the organic residue obtained after photolysis at 25 K of the interstellar ice analogue (H2O:CH3OH:NH3) warmed to 300 K. Aims: We determine the formation mechanism of one major product detected in the organic residue: hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). We compare the warming of the photolysed interstellar ice analogue with the warming of the two non-photolysed specific ice mixtures H2CO:NH3:HCOOH and CH2NH:HCOOH, which are used as references. Using both general and specific approaches, we show the precise role of the UV photons and the thermal processing in the HMT formation. Methods: We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to monitor the chemical changes induced by the heating of the photolysed ice analogue and characterize some important species that will subsequently evolve in the formation of HMT in the residue. Results: We show that the thermal processes play a key role in the HMT formation in photolysed ice analogues heated at 300 K. We identify the stable intermediates in the HMT formation that are formed during the warming: the aminomethanol (NH2CH2OH) and the protonated ion trimethyletriamine (TMTH+, C3H10N3+). We also identify for the first time a new product in the organic residue, the polymethylenimine PMI (-(CH2 -NH)n). Results from this study will be interesting for the analysis of the forthcoming Rosetta mission.

  13. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy & Dynamics: Photochemistry of Phenol: A Full-Dimensional Semiclassical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald

    This lecture will present a simulation of the photodissociation of phenol that is made possible by combining four methods in a complementary way: (1) the fourfold way for generating diabatic electronic states, based on diabatic molecular orbitals and configurational uniformity; (2) anchor points reactive potentials for fitting the 33-dimensional diabatic potentials; (3) coherent switches with decay of mixing for multistate dynamics governed by coupled potential energy surfaces, including density matrix coherence and decoherence; (4) army ants tunneling, including electronically nonadiabatic tunneling. By combining all these methods, one can thoroughly sample an ensemble of trajectories with potential energy surfaces and couplings that include multireference dynamic electron correlation. By including army ants tunneling, the trajectory simulation of phenol photodissociation dynamics based on accurate full-dimensional anchor-points reactive potential surfaces and state couplings successfully reproduces the experimentally observed bimodal total kinetic energy release spectra. Analysis of the trajectories uncovers an unexpected dissociation pathway. The new method for including tunneling in full-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations is general, and it can also be used for electronically adiabatic processes. My coauthors in this work are Xuefei Xu, Jingjing Zheng, and Ke R. Yang. This work was supported in part by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under SciDAC Grant No. DE-SC0008666.

  14. Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Structural Dynamic Frequency Characteristics Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In general, mechanical equipment such as cars, airplanes, and machine tools all operate with constant frequency characteristics. These constant working characteristics should be controlled if the dynamic performance of the equipment demands improvement or the dynamic characteristics is intended to change with different working conditions. Active control is a stable and beneficial method for this, but current active control methods mainly focus on vibration control for reducing the vibration amplitudes in the time domain or frequency domain. In this paper, a new method of dynamic frequency characteristics active control (DFCAC is presented for a flat plate, which can not only accomplish vibration control but also arbitrarily change the dynamic characteristics of the equipment. The proposed DFCAC algorithm is based on a neural network including two parts of the identification implement and the controller. The effectiveness of the DFCAC method is verified by several simulation and experiments, which provide desirable results.

  15. The fractional-nonlinear robotic manipulator: Modeling and dynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S. A.; Balthazar, J. M.; Julio, B. H. S.; Oliveira, C.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we applied the Riemann-Liouville approach and the fractional Euler-Lagrange equations in order to obtain the fractional-order nonlinear dynamics equations of a two link robotic manipulator. The aformentioned equations have been simulated for several cases involving: integer and non-integer order analysis, with and without external forcing acting and some different initial conditions. The fractional nonlinear governing equations of motion are coupled and the time evolution of the angular positions and the phase diagrams have been plotted to visualize the effect of fractional order approach. The new contribution of this work arises from the fact that the dynamics equations of a two link robotic manipulator have been modeled with the fractional Euler-Lagrange dynamics approach. The results reveal that the fractional-nonlinear robotic manipulator can exhibit different and curious behavior from those obtained with the standard dynamical system and can be useful for a better understanding and control of such nonlinear systems.

