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Sample records for reaction rate enhancers

  1. Enhancement of nuclear reaction rates in asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerouin, J.; Arnault, P.; Desbiens, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); White, A.; Ticknor, C.; Kress, J.D.; Collins, L.A. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Using orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations we study the structure and dynamics of increasingly asymmetric mixtures such as hydrogen-carbon, hydrogen-aluminium, hydrogen-copper, and hydrogen-silver. We show that, whereas the heavy component structure is close to an effective one-component plasma (OCP), the light component appears more structured than the corresponding OCP. This effect is related to the crossover towards a Lorentz-type diffusion triggered by strongly coupled, highly charged heavy ions, and witnessed by the change of temperature scaling laws of diffusion. This over-correlation translates into an enhancement of nuclear reaction rates much higher than its classical OCP counterpart. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Enhancement of D-T reaction rate due to D-T contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitoki, Shigehisa; Ogasawara, Masatada; Aono, Osamu.

    1979-09-01

    The reaction rate that is appropriate for magnetized nonuniform plasma is numerically calculated to investigate the enhancement of the D-T reaction rate. Spatial separation of the guiding center distributions of D and T enhances the reaction rate. Cases of several guiding center configurations are investigated. The largest enhancement is obtained, when both guiding center distributions are delta-functions which are separated by a length that corresponds to the Gamow peak energy. As compared with the case of no separation of D and T, the maximum enhancing factors obtained are 2.3 for total reaction rate and 1.6 for local reaction rate. Cases of the guiding center distributions with finite widths are also investigated. (author)

  3. On the existence of and mechanism for microwave-specific reaction rate enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Gregory B; Richert, Ranko; Stiegman, A E

    2015-04-01

    The use of microwave radiation to drive chemical reactions has become ubiquitous in almost all fields of chemistry. In all of these areas it is principally due to rapid and convenient heating resulting in significantly higher rates of reaction, with other advantages including enhanced product selectivity and control of materials properties. Although microwave heating continues to grow as an enabling technology, fundamental research into the nature of microwave heating has not grown at the same rate. In the case of chemical reactions run in homogeneous solution, particularly synthetic organic reactions, there is considerable controversy over the origins of rate enhancement, with a fundamental question being whether there exist microwave-specific effects, distinct from what can be attained under conventional convective heating, that can accelerate a reaction rate. In this Perspective, we discuss unique aspects of microwave heating of molecules in solution and discuss the origin and nature of microwave-specific effects arising from the process of "selective heating" of reactants in solution. Integral to this discussion is work from the field of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, which provides a model for selective heating by Debye relaxation processes. The Perspective also includes a critical discussion of hypotheses of non-thermal effects (alternatively classified here as resonant processes) and an outline of specific reaction parameters for chemical systems in which microwave-specific Debye relaxation processes can result in observable reaction rate enhancement.

  4. Quantum theory of enhanced unimolecular reaction rates below the ergodicity threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, David M.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of unimolecular reactions exhibit measured rates that exceed Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) predictions. We show using the local random matrix theory (LRMT) of vibrational energy flow how the quantum localization of the vibrational states of a molecule, by violating the ergodicity assumption, can give rise to such an enhancement of the apparent reaction rate. We present an illustrative calculation using LRMT for a model 12-vibrational mode organic molecule to show that below the ergodicity threshold the reaction rate may exceed many times the RRKM prediction due to quantum localization of vibrational states

  5. Thermodynamic and molecular origin of interfacial rate enhancements and endo-selectivities of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniwal, Vijay; Kumar, Anil

    2017-02-08

    Organic reactions in general display large rate accelerations when performed under interfacial conditions, such as on water or at ionic liquid interfaces. However, a clear picture of the physicochemical factors responsible for this large rate enhancements is not available. To gain an understanding of the thermodynamic and molecular origin of these large rate enhancements, we performed a Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and methyl acrylate at ionic liquid/n-hexane interfaces. This study describes, for the first time, a methodology for the calculation of the activation parameters of an interfacial reaction. It has been seen that the energy of activation for an interfacial reaction is much smaller than that of the corresponding homogeneous reaction, resulting into the large rate acceleration for the interfacial reaction. Furthermore, the study describes the effects of the alkyl chain length of ionic liquid cations, the extent of heterogeneity, and the polarity of ionic liquids on the rate constants and stereoselectivity of the reaction.

  6. Reaction mechanisms and rate constants of waste degradation in landfill bioreactor systems with enzymatic-enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, P A; Hettiaratchi, J P A; Mehrotra, A K; Kumar, S

    2014-06-01

    Augmenting leachate before recirculation with peroxidase enzymes is a novel method to increase the available carbon, and therefore the food supply to microorganisms at the declining phase of the anaerobic landfill bioreactor operation. In order to optimize the enzyme-catalyzed leachate recirculation process, it is necessary to identify the reaction mechanisms and determine rate constants. This paper presents a kinetic model developed to ascertain the reaction mechanisms and determine the rate constants for enzyme catalyzed anaerobic waste degradation. The maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) for MnP enzyme-catalyzed reactors was 0.076 g(TOC)/g(DS).day. The catalytic turnover number (k(cat)) of the MnP enzyme-catalyzed was 506.7 per day while the rate constant (k) of the un-catalyzed reaction was 0.012 per day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2003-04-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus (vessel) for providing a heat transfer rate from a reaction chamber through a wall to a heat transfer chamber substantially matching a local heat transfer rate of a catalytic thermal chemical reaction. The key to the invention is a thermal distance defined on a cross sectional plane through the vessel inclusive of a heat transfer chamber, reaction chamber and a wall between the chambers. The cross sectional plane is perpendicular to a bulk flow direction of the reactant stream, and the thermal distance is a distance between a coolest position and a hottest position on the cross sectional plane. The thermal distance is of a length wherein the heat transfer rate from the reaction chamber to the heat transfer chamber substantially matches the local heat transfer rate.

  8. Thermonuclear reaction rates. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Fowler, W.A.; Caughlan, G.R.; Zimmerman, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar thermonuclear reaction rates are revised and updated, adding a number of new important reaction rates. Several reactions with large negative Q-values are included, and examples of them are discussed. The importance of the decay rates for Mg-26(p,n) exp 26 Al and Al-26(n,p) exp 26 Mg for stellar studies is emphasized. 19 references

  9. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  10. Spectacular Rate Enhancement of the Diels-Alder Reaction at the Ionic Liquid/n-Hexane Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniwal, Vijay; Manna, Arpan; Kumar, Anil

    2016-07-04

    The use of the ionic liquid/n-hexane interface as a new class of reaction medium for the Diels-Alder reaction gives large rate enhancements of the order of 10(6) to 10(8) times and high stereoselectivity, as compared to homogeneous media. The rate enhancement is attributed to the H-bonding abilities and polarities of the ionic liquids, whereas the hydrophobicity of ionic liquids was considered to be the factor in controlling stereoselectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Low-energy enhancement of nuclear γ strength and its impact on astrophysical reaction rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen A. C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An unexpected enhancement in the low-energy part of the γ-strength function for light and medium-mass nuclei has been discovered at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. This enhancement could lead to an increase in the neutron-capture rates up to two orders of magnitude for very exotic, neutron-rich nuclei. However, it is still an open question whether this structure persists when approaching the neutron drip line.

  12. Applications of Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  13. Enhancing chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  14. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  15. Pulsed laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching of titanium with XeF2: enhanced reaction rate and precursor transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, J H; Fowlkes, J D; Timilsina, R; Stanford, M G; Lewis, B B; Rack, P D

    2015-02-25

    In order to enhance the etch rate of electron-beam-induced etching, we introduce a laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching (LA-FEBIE) process which is a versatile, direct write nanofabrication method that allows nanoscale patterning and editing. The results demonstrate that the titanium electron stimulated etch rate via the XeF2 precursor can be enhanced up to a factor of 6 times with an intermittent pulsed laser assist. The evolution of the etching process is correlated to in situ stage current measurements and scanning electron micrographs as a function of time. The increased etch rate is attributed to photothermally enhanced Ti-F reaction and TiF4 desorption and in some regimes enhanced XeF2 surface diffusion to the reaction zone.

  16. Implementation of 5E Inquiry Incorporated with Analogy Learning Approach to Enhance Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Reaction Rate for Grade 11 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supasorn, Saksri; Promarak, Vinich

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to enhance student understanding of the scientific concepts of chemical reaction rate. Forty-four grade 11 students were the target group. The treatment tools were seven learning plans of 5E inquiry incorporated with an analogy learning approach during 15 hours of class time. In each learning plan, the students…

  17. Reaction rate of propene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peipei; Su, Kehe; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2011-10-01

    The reaction rate of propene pyrolysis was investigated based on the elementary reactions proposed in Qu et al., J Comput Chem 2009, 31, 1421. The overall reaction rate was developed with the steady-state approximation and the rate constants of the elementary reactions were determined with the variational transition state theory. For the elementary reaction having transition state, the vibrational frequencies of the selected points along the minimum energy path were calculated with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level and the energies were improved with the accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2). For the elementary reaction without transition state, the frequencies were calculated with CASSCF/6-311G(d,p) and the energies were refined with the multireference configuration interaction method MRCISD/6-311G(d,p). The rate constants were evaluated within 200-2000 K and the fitted three-parameter expressions were obtained. The results are consistent with those in the literatures in most cases. For the overall rate, it was found that the logarithm of the rate and the reciprocal temperature have excellent linear relationship above 400 K, predicting that the rate follows a typical first-order law at high temperatures of 800-2000 K, which is also consistent with the experiments. The apparent activation energy in 800-2000 K is 317.3 kJ/mol from the potential energy surface of zero Kelvin. This value is comparable with the energy barriers, 365.4 and 403.7 kJ/mol, of the rate control steps. However, the apparent activation energy, 215.7 kJ/mol, developed with the Gibbs free energy surface at 1200 K is consistent with the most recent experimental result 201.9 ± 0.6 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A more robust model of the biodiesel reaction, allowing identification of process conditions for significantly enhanced rate and water tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Valentine C; Phan, Anh N; Harvey, Adam P

    2014-03-01

    A more robust kinetic model of base-catalysed transesterification than the conventional reaction scheme has been developed. All the relevant reactions in the base-catalysed transesterification of rapeseed oil (RSO) to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) were investigated experimentally, and validated numerically in a model implemented using MATLAB. It was found that including the saponification of RSO and FAME side reactions and hydroxide-methoxide equilibrium data explained various effects that are not captured by simpler conventional models. Both the experiment and modelling showed that the "biodiesel reaction" can reach the desired level of conversion (>95%) in less than 2min. Given the right set of conditions, the transesterification can reach over 95% conversion, before the saponification losses become significant. This means that the reaction must be performed in a reactor exhibiting good mixing and good control of residence time, and the reaction mixture must be quenched rapidly as it leaves the reactor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancement Mechanisms of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I. E.

    2005-01-01

    The review of possible stimulation mechanisms of LENR (low energy nuclear reaction) is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies and excess heat are possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - the universal resonance synchronization principle [1] and based on its different enhancement mechanisms of reaction rates are responsible for these processes [2]. The excitation and ionization of atoms may play role as a trigger for LENR. Superlow energy o...

  20. Observation of low-lying resonances in the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt and enhanced astrophysical reaction rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacoppo F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An excess of strength on the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance recently has been observed in the γ-decay from the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt. The nature of this phenomenon is not yet fully investigated. If this feature is present also in the γ-ray strength of the neutron-rich isotopes, it can affect the neutron-capture reactions involved in the formation of heavy-elements in stellar nucleosynthesis. The experimental level density and γ-ray strength function of 195,196Pt are presented together with preliminary calculations of the corresponding neutron-capture cross sections.

  1. Reaction rates for neutrino processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalitin, D.

    1978-01-01

    Some integrals involved in neutrino processes are evaluated by transformation to a special system of reference - usually to the center of mass system (CM). Rather simple analytic expressions are obtained for reaction rates and, though less simple, for moments. An interesting result thus obtained is for an isotropic interaction (in CM) of a neutrino with a monoenergetic isotropic gas of extreme relativistic electrons: it is found that the probability of the scattered neutrino to have energy in a certain range is independent of this energy. (Auth.)

  2. Pycnonuclear reaction rates for binary ionic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimaru, S.; Ogata, S.; Van Horn, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of compositional scaling arguments and examinations of Monte Carlo simulation results for the interparticle separations in binary-ionic mixture (BIM) solids, we have derived parameterized expressions for the BIM pycnonuclear rates as generalizations of those in one-component solids obtained previously by Salpeter and Van Horn and by Ogata et al. We have thereby discovered a catalyzing effect of the heavier elements, which enhances the rates of reactions among the lighter elements when the charge ratio exceeds a critical value of approximately 2.3.

  3. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  4. Measurement of inertial confinement fusion reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoshi; Wang Feng; Tang Daorun; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Liu Yonggang; Xu Tao; Chen Ming; Mei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Fusion reaction rate is an important parameter for measuring compression during the implosion in inertial confinement fusion experiment. We have developed a system for fusion reaction history measurement with high temporal resolution. The system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, optical system and streak camera. We have applied this system on the SG-III prototype for fusion reaction rate measuring. For the first time, fusion reaction rate history have been measured for deuterium-tritium filled targets with neutrons yields about 10 10 . We have analyzed possible influence factor during fusion reaction rate measuring. It indicates that the instrument measures fusion reaction bang time at temporal resolutions as low as 30 ps.(authors)

  5. Ignition delays, heats of combustion, and reaction rates of aluminum alkyl derivatives used as ignition and combustion enhancers for supersonic combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas W., III; Schwab, S. T.; Harlowe, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of this paper is the design of supersonic combustors which will be required in order to achieve the needed reaction rates in a reasonable sized combustor. A fuel additive approach, which is the focus of this research, is the use of pyrophorics to shorten the ignition delay time and to increase the energy density of the fuel. Pyrophoric organometallic compounds may also provide an ignition source and flame stabilization mechanism within the combustor, thus permitting use of hydrocarbon fuels in supersonic combustion systems. Triethylaluminum (TEA) and trimethylaluminum (TMA) were suggested for this application due to their high energy density and reactivity. The objective here is to provide comparative data for the ignition quality, the energy content, and the reaction rates of several different adducts of both TEA and TMA. The results of the experiments indicate the aluminum alkyls and their more stable derivatives reduce the ignition delay and total reaction time to JP-10 jet fuel. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of ignition delay and total reaction time of the blends of the adducts are significantly lower than in neat JP-10.

  6. Ignition delays, heats of combustion, and reaction rates of aluminum alkyl derivatives used as ignition and combustion enhancers for supersonic combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, T. W., III; Harlowe, W. W.; Schwab, S.

    1992-01-01

    The work was based on adapting an apparatus and procedure developed at Southwest Research Institute for rating the ignition quality of fuels for diesel engines. Aluminum alkyls and various Lewis-base adducts of these materials, both neat and mixed 50/50 with pure JP-10 hydrocarbon, were injected into the combustion bomb using a high-pressure injection system. The bomb was pre-charged with air that was set at various initial temperatures and pressures for constant oxygen density. The ignition delay times were determined for the test materials at these different initial conditions. The data are presented in absolute terms as well as comparisons with the parent alkyls. The relative heats of reaction of the various test materials were estimated based on a computation of the heat release, using the pressure data recorded during combustion in the bomb. In addition, the global reaction rates for each material were compared at a selected tmperature and pressure.

  7. Reaction rate of hydrolysis of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Yoshikazu; Eguchi, Wataru; Adachi, Motonari

    1979-01-01

    Absorption rates of dilute iodine vapor contained in air by aqueous mixtures of sodium hydroxide and boric acid were measured using a laminar liquid jet column absorber at 298 K. Absorption rates in this system are controlled by a series of complex reactions taking place in the liquid phase. The reaction rate constant of iodine hydrolysis in the aqueous phase was determined from the absorption rates observed under the conditions that the base-catalytic hydrolysis reaction of iodine can be considered to be irreversible and that other reactions can be neglected. The absorption rates calculated theoretically with the rate constant value obtained above were in good accordance with the whole experimental data observed for a wide range of experimental conditions. (author)

  8. Rates of Thermonuclear Reactions in Dense Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V.N.; Bornatici, M.

    2000-01-01

    The problem of plasma screening of thermonuclear reactions has attracted considerable scientific interest ever since Salpeter's seminal paper, but it is still faced with controversial statements and without any definite conclusion. It is of relevant importance to thermonuclear reactions in dense astrophysical plasmas, for which charge screening can substantially affect the reaction rates. Whereas Salpeter and a number of subsequent investigations have dealt with static screening, Carraro, Schafer, and Koonin have drawn attention to the fact that plasma screening of thermonuclear reactions is an essentially dynamic effect. In addressing the issue of collective plasma effects on the thermonuclear reaction rates, the first critical overview of most of the work carried out so far is presented and the validity of the test particle approach is assessed. In contrast to previous investigations, we base our description on the kinetic equation for nonequilibrium plasmas, which accounts for the effects on the rates of thermonuclear reactions of both plasma fluctuations and screening and allows one to analyze explicitly the effects of the fluctuations on the reaction rates. Such a kinetic formulation is more general than both Salpeter's approach and the recently developed statistical approaches and makes it possible to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the problem. A noticeable result of the fluctuation approach is that the static screening, which affects both the interaction and the self-energy of the reacting nuclei, does not affect the reaction rates, in contrast with the results obtained so far. Instead, a reduction of the thermonuclear reaction rates is obtained as a result of the effect of plasma fluctuations related to the free self-energy of the reacting nuclei. A simple physical explanation of the slowing down of the reaction rates is given, and the relation to the dynamically screened test particle approach is discussed. Corrections to the reaction rates

  9. Enhanced detection rate of typhoid fever among clinically suspected patients in a tertiary referral hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh using nested polymerase chain reaction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Miah, M R; Khatun, S

    2015-12-01

    A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) specific for Salmonella enterica subspecies enteric serovar Typhi was used for the detection of the pathogen, in blood. This study was done during the period of March 2013 to February 2014. A total of 80 clinically suspected cases of typhoid fever were included in the study. Blood was collected from all participating individuals. Nested PCR targeting the flagellin gene (fliC) of Salmonella Typhi & blood culture were done for each of the cases. The positivity rate of PCR & blood culture was 70%& 20% respectively. The positivity rate of PCR was significantly higher than blood culture (Ptyphoid fever cases on the basis of clinical features but with negative cultures. We conclude that the PCR technique could be used as a novel diagnostic method of typhoid fever, particularly in culture-negative cases in an endemic country like Bangladesh.

  10. Rates of the main thermonuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramovich, S.N.; Guzhovskii, B.Ya.; Dunaeva, S.A.; Fomushkin, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    The data on the cross sections of main thermonuclear reactions have been estimated with an account of the latest experimental results in a form of S-factor spline presentation. Based on this estimation, the reates of these reactions in 0.0001-1 MeV temperature range in the supposition of Maxwell distribution of relative velocities have been computed. The Maxwell-Boltzmann averaged -factors were calculated according to the table values of the reaction rates. Then the -factors were approximated with the 3 order spline-function. The necessity of the account of electron shielding and intramolecular movement at low temperatures is discussed (orig.)

  11. Back Reaction And Local Cosmological Expansion Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Geshnizjani, G; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Brandenberger, Robert

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the back reaction of cosmological perturbations on a general relativistic variable which measures the local expansion rate of the Universe. Specifically, we consider a cosmological model in which matter is described by a single field. We analyze back reaction both in a matter dominated Universe and in a phase of scalar field-driven chaotic inflation. In both cases, we find that the leading infrared terms contributing to the back reaction vanish when the local expansion rate is measured at a fixed value of the matter field which is used as a clock, whereas they do not appear to vanish if the expansion rate is evaluated at a fixed value of the background time. We discuss possible implications for more realistic models with a more complicated matter sector.

  12. Effective dynamics along given reaction coordinates, and reaction rate theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Hartmann, Carsten; Schütte, Christof

    2016-12-22

    In molecular dynamics and related fields one considers dynamical descriptions of complex systems in full (atomic) detail. In order to reduce the overwhelming complexity of realistic systems (high dimension, large timescale spread, limited computational resources) the projection of the full dynamics onto some reaction coordinates is examined in order to extract statistical information like free energies or reaction rates. In this context, the effective dynamics that is induced by the full dynamics on the reaction coordinate space has attracted considerable attention in the literature. In this article, we contribute to this discussion: we first show that if we start with an ergodic diffusion process whose invariant measure is unique then these properties are inherited by the effective dynamics. Then, we give equations for the effective dynamics, discuss whether the dominant timescales and reaction rates inferred from the effective dynamics are accurate approximations of such quantities for the full dynamics, and compare our findings to results from approaches like Mori-Zwanzig, averaging, or homogenization. Finally, by discussing the algorithmic realization of the effective dynamics, we demonstrate that recent algorithmic techniques like the "equation-free" approach and the "heterogeneous multiscale method" can be seen as special cases of our approach.

  13. Astrophysical Nuclear Reaction Rates in the Dense Metallic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ali Ihsan

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear reaction rates can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude in dense and relatively cold astrophysical plasmas such as in white dwarfs, brown dwarfs, and giant planets. Similar conditions are also present in supernova explosions where the ignition conditions are vital for cosmological models. White dwarfs are compact objects that have both extremely high interior densities and very strong local magnetic fields. For the first time, a new formula has been developed to explain cross section and reaction rate quantities for light elements that includes not only the nuclear component but also the material dependence, magnetic field, and crystal structure dependency in dense metallic environments. I will present the impact of the developed formula on the cross section and reaction rates for light elements. This could have possible technological applications in energy production using nuclear fusion reactions.

  14. Enhancing Activity for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendal, Rasmus; Busch, Michael; Halck, Niels Bendtsen

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical production of hydrogen, facilitated in electrolyzers, holds great promise for energy storage and solar fuel production. A bottleneck in the process is the catalysis of the oxygen evolution reaction, involving the transfer of four electrons. The challenge is that the binding energies...... of all reaction intermediates cannot be optimized individually. However, experimental investigations have shown that drastic improvements can be realized for manganese and cobalt-based oxides if gold is added to the surface or used as substrate. We propose an explanation for these enhancements based...... that the oxygen evolution reaction overpotential decreases by 100–300 mV for manganese oxides and 100 mV for cobalt oxides....

  15. Determination of the photolysis rate coefficient of monochlorodimethyl sulfide (MClDMS) in the atmosphere and its implications for the enhancement of SO2 production from the DMS + Cl2 reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, G; Lee, E P F; Williams, R G; Archibald, A T; Shallcross, D E; Dyke, J M

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the photolysis rate coefficient of CH3SCH2Cl (MClDMS) in the lower atmosphere has been determined and has been used in a marine boundary layer (MBL) box model to determine the enhancement of SO2 production arising from the reaction DMS + Cl2. Absorption cross sections measured in the 28000-34000 cm(-1) region have been used to determine photolysis rate coefficients of MClDMS in the troposphere at 10 solar zenith angles (SZAs). These have been used to determine the lifetimes of MClDMS in the troposphere. At 0° SZA, a photolysis lifetime of 3-4 h has been obtained. The results show that the photolysis lifetime of MClDMS is significantly smaller than the lifetimes with respect to reaction with OH (≈ 4.6 days) and with Cl atoms (≈ 1.2 days). It has also been shown, using experimentally derived dissociation energies with supporting quantum-chemical calculations, that the dominant photodissocation route of MClDMS is dissociation of the C-S bond to give CH3S and CH2Cl. MBL box modeling calculations show that buildup of MClDMS at night from the Cl2 + DMS reaction leads to enhanced SO2 production during the day. The extra SO2 arises from photolysis of MClDMS to give CH3S and CH2Cl, followed by subsequent oxidation of CH3S.

  16. Rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence has been advanced that the rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO right arrow N2 + O has a small positive temperature dependence at the high temperatures (900 to 1500 K) that prevail in the terrestrial middle and upper thermosphere by Siskind and Rusch (1992), and at the low temperatures (100 to 200 K) of the Martian lower thermosphere by Fox (1993). Assuming that the rate coefficient recommended by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory evaluation (DeMore et al., 1992) is accurate at 300 K, we derive here the low temperature value of the activation energy for this reaction and thus the rate coefficient that best fits the Viking 1 measured NO densities. We find that the fit is acceptable for a rate coefficient of about 1.3 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-400/T) and better for a value of about 2.5 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-600/T)cu cm/s.

  17. BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF THERMONUCLEAR REACTION RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliadis, C.; Anderson, K. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Coc, A. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris–Saclay, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Timmes, F. X.; Starrfield, S., E-mail: iliadis@unc.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The problem of estimating non-resonant astrophysical S -factors and thermonuclear reaction rates, based on measured nuclear cross sections, is of major interest for nuclear energy generation, neutrino physics, and element synthesis. Many different methods have been applied to this problem in the past, almost all of them based on traditional statistics. Bayesian methods, on the other hand, are now in widespread use in the physical sciences. In astronomy, for example, Bayesian statistics is applied to the observation of extrasolar planets, gravitational waves, and Type Ia supernovae. However, nuclear physics, in particular, has been slow to adopt Bayesian methods. We present astrophysical S -factors and reaction rates based on Bayesian statistics. We develop a framework that incorporates robust parameter estimation, systematic effects, and non-Gaussian uncertainties in a consistent manner. The method is applied to the reactions d(p, γ ){sup 3}He, {sup 3}He({sup 3}He,2p){sup 4}He, and {sup 3}He( α , γ ){sup 7}Be, important for deuterium burning, solar neutrinos, and Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  18. X particle effect for 6Li reaction rates calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocak, G.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2009-01-01

    The inferred primordial 6 L i-7 L i abundances are different from standard big bang nucleosynthesis results, 6 L i is 1000 times larger and 7 L i is 3 times smaller than the big bang prediction. In big bang nucleosynthesis, negatively charged massive X particles a possible solution to explain this primordial Li abundances problem [1]. In this study, we consider only X particle effect for nuclear reactions to obtain S-factor and reaction rates for Li. All S-factors calculated within the Optical Model framework for d(α,γ)6 L i system. We showed that the enhancement effect of massive negatively charged X particle for 6 L i system reaction rate.(author)

  19. Nuclear reaction rates and the nova outburst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.G.; Iliadis, C.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we examined the consequences of improving the nuclear reaction library on our simulations of TNRs on 1.25M, WD and 1.35M, WDS. We have found that the changes in the rates have affected the nucleosynthesis predictions of our calculations but not, to any great extent, the gross features. In addition, we have used a lower mass accretion rate than in our previous studies in order to accrete (and eject) more material. This has, as expected, caused the peak values of some important parameters to increase over our previous studies at the same WD mass. However, because some important reaction rates have declined in the new compilation this has not increased the abundances for nuclei above aluminum and, in fact, they have declined while the abundances of both 26 Al and 27 Al have increased at both WD masses. In contrast, the abundance of 22 Na has declined at both WD masses over the values predicted in our earlier work. This has important implications with respect to predictions of the observability of novae with INTEGRAL

  20. Reaction rate calculations via transmission coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Alder, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The transmission coefficient of a wavepacket traversing a potential barrier can be determined by steady state calculations carried out in imaginary time instead of by real time dynamical calculations. The general argument is verified for the Eckart barrier potential by a comparison of transmission coefficients calculated from real and imaginary time solutions of the Schroedinger equation. The correspondence demonstrated here allows a formulation for the reaction rate that avoids difficulties due to both rare events and explicitly time dependent calculations. 5 refs., 2 figs

  1. Effects of ion and electron screening on thermonuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of screening by ions and electrons on thermonuclear reaction rates in stellar plasmas are considered. The enhancement of the reaction rate ranges from negligible to extremely large (on the order of 10 26 or greater). In order to calculate these effects, the potential about a given reacting nucleus is determined. First, Boltzmann-Vlasov and Poisson-Boltzmann equations are solved to yield a Yukawa potential. A suitable approximation to this potential is integrated in the action integral to give the barrier penetration. The screened reaction rate is then found by the saddle-point method. In developing a general formalism to calculate the screened reaction rate and the screening factor, effects due to the finite size of the nucleus are considered and found to be negligible. An expression for the screening factor for resonant reaction rates is also derived. A different and relatively simple approach, based on work of Stewart and Pyatt (1966), is used to find the barrier penetration from the action integral in two approximations: a modified Coulomb potential and a constant-shift potential. Screening factors are calculated for carbon burning at T 6 = 100 and T 6 = 400 for a wide range of densities and also for several examples in late stellar evolution. These screening factors are, for the most part, greater than those given by most others by a few percent at low density to 4 or more orders of magnitude at T 6 = 100 and rho = 10 10 g/cm 3 . Near the edge of the crystalline lattice region, however, they are significantly lower than those of some others. The increase in reaction rates for carbon burning indicates that carbon ignition may occur at lower densities than previously thought and may affect the density at which a supernova shock may occur

  2. Effect of excited states on thermonuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargood, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    Values of the ratio of the thermonuclear reaction rate of a reaction, with target nuclei in a thermal distribution of energy states, to the reaction rate with all target nuclei in their ground states are tabulated for neutron, proton and α-particle induced reactions on the naturally occurring nuclei from 20 Ne to 70 Zn, at temperatures of 1, 2, 3.5 and 5x10 9 K. The ratios are determined from reaction rates based on statistical model cross sections

  3. Representing Rate Equations for Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Addison

    2011-01-01

    Rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are derived and presented in a way that makes it easier for the nonspecialist to see how the rate of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction depends upon kinetic constants and concentrations. This is done with distribution equations that show how the rate of the reaction depends upon the relative quantities of…

  4. Metal-silicon reaction rates - The effects of capping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1989-01-01

    Evidence is presented showing that the presence of the commonly used anti-reflection coating material Ta2O5 on the free surface of contact metallization can either suppress or enhance, depending on the system, the interaction that takes place at elevated temperatures between the metallization and the underlying Si. The cap layer is shown to suppress both the generation and annihilation of vacancies at the free surface of the metal which are necessary to support metal-Si interactons. Evidence is also presented indicating that the mechanical condition of the free metal surface has a significant effect on the metal-silicon reaction rate.

  5. Reaction enhancement of initially distant scalars by Lagrangian coherent structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, Kenneth R.; Crimaldi, John P.; Meiss, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent fluid flows have long been recognized as a superior means of diluting initial concentrations of scalars due to rapid stirring. Conversely, experiments have shown that the structures responsible for this rapid dilution can also aggregate initially distant reactive scalars and thereby greatly enhance reaction rates. Indeed, chaotic flows not only enhance dilution by shearing and stretching but also organize initially distant scalars along transiently attracting regions in the flow. To show the robustness of this phenomenon, a hierarchical set of three numerical flows is used: the periodic wake downstream of a stationary cylinder, a chaotic double gyre flow, and a chaotic, aperiodic flow consisting of interacting Taylor vortices. We demonstrate that Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), as identified by ridges in finite time Lyapunov exponents, are directly responsible for this coalescence of reactive scalar filaments. When highly concentrated filaments coalesce, reaction rates can be orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted in a well-mixed system. This is further supported by an idealized, analytical model that was developed to quantify the competing effects of scalar dilution and coalescence. Chaotic flows, known for their ability to efficiently dilute scalars, therefore have the competing effect of organizing initially distant scalars along the LCS at timescales shorter than that required for dilution, resulting in reaction enhancement

  6. Temperature dependence of muonium reaction rates in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, D.G.; Garner, D.M.; Mikula, R.J.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver

    1981-01-01

    A study of the temperature dependence of reaction rates has long been an important tool in establishing reaction pathways in chemical reactions. This is particularly true for the reactions of muonium (in comparison with those of hydrogen) since a measurement of the activation energy for chemical reaction is sensitive to both the height and the position of the potential barrier in the reaction plane. For collision controlled reactions, on the other hand, the reaction rate is expected to exhibit a weak T 1 sup(/) 2 dependence characteristic of the mean collision velocity. These concepts are discussed and their effects illustrated in a comparison of the chemical and spin exchange reaction rates of muonium and hydrogen in the temperature range approx.300-approx.500 K. (orig.)

  7. Typewriting rate as a function of reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, V; Wilson, G D; Schafer, R L

    1977-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the relationship between reaction time and typewriting rate. Subjects were 24 typists ranging in age from 19 to 39 yr. Reaction times (.001 sec) to a light were recorded for each finger and to each alphabetic character and three punctuation marks. Analysis of variance yielded significant differences in reaction time among subjects and fingers. Correlation between typewriting rate and average reaction time to the alphabetic characters and three punctuation marks was --.75. Correlation between typewriting rate and the difference between the reaction time of the hands was --.42. Factors influencing typewriting rate may include reaction time of the fingers, difference between the reaction time of the hands, and reaction time to individual keys on the typewriter. Implications exist for instructional methodology and further research.

  8. Thermonuclear reaction rates in a deuterium-tritium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, L.

    1978-12-01

    In a deuterium-tritium plasma six thermonuclear reactions take place between the deuterons, tritons and the 3 He-particles formed in about half of the d-d-reactions. The rate constants for these six reactions have been calculated from the latest evaluations of the reaction cross sections which were available. In some cases, notably the reactions t+t, t+ 3 He and 3 He+ 3 He, the number of published cross section measurements is small, and the uncertainty in the calculated rate constants consequently large. Analytical expressions for the rate constants as functions of the plasma temperature have been set up. (author)

  9. Rates for some reactions involving 42Ca and 44Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.W.; King, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Ground-state reaction rates have been deduced from recent cross section measurements for the 42 CA(α, n) 45 Ti, 42 Ca(p, γ) 43 Sc, and 44 Ca(p, n) 44 Sc reactions. Comparison of these rates with those calculated from a statistical model of nuclear reactions. (Woosley et al) shows good agreement for the first two, but the 44 Ca(p, n) rate is more than a factor of 2 less than the theoretical prediction. Stellar reaction rates have been derived from the ground-state rates by multiplying the ground-state rates by the ratio of stellar to ground-state rates given by the statistical model. Both ground-state and stellar rates have been represented by analytic functions of the temperature. The role of these reactions in the approach to quasi-equilibrium during explosive silicon burning is discussed

  10. Effect of nuclear reaction rates on primordial abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Abhishek; Basu, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical predictions of the primordial abundances of elements in the big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) are dominated by uncertainties in the input nuclear reaction rates. The effect of modifying these reaction rates on light element abundance yields in BBN by replacing the thirty-five reaction rates out of the existing eighty-eight has been investigated. Also the study have been taken of these yields as functions of evolution time or temperature. Here it has been found that using these new reaction rates results in only a little increase in helium mass fraction over that obtained previously in BBN calculations. This allows insights into the role of the nuclear reaction rates in the setting of the neutron-to-proton ratio during the BBN epoch. We observe that most of these nuclear reactions have minimal effect on the standard BBN abundance yields of 6 Li and 7 Li

  11. Rate coefficients for hydrogen abstraction reaction of pinonaldehyde

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The H abstraction reaction from the –CHO group was found to be the most dominant reaction channelamong all the possible reaction pathways and its corresponding rate coefficient at 300 K is kEckart's unsymmetrical= 3.86 ×10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Whereas the channel with immediate lower activation energy is the ...

  12. Chemical changes in groundwater and their reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talma, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of the major ion concentrations of groundwater (Na, K, Ca, Mg, HCO 3 , SO 4 , Cl and NO 3 ) can be described as the consequence of a number of competing chemical reactions. With the aid of the naturally occuring radioactive and stable isotopes some of these reactions can be separated, identified and followed in space and time. In some field studies, especialy of artesian water, the rates of reactions can be estimated. A number of processes observed in South African sandstones aquifers are discussed and the variable reaction rates demonstrated. Reactions that can be identified include carbonate solution, chemical weathering, salt leaching, cation exchange and redox processes

  13. Enzymatic spectrophotometric reaction rate determination of aspartame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifković Kata T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame is an artificial sweetener of low caloric value (approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. Aspartame is currently permitted for use in food and beverage production in more than 90 countries. The application of aspartame in food products requires development of rapid, inexpensive and accurate method for its determination. The new assay for determination of aspartame was based on set of reactions that are catalyzed by three different enzymes: α-chymotrypsin, alcohol oxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Optimization of the proposed method was carried out for: (i α-chymotrypsin activity; (ii time allowed for α-chymotrypsin action, (iii temperature. Evaluation of the developed method was done by determining aspartame content in “diet” drinks, as well as in artificial sweetener pills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46010

  14. A review of reaction rates in high temperature air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul

    1989-01-01

    The existing experimental data on the rate coefficients for the chemical reactions in nonequilibrium high temperature air are reviewed and collated, and a selected set of such values is recommended for use in hypersonic flow calculations. For the reactions of neutral species, the recommended values are chosen from the experimental data that existed mostly prior to 1970, and are slightly different from those used previously. For the reactions involving ions, the recommended rate coefficients are newly chosen from the experimental data obtained more recently. The reacting environment is assumed to lack thermal equilibrium, and the rate coefficients are expressed as a function of the controlling temperature, incorporating the recent multitemperature reaction concept.