  16. Generic solar photovoltaic system dynamic simulation model specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Abraham [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Behnke, Michael Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Elliott, Ryan Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This document is intended to serve as a specification for generic solar photovoltaic (PV) system positive-sequence dynamic models to be implemented by software developers and approved by the WECC MVWG for use in bulk system dynamic simulations in accordance with NERC MOD standards. Two specific dynamic models are included in the scope of this document. The first, a Central Station PV System model, is intended to capture the most important dynamic characteristics of large scale (> 10 MW) PV systems with a central Point of Interconnection (POI) at the transmission level. The second, a Distributed PV System model, is intended to represent an aggregation of smaller, distribution-connected systems that comprise a portion of a composite load that might be modeled at a transmission load bus.

  17. Dynamic simulation on rubber spring supporting equipment of vibrating screen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Rong-hua; PENG Chen-yu

    2011-01-01

    By ANSYS, dynamic simulation analysis of rubber spring supporting equipment used in vibrating screen was made. The modal frequency, mode, and harmonic displacement under working frequency were obtained. Variation of rubber spring supporting equipment's dynamic performance was discussed first, which is under the condition of existing spring stiffness difference and exciting force bias. Also, the quantitative calculation formulas were given. The results indicate that the performance of vibrating screen is closely related with rubber spring supporting equipment's dynamic performance. Differences of springs' stiffness coefficients reduce the modal frequency reduced, decrease the dynamic stiffness, and increase vibration displacement. Exciting force bias induces a larger lateral displacement. When rubber springs' stiffness coefficients exist, differences and lateral force accounts for 5% in total exciting force; rubber spring supporting equipment's side swing is larger than 1 mm, exceeding the side swing limit.

  18. Synthesis of recurrent neural networks for dynamical system simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trischler, Adam P; D'Eleuterio, Gabriele M T

    2016-08-01

    We review several of the most widely used techniques for training recurrent neural networks to approximate dynamical systems, then describe a novel algorithm for this task. The algorithm is based on an earlier theoretical result that guarantees the quality of the network approximation. We show that a feedforward neural network can be trained on the vector-field representation of a given dynamical system using backpropagation, then recast it as a recurrent network that replicates the original system's dynamics. After detailing this algorithm and its relation to earlier approaches, we present numerical examples that demonstrate its capabilities. One of the distinguishing features of our approach is that both the original dynamical systems and the recurrent networks that simulate them operate in continuous time.

  19. Reactivity Initiated Accident Simulation to Inform Transient Testing of Candidate Advanced Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nicholas R [ORNL; Wysocki, Aaron J [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Advanced cladding materials with potentially enhanced accident tolerance will yield different light water reactor performance and safety characteristics than the present zirconium-based cladding alloys. These differences are due to different cladding material properties and responses to the transient, and to some extent, reactor physics, thermal, and hydraulic characteristics. Some of the differences in reactors physics characteristics will be driven by the fundamental properties (e.g., absorption in iron for an iron-based cladding) and others will be driven by design modifications necessitated by the candidate cladding materials (e.g., a larger fuel pellet to compensate for parasitic absorption). Potential changes in thermal hydraulic limits after transition from the current zirconium-based cladding to the advanced materials will also affect the transient response of the integral fuel. This paper leverages three-dimensional reactor core simulation capabilities to inform on appropriate experimental test conditions for candidate advanced cladding materials in a control rod ejection event. These test conditions are using three-dimensional nodal kinetics simulations of a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) in a representative state-of-the-art pressurized water reactor with both nuclear-grade iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) and silicon carbide based (SiC-SiC) cladding materials. The effort yields boundary conditions for experimental mechanical tests, specifically peak cladding strain during the power pulse following the rod ejection. The impact of candidate cladding materials on the reactor kinetics behavior of RIA progression versus reference zirconium cladding is predominantly due to differences in: (1) fuel mass/volume/specific power density, (2) spectral effects due to parasitic neutron absorption, (3) control rod worth due to hardened (or softened) spectrum, and (4) initial conditions due to power peaking and neutron transport cross sections in the