  15. Raman Spectral Determination of Chemical Reaction Rate Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakhnina, I. A.; Brandt, N. N.; Mankova, A. A.; Chikishev, A. Yu.; Shpachenko, I. G.

    2017-09-01

    The feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy to determine chemical reaction rates and activation energies has been demonstrated for the saponification of ethyl acetate. The temperature dependence of the reaction rate was found in the range from 15 to 45°C.

  16. Temperature effects on lithium-nitrogen reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijams, W.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1985-08-01

    A series of experiments have been run with the aim of measuring the reaction rate of lithium and nitrogen over a wide spectrum of lithium pool temperatures. In these experiments, pure nitrogen was blown at a controlled flow rate over a preheated lithium pool. The pool had a surface area of approximately 4 cm 2 and a total volume of approximately 6 cm 3 . The system pressure varied from 0 to 4 psig. The reaction rate was very small - approximately 0.002 to 0.003 g Li min cm 2 for lithium temperatures below 500 0 C. Above 500 0 C the reaction rate began to increase sharply, and reached a maximum of approximately 0.80 g Li min cm 2 above 700 0 C. It dropped off beyond 1000 0 C and seemed to approach zero at 1150 0 C. The maximum reaction rate observed in these forced convection experiments was higher by 60% than those previously observed in experiments where the nitrogen flowed to the reaction site by means of natural convection. During a reaction, a hard nitride layer built up on the surface of the lithium pool - its effect on the reaction rate was observed. The effect of the nitrogen flow rate on the reaction rate was also observed

  17. Enhancement of isotope exchange reactions over ceramic breeder material by deposition of catalyst metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narisato, Y.; Munakata, K.; Koga, A.; Yokoyama, Y.; Takata, T.; Okabe, H.

    2004-01-01

    The deposition of catalyst metals in ceramic breeders could enhance the release rate of tritium due to the promotion of isotope exchange reactions taking place at the interface of the breeder surface and the sweep gas. In this work, the authors examined the effects of catalytic active metal deposited on lithium titanate on the isotope exchange reactions. With respect to the virgin lithium titanate, it was found that the rate of the isotope exchange reactions taking place on the surface is quite low. However, the deposition of palladium greatly increased the exchange reaction rate. The effect of the amounts of deposited palladium on the isotope exchange reaction rate was also investigated. The results indicate that the exchange reactions are still enhanced even if the amounts of deposited palladium are as low as 0.04%

  18. Charged particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal reason for setting up the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged-particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The main goal of NACRE network was the transparency in the procedure of calculating the rates. More specifically this compilation aims at: 1. updating the experimental and theoretical data; 2. distinctly identifying the sources of the data used in rate calculation; 3. evaluating the uncertainties and errors; 4. providing numerically integrated reaction rates; 5. providing reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. The compilation is concerned with the reaction rates that are large enough for the target lifetimes shorter than the age of the Universe, taken equal to 15 x 10 9 y. The reaction rates are provided for temperatures lower than T = 10 10 K. In parallel with the rate compilation a cross section data base has been created and located at the site http://pntpm.ulb.ac.be/nacre..htm. (authors)

  19. Estimating the Backup Reaction Wheel Orientation Using Reaction Wheel Spin Rates Flight Telemetry from a Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    A report describes a model that estimates the orientation of the backup reaction wheel using the reaction wheel spin rates telemetry from a spacecraft. Attitude control via the reaction wheel assembly (RWA) onboard a spacecraft uses three reaction wheels (one wheel per axis) and a backup to accommodate any wheel degradation throughout the course of the mission. The spacecraft dynamics prediction depends upon the correct knowledge of the reaction wheel orientations. Thus, it is vital to determine the actual orientation of the reaction wheels such that the correct spacecraft dynamics can be predicted. The conservation of angular momentum is used to estimate the orientation of the backup reaction wheel from the prime and backup reaction wheel spin rates data. The method is applied in estimating the orientation of the backup wheel onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The flight telemetry from the March 2011 prime and backup RWA swap activity on Cassini is used to obtain the best estimate for the backup reaction wheel orientation.

  20. Non-equilibrium reaction rates in chemical kinetic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy

    2018-05-01

    Within the recently proposed asymptotic method for solving the Boltzmann equation for chemically reacting gas mixture, the chemical kinetic equations has been derived. Corresponding one-temperature non-equilibrium reaction rates are expressed in terms of specific heat capacities of the species participate in the chemical reactions, bracket integrals connected with the internal energy transfer in inelastic non-reactive collisions and energy transfer coefficients. Reactions of dissociation/recombination of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules are considered. It is shown that all reaction rates are the complex functions of the species densities, similarly to the unimolecular reaction rates. For determining the rate coefficients it is recommended to tabulate corresponding bracket integrals, additionally to the equilibrium rate constants. Correlation of the obtained results with the irreversible thermodynamics is established.

  1. Nuclear reaction rates and primordial 6Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nollett, K.M.; Schramm, D.N.; Lemoine, M.; Schramm, D.N.; Lemoine, M.; Schramm, D.N.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the possibility that big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) may produce nontrivial amounts of 6 Li. If a primordial component of this isotope could be observed, it would provide a new fundamental test of big-bang cosmology, as well as new constraints on the baryon density of the universe. At present, however, theoretical predictions of the primordial 6 Li abundance are extremely uncertain due to difficulties in both theoretical estimates and experimental determinations of the 2 H(α,γ) 6 Li radiative capture reaction cross section. We also argue that present observational capabilities do not yet allow the detection of primeval 6 Li in very metal-poor stars of the galactic halo. However, if the critical cross section is very high in its plausible range and the baryon density is relatively low, then improvements in 6 Li detection capabilities may allow the establishment of 6 Li as another product of BBN. It is also noted that a primordial 6 Li detection could help resolve current concerns about the extragalactic D/H determination. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. Charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates: II. Tables and graphs of reaction rates and probability density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.; Champagne, A.E.; Coc, A.; Fitzgerald, R.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this issue (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, 'lower limit', 'nominal value' and 'upper limit' of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters μ and σ at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rate probability density functions directly in a stellar model code for studies of stellar energy generation and nucleosynthesis. For each reaction, the Monte Carlo reaction rate probability density functions, together with their lognormal approximations, are displayed graphically for selected temperatures in order to provide a visual impression. Our new reaction rates are appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory. The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the subsequent paper of this issue (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this issue (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  3. High-precision (p,t) reactions to determine reaction rates of explosive stellar processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matić, Andrija

    2007-01-01

    The aim of my study was to investigate the nuclear structure of 22Mg and 26Si. These two nuclei play a significant role in stellar reaction processes at high temperatures. On base of the obtained nuclear structure we calculated the stellar reaction rates for the following reactions: 18Ne(α,p)21Na,

  4. APUAMA: a software tool for reaction rate calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euclides, Henrique O; P Barreto, Patricia R

    2017-06-01

    APUAMA is a free software designed to determine the reaction rate and thermodynamic properties of chemical species of a reagent system. With data from electronic structure calculations, the APUAMA determine the rate constant with tunneling correction, such as Wigner, Eckart and small curvature, and also, include the rovibrational level of diatomic molecules. The results are presented in the form of Arrhenius-Kooij form, for the reaction rate, and the thermodynamic properties are written down in the polynomial form. The word APUAMA means "fast" in Tupi-Guarani Brazilian language, then the code calculates the reaction rate on a simple and intuitive graphic interface, the form fast and practical. As program output, there are several ASCII files with tabulated information for rate constant, rovibrational levels, energy barriers and enthalpy of reaction, Arrhenius-Kooij coefficient, and also, the option to the User save all graphics in BMP format.

  5. The path to improved reaction rates for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, T.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on nuclear reactions in astrophysics and, more specifically, on reactions with light ions (nucleons and α particles) proceeding via the strong interaction. It is intended to present the basic definitions essential for studies in nuclear astrophysics, to point out the differences between nuclear reactions taking place in stars and in a terrestrial laboratory, and to illustrate some of the challenges to be faced in theoretical and experimental studies of those reactions. The discussion revolves around the relevant quantities for astrophysics, which are the astrophysical reaction rates. The sensitivity of the reaction rates to the uncertainties in the prediction of various nuclear properties is explored and some guidelines for experimentalists are also provided. (author)

  6. Rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the interest in the chemistry of germane in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and because previously reported kinetic reaction rate studies at 298 K gave results differing by a factor of 200, laboratory measurements were performed to determine the reaction rate constant for H + GeH4. Results of the study at 298 K, obtained via the direct technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence, yield the reaction rate constant, k = (4.08 + or - 0.22) x 10(exp -12) cu cm/s.

  7. Fusion enhancement in the reactions of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Baoan; Zhang Fengshou; Zhou Hongyu

    2009-01-01

    The neutron-rich fusion reactions are investigated systematically using the improved isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. By studying the systematic dependence of fusion barrier on neuron excess, we find the enhancement of the fusion cross sections for neutron-rich nuclear reactions that give the lowered static Coulomb barriers. The calculated fusion cross sections agree quantitatively with the experimental data. We further discuss the mechanism of the fusion enhancement of the cross sections for neutron-rich nuclear reactions by analyzing the dynamical lowering of the Coulomb barrier that is attributed to the enhancement of the N/Z ratio at the neck region.

  8. The Investors- Reaction to Investment Rating Change Announcements

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Hsiang Chang; Liang-Chien Lee; Shu-Ling Wu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the investors- behavioral reaction to the investment rating change announcements from the views of behavioral finance. The empirical results indicate that self-interest does affect the intention of securities firms to release investment ratings for individual stocks. In addition, behavioral pitfalls are also found in the response of retail investors to investment rating change announcements.

  9. Modular rate laws for enzymatic reactions: thermodynamics, elasticities and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermeister, Wolfram; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Klipp, Edda

    2010-06-15

    Standard rate laws are a key requisite for systematically turning metabolic networks into kinetic models. They should provide simple, general and biochemically plausible formulae for reaction velocities and reaction elasticities. At the same time, they need to respect thermodynamic relations between the kinetic constants and the metabolic fluxes and concentrations. We present a family of reversible rate laws for reactions with arbitrary stoichiometries and various types of regulation, including mass-action, Michaelis-Menten and uni-uni reversible Hill kinetics as special cases. With a thermodynamically safe parameterization of these rate laws, parameter sets obtained by model fitting, sampling or optimization are guaranteed to lead to consistent chemical equilibrium states. A reformulation using saturation values yields simple formulae for rates and elasticities, which can be easily adjusted to the given stationary flux distributions. Furthermore, this formulation highlights the role of chemical potential differences as thermodynamic driving forces. We compare the modular rate laws to the thermodynamic-kinetic modelling formalism and discuss a simplified rate law in which the reaction rate directly depends on the reaction affinity. For automatic handling of modular rate laws, we propose a standard syntax and semantic annotations for the Systems Biology Markup Language. An online tool for inserting the rate laws into SBML models is freely available at www.semanticsbml.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Optimized reaction mechanism rate rules for ignition of normal alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming; Pitsch, Heinz; Mohamed, Samah; Raman, Venkat; Bugler, John; Curran, Henry; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    fidelity reacting flow simulations capable of improving combustor design and operation. The development of such models for many new fuel components and/or surrogate molecules is greatly facilitated by the application of reaction classes and rate rules

  11. Cyanohydrin reactions enhance glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Nielsen, Astrid Gram; Tortzen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous metabolic oscillations can be induced in yeast by addition of glucose and removal of extracellular acetaldehyde (ACAx). Compared to other means of ACAx removal, cyanide robustly induces oscillations, indicating additional cyanide reactions besides ACA to lactonitrile conversion. Here......: a) by reducing [ACAx] relative to oscillation amplitude, b) by targeting multiple intracellular carbonyl compounds during fermentation, and c) by acting as a phase resetting stimulus....

  12. Improved predictions of nuclear reaction rates with the TALYS reaction code for astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J

    2008-01-01

    Context. Nuclear reaction rates of astrophysical applications are traditionally determined on the basis of Hauser-Feshbach reaction codes. These codes adopt a number of approximations that have never been tested, such as a simplified width fluctuation correction, the neglect of delayed or multiple-particle emission during the electromagnetic decay cascade, or the absence of the pre-equilibrium contribution at increasing incident energies. Aims. The reaction code TALYS has been recently updated to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates that are of astrophysical relevance. These new developments enable the reaction rates to be calculated with increased accuracy and reliability and the approximations of previous codes to be investigated. Methods. The TALYS predictions for the thermonuclear rates of relevance to astrophysics are detailed and compared with those derived by widely-used codes for the same nuclear ingredients. Results. It is shown that TALYS predictions may differ significantly from those of previous codes, in particular for nuclei for which no or little nuclear data is available. The pre-equilibrium process is shown to influence the astrophysics rates of exotic neutron-rich nuclei significantly. For the first time, the Maxwellian- averaged (n, 2n) reaction rate is calculated for all nuclei and its competition with the radiative capture rate is discussed. Conclusions. The TALYS code provides a new tool to estimate all nuclear reaction rates of relevance to astrophysics with improved accuracy and reliability. (authors)

  13. Accurate and approximate thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    In favourable cases it is possible to calculate thermal rate constants for polyatomic reactions to high accuracy from first principles. Here, we discuss the use of flux correlation functions combined with the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach to efficiently calculate cumulative reaction probabilities and thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions. Three isotopic variants of the H 2 + CH 3 → CH 4 + H reaction are used to illustrate the theory. There is good agreement with experimental results although the experimental rates generally are larger than the calculated ones, which are believed to be at least as accurate as the experimental rates. Approximations allowing evaluation of the thermal rate constant above 400 K are treated. It is also noted that for the treated reactions, transition state theory (TST) gives accurate rate constants above 500 K. TST theory also gives accurate results for kinetic isotope effects in cases where the mass of the transfered atom is unchanged. Due to neglect of tunnelling, TST however fails below 400 K if the mass of the transferred atom changes between the isotopic reactions

  14. Non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, T.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Fujita, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ogata, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Carter, J.; Donaldson, L.; Sideras-Haddad, E. [Schools of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Furuno, T.; Kawabata, T. [Departments of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Kamimura, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Nemulodi, F.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swarts, C. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences Somerset, West, 7129 (South Africa)

    2014-05-02

    Our experimental goal is to study the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperture (T < 10{sup 8} K). The {sup 13}C(p,d) reaction at 66 MeV has been used to probe the alpha-unbound continuum state in {sup 12}C just below the 2{sup nd} 0{sup +} state at 7.65 MeV. The transition strength to the continuum state is predicted to be sensitive to the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate. The experiment has been performed at iThemba LABS. We report the present status of the experiment.

  15. Analysis of reaction schemes using maximum rates of constituent steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motagamwala, Ali Hussain; Dumesic, James A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the steady-state kinetics of a chemical reaction can be analyzed analytically in terms of proposed reaction schemes composed of series of steps with stoichiometric numbers equal to unity by calculating the maximum rates of the constituent steps, rmax,i, assuming that all of the remaining steps are quasi-equilibrated. Analytical expressions can be derived in terms of rmax,i to calculate degrees of rate control for each step to determine the extent to which each step controls the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction. The values of rmax,i can be used to predict the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction, making it possible to estimate the observed reaction kinetics. This approach can be used for catalytic reactions to identify transition states and adsorbed species that are important in controlling catalyst performance, such that detailed calculations using electronic structure calculations (e.g., density functional theory) can be carried out for these species, whereas more approximate methods (e.g., scaling relations) are used for the remaining species. This approach to assess the feasibility of proposed reaction schemes is exact for reaction schemes where the stoichiometric coefficients of the constituent steps are equal to unity and the most abundant adsorbed species are in quasi-equilibrium with the gas phase and can be used in an approximate manner to probe the performance of more general reaction schemes, followed by more detailed analyses using full microkinetic models to determine the surface coverages by adsorbed species and the degrees of rate control of the elementary steps. PMID:27162366

  16. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  17. Reaction rate constant for uranium in water and water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRIMBLE, D.J.

    1998-11-09

    The literature on uranium oxidation in water and oxygen free water vapor was reviewed. Arrhenius rate equations were developed from the review data. These data and equations will be used as a baseline from which to compare reaction rates measured for K Basin fuel.

  18. BIG-10 fission product generation and reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Fission product generation rates for high quality fission foils and reaction rates of nonfission foils have been measured by gamma ray activation analyses. These foils were irradiated in the BIG-10 facility and the activities were measured by NaI counting techniques

  19. General properties of astrophysical reaction rates in explosive nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental differences in the prediction of reaction rates with intermediate and heavy target nuclei compared to the ones with light nuclei are discussed, with special emphasis on stellar modifications of the rates. Ground and excited state contributions to the stellar rates are quantified, deriving a linear weighting of excited state contributions despite of a Boltzmann population of the nuclear states. A Coulomb suppression effect of the excited state contributions is identified, acting against the usual Q-value rule in some reactions. The proper inclusion of experimental data in revised stellar rates is shown, containing revised uncertainties. An application to the s-process shows that the actual uncertainties in the neutron capture rates are larger than would be expected from the experimental errors alone. Sensitivities of reaction rates and cross sections are defined and their application in reaction studies is discussed. The conclusion provides a guide to experiment as well as theory on how to best improve the rates used in astrophysical simulations and how to assess their uncertainties.

  20. Effects of Surfactants on the Rate of Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are self-assembled compounds that depend on their structure and electric charge can interact as monomer or micelle with other compounds (substrates. These interactions which may catalyze or inhibit the reaction rates are studied with pseudophase, cooperativity, and stoichiometric (classical models. In this review, we discuss applying these models to study surfactant-substrate interactions and their effects on Diels-Alder, redox, photochemical, decomposition, enzymatic, isomerization, ligand exchange, radical, and nucleophilic reactions.

  1. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  2. Cross-section and reaction rates for some reactions involved in explosive nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.W.

    1979-03-01

    Total proton-induced and alpha-induced reaction cross sections have been determined for the 24 Mg(α,n), 25 Mg(p,n), 26 Mg(p,n), 27 Al(p,n), 28 Si(α,n), 42 Ca(p,γ), 42 Ca(α,n) and 44 Ca(p,n) reactions from energies near threshold (except the exothermic (p,γ) reaction) to about 3 to 4 MeV above threshold. The product nuclei are all positron emitters with half-lives ranging from about 3 sec to about 4 hours. From the measured cross sections reaction rates have been calculated in the temperature range 1 9 9 =1, at which the discrepancy is large. Included also are analytic forms for (p,n), (α,n), and (p,γ) reactions which can be used to describe the reaction rate within the temperature range 1 9 <=6 and which agree with the experimental rates at the discrete temperatures where the reaction rates have been calculated

  3. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The reaction rates of electrons with native and irradiated ribonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuessler, H.; Ebert, M.; Davies, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of reaction of hydrated electrons with proteins depends, amongst other things, on the conformational structure of the protein, and irradiation itself causes conformational changes in proteins. A study has been made of variations in the reaction rates of hydrated electrons with RNase pre-irradiated by the Linac or by a 60 Co γ-source. The reaction rate constants varied with the pre-irradiation dose, the concentration of phosphate buffer, the enzyme concentration and also the presence of 10 -2 M ethanol. These variations serve to emphasize the importance of the tertiary structure of biological molecules in irradiation processes and have significant implications in the mathematical analysis of the inactivation of enzymes in steady-state irradiation processes. (U.K.)

  5. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.; Allen, J.W.; Green, W.H.

    2013-01-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Back reaction and the local cosmological expansion rate

    CERN Document Server

    Geshnizjani, G

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the back reaction of cosmological perturbations on a general relativistic variable which measures the local expansion rate of the Universe. Specifically, we consider a cosmological model in which matter is described by a single field. We analyze back reaction both in a matter-dominated Universe and in a phase of scalar field-driven chaotic inflation. In both cases, we find that the leading infrared terms contributing to the back reaction vanish when the local expansion rate is measured at a fixed value of the matter field which is used as a clock, whereas they do not appear to vanish if the expansion rate is evaluated at a fixed value of the background time. We discuss possible implications for more realistic models with a more complicated matter sector.

  7. Reaction rate of 24Mg(p,γ)25Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, D.C.; Iliadis, C.; Champagne, A.E.; Grossmann, C.A.; Hale, S.E.; Hansper, V.Y.; McLean, L.K.

    1999-01-01

    The proton-capture reaction on 24 Mg has been investigated in the bombarding energy range of E p =0.2-1.7 MeV. Resonance properties (strengths, branching ratios and lifetimes) of low-energy resonances have been measured. From the experimental results, accurate proton partial widths, γ-ray partial widths and total widths (Γ p , Γ γ , and Γ) have been deduced. The present experimental information establishes the 24 Mg+p reaction rates over the temperature range T=0.02-2.0 GK with statistical uncertainties of 5% to 21%. Our recommended reaction rates deviate from previous estimates by 18% to 45%. Based on our results, we can rule out the recent suggestion that the total width of the E R =223 keV resonance has a significant influence on the reaction rates. We also discuss several effects that might give rise to systematic uncertainties in the reaction rates. The astrophysical implications for hydrogen burning of 24 Mg at low stellar temperatures are presented

  8. Suppression of the stellar enhancement factor and the reaction 85Rb(p,n)85Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, T.; Kiss, G. G.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Simon, A.; Fueloep, Zs.; Somorjai, E.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that a Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor occurs in many endothermic reactions at and far from stability. Contrary to common assumptions, reaction measurements for astrophysics with minimal impact of stellar enhancement should be preferably performed for those reactions instead of their reverses, despite of their negative Q value. As a demonstration, the cross section of the astrophysically relevant 85 Rb(p,n) 85 Sr reaction has been measured by activation between 2.16≤E c.m. ≤3.96 MeV and the astrophysical reaction rates at p process temperatures for (p,n) as well as (n,p) are directly inferred from the data. Additionally, our results confirm a previously derived modification of a global optical proton potential. The presented arguments are also relevant for other α- and proton-induced reactions in the p, rp, and νp processes.

  9. Liquid Film Diffusion on Reaction Rate in Submerged Biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Pia; Hollesen, Line; Harremoës, Poul

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in order to investigate the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate in a submerged biofilter with denitrification and in order to compare with a theoretical study of the mass transfer coefficient. The experiments were carried out with varied flow, identified...... by the empty bed velocity of inflow and recirculation, respectively 1.3, 2.8, 5.6 and 10.9 m/h. The filter material consisted of 3 mm biostyren spheres. The results indicate that the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate can be ignored....

  10. The Influence of Particle Charge on Heterogeneous Reaction Rate Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, A. C.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of particle charge on heterogeneous reaction rates are presented. Many atmospheric particles, whether liquid or solid are charged. This surface charge causes a redistribution of charge within a liquid particle and as a consequence a perturbation in the gaseous uptake coefficient. The amount of perturbation is proportional to the external potential and the square of the ratio of debye length in the liquid to the particle radius. Previous modeling has shown how surface charge affects the uptake coefficient of charged aerosols. This effect is now included in the heterogeneous reaction rate of an aerosol ensemble. Extension of this analysis to ice particles will be discussed and examples presented.

  11. Improved predictions of nuclear reaction rates for astrophysics applications with the TALYS reaction code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates for astrophysics applications are traditionally determined on the basis of Hauser-Feshbach reaction codes, like MOST. These codes use simplified schemes to calculate the capture reaction cross section on a given target nucleus, not only in its ground state but also on the different thermally populated states of the stellar plasma at a given temperature. Such schemes include a number of approximations that have never been tested, such as an approximate width fluctuation correction, the neglect of delayed particle emission during the electromagnetic decay cascade or the absence of the pre-equilibrium contribution at increasing incident energies. New developments have been brought to the reaction code TALYS to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates of astrophysics relevance. These new developments give us the possibility to calculate with an improved accuracy the reaction cross sections and the corresponding astrophysics rates. The TALYS predictions for the thermonuclear rates of astrophysics relevance are presented and compared with those obtained with the MOST code on the basis of the same nuclear ingredients for nuclear structure properties, optical model potential, nuclear level densities and γ-ray strength. It is shown that, in particular, the pre-equilibrium process significantly influences the astrophysics rates of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The reciprocity theorem traditionally used in astrophysics to determine photo-rates is also shown no to be valid for exotic nuclei. The predictions obtained with different nuclear inputs are also analyzed to provide an estimate of the theoretical uncertainties still affecting the reaction rate prediction far away from the experimentally known regions. (authors)

  12. Semiclassical Calculation of Reaction Rate Constants for Homolytical Dissociations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2002-01-01

    There is growing interest in extending organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) to III-V materials that exhibit large thermal decomposition at their optimum growth temperature, such as indium nitride. The group III nitrides are candidate materials for light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. To overcome decomposition of the deposited compound, the reaction must be conducted at high pressures, which causes problems of uniformity. Microgravity may provide the venue for maintaining conditions of laminar flow under high pressure. Since the selection of optimized parameters becomes crucial when performing experiments in microgravity, efforts are presently geared to the development of computational OMCVD models that will couple the reactor fluid dynamics with its chemical kinetics. In the present study, we developed a method to calculate reaction rate constants for the homolytic dissociation of III-V compounds for modeling OMCVD. The method is validated by comparing calculations with experimental reaction rate constants.

  13. Rates of ionic reactions with charged nanoparticles in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duval, J.F.L.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2012-01-01

    A theory is developed to evaluate the electrostatic correction for the rate of reaction between a small ion and a charged ligand nanoparticle. The particle is assumed to generally consist of an impermeable core and a shell permeable to water and ions. A derivation is proposed for the ion diffusion

  14. Calculation of multigroup reaction rates for the Ghana Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The discrete ordinate spatial model, which pro-vides solution to the differential form of the transport equation by the Carlson-SN (N=4) approach was adopted to solve the Ludwig-Boltzmann multigroup neutron transport equation for this analysis. The results show that for any fissile resonance absorber, the reaction rates ...

  15. Neutron detector for fusion reaction-rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Tietbohl, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a fast, sensitive neutron detector for recording the fusion reaction-rate history of inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The detector is based on the fast rise-time of a commercial plastic scintillator (BC-422) and has a response 7 neutrons

  16. Estimation of the rate of volcanism on Venus from reaction rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory rate data for the reaction between SO2 and calcite to form anhydrite are presented. If this reaction rate represents the SO2 reaction rate on Venus, then all SO2 in the Venusian atmosphere will disappear in 1.9 Myr unless volcanism replenishes the lost SO2. The required volcanism rate, which depends on the sulfur content of the erupted material, is in the range 0.4-11 cu km of magma erupted per year. The Venus surface composition at the Venera 13, 14, and Vega 2 landing sites implies a volcanism rate of about 1 cu km/yr. This geochemically estimated rate can be used to determine if either (or neither) of two discordant geophysically estimated rates is correct. It also suggests that Venus may be less volcanically active than the earth.

  17. Determination of rate constants for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, A.; Walter, T.; Stimming, U. [Munich Technical Univ., Garching (Germany). Dept. of Physics

    2008-07-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells is a complex and fundamental electrochemical reaction. However, greater insight is needed into this multi-electron reaction in order to develop efficient and innovative catalysts. The rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) is a useful tool for studying reaction intermediates of the ORR and to better understand the reaction pathway. Carbon materials such as carbon nanofilaments-platelets (CNF-PL) have high electrical conductivity and may be considered for fuel cells. In particular Pt and RuSe{sub x}, deposited on CNF-PL materials could act as efficient catalysts in fuel cells. This study used the RRDE to evaluate the oxygen reduction kinetics of these catalysts in oxygen-saturated, diluted sulphuric acid at room temperature. Kinetic data and hydrogen peroxide formation were determined by depositing a thin-film of the catalyst on the Au disc. The values for the constants k1, k2 and k3 were obtained using diagnostic criteria and expressions to calculate the rate constants of the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction for RuSe on new carbon supports. A potential dependency of the constants k1 and k2 for RuSe{sub x}/CNF-PL was observed. The transition of the Tafel slopes for this catalyst was obtained. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Recent developments in semiclassical mechanics: eigenvalues and reaction rate constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.

    1976-04-01

    A semiclassical treatment of eigenvalues for a multidimensional non-separable potential function and of the rate constant for a chemical reaction with an activation barrier is presented. Both phenomena are seen to be described by essentially the same semiclassical formalism, which is based on a construction of the total Hamiltonian in terms of the complete set of ''good'' action variables (or adiabatic invariants) associated with the minimum in the potential energy surface for the eigenvalue case, or the saddle point in the potential energy surface for the case of chemical reaction

  19. Rate constant for reaction of hydroxyl radicals with bicarbonate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, G.V.; Elliot, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for reaction of hydroxyl radicals with the bicarbonate ion has been determined to be 8.5 x 10 6 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . This value was calculated from: the measured rate of formation of the CO 3 - radical in pulsed electron irradiation of bicarbonate solutions over the pH range 7.0 to 9.4; the pK for the equilibrium HCO 3 - = CO 3 2- + H + ; and the rate constant for hydroxyl radicals reacting with the carbonate ion. (author)

  20. Non extensive corrections to stellar nuclear reactions rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assuncao, M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (DCET/UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra; Silveira, F.E.M. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas; Lima, J.A.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IAG/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Stellar nucleosynthesis is widely accepted as the basic mechanism for creation of chemical elements in the Universe. In particular, nuclear reactions occurring in the Sun are recognized as responsible for its energy generation. The problem of to determine the energy generation mechanism in stars was firstly attacked by Gamow in the framework of his quantum mechanical theory of potential barrier penetration. According to that approach, the reactions rate is calculated by averaging the penetration factor over the velocity distribution of the plasma particles. A randomization of that distribution is expected as a consequence of the reactions. However, diffusion processes in the macroscopic environment should balance the resulting particles number depletion. Therefore, matter, energy, and momentum might steadily flow. In other words, a quasi-stationary equilibrium state must be attained. In this work, the potential barrier penetration approach to stellar nuclear reactions rate has been rediscussed with basis on Tsallis nonextensive statistics. The investigation has been restricted to non-resonant reactions, for which the S-factor can be regarded as a constant. It has been found that, within the extended formulation, the nonextensive q-parameter is constrained to a maximum value. Accordingly, the q-energy has been shown to exhibit a minimum. The q-Gamow peak has been derived and, in connection with the usual Gaussian approximation, the corresponding half q-width has been also estimated. Plots of the q-energy, q-Gamow peak and half q-width for some reactions with stellar physics interest have been produced. (author)

  1. Cross sections and thermonuclear reaction rates of proton-induced reactions on 37Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, R.O.; Tingwell, C.I.W.; Mitchell, L.W.; Sevior, M.E.; Sargood, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    The yields of γ-rays from the reactions of 37 Cl(p,γ) 38 Ar and 37 Cl(p,αγ) 34 S have been measured as a of bombarding energy over the ranges 0.65 - 2.15 MeV and 1.25 -2.15 MeV respectively, and the yield of neutrons from 37 Cl(p,n) 37 Ar from threshold to 2.50 MeV. The results are compared with global statistical-model calculations and thermonuclear reaction rates are calculated for the temperature range 5 x 10 8 - 10 10 K. The significance of these thermonuclear reaction rates for stellar nucleosynthesis calculations is discussed

  2. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  3. Estimation of the Polymerization Rate of Liquid Propylene Using Adiabatic Reaction Calorimetry and Reaction Dilatometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-haj Ali, Mohammad; Betlem, Ben; Roffel, Brian; Weickert, Günter

    2007-01-01

    The use of pressure-drop and constant-pressure dilatometry for obtaining rate data for liquid propylene polymerization in filled batch reactors was examined. The first method uses reaction temperature and pressure as well as the compressibility of the reactor contents to calculate the polymerization

  4. Kinetic aspects of the embedded clusters: Reaction - Rate Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despa, F.; Apostol, M.

    1995-07-01

    The main stages of the cluster growth process are reviewed using Reaction - Rate Theory. The precipitation stage is shown as a relaxation of the solute towards a cluster state characterized by a higher stability. The kinetic of the late stage of phase separation, the coarsening process, is analyzed by an off-centre diffusion mechanism. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental ones. (author). 37 refs, 6 figs

  5. Enhancing the efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using graphene nanoflakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Khaliq, R; Kafafy, Raed; Salleh, Hamzah Mohd; Faris, Waleed Fekry

    2012-11-16

    The effect of the recently developed graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been investigated in this paper. The rationale behind the use of GNFs is their unique physical and thermal properties. Experiments show that GNFs can enhance the thermal conductivity of base fluids and results also revealed that GNFs are a potential enhancer of PCR efficiency; moreover, the PCR enhancements are strongly dependent on GNF concentration. It was found that GNFs yield DNA product equivalent to positive control with up to 65% reduction in the PCR cycles. It was also observed that the PCR yield is dependent on the GNF size, wherein the surface area increases and augments thermal conductivity. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to analyze the heat transfer through the PCR tube model in the presence and absence of GNFs. The results suggest that the superior thermal conductivity effect of GNFs may be the main cause of the PCR enhancement.

  6. Optimized reaction mechanism rate rules for ignition of normal alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2016-08-11

    The increasing demand for cleaner combustion and reduced greenhouse gas emissions motivates research on the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and their surrogates. Accurate detailed chemical kinetic models are an important prerequisite for high fidelity reacting flow simulations capable of improving combustor design and operation. The development of such models for many new fuel components and/or surrogate molecules is greatly facilitated by the application of reaction classes and rate rules. Accurate and versatile rate rules are desirable to improve the predictive accuracy of kinetic models. A major contribution in the literature is the recent work by Bugler et al. (2015), which has significantly improved rate rules and thermochemical parameters used in kinetic modeling of alkanes. In the present study, it is demonstrated that rate rules can be used and consistently optimized for a set of normal alkanes including n-heptane, n-octane, n-nonane, n-decane, and n-undecane, thereby improving the predictive accuracy for all the considered fuels. A Bayesian framework is applied in the calibration of the rate rules. The optimized rate rules are subsequently applied to generate a mechanism for n-dodecane, which was not part of the training set for the optimized rate rules. The developed mechanism shows accurate predictions compared with published well-validated mechanisms for a wide range of conditions.

  7. Enhanced pycnonuclear reactions in ultrahigh-pressure metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, Setsuo; Kitamura, Hikaru

    1995-01-01

    By combining the concepts of pycnonuclear reactions at low temperatures and their enhancement due to strong internuclear Coulomb correlations, we predict the possibilities of a novel scheme for fusion in ultrahigh-pressure liquid-metallic hydrogen near the freezing conditions, for the reactions 2 H(p,γ) 3 He, 3 H(d,n) 4 He, and 7 Li(p,α) 4 He. Time evolution is followed for p-d reaction after a pulsed compression with 1 kJ input and the initial conditions of mass density ≅ 20 g/cm 3 , temperature ≅ 1400 K, pressure ≅ 490 Mbar, and radius ≅ 0.017 cm; an energy yield of 33 kJ in 0.03 fs is thus predicted. (author)

  8. Reaction of H2 with O2 in Excited Electronic States: Reaction Pathways and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelevkin, Alexey V; Loukhovitski, Boris I; Sharipov, Alexander S

    2017-12-21

    Comprehensive quantum chemical analysis with the use of the multireference state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field approach was carried out to study the reactions of H 2 with O 2 in a 1 Δ g , b 1 Σ g + , c 1 Σ u - , and A' 3 Δ u electronically excited states. The energetically favorable reaction pathways and possible intersystem crossings have been revealed. The energy barriers were refined employing the extended multiconfiguration quasi-degenerate second-order perturbation theory. It has been shown that the interaction of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (A' 3 Δ u ) with H 2 occurs through the H-abstraction process with relatively low activation barriers that resulted in the formation of the HO 2 molecule in A″ and A' electronic states, respectively. Meanwhile, molecular oxygen in singlet sigma states (b 1 Σ g + and c 1 Σ u - ) was proved to be nonreactive with respect to the molecular hydrogen. Appropriate rate constants for revealed reaction and quenching channels have been estimated using variational transition-state theory including corrections for the tunneling effect, possible nonadiabatic transitions, and anharmonicity of vibrations for transition states and reactants. It was demonstrated that the calculated reaction rate constant for the H 2 + O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) process is in reasonable agreement with known experimental data. The Arrhenius approximations for these processes have been proposed for the temperature range T = 300-3000 K.

  9. Primordial lithium: New reaction rates, new abundances, new constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, L.; Schramm, D.; Steigman, G.