  20. An alternative to fully coupled reactive transport simulations for long-term prediction of chemical reactions in complex geological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kempka, Thomas; Kühn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Fully-coupled reactive transport simulations involving multiphase hydrodynamics and chemical reactions in heterogeneous settings are extremely challenging from a computational point of view. This often leads to oversimplification of the investigated system: coarse spatial discretization, to keep the number of elements in the order of few thousands; simplified chemistry, disregarding many potentially important reactions. A novel approach for coupling non-reactive hydrodynamic simulations with the outcome of single batch geochemical simulations was therefore introduced to assess the potential long-term mineral trapping at the Ketzin pilot site for underground CO2 storage in Germany [1],[2]. The advantage of the coupling is the ability to use multi-million grid non-reactive hydrodynamics simulations on one side and few batch 0D geochemical simulations on the other, so that the complexity of both systems does not need to be reduced. This contribution shows the approach which was taken to validate this simplified coupling scheme. The procedure involved batch simulations of the reference geochemical model, then performing both non-reactive and fully coupled 1D and 3D reactive transport simulations and finally applying the simplified coupling scheme based on the non-reactive and geochemical batch model. The TOUGHREACT/ECO2N [3] simulator was adopted for the validation. The degree of refinement of the spatial grid and the complexity and velocity of the mineral reactions, along with a cut-off value for the minimum concentration of dissolved CO2 allowed to originate precipitates in the simplified approach were found out to be the governing parameters for the convergence of the two schemes. Systematic discrepancies between the approaches are not reducible, simply because there is no feedback between chemistry and hydrodynamics, and can reach 20 % - 30 % in unfavourable cases. However, even such discrepancy is completely acceptable, in our opinion, given the amount of

  1. Molecular dynamics calculation of thermophysical properties for a highly reactive liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H P; Luo, B C; Wei, B

    2008-10-01

    In order to further understand the physical characteristics of liquid silicon, the thermophysical properties are required over a broad temperature range. However, its high reactivity brings about great difficulties in the experimental measurement. Here we report the thermophysical properties by molecular dynamics calculation, including density, specific heat, diffusion coefficient, and surface tension. The calculation is performed with a system consisting of 64,000 atoms, and employing the Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential model and the modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential model. The results show that the density increases as a quadratic function of undercooling, and the value calculated by SW potential model is only 2-4 % smaller than the reported experimental data. The specific heat is obtained to be 30.95 J mol;{-1}K;{-1} by SW potential model and 32.50 J mol;{-1}K;{-1} by MEAM potential model, both of which are constants in the corresponding ranges of temperature. The self-diffusion coefficient is exponentially dependent on the temperature and consistent with the Arrhenius equation. The surface tension increases linearly with the rise of undercooling and agrees well with the reported experimental results. This work provides reasonable data in much wider temperature range, especially for the undercooled metastable state.

  2. NETIMIS: Dynamic Simulation of Health Economics Outcomes Using Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Owen A; Hall, Peter S; Hulme, Claire

    2016-02-01

    Many healthcare organizations are now making good use of electronic health record (EHR) systems to record clinical information about their patients and the details of their healthcare. Electronic data in EHRs is generated by people engaged in complex processes within complex environments, and their human input, albeit shaped by computer systems, is compromised by many human factors. These data are potentially valuable to health economists and outcomes researchers but are sufficiently large and complex enough to be considered part of the new frontier of 'big data'. This paper describes emerging methods that draw together data mining, process modelling, activity-based costing and dynamic simulation models. Our research infrastructure includes safe links to Leeds hospital's EHRs with 3 million secondary and tertiary care patients. We created a multidisciplinary team of health economists, clinical specialists, and data and computer scientists, and developed a dynamic simulation tool called NETIMIS (Network Tools for Intervention Modelling with Intelligent Simulation; http://www.netimis.com ) suitable for visualization of both human-designed and data-mined processes which can then be used for 'what-if' analysis by stakeholders interested in costing, designing and evaluating healthcare interventions. We present two examples of model development to illustrate how dynamic simulation can be informed by big data from an EHR. We found the tool provided a focal point for multidisciplinary team work to help them iteratively and collaboratively 'deep dive' into big data.