    1986-12-01

    Newly measured nuclear reaction rates for 3 H(α,γ) 7 Li (higher than previous values) and 7 Li(p,α) 4 He (lower than previous values) are shown to increase the 7 Li yield from big bang nucleosynthesis for lower baryon to photon ratio (eta ≤ 4 x 10 -10 ); the yield for higher eta is not affected. New, independent determinations of Li abundances in extreme Pop II stars are in excellent agreement with the earlier work of the Spites and give continued confidence in the use of 7 Li in big bang baryon density determinations. The new 7 Li constraints imply a lower limit on eta of 2 x 10 -10 and an upper limit of 5 x 10 -10 . This lower limit to eta is concordant with that obtained from considerations of D + 3 He. The upper limit is consistent with, but even more restrictive than, the D bound. With the new rates, any observed primordial Li/H ratio below 10 -10 would be inexplicable by the standard big bang nucleosynthesis. A review is made of the strengths and possible weaknesses of utilizing conclusions drawn from big bang lithium considerations. An appendix discusses the null effect of a factor of 32 increase in the experimental rate for the D(d,γ) 4 He reaction. 28 refs., 1 fig

  10. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öström, Jonatan, E-mail: jonatan.ostrom@gmail.com; Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.gustafsson@ltu.se [Applied Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Science and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Bezrukov, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  11. Flat Graphene-Enhanced Electron Transfer Involved in Redox Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Meilan; Zhang, Yanyang; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Gao, Guandao; Pan, Bingcai

    2017-08-01

    Graphene is easily warped in the out-of-plane direction because of its high in-plane Young's modulus, and exploring the influence of wrinkled graphene on its properties is essential for the design of graphene-based materials for environmental applications. Herein, we prepared wrinkled graphene (WGN-1 and WGN-2) by thermal treatment and compared their electrochemical properties with those of flat graphene nanosheets (FGN). FGN exhibit activities that are much better than those of wrinkled graphene nanosheets (WGN), not only in the electrochemical oxidation of methylene blue (MB) but also in the electrochemical reduction of nitrobenzene (NB). Transformation ratios of MB and NB in FGN, WGN-1, and WGN-2 were 97.5, 80.1, and 57.9% and 94.6, 92.1, and 81.2%, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and the surface resistance of the graphene samples increased in the following order: FGN reaction charges transfer faster across the reaction interfaces and along the surface of FGN than that of WGN, and wrinkles restrict reaction charge transfer and reduce the reaction rates. This study reveals that the morphology of the graphene (flat or wrinkle) greatly affects redox reaction activities and may have important implications for the design of novel graphene-based nanostructures and for our understanding of graphene wrinkle-dependent redox reactions in environmental processes.

  12. Substantial rate enhancements of the esterification reaction of phthalic anhydride with methanol at high pressure and using supercritical CO2 as a co-solvent in a glass microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benito-Lopez, F.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Salblut, K.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Egberink, Richard J.M.; Reinhoudt, David; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Verboom, Willem

    2007-01-01

    The esterification reaction of phthalic anhydride with methanol was performed at different temperatures in a continuous flow glass microreactor at pressures up to 110 bar and using supercritical CO2 as a co-solvent. The design is such that supercritical CO2 can be generated inside the microreactor.

  13. Ozonation of norfloxacin and levofloxacin in water: Specific reaction rate constants and defluorination reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Wencui; Ben, Weiwei; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Qiang, Zhimin

    2018-03-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of two typical fluoroquinolones (FQs), norfloxacin (NF) and levofloxacin (LOF), by ozone in water were investigated. Semi-continuous mode and competition kinetics mode experiments were conducted to determine the reaction rate constants of target FQs with ozone and OH, separately. Results indicate that both NF and LOF were highly reactive toward ozone, and the reactivity was strongly impacted by the solution pH. The specific reaction rate constants of the diprotonated, monoprotonated and deprotonated species were determined to be 7.20 × 10 2 , 8.59 × 10 3 , 4.54 × 10 5  M -1  s -1 respectively for NF and 1.30 × 10 3 , 1.40 × 10 4 , 1.33 × 10 6  M -1  s -1 respectively for LOF. The reaction rate constants of target FQs toward OH were measured to be (4.81-7.41) × 10 9  M -1  s -1 in the pH range of 6.3-8.3. Furthermore, NF was selected as a model compound to clarify the degradation pathways, with a particular focus on the defluorination reaction. The significant release of F - ions and the formation of three F-free organic byproducts indicated that defluorination was a prevalent pathway in ozonation of FQs, while six F-containing organic byproducts indicated that ozone also attacked the piperazinyl and quinolone moieties. Escherichia coli growth inhibition tests revealed that ozonation could effectively eliminate the antibacterial activity of target FQ solutions, and the residual antibacterial activity had a negative linear correlation with the released F - concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'danskij, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerisation, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerisation reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau 0 ) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerisation by radiation and during postpolymerisation and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau 0 slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau 0 reaches a plateau (tau 0 approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life)

  15. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gol' danskii, V I [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Khimicheskoj Fiziki

    1975-12-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius Law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerization, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerization reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau/sub 0/) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerization by radiation and during postpolymerization and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau/sub 0/ slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau/sub 0/ reaches a plateau (tau/sub 0/ approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life).

  16. Charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates: IV. Comparison to previous work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.; Champagne, A.E.; Coc, A.

    2010-01-01

    We compare our Monte Carlo reaction rates (see Paper II of this issue) to previous results that were obtained by using the classical method of computing thermonuclear reaction rates. For each reaction, the comparison is presented using two types of graphs: the first shows the change in reaction rate uncertainties, while the second displays our new results normalized to the previously recommended reaction rate. We find that the rates have changed significantly for almost all reactions considered here. The changes are caused by (i) our new Monte Carlo method of computing reaction rates (see Paper I of this issue), and (ii) newly available nuclear physics information (see Paper III of this issue).

  17. Relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency of nanomachine-based targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingying; Li, Min; Luo, Jun

    2017-12-04

    In nanomachine applications towards targeted drug delivery, drug molecules released by nanomachines propagate and chemically react with tumor cells in aqueous environment. If the nanomachines release drug molecules faster than the tumor cells react, it will result in loss and waste of drug molecules. It is a potential issue associated with the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency. This paper aims to investigate the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency based on two drug reception models. We expect to pave a way for designing a control method of drug release. We adopted two analytical methods that one is drug reception process based on collision with tumors and another is based on Michaelis Menten enzymatic kinetics. To evaluate the analytical formulations, we used the well-known simulation framework N3Sim to establish simulations. The analytical results of the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency is obtained, which match well with the numerical simulation results in a 3-D environment. Based upon two drug reception models, the results of this paper would be beneficial for designing a control method of nanomahine-based drug release.

  18. Reaction mechanisms for enhancing carbon dioxide mineral sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Karalee Ann

    Increasing global temperature resulting from the increased release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is one of the greatest problems facing society. Nevertheless, coal plants remain the largest source of electrical energy and carbon dioxide gas. For this reason, researchers are searching for methods to reduce carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere from the combustion of coal. Mineral sequestration of carbon dioxide reacted in electrolyte solutions at 185°C and 2200 psi with olivine (magnesium silicate) has been shown to produce environmentally benign carbonates. However, to make this method feasible for industrial applications, the reaction rate needs to be increased. Two methods were employed to increase the rate of mineral sequestration: reactant composition and concentration were altered independently in various runs. The products were analyzed with complete combustion for total carbon content. Crystalline phases in the product were analyzed with Debye-Scherrer X-ray powder diffraction. To understand the reaction mechanism, single crystals of San Carlos Olivine were reacted in two solutions: (0.64 M NaHCO3/1 M NaCl) and (5.5 M KHCO3) and analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) to study the surface morphology, atomic crystalline structure, composition and amorphous structure. From solution chemistry studies, it was found that increasing the activity of the bicarbonate ion increased the conversion rate of carbon dioxide to magnesite. The fastest conversion, 60% conversion in one hour, occurred in a solution of 5.5 M KHCO3. The reaction product particles, magnesium carbonate, significantly increased in both number density and size on the coupon when the bicarbonate ion activity was increased. During some experiments reaction vessel corrosion also altered the mineral sequestration mechanism. Nickel ions from vessel

  19. Transcriptional dynamics with time-dependent reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shubhendu; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-02-01

    Transcription is the first step in the process of gene regulation that controls cell response to varying environmental conditions. Transcription is a stochastic process, involving synthesis and degradation of mRNAs, that can be modeled as a birth-death process. We consider a generic stochastic model, where the fluctuating environment is encoded in the time-dependent reaction rates. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the mRNA probability distribution and are able to analyze the response for arbitrary time-dependent protocols. Our analytical results and stochastic simulations confirm that the transcriptional machinery primarily act as a low-pass filter. We also show that depending on the system parameters, the mRNA levels in a cell population can show synchronous/asynchronous fluctuations and can deviate from Poisson statistics.

  20. Transcriptional dynamics with time-dependent reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-01-01

    Transcription is the first step in the process of gene regulation that controls cell response to varying environmental conditions. Transcription is a stochastic process, involving synthesis and degradation of mRNAs, that can be modeled as a birth–death process. We consider a generic stochastic model, where the fluctuating environment is encoded in the time-dependent reaction rates. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the mRNA probability distribution and are able to analyze the response for arbitrary time-dependent protocols. Our analytical results and stochastic simulations confirm that the transcriptional machinery primarily act as a low-pass filter. We also show that depending on the system parameters, the mRNA levels in a cell population can show synchronous/asynchronous fluctuations and can deviate from Poisson statistics. (paper)

  1. The effects of vacuum polarization on thermonuclear reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Added to the pure Coulomb potential, the contribution from vacuum polarization increases the barrier, reducing the wave function (u) for reacting nuclei within the range of nuclear forces. The cross section and reaction rate are then reduced accordingly by a factor proportional to u squared. The effect is treated by evaluating the vacuum polarization potential as a small correction to the Coulomb term, then computing u in a WKB formulation. The calculation is done analytically employing the small r power-series expansion for the Uehling potential to express the final result in terms of convenient parameters. At a temperature of 1.4 x 10 to the 7th K the (negative) correction is 1.3 percent for the fundamental fusion process p + p yields d + e(+) + nu.

  2. Nuclear Data and Reaction Rate Databases in Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas

    2018-06-01

    Astrophysical simulations and models require a large variety of micro-physics data, such as equation of state tables, atomic opacities, properties of nuclei, and nuclear reaction rates. Some of the required data is experimentally accessible, but the extreme conditions present in many astrophysical scenarios cannot be reproduced in the laboratory and thus theoretical models are needed to supplement the empirical data. Collecting data from various sources and making them available as a database in a unified format is a formidable task. I will provide an overview of the data requirements in astrophysics with an emphasis on nuclear astrophysics. I will then discuss some of the existing databases, the science they enable, and their limitations. Finally, I will offer some thoughts on how to design a useful database.

  3. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  4. Manual Choice Reaction Times in the Rate-Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eHarris

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 150 years, human manual reaction times (RTs have been recorded countless times. Yet, our understanding of them remains remarkably poor. RTs are highly variable with positively skewed frequency distributions, often modelled as an inverse Gaussian distribution reflecting a stochastic rise to threshold (diffusion process. However, latency distribution of saccades are very close to the reciprocal Normal, suggesting that ‘rate’ (reciprocal RT may be the more fundamental variable. We explored whether this phenomenon extends to choice manual RTs. We recorded two-alternative choice RTs from 24 subjects, each with 4 blocks of 200 trials with two task difficulties (easy vs. difficult discrimination and two instruction sets (urgent vs. accurate. We found that rate distributions were, indeed, very close to Normal, shifting to lower rates with increasing difficulty and accuracy, and for some blocks subjects they appeared to become left-truncated, but still close to Normal. Using autoregressive techniques, we found temporal sequential dependencies for lags of at least 3. We identified a transient and steady-state component in each block. Because rates were Normal, we were able to estimate autoregressive weights using the Box-Jenkins technique, and convert to a moving average model using z-transforms to show explicit dependence on stimulus input. We also found a spatial sequential dependence for the previous 3 lags depending on whether the laterality of previous trials was repeated or alternated. This was partially dissociated from temporal dependency as it only occurred in the easy tasks. We conclude that 2-alternative choice manual RT distributions are close to reciprocal Normal and not the inverse Gaussian. This is not consistent with stochastic rise to threshold models, and we propose a simple optimality model in which reward is maximized to yield to an optimal rate, and hence an optimal time to respond. We discuss how it might be

  5. Search for a resonant enhancement of the 7Be + d reaction and primordial 7Li abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Malley, Patrick; Adekola, A.S.; Cizewski, J.A.; Howard, M.E.; Strauss, S.; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Pain, Steven D.; Smith, Michael Scott; Ahn, S.H.; Jones, K.L.; Pittman, S.T.; Schmitt, Kyle; Graves, S.; Kozub, R.L.; Shriner, J.F. Jr.; Wheeler, J.L.; Linhardt, Laura; Matos, M.; Moazen, B.M.; Peters, W.A.; Spassova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results, produce 7 Li abundances almost a factor of four larger than those extrapolated from observations. Since primordial 7 Li is believed to be mostly produced by the beta decay of 7 Be, one proposed solution to this discrepancy is a resonant enhancement of the 7 Be(d,p)2α reaction rate through the 5/2 + 16.7-MeV state in 9 B. The 2 H( 7 Be,d) 7 Be reaction was used to search for such a resonance; none was observed. An upper limit on the width of the proposed resonance was deduced.

  6. Porous platinum mesoflowers with enhanced activity for methanol oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang Lina; Wang Wenjin; Hong Feng [School of Science, MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Yang Shengchun, E-mail: ysch1209@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Science, MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); You Hongjun, E-mail: hjyou@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Science, MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Fang Jixiang; Ding Bingjun [School of Science, MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Porous Pt and Pt-Ag alloy mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesized using Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic reaction. The silver content in Pt-Ag alloys can be facilely controlled by nitric acid treatment. And the pure Pt MFs can be obtained by selective removal of silver element from Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} MFs electrochemically. Both Pt{sub 45}Ag{sub 55}, Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} and pure Pt show a high catalytic performance in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Especially, pure Pt MFs exhibited a 2 to 3 times current density enhancement in MOR compared with the commercial used Pt black, which can be attributed to their porous nanostructure with 3-dimentional nature and small crystal sizes. - Graphical Abstract: The CVs of MOR on Pt (red) and Pt black (green) catalysts in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} and 0.5 M CH{sub 3}OH for specific mass current. The insert shows the SEM images of two porous Pt MFs. Platinum mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesised with Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic replacement. The porous Pt MFs exhibited a more than 3 times enhancement in electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation reaction compared the commercial used Pt black. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous Pt and Pt-Ag mesoflowers (MFs) were synthesized using Ag MFs sacrifical template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt MFs presents an improved catalytic activity in MOR compared with Pt black. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provided a facile approach for the development of high performance Pt electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  7. Reaction-rate formula in out of equilibrium quantum field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Niegawa, A.; Okano, K.; Ozaki, H.

    1999-01-01

    A complete derivation, from first principles, of the reaction-rate formula for a generic reaction taking place in an out of equilibrium quantum-field system is given. It is shown that the formula involves no finite-volume correction. Each term of the reaction-rate formula represents a set of physical processes that contribute to the reaction under consideration.

  8. On the mechanism of effective chemical reactions with turbulent mixing of reactants and finite rate of molecular reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorotilin, V. P., E-mail: VPVorotilin@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    A generalization of the theory of chemical transformation processes under turbulent mixing of reactants and arbitrary values of the rate of molecular reactions is presented that was previously developed for the variant of an instantaneous reaction [13]. The use of the features of instantaneous reactions when considering the general case, namely, the introduction of the concept of effective reaction for the reactant volumes and writing a closing conservation equation for these volumes, became possible due to the partition of the whole amount of reactants into “active” and “passive” classes; the reactants of the first class are not mixed and react by the mechanism of instantaneous reactions, while the reactants of the second class approach each other only through molecular diffusion, and therefore their contribution to the reaction process can be neglected. The physical mechanism of reaction for the limit regime of an ideal mixing reactor (IMR) is revealed and described. Although formally the reaction rate in this regime depends on the concentration of passive fractions of the reactants, according to the theory presented, the true (hidden) mechanism of the reaction is associated only with the reaction of the active fractions of the reactants with vanishingly small concentration in the volume of the reactor. It is shown that the rate constant of fast chemical reactions can be evaluated when the mixing intensity of reactants is much less than that needed to reach the mixing conditions in an IMR.

  9. Proton-proton reaction rates at extreme energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Motohiko

    1993-01-01

    Results on proton-antiproton reaction rates (total cross-section) at collision energies of 1.8 TeV from experiments at Fermilab have suggested a lower rate of increase with energy compared to the extrapolation based on results previously obtained at CERN's proton-antiproton collider (CERN Courier, October 1991). Now an independent estimate of the values for the proton-proton total cross-section for collision energies from 5 to 30 TeV has been provided by the analysis of cosmic ray shower data collected over ten years at the Akeno Observatory operated by the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research of University of Tokyo. These results are based on the inelastic cross-section for collisions of cosmic ray protons with air nuclei at energies in the range10 16-18 eV. A new extensive air shower experiment was started at Akeno, 150 km west of Tokyo, in 1979 with a large array of detectors, both on the ground and under a 1-metre concrete absorber. This measured the total numbers of electrons and muons of energies above 1GeV for individual showers with much better accuracy than before. Data collection was almost continuous for ten years without any change in the triggering criteria for showers above10 16 eV. The mean free path for proton-air nuclei collisions has been determined from the zenith angle of the observed frequency of air showers which have the same effective path length for development in the atmosphere and the same primary energy

  10. Measurements of astrophysical reaction rates for radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P.E.; O'Brien, H.A.; Bowman, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction rates for both big-bang and stellar nucleosynthesis can be obtained from the measurement of (n,p) and (n,γ) cross sections for radioactive nuclei. In the past, large backgrounds associated with the sample activity limited these types of measurements to radioisotopes with very long half lives. The advent of the low-energy, high-intensity neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE) has greatly increased the number of nuclei which can be studied. Results of (n,p) measurements on samples with half lives as short as fifty-three days will be given. The astrophysics to be learned from these data will be discussed. Additional difficulties are encountered when making (n,γ) rather than (n,p) measurements. However, with a properly designed detector, and with the high peak neutron intensities now available, (n,γ) measurements can be made for nuclei with half lives as short as several weeks. Progress on the Los Alamos (n,γ) cross-section measurement program for radioactive samples will be discussed. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reactions of sulfur atoms. XV. Absolute rate parameters for the S(3P210) + alkyne reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Roodselaar, A.; Safarik, I.; Strausz, O.P.; Gunning, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Using flash photolysis with vacuum uv kinetic absorption spectroscopy, absolute rate constants and Arrhenius parameters have been measured for the addition of ground state S( 3 P 2 , 1 , 0 ) atoms to alkynes. The decay of sulfur atoms in COS, alkyne, and CO 2 -diluent mixtures is first order in sulfur atom concentration and the first-order decay rate constants are proportional to the alkyne concentration. The following rate constants were determined at room temperature: k(C 2 H 2 ) = k(C 2 D 2 ) + (2.3 +- 0.4) x 10 8 ; k(CHCCH 3 ) = (4.8 +- 0.2) x 10 9 ; k(CHCC 2 H 5 ) = (3.3 +- 0.2) x 10 9 ; k(CH 3 CCCH 3 ) = 1.6 +- 0.2) x 10 10 ; k(CH 3 CCC 2 C 5 ) = 1.8 +- 0.3) x 10 10 ; and k(CF 3 CCCF 3 ) = (2.1 +- 0.4) x 10 8 L mol -1 s -1 . The Arrhenius parameters determined are k(C 2 H 2 ) = (3.4 +- 1.9) x 10 10 exp[(-3000 +- 400)/RT] L mol -1 s -1 and k(CHCCH 3 ) = (2.0 +- 1.2) x 10 10 exp[(-900 +- 200)/RT] L mol -1 s -1 where error limits represent standard deviations. The rate parameters are compared to those obtained for the addition of other electrophilic reagents to alkynes and the results discussed in terms of structural and kinetic factors. Theoretical treatment of the secondary H/D isotope effect in the acetylene reaction satisfactorily reproduces the experimental value. 5 tables, 4 figures, 59 references

  13. Study of the Reaction Rate of Gold Nanotube Synthesis from Sacrificial Silver Nanorods through the Galvanic Replacement Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out about the gold nanotube synthesis via a galvanic replacement reaction. The progress of the gold nanotube synthesis was investigated using electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. In addition, the reaction rates of gold nanotube formation in the early stage of the reaction were studied. The chlorine ion concentration linearly increased with the gold precursor concentration but deviated from the stoichiometric amounts. This deviation was probably due to AgCl precipitates formed by the reaction of chlorine ions with dissolved silver ions. The replacement reaction was promoted with increased temperature and was nonlinearly proportional to the gold ion concentration. The outcomes of this research will enhance the current understanding of the galvanic replacement reaction.

  14. Species Diversity Enhances Predator Growth Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, M.H.; Jacobs, R.P.; O'Donnell, E.B.

    2007-01-01

    Predators can be important top-down regulators of community structure and are known to have both positive and negative effects on species diversity. However, little is known about the reciprocal effects of species diversity on predators. Across a set of 80 lakes in Connecticut, USA, we found a strong positive correlation between prey species diversity (using the Shannon-Weiner Diversity Index) and growth rates of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). This correlation was strongest for small predators and decreased with body size. Although the underlying mechanisms are not known, the correlation is not driven by total fish abundance, predator abundance, or productivity.

  15. The effect of composition of mixture on rate of radiation initiation of chain reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poluehktov, V.A.; Begishev, I.R.; Podkhalyuzin, A.T.; Babkina, Eh.I.; Morozov, V.A.; Shapovalov, V.V.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the composition of starting components on the rate of a number of chain liquid-phase reactions initiated by γ-quanta of Co 60 has been investigated at constant temperature and dosage rate. In regard to 1,1-difluoroethane chlorination, cyclohexene phosphorylation and adamantane alkylation with hexafluoropropylene reactions, abnormal effect of the reagent compositions on reaction rates has been discovered. The possible radical - starting molecule complexing reaction and molecular complexing from the starting components have been considered

  16. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for the production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.; Gaffney, T.; Nataraj, S.; Rao, M.; Sircar, S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process has the potential to decrease the cost of hydrogen production by steam methane reforming. Current effort for development of this technology has focused on adsorbent development, experimental process concept testing, and process development and design. A preferred CO{sub 2} adsorbent, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted hydrotalcite, satisfies all of the performance targets and it has been scaled up for process testing. A separate class of adsorbents has been identified which could potentially improve the performance of the H{sub 2}-SER process. Although this material exhibits improved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the HTC adsorbent, its hydrothermal stability must be improved. Single-step process experiments (not cyclic) indicate that the H{sub 2}-SER reactor performance during the reaction step improves with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature and steam to methane ratio in the feed. Methane conversion in the H{sub 2}-SER reactor is higher than for a conventional catalyst-only reactor operated at similar temperature and pressure. The reactor effluent gas consists of 90+% H{sub 2}, balance CH{sub 4}, with only trace levels (< 50 ppm) of carbon oxides. A best-case process design (2.5 MMSCFD of 99.9+% H{sub 2}) based on the HTC adsorbent properties and a revised SER process cycle has been generated. Economic analysis of this design indicates the process has the potential to reduce the H{sub 2} product cost by 25--31% compared to conventional steam methane reforming.

  17. Computational and experimental studies on stabilities, reactions and reaction rates of cations and ion-dipole complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ervasti, H.K.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, ion stability, ion-molecule reactions and reaction rates are studied using mass spectrometry and molecular modelling. In Chapter 2 the effect of functional group substitution on neutral and ionised ketene are studied. Electron-donating substituents show a stabilising positive

  18. Pop-It Beads to Introduce Catalysis of Reaction Rate and Substrate Depletion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehret, Austin U.

    2017-01-01

    A kinesthetic classroom activity was designed to help students understand enzyme activity and catalysis of reaction rate. Students served the role of enzymes by manipulating Pop-It Beads as the catalytic event. This activity illuminates the relationship between reaction rate and reaction progress by allowing students to experience first-hand the…

  19. Constrained least squares methods for estimating reaction rate constants from spectroscopic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, S.; Boelens, H.F.M.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Smilde, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Model errors, experimental errors and instrumental noise influence the accuracy of reaction rate constant estimates obtained from spectral data recorded in time during a chemical reaction. In order to improve the accuracy, which can be divided into the precision and bias of reaction rate constant

  20. Estimating reaction rate constants: comparison between traditional curve fitting and curve resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, S.; Boelens, H. F. M.; Hoefsloot, H. C. J.; Smilde, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    A traditional curve fitting (TCF) algorithm is compared with a classical curve resolution (CCR) approach for estimating reaction rate constants from spectral data obtained in time of a chemical reaction. In the TCF algorithm, reaction rate constants an estimated from the absorbance versus time data

  1. Students' Ideas about Reaction Rate and Its Relationship with Concentration or Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, Gultekin; Leach, John; Donnelly, James

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional study identifies key conceptual difficulties experienced by upper secondary school and pre-service chemistry teachers (N = 191) in the area of reaction rates. Students' ideas about reaction rates were elicited through a series of written tasks and individual interviews. In this paper, students' ideas related to reaction rate…

  2. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  3. "Depletion": A Game with Natural Rules for Teaching Reaction Rate Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbris, Donald J.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2002-01-01

    Depletion is a game that reinforces central concepts of reaction rate theory through simulation. Presents the game with a set of follow-up questions suitable for either a quiz or discussion. Also describes student reaction to the game. (MM)

  4. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  5. On the use temperature parameterized rate coefficients in the estimation of non-equilibrium reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.; Chikhaoui, Aziz

    2006-06-01

    The present paper considers a detailed analysis of the nonequilibrium effects for a model reactive system with the Chapman-Eskog (CE) solution of the Boltzmann equation as well as an explicit time dependent solution. The elastic cross sections employed are a hard sphere cross section and the Maxwell molecule cross section. Reactive cross sections which model reactions with and without activation energy are used. A detailed comparison is carried out with these solutions of the Boltzmann equation and the approximation introduced by Cukrowski and coworkers [J. Chem. Phys. 97 (1992) 9086; Chem. Phys. 89 (1992) 159; Physica A 188 (1992) 344; Chem. Phys. Lett. A 297 (1998) 402; Physica A 275 (2000) 134; Chem. Phys. Lett. 341 (2001) 585; Acta Phys. Polonica B 334 (2003) 3607.] based on the temperature of the reactive particles. We show that the Cukrowski approximation has limited applicability for the large class of reactive systems studied in this paper. The explicit time dependent solutions of the Boltzmann equation demonstrate that the CE approach is valid only for very slow reactions for which the corrections to the equilibrium rate coefficient are very small.

  6. Constant rate thermal analysis of a dehydrogenation reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perejon, A.; Perez-Maqueda, L. A.; Sanchez-Jimenez, P.E.; Criado, J. M.; Murafa, Nataliya; Šubrt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 84 (2016), s. 81454-81460 ISSN 2046-2069 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : solid-state reaction s * hydrogen storage properties * milled magnesium hydride Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  7. Quick and Easy Rate Equations for Multistep Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Phillip E.

    2008-01-01

    Students rarely see closed-form analytical rate equations derived from underlying chemical mechanisms that contain more than a few steps unless restrictive simplifying assumptions (e.g., existence of a rate-determining step) are made. Yet, work published decades ago allows closed-form analytical rate equations to be written quickly and easily for…

  8. 42 CFR 433.11 - Enhanced FMAP rate for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Enhanced FMAP rate for children. 433.11 Section 433... Administration Provisions § 433.11 Enhanced FMAP rate for children. (a) Subject to the conditions in paragraph (b... targeted low-income children described in § 435.4 or § 436.3 of this chapter; and (2) Services provided to...

  9. Improved removal performance and mechanism investigation of papermaking wastewater treatment using manganese enhanced Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingcai; Wang, Can; Shi, Shuai; Fang, Shuai

    2018-06-01

    The effects of Mn(II) on Fenton system to treat papermaking wastewater and the mechanism of Mn(II) enhanced Fenton reaction were investigated in this study. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was enhanced in the presence of Mn(II), which increased by 19% compared with that of the Fenton system alone. The pseudo-first order reaction kinetic rate constant of Mn(II)/Fenton system was 2.11 times higher than that of Fenton system. 67%-81% COD were removed with the increasing Mn(II) concentration from 0 to 0.8 g/L. COD removal efficiency was also enhanced in a wider pH range (3-7), which indicated the operation parameters of Fenton technology could be broadened to a milder condition. The study of the mechanism showed that Mn(II) participated in the oxidation and coagulation stages in Fenton system. In the oxidation stage, Mn(II) promotes the production of HO 2 •/ O 2 • - , then HO 2 •/ O 2 • - reacts with Fe(III) to accelerate the formation of Fe(II), and finally accelerates the production of HO•. Meantime MnMnO 3 and Fe(OH) 3 forms in the coagulation stage, facilitating the removal of suspended substances and a large amount of COD, which enhances the overall COD removal of papermaking wastewater. This study provided a detailed mechanism to improve practical applications of Fenton technology.

  10. Reactions and reaction rates in the regional aquifer beneath the Pajarito Plateau, north-central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereford, Anne G.; Keating, Elizabeth H.; Guthrie, George D.; Zhu, Chen

    2007-05-01

    Reactions and reaction rates within aquifers are fundamental components of critical hydrological processes. However, reactions simulated in laboratory experiments typically demonstrate rates that are much faster than those observed in the field. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct more reaction rate analyses in natural settings. This study of geochemical reactions in the regional aquifer in the Pajarito Plateau near Los Alamos, New Mexico combines modeling with petrographic assessment to further knowledge and understanding of complex natural hydrologic systems. Groundwater geochemistry shows marked evolution along assumed flow paths. The flow path chosen for this study was evaluated using inverse mass balance modeling to calculate the mass transfer. X-ray diffraction and field emission gun scanning electron microscopy were used to identify possible reactants and products. Considering the mineralogy of the aquifer and saturation indices for the regional water refined initial interpretations. Calculations yielded dissolution rates for plagioclase on the order of 10-15 mol s-1 m-2 and for K-feldspar on the order of 10-17 mol s-1 m-2, orders of magnitude slower than laboratory rates. While these rates agree with other aquifer studies, they must be considered in the light of the uncertainty associated with geometric surface area estimates, 14C ages, and aquifer properties.

  11. for the inference of Furan combustion reaction rate

    KAUST Repository

    Long, Quan

    2016-01-06

    We carry out the design of experiments for the identification of the reaction parameters in Furan combustion. The lacks of information on the true value of the control parameters, specifically, the initial temperature and the initial TBHP concentration, are considered in the design procedure by errors-invariables models. We use two types of observables. The first is a scaler observable, i.e., half decay time of the [TBHP]. The second is the time history of the concentration.

  12. Collective plasma corrections to thermonuclear reactions rates in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V.N.

    2002-01-01

    General kinetic equations for nuclear reaction in dense plasmas are obtained. They take into account the first order collective plasma effects. Together with previously known corrections proportional to Z i Z j , the product of the charges Z i and Z j of two interacting nuclei, it is shown that there exist corrections proportional to the squares Z i 2 and Z j 2 of the charges. It is shown that the Salpeter's [1] correction due to the plasma screening of the interaction potential is at least r/d smaller (r is the nuclei size and d is Debye screening length) than previously thought and is zero in the approximation when the terms of the order r/d are neglected. But the correlation effects in the first approximation in the parameter 1/N d (where N d is the number of particle in the Debye sphere) give corrections which often coincide with the first order Salpeter's corrections (found by expansion in another small parameter, the ratio of thermal energy to Gamov's energy). The correlation corrections are ∝ Z i Z j , have a different physical meaning than the corrections [1], can have a different sign and are present for reactions where the Salpeter's corrections are zero. Previously in astrophysical applications it was widely used the interpolation formulas between weak and strong Salpeter's screening corrections. Since the correlation correction take place the previously known Salpeter's corrections and the strong correlation corrections is difficult to describe analytically, the interpolation formulas between the weak and strong correlations cannot be yet found. A new type of corrections are found here which are proportional to the square of the charges. They are due to collective change in electrostatic self-energy of the plasma system during the nuclear reactions. The latter corrections are found by taking into account the changes of plasma particle fluctuations by the nuclear reactions. Numerical evaluation of the plasma corrections for the nuclear reactions of the

  13. Microwave-Enhanced Organic Syntheses for the Undergraduate Laboratory: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Reaction, and Williamson Ether Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baar, Marsha R.; Falcone, Danielle; Gordon, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Microwave heating enhanced the rate of three reactions typically performed in our undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory: a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, a Wittig salt formation, and a Williamson ether synthesis. Ninety-minute refluxes were shortened to 10 min using a laboratory-grade microwave oven. In addition, yields improved for the Wittig…

  14. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface. Résumé. Il se produit au voisinage de l'interface entre les aquifères et les imperméables plusieurs réactions biogéochimiques importantes. Il s'agit des réactions de réduction de l'oxygène, de la dénitrification et de la réduction de Fe3+, SO42- et CO2 (méthanogenèse). Dans certaines situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté imperméable de l'interface, avec des accepteurs d'électrons qui vont de l'aquifère vers l'imperméable riche en donneurs d'électrons. Dans d'autres situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté aquifère de l'interface, avec des donneurs d'électrons qui se déplacent de l'imperméable vers l'aquifère riche en accepteurs d'électrons ou en microorganismes. Ainsi, l'interface aquif

  15. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates: BIOFILM DISTRIBUTION AND RATE SCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng [Institute of Surface-Earth System Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen China; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Earth Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing China; Bailey, Vanessa L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models, and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  16. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is a powerful technique for the evaluation of flux control within biochemical pathways. Its foundation is the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients (FCCs). On the basis of a thermokinetic description of reaction rates it is here shown...... that the elasticity coefficients can be calculated directly from the pool levels of metabolites at steady state. The only requirement is that one thermodynamic parameter be known, namely the reaction affinity at the intercept of the tangent in the inflection point of the curve of reaction rate against reaction...... of the thermokinetic description of reaction rates to include the influence of effecters. Here the reaction rate is written as a linear function of the logarithm of the metabolite concentrations. With this type of rate function it is shown that the approach of Delgado and Liao [Biochem. J. (1992) 282, 919-927] can...

  17. Kinetic study of the Diels-Alder reaction of Li⁺@C₆₀ with cyclohexadiene: greatly increased reaction rate by encapsulated Li⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Koji; Okada, Hiroshi; Ikuma, Naohiko; Aoyagi, Shinobu; Kokubo, Ken; Matsuo, Yutaka; Oshima, Takumi

    2014-08-06

    We studied the kinetics of the Diels-Alder reaction of Li(+)-encapsulated [60]fullerene with 1,3-cyclohexadiene and characterized the obtained product, [Li(+)@C60(C6H8)](PF6(-)). Compared with empty C60, Li(+)@C60 reacted 2400-fold faster at 303 K, a rate enhancement that corresponds to lowering the activation energy by 24.2 kJ mol(-1). The enhanced Diels-Alder reaction rate was well explained by DFT calculation at the M06-2X/6-31G(d) level of theory considering the reactant complex with dispersion corrections. The calculated activation energies for empty C60 and Li(+)@C60 (65.2 and 43.6 kJ mol(-1), respectively) agreed fairly well with the experimentally obtained values (67.4 and 44.0 kJ mol(-1), respectively). According to the calculation, the lowering of the transition state energy by Li(+) encapsulation was associated with stabilization of the reactant complex (by 14.1 kJ mol(-1)) and the [4 + 2] product (by 5.9 kJ mol(-1)) through favorable frontier molecular orbital interactions. The encapsulated Li(+) ion catalyzed the Diels-Alder reaction by lowering the LUMO of Li(+)@C60. This is the first detailed report on the kinetics of a Diels-Alder reaction catalyzed by an encapsulated Lewis acid catalyst rather than one coordinated to a heteroatom in the dienophile.

  18. Charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates: I. Monte Carlo method and statistical distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longland, R.; Iliadis, C.; Champagne, A.E.; Newton, J.R.; Ugalde, C.; Coc, A.; Fitzgerald, R.

    2010-01-01

    A method based on Monte Carlo techniques is presented for evaluating thermonuclear reaction rates. We begin by reviewing commonly applied procedures and point out that reaction rates that have been reported up to now in the literature have no rigorous statistical meaning. Subsequently, we associate each nuclear physics quantity entering in the calculation of reaction rates with a specific probability density function, including Gaussian, lognormal and chi-squared distributions. Based on these probability density functions the total reaction rate is randomly sampled many times until the required statistical precision is achieved. This procedure results in a median (Monte Carlo) rate which agrees under certain conditions with the commonly reported recommended 'classical' rate. In addition, we present at each temperature a low rate and a high rate, corresponding to the 0.16 and 0.84 quantiles of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. These quantities are in general different from the statistically meaningless 'minimum' (or 'lower limit') and 'maximum' (or 'upper limit') reaction rates which are commonly reported. Furthermore, we approximate the output reaction rate probability density function by a lognormal distribution and present, at each temperature, the lognormal parameters μ and σ. The values of these quantities will be crucial for future Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. Our new reaction rates, appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory, are tabulated in the second paper of this issue (Paper II). The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the third paper of this issue (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this issue (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  19. Upper atmosphere research: Reaction rate and optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to provide photochemical, kinetic, and spectroscopic information necessary for photochemical models of the Earth's upper atmosphere and to examine reactions or reactants not presently in the models to either confirm the correctness of their exclusion or provide evidence to justify future inclusion in the models. New initiatives are being taken in technique development (many of them laser based) and in the application of established techniques to address gaps in the photochemical/kinetic data base, as well as to provide increasingly reliable information.

  20. Enhanced wet air oxidation : synergistic rate acceleration upon effluent recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Birchmeier; Charles G. Hill; Carl J. Houtman; Rajai H. Atalla; Ira A. Weinstock

    2000-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) reactions of cellobiose, phenol, and syringic acid were carried out under mild conditions (155°C; 0.93MPa 02; soluble catalyst, Na5[PV2Mo10O40]). Initial oxidation rates were rapid but decreased to small values as less reactive oxidation products accumulated. Recalcitrant oxidation products were consumed more rapidly, however, if additional...

  1. Interlaboratory reaction rate program. 12th progress report, November 1976-October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Preston, C.C.

    1980-09-01

    The Interlaboratory Reaction Rate UILRR) program is establishing the capability to accurately measure neutron-induced reactions and reaction rates for reactor fuels and materials development programs. The goal for the principal fission reactions, 235 U, 238 U and 239 Pu, is an accuracy to within +- 5% at the 95% confidence level. Accurate measurement of other fission and nonfission reactions is also required, but to a lesser accuracy, between +- 5% and 10% at the 95% confidence level. A secondary program objective is improvement in knowledge of the nuclear parameters involved in the standarization of fuels and materials dosimetry measurements of neutron flux, spectra, fluence and burnup

  2. Enhanced antiproton production in Pb(160 A GeV)+Pb reactions evidence for quark gluon matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Bleicher, M; Bass, S A; Soff, S; Stöcker, H

    2000-01-01

    The centrality dependence of the antiproton per participant ratio is studied in Pb(160 AGeV)+Pb reactions. Antiproton production in collisions of heavy nuclei at the CERN/SPS seems considerably enhanced as compared to conventional hadronic physics, given by the antiproton production rates in $pp$ and antiproton annihilation in $\\bar{p}p$ reactions. This enhancement is consistent with the observation of strong in-medium effects in other hadronic observables and may be an indication of partial restoration of chiral symmetry.

  3. Evaluation of Chemical Kinetic for Mathematics Model Reduction of Cadmium Reaction Rate, Constant and Reaction Orde in to Electrochemical Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno

    2007-01-01

    The experiment was reduction of cadmium rate with electrochemical influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. The aim of the experiment was to know the influence, mathematic model reduction of cadmium the reaction rate, reaction rate constant and reaction orde influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. Result of research indicate the time processing if using plate of copper electrode is during 30 minutes and using plate of aluminium electrode is during 20 minutes. Condition of strong current that used in process of electrochemical is only 0.8 ampere and concentration effective is 5.23 mg/l. The most effective type Al of electrode plate for reduction from waste and the efficiency of reduction is 98 %. (author)

  4. Rate Constants for the Reactions of Hydroxyl Radical with Several Alkanes, Cycloalkanes, and Dimethyl Ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMore, W.; Bayes, K.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiements were used to measure rate constants and temperature denpendencies of the reactions of OH with propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, and dimethyl ether.

  5. Resonance reactions and enhancement of weak interactions in collisions of cold molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-01-01

    With the creation of ultracold atoms and molecules, a new type of chemistry - 'resonance' chemistry - emerges: chemical reactions can occur when the energy of colliding atoms and molecules matches a bound state of the combined molecule (Feshbach resonance). This chemistry is rather similar to reactions that take place in nuclei at low energies. In this paper we suggest some problems for future experimental and theoretical work related to the resonance chemistry of ultracold molecules. Molecular Bose-Einstein condensates are particularly interesting because in this system collisions and chemical reactions are extremely sensitive to weak fields; also, a preferred reaction channel may be enhanced due to a finite number of final states. The sensitivity to weak fields arises due to the high density of narrow compound resonances and the macroscopic number of molecules with kinetic energy E=0 (in the ground state of a mean-field potential). The high sensitivity to the magnetic field may be used to measure the distribution of energy intervals, widths, and magnetic moments of compound resonances and study the onset of quantum chaos. A difference in the production rate of right-handed and left-handed chiral molecules may be produced by external electric E and magnetic B fields and the finite width Γ of the resonance (correlation ΓE·B). The same effect may be produced by the parity-violating energy difference in chiral molecules

  6. Systematic variation of threshold reaction rates in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippincott, E.P.; Combs, B.L.; Davis, A.I.

    1976-01-01

    Characterization of neutron flux, fluence, and spectra in fast reactor irradiation environments is presently being carried out at HEDL utilizing the multiple foil technique. These fluences and spectra are then used to correlate damage effects data to produce damage functions or equations to predict materials effects under future irradiation conditions. The neutron flux and spectrum, then, act as a transfer function to relate present observations to future effects in the same or different environments and thus consistent fluence evaluations are of utmost importance. As part of a continuing program to establish the data base to meet consistency requirements, a systematic correlation of data from a recent dosimetry test in EBR-II is being made. The paper presents preliminary results of some of these correlations involving threshold reactions

  7. Co-solvent effects on reaction rate and reaction equilibrium of an enzymatic peptide hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangler, A; Canales, R; Held, C; Luong, T Q; Winter, R; Zaitsau, D H; Verevkin, S P; Sadowski, G

    2018-04-25

    This work presents an approach that expresses the Michaelis constant KaM and the equilibrium constant Kth of an enzymatic peptide hydrolysis based on thermodynamic activities instead of concentrations. This provides KaM and Kth values that are independent of any co-solvent. To this end, the hydrolysis reaction of N-succinyl-l-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide catalysed by the enzyme α-chymotrypsin was studied in pure buffer and in the presence of the co-solvents dimethyl sulfoxide, trimethylamine-N-oxide, urea, and two salts. A strong influence of the co-solvents on the measured Michaelis constant (KM) and equilibrium constant (Kx) was observed, which was found to be caused by molecular interactions expressed as activity coefficients. Substrate and product activity coefficients were used to calculate the activity-based values KaM and Kth for the co-solvent free reaction. Based on these constants, the co-solvent effect on KM and Kx was predicted in almost quantitative agreement with the experimental data. The approach presented here does not only reveal the importance of understanding the thermodynamic non-ideality of reactions taking place in biological solutions and in many technological applications, it also provides a framework for interpreting and quantifying the multifaceted co-solvent effects on enzyme-catalysed reactions that are known and have been observed experimentally for a long time.

  8. Reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 in the temperature range 233-400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 were measured in the temperature range 233-400 K using a discharge flow system with photofragment emission detection. In the range 233-253 K, the constants are approximately a constant value, and then increase with increasing temperature. This result suggests that the reaction may have two different channels. An expression representing the reaction rate constants is presented.

  9. Accurate quantum calculations of the reaction rates for H/D+ CH4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrevelt, R. van; Nyman, G.; Manthe, U.

    2007-01-01

    In previous work [T. Wu, H. J. Werner, and U. Manthe, Science 306, 2227 (2004)], accurate quantum reaction rate calculations of the rate constant for the H+CH4 -> CH3+H-2 reaction have been presented. Both the electronic structure calculations and the nuclear dynamics calculations are converged with

  10. Rate of reaction of dimethylmercury with oxygen atoms in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen (O(3P)) with dimethylmercury has been measured at room temperature at a pressure of about 1 Torr using a fast flow system with electron paramagnetic resonance and mass spectrometric detection. Some reaction products were identified. The rate...

  11. Putting Reaction Rates and Collision Theory in the Hands of Your Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Andy

    2002-01-01

    Describes a simulation that can be used to give concrete analogies of collision theory and the factors that affect reaction rates including temperature, concentration, catalyst, and molecular orientation. The simulation works best if done as an introduction to the concepts to help prevent misconceptions about reaction rates and collision theory.…

  12. Applications of the absolute reaction rate theory to biological responses in electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brannen, J.P.; Wayland, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper develops a theoretical foundation for the study of biological responses of electric and magnetic fields. The basis of the development is the absolute reaction rate theory and the effects of fields on reaction rates. A simple application to the response of Bacillus subtilis var niger in a microwave field is made. Potential areas of application are discussed

  13. Compilation and R-matrix analysis of Big Bang nuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre; Adahchour, Abderrahim; Angulo, Carmen; Coc, Alain; Vangioni-Flam, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    We use the R-matrix theory to fit low-energy data on nuclear reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Special attention is paid to the rate uncertainties which are evaluated on statistical grounds. We provide S factors and reaction rates in tabular and graphical formats

  14. Diffusion-controlled reaction. V. Effect of concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient on reaction rate in graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, K.; Odian, G.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of diffusion on radiation-initiated graft polymerization has been studied with emphasis on the single- and two-penetrant cases. When the physical properties of the penetrants are similar, the two-penetrant problems can be reduced to the single-penetrant problem by redefining the characteristic parameters of the system. The diffusion-free graft polymerization rate is assumed to be proportional to the upsilon power of the monomer concentration respectively, and, in which the proportionality constant a = k/sub p/R/sub i//sup w//k/sub t//sup z/, where k/sub p/ and k/sub t/ are the propagation and termination rate constants, respectively, and R/sub i/ is the initiation rate. The values of upsilon, w, and z depend on the particular reaction system. The results of earlier work were generalized by allowing a non-Fickian diffusion rate which predicts an essentially exponential dependence on the monomer concentration of the diffusion coefficient, D = D 0 [exp(deltaC/M)], where M is the saturation concentration. A reaction system is characterized by the three dimensionless parameters, upsilon, delta, and A = (L/2)[aM/sup (upsilon--1)//D 0 ]/sup 1/2/, where L is the polymer film thickness. Graft polymerization tends to become diffusion controlled as A increases. Larger values of delta and ν cause a reaction system to behave closer to the diffusion-free regime. Transition from diffusion-free to diffusion-controlled reaction involves changes in the dependence of the reaction rate on film thickness, initiation rate, and monomer concentration. Although the diffusion-free rate is w order in initiation rate, upsilon order in monomer, and independent of film thickness, the diffusion-controlled rate is w/2 order in initiator rate and inverse first-order in film thickness. Dependence of the diffusion-controlled rate on monomer is dependent in a complex manner on the diffusional characteristics of the reaction system. 11 figures, 4 tables

  15. Effect of Substrate Character on Heterogeneous Ozone Reaction Rate with Individual PAHs and Their Reaction Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmen, B. A.; Stevens, T.

    2009-12-01

    Vehicle exhaust contains many unregulated chemical compounds that are harmful to human health and the natural environment, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a class of organic compounds derived from fuel combustion that can be carcinogenic and mutagenic. PAHs have been quantified in vehicle-derived ultrafine particles (Dpsolid, reacting the samples with gas-phase ozone, and determining both PAH loss over time and products formed, using thermal-desorption gas chromatography / mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). The individual PAHs anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluorene, adsorbed to a QFF were also separately reacted with 0.4 ppm ozone. A volatilization control and the collection of volatilized PAHs using a Tenax-packed thermal desorption vial completed the mass balance and aided determination parent-product relationships. Heterogeneous reaction products analyzed directly without derivatization indicate the formation of 9,10-anthracenedione, 9H-fluoren-9-one, and (1,1’-biphenyl)-2,2’-dicarboxaldehyde from the reaction of ozone with the PAH mix on a QFF, but only 9,10-anthracenedione was detected for the diesel PM reaction. The implications of these results for aging of diesel particulate in urban environments will be discussed.

  16. The role of high temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics in the rate of radionuclide vaporisation during core-concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, D.P.; Clough, P.N.

    1989-09-01

    Heterogeneous reactions may cause enhanced release of radionuclides during the core-concrete interaction (CCl) stage of a PWR severe accident. The VANESA computer code models these CCI releases using chemical equilibrium assumptions; however, the possibility that chemical kinetics could prevent equilibrium from being achieved is considered in this report. Direct experimental evidence is lacking on these reactions. Therefore, some analogues studies are reviewed, including examples of Eyring's surface reaction rate theory; sequential vaporisation-oxidation processes; iron and steelmaking chemistry; radionuclide evaporation from solid UO 2 . This circumstantial evidence appeared to agree with the current assumptions, in VANESA and some UK modelling studies, that mass transfer, rather than chemical kinetics will limit the rate at which equilibrium is attained. (author)

  17. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  18. Rate constants for some electrophilic reactions of benzyl, benzhydryl, and trityl cations in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujdak, R.J.; Jones, R.L.; Dorfman, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute rate constants have been determined by the pulse radiolysis technique for several electrophilic reactions of the benzyl, the benzhydryl, and the trityl cation in 1,2-dichloroethane solution. The rate constants for the reactions of these carbonium ions with chloride ion, with bromide ion, and with iodide ion are all very nearly the same, namely 6 x 10 10 M -1 s -1 at 24 0 C. The values very likely represent the diffusion controlled limit for the ion combination reactions. The rate constants for the reactions with triethylamine, tri-n-propylamine, and tri-n-butylamine range from 2.0 x 10 9 to 7 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 at 24 0 C. With increasing phenyl substitution, the decreasing trend in the magnitude of the rate constant is consistent with the combined electronic and steric effects. With increasing size of the amine, the decrease in the value of the rate constant seems to indicate that the steric effect predominates. The values of the rate constants for reactions of benzyl and benzhydryl cation with methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol indicate the following. The rate constant is higher for reaction with the alcohol dimer in solution than with alcohol monomer. The rate constants for reaction with alcohol monomer have values of 1 x 10 8 M -1 s -1 or lower

  19. Predicting the enhancement of mixing-driven reactions in nonuniform flows using measures of flow topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, Nicholas B; Benson, David A; Bolster, Diogo

    2014-11-01

    The ability for reactive constituents to mix is often the key limiting factor for the completion of reactions across a huge range of scales in a variety of media. In flowing systems, deformation and shear enhance mixing by bringing constituents into closer proximity, thus increasing reaction potential. Accurately quantifying this enhanced mixing is key to predicting reactions and typically is done by observing or simulating scalar transport. To eliminate this computationally expensive step, we use a Lagrangian stochastic framework to derive the enhancement to reaction potential by calculating the collocation probability of particle pairs in a heterogeneous flow field accounting for deformations. We relate the enhanced reaction potential to three well known flow topology metrics and demonstrate that it is best correlated to (and asymptotically linear with) one: the largest eigenvalue of the (right) Cauchy-Green tensor.

  20. Reaction rate and composition dependence of the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keek, L.; Cyburt, R. H.; Heger, A.

    2014-01-01

    The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a 10 times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of 3α and the hot-CNO breakout reactions 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne and 18 Ne(α, p) 21 Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor 10 decrease of the 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depending on the true 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne reaction rate, the actual discrepancy may be substantially larger. We find that the width of the interval of accretion rates with marginally stable burning depends strongly on both composition and reaction rates. Furthermore, close to the stability transition, our models predict that X-ray bursts have extended tails where freshly accreted fuel prolongs nuclear burning.

  1. Absolute calibration of the Rh-103(n,n')Rh-103m reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.H.; Murphy, M.F.; March, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The uncertainties in determining the absolute values of the Rh-103(n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate (which is widely used as a neutron damage flux monitor) have been reduced to approximately +-5%. This has been achieved with the use of a calibrated source of Pd-103-Rh-103m activity supplied by the IAEA. Agreement to within 3% between measured and calculated values of the reaction rate (normalised to the U-238 fission rate) has been achieved. (author)

  2. Estimation of the prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Benjamin P.L.; Lohrke, Britta; Wilkinson, Robert; Pitman, John P.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Bock, Naomi; Lowrance, David W.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Mataranyika, Mary; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute transfusion reactions are probably common in sub-Saharan Africa, but transfusion reaction surveillance systems have not been widely established. In 2008, the Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia implemented a national acute transfusion reaction surveillance system, but substantial under-reporting was suspected. We estimated the actual prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia. Methods The percentage of transfusion events resulting in a reported acute transfusion reaction was calculated. Actual percentage and rates of acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units were estimated by reviewing patients’ records from six hospitals, which transfuse >99% of all blood in Windhoek. Patients’ records for 1,162 transfusion events occurring between 1st January – 31st December 2011 were randomly selected. Clinical and demographic information were abstracted and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network criteria were applied to categorize acute transfusion reactions1. Results From January 1 – December 31, 2011, there were 3,697 transfusion events (involving 10,338 blood units) in the selected hospitals. Eight (0.2%) acute transfusion reactions were reported to the surveillance system. Of the 1,162 transfusion events selected, medical records for 785 transfusion events were analysed, and 28 acute transfusion reactions were detected, of which only one had also been reported to the surveillance system. An estimated 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.3–4.4) of transfusion events in Windhoek resulted in an acute transfusion reaction, with an estimated rate of 11.5 (95% CI: 7.6–14.5) acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units. Conclusion The estimated actual rate of acute transfusion reactions is higher than the rate reported to the national haemovigilance system. Improved surveillance and interventions to reduce transfusion-related morbidity and mortality

  3. Temperature-Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Reaction of CH2OO with Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2017-02-09

    The reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with hydrogen sulfide was measured with transient UV absorption spectroscopy in a temperature-controlled flow reactor, and bimolecular rate coefficients were obtained from 278 to 318 K and from 100 to 500 Torr. The average rate coefficient at 298 K and 100 Torr was (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -13 cm 3 s -1 . The reaction was found to be independent of pressure and exhibited a weak negative temperature dependence. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of the temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficient at the QCISD(T)/CBS level are in reasonable agreement with the experiment. The reaction of CH 2 OO with H 2 S is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the reaction with H 2 O monomer. Though rates of CH 2 OO scavenging by water vapor under atmospheric conditions are primarily controlled by the reaction with water dimer, the H 2 S loss pathway will be dominated by the reaction with monomer. The agreement between experiment and theory for the CH 2 OO + H 2 S reaction lends credence to theoretical descriptions of other Criegee intermediate reactions that cannot easily be probed experimentally.

  4. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-05

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  6. Measurements of rates of some reactions related to radiolytic effect on aqueous iodide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, H.; Okuda, H.; Ishigure, K.

    1986-01-01

    A number of reactions takes place concurrently when aqueous iodide solution is subjected to radiation field. In order to help analyze this complicated radiation effect measurements of rate constants were undertaken for several important reactions. One of these concerns reduction of hypoiodous acid by hydrogen peroxide. For this reaction catalytic effect was found to be significant, and old rate data was revised. Measurements on reactions involving radicals were carried out by use of pulse radiolysis technique, which also include reexamination of results by previous workers. The reactions studied are (1) oxidation of iodide ion by hydroxyl radical (2) recombination reactions of atomic iodine and diiodide ion and (3) reduction of atomic and molecular iodine either by superoxide ion or by hydroperoxyl radical

  7. The time dependence of rate constants of esub(aq)sup(-) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burcl, R.; Byakov, V.M.; Grafutin, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    Published data about the time dependence of rate constants k(esub(aq)sup(-)+Ac) of esub(aq)sup(-) reactions with the acceptor Ac are analyzed, using the results of rate constant k(Ps+Ac) measurements for positronium reactions. It is shown that neither esub(aq)sup(-) nor Ps reaction rate constants depend on time in the observable range. Experimentally found concentration dependence of k(esub(aq)sup(-)+Ac) is due to other factors, connected with the existence of electric charge of esub(aq)sup(-), e.g. ionic strength, tunnelling effect etc. (author)

  8. Enhancement of dissolution rate of piroxicam by electrospinning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, S K Raziya; Varma, M Mohan; Raju, D B; Prasad, R G S V; Phani, A R; Jacob, Biju; Salins, Paul C

    2012-01-01

    The use of electrospun nanofibers to enhance dissolution of poorly soluble drugs could be a novel strategy in future for pharmaceutical applications. In the present work electrospun nanofibers were prepared as a novel system for enhancing the delivery of piroxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). These nanofibers were prepared from polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) (pharmaceutical grade), a biodegradable polymer, to obtain a solution with drug:polymer ratio of 1:4. The release rate of the piroxicam nanofibers was studied in simulated gastric fluid. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to evaluate the chemical and physical nature. The results showed that the release rates were twice increased in comparison with the pure drug. However, the blend of drug and polymer could be varied to optimize the release rates depending upon the need and formulation (paper)

  9. Enhancement of dissolution rate of piroxicam by electrospinning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziya Begum, S. K.; Mohan Varma, M.; Raju, D. B.; Prasad, R. G. S. V.; Phani, A. R.; Jacob, Biju; Salins, Paul C.

    2012-12-01

    The use of electrospun nanofibers to enhance dissolution of poorly soluble drugs could be a novel strategy in future for pharmaceutical applications. In the present work electrospun nanofibers were prepared as a novel system for enhancing the delivery of piroxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). These nanofibers were prepared from polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) (pharmaceutical grade), a biodegradable polymer, to obtain a solution with drug:polymer ratio of 1:4. The release rate of the piroxicam nanofibers was studied in simulated gastric fluid. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to evaluate the chemical and physical nature. The results showed that the release rates were twice increased in comparison with the pure drug. However, the blend of drug and polymer could be varied to optimize the release rates depending upon the need and formulation

  10. Comparing transfusion reaction rates for various plasma types: a systematic review and meta-analysis/regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadah, Nicholas H; van Hout, Fabienne M A; Schipperus, Martin R; le Cessie, Saskia; Middelburg, Rutger A; Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna C; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2017-09-01

    We estimated rates for common plasma-associated transfusion reactions and compared reported rates for various plasma types. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed articles that reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Random-effects pooled rates were calculated and compared between plasma types. Meta-regression was used to compare various plasma types with regard to their reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Forty-eight studies reported transfusion reaction rates for fresh-frozen plasma (FFP; mixed-sex and male-only), amotosalen INTERCEPT FFP, methylene blue-treated FFP, and solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma. Random-effects pooled average rates for FFP were: allergic reactions, 92/10 5 units transfused (95% confidence interval [CI], 46-184/10 5 units transfused); febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs), 12/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 7-22/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), 6/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1-30/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), 1.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1.2-2.7/10 5 units transfused); and anaphylactic reactions, 0.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 0-45.7/10 5 units transfused). Risk differences between plasma types were not significant for allergic reactions, TACO, or anaphylactic reactions. Methylene blue-treated FFP led to fewer FNHTRs than FFP (risk difference = -15.3 FNHTRs/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -24.7 to -7.1 reactions/10 5 units transfused); and male-only FFP led to fewer cases of TRALI than mixed-sex FFP (risk difference = -0.74 TRALI/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -2.42 to -0.42 injuries/10 5 units transfused). Meta-regression demonstrates that the rate of FNHTRs is lower for methylene blue-treated compared with FFP, and the rate of TRALI is lower for male-only than for mixed-sex FFP; whereas no significant differences are observed between plasma types for allergic reactions, TACO

  11. Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates in tritium, hydrogen and deuterium mixed gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates in H 2 +T 2 , D 2 +T 2 and H 2 +D 2 +T 2 mixed gases, as induced by tritium decay and beta radiation, were experimentally measured by laser Raman spectrometry. Initially a glass cell was filled with T 2 gas to a pressure of 30-40 kPa, and an equivalent partial pressure of H 2 and/or D 2 was added. The first-order hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates were 5.54x10 -2 h -1 for H 2 +T 2 mixed gas and 4.76x10 -2 h -1 for D 2 +T 2 . The actual HT producing rate was nearly equivalent to the rate of DT, but the reverse reaction rate of HT was faster than that of DT. The exchange reaction rates between H, D and T showed the isotope effect, HD>HT>DT. The hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates observed were about twenty times larger than ion formation rates by beta radiation. This result suggests that a free radical chain reaction in hydrogen isotopes is occurring. (orig.)

  12. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  13. Enhancing chemical synthesis using catalytic reactions under continuous flow conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Asadi, Mousa

    2017-01-01

    Many advantages have been demonstrated for continuous flow chemistry in comparison with batch chemistry; such as easy automation, high level of reproducibility, improved safety, and process reliability. Indeed, with continuous flow processes constant reaction parameters such as temperature, time, amount of reagents, catalyst, solvents, efficient mixing etc. can easily be assured. The research detailed in this PhD thesis takes advantages of flow chemistry applying it to the Fukuyama ...

  14. Large area isotopic silicon targets for astrophysical reaction rate studies in Si-26

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greene, JP; Berg, GPA

    2005-01-01

    For measurements of stellar reaction rates of proton rich nuclei involving resonance levels just above threshold, targets of Si-28 were used in studies of the Si-21(He-4, He-6)Si-26 reaction using the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) Ring Cyclotron at Osaka University. Resonance structure

  15. Capture cross-section and rate of the 14 C (n, γ) 15 C reaction from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We calculate the Coulomb dissociation of 15C on a Pb target at 68 MeV/u incident beam energy within the fully quantum mechanical distorted wave Born approximation formalism of breakup reactions. The capture cross-section and the subsequent rate of the 14C(, )15C reaction are calculated from the ...

  16. Analyzing Reaction Rates with the Distortion/Interaction-Activation Strain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Houk, Kendall N.

    2017-01-01

    The activation strain or distortion/interaction model is a tool to analyze activation barriers that determine reaction rates. For bimolecular reactions, the activation energies are the sum of the energies to distort the reactants into geometries they have in transition states plus the interaction

  17. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrasi, F.; D''Onofrio, A.; Campajola, L.; Imbriani, G.; Gialanella, L.; Greife, U.; Rolfs, C.; Strieder, F.; Trautvetter, H.P.; Roca, V.; Romano, M.; Straniero, O.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely 7 Be(p,γ) 8 B and 12 C(α,γ) 16 O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  18. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. II. Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.; Farhataziz; Ross, A.B.

    1975-05-01

    Rates of reactions of hydrogen atoms (from radiolysis of water and other sources) with organic and inorganic molecules, ions, and transients in aqueous solution were tabulated. Directly measured rates obtained by kinetic spectroscopy or conductimetric methods, and relative rates determined by competition kinetics are included. (U.S.)

  19. Matching of experimental and statistical-model thermonuclear reaction rates at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J. R.; Longland, R.; Iliadis, C.

    2008-01-01

    We address the problem of extrapolating experimental thermonuclear reaction rates toward high stellar temperatures (T>1 GK) by using statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) results. Reliable reaction rates at such temperatures are required for studies of advanced stellar burning stages, supernovae, and x-ray bursts. Generally accepted methods are based on the concept of a Gamow peak. We follow recent ideas that emphasized the fundamental shortcomings of the Gamow peak concept for narrow resonances at high stellar temperatures. Our new method defines the effective thermonuclear energy range (ETER) by using the 8th, 50th, and 92nd percentiles of the cumulative distribution of fractional resonant reaction rate contributions. This definition is unambiguous and has a straightforward probability interpretation. The ETER is used to define a temperature at which Hauser-Feshbach rates can be matched to experimental rates. This matching temperature is usually much higher compared to previous estimates that employed the Gamow peak concept. We suggest that an increased matching temperature provides more reliable extrapolated reaction rates since Hauser-Feshbach results are more trustwhorthy the higher the temperature. Our ideas are applied to 21 (p,γ), (p,α), and (α,γ) reactions on A=20-40 target nuclei. For many of the cases studied here, our extrapolated reaction rates at high temperatures differ significantly from those obtained using the Gamow peak concept

  20. Charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, Cornelia; Angulo, C.; Arnould, M.

    2000-01-01

    The rapidly growing wealth of nuclear data becomes less and less easily accessible to the astrophysics community. Mastering this volume of information and making it available in an accurate and usable form for incorporation into stellar evolution or nucleosynthesis models become urgent goals of prime necessity. we report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal motivation for the setting-up of the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged-particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. When cross section data are not available in the whole needed range of energies, the theoretical predictions obtained in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach model is used. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. Reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates are also provided. (authors)

  1. Charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, Cornelia

    1999-01-01

    The rapidly growing wealth of nuclear data becomes less and less easily accessible to the astrophysics community. Mastering this volume of information and making it available in an accurate and usable form for incorporation into stellar evolution or nucleosynthesis models become urgent goals of prime necessity. We report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal motivation for the setting-up of the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged -particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. When cross section data are not available in the whole needed range of energies the theoretical predictions obtained in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach model are used. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. Reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates are also provided. (author)

  2. IFNgamma enhances microglial reactions to hippocampal axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Hegelund, I V; Lomholt, N D

    2000-01-01

    periods. Message for the immune cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) was undetectable, and glial reactivity to axonal lesions occurred as normal in IFNgamma-deficient mice. Microglial responses to lesion-induced neuronal injury were markedly enhanced in myelin basic protein promoter-driven transgenic mice...

  3. Rate coefficients from quantum and quasi-classical cumulative reaction probabilities for the S(1D) + H2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, P. G.; Lara, Manuel; Menéndez, M.; Launay, J.-M.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2012-10-01

    Cumulative reaction probabilities (CRPs) at various total angular momenta have been calculated for the barrierless reaction S(1D) + H2 → SH + H at total energies up to 1.2 eV using three different theoretical approaches: time-independent quantum mechanics (QM), quasiclassical trajectories (QCT), and statistical quasiclassical trajectories (SQCT). The calculations have been carried out on the widely used potential energy surface (PES) by Ho et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 4124 (2002), 10.1063/1.1431280] as well as on the recent PES developed by Song et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 9213 (2009), 10.1021/jp903790h]. The results show that the differences between these two PES are relatively minor and mostly related to the different topologies of the well. In addition, the agreement between the three theoretical methodologies is good, even for the highest total angular momenta and energies. In particular, the good accordance between the CRPs obtained with dynamical methods (QM and QCT) and the statistical model (SQCT) indicates that the reaction can be considered statistical in the whole range of energies in contrast with the findings for other prototypical barrierless reactions. In addition, total CRPs and rate coefficients in the range of 20-1000 K have been calculated using the QCT and SQCT methods and have been found somewhat smaller than the experimental total removal rates of S(1D).

  4. Nonequilibrium Contribution to the Rate of Reaction. III. Isothermal Multicomponent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizgal, B.; Karplus, M.

    1970-10-01

    The nonequilibrium contribution to the reaction rate of an isothermal multicomponent system is obtained by solution of the appropriate Chapman-Enskog equation; the system is composed of reactive species in contact with a heat bath of inert atoms M.

  5. Compilation of neutron flux density spectra and reaction rates in different neutron fields. V.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertek, C.

    1980-04-01

    Upon the recommendation of the International Working Group of Reactor Radiation Measurements (IWGRRM) a compilation of documents containing neutron flux density spectra and the reaction rates obtained by activiation and fission foils in different neutron fields is presented

  6. Neutron Scattering in Hydrogenous Moderators, Studied by Time Dependent Reaction Rate Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, L G; Moeller, E; Purohit, S N

    1966-03-15

    The moderation and absorption of a neutron burst in water, poisoned with the non-1/v absorbers cadmium and gadolinium, has been followed on the time scale by multigroup calculations, using scattering kernels for the proton gas and the Nelkin model. The time dependent reaction rate curves for each absorber display clear differences for the two models, and the separation between the curves does not depend much on the absorber concentration. An experimental method for the measurement of infinite medium reaction rate curves in a limited geometry has been investigated. This method makes the measurement of the time dependent reaction rate generally useful for thermalization studies in a small geometry of a liquid hydrogenous moderator, provided that the experiment is coupled to programs for the calculation of scattering kernels and time dependent neutron spectra. Good agreement has been found between the reaction rate curve, measured with cadmium in water, and a calculated curve, where the Haywood kernel has been used.

  7. Coloring Rate of Phenolphthalein by Reaction with Alkaline Solution Observed by Liquid-Droplet Collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yuuka; Kikkawa, Shigenori; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kohno, Jun-ya

    2015-06-11

    Many important chemical reactions are induced by mixing two solutions. This paper presents a new way to measure rates of rapid chemical reactions induced by mixing two reactant solutions using a liquid-droplet collision. The coloring reaction of phenolphthalein (H2PP) by a reaction with NaOH is investigated kinetically. Liquid droplets of H2PP/ethanol and NaOH/H2O solutions are made to collide, which induces a reaction that transforms H2PP into a deprotonated form (PP(2-)). The concentration of PP(2-) is evaluated from the RGB values of pixels in the colored droplet images, and is measured as a function of the elapsed time from the collision. The obtained rate constant is (2.2 ± 0.7) × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), which is the rate constant for the rate-determining step of the coloring reaction of H2PP. This method was shown to be applicable to determine rate constants of rapid chemical reactions between two solutions.

  8. Nuclear-reaction rates in the thermonuclear runaway phase of accreting neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiescher, M.; Barnard, V.; Goerres, J.; Fisker, J.L.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Langanke, K.; Rembges, F.; Thielemann, F.K.; Schatz, H.

    2002-01-01

    The rp-process has been suggested as the dominant nucleosynthesis process in explosive hydrogen burning at high temperature and density conditions. The process is characterized by a sequence of fast proton capture reactions and subsequent β-decays. The reaction path of the rp-process runs along the drip line up to Z∼50. Most of the charged-particle reaction rates for the reaction path are presently based on statistical Hauser-Feshbach calculations. While these rates are supposed to be reliable within a factor of two for conditions of high density in the compound nuclei, discrepancies may occur for nuclei near closed shells or near the proton drip line where the Q-values of proton capture processes are typically very small. It has been argued that the thermonuclear runaway is less sensitive to the reaction rates because of the rapid time-scale of the event. However, since these processes may operate at the same time-scale as fast mixing and convection processes, a change in reaction rates indeed may have a significant impact. In this paper we present two examples, the break-out from the hot CNO cycles, and the thermonuclear runaway in X-ray bursts itself, where changes in reaction rates have a direct impact on time-scale, energy generation and nucleosynthesis predictions for the explosive event. (orig.)

  9. Dissolution rate enhancement of piroxicam by ordered mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharan, Vikas Anand; Choudhury, Pratim Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Micronized piroxicam was mixed with lactose, mannitol, sorbitol, maltitol and sodium chloride to produce ordered mixture in a glass vial by manual hand shaking method. The effect of excipients, surfactant, superdisintegrant, drug concentration and carrier particle size on dissolution rate was investigated. Dissolution rate studies of the prepared ordered mixtures revealed that all water soluble excipients increased the dissolution rate of piroxicam when compared to the dissolution rate of piroxicam or its suspension. Ordered mixture formulation PLF4, consisting of lactose as water soluble excipient, SSG (8% w/s) and SLS (1% w/w), released piroxcam at a very fast rate so much so that about 90% of the composition had passed into solution within 2 min. The order of the dissolution rate enhancement for ordered mixtures of various water soluble excipients was: lactose > mannitol > maltitol > sorbitol > sodium chloride. Carrier granules of size 355-710 µm were most effective in increasing the dissolution rate of drug from ordered mixtures. Decreasing the carrier particle size reduced drug dissolution from ordered mixtures. The dissolution rate of ordered mixtures consisting of 1-5% w/w piroxicam was superior to dissolution rate of piroxicam suspension. The dissolution data fitting and the resulting regression parameters indicated Hixson Crowell, cube root law, as the best fit to drug release data of ordered mixtures.

  10. Experimental Study on Impact-Induced Reaction Characteristics of PTFE/Ti Composites Enhanced by W Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Metal/fluoropolymer composites are a category of energetic structural materials that release energy through exothermic chemical reactions initiated under highly dynamic loadings. In this paper, the chemical reaction mechanism of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene/Ti/W composites is investigated through thermal analysis and composition analysis. These composites undergo exothermic reactions at 510 °C to 600 °C, mainly producing TiFx. The tungsten significantly reduces the reaction heat due to its inertness. In addition, the dynamic compression properties and impact-induced reaction behaviors of PTFE/Ti/W composites with different W content prepared by pressing and sintering are studied using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar and high speed photography. The results show that both the mechanical strength and the reaction degree are significantly improved with the increasing strain rate. Moreover, as W content increases, the mechanical strength is enhanced, but the elasticity/plasticity is decreased. The PTFE/Ti/W composites tend to become more inert with the increasing W content, which is reflected by the reduced reaction degree and the increased reaction threshold for the impact ignition.

  11. The correlation schemes in calculations of the rate constants of some radiation chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorets, P.A.; Shostenko, A.G.; Kim, V.