  3. Molecular-dynamics simulation of a ceramide bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sagar A.; Scott, H. Larry

    2006-01-01

    Ceramide is the simplest lipid in the biologically important class of glycosphingolipids. Ceramide is an important signaling molecule and a major component of the strateum corneum layer in the skin. In order to begin to understand the biophysical properties of ceramide, we have carried out a molecular-dynamics simulation of a hydrated 16:0 ceramide lipid bilayer at 368K (5° above the main phase transition). In this paper we describe the simulation and present the resulting properties of the bilayer. We compare the properties of the simulated ceramide bilayer to an earlier simulation of 18:0 sphingomyelin, and we discuss the results as they relate to experimental data for ceramide and other sphingolipids. The most significant differences arise at the lipid/water interface, where the lack of a large ceramide polar group leads to a different electron density and a different electrostatic potential but, surprisingly, not a different overall "dipole potential," when ceramide is compared to sphingomyelin.

  4. Determination of Reference Chemical Potential Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadeo Jatkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method implementing molecular dynamics (MD simulations for calculating the reference properties of simple gas hydrates has been proposed. The guest molecules affect interaction between adjacent water molecules distorting the hydrate lattice, which requires diverse values of reference properties for different gas hydrates. We performed simulations to validate the experimental data for determining Δ0, the chemical potential difference between water and theoretical empty cavity at the reference state, for structure II type gas hydrates. Simulations have also been used to observe the variation of the hydrate unit cell volume with temperature. All simulations were performed using TIP4P water molecules at the reference temperature and pressure conditions. The values were close to the experimental values obtained by the Lee-Holder model, considering lattice distortion.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...... simulation program requires a detailed description of the energy flow in the air movement which can be obtained by a CFD program. The paper describes an energy consumption calculation in a large building, where the building energy simulation program is modified by CFD predictions of the flow between three...... program and a building energy performance simulation program will improve both the energy consumption data and the prediction of thermal comfort and air quality in a selected area of the building....

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Helium Behaviour in Titanium Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Tie-Ying; LONG Xing-Gui; WANG Jun; HOU Qing; WU Zhong-Cheng; PENG Shu-Ming; LUO Shun-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the behaviour of helium atoms in titanium at a temperature of 300 K.The nucleation and growth of helium bubble has been simulated up to 50 helium atoms.The approach to simulate the bubble growth is to add helium atoms one by one to the bubble and let the system evolve.The titanium cohesion is based on the tight binding scheme derived from the embedded atom method,and the helium-titanium interaction is characterized by fitted potential in the form of a Lennard-Jones function.The pressure in small helium bubbles is approximately calculated.The simulation results show that the pressure will decrease with the increasing bubble size,while increase with the increasing helium atoms.An analytic function about the quantitative relationship of the pressure with the bubble size and number of helium atoms is also fitted.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Egberts, Philip; Dong, Yalin; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-06-12

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to model amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). In this novel simulation, the model AFM tip responds to both tip-substrate interactions and to a sinusoidal excitation signal. The amplitude and phase shift of the tip oscillation observed in the simulation and their variation with tip-sample distance were found to be consistent with previously reported trends from experiments and theory. These simulation results were also fit to an expression enabling estimation of the energy dissipation, which was found to be smaller than that in a corresponding experiment. The difference was analyzed in terms of the effects of tip size and substrate thickness. Development of this model is the first step toward using MD to gain insight into the atomic-scale phenomena that occur during an AM-AFM measurement.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  9. Prototyping Bio-Nanorobots using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hamdi, Mustapha; Ferreira, A; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a molecular mechanics study using a molecular dynamics software (NAMD) coupled to virtual reality (VR) techniques for intuitive Bio-NanoRobotic prototyping. Using simulated Bio-Nano environments in VR, the operator can design and characterize through physical simulation and 3-D visualization the behavior of Bio-NanoRobotic components and structures. The main novelty of the proposed simulations is based on the characterization of stiffness performances of passive joints-based deca-alanine protein molecule and active joints-based viral protein motor (VPL) in their native environment. Their use as elementary Bio-NanoRobotic components (1 dof platform) are also simulated and the results discussed.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of multiple-droplet interaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenchao; Loney, Drew; Fedorov, Andrei G.; Degertekin, F. Levent; Rosen, David W.