    1983-01-01

    The various correlation relationships of the evaluation of the rate constants of radiation chemical reactions of addition, abstraction and isomerization were considered. It was shown that neglection of the influence of solvent can result in errors in calculations of rate constants equalling two orders in magnitude. Several examples of isokinetic relationship are given. The methods of calculation of transmission coefficient of reaction addition have been discussed. (author)

  12. Shell and explosive hydrogen burning. Nuclear reaction rates for hydrogen burning in RGB, AGB and Novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeltzig, A. [Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Bruno, C.G.; Davinson, T. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cavanna, F.; Ferraro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova (Italy); INFN, Genova (Italy); Cristallo, S. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, INAF, Teramo (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Depalo, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN, Padova (Italy); DeBoer, R.J.; Wiescher, M. [University of Notre Dame, Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, Indiana (United States); Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Marigo, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Terrasi, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Seconda Universita di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    The nucleosynthesis of light elements, from helium up to silicon, mainly occurs in Red Giant and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Novae. The relative abundances of the synthesized nuclides critically depend on the rates of the nuclear processes involved, often through non-trivial reaction chains, combined with complex mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we summarize the contributions made by LUNA experiments in furthering our understanding of nuclear reaction rates necessary for modeling nucleosynthesis in AGB stars and Novae explosions. (orig.)

  13. Coherently enhanced radiation reaction effects in laser-vacuum acceleration of electron bunches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smorenburg, P.W.; Kamp, L.P.J.; Geloni, G.; Luiten, O.J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of coherently enhanced radiation reaction on the motion of subwavelength electron bunches in interaction with intense laser pulses are analyzed. The radiation reaction force behaves as a radiation pressure in the laser beam direction, combined with a viscous force in the perpendicular

  14. Enhanced radioresistance of behavioral reaction of rats adopted to hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizan, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were adapted to hypoxia in the altitude chamber imitating the altitude of 5000 m with peaky ''ascents'' up to 8000 m every 60 min at the rates of ''ascent'' and ''descent'' of 40 m/sec. Adapted and intact animals were exposed to a dose of 400 rad at a dose rate of 20 rad/min. Rats adapted to oxygen deficiency and irradiated executed their conditioned reflexes much better than nonadapted ones

  15. Communication: Rate coefficients from quasiclassical trajectory calculations from the reverse reaction: The Mu + H2 reaction re-visited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayoon, Zahra; Jambrina, Pablo G.; Aoiz, F. Javier; Bowman, Joel M.

    2012-07-01

    In a previous paper [P. G. Jambrina et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034310 (2011), 10.1063/1.3611400] various calculations of the rate coefficient for the Mu + H2 → MuH + H reaction were presented and compared to experiment. The widely used standard quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) method was shown to overestimate the rate coefficients by several orders of magnitude over the temperature range 200-1000 K. This was attributed to a major failure of that method to describe the correct threshold for the reaction owing to the large difference in zero-point energies (ZPE) of the reactant H2 and product MuH (˜0.32 eV). In this Communication we show that by performing standard QCT calculations for the reverse reaction and then applying detailed balance, the resulting rate coefficient is in very good agreement with the other computational results that respect the ZPE, (as well as with the experiment) but which are more demanding computationally.

  16. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turick, C.E.

    1997-06-10

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases. 3 figs.

  17. Evaporation rates and surface profiles on heterogeneous surfaces with mass transfer and surface reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M; Schmidt, L D

    1979-01-01

    Simple models incorporating surface reaction and diffusion of volatile products through a boundary layer are developed to calculate effective rates of evaporation and local surface profiles on surfaces having active and inactive regions. The coupling between surface heterogeneities with respect to a particular reaction and external mass transfer may provide a mechanism for the surface rearrangement and metal loss encountered in several catalytic systems of practical interest. Calculated transport rates for the volatilization of platinum in oxidizing environments and the rearrangement of this metal during the ammonia oxidation reaction agree well with published experimental data.

  18. Reevaluation of the O+(2P) reaction rate coefficients derived from atmosphere explorer C observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D.G.; Richards, P.G.; Solomon, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    O + ( 2 P) is an important species for studies of the ionosphere and thermosphere: its emission at 7320 angstrom can be used as a diagnostic of the thermospheric atomic oxygen density. Unfortunately, there are no laboratory measurements of the O and N 2 reaction rates which are needed to determine the major sinks of O + ( 2 P). The reaction rates that are generally used were determined from aeronomic data by Rusch et al. but there is evidence that several important inputs that they used should be changed. The authors have recalculated the O and N 2 reaction rates for O + ( 2 P) using recent improvements in the solar EUV flux, cross sections, and photoelectron fluxes. For the standard solar EUV flux, the new N 2 reaction rate of 3.4 ± 1.5 x 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 is close to the value obtained by Rusch et al., but the new O reaction rate of 4.0 ± 1.9 x 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 is about 8 times larger. These new reaction rates are derived using neutral densities, electron density, and solar EUV fluxes measured by Atmosphere Explorer C in 1974 during solar minimum. The new theoretical emission rates are in good agreement with the data for the two orbits studied by Rusch et al. and they are in reasonable agreement with data from five additional orbits that are used in this study. The authors have also examined the effect of uncertainties in the solar EUV flux on the derived reaction rates and found that 15% uncertainties in the solar flux could cause additional uncertainties of up to a factor of 1.5 in the O quenching rate. 19 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  19. The rate coefficients of unimolecular reactions in the systems with power-law distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Cangtao; Guo, Ran; Du, Jiulin

    2014-08-01

    The rate coefficient formulae of unimolecular reactions are generalized to the systems with the power-law distributions based on nonextensive statistics, and the power-law rate coefficients are derived in the high and low pressure limits, respectively. The numerical analyses are made of the rate coefficients as functions of the ν-parameter, the threshold energy, the temperature and the number of degrees of freedom. We show that the new rate coefficients depend strongly on the ν-parameter different from one (thus from a Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution). Two unimolecular reactions, CH3CO→CH3+CO and CH3NC→CH3CN, are taken as application examples to calculate their power-law rate coefficients, which obtained with the ν-parameters slightly different from one can be exactly in agreement with all the experimental studies on these two reactions in the given temperature ranges.

  20. Helium generation reaction rates for 6Li and 10B in benchmark facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, Harry IV; Oliver, B.M.; Lippincott, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    The helium generation rates for 10 B and 6 Li have been measured in two benchmark reactor facilities having neutron spectra similar to those found in a breeder reactor. The irradiations took place in the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility (CFRMF) and in the 10% enriched 235 U critical assembly, BIG-10. The helium reaction rates were obtained by precise high-sensitivity gas mass spectrometric analyses of the helium content of numerous small samples. Comparison of these reaction rates with other reaction rates measured in the same facilities, and with rates calculated from published cross sections and from best estimates of the neutron spectral shapes, indicate significant discrepancies in the calculated values. Additional irradiations in other benchmark facilities have been undertaken to better determine the energy ranges where the discrepancies lie

  1. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Niobium

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 93Nb(n,n′)93mNb. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for monitoring neutrons with energies above approximately 0.5 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 30 years. 1.3 With suitable techniques, fast-neutron reaction rates for neutrons with energy distribution similar to fission neutrons can be determined in fast-neutron fluences above about 1016cm−2. In the presence of high thermal-neutron fluence rates (>1012cm−2·s−1), the transmutation of 93mNb due to neutron capture should be investigated. In the presence of high-energy neutron spectra such as are associated with fusion and spallation sources, the transmutation of 93mNb by reactions such as (n,2n) may occur and should be investigated. 1.4 Procedures for other fast-neutron monitors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 Fast-neutron fluence rates can be determined from the reaction rates provided that the appropriate cross section information ...

  2. Reaction rate and energy-loss rate for photopair production by relativistic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Michal J.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Sikora, Marek

    1992-01-01

    The process of e(+/-) pair production by relativistic nuclei on ambient photons is considered. The process is important for cosmic-ray nuclei in interstellar and intergalactic space as well as in galactic and extragalactic compact objects. The rate of this process is given by an integral of the cross section over the photon angular and energy distribution. In the case of isotropic photons, the angular integration is performed to provide an expression for the rate at given photon energy in the nucleus rest frame. The total rate then becomes a single integral of that rate over the photon energy distribution. Formulas are also given for the fractional energy loss of a relativistic nucleus colliding with a photon of a given energy in the rest frame. The nucleus energy-loss rate is integrated over the photon angular distribution in the case of isotropic photons, and simple fits are provided.

  3. Cross sections and reaction rates of d+{sup 8}Li reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbes, M.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Farrell, M.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Boyd, R.N. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Gu, X. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hencheck, M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kalen, J.D. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Mitchell, C.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kolata, J.J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Lamkin, K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Smith, R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Tighe, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ashktorab, K. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Becchetti, F.D. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brown, J. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Roberts, D. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wang, T.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Humphrey, D. [Department of Physics, University of Western Kentucky, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Vourvopoulos, G. [Department of Physics, University of Western Kentucky, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Islam, M.S. [Department of Physics, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306 (United States)

    1995-02-20

    We have measured angular distributions of the {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 7}Li){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 9}Be)n reactions at E{sub c.m.}=1.5 to 2.8 MeV using an {sup 8}Li-radioactive-beam technique. Astrophysical S-factors and reaction rates were calculated from the measured cross sections. Although the {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 9}Be)n cross section is small, it can contribute to {sup 9}Be synthesis. The {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 7}Li){sup 3}H reaction has a sufficiently large cross section to destroy {sup 8}Li, which may decrease the synthesis of heavier elements. No products from the {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 9}Li)p reaction were detected. We also present the results of calculations using the inhomogeneous model of primordial nucleosynthesis in several regions of parameter space. ((orig.))

  4. Astrophysical reaction rate for α(αn,γ)9Be by photodisintegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumiyoshi, K.; Utsunomiya, H.; Goko, S.; Kajino, T.

    2002-01-01

    We study the astrophysical reaction rate for the formation of 9 Be through the three body reaction α(αn,γ). This reaction is one of the key reactions which could bridge the mass gap at A=8 nuclear systems to produce intermediate-to-heavy mass elements in alpha- and neutron-rich environments such as r-process nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions, s-process nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and primordial nucleosynthesis in baryon inhomogeneous cosmological models. To calculate the thermonuclear reaction rate in a wide range of temperatures, we numerically integrate the thermal average of cross sections assuming a two-steps formation through a metastable 8 Be, α+α[rlhar2] 8 Be(n,γ) 9 Be. Off-resonant and on-resonant contributions from the ground state in 8 Be are taken into account. As input cross section, we adopt the latest experimental data by photodisintegration of 9 Be with laser-electron photon beams, which covers all relevant resonances in 9 Be. Experimental data near the neutron threshold are added with γ-ray flux corrections and a new least-squares analysis is made to deduce resonance parameters in the Breit-Wigner formulation. Based on the photodisintegration cross section, we provide the reaction rate for α(αn,γ) 9 Be in the temperature range from T 9 =10 -3 to T 9 =10 1 (T 9 is the temperature in units of 10 9 K) both in the tabular form and in the analytical form for potential usage in nuclear reaction network calculations. The calculated reaction rate is compared with the reaction rates of the CF88 and the NACRE compilations. The CF88 rate, which is based on the photoneutron cross section for the 1/2 + state in 9 Be by Berman et al., is valid at T 9 >0.028 due to lack of the off-resonant contribution. The CF88 rate differs from the present rate by a factor of two in a temperature range T 9 ≥0.1. The NACRE rate, which adopted different sources of experimental information on resonance states in 9 Be, is 4-12 times

  5. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. REACLIB: A Reaction Rate Library for the Era of Collaborative Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Zachary

    2008-10-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates and weak decay rates are of great importance to modern nuclear astrophysics. They are critical in the study of many topics such as Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, X-ray bursts, Supernovae, and S-process element formation, among others. The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) has been created to increase connectivity amongst nuclear astrophysicists in our modern age of highly collaborative science. Within JINA there has been an effort to create a frequently updated and readily accessible database of thermonuclear reactions and weak decay rates. This database is the REACLIB library, which can be accessed at the web address: http://www.nscl.msu.edu/˜nero/db/. Here I will discuss the JINA REACLIB Project, including a new procedure to fit reaction rates as a function of temperature that takes full advantage of physicality. With these updated reaction rates, astrophysical modelers will no longer have to worry about the adverse effects of using obsolete reaction rate libraries lacking physical behavior.

  7. Reevaluation of the O(+)(2P) reaction rate coefficients derived from Atmosphere Explorer C observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D. G.; Richards, P. G.; Solomon, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    O(+)(2P) is an important species for studies of the ionosphere and thermosphere: its emission at 7320 A can be used as a diagnostic of the thermospheric atomic oxygen density. Unfortunately, there are no laboratory measurements of the O and N2 reaction rates which are needed to determine the major sinks of (O+)(2p). We have recalculated the O and N2 reaction rates for O(+) (2P) using recent improvements in the solar EUV flux, cross sections, and photoelectron fluxes. For the standard solar EUV flux, the new N2 reaction rate of 3.4 +/- 1.5 x 10 exp -10 cu cm/s is close to the value obtained by Rusch et al. (1977), but the new O reaction rate of 4.0 +/- 1.9 x 10 exp -10 cu cm/sec is about 8 times larger. These new reaction rates are derived using neutral densities, electron density, and solar EUV fluxes measured by Atmosphere Explorer C in 1974 during solar minimum. The new theoretical emission rates are in good agreement with the data for the two orbits studied by Rusch et al.

  8. Determination of the enzyme reaction rate in a differential fixed-bed reactor: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruque Filho E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction rate of starch hydrolysis catalyzed by a glucoamylase covalently bound to chitin particles was measured in a Differential Fixed-Bed Reactor (DFBR. Under selected test conditions the initial reaction rate may represent biocatalyst activity. Some aspects which influence measurement of the initial reaction rate of an immobilized enzyme were studied: the amount of desorbed enzyme and its hydrolytic activity, the extent of pore blockage of the biocatalyst caused by substrate solution impurities and the internal and external diffusional mass transfer effects. The results showed that the enzyme glucoamylase was firmly bound to the support, as indicated by the very low amount of desorbed protein found in the recirculating liquid. Although this protein was very active, its contribution to the overall reaction rate was negligible. It was observed that the biocatalyst pores were susceptible to being blocked by the impurities of the starch solution. This latter effect was accumulative, increasing with the number of sequential experiments carried out. When the substrate solution was filtered before use, very reliable determinations of immobilized enzyme reaction rates could be performed in the DFBR. External and internal diffusional resistences usually play a significant role in fixed-bed reactors. However, for the experimental system studied, internal mass transfer effects were not significant, and it was possible to select an operational condition (recirculation flow rate value that minimized the external diffusional limitations.

  9. [Incidence rate of adverse reaction/event by Qingkailing injection: a Meta-analysis of single rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Chun-ling; Xie, Yan-ming; Li, Ming-quan; Wang, Lian-xin; Liao, Xing

    2015-12-01

    To systematically review the incidence rate of adverse drug reaction/event by Qingkailing injection. Such databases as the PubMed, EMbase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, VIP WanFang data and CBM were searched by computer from foundation to July 30, 2015. Two reviewers independently screened literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted data and cross check data. Then, Meta-analysis was performed by using the R 3.2.0 software, subgroup sensitivity analysis was performed based on age, mode of medicine, observation time and research quality. Sixty-three studies involving 9,793 patients with Qingkailing injection were included, 367 cases of adverse reactions/events were reported in total. The incidence rate of adverse reaction in skin and mucosa group was 2% [95% CI (0.02; 0.03)]; the digestive system adverse reaction was 6% [95% CI(0.05; 0.07); the injection site adverse reaction was 4% [95% CI (0.02; 0.07)]. In the digestive system as the main types of adverse reactions/events, incidence of children and adults were 4.6% [0.021 1; 0.097 7] and 6.9% [0.053 5; 0.089 8], respectively. Adverse reactions to skin and mucous membrane damage as the main performance/event type, the observation time > 7 days and ≤ 7 days incidence of 3% [0.012 9; 0.068 3] and 1.9% [0.007 8; 0.046 1], respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that different types of adverse reactions, combination in the incidence of adverse reactions/events were higher than that of single drug, the difference was statistically significant (P reactions occur, and clinical rational drug use, such as combination, age and other fators, and the influence factors vary in different populations. Therefore, clinical doctors for children and the elderly use special care was required for a clear and open spirit injection, the implementation of individualized medication.

  10. Rate constant and reaction coordinate of Trp-cage folding in explicit water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juraszek, J.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    We report rate constant calculations and a reaction coordinate analysis of the rate-limiting folding and unfolding process of the Trp-cage mini-protein in explicit solvent using transition interface sampling. Previous transition path sampling simulations revealed that in this (un)folding process the

  11. Rate constants for the reaction of OH radicals with 1-chloroalkanes at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, F.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1992-01-01

    The rate constants for the reaction of OH radicals with a series of 1-chloroalkanes were measured at 295 K and at a total pressure of 1 atm. The rate constants were obtained by using the absolute technique of pulse radiolysis combined with kinetic UV-spectroscopy. The results are discussed in terms...

  12. Calculation of astrophysical S-factor and reaction rate in 12C(p, γ)13N reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasi, A.; Sadeghi, H.; Pourimani, R.

    2018-02-01

    The 12C(p, γ)13N reaction is the first process in the CNO cycle. Also it is a source of low-energy solar neutrinos in various neutrino experiments. Therefore, it is of high interest to gain data of the astrophysical S-factor in low energies. By applying Faddeev's method, we calculated wave functions for the bound state of 13N. Then the cross sections for resonance and non-resonance were calculated through using Breit-Wigner and direct capture cross section formulae, respectively. After that, we calculated the total S-factor and compared it with previous experimental data, revealing a good agreement altogether. Then, we extrapolated the S-factor in zero energy and the result was 1.32 ± 0.19 (keV.b). In the end, we calculated reaction rate and compared it with NACRE data.

  13. Reaction paths and rate constants of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with environmental species under tropospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, C.; Wahner, A.; Zetzsch, C.

    1987-01-01

    The uv-laser absorption technique in a multipath cell (with excimer-laser photolysis for radical production) is used to investigate the rate constants of the reaction of OH with carbon monoxide. The pressure dependence and the influence of collision partners (measurements in pure oxygen up to one atmosphere) of this important atmospheric chemical reaction are determined. In the kinetic measurements detection limits of 10 7 OH cm -3 are reached with millisecond time resolution. Furthermore the application of the cw-Laser for stationary OH measurements (for example in smog chambers or the free troposphere) is described. The possibilities and limits of different detection methods are discussed with respect to of noise spectra. Modifications of the apparatus with a frequency modulation technique are presented, with an extrapolated detection limit of 10 5 OH cm -3 . (orig.) With 43 refs., 16 figs [de

  14. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Absolute calibration of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, W.H.; Murphy, M.F.; March, M.R. [Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1979-05-15

    The uncertainties in determining the absolute values of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate (which is widely used as a neutron damage flux monitor) have been reduced to {approx}{+-}5%. This has been achieved with the use of a calibrated source of Pd-103-Rh-103m activity supplied by the I.A.E.A. Agreement to within 3% between measured and calculated values of the reaction rate (normalised to the U-238 fission rate) has been achieved. (author)

  16. Absolute calibration of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.H.; Murphy, M.F.; March, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The uncertainties in determining the absolute values of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate (which is widely used as a neutron damage flux monitor) have been reduced to ∼±5%. This has been achieved with the use of a calibrated source of Pd-103-Rh-103m activity supplied by the I.A.E.A. Agreement to within 3% between measured and calculated values of the reaction rate (normalised to the U-238 fission rate) has been achieved. (author)

  17. Rate Constant Change of Photo Reaction of Bacteriorhodopsin Observed in Trimeric Molecular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujiuchi, Yutaka; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Goto, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the time evolution of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin in glycerol mixed purple membrane at around 196 K under irradiation by red light, a kinetic model was constructed. The change of absorption with irradiation at times of 560 nm and 412 nm was analyzed for the purpose of determining reaction rates of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin and its product M intermediate. In this study it is shown that reaction rates of conversion from bacteriorhodopsin to the M intermediate can be explained by a set of linear differential equations. This model analysis concludes that bacteriorhodopsin in which constitutes a trimer unit with other two bacteriorhodopsin molecules changes into M intermediates in the 1.73 of reaction rate, in the initial step, and according to the number of M intermediate in a trimer unit, from three to one, the reaction rate of bacteriorhodopsin into M intermediates smaller as 1.73, 0.80, 0.19 which caused by influence of inter-molecular interaction between bacteriorhodopsin.

  18. Speed of reaction to sensory stimulation is enhanced during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juravle, Georgiana; Spence, Charles

    2015-10-01

    We report four experiments on the speed of people's reactions to sensory stimulation while throwing and catching a basketball. Thirty participants participated in Experiment 1, split according to basketball expertise: none, intermediate (6years on average), or advanced (20years or more). The participants had to catch a bouncing basketball. The movement triggered a short tactile pulse in a tactor attached to their wrist to which they made a speeded vocal response (RT). The pulse could be presented either at rest, at two time-points during the reaching movement, or when the hand reached forward to catch the ball. The results indicated that participants responded more rapidly to vibrations on the moving hand relative to preparing or catching the ball, with expert athletes responding significantly faster than novices. In a second experiment, participants made a speeded vocal response to an auditory signal. As in Experiment 1, faster auditory RTs were observed when the hand was moving, as compared to the other time-points. In a third study, the participants responded to a pulse delivered at their resting hand at various time-points corresponding to the average timings of stimulation in Experiment 1. The results revealed comparable RTs across the tested time-points. In a final experiment, the participants made a vocal response to a pulse presented at various time-points while they were throwing the basketball. The results indicated faster tactile RTs while the ball was being thrown. These results are discussed with reference to the literature on goal-directed movements and in terms of current theories of attention and sensory suppression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, sub -0.47 ) x 10(exp 13) e(-15813 +/- 587 K/T)/cubic cm.mol.s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  20. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3+O2+CH3O+O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, -0.47)) X 10(exp 13) exp(- 15813 +/- 587 K/T)cc/mol s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  1. A numerical evaluation of prediction accuracy of CO2 absorber model for various reaction rate coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the CO2 absorber column using mono-ethanolamine (MEA solution as chemical solvent are predicted by a One-Dimensional (1-D rate based model in the present study. 1-D Mass and heat balance equations of vapor and liquid phase are coupled with interfacial mass transfer model and vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The two-film theory is used to estimate the mass transfer between the vapor and liquid film. Chemical reactions in MEA-CO2-H2O system are considered to predict the equilibrium pressure of CO2 in the MEA solution. The mathematical and reaction kinetics models used in this work are calculated by using in-house code. The numerical results are validated in the comparison of simulation results with experimental and simulation data given in the literature. The performance of CO2 absorber column is evaluated by the 1-D rate based model using various reaction rate coefficients suggested by various researchers. When the rate of liquid to gas mass flow rate is about 8.3, 6.6, 4.5 and 3.1, the error of CO2 loading and the CO2 removal efficiency using the reaction rate coefficients of Aboudheir et al. is within about 4.9 % and 5.2 %, respectively. Therefore, the reaction rate coefficient suggested by Aboudheir et al. among the various reaction rate coefficients used in this study is appropriate to predict the performance of CO2 absorber column using MEA solution. [Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011-0017220].

  2. The rate of the reaction between CN and C2H2 at interstellar temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, D. E.; Herbst, E.

    1997-01-01

    The rate coefficient for the important interstellar reaction between CN and C2H2 has been calculated as a function of temperature between 10 and 300 K. The potential surface for this reaction has been determined through ab initio quantum chemical techniques; the potential exhibits no barrier in the entrance channel but does show a small exit channel barrier, which lies below the energy of reactants. Phase-space calculations for the reaction dynamics, which take the exit channel barrier into account, show the same unusual temperature dependence as determined by experiment, in which the rate coefficient at first increases as the temperature is reduced below room temperature and then starts to decrease as the temperature drops below 50-100 K. The agreement between theory and experiment provides strong confirmation that the reaction occurs appreciably at cool interstellar temperatures.

  3. Magnetic field assisted Fenton reactions for the enhanced degradation of methyl blue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Long Hao; Lu Yi Zou; Guang Sheng Zhang; Yi Bo Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic field was tentatively introduced into Fenton reactions system for the degradation and discoloration of methyl blue as the represent of organic chemical dye, which was a bio-refractory organic pollutant in industry wastewater. It was found that under optimal Fenton reaction conditions, with the assistant of magnetic field in Fenton reactions, the degradation rate of methyl blue, the decomposition rate of H2O2 and the conversion rate of Fe2+ were accelerated, the extent of them would be improved by the increase of magnetic field intensity. Meanwhile, the mineralization of methyl blue (CODcr) was improved by over 10% with magnetic fiold.

  4. DEPENDENCE OF X-RAY BURST MODELS ON NUCLEAR REACTION RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyburt, R. H.; Keek, L.; Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Amthor, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Heger, A.; Meisel, Z.; Smith, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Johnson, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars, and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p, γ ), ( α , γ ), and ( α , p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophysical conditions. A two-step approach first identified sensitive nuclear reaction rates in a single-zone model with ignition conditions chosen to match calculations with a state-of-the-art 1D multi-zone model based on the Kepler stellar evolution code. All relevant reaction rates on neutron-deficient isotopes up to mass 106 were individually varied by a factor of 100 up and down. Calculations of the 84 changes in reaction rate with the highest impact were then repeated in the 1D multi-zone model. We find a number of uncertain reaction rates that affect predictions of light curves and burst ashes significantly. The results provide insights into the nuclear processes that shape observables from X-ray bursts, and guidance for future nuclear physics work to reduce nuclear uncertainties in X-ray burst models.

  5. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  6. Asynchronous beating of cilia enhances particle capture rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2014-11-01

    Many aquatic micro-organisms use beating cilia to generate feeding currents and capture particles in surrounding fluids. One of the capture strategies is to ``catch up'' with particles when a cilium is beating towards the overall flow direction (effective stroke) and intercept particles on the downstream side of the cilium. Here, we developed a 3D computational model of a cilia band with prescribed motion in a viscous fluid and calculated the trajectories of the particles with different sizes in the fluid. We found an optimal particle diameter that maximizes the capture rate. The flow field and particle motion indicate that the low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the laminar flow in the neighbor of the cilia, whereas larger particles have to move above the cilia tips to get advected downstream which decreases their capture rate. We then analyzed the effect of beating coordination between neighboring cilia on the capture rate. Interestingly, we found that asynchrony of the beating of the cilia can enhance the relative motion between a cilium and the particles near it and hence increase the capture rate.

  7. Enhanced diphoton rates at Fermi and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Staub, Florian

    2012-11-01

    We show that within MSSM singlet extensions the experimental hints beyond the standard model from the Fermi LAT telescope as well as from the LHC can be explained simultaneously while being consistent with all experimental constraints. In particular we present an example point which features a ∝130 GeV lightest neutralino with an annihilation cross section into photons consistent with the indication from the Fermi satellite with simultaneously the right relic abundance, a continuum photon spectrum consistent with observation, direct detection cross section below the experimental limits, electroweak observables consistent with experiment and a 125 GeV light Higgs boson with a slightly enhanced h→γγ rate.

  8. Energy dependence of the reaction rate constants of Ar+, Ar++ and N2+ ions with Cl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukac, P.; Holubcik, L.; Morva, I.; Lindinger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Dry etching processes using low temperature plasmas in Cl 2 and in Cl 2 -noble gas or nitrogen mixtures are common in the manufacture of semiconductor devices, but their chemical mechanisms are often poorly understood. Results are given for the reaction rate constant measurements of Ar + , Ar ++ , N 2 + ions with chlorine as a function of mean relative kinetic energy. The experiments were performed by using the innsbruck flow drift tube (IFDT) apparatus. Measurements were done at various E/N values, where E is the electric field strength and N the buffer gas density in the drift section. The mean relative kinetic energy KE CM between the ions and the neutral chlorine Cl 2 was calculated using the Wanniers formula. It was found that The N 2 + , Ar + and Ar ++ positive ions react with chlorine Cl 2 very fast and the corresponding reaction rate coefficients depend on the mean relative kinetic energy. For the reaction of Ar - with Cl 2 , its reaction coefficient depends also on the buffer gas. It can imply the enhancement of Cl 2 + ions during etching of Si in the Ar/Cl 2 mixtures. (nevyjel)

  9. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, F; D` Onofrio, A [Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); [INFN, Napoli (Italy); Campajola, L; Imbriani, G [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, L [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Greife, U; Rolfs, C; Strieder, F; Trautvetter, H P [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Roca, V; Romano, M [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Straniero, O [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  10. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  11. A review of the rates of reaction of unirradiated uranium in gaseous atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, R.J.

    1989-10-01

    The review collates available quantitative rate data for the reaction of unirradiated uranium in dry and moist air, steam and carbon dioxide based atmospheres at temperatures ranging from room temperature to above the melting point of uranium. Reactions in nitrogen and carbon monoxide are also considered. The aim of the review is to provide a compilation of base data for the hazard analysis of fault conditions relating to Magnox fuel. (author)

  12. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation reaction on Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs hybrid electro-catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouralishahi, Amideddin; Rashidi, Ali Morad; Mortazavi, Yadollah; Khodadadi, Abbas Ali; Choolaei, Mohammadmehdi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Promoting effects of Cobalt oxide on methanol electro-oxidation over Pt/MWCNTs are investigated. • Higher activity, about 2.9 times, and enhanced stability are observed on Pt-CoO x /MWCNTs. • Electrochemical active surface area of Pt nanoparticles is significantly improved upon CoO x addition. • Bi-functional mechanism is facilitated in presence of CoO x . - Abstract: The electro-catalytic behavior of Pt-CoO x /MWCNTs in methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) is investigated and compared to that of Pt/MWCNTs. The electro-catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method using NaBH 4  as the reducing agent. The morphological and physical characteristics of samples are examined by XRD, TEM, ICP and EDS techniques. In the presence of CoO x , Pt nanoparticles were highly distributed on the support with an average particle size of 2 nm, an obvious decrease from 5.1 nm for Pt/MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry, CO-stripping, Chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are used to study the electrochemical behavior of the electro-catalysts. The results revealed a considerable enhancement in the oxidation kinetics of CO ads on Pt active sites by the participation of CoO x . Compared to Pt/MWCNTs, Pt-CoO x /MWCNTs sample has a larger electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) and higher electro-catalytic activity and stability toward methanol electro-oxidation. According to the results of cyclic voltammetry, the forward anodic peak current density enhances more than 89% at the optimum atomic ratio of Pt:Co = 2:1. Furthermore, inclusion of cobalt oxide species causes the onset potential of methanol electro-oxidation reaction to shift 84 mV to negative values compared to that on Pt/MWCNTs. Based on EIS data, dehydrogenation of methanol is the rate-determining step of MOR on both Pt/MWCNTs and Pt-CoO x /MWCNTs, at small overpotentials. However, at higher overpotentials, the oxidation of adsorbed oxygen-containing groups

  13. Discovery of a Significant Acetone•Hydroperoxy Adduct Chaperone Effect and Its Impact on the Determination of Room Temperature Rate Constants for Acetonylperoxy/Hydroperoxy Self-Reactions and Cross Reaction Via Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieman, F. J.; Hui, A. O.; Okumura, M.; Sander, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    In order to model the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere in regions containing acetone properly, the kinetics of the acetonylperoxy/hydroperoxy self-reactions and cross reaction have been studied over a wide temperature range using Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy. We report here the determination of different rate constants for the acetonylperoxy chemistry that we obtained at 298 K compared to currently accepted values. A considerable increase in the observed HO2 self-reaction rate constant due to rate enhancement via the chaperone effect from the reaction between HO2 and the (CH3)2CO•HO2 hydrogen-bonded adduct, even at room temperature, was discovered that was previously ignored. Correct determination of the acetonylperoxy and hydroperoxy kinetics must include this dependence of the HO2 self-reaction rate on acetone concentration. Via excimer laser flash photolysis to create the radical reactants, HO2 absorption was monitored in the infrared by diode laser wavelength modulation detection simultaneously with CH3C(O)CH2O2absorption monitored in the ultraviolet at 300 nm as a function of time. Resulting decay curves were fit concurrently first over a short time scale to obtain the rate constants minimizing subsequent product reactions. Modeling/fitting with a complete reaction scheme was then performed to refine the rate constants and test their veracity. Experiments were carried out over a variety of concentrations of acetone and methanol. Although no effect due to methanol concentration was found at room temperature, the rate constant for the hydroperoxy self-reaction was found to increase linearly with acetone concentration which is interpreted as the adduct being formed and resulting in a chaperone mechanism that enhances the self-reaction rate: (CH3)2CO·HO2 + HO2 → H2O2 + O2 + (CH3)2CO Including this effect, the resulting room temperature rate constants for the cross reaction and the acetonylperoxy self-reaction were found to be 2-3 times smaller than

  14. Exchange Rate and Interest Rate in the Monetary Policy Reaction Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krušković Borivoje D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a particular interest in the relation between exchange rates and interest rates both in developed countries and emerging countries. This is understandable given the important role that these variables have in determining the movement of nominal and real economic variables, including the movement of domestic inflation, real output, exports and imports, foreign exchange reserves, etc. To realized the importance of the given instruments selected macroeconomic indicators, data analysis (monthly data relating to Serbia was made on the basis of the Transfer Function Model, a data analysis (annual data relating to emerging countries was done on the basis of the Stepvise Multiple Regression model. In the transfer function model we used the Maximum Likelihood method for assessing unknown coefficients. In the gradual multiple regression model we used the Least Square method for the evaluation of unknown coefficients. All indicator values were used in the original unmodified form, i.e. there was no need for a variety of transformations. Empirical analysis showed that the exchange rate is a more significant transmission mechanism than the interest rate both in emerging markets and Serbia.

  15. Rate constant computation on some elementary reactions of Hg during combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Bo-wen; Bai, Jing-ru [Northeast Dianli Univ., Jilin (China). Inst. of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The geometry optimizations of reactants, products and transition states were made by the quantum chemistry MP2 method at the SDD basis function level for Hg, and 6-311++G(3df, 3pd) for others. The properties of stable minimums were validated by vibration frequencies analysis. Furthermore, the microcosmic chemical reaction mechanisms of reactions were investigated by ab initio calculations of quantum chemistry. On the basis of the geometry optimization, reaction rate constants within 298-2,000 K are calculated neither from experimental data nor by estimated, but directly from Quantum Chemistry software-Khimera.

  16. A simple recipe for modeling reaction-rate in flows with turbulent-combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1991-01-01

    A computationally viable scheme to account for chemical reaction in turbulent flows is presented. The multivariate beta-pdf model for multiple scalar mixing forms the basis of this scheme. Using the model scalar joint pdf and a general form of the instantaneous reaction-rate, the unclosed chemical reaction terms are expressed as simple functions of scalar means and the turbulent scalar energy. The calculation procedure requires that the mean scalar equations and only one other transport equation - for the turbulent scalar energy - be solved.

  17. Thermonuclear 19F(p, {{\\boldsymbol{\\alpha }}}_{0})16O reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian-Jun; Lombardo, Ivano; Dell'Aquila, Daniele; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Li-Yong; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2018-01-01

    The thermonuclear 19F(p, {{{α }}}0)16O reaction rate in the temperature region 0.007-10 GK has been derived by re-evaluating the available experimental data, together with the low-energy theoretical R-matrix extrapolations. Our new rate deviates by up to about 30% compared to the previous results, although all rates are consistent within the uncertainties. At very low temperature (e.g. 0.01 GK) our reaction rate is about 20% lower than the most recently published rate, because of a difference in the low energy extrapolated S-factor and a more accurate estimate of the reduced mass used in the calculation of the reaction rate. At temperatures above ˜1 GK, our rate is lower, for instance, by about 20% around 1.75 GK, because we have re-evaluated the previous data (Isoya et al., Nucl. Phys. 7, 116 (1958)) in a meticulous way. The present interpretation is supported by the direct experimental data. The uncertainties of the present evaluated rate are estimated to be about 20% in the temperature region below 0.2 GK, and are mainly caused by the lack of low-energy experimental data and the large uncertainties in the existing data. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars evolve at temperatures below 0.2 GK, where the 19F(p, {{α }})16O reaction may play a very important role. However, the current accuracy of the reaction rate is insufficient to help to describe, in a careful way, the fluorine over-abundances observed in AGB stars. Precise cross section (or S factor) data in the low energy region are therefore needed for astrophysical nucleosynthesis studies. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11490562, 11490560, 11675229) and National Key Research and Development Program of China (2016YFA0400503)

  18. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Titanium

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reactions 46Ti(n,p) 46Sc + 47Ti(n, np)46Sc. Note 1—Since the cross section for the (n,np) reaction is relatively small for energies less than 12 MeV and is not easily distinguished from that of the (n,p) reaction, this test method will refer to the (n,p) reaction only. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 4.4 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 250 days (for longer irradiations, see Practice E 261). 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 109 cm–2·s–1 can be determined. However, in the presence of a high thermal-neutron fluence rate, 46Sc depletion should be investigated. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all...

  19. Thermonuclear reaction rate of 17O(p,γ)18F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, C.; Iliadis, C.; Champagne, A.E.; Fitzgerald, R.P.; Longland, R.; Newton, J.; Pollanen, J.; Runkle, R.

    2005-01-01

    The 17 O(p,γ) 18 F and 17 O(p,α) 14 N reactions have a profound influence on hydrogen-burning nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, and classical novae. Previously evaluated thermonuclear rates for both reactions carry large uncertainties. We investigated the proton-capture reaction on 17 O in the bombarding energy range of E p lab = 180-540 keV. We observed a previously undiscovered resonance at E R lab = 193.2 ± 0.9 keV. The resonance strength amounts to (ωγ) pγ (1.2±0.2)x10 -6 eV. With this value, the uncertainties of the 17 O(p,γ) 18 F reaction rates are reduced by orders of magnitude in the peak temperature range of classical novae (T=0.1-0.4 GK). We also report on a reevaluation of the 17 O(p,γ) 18 F reaction rates at lower temperatures that are pertinent to red giants, AGB stars, or massive stars. The present work establishes the 17 O(p,γ) 18 F reaction rates over a temperature range of T= 0.01-1.5 GK with statistical uncertainties of 10-50%. The new recommended reaction rates deviate from the previously accepted values by an order of magnitude around T≅0.2 GK and by factors of 2-3 at T < 0.1 GK

  20. Clinical experience of adverse drug reaction in gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Hyae; Hong, Ju Hee; Lee, Yeon Su; Cha, Kyung Soo; Chang, Suk Il; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Yeong Soo

    1992-01-01

    Gadopentetate dimenglumine(Gd-DTPA) has low toxicity and good tolerance and it is said that the observed adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is compatible to those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. The overall incidence of adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is even lower than those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. Then, the possibility of potential adverse drug reaction of these contrast media is not fully known and recently, many authors have a growing interest in this point. We have taken 2501 cases of MRI and executed 1467 case of Gd-DTPA enhancement scanning(58.7%) and experienced 12 cases of adverse drug reaction(11 cases: mild reaction, 1 case: severs anaphylactic shock) and the overall incidence of our adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA was 0.8%. In conclusion, the adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is not rare and the severe adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA may occur. So, the possibility of adverse drug reaction after Gd-DTPA injection should always be kept in mind, especially when the patient has a history of reaction to contrast material, allergy(particularly asthma) and cardiac disease. For the safe use of Gd-DTPA, well trained personnel and nearby emergent care facilities should be available

  1. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: measurements and site-specific rate rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badra, Jihad; Elwardany, Ahmed E; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-06-28

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (C=O) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (C=O), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):

  2. Effect of crystallochemistry of starting materials on the rate of smectite to illite reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tsutomu; Isobe, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Murakami, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    A series of hydrothermal experiments was performed to determine the effect of layer charge of starting materials on the smectite to illite reaction rate that might be applied to nuclear-waste repository design. The experiments were conducted on K-saturated fractions of Wyoming smectite (SWy-1) and Tsukinuno smectite (SKu-F) in a closed system at temperatures of 95, 150, 200, 250, 300 C for run durations of up to 477 days with a 1:20 mass ratio of solid to deionized water. The mean layer charge and tetrahedral charge of SKu-F are larger than those of SWy-1. The proportion of smectite layers in illite/smectite interstratified minerals rapidly decreases, and then slowly decreases with increase in reaction time; a plot of ln (100/% smectite) vs. time produces two distinct straight lines in all experiments. These lines are suggestive of two first-order kinetic processes with different rates for this reaction; the first process has a greater rate than the second one. An Arrhenius plot of the reaction rates for each process produces a folding and straight lines for the first and second processes, respectively, suggesting that there are at least two parallel processes in the first process, and a dominant process is different between high- and low-temperature reactions. The activation energies of the first and second processes determined from the plots are the same for the two starting materials, meaning that the reaction mechanisms for the two starting materials are the same. However, the rate of the first process is different between the two starting materials, although that of the second process is similar. The difference in the rate of the first process results possibly from the difference in the amount of layer charge between the two starting smectites

  3. Simplified method of ''push-pull'' test data analysis for determining in situ reaction rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, R.; Schroth, M.H.; Istok, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The single-well, ''''push-pull'''' test method is useful for obtaining information on a wide variety of aquifer physical, chemical, and microbiological characteristics. A push-pull test consists of the pulse-type injection of a prepared test solution into a single monitoring well followed by the extraction of the test solution/ground water mixture from the same well. The test solution contains a conservative tracer and one or more reactants selected to investigate a particular process. During the extraction phase, the concentrations of tracer, reactants, and possible reaction products are measured to obtain breakthrough curves for all solutes. This paper presents a simplified method of data analysis that can be used to estimate a first-order reaction rate coefficient from these breakthrough curves. Rate coefficients are obtained by fitting a regression line to a plot of normalized concentrations versus elapsed time, requiring no knowledge of aquifer porosity, dispersivity, or hydraulic conductivity. A semi-analytical solution to the advective-dispersion equation is derived and used in a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a homogeneous, confined aquifer with a fully-penetrating injection/extraction well and varying porosity, dispersivity, test duration, and reaction rate. A numerical flow and transport code (SUTRA) is used to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a heterogeneous, unconfined aquifer with a partially penetrating well. In all cases the simplified method provides accurate estimates of reaction rate coefficients; estimation errors ranged from 0.1 to 8.9% with most errors less than 5%

  4. Temperature dependence of electrocatalytic and photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction rates using NiFe oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2016-01-25

    The present work compares oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis in aqueous solutions using nanostructured NiFeOx as catalysts. The impacts of pH and reaction temperature on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic OER kinetics were investigated. For electrocatalysis, a NiFeOx catalyst was hydrothermally decorated on Ni foam. In 1 M KOH solution, the NiFeOx electrocatalyst achieved 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 260 mV. The same catalyst was decorated on the surface of Ta3N5 photocatalyst powder. The reaction was conducted in the presence of 0.1 M Na2S2O8 as a strong electron scavenger, thus likely leading to the OER being kinetically relevant. When compared with the bare Ta3N5, NiFeOx/Ta3N5 demonstrated a 5-fold improvement in photocatalytic activity in the OER under visible light irradiation, achieving a quantum efficiency of 24 % at 480 nm. Under the conditions investigated, a strong correlation between the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic performances was identified: an improvement in electrocatalysis corresponded with an improvement in photocatalysis without altering the identity of the materials. The rate change at different pH was likely associated with electrocatalytic kinetics that accordingly influenced the photocatalytic rates. The sensitivity of the reaction rates with respective to the reaction temperature resulted in an apparent activation energy of 25 kJ mol-1 in electrocatalysis, whereas that in photocatalysis was 16 kJ mol-1. The origin of the difference in these activation energy values is likely attributed to the possible effects of temperature on the individual thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the reaction process. The work described herein demonstrates a method of “transferring the knowledge of electrocatalysis to photocatalysis” as a strong tool to rationally and quantitatively understand the complex reaction schemes involved in photocatalytic reactions.

  5. Benchmark experiments at ASTRA facility on definition of space distribution of 235U fission reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, A. E.; Glushkov, E. S.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Moroz, N. P.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Nosov, V. I.; Smirnov, O. N.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Zimin, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Results of critical experiments performed at five ASTRA facility configurations modeling the high-temperature helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactors are presented. Results of experiments on definition of space distribution of 235 U fission reaction rate performed at four from these five configurations are presented more detail. Analysis of available information showed that all experiments on criticality at these five configurations are acceptable for use them as critical benchmark experiments. All experiments on definition of space distribution of 235 U fission reaction rate are acceptable for use them as physical benchmark experiments. (authors)

  6. Reaction rate constant of HO2+O3 measured by detecting HO2 from photofragment fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, E. R.; Suto, Masako; Lee, Long C.; Coffey, Dewitt, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A room-temperature discharge-flow system investigation of the rate constant for the reaction 'HO2 + O3 yields OH + 2O2' has detected HO2 through the OH(A-X) fluorescence produced by photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. A reaction rate constant of 1.9 + or - 0.3 x 10 to the -15th cu cm/molecule per sec is obtained from first-order decay of HO2 in excess O3; this agrees well with published data.

  7. Synergetic pretreatment of waste activated sludge by hydrodynamic cavitation combined with Fenton reaction for enhanced dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Meiqiang; Hu, Jianqiang; Lian, Guanghu; Xiao, Ruiyang; Song, Zhijun; Jin, Micong; Dong, Chunying; Wang, Quanyuan; Luo, Dewen; Wei, Zongsu

    2018-04-01

    The dewatering of waste activated sludge by integrated hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) and Fenton reaction was explored in this study. We first investigated the effects of initial pH, sludge concentration, flow rate, and H 2 O 2 concentration on the sludge dewaterability represented by water content, capillary suction time and specific resistance to filtration. The results of dewatering tests showed that acidic pH and low sludge concentration were favorable to improve dewatering performance in the HC/Fenton system, whereas optimal flow rate and H 2 O 2 concentration applied depended on the system operation. To reveal the synergism of HC/Fenton treatment, a suite of analysis were implemented: three-dimensional excitation emission matrix (3-DEEM) spectra of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) such as proteins and polysaccharides, zeta potential and particle size of sludge flocs, and SEM/TEM imaging of sludge morphology. The characterization results indicate a three-step mechanism, namely HC fracture of different EPS in sludge flocs, Fenton oxidation of the released EPS, and Fe(III) re-flocculation, that is responsible for the synergistically enhanced sludge dewatering. Results of current study provide a basis to improve our understanding on the sludge dewatering performance by HC/Fenton treatment and possible scale-up of the technology for use in wastewater treatment plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhancement of cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reactions by a single exposure to UV-A or PUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moberg, S.; Mobacken, H.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of irradiation with UV-A and PUVA (8-methoxy-psoralen and UV-A) on delayed hypersensitivity reactions to microbial antigens was studied in healthy human individuals. Skin reactions to Candida albicans antigen and PPD were enhanced by UV-A als well as by PUVA compared with nonirradiated tests. A statistically significant difference was reached with UV-A for both antigens. For PUVA, erythemogenic doses to Candida tests produced a significant increase of response. (orig.)

  9. Correlation analysis of the progesterone-induced sperm acrosome reaction rate and the fertilisation rate in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, T; Qin, Y; Ye, T; Wang, Y; Pan, J; Zhu, Y; Duan, L; Li, K; Teng, X

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate whether progesterone-induced acrosome reaction (AR) rate could be an indicator for fertilisation rate in vitro. Twenty-six couples with unexplained infertility and undergoing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment were involved. On the oocytes retrieval day after routine IVF, residual sperm samples were collected to receive progesterone induction (progesterone group) or not (control group). AR rate was calculated and fertilisation rate was recorded. The correlation between progesterone-induced AR and fertilisation rate and between sperm normal morphology and 3PN (tripronuclear) were analysed using the Spearman correlation analysis. The AR rate of progesterone group was statistically higher than that of the control group (15.6 ± 5.88% versus 9.66 ± 5.771%, P rate (r = -0.053, P > 0.01) or rate of high-quality embryo development (r = -0.055, P > 0.01). Normal sperm morphology also showed no significant correlation with the amount of 3PN zygotes (r = 0.029, P > 0.01), rate of 3PN zygotes production (r = 0.20, P > 0.01), rate of 3PN embryo development (r = -0.406, P > 0.01), fertilisation rate (r = -0.148, P > 0.01) or progesterone-induced AR rate (r = 0.214, P > 0.01). Progesterone can induce AR in vitro significantly; however, the progesterone-induced AR may not be used to indicate fertilisation rate. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Electrochemical reaction rates in a dye sentisised solar cell - the iodide/tri-iodide redox system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; West, Keld; Winter-Jensen, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction rate of the redox couple iodide / tri-iodide in acetonitrile is characterised by impedance spectroscopy. Different electrode materials relevant for the function of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) are investigated. Preferably, the reaction with the iodide / tri......-iodide couple should be fast at the counter electrode, i.e. this electrode must have a high catalytic activity towards the redox couple, and the same reaction must be slow on the photo electrode. The catalytic activity is investigated for platinum, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polypyrrole (PPy......), and polyaniline (PANI) - all deposited onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. Both Pt and PEDOT are found to have sufficiently high catalytic activities for practical use as counter electrode in DSSC. The reaction resistance on FTO and anatase confirmed the beneficial effect of a compact anatase layer on top...

  11. Measurement of droplet vaporization rate enhancement caused by acoustic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. J.; Winter, M.

    1992-10-01

    Advanced laser diagnostics are being applied to quantify droplet vaporization enhancement in the presence of acoustic fields which can lead to instability in liquid-fueled rockets. While models have been developed to describe the interactions between subcritical droplet vaporization and acoustic fields in the surrounding gases, they have not been verified experimentally. In the super critical environment of a rocket engine combustor, little is understood about how the injected fluid is distributed. Experiments in these areas have been limited because of the lack of diagnostic techniques capable of providing quantitative results. Recently, however, extremely accurate vaporization rate measurements have been performed on droplets in a subcritical environment using morphology-dependent resonances (MDR's) in which fluorescence from an individual droplet provides information about its diameter. Initial measurements on methanol droplets behind a pressure pulse with a pressure ratio of 1.2 indicated that the evaporation rate in the first few microsec after wave passage was extremely high. Subsequent measurements have been made to validate these results using MDR's acquired from similarly-sized droplets using a pulse with a 1.1 pressure ratio. A baseline measurement was also made using a non evaporative fluid under similar Weber and Reynolds number conditions. The MDR technique employed for these measurements is explained and the facilities are described. The evaporation measurement results are shown and the rates observed from different droplet materials and different wave strengths are compared.

  12. Examining the reaction of monetary policy to exchange rate changes: A nonlinear ARDL approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manogaran, Lavaneesvari; Sek, Siok Kun

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies showed the exchange rate changes can have significant impacts on macroeconomic performance. Over fluctuation of exchange rate may lead to economic instability. Hence, monetary policy rule tends to react to exchange rate changes. Especially, in emerging economies where the policy-maker tends to limit the exchange rate movement through interventions. In this study, we seek to investigate how the monetary policy rule reacts to exchange rate changes. The nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag (NARDL) model is applied to capture the asymmetric effect of exchange rate changes on monetary policy reaction function (interest rate). We focus the study in ASEAN5 countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore). The results indicated the existence of asymmetric effect of exchange rates changes on the monetary reaction function for all ASEAN5 countries in the long-run. Where, in majority of the cases the monetary policy is reacting to the appreciation and depreciation of exchange rate by raising the policy rate. This affirms the intervention of policymakers with the `fear of floating' behavior.

  13. Nickel group cluster anion reactions with carbon monoxide: Rate coefficients and chemisorption efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Paul A.; Ervin, Kent M.

    1994-04-01

    Reactions of Ni-n(n=3-10), Pd-n(n=3-8), and Pt-n(n=3-7) with CO are studied in a flow tube reactor. Bimolecular rate coefficients are measured for the association reaction of CO adsorbing on the cluster surface. The rate coefficients range from about 10% of the collision rate for the trimer anions to near the collision rate for clusters larger than four atoms. The maximum number of CO molecules that bind to each cluster is determined. Whereas the saturation limits for nickel are typical for an 18 electron transition metal, the limits for platinum are lower, reflecting the electron deficient structures observed in condensed phase chemistry. The CO saturated palladium clusters represent the first examples of saturated binary palladium carbonyl compounds. Comparisons are made to similar studies on metal cation and neutral clusters and also to surface scattering studies of nickel group metals.

  14. Cross sections and rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Wang, J.G.

    2001-05-01

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data on charge exchange processes in collisions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules have been collected and critically assessed. Using well established scaling relationships for the charge exchange cross sections at low and high collision energies, as well as the known rate coefficients for these reactions in the thermal energy region, a complete cross section database is constructed for proton-C x H y charge exchange reactions from thermal energies up to several hundreds keV for all C x H y molecules with x=1, 2, 3 and 1 ≤ y ≤ 2x + 2. Rate coefficients for these charge exchange reactions have also been calculated in the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 20 keV. (author)

  15. Cross sections and rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K.; Kato, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Wang, J.G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens (United States)

    2001-05-01

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data on charge exchange processes in collisions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules have been collected and critically assessed. Using well established scaling relationships for the charge exchange cross sections at low and high collision energies, as well as the known rate coefficients for these reactions in the thermal energy region, a complete cross section database is constructed for proton-C{sub x}H{sub y} charge exchange reactions from thermal energies up to several hundreds keV for all C{sub x}H{sub y} molecules with x=1, 2, 3 and 1 {<=} y {<=} 2x + 2. Rate coefficients for these charge exchange reactions have also been calculated in the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 20 keV. (author)

  16. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Aluminum

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 27Al(n,α)24Na. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 6.5 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 2 days (for longer irradiations, see Practice E261). 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 106 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E261. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Relationship between reaction layer thickness and leach rate for nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1984-02-01

    Three leaching tests, devised to distinguish among several proposed nuclear waste glass leaching mechanisms, were carried out for four different waste glasses. In the first test, the influence of a pre-formed reaction layer on elemental release was evaluated. In the second test, glass specimens were replaced with fresh samples halfway through the leaching experiment, to evaluate the influence of the concentration of glass components in leaching. Finally, regular replacement of the leachant at fixed time intervals essentially removed the variable changing solution concentration, and allowed an assessment of the influence of reaction layer thickness on the leaching rate. Results for all glasses tested indicated that the reaction layer presented little or no barrier to leaching, and that most of the retardation on leaching rates generally observed are attributable to saturation effects. 20 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  18. Numerical Analysis Of Hooke Jeeves-Runge Kutta To Determine Reaction Rate Equation In Pyrrole Polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawan, Indra; Sulistyo, Harry; Rochmad

    2001-01-01

    The numerical analysis of Hooke Jeeves Methods combined with Runge Kutta Methods is used to determine the exact model of reaction rate equation of pyrrole polymerization. Chemical polymerization of pyrrole was conducted with FeCI 3 / pyrrole solution at concentration ratio of 1.62 mole / mole and 2.18 mole / mole with varrying temperature of 28, 40, 50, and 60 o C. FeCl 3 acts as an oxidation agent to form pyrrole cation that will polymerize. The numerical analysis was done to examine the exact model of reaction rate equation which is derived from reaction equation of initiation, propagation, and termination. From its numerical analysis, it is found that the pyrrole polymerization follows third order of pyrrole cation concentration

  19. Rate constant for the reaction of O(3P) with diacetylene from 210 to 423 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, M. B.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction of O(3P) with diacetylene (C4H2) has been measured as a function of pressure and temperature by the flash-photolysis/resonance-fluorescence method. At 298 K and below, no pressure dependence of the rate constant was observed, but at 423 K a moderate (factor-of-2) increase was detected in the range 3 to 75 torr Ar.Results at or near the high-pressure limit are represented by an Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 210 to 423 K. The results are compared with previous determinations, all of which employed the discharge-flow/mass-spectrometry technique. The mechanism of the reaction is considered, including both primary and secondary processes. The heats of formation of the reactants, adducts, and products for the O(3P) + C4H2 reaction are discussed and contrasted with those for O(3P) + C2H2.

  20. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  1. Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Libraries and Software Tools for Nuclear Astrophysics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Cyburt, Richard; Schatz, Hendrik; Smith, Karl; Warren, Scott; Ferguson, Ryan; Wiescher, Michael; Lingerfelt, Eric; Buckner, Kim; Nesaraja, Caroline D.

    2008-01-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates are a crucial input for simulating a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A new collaboration has been formed to ensure that astrophysical modelers have access to reaction rates based on the most recent experimental and theoretical nuclear physics information. To reach this goal, a new version of the REACLIB library has been created by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), now available online at http://www.nscl.msu.edu/~nero/db. A complementary effort is the development of software tools in the Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics, online at nucastrodata.org, to streamline, manage, and access the workflow of the reaction evaluations from their initiation to peer review to incorporation into the library. Details of these new projects will be described

  2. SENSMG: First-Order Sensitivities of Neutron Reaction Rates, Reaction-Rate Ratios, Leakage, keff, and α Using PARTISN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-21

    SENSMG is a tool for computing first-order sensitivities of neutron reaction rates, reaction-rate ratios, leakage, keff, and α using the PARTISN multigroup discrete-ordinates code. SENSMG computes sensitivities to all of the transport cross sections and data (total, fission, nu, chi, and all scattering moments), two edit cross sections (absorption and capture), and the density for every isotope and energy group. It also computes sensitivities to the mass density for every material and derivatives with respect to all interface locations. The tool can be used for one-dimensional spherical (r) and two-dimensional cylindrical (r-z) geometries. The tool can be used for fixed-source and eigenvalue problems. The tool implements Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) as discussed by Williams and Stacey. Section II of this report describes the theory behind adjoint-based sensitivities, gives the equations that SENSMG solves, and defines the sensitivities that are output. Section III describes the user interface, including the input file and command line options. Section IV describes the output. Section V gives some notes about the coding that may be of interest. Section VI discusses verification, which is ongoing. Section VII lists needs and ideas for future work. Appendix A lists all of the input files whose results are presented in Sec. VI.

  3. Advancements in solar stills for enhanced flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sourav; Dubey, Maneesh; Raghuwanshi, Jitendra; Sharma, Vipin

    2018-05-01

    All over the world there is a scarcity of water and it is difficult to access potable water. Due to this most of the people are affected by diseases that are caused due to drinking of polluted water. There are technologies through which we can purify polluted water but the only problem is these technologies uses electrical energy. Since solar energy is abundant in nature therefore we can use solar as an energy source in solar stills for water distillation. Solar stills can be used in village areas where there is no electricity. It is simple and also economic in construction. This article addresses advancement in solar distillation and usage of nanofluids for enhancement in flow rate.

  4. Enhanced diphoton rates at Fermi and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Staub, Florian [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics und Physikalisches Inst.; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    We show that within MSSM singlet extensions the experimental hints beyond the standard model from the Fermi LAT telescope as well as from the LHC can be explained simultaneously while being consistent with all experimental constraints. In particular we present an example point which features a {proportional_to}130 GeV lightest neutralino with an annihilation cross section into photons consistent with the indication from the Fermi satellite with simultaneously the right relic abundance, a continuum photon spectrum consistent with observation, direct detection cross section below the experimental limits, electroweak observables consistent with experiment and a 125 GeV light Higgs boson with a slightly enhanced h{yields}{gamma}{gamma} rate.

  5. Compilation of neutron flux density spectra and reaction rates in different neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertek, C.

    1979-07-01

    Upon the recommendation of International Working Group of Reactor Radiation Measurements (IWGRRM), the compilation of neutron flux density spectra and the reaction rates obtained by activation and fission foils in different neutron fields is presented. The neutron fields considered are as follows: 1/E; iron block; LWR core and pressure vessel; LMFBR core and blanket; CTR first wall and blanket; fission spectrum

  6. Probing the Rate-Determining Step of the Claisen-Schmidt Condensation by Competition Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.; Chan, Wing-Fat; Lung, Ka-Ying; Lam, Wai-Yee; Ng, Weng-Cheong; Lee, Siu-Fung

    2007-01-01

    Competition experiments are a useful tool for preliminary study of the linear free energy relationship of organic reactions. This article describes a physical organic experiment for upper-level undergraduates to identify the rate-determining step of the Claisen-Schmidt condensation of benzaldehyde and acetophenone by studying the linear free…

  7. Thermonuclear F-19(p,alpha(0))O-16 reaction rate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    He, J. J.; Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Xu, Yi; Zang, L. Y.; Liu, W. P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2018), č. článku 015001. ISSN 1674-1137 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star * nucleosynthesis * astrophysical S factor * cross section * reaction rate Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.084, year: 2016

  8. Efficient Computation of Transition State Resonances and Reaction Rates from a Quantum Normal Form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, Roman; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    A quantum version of a recent formulation of transition state theory in phase space is presented. The theory developed provides an algorithm to compute quantum reaction rates and the associated Gamov-Siegert resonances with very high accuracy. The algorithm is especially efficient for

  9. Measurement and analysis of reaction rate distributions of cores with spectrum shifter region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Shigekazu; Shiroya, Seiji; Unesaki, Hironobu; Takeda, Toshikazu; Aizawa, Otohiko; Kanda, Keiji.

    1995-01-01

    A study for the neutronic characteristics of the spectrum-controlled neutron irradiation fields using various reflector materials was performed. Spectrum shifter regions were constructed in the upper reflector region of the solid moderated core (B-Core) of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). Beryllium, graphite and aluminum were selected as the loading materials for the spectrum shifter. Two tight-pitch lattice cores with different moderator-to-fuel volume ratio (V m /V f ) of 0.97 and 0.65 have been used. Axial reaction rate distributions of gold, nickel and indium wires were measured, and the spectrum index was defined as the Cd ratio of the gold wire and the ratio of gold reaction rate to nickel reaction rate. Using the conventional design calculation procedure, the experimental and calculated reaction rate and spectrum index show several disagreements. Detailed treatment of the neutron streaming effect, heterogeneous cell structure and depression factor are shown to be necessary for improving the agreement between experimental and calculated values. (author)

  10. Effect of Conceptual Change Approach on Students' Understanding of Reaction Rate Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingir, Sevgi; Geban, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of conceptual change text oriented instruction compared to traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of reaction rate concepts. 45 students from two classes of the same teacher in a public high school participated in this study. Students in the experimental group…

  11. The Effect of Conceptual Change Pedagogy on Students' Conceptions of Rate of Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Muammer; Kolomuc, Ali; Karagolge, Zafer

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the effect of conceptual change pedagogy on students' conceptions of "rate of reaction" concepts. The study used a pre-test/post-test non-equivalent comparison group design approach and the sample consisted of 72 Turkish grade-11 students (aged 16-18 years) selected from two intact classrooms.…

  12. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  13. A modified Gaussian integration method for thermal reaction rate calculation in U- and Pu-isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.; Fredin, B.

    1966-01-01

    An advanced multi-group cell calculations a lot of data information is very often necessary, and hence the data administration will be elaborate, and the spectrum calculation will be time consuming. We think it is possible to reduce the necessary data information by using an effective reaction rate integration method well suited for U- and Pu-absorptions (author)

  14. A method of inferring k-infinity from reaction rate measurements in thermal reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newmarch, D.A.

    1967-05-01

    A scheme is described for inferring a value of k-infinity from reaction rate measurements. The method is devised with the METHUSELAH group structure in mind and was developed for the analysis of S.G.H.W. reactor experiments; the underlying principles, however, are general. (author)

  15. Flux Rope Acceleration and Enhanced Magnetic Reconnection Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.Z. Cheng; Y. Ren; G.S. Choe; Y.-J. Moon

    2003-01-01

    A physical mechanism of flares, in particular for the flare rise phase, has emerged from our 2-1/2-dimensional resistive MHD simulations. The dynamical evolution of current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection and flux-rope acceleration subject to continuous, slow increase of magnetic shear in the arcade are studied by employing a non-uniform anomalous resistivity in the reconnecting current sheet under gravity. The simulation results directly relate the flux rope's accelerated rising motion with an enhanced magnetic reconnection rate and thus an enhanced reconnection electric field in the current sheet during the flare rise phase. The simulation results provide good quantitative agreements with observations of the acceleration of flux rope, which manifests in the form of SXR ejecta or erupting filament or CMEs, in the low corona. Moreover, for the X-class flare events studied in this paper the peak reconnection electric field is about O(10 2 V/m) or larger, enough to accelerate p articles to over 100 keV in a field-aligned distance of 10 km. Nonthermal electrons thus generated can produce hard X-rays, consistent with impulsive HXR emission observed during the flare rise phase

  16. Enhancing rates of erosion and uplift through glacial perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Kevin; Schlunegger, Fritz; Abbühl, Luca

    2010-05-01

    Research over the past decade has shown that the pattern of modern rock uplift in the Swiss Alps correlates with both long-term (thermochronometers) and short-term (cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates, sediment loads, lake fills) measures of erosion. This correlation has been attributed alternately to isostatic causes (compensation to erosion and/or glacial unloading) and tectonic forces (ongoing collision and partial delamination). Of these potential driving forces, only isostatic compensation to erosion fits all available structural, geodetic, and flexural models. We explore this uplift-erosion relationship by analyzing river channel steepness for Alpine rivers. Zones of oversteepening, and hence enhanced stream power, are associated with glacial erosion and deposition during LGM and earlier glaciations, resulting in the focusing of erosion into the inner gorges which connect hanging tributary valleys to the main glacial trunk valley. These inner gorges are transient zones in which fluvial and hillslope processes are in the process of re-adjusting this glacially perturbed landscape. Bedrock properties also play a major role in the response time of these adjustments. Glacially generated knickzones are located within 5 km of the trunk stream in the Rhone valley where resistant lithologies dominate (gneiss), whereas the knickzones have migrated as much as 10 km or further in the less resistant rocks (buendnerschists) of the Rhine valley. We suggest that the rock uplift pattern is controlled by surface denudation as set by the glacial-interglacial history of the Alps. Rapid, focused erosion results in rapid rock uplift rates in the Central Swiss Alps, where glaciers were most active. An interesting ramification of this reasoning is that in the absence of glacial perturbation, both rock uplift rates and denudation rates would be substantially lower in this isostatically compensated mountain belt.

  17. Corrosion potential detection method, potential characteristic simulation method for reaction rate and plant monitoring system using the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masanori; Onaka, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Yamanaka, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    In a calculation controlling device for a plant monitoring system, concentrations of materials concerning reaction materials in a certain state of a reaction process, and an actually measured value for the potential of a material in this state are substituted into a reaction rate equation obtained in accordance with a reaction process model. With such procedures, a relation between the reaction rate (current value) and the potential of the material can be obtained. A potential at which the reaction rates of an anode reaction and a cathode reaction contained in a corrosion reaction are made equal is determined by a numerical value calculation, based on an electrochemical hybrid potential logic by using the reaction rate equation, the reaction rate information relative to the corrosion reaction of the material and the concentration of the material concerning the corrosion reaction is obtained by a numerical value calculation. Then, simulation for the corrosion potential is enabled based on the handling corresponding to the actual reaction. Further, even for a portion which can not be measured actually, the corrosion potential can be recognized by simulation. (N.H.)

  18. Cathodic current enhancement via manganese and oxygen related reactions in marine biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Matthew James

    Corrosion is a threat that has economic, and environmental impacts worldwide. Many types of corrosive attack are the subject of ongoing research. One of these areas of research is microbiologically influenced corrosion, which is the enhancement and/or initiation of corrosion events caused by microorganisms. It is well known that colonies of microorganisms can enhance cathodic currents through biofilm formation. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the role of manganese in enhancing cathodic currents in the presence of biofilms. Repeated polarizations conducted in Delaware Bay waters, on biofilm coated Cr identified potentially sustainable reduction reactions. The reduction of MnO2 and the enhancement of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were proven to be factors that influence cathodic current enhancement. The removal of ambient oxygen during polarizations resulted in a shutdown of cathodic current enhancement. These field data led to an exploration of the synergistic relationship between MnO2 and the ORR. Laboratory studies of the catalysis of peroxide disproportionation by MnO2 were monitored using a hanging mercury drop electrode. Experiments were run at an ambient sweater pH of 8 and pH 9, which simulated the near-surface conditions typical of cathodes immersed in seawater. Rapid reoxidation at the more basic pH was shown to allow manganese to behave as a persistent catalyst under the typical electrochemical surface conditions of a cathode. As a result a mechanism for ORR enhancement by manganese was proposed as a unique mechanism for cathodic current enhancement in biofilms. A separate field study of Delaware biofilms on stainless steel coupled to a sacrificial Al anode was carried out to identify the ORR enhancement mechanism and sustainable redox reactions at the cathode. Chemical treatments of glutaraldehyde and formaldoxime were applied to cathodes with biofilms to distinguish between enzymatic and MnO2 related ORR enhancement. The results ruled

  19. Influence of refreshment/activation cycles and temperature rise on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, R G; Verhaagen, B; Wesselink, P R; Versluis, M; van der Sluis, L W M

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of multiple refreshment/activation cycles and temperature on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation (UAI) under laboratory conditions. The root canal walls of 24 standardized root canals in bovine incisors were exposed to a standardized volume of NaOCl at different temperatures (24 °C and 38 °C) and exposure times (20, 60 and 180 s). The irrigant was refreshed and ultrasonically activated four times for 20 s followed by a 40 s rest interval, with no refreshment and no activation as the controls. The reaction rate was determined by measuring the amount of active chlorine in the NaOCl solution before and after being exposed to dentine during the specific experimental conditions. Calorimetry was used to measure the electrical-to-sonochemical conversion efficiency during ultrasonic activation. Refreshment, activation and exposure time all increased the reaction rate of NaOCl (P reaction rate of NaOCl (P > 0.125). The reaction rate of NaOCl with dentine is enhanced by refreshment, ultrasonic activation and exposure time. Temperature rise of irrigant during ultrasonic activation was not sufficient to alter the reaction rate. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ion-neutral gas reactions in a collision/reaction cell in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Correlation of ion signal decrease to kinetic rate constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Patrick J. [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, 120 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olesik, John W., E-mail: olesik.2@osu.edu [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Reaction gas flow rate dependent Ar{sub 2}{sup +} and Ar{sup +} signals are correlated to fundamental kinetic rate coefficients. A simple calculation, assuming that gas exits the reaction cell due only to effusion, is described to estimate the gas pressure in the reaction cell. The value of the product of the kinetic rate constant and the ion residence time in the reaction cell can be determined from experimental measurement of the decrease in an ion signal as a function of reaction gas flow rate. New kinetic rate constants are determined for the reaction of CH{sub 3}F with Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. - Highlights: • How to determine pressure and the product of the kinetic rate constant times the ion residence time in reaction cell • Relate measured ICP-DRC-MS signals versus gas flow rate to kinetic rate constants measured previously using SIFT-MS • Describe how to determine previously unmeasured kinetic rate constants using ICP-DRC-MS.

  1. From cutting-edge pointwise cross-section to groupwise reaction rate: A primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublet, Jean-Christophe; Fleming, Michael; Gilbert, Mark R.

    2017-09-01

    The nuclear research and development community has a history of using both integral and differential experiments to support accurate lattice-reactor, nuclear reactor criticality and shielding simulations, as well as verification and validation efforts of cross sections and emitted particle spectra. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the neutron spectrum in its entirety, with correct propagation of uncertainties and standard deviations derived from Monte Carlo simulations, to the local and total uncertainty in the simulated reactions rates (RRs), which usually only apply to one application at a time. This paper identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment, and discusses correct handling of the RR uncertainty quantification and propagation, including details of the cross section components in the RR uncertainty estimates, which are verified for relevant applications. The methodology that rigorously captures the spectral shift and cross section contributions to the uncertainty in the RR are discussed with quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment of the spectrum profile and cross section contributions to the uncertainty in the RR and subsequent response functions. The recently developed inventory code FISPACT-II, when connected to the processed nuclear data libraries TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0u or JEFF-3.2, forms an enhanced multi-physics platform providing a wide variety of advanced simulation methods for modelling activation, transmutation, burnup protocols and simulating radiation damage sources terms. The system has extended cutting-edge nuclear data forms, uncertainty quantification and propagation methods, which have been the subject of recent integral and differential, fission, fusion and accelerators validation efforts. The simulation system is used to accurately and predictively probe, understand and underpin a modern and sustainable understanding

  2. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of MoSx on TCNQ-treated electrode for hydrogen evolution reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yunghuang

    2014-10-22

    Molybdenum sulfide has recently attracted much attention because of its low cost and excellent catalytical effects in the application of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). To improve the HER efficiency, many researchers have extensively explored various avenues such as material modification, forming hybrid structures or modifying geometric morphology. In this work, we reported a significant enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity of the MoSx via growing on Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) treated carbon cloth, where the MoSx was synthesized by thermolysis from the ammonium tetrathiomolybdate ((NH4)2MoS4) precursor at 170 °C. The pyridinic N- and graphitic N-like species on the surface of carbon cloth arising from the TCNQ treatment facilitate the formation of Mo5+ and S2 2- species in the MoSx, especially with S2 2- serving as an active site for HER. In addition, the smaller particle size of the MoSx grown on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth reveals a high ratio of edge sites relative to basal plane sites, indicating the richer effective reaction sites and superior electrocatalytic characteristics. Hence, we reported a high hydrogen evolution rate for MoSx on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth of 6408 mL g-1 cm-2 h-1 (286 mmol g-1 cm-2 h-1) at an overpotential of V = 0.2 V. This study provides the fundamental concepts useful in the design and preparation of transition metal dichalcogenide catalysts, beneficial in the development in clean energy.