    2014-03-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) formulation, which is consistent with the phase-field model for two-phase incompressible fluid, is proposed to model the interface dynamics of droplet impingement. The interparticle force is derived by comparing the macroscopic transport equations recovered from LB equations with the governing equations of the continuous phase-field model. The inconsistency between the existing LB implementations and the phase-field model in calculating the relaxation time at the phase interface is identified and an approximation is proposed to ensure the consistency with the phase-field model. It is also shown that the commonly used equilibrium velocity boundary for the binary fluid LB scheme does not conserve momentum at the wall boundary and a modified scheme is developed to ensure the momentum conservation at the boundary. In addition, a geometric formulation of the wetting boundary condition is proposed to replace the popular surface energy formulation and results show that the geometric approach enforces the prescribed contact angle better than the surface energy formulation in both static and dynamic wetting. The proposed LB formulation is applied to simulating droplet impingement dynamics in three dimensions and results are compared to those obtained with the continuous phase-field model, the LB simulations reported in the literature, and experimental data from the literature. The results show that the proposed LB simulation approach yields not only a significant speed improvement over the phase-field model in simulating droplet impingement dynamics on a submillimeter length scale, but also better accuracy than both the phase-field model and the previously reported LB techniques when compared to experimental data. Upon validation, the proposed LB modeling methodology is applied to the study of multiple-droplet impingement and interactions in three dimensions, which demonstrates its powerful capability of simulating extremely complex interface

  12. Simulation of liquid dynamics in a cryogenic mobile vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lisowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Technical gases becomes liquid in extremely low temperature ranging minus 200 °C and very high pressure what makes that transportationdevices have to perform very strict requirement. Presented paper shows selected aspect of simulation of liquefied gas sloshing in aspect of requirements that mobile vessels have to fulfill. Mobile vessel which is the object of simulation is a two shell tank with vacuum and layer insulation between shells adapted to 20 ft container. It is assigned for see, railway and road transport and have to follow all of requirements for such transportation systems. Requirements for such tank are enclosed in standard ISO 1496-3 which deals with freight containers and standard EN13530-2 that describes vacuum, cryogenic vessels. The standards EN13530-2 defines that vessels which are to be filled equal or less than 80% should be fitted with surge plates to provide vessel stability and limit dynamic loads. Additionally surge plates area has tobe at least 70% of cross section of the vessel and volume between surge plates shall be not higher than 7.5 m3. Structure of the vessel as well as the surge plate should resist of longitudinal acceleration of 2g. Additionally surge plates shall resists stresses caused by pressure distributed across the area of surge plate and the pressure shall be calculated as mass of liquid between plates and acceleration 2g. In this paper is presented way of simulation of dynamic behavior of liquefied Argon on vessel structure. A numerical methods likeComputational Fluid Dynamics (CFD and Finite Element Analysis (FEA were used for this purpose. Combination of both tools allowedto get pick value of dynamic pressure that arising during acceleration of 2g, which was assumed is 0.2 s and investigate resistance of vessel and container structure. Presented approach is called Fluid – Structure Interaction simulation. In CFD simulation was used Ansys CFX code, while for FEA calculations Pro/Mechanica package.

  13. Liquid Methanol from DFT and DFT/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieffert, Nicolas; Bühl, Michael; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Morrison, Carole A

    2013-01-08

    We present a comparative study of computational protocols for the description of liquid methanol from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, in view of further applications directed at the modeling of chemical reactivity of organic and organometallic molecules in (explicit) methanol solution. We tested density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) in its Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics (CPMD) and Quickstep/Born-Oppenheimer MD (CP2K) implementations, employing six popular density functionals with and without corrections for dispersion interactions (namely BLYP, BLYP-D2, BLYP-D3, BP86, BP86-D2, and B97-D2). Selected functionals were also tested within the two QM/MM frameworks implemented in CPMD and CP2K, considering one DFT molecule in a MM environment (described by the OPLS model of methanol). The accuracy of each of these methods at describing the bulk liquid phase under ambient conditions was evaluated by analyzing their ability to reproduce (i) the average structure of the liquid, (ii) the mean squared displacement of methanol molecules, (iii) the average molecular dipole moments, and (iv) the gas-to-liquid red-shift observed in their infrared spectra. We show that it is difficult to find a DFT functional that describes these four properties equally well within full DFT-MD simulations, despite a good overall performance of B97-D2. On the other hand, DFT/MM-MD provides a satisfactory description of the solvent-solute polarization effects with all functionals and thus represents a good alternative for the modeling of methanol solutions in the context of chemical reactivity in an explicit environment.