  3. Rate Coefficients for the OH + (CHO)2 (Glyoxal) Reaction Between 240 and 400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierabend, K. J.; Talukdar, R. K.; Zhu, L.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2006-12-01

    Glyoxal (CHO)2, the simplest dialdehyde, is an end product formed in the atmospheric oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons, for example, isoprene. As such, glyoxal plays a role in regional air quality and ozone production in certain locations. Glyoxal is lost in the atmosphere via UV photolysis and reaction with OH. However, the currently available rate coefficient data for the OH + glyoxal reaction is limited to a single room- temperature measurement made using the relative rate method. A determination of the rate coefficient temperature dependence is therefore needed for a more complete interpretation of the atmospheric processing of glyoxal. This study reports the rate coefficient for the OH + (CHO)2 reaction measured under pseudo- first-order conditions in OH ([(CHO)2] > 1000 [OH]0). OH radicals were produced using 248 nm pulsed laser photolysis of H2O2 or HNO3 and detected by pulsed laser induced fluorescence. The concentration of glyoxal in the reactor was determined using three independent techniques; gas flow rates as well as in situ UV and IR absorption. The total pressure in the reactor was varied from 40 to 300 Torr (He), and the rate coefficient was found to be independent of pressure over the temperature range studied. The rate coefficient exhibits a negative temperature dependence between 240 and 400 K consistent with the dependence previously observed for many other aldehydes. Our room-temperature rate coefficient is smaller than the relative rate value that is currently recommended for use in atmospheric model calculations. Our measured rate coefficients are discussed with respect to those for other aldehydes. The atmospheric implications of our work will also be discussed.

  4. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles.

  5. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Böhlke, John Karl; Bekins, Barbara A.; Phillips, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field‐scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local‐scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample‐based estimates of “apparent” parameters with “true“ (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non‐Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport.

  6. Variational transition-state theory study of the rate constant of the DMS·OH scavenging reaction by O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Anguita, Juan M; González-Lafont, Àngels; Lluch, José M

    2011-07-30

    The chemical tropospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS, CH3SCH3) degradation involves several steps highly dependent on the environmental conditions. So, intensive efforts have been devoted during the last years to enhance the understanding of the DMS oxidation mechanism under different conditions. The reaction of DMS with OH is considered to be the most relevant process that initiates the whole oxidation process. The experimental observations have been explained by a two-channel mechanism consisting of a H-abstraction process leading to CH3S(O)CH3 and HO2 and an addition reaction leading to the DMS·OH adduct. In the presence of O2, the DMS·OH adduct is competitively scavenged increasing the contribution of the addition channel to the overall DMS oxidation. Recent experimental measurements have determined from a global fit that the rate constant of this scavenging process is independent of pressure and temperature but this rate constant cannot be directly measured. In this article, a variational transition-state theory calculation of the low- and high-pressure rate constants for the reaction between DMS·OH and O2 has been carried out as a function of temperature. Our proposal is that the slight temperature dependence of the scavenging rate constant can only be explained if the H-abstraction bottleneck is preceded by a dynamical bottleneck corresponding to the association process between the DMS·OH adduct and the O2 molecule. The agreement between the low-pressure and high-pressure rate constants confirms the experimental observations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in the Radiolysis of Fe2+-Cu2+ Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbakke, Erling; Sehested, Knud; Rasmussen, O. Lang

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis and gamma radiolysis have been used to study the reaction mechanism in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe2+ and Cu2+. A reaction scheme has been developed and confirmed by computation of the corresponding complete set of differential equations. The rate constants for some ...... 10^{8}$ and $1.3\\times 10^{8}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$ in pH 2.1 H2 SO4 and HClO4, respectively.......Pulse radiolysis and gamma radiolysis have been used to study the reaction mechanism in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe2+ and Cu2+. A reaction scheme has been developed and confirmed by computation of the corresponding complete set of differential equations. The rate constants for some...... of the reactions have been determined at different pH's. $k_{{\\rm Cu}^{+}+{\\rm O}_{2}}=4.6\\times 10^{5}$ and $1.0\\times 10^{6}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$, $k_{{\\rm Cu}^{+}+{\\rm Fe}^{3+}}=5.5\\times 10^{6}$ and $1.3\\times 10^{7}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$, $k_{{\\rm Cu}({\\rm III)}+{\\rm Fe}^{2+}}=3.3\\times...

  8. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Copper

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 63Cu(n,α)60Co. The cross section for 60Co produced in this reaction increases rapidly with neutrons having energies greater than about 5 MeV. 60Co decays with a half-life of 1925.27 days (±0.29 days)(1) and emits two gamma rays having energies of 1.1732278 and 1.332492 MeV (1). The isotopic content of natural copper is 69.17 % 63Cu and 30.83 % 65Cu (2). The neutron reaction, 63Cu(n,γ)64Cu, produces a radioactive product that emits gamma rays which might interfere with the counting of the 60Co gamma rays. 1.2 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 109 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. The 63Cu(n,α)60Co reaction can be used to determine fast-neutron fluences for irradiation times up to about 15 years (for longer irradiations, see Practice E261). 1.3 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E261. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the...

  9. Estimating Reaction Rate Coefficients Within a Travel-Time Modeling Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, R [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lu, C [Georgia Institute of Technology; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Cheng, H. [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    A generalized, efficient, and practical approach based on the travel-time modeling framework is developed to estimate in situ reaction rate coefficients for groundwater remediation in heterogeneous aquifers. The required information for this approach can be obtained by conducting tracer tests with injection of a mixture of conservative and reactive tracers and measurements of both breakthrough curves (BTCs). The conservative BTC is used to infer the travel-time distribution from the injection point to the observation point. For advection-dominant reactive transport with well-mixed reactive species and a constant travel-time distribution, the reactive BTC is obtained by integrating the solutions to advective-reactive transport over the entire travel-time distribution, and then is used in optimization to determine the in situ reaction rate coefficients. By directly working on the conservative and reactive BTCs, this approach avoids costly aquifer characterization and improves the estimation for transport in heterogeneous aquifers which may not be sufficiently described by traditional mechanistic transport models with constant transport parameters. Simplified schemes are proposed for reactive transport with zero-, first-, nth-order, and Michaelis-Menten reactions. The proposed approach is validated by a reactive transport case in a two-dimensional synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and a field-scale bioremediation experiment conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field application indicates that ethanol degradation for U(VI)-bioremediation is better approximated by zero-order reaction kinetics than first-order reaction kinetics.

  10. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  11. Microwave activation of palladium nanoparticles for enhanced ethanol electrocatalytic oxidation reaction in alkaline medium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rohwer, MB

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available in alkaline medium (in terms of high mass activity stability and fast reaction kinetics). The remarkable microwave-induced properties on the Pd catalyst promise to revolutionize the use of microwave for catalyst activation for enhanced heterogeneous catalysis...

  12. A randomised controlled trial of two infusion rates to decrease reactions to antivenom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Isbister

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Snake envenoming is a major clinical problem in Sri Lanka, with an estimated 40,000 bites annually. Antivenom is only available from India and there is a high rate of systemic hypersensitivity reactions. This study aimed to investigate whether the rate of infusion of antivenom reduced the frequency of severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This was a randomized comparison trial of two infusion rates of antivenom for treatment of non-pregnant adult patients (>14 y with snake envenoming in Sri Lanka. Snake identification was by patient or hospital examination of dead snakes when available and confirmed by enzyme-immunoassay for Russell's viper envenoming. Patients were blindly allocated in a 11 randomisation schedule to receive antivenom either as a 20 minute infusion (rapid or a two hour infusion (slow. The primary outcome was the proportion with severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions (grade 3 by Brown grading system within 4 hours of commencement of antivenom. Secondary outcomes included the proportion with mild/moderate hypersensitivity reactions and repeat antivenom doses. Of 1004 patients with suspected snakebites, 247 patients received antivenom. 49 patients were excluded or not recruited leaving 104 patients allocated to the rapid antivenom infusion and 94 to the slow antivenom infusion. The median actual duration of antivenom infusion in the rapid group was 20 min (Interquartile range[IQR]:20-25 min versus 120 min (IQR:75-120 min in the slow group. There was no difference in severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions between those given rapid and slow infusions (32% vs. 35%; difference 3%; 95%CI:-10% to +17%;p = 0.65. The frequency of mild/moderate reactions was also similar. Similar numbers of patients in each arm received further doses of antivenom (30/104 vs. 23/94. CONCLUSIONS: A slower infusion rate would not reduce the rate of severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions from current high

  13. An analysis of ZEEP reaction rate measurements using the iterative five group scheme of METHUSELAH I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F R; Askew, J R [Technical Assessments and Services Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-02-15

    The five group iterative scheme of METHUSELAH I has been used to provide estimates of reaction rates for comparison with measurements in a number of loop experiments in ZEEP. Theory and experiment show good agreement for individual fission rate distributions and for the Pu-239/U-235 reaction rate ratios. Estimates of Lu/Mn ratios are in reasonable agreement with measurements in the H{sub 2}O cores, but become progressively less satisfactory as the D{sub 2}O content of the coolant is increased. It is concluded that for assessment calculations, the introduction of an iterative five group scheme improves the representation of thermal spectra in pressure tube reactor lattices. (author)

  14. ENHANCED TIDAL DISRUPTION RATES FROM MASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xian; Liu, F. K.; Madau, Piero; Sesana, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    'Hard' massive black hole (MBH) binaries embedded in steep stellar cusps can shrink via three-body slingshot interactions. We show that this process will inevitably be accompanied by a burst of stellar tidal disruptions, at a rate that can be several orders of magnitude larger than that appropriate for a single MBH. Our numerical scattering experiments reveal that (1) a significant fraction of stars initially bound to the primary hole are scattered into its tidal disruption loss cone by gravitational interactions with the secondary hole, an enhancement effect that is more pronounced for very unequal mass binaries; (2) about 25% (40%) of all strongly interacting stars are tidally disrupted by an MBH binary of mass ratio q = 1/81 (q = 1/243) and eccentricity 0.1; and (3) two mechanisms dominate the fueling of the tidal disruption loss cone, a Kozai nonresonant interaction that causes the secular evolution of the stellar angular momentum in the field of the binary, and the effect of close encounters with the secondary hole that change the stellar orbital parameters in a chaotic way. For a hard MBH binary of 10 7 M sun and mass ratio 10 -2 , embedded in an isothermal stellar cusp of velocity dispersion σ * = 100 km s -1 , the tidal disruption rate can be as large as N-dot * ∼1 yr -1 . This is 4 orders of magnitude higher than estimated for a single MBH fed by two-body relaxation. When applied to the case of a putative intermediate-mass black hole inspiraling onto Sgr A*, our results predict tidal disruption rates N-dot * ∼0.05-0.1 yr -1 .

  15. Addition and spin exchange rate constants by longitudinal field μSR: the Mu + NO reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senba, Masayoshi; Gonzalez, A.C.; Kempton, J.R.; Arseneau, D.J.; Pan, J.J.; Tempelmann, A.; Fleming, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The addition reaction Mu + NO + M → MuNO + M and the spin exchange reaction Mu(↑) + NO(↓)→Mu(↓)+NO(↑) have been measured by longitudinal field μSR at room temperature in the presence of up to 58 atm of N 2 as inert collider. The pressure dependence of the longitudinal relaxation rate due to the addition reaction (λ c ) demonstrates that the system is still in the low pressure regime in this pressure range. The corresponding termolecular rate constant has been determined as k 0.Mu =(1.10±0.25)x10 -32 cm 6 molecules -2 s -1 , almost 4 times smaller than the corresponding H atom reaction k 0,H =3.90x10 -32 cm 6 molecules -2 s -1 . The average value of the spin exchange rate constants in the 2.5-58 atm pressure range, k SE = (3.16±0.06)x10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , is in good agreement with previous values obtained by transverse field μSR. (orig.)

  16. Aqueous Complexation Reactions Governing the Rate and Extent of Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott C. Brooks; Wenming Dong; Sue Carroll; James K. Fredrickson; Kenneth M. Kemner; Shelly D. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. In addition, the work plan is designed to: (1) Generate fundamental scientific understanding on the relationship between U(VI) chemical speciation and its susceptibility to biogeochemical reduction reactions. (2) Elucidate the controls on the rate and extent of contaminant reactivity. (3) Provide new insights into the aqueous and solid speciation of U(VI)/U(IV) under representative groundwater conditions

  17. Rates of chemical reaction and atmospheric heating during core debris expulsion from a pressurized vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockman, J.E.; Pilch, M.

    1986-01-01

    Core debris may be expelled from a pressurized reactor vessel during a severe nuclear reactor accident. Experimental studies of core debris expulsion from pressurized vessels have established that the expelled material can be lofted into the atmosphere of the reactor containment as particulate 0.4 to 2 mm in diameter. These particles will vigorously react with steam and oxygen in the containment atmosphere. Data on such reactions during tests with 80 kg of expelled melt will be reported. A model of the reaction rates based on gas phase mass transport will be described and shown to account for atmospheric heating and aerosol generation observed in the tests

  18. Determination of the rate coefficient for the N2/+/ + O reaction in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, D. G.; Torr, M. R.; Orsini, N.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1977-01-01

    Using approximately 400 simultaneous measurements of ion and neutral densities and temperatures, and the spectrum of the solar flux measured by the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite, we have determined the rate constant k1 for the reaction between N2(+) and O in the ionosphere for ion temperatures between 600 and 700 K. We find that k1 = 1.1 x 10 to the minus 10th power cu cm per sec, with a standard deviation of + or - 15%. If we use the temperature dependence for this reaction determined in the laboratory then at 300 K we find excellent agreement with the recommended laboratory value.

  19. Understanding and Improvement of an Experiment Measuring Chemical Reaction Rates by Monitoring Volume Change of a Gas: On the Reaction between HCl(aq) and Mg(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Jeong Ah; Yoon, Hee Sook; Jeong, Dae Hong; Choi, Won Ho

    2006-01-01

    In this study we analyzed and improved an experiment measuring chemical reaction rates introduced in the high school science textbooks through an understanding of the phenomena observed in carrying out the experiment. For this purpose, the contents of textbooks related to the experiment were analyzed, and the problems observed in carrying out the experiment were addressed through experimental analysis. When the experiment was carried out by the method of aquatic transposition presented in textbooks, the observed volume change of H 2 gas was delayed and chemical reaction rate was increased in the early stage of reaction period. To resolve these problems, an improved method for measuring the reaction rates was suggested. In the improved experiment the reaction rate was measured to be constant on time, which was interpreted in terms of the concentration of H + and the surface area of magnesium

  20. Reaction of atomic bromine with acetylene and loss rate of atmospheric acetylene due to reaction with OH, Cl, O, and Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.; Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The first-order, diffusion, and bimolecular rate constants for the reaction Br + C2H2 yields C2H3Br are evaluated. The rate constants are measured at 210, 248, 298, and 393 K and at pressures between 15-100 torr Ar using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of atomic bromine via Br resonance radiation. It is observed that the reaction is not affected by pressure or temperature and the bimolecular constant = (4.0 + or - 0.8) x 10 to the -15th cu cm/sec with an error of two standard deviations. The C2H2 + Br reaction rates are compared with reactions of C2H2 with Cl, OH, NH2, and H. The loss rates for atmospheric C2H2 for reactions with OH, Cl, O, and Br are calculated as a function of altitude.

  1. Binding proteins enhance specific uptake rate by increasing the substrate-transporter encounter rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosdriesz, Evert; Magnúsdóttir, Stefanía; Bruggeman, Frank J; Teusink, Bas; Molenaar, Douwe

    2015-06-01

    Microorganisms rely on binding-protein assisted, active transport systems to scavenge for scarce nutrients. Several advantages of using binding proteins in such uptake systems have been proposed. However, a systematic, rigorous and quantitative analysis of the function of binding proteins is lacking. By combining knowledge of selection pressure and physiochemical constraints, we derive kinetic, thermodynamic, and stoichiometric properties of binding-protein dependent transport systems that enable a maximal import activity per amount of transporter. Under the hypothesis that this maximal specific activity of the transport complex is the selection objective, binding protein concentrations should exceed the concentration of both the scarce nutrient and the transporter. This increases the encounter rate of transporter with loaded binding protein at low substrate concentrations, thereby enhancing the affinity and specific uptake rate. These predictions are experimentally testable, and a number of observations confirm them. © 2015 FEBS.

  2. A simple thermometric technique for reaction-rate determination of inorganic species, based on the iodide-catalysed cerium(IV)-arsenic(III) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, F; Forteza, R; March, J G; Cerda, V

    1985-02-01

    A very simple reaction-rate thermometric technique is used for determination of iodide (5-20 ng ml ), based on its catalytic action on the cerium(IV)-arsenic(III) reaction, and for determination of mercury(II) (1.5-10 ng ml ) and silver(I) (2-10 ng ml ), based on their inhibitory effect on this reaction. The reaction is followed by measuring the rate of temperature increase. The method suffers from very few interferences and is applied to determination of iodide in biological and inorganic samples, and Hg(II) and Ag(I) in pharmaceutical products.

  3. Rate constants for the slow Mu + propane abstraction reaction at 300 K by diamagnetic RF resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Donald G; Cottrell, Stephen P; McKenzie, Iain; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2015-08-14

    The study of kinetic isotope effects for H-atom abstraction rates by incident H-atoms from the homologous series of lower mass alkanes (CH4, C2H6 and, here, C3H8) provides important tests of reaction rate theory on polyatomic systems. With a mass of only 0.114 amu, the most sensitive test is provided by the rates of the Mu atom. Abstraction of H by Mu can be highly endoergic, due to the large zero-point energy shift in the MuH bond formed, which also gives rise to high activation energies from similar zero-point energy corrections at the transition state. Rates are then far too slow near 300 K to be measured by conventional TF-μSR techniques that follow the disappearance of the spin-polarised Mu atom with time. Reported here is the first measurement of a slow Mu reaction rate in the gas phase by the technique of diamagnetic radio frequency (RF) resonance, where the amplitude of the MuH product formed in the Mu + C3H8 reaction is followed with time. The measured rate constant, kMu = (6.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1) at 300 K, is surprisingly only about a factor of three slower than that expected for H + C3H8, indicating a dominant contribution from quantum tunneling in the Mu reaction, consistent with elementary transition state theory calculations of the kMu/kH kinetic isotope effect.

  4. Communication: Enhanced oxygen reduction reaction and its underlying mechanism in Pd-Ir-Co trimetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Hyung Chul; Hwang, Gyeong S., E-mail: gshwang@che.utexas.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Manogaran, Dhivya [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Lee, Kang Hee; Jin, Seon-ah; You, Dae Jong; Pak, Chanho [Energy Lab, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kyungjung [Department of Energy and Mineral Resources Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-28

    Based on a combined density functional theory and experimental study, we present that the electrochemical activity of Pd{sub 3}Co alloy catalysts toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be enhanced by adding a small amount of Ir. While Ir tends to favorably exist in the subsurface layers, the underlying Ir atoms are found to cause a substantial modification in the surface electronic structure. As a consequence, we find that the activation barriers of O/OH hydrogenation reactions are noticeably lowered, which would be mainly responsible for the enhanced ORR activity. Furthermore, our study suggests that the presence of Ir in the near-surface region can suppress Co out-diffusion from the Pd{sub 3}Co substrate, thereby improving the durability of Pd-Ir-Co catalysts. We also discuss the relative roles played by Ir and Co in enhancing the ORR activity relative to monometallic Pd catalysts.

  5. Communication: Enhanced oxygen reduction reaction and its underlying mechanism in Pd-Ir-Co trimetallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Hyung Chul; Hwang, Gyeong S.; Manogaran, Dhivya; Lee, Kang Hee; Jin, Seon-ah; You, Dae Jong; Pak, Chanho; Kwon, Kyungjung

    2013-01-01

    Based on a combined density functional theory and experimental study, we present that the electrochemical activity of Pd 3 Co alloy catalysts toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be enhanced by adding a small amount of Ir. While Ir tends to favorably exist in the subsurface layers, the underlying Ir atoms are found to cause a substantial modification in the surface electronic structure. As a consequence, we find that the activation barriers of O/OH hydrogenation reactions are noticeably lowered, which would be mainly responsible for the enhanced ORR activity. Furthermore, our study suggests that the presence of Ir in the near-surface region can suppress Co out-diffusion from the Pd 3 Co substrate, thereby improving the durability of Pd-Ir-Co catalysts. We also discuss the relative roles played by Ir and Co in enhancing the ORR activity relative to monometallic Pd catalysts

  6. Laser-enhanced chemical reactions and the liquid state. II. Possible applications to nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePoorter, G.L.; Rofer-DePoorter, C.K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser photochemistry is surveyed as a possible improvement upon the Purex process for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel. Most of the components of spent nuclear fuel are photochemically active, and lasers can be used to selectively excite individual chemical species. The great variety of chemical species present and the degree of separation that must be achieved present difficulties in reprocessing. Lasers may be able to improve the necessary separations by photochemical reaction or effects on rates and equilibria of reactions

  7. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of hypochlorous acid with protein side chains and peptide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    , absolute second-order rate constants for the reactions of HOCl with protein side chains, model compounds, and backbone amide (peptide) bonds have been determined at physiological pH values. The reactivity of HOCl with potential reactive sites in proteins is summarized by the series: Met (3.8 x 10(7) M(-1......Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a potent oxidant, which is produced in vivo by activated phagocytes. This compound is an important antibacterial agent, but excessive or misplaced production has been implicated in a number of human diseases, including atherosclerosis, arthritis, and some cancers....... Proteins are major targets for this oxidant, and such reaction results in side-chain modification, backbone fragmentation, and cross-linking. Despite a wealth of qualitative data for such reactions, little absolute kinetic data is available to rationalize the in vitro and in vivo data. In this study...

  8. Light elements burning reaction rates at stellar temperatures as deduced by the Trojan Horse measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Puglia, S. M. R. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    Experimental nuclear astrophysics aims at determining the reaction rates for astrophysically relevant reactions at their Gamow energies. For charged-particle induced reactions, the access to these energies is usually hindered, in direct measurements, by the presence of the Coulomb barrier between the interacting particles or by electron screening effects, which make hard the determination of the bare-nucleus S(E)-factor of interest for astrophysical codes. The use of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) appears as one of the most suitable tools for investigating nuclear processes of interest for astrophysics. Here, in view of the recent TH measurements, the main destruction channels for deuterium ({sup 2}H), for the two lithium {sup 6,7}Li isotopes, for the {sup 9}Be and the one for the two boron {sup 10,11}B isotopes will be discussed.

  9. Electron capture rates in stars studied with heavy ion charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulani, C. A.

    2018-01-01

    Indirect methods using nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies (here, high energies mean ~ 50 MeV/nucleon and higher) are now routinely used to extract information of interest for nuclear astrophysics. This is of extreme relevance as many of the nuclei involved in stellar evolution are short-lived. Therefore, indirect methods became the focus of recent studies carried out in major nuclear physics facilities. Among such methods, heavy ion charge exchange is thought to be a useful tool to infer Gamow-Teller matrix elements needed to describe electron capture rates in stars and also double beta-decay experiments. In this short review, I provide a theoretical guidance based on a simple reaction model for charge exchange reactions.

  10. Reaction Rate Distributions and Ratios in FR0 Assemblies 1, 2 and 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, T L

    1966-06-15

    The spatial distribution of different reaction rates and reaction ratios in Assemblies 1, 2 and 3 of the fast reactor FR0 was measured by fission chamber scans and foil activation technique. Assemblies 1 and 2 had cores of undiluted fuel (uranium metal enriched to 20 % U{sup 235}) while the core of Assembly 3 was diluted with about 30 vol. % graphite. All the systems had a thick copper reflector, The experimental results were compared with calculated values obtained from DSN and TDC multigroup spectra and group cross-section sets for the reactions. Good agreement between experiment and calculations is generally obtained in the core region but in the reflector the neutron spectrum is calculated too hard.

  11. Rate coefficients for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at interstellar temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.; Clary, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    A theory has been developed recently which predicts that the rate coefficients, k, for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at low temperatures will be much greater than the canonical value of 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 . The new theory indicates that k is greatest for low-lying rotational sates and increases rapidly with decreasing temperature. We refer to recent laboratory measurements which validate the theory, present calculated values of k for the reactions of H + 3 ions with several polar molecules, and discuss their significance to interstellar chemistry. For the reactions of ions with molecules having large dipole moments, we recommend that k values as large as 10 -7 cm 3 s -1 should be used in ion-chemical models of low-temperature interstellar clouds

  12. Rate constant for the reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of the radical-radical reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br has been determined at 298 K in a discharge flow system near 1 torr pressure with detection of SO and BrO via collision-free sampling mass spectrometry. The rate constant was determined using two different methods: measuring the decay of SO radicals in the presence of an excess of BrO and measuring the decay of BrO radicals in excess SO. The results from the two methods are in reasonable agreement and the simple mean of the two values gives the recommended rate constant at 298 K, k = (5.7 + or - 2.0) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s. This represents the first determination of this rate constant and it is consistent with a previously derived lower limit based on SO2 formation. Comparison is made with other radical-radical reactions involving SO or BrO. The reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br is of interest for models of the upper atmosphere of the earth and provides a potential coupling between atmospheric sulfur and bromine chemistry.

  13. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun; Khaled, Fathi; Ning, Hongbo; Ma, Liuhao; Farooq, Aamir; Ren, Wei

    2017-01-01

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  14. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  15. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity. PMID:26574737

  16. Effects of the anion salt nature on the rate constants of the aqueous proton exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Jose M; Garzon, Andres; Crovetto, Luis; Orte, Angel; Lopez, Sergio G; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2012-04-28

    The proton-transfer ground-state rate constants of the xanthenic dye 9-[1-(2-methyl-4-methoxyphenyl)]-6-hydroxy-3H-xanthen-3-one (TG-II), recovered by Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS), have proven to be useful to quantitatively reflect specific cation effects in aqueous solutions (J. M. Paredes, L. Crovetto, A. Orte, J. M. Alvarez-Pez and E. M. Talavera, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 1685-1694). Since these phenomena are more sensitive to anions than to cations, in this paper we have accounted for the influence of salts with the sodium cation in common, and the anion classified according to the empirical Hofmeister series, on the proton transfer rate constants of TG-II. We demonstrate that the presence of ions accelerates the rate of the ground-state proton-exchange reaction in the same order than ions that affect ion solvation in water. The combination of FLCS with a fluorophore undergoing proton transfer reactions in the ground state, along with the desirable feature of a pseudo-dark state when the dye is protonated, allows one unique direct determination of kinetic rate constants of the proton exchange chemical reaction. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  17. The chemistry of the carbothermal synthesis of β-SiC : reaction mechanism, reaction rate and grain growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijen, F.K.; Metselaar, R.

    1991-01-01

    Evidence is given that in the present case the reaction mechanism of ß-SiC formation from silica and carbon is a direct solid-state reaction in which silica migrates over the silicon carbide surface to the carbon. A high value (440 kJ/mol) of activation energy is obtained for this reaction. This

  18. Effects of network dissolution changes on pore-to-core upscaled reaction rates for kaolinite and anorthite reactions under acidic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang

    2013-11-01

    We have extended reactive flow simulation in pore-network models to include geometric changes in the medium from dissolution effects. These effects include changes in pore volume and reactive surface area, as well as topological changes that open new connections. The computed changes were based upon a mineral map from an X-ray computed tomography image of a sandstone core. We studied the effect of these changes on upscaled (pore-scale to core-scale) reaction rates and compared against the predictions of a continuum model. Specifically, we modeled anorthite and kaolinite reactions under acidic flow conditions during which the anorthite reactions remain far from equilibrium (dissolution only), while the kaolinite reactions can be near-equilibrium. Under dissolution changes, core-scale reaction rates continuously and nonlinearly evolved in time. At higher injection rates, agreement with predictions of the continuum model degraded significantly. For the far-from-equilibrium reaction, our results indicate that the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in dissolution changes in the reactive mineral surface area is critical to accurately predict upscaled reaction rates. For the near-equilibrium reaction, the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in the saturation state remains critical. Inclusion of a Nernst-Planck term to ensure neutral ionic currents under differential diffusion resulted in at most a 9% correction in upscaled rates.

  19. Rate Constant and Temperature Dependence for the Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals with 2-Flouropropane (FC-281ea) and Comparison with an Estimated Rate Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMore, W.; Wilson, E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiments were used to measure the rate constant and temperature dependence of the reaction of OH radicals with 2-fluoropropane (HFC-281ea), using ethane, propane, ethyl chloride as reference standards.

  20. Comparison of measured and calculated reaction rate distributions in an scwr-like test lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raetz, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.raetz@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Jordan, Kelly A., E-mail: kelly.jordan@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Murphy, Michael F., E-mail: mike.murphy@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Perret, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.perret@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, Rakesh, E-mail: rakesh.chawla@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, EPFL (Switzerland)

    2011-04-15

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements were performed on 61 rods of an SCWR-like fuel lattice, after irradiation in the central test zone of the PROTEUS zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The derived reaction rates are the capture rate in {sup 238}U (C{sub 8}) and the total fission rate (F{sub tot}), and also the reaction rate ratio C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}. Each of these has been mapped rod-wise on the lattice and compared to calculated results from whole-reactor Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX. Ratios of calculated to experimental values (C/E's) have been assessed for the C{sub 8}, F{sub tot} and C{sub 8}/F{sub tot} distributions across the lattice. These C/E's show excellent agreement between the calculations and the measurements. For the {sup 238}U capture rate distribution, the 1{sigma} level in the comparisons corresponds to an uncertainty of {+-}0.8%, while for the total fission rate the corresponding value is {+-}0.4%. The uncertainty for C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}, assessed as a reaction rate ratio characterizing each individual rod position in the test lattice, is significantly higher at {+-}2.2%. To determine the reproducibility of these results, the measurements were performed twice, once in 2006 and again in 2009. The agreement between these two measurement sets is within the respective statistical uncertainties.

  1. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Samuel M., E-mail: samuel.greene@chem.ox.ac.uk; Shan, Xiao, E-mail: xiao.shan@chem.ox.ac.uk; Clary, David C., E-mail: david.clary@chem.ox.ac.u [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  2. A comparison of reaction rate calculations using Endf/B-VII with critical assembly measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkerson, C.; Mac Innes, M.; Barr, D.; Trellue, H.; MacFarlane, R.; Chadwick, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present critical assembly reaction rate data, and modeling of the same using the recently released Endf/B-VII library. While some of the experimental measurements were performed as long as 50 years ago, the results have not been widely used/available outside of Los Alamos. Over the years, a variety of target foils were fabricated and placed in differing neutron spectrum/fluence environments within critical assemblies. Neutron-induced reactions such as (n,γ), (n,2n), and (n,f) on these targets were measured, typically referenced to 235 U(n,f) or 239 Pu(n,f). Because the cross section for the latter reactions are now well known, these experiments provide a rich data set for testing evaluated cross sections. Due to the large variety of critical assemblies that were historically available at Los Alamos, it was possible to make measurements in spectral environments ranging from hard (Pu Jezebel, center of Pu Flattop) through intermediate (Big Ten) to degraded (reflector region of Flattop). This broad range of configurations allows us to test both the cross section magnitudes and their energy dependencies. We will present data, along with reaction rate predictions using primarily MCNP5 in conjunction with Endf/B-VII, for a number of target nuclei, including iridium, isotopes of uranium (e.g., 233, 235, 237, 238), neptunium (237), plutonium (239), and americium (241). (authors)

  3. Negativization rates of IgE radioimmunoassay and basophil activation test in immediate reactions to penicillins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, T D; Torres, M J; Blanca-López, N; Rodríguez-Bada, J L; Gomez, E; Canto, G; Mayorga, C; Blanca, M

    2009-02-01

    Skin test sensitivity in patients with immediate allergy to penicillins tends to decrease over time, but no information is available concerning in vitro tests. We analysed the negativization rates of two in vitro methods that determine specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies, the basophil activation test using flow cytometry (BAT) and the radioallergosorbent test (RAST), in immediate allergic reactions to penicillins. Forty-one patients with immediate allergic reactions to amoxicillin were followed up over a 4-year period. BAT and RAST were performed at 6-month intervals. Patients were randomized into groups: Group I, skin tests carried out at regular intervals; Group II, skin tests made only at the beginning of the study. Differences were observed between RAST and BAT (P testing influenced the rate of negativization of the RAST assay, contributing to maintenance of in vitro sensitivity. Because of the loss of sensitivity over time, the determination of specific IgE antibodies to penicillins in patients with immediate allergic reactions must be done as soon as possible after the reaction.

  4. Survival behavior in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model with a randomly switching reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert; Mobilia, Mauro; Rucklidge, Alastair M.

    2018-02-01

    We study the influence of a randomly switching reproduction-predation rate on the survival behavior of the nonspatial cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, also known as the zero-sum rock-paper-scissors game, used to metaphorically describe the cyclic competition between three species. In large and finite populations, demographic fluctuations (internal noise) drive two species to extinction in a finite time, while the species with the smallest reproduction-predation rate is the most likely to be the surviving one (law of the weakest). Here we model environmental (external) noise by assuming that the reproduction-predation rate of the strongest species (the fastest to reproduce and predate) in a given static environment randomly switches between two values corresponding to more and less favorable external conditions. We study the joint effect of environmental and demographic noise on the species survival probabilities and on the mean extinction time. In particular, we investigate whether the survival probabilities follow the law of the weakest and analyze their dependence on the external noise intensity and switching rate. Remarkably, when, on average, there is a finite number of switches prior to extinction, the survival probability of the predator of the species whose reaction rate switches typically varies nonmonotonically with the external noise intensity (with optimal survival about a critical noise strength). We also outline the relationship with the case where all reaction rates switch on markedly different time scales.

  5. Survival behavior in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model with a randomly switching reaction rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert; Mobilia, Mauro; Rucklidge, Alastair M

    2018-02-01

    We study the influence of a randomly switching reproduction-predation rate on the survival behavior of the nonspatial cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, also known as the zero-sum rock-paper-scissors game, used to metaphorically describe the cyclic competition between three species. In large and finite populations, demographic fluctuations (internal noise) drive two species to extinction in a finite time, while the species with the smallest reproduction-predation rate is the most likely to be the surviving one (law of the weakest). Here we model environmental (external) noise by assuming that the reproduction-predation rate of the strongest species (the fastest to reproduce and predate) in a given static environment randomly switches between two values corresponding to more and less favorable external conditions. We study the joint effect of environmental and demographic noise on the species survival probabilities and on the mean extinction time. In particular, we investigate whether the survival probabilities follow the law of the weakest and analyze their dependence on the external noise intensity and switching rate. Remarkably, when, on average, there is a finite number of switches prior to extinction, the survival probability of the predator of the species whose reaction rate switches typically varies nonmonotonically with the external noise intensity (with optimal survival about a critical noise strength). We also outline the relationship with the case where all reaction rates switch on markedly different time scales.

  6. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Catherine A

    2013-02-28

    Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of

  7. Reaction rate distribution measurement and the core performance evaluation in the prototype FBR Monju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, S.; Suzuoki, Z.; Deshimaru, T. [Monju Construction Office, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Fukui-ken (Japan); Nakashima, F. [Tsuruga head Office, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Fukui-ken (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Monju is a prototype fast breeder reactor designed to have an output of 280 MW (714 MWt), fueled with mixed oxides of plutonium and uranium and cooled by liquid sodium. The principal data on plant design and performance are shown in Table 1. Monju attained initial criticality in April 1994 and the reactor physics tests were carried out from May through November 1994. The reaction rate distribution measurement by the foil activation method was one of these tests and was carried out in order to verify the core performance and to contribute to the development of the core design methods. On the basis of the reaction rate measurement data, the Monju initial core breeding ratio and the power distribution were evaluated. (author)

  8. Rate coefficients of exchange reactions accounting for vibrational excitation of reagents and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, E. V.; Savelev, A. S.; Kunova, O. V.

    2018-05-01

    Theoretical models for the vibrational state-resolved Zeldovich reaction are assessed by comparison with the results of quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations. An error in the model of Aliat is corrected; the model is generalized taking into account NO vibrational states. The proposed model is fairly simple and can be easily implemented to the software for non-equilibrium flow modeling. It provides a good agreement with the QCT rate coefficients in the whole range of temperatures and reagent/product vibrational states. The developed models are tested in simulations of vibrational and chemical relaxation of air mixture behind a shock wave. The importance of accounting for excitated NO vibrational states and accurate prediction of Zeldovich reactions rates is shown.

  9. Efficient kinetic Monte Carlo method for reaction-diffusion problems with spatially varying annihilation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Karsten; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-03-01

    We present an efficient Monte Carlo method to simulate reaction-diffusion processes with spatially varying particle annihilation or transformation rates as it occurs for instance in the context of motor-driven intracellular transport. Like Green's function reaction dynamics and first-passage time methods, our algorithm avoids small diffusive hops by propagating sufficiently distant particles in large hops to the boundaries of protective domains. Since for spatially varying annihilation or transformation rates the single particle diffusion propagator is not known analytically, we present an algorithm that generates efficiently either particle displacements or annihilations with the correct statistics, as we prove rigorously. The numerical efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated with an illustrative example.

  10. Reaction rate distribution measurement and the core performance evaluation in the prototype FBR Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, S.; Suzuoki, Z.; Deshimaru, T.; Nakashima, F.