  14. Dynamic modeling and simulation for nonholonomic welding mobile robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Newton-Euler method, the dynamic behaviors of the left and right driving wheels and the robot body for the welding mobile robot were derived. In order to realize the combination control of body turning and slider adjustment, the dynamic behaviors of sliders were also investigated. As a result, a systematic and complete dynamic model for the welding mobile robot was constructed. In order to verify the effectiveness of the above model, a sliding mode tracking control method was proposed and simulated, the lateral error stabilizes between -0.2 mm and +0.2 mm, and the total distance of travel for the slider is consistently within ±2 mm. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the established dynamic model and also show that the seam tracking controller based on the dynamic model has excellent performance in terms of stability and robustness. Furthermore, the model is found to be very suitable for practical applications of the welding mobile robot.

  15. Autoinhibitory mechanisms of ERG studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Salsbury, Freddie R.

    2015-01-01

    ERG, an ETS-family transcription factor, acts as a regulator of differentiation of early hematopoietic cells. It contains an autoinhibitory domain, which negatively regulates DNA-binding. The mechanism of autoinhibitory is still illusive. To understand the mechanism, we study the dynamical properties of ERG protein by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations suggest that DNA binding autoinhibition associates with the internal dynamics of ERG. Specifically, we find that (1), The N-C terminal correlation in the inhibited ERG is larger than that in uninhibited ERG that contributes to the autoinhibition of DNA-binding. (2), DNA-binding changes the property of the N-C terminal correlation from being anti-correlated to correlated, that is, changing the relative direction of the correlated motions and (3), For the Ets-domain specifically, the inhibited and uninhibited forms exhibit essentially the same dynamics, but the binding of the DNA decreases the fluctuation of the Ets-domain. We also find from PCA analysis that the three systems, even with quite different dynamics, do have highly similar free energy surfaces, indicating that they share similar conformations.

  16. DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF ROTATING SHELLS COUPLED WITH LIQUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Fayuan; Li Shiqi; Zhong Yifang; Huang Yuying

    2001-01-01

    The dynamic behaviors of rotating shells coupled with liquid are shown. The shell under consideration has arbitrary boundary conditions and a complex shape. A modified boundary element method and finite strip technique are used to improve the computing efficiency and to guarantee the continuity conditions on the liquid-shell interaction plane. The effects of various parameters such as shell's thickness and liquid depth are investigated. Dynamic simulations are applied to several typical shell-liquid systems, and the natural frequencies, mode shapes and response of vibration are calculated numerically.

  17. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyar Hamid

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002] for the statically stable structures.

  18. Multi-Scale Dynamics, Control, and Simulation of Granular Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Basinger, Scott; Swartzlander, Grover

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present some ideas regarding the modeling, dynamics and control aspects of granular spacecraft. Granular spacecraft are complex multibody systems composed of a spatially disordered distribution of a large number of elements, for instance a cloud of grains in orbit. An example of application is a spaceborne observatory for exoplanet imaging, where the primary aperture is a cloud instead of a monolithic aperture. A model is proposed of a multi-scale dynamics of the grains and cloud in orbit, as well as a control approach for cloud shape maintenance and alignment, and preliminary simulation studies are carried out for the representative imaging system.

  19. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of a Real World Billiard

    CERN Document Server

    Hartl, Alexandre E; Mazzoleni, Andre P

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational billiards provide an experimentally accessible arena for testing formulations of nonlinear dynamics. We present a mathematical model that captures the essential dynamics required for describing the motion of a realistic billiard for arbitrary boundaries. Simulations of the model are applied to parabolic, wedge and hyperbolic billiards that are driven sinusoidally. Direct comparisons are made between the model's predictions and previously published experimental data. It is shown that the data can be successfully modeled with a simple set of parameters without an assumption of exotic energy dependence.

  20. 3D vesicle dynamics simulations with a linearly triangulated surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedec, G.; Leonetti, M.; Jaeger, M.

    2011-02-01

    Simulations of biomembranes have gained an increasing interest in the past years. Specificities of these membranes propose new challenges for the numerics. In particular, vesicle dynamics are governed by bending forces as well as a surface incompressibility constraint. A method to compute the bending force density resultant onto piecewise linearly triangulated surface meshes is described. This method is coupled with a boundary element method solver for inner and outer fluids, to compute vesicle dynamics under external flows. The surface incompressibility constraint is satisfied by the construction of a projection operator.