    2001-01-01

    Monju is a prototype fast breeder reactor designed to have an output of 280 MW (714 MWt), fueled with mixed oxides of plutonium and uranium and cooled by liquid sodium. The principal data on plant design and performance are shown in Table 1. Monju attained initial criticality in April 1994 and the reactor physics tests were carried out from May through November 1994. The reaction rate distribution measurement by the foil activation method was one of these tests and was carried out in order to verify the core performance and to contribute to the development of the core design methods. On the basis of the reaction rate measurement data, the Monju initial core breeding ratio and the power distribution were evaluated. (author)

  11. Actinide complexation kinetics: rate and mechanism of dioxoneptunium (V) reaction with chlorophosphonazo III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fugate, G.; Feil-Jenkins, J.F.; Sullivan, J.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1996-12-01

    Rates of complex formation and dissociation in NpO 2 + - Chlorophosphonazo III (2,7-bis(4-chloro-2-phosphonobenzeneazo)-1,8- dihydroxynapthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid)(CLIII) were investigated by stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Also, limited studies were made of the rates of reaction of La 3+ , Eu 3+ , Dy 3+ , and Fe 3+ with CLIII. Rate determining step in each system is an intramolecular process, the NpO 2 + -CLIII reaction proceeding by a first order approach to equilibrium in the acid range from 0.1 to 1.0 M. Complex formation occurs independent of acidity, while both acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are observed. Activation parameters for the complex formation reaction are ΔH=46.2±0.3 kJ/m and ΔS=7± J/mK (I=1.0 M); these for the acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are ΔH=38.8±0.6 kJ/m, ΔS=-96±18 J/mK, ΔH=70.0± kJ/m, and ΔS=17±1 J/mK, respectively. An isokinetic relationship is observed between the activation parameters for CLIII complex formation with NpO 2 + , UO 2 2+ , Th 4+ , and Zr 4+ . Rates of CLIII complex formation reactions for Fe 3+ , Zr 4+ , NpO 2 + , UO 2 2+ , Th 4+ , La 3+ , Eu 3+ , and Dy 3+ correlate with cation radius rather than charge/radius ratio

  12. Reactivity and reaction rate studies on the fourth loading of ZENITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, I.R.; Freemantle, R.G.; Reed, D.L.; Wilson, D.J.

    1963-08-01

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, prompt neutron lifetime, flux fine structure, and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fourth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contains 7.76 kg of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atom ratio of 7578, and forms the most dilute of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  13. Reactivity and reaction rate studies on the fourth loading of ZENITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, I R; Freemantle, R G; Reed, D L; Wilson, D J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-08-15

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, prompt neutron lifetime, flux fine structure, and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fourth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contains 7.76 kg of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atom ratio of 7578, and forms the most dilute of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  14. The rate constant for the CO + H2O2 reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction CO + H2O2 -> HOCO + OH (R1) at 713 K is determined based on the batch reactor experiments of Baldwin et al. [ R. R. Baldwin, R. W. Walker, S. J. Webster, Combust. Flame 15 (1970) 167] on decomposition of H2O2 sensitized by CO. The value, k(1) (713 K) = 8.1 x 10...

  15. Computer investigations on the asymptotic behavior of the rate coefficient for the annihilation reaction A + A → product and the trapping reaction in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litniewski, Marek; Gorecki, Jerzy

    2011-06-28

    We have performed intensive computer simulations of the irreversible annihilation reaction: A + A → C + C and of the trapping reaction: A + B → C + B for a variety of three-dimensional fluids composed of identical spherical particles. We have found a significant difference in the asymptotic behavior of the rate coefficients for these reactions. Both the rate coefficients converge to the same value with time t going to infinity but the convergence rate is different: the O(t(-1/2)) term for the annihilation reaction is higher than the corresponding term for the trapping reaction. The simulation results suggest that ratio of the terms is a universal quantity with the value equal to 2 or slightly above. A model for the annihilation reaction based on the superposition approximation predicts the difference in the O(t(-1/2)) terms, but overestimates the value for the annihilation reaction by about 30%. We have also performed simulations for the dimerization process: A + A → E, where E stands for a dimer. The dimerization decreases the reaction rate due to the decrease in the diffusion constant for A. The effect is successfully predicted by a simple model.

  16. Quantum mechanical calculations of state-to-state cross sections and rate constants for the F + DCl → Cl + DF reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Niyazi; Kłos, Jacek; Roncero, Octavio

    2015-06-07

    We present accurate state-to-state quantum wave packet calculations of integral cross sections and rate constants for the title reaction. Calculations are carried out on the best available ground 1(2)A' global adiabatic potential energy surface of Deskevich et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224303 (2006)]. Converged state-to-state reaction cross sections have been calculated for collision energies up to 0.5 eV and different initial rotational and vibrational excitations, DCl(v = 0, j = 0 - 1; v = 1, j = 0). Also, initial-state resolved rate constants of the title reaction have been calculated in a temperature range of 100-400 K. It is found that the initial rotational excitation of the DCl molecule does not enhance reactivity, in contract to the reaction with the isotopologue HCl in which initial rotational excitation produces an important enhancement. These differences between the isotopologue reactions are analyzed in detail and attributed to the presence of resonances for HCl(v = 0, j), absent in the case of DCl(v = 0, j). For vibrational excited DCl(v = 1, j), however, the reaction cross section increases noticeably, what is also explained by another resonance.

  17. The Carbonation of Wollastonite: A Model Reaction to Test Natural and Biomimetic Catalysts for Enhanced CO2 Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Di Lorenzo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most promising strategies for the safe and permanent disposal of anthropogenic CO2 is its conversion into carbonate minerals via the carbonation of calcium and magnesium silicates. However, the mechanism of such a reaction is not well constrained, and its slow kinetics is a handicap for the implementation of silicate mineral carbonation as an effective method for CO2 capture and storage (CCS. Here, we studied the different steps of wollastonite (CaSiO3 carbonation (silicate dissolution → carbonate precipitation as a model CCS system for the screening of natural and biomimetic catalysts for this reaction. Tested catalysts included carbonic anhydrase (CA, a natural enzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2(aq, and biomimetic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs. Our results show that dissolution is the rate-limiting step for wollastonite carbonation. The overall reaction progresses anisotropically along different [hkl] directions via a pseudomorphic interface-coupled dissolution–precipitation mechanism, leading to partial passivation via secondary surface precipitation of amorphous silica and calcite, which in both cases is anisotropic (i.e., (hkl-specific. CA accelerates the final carbonate precipitation step but hinders the overall carbonation of wollastonite. Remarkably, one of the tested Zr-based MOFs accelerates the dissolution of the silicate. The use of MOFs for enhanced silicate dissolution alone or in combination with other natural or biomimetic catalysts for accelerated carbonation could represent a potentially effective strategy for enhanced mineral CCS.

  18. The Rate Constant for the Reaction H + C2H5 at T = 295 - 150K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Andre S.; Payne, Walter A.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Cody, Regina J.; Stief, Louis J.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction between the hydrogen atom and the ethyl (C2H3) radical is predicted by photochemical modeling to be the most important loss process for C2H5 radicals in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. This reaction is also one of the major sources for the methyl radicals in these atmospheres. These two simplest hydrocarbon radicals are the initial species for the synthesis of larger hydrocarbons. Previous measurements of the rate constant for the H + C2H5 reaction varied by a factor of five at room temperature, and some studies showed a dependence upon temperature while others showed no such dependence. In addition, the previous studies were at higher temperatures and generally higher pressures than that needed for use in planetary atmospheric models. The rate constant for the reaction H + C2H5 has been measured directly at T = 150, 202 and 295 K and at P = 1.0 Torr He for all temperatures and additionally at P = 0.5 and 2.0 Torr He at T = 202 K. The measurements were performed in a discharge - fast flow system. The decay of the C2H5 radical in the presence of excess hydrogen was monitored by low-energy electron impact mass spectrometry under pseudo-first order conditions. H atoms and C2H5 radicals were generated rapidly and simultaneously by the reaction of fluorine atoms with H2 and C2H6, respectively. The total rate constant was found to be temperature and pressure independent. The measured total rate constant at each temperature are: k(sub 1)(295K) = (1.02+/-0.24)x10(exp -10), k(sub 1)(202K) = (1.02+/-0.22)x10(exp -10) and k(sub 1)(150K) = (0.93+/-0.21)x10(exp -10), all in units of cu cm/molecule/s. The total rate constant derived from all the combined measurements is k(sub 1) = (l.03+/-0.17)x10(exp -10) cu cm/molecule/s. At room temperature our results are about a factor of two higher than the recommended rate constant and a factor of three lower than the most recently published study.

  19. Transfusion reactions in pediatric compared with adult patients: a look at rate, reaction type, and associated products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Fredrick D; Woods, Marcella; Arnold, Shanna; Young, Pampee P

    2015-03-01

    The majority of reports on transfusion reactions address adult patients. Less is known about the types, incidence, and other clinical details of transfusion reactions in pediatric populations. Furthermore, to our knowledge, there have been no previous reports directly comparing these aspects between adults and pediatric patient populations to assess if there are differences. Between the period of January 1, 2011, and February 1, 2013, all reported adult and pediatric transfusion reactions at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) were evaluated by transfusion medicine clinical service. The information was subsequently shared with the hemovigilance database. Data provided to hemovigilance included age, sex, blood product associated with the reaction, severity of the reaction, and the type of transfusion reactions. These were collated with hospital and blood bank information system-acquired data on overall admission and product transfusion. A total of 133,671 transfusions were performed at VUMC during the study period including 20,179 platelet (PLT) transfusions, 31,605 plasma transfusions, 79,933 red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, and 2154 cryoprecipitate transfusions. Over the same period, 108 pediatric and 277 adult transfusion reactions were recorded. This corresponds to an incidence of 6.2 reactions per 1000 transfusions within the pediatric (age reactions per 1000 transfusions within the adult population. In both adult and pediatric populations, transfusion reactions were most commonly associated with PLT, followed by RBC, and then plasma transfusions. Within the pediatric population, subset analysis identified multiple differences when compared to the adult population, including an increased incidence of allergic transfusion reactions (2.7/1000 vs. 1.1/1000, p reactions (1.9/1000 vs. 0.47/1000, p reactions (0.29/1000 vs. 0.078/1000, p reaction incidence was the same between sexes in adults, in pediatric patients, reactions were more common in male

  20. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: Measurements and site-specific rate rules

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (CO) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (CO), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):P1,CO = 7.38 × 10-14 exp(-274 K/T) + 9.17 × 10-12 exp(-2499 K/T) (285-1355 K)S10,CO = 1.20 × 10-11 exp(-2046 K/T) + 2.20 × 10-13 exp(160 K/T) (222-1464 K)S11,CO = 4.50 × 10-11 exp(-3000 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1440 K/T) (248-1302 K)S11′,CO = 3.80 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1550 K/T) (263-1370 K)S 21,CO = 5.00 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 4.00 × 10-13 exp(775 K/T) (297-1376 K) © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  1. Electronically stimulated deep-center reactions in electron-irradiated InP: Comparison between experiment and recombination-enhancement theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.

    1987-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the recombination enhancement of several defect reactions involving the main deep centers in low-temperature electron-irradiated InP. A fairly good agreement is obtained with the Weeks-Tully-Kimerling theory for the activation energies of the enhanced process. On the other hand, a thorough investigation of a thermally and electronically stimulated defect transformation shows evidence that one major approximation (local vibrational equilibrium) fails, and that the recently proposed [H. Sumi, Phys. Rev. B 29, 4616 (1984)] mechanism of coherent recombination on deep centers is responsible for altered reaction rates at high injection levels

  2. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Nickel

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 58Ni(n,p)58Co. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 2.1 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 200 days in the absence of high thermal neutron fluence rates (for longer irradiations, see Practice E 261). 1.3 With suitable techniques fission-neutron fluence rates densities above 107 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Note—The burnup corrections were com...

  3. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  4. Calculus of variations in rate of reactions tax using the general pertubation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C. da.

    1981-02-01

    A perturbation expression to calculate the variations in the rates of integral parameters (such as reaction rates) of a reactor using a Time-Independent Generalized Perturbation Theory, was developed. This theory makes use of the concepts of neutron generation and neutron importance with respect to a given process occurring in a system. The application of Time-Dependent Generalized Perturbation Theory to the calculation of Burnup, by using the expressions derived by A. Gandini, along with the perturbation expression derived in the Time Independent Generalized Perturbation Theory, is done. (Author) [pt

  5. Gas-phase reaction rate constants for atmospheric pressure ionization in ion-mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandiver, V.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an instrumental technique in which gaseous ions are formed from neutral molecules by proton and charge transfer from reactant ions through collisional ionization. An abbreviated rate theory has been proposed for atmospheric pressure ionization (API) in IMS, but supporting experimental measurements have not been reported. The objectives of this thesis were (1) assessment of existing API rate theory using positive and negative product ions in IMS, (2) measurement of API equilibria and kinetics for binary mixtures, and (3) investigating of cross-ionizations with multiple-product ions in API reactions. Although IMS measurements and predictions from rate theory were comparable, shapes and slopes of response curves for both proton transfer and electron capture were not described exactly by existing theory. In particular, terms that are needed for calculation of absolute rate constants were unsuitable in the existing theory. These included recombination coefficients,initial number of reactant ions, and opposing ion densities

  6. From cutting-edge pointwise cross-section to groupwise reaction rate: A primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sublet Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear research and development community has a history of using both integral and differential experiments to support accurate lattice-reactor, nuclear reactor criticality and shielding simulations, as well as verification and validation efforts of cross sections and emitted particle spectra. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the neutron spectrum in its entirety, with correct propagation of uncertainties and standard deviations derived from Monte Carlo simulations, to the local and total uncertainty in the simulated reactions rates (RRs, which usually only apply to one application at a time. This paper identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment, and discusses correct handling of the RR uncertainty quantification and propagation, including details of the cross section components in the RR uncertainty estimates, which are verified for relevant applications. The methodology that rigorously captures the spectral shift and cross section contributions to the uncertainty in the RR are discussed with quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment of the spectrum profile and cross section contributions to the uncertainty in the RR and subsequent response functions. The recently developed inventory code FISPACT-II, when connected to the processed nuclear data libraries TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0u or JEFF-3.2, forms an enhanced multi-physics platform providing a wide variety of advanced simulation methods for modelling activation, transmutation, burnup protocols and simulating radiation damage sources terms. The system has extended cutting-edge nuclear data forms, uncertainty quantification and propagation methods, which have been the subject of recent integral and differential, fission, fusion and accelerators validation efforts. The simulation system is used to accurately and predictively probe, understand and underpin a modern and

  7. Effect of Solvents on the Product Distribution and Reaction Rate of a Buchwald-Hartwig Amination Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction between p-bromotoluene and piperazine in the presence of the homogeneous catalytic system Pd(dba)(2)/(+/-)-BINAP and the base NaO-t-Bu was investigated in two different classes of solvents: aprotic, nonpolar and aprotic, polar. The reaction was carried out...... solvent for the Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction under the conditions applied was m-xylene....

  8. A study of the photocatalytic effects of aqueous suspensions of platinized semiconductor materials on the reaction rates of candidate redox reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of powdered semiconductor materials in photocatalyzing candidate redox reactions was investigated. The rate of the photocatalyzed oxidation of cyanide at platinized TiO2 was studied. The extent of the cyanide reaction was followed directly using an electroanalytical method (i.e. differential pulse polarography). Experiments were performed in natural or artificial light. A comparison was made of kinetic data obtained for photocatalysis at platinized powders with rate data for nonplatinized powders.

  9. Ag_3PO_4 Microcrystals Synthesized by Room-Temperature Solid State Reaction: Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity and Photoelectronchemistry Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Chen-Chun; Xu Jie; Shi Hong-Long; Fu Jun-Li; Zou Bin; Meng Shan; Wang Wen-Zhong; Jia Ying

    2015-01-01

    Ag_3PO_4 microcrystals with highly enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity are prepared by a facile and simple solid state reaction at room temperature. The composition, morphology and optical properties of the as-prepared Ag_3PO_4 microcrystals are characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra. The photocatalytic properties of Ag_3PO_4 are investigated by the degradation of both methylene blue and methyl orange dyes under visible light irradiation. The as-prepared Ag_3PO_4 microcrystals possess high photocatalytic oxygen production with the rate of 673 μmolh"−"1 g"−"1. Moreover, the as-prepared Ag_3PO_4 microcrystals show an enhanced photoelectrochemistry performance under irradiation of visible light. (paper)

  10. (Gold core) at (ceria shell) nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced catalytic reactions under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianfang; Li, Benxia; Gu, Ting; Ming, Tian; Wang, Junxin; Wang, Peng; Yu, Jimmy C.

    2014-01-01

    Driving catalytic reactions with sunlight is an excellent example of sustainable chemistry. A prerequisite of solar-driven catalytic reactions is the development of photocatalysts with high solar-harvesting efficiencies and catalytic activities. Herein, we describe a general approach for uniformly coating ceria on monometallic and bimetallic nanocrystals through heterogeneous nucleation and growth. The method allows for control of the shape, size, and type of the metal core as well as the thickness of the ceria shell. The plasmon shifts of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures resulting from the switching between Ce(IV) and Ce(III) are observed. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, one of the fundamental reactions for organic synthesis, performed under both broad-band and monochromatic light, demonstrates the visible-light-driven catalytic activity and reveals the synergistic effect on the enhanced catalysis of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  11. (Gold core) at (ceria shell) nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced catalytic reactions under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianfang

    2014-08-26

    Driving catalytic reactions with sunlight is an excellent example of sustainable chemistry. A prerequisite of solar-driven catalytic reactions is the development of photocatalysts with high solar-harvesting efficiencies and catalytic activities. Herein, we describe a general approach for uniformly coating ceria on monometallic and bimetallic nanocrystals through heterogeneous nucleation and growth. The method allows for control of the shape, size, and type of the metal core as well as the thickness of the ceria shell. The plasmon shifts of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures resulting from the switching between Ce(IV) and Ce(III) are observed. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, one of the fundamental reactions for organic synthesis, performed under both broad-band and monochromatic light, demonstrates the visible-light-driven catalytic activity and reveals the synergistic effect on the enhanced catalysis of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  12. Kinetic Modeling of the Reaction Rate for Quartz and Carbon Pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2018-04-01

    Kinetic modeling of quartz and carbon pellet at temperatures of 1898 K, 1923 K, and 1948 K (1625 °C, 1650 °C, and 1675 °C) was investigated in this study. The carbon materials used were charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal. The overall SiC producing reaction can be described by the reaction SiO2 + 3C = SiC + 2CO. In the SiC-producing step, the reaction rate of quartz and carbon pellet can be expressed as {d{ pct}}/dt = ( {1 - 0.40 × X_{fix - C}^{ - 0.86} × FC × {pct}} ) × A × \\exp ( { - E/{{RT}}} ) The carbon factor F C was used to describe the influence of different carbon materials that effect the gas-solid interface reaction. For charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal, the F C values were 0.83, 0.80, 0.94, and 0.83, respectively. The pre-exponential factor A values for the preceding four carbon materials were 1.06 × 1016 min-1, 4.21 × 1015 min-1, 3.85 × 109 min-1, and 1.00 × 1025 min-1, respectively. The activation energies E for the SiC-producing step were 570, 563, 336, and 913 kJ/mole for charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal pellets, respectively.

  13. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Analysis of Barium-140 From Fission Dosimeters

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes two procedures for the measurement of reaction rates by determining the amount of the fission product 140Ba produced by the non-threshold reactions 235U(n,f), 241Am(n,f), and 239Pu(n,f), and by the threshold reactions 238U(n,f), 237Np(n,f), and 232Th(n,f). 1.2 These reactions produce many fission products, among which is 140Ba, having a half-life of 12.752 days. 140Ba emits gamma rays of several energies; however, these are not easily detected in the presence of other fission products. Competing activity from other fission products requires that a chemical separation be employed or that the 140Ba activity be determined indirectly by counting its daughter product 140La. This test method describes both procedure (a), the nondestructive determination of 140Ba by the direct counting of 140La several days after irradiation, and procedure (b), the chemical separation of 140Ba and the subsequent counting of 140Ba or its daughter 140La. 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission neutron fl...

  14. Determining Role of the Chain Mechanism in the Temperature Dependence of the Gas-Phase Rate of Combustion Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatyan, V. V.; Bolod'yan, I. A.; Kopylov, N. P.; Kopylov, S. N.; Prokopenko, V. M.; Shebeko, Yu. N.

    2018-05-01

    It is shown that the strong dependence of the rate of gas-phase combustion reactions on temperature is determined by the high values of the reaction rate constants of free atoms and radicals. It is established that with a branched chain mechanism, a special role in the reaction rate temperature dependence is played by positive feedback between the concentrations of active intermediate species and the rate of their change. The role of the chemical mechanism in the temperature dependence of the process rate with and without inhibitors is considered.

  15. Promotion of multi-electron transfer for enhanced photocatalysis: A review focused on oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Changhua [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); College of Chemistry and Biology, Beihua University, Jilin 132013 (China); Zhang, Xintong, E-mail: xtzhang@nenu.edu.cn [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Liu, Yichun [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in photocatalysis process is focused. • Multi-electron transfer ORR is reviewed. • This review provides a guide to access to enhanced photocatalysis via multi-electron transfer. - Abstract: Semiconductor photocatalysis has attracted significant interest for solar light induced environmental remediation and solar fuel generation. As is well known, photocatalytic performance is determined by three steps: photoexcitation, separation and transport of photogenerated charge carriers, and surface reactions. To achieve higher efficiency, significant efforts have been made on improvement of efficiency of above first two steps, which have been well documented in recent review articles. In contrast, this review intends to focus on strategies moving onto the third step of improvement for enhanced photocatalysis wherein active oxygen species including superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical are in situ detected. Particularly, surface electron-transfer reduction of oxygen over single component photocatalysts is reviewed and systems enabling multi-electron transfer induced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highlighted. It is expected this review could provide a guideline for readers to better understand the critical role of ORR over photocatalyst in charge carrier separation and transfer and obtain reliable results for enhanced aerobic photocatalysis.

  16. Correlation between discrete probability and reaction front propagation rate in heterogeneous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naine, Tarun Bharath; Gundawar, Manoj Kumar

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a very powerful correlation between the discrete probability of distances of neighboring cells and thermal wave propagation rate, for a system of cells spread on a one-dimensional chain. A gamma distribution is employed to model the distances of neighboring cells. In the absence of an analytical solution and the differences in ignition times of adjacent reaction cells following non-Markovian statistics, invariably the solution for thermal wave propagation rate for a one-dimensional system with randomly distributed cells is obtained by numerical simulations. However, such simulations which are based on Monte-Carlo methods require several iterations of calculations for different realizations of distribution of adjacent cells. For several one-dimensional systems, differing in the value of shaping parameter of the gamma distribution, we show that the average reaction front propagation rates obtained by a discrete probability between two limits, shows excellent agreement with those obtained numerically. With the upper limit at 1.3, the lower limit depends on the non-dimensional ignition temperature. Additionally, this approach also facilitates the prediction of burning limits of heterogeneous thermal mixtures. The proposed method completely eliminates the need for laborious, time intensive numerical calculations where the thermal wave propagation rates can now be calculated based only on macroscopic entity of discrete probability.

  17. Rate constants for the reaction of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons at 298 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, C.; Treacy, J.; Sidebottom, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    Rate constant ratios of the reactions of CF3O radicals with a number of hydrocarbons have been determined at 298 +/- 2 K and atmospheric pressure using a relative rate method. Using a previously determined value k(CF30 + C2H6) = 1.2 x 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 these rate constant ratios provide...... estimates of the rate constants: k(CF3O + CH4) = (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10(-14), k(CF3O + c-C3H6) = (3.6 +/- 0.2) x 10(-13), k(CF3O + C3H8) = (4.7 +/- 0.7) x 10(-12), k(CF3O + (CH3)3CH) = (7.2 +/- 0.5) x 10(-12), k(CF3O + C2H4) = (3.0 +/- 0.1) x 10(-11) and k(CF3O + C6H6) = (3.6 +/- 0.1) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule-1 s......-1. The importance of the reactions of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions is discussed....

  18. Reaction rate of a composite core-shell nanoreactor with multiple nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Ballauff, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-07-27

    We present a detailed theory for the total reaction rate constant of a composite core-shell nanoreactor, consisting of a central solid core surrounded by a hydrogel layer of variable thickness, where a given number of small catalytic nanoparticles are embedded at prescribed positions and are endowed with a prescribed surface reaction rate constant. Besides the precise geometry of the assembly, our theory accounts explicitly for the diffusion coefficients of the reactants in the hydrogel and in the bulk as well as for their transfer free energy jump upon entering the hydrogel shell. Moreover, we work out an approximate analytical formula for the overall rate constant, which is valid in the physically relevant range of geometrical and chemical parameters. We discuss in depth how the diffusion-controlled part of the rate depends on the essential variables, including the size of the central core. In particular, we derive some simple rules for estimating the number of nanocatalysts per nanoreactor for an efficient catalytic performance in the case of small to intermediate core sizes. Our theoretical treatment promises to provide a very useful and flexible tool for the design of superior performing nanoreactor geometries with optimized nanoparticle load.

  19. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Larsen, Flemming; Postma, Diederik Jan

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase in the inc......The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase...... in the incubation bags became depleted in O2 and enriched in CO2 and N2 and was interpreted as due to pyrite oxidation in combination with calcite dissolution. Sediment incubation provides a new method to estimate low rates of pyrite oxidation in unsaturated zone aquifer sediments. Oxidation rates of up to 9.4â10......-10 mol FeS2/gâs are measured, and the rates are only weakly correlated with the sediment pyrite content. The reactivity of pyrite, including the inhibition by FeOOH layers formed on its surface, apparently has a major effect on the rate of oxidation. The code PHREEQC 2.0 was used to calculate...

  20. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    DESIG: E 263 09 ^TITLE: Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron ^SIGNUSE: Refer to Guide E 844 for guidance on the selection, irradiation, and quality control of neutron dosimeters. Refer to Practice E 261 for a general discussion of the determination of fast-neutron fluence rate with threshold detectors. Pure iron in the form of foil or wire is readily available and easily handled. Fig. 1 shows a plot of cross section as a function of neutron energy for the fast-neutron reaction 54Fe(n,p)54Mn (1). This figure is for illustrative purposes only to indicate the range of response of the 54Fe(n,p)54Mn reaction. Refer to Guide E 1018 for descriptions of recommended tabulated dosimetry cross sections. 54Mn has a half-life of 312.13 days (3) (2) and emits a gamma ray with an energy of 834.845 keV (5). (2) Interfering activities generated by neutron activation arising from thermal or fast neutron interactions are 2.57878 (46)-h 56Mn, 44.95-d (8) 59Fe, and 5.27...

  1. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Uranium-238

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by assaying a fission product (F.P.) from the fission reaction 238U(n,f)F.P. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies from approximately 1.5 to 7 MeV and for irradiation times up to 30 to 40 years. 1.3 Equivalent fission neutron fluence rates as defined in Practice E 261 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other unites of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Neptunium-237

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by assaying a fission product (F.P.) from the fission reaction 237Np(n,f)F.P. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies from approximately 0.7 to 6 MeV and for irradiation times up to 30 to 40 years. 1.3 Equivalent fission neutron fluence rates as defined in Practice E 261 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. 2-16 Thermonuclear Reaction Rates in rp Process of sd

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lam; Yihua[1; Nadezda; A.; Smirnova[2; W.A.; Richter[3

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have constructed a new set of isospin non-conserving (INC) shell-model Hamiltonians as a combinationof isospin conserving (IC) Hamiltonian, Coulomb interaction and effective isospin-symmetry breaking forcesof nuclear origin[1]. The advantage is that Coulomb effects are taken into account with great care, thus the new ap-Fig. 1 (color online) The comparison of resonant rates of23Al(p;)24Si calculated by IC and INC Hamiltonians. TheINC Hamiltonians of OB+USD, OB+USDA, OB+USDBwere constructed in Ref. [5]; whereas (cd-USD), (cd-USDA),(cd-USDB) are INC Hamiltonians in Ref. [1]. USD, USDA,USDB are IC Hamiltonians in Ref. [6].proach allows one to describe more accurately and topredict unknown nuclear level schemes and decay modes.Since the approximate isospin-symmetry becomes broken,a realistic amount of isospin-mixing in nuclearstates is thus introduced. Among numerous applicationsto the structure of proton-rich nuclei, we usedthe new Hamiltonian to calculate resonant reaction andnon-resonant reaction (direct capture) rates of radiativeproton-capture reactions important for astrophysical rpprocess.

  4. Possibility of increasing the average rate of heterogeneous catalytic reactions by operating in the self-oscillating regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumakov, G A; Slinko, M G

    1979-05-01

    The possibility of increasing the average rate of heterogeneous catalytic reactions by operating in the self-oscillating regime was demonstrated by analyzing a kinetic model of hydrogen interaction with oxygen over a metallic catalyst. Within a certain interval of partial pressures of oxygen, the average reaction rate over a period of oscillation may be over five times that of the steady-state reaction.

  5. Rate enhancement in microfabricated chemical reactors under fast forced temperature oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heine Anton; Olsen, Jakob L.; Jensen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of CO under fast forced temperature oscillations shows increased reaction rate compared to steady state. A maximum increase of 40% is observed relative to steady state. The reaction rate is investigated for varying mean temperature, amplitude and frequency. As function of mean temperatu...

  6. Linear free energy relationships between aqueous phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and free energy of activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2011-04-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites on organic compounds and initiates complex radical chain reactions in aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Computer based kinetic modeling requires a reaction pathway generator and predictions of associated reaction rate constants. Previously, we reported a reaction pathway generator that can enumerate the most important elementary reactions for aliphatic compounds. For the reaction rate constant predictor, we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) between aqueous phase literature-reported HO(•) reaction rate constants and theoretically calculated free energies of activation for H-atom abstraction from a C-H bond and HO(•) addition to alkenes. The theoretical method uses ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, Gaussian 1-3, for gas phase reactions and a solvation method, COSMO-RS theory, to estimate the impact of water. Theoretically calculated free energies of activation are found to be within approximately ±3 kcal/mol of experimental values. Considering errors that arise from quantum mechanical calculations and experiments, this should be within the acceptable errors. The established LFERs are used to predict the HO(•) reaction rate constants within a factor of 5 from the experimental values. This approach may be applied to other reaction mechanisms to establish a library of rate constant predictions for kinetic modeling of AOPs.

  7. Fundamental challenges in mechanistic enzymology: progress toward understanding the rate enhancements of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschlag, Daniel; Natarajan, Aditya

    2013-03-26

    Enzymes are remarkable catalysts that lie at the heart of biology, accelerating chemical reactions to an astounding extent with extraordinary specificity. Enormous progress in understanding the chemical basis of enzymatic transformations and the basic mechanisms underlying rate enhancements over the past decades is apparent. Nevertheless, it has been difficult to achieve a quantitative understanding of how the underlying mechanisms account for the energetics of catalysis, because of the complexity of enzyme systems and the absence of underlying energetic additivity. We review case studies from our own work that illustrate the power of precisely defined and clearly articulated questions when dealing with such complex and multifaceted systems, and we also use this approach to evaluate our current ability to design enzymes. We close by highlighting a series of questions that help frame some of what remains to be understood, and we encourage the reader to define additional questions and directions that will deepen and broaden our understanding of enzymes and their catalysis.

  8. Enhanced bimolecular exchange reaction through programmed coordination of a five-coordinate oxovanadium complex for efficient redox mediation in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyaizu, Kenichi; Hayo, Noriko; Sasada, Yoshito; Kato, Fumiaki; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-07

    Electrochemical reversibility and fast bimolecular exchange reaction found for VO(salen) gave rise to a highly efficient redox mediation to enhance the photocurrent of a dye-sensitized solar cell, leading to an excellent photovoltaic performance with a conversion efficiency of 5.4%. A heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant at an electrode (k0) and a second-order rate constant for an electron self-exchange reaction (k(ex)) were proposed as key parameters that dominate the charge transport property, which afforded a novel design concept for the mediators based on their kinetic aspects.

  9. Experimental determination of reaction rates of water. Hydrogen exchange of tritium with hydrophobic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixel, J.C.; Hartzell, B.W.; Park, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    This study was undertaken to obtain data needed for further development of a process for the enrichment and removal of tritium from the water associated with light-water reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, and tritium-handling laboratories. The approach is based on the use of antiwetting, hydrophobic catalysts which permit the chemical exchange reactions between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen in direct contact, thus eliminating problems of catalyst deactivation and the complexity of reactor design normally associated with current catalytic-detritiation techniques involving gas-phase catalysis. An apparatus and procedure were developed for measuring reaction rates of water-hydrogen chemical exchange with hydrophobic catalysts. Preliminary economic evaluations of the process were made as it might apply to the AGNS fuel reprocessing plant

  10. Eight-dimensional quantum reaction rate calculations for the H+CH4 and H2+CH3 reactions on recent potential energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Dong H

    2014-11-21

    Eight-dimensional (8D) transition-state wave packet simulations have been performed on two latest potential energy surfaces (PES), the Zhou-Fu-Wang-Collins-Zhang (ZFWCZ) PES [Y. Zhou, B. Fu, C. Wang, M. A. Collins, and D. H. Zhang, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064323 (2011)] and the Xu-Chen-Zhang (XCZ)-neural networks (NN) PES [X. Xu, J. Chen, and D. H. Zhang, Chin. J. Chem. Phys. 27, 373 (2014)]. Reaction rate constants for both the H+CH4 reaction and the H2+CH3 reaction are calculated. Simulations of the H+CH4 reaction based on the XCZ-NN PES show that the ZFWCZ PES predicts rate constants with reasonable high accuracy for low temperatures while leads to slightly lower results for high temperatures, in line with the distribution of interpolation error associated with the ZFWCZ PES. The 8D H+CH4 rate constants derived on the ZFWCZ PES compare well with full-dimensional 12D results based on the equivalent m-ZFWCZ PES, with a maximum relative difference of no more than 20%. Additionally, very good agreement is shown by comparing the 8D XCZ-NN rate constants with the 12D results obtained on the ZFWCZ-WM PES, after considering the difference in static barrier height between these two PESs. The reaction rate constants calculated for the H2+CH3 reaction are found to be in good consistency with experimental observations.

  11. A Reaction-Diffusion-Based Coding Rate Control Mechanism for Camera Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Wakamiya

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A wireless camera sensor network is useful for surveillance and monitoring for its visibility and easy deployment. However, it suffers from the limited capacity of wireless communication and a network is easily overflown with a considerable amount of video traffic. In this paper, we propose an autonomous video coding rate control mechanism where each camera sensor node can autonomously determine its coding rate in accordance with the location and velocity of target objects. For this purpose, we adopted a biological model, i.e., reaction-diffusion model, inspired by the similarity of biological spatial patterns and the spatial distribution of video coding rate. Through simulation and practical experiments, we verify the effectiveness of our proposal.

  12. A reaction-diffusion-based coding rate control mechanism for camera sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Katsuya; Wakamiya, Naoki; Murata, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    A wireless camera sensor network is useful for surveillance and monitoring for its visibility and easy deployment. However, it suffers from the limited capacity of wireless communication and a network is easily overflown with a considerable amount of video traffic. In this paper, we propose an autonomous video coding rate control mechanism where each camera sensor node can autonomously determine its coding rate in accordance with the location and velocity of target objects. For this purpose, we adopted a biological model, i.e., reaction-diffusion model, inspired by the similarity of biological spatial patterns and the spatial distribution of video coding rate. Through simulation and practical experiments, we verify the effectiveness of our proposal.

  13. Quantum chemical and conventional TST calculations of rate constants for the OH + alkane reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo-Perez, Graciela; Alvarez-Idaboy, J. Raul; Jimenez, Annia Galano; Cruz-Torres, Armando

    2005-01-01

    Reactions of OH with methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, and n-butane have been modeled using ab initio (MP2) and hybrid DFT (BHandHLYP) methods, and the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Furthermore, single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level were carried out at the optimized geometries. The rate constants have been calculated using the conventional transition-state theory (CTST). Arrhenius equations are proposed in the temperature range of 250-650 K. Hindered Internal Rotation partition functions calculations were explicitly carried out and included in the total partition functions. These corrections showed to be relevant in the determination of the pre-exponential parameters, although not so important as in the NO 3 + alkane reactions [G. Bravo-Perez, J.R. Alvarez-Idaboy, A. Cruz-Torres, M.E. Ruiz, J. Phys. Chem. A 106 (2002) 4645]. The explicit participation of the tunnel effect has been taken into account. The calculated rate coefficients provide a very good agreement with the experimental data. The best agreement for the overall alkane + OH reactions seemed to occur when the BHandHLYP geometries and partition functions are used. For propane and i-butane, in addition to the respective secondary and tertiary H-abstraction channels, the primary one has been considered. These pathways are confirmed to be significant in spite of the large differences in activation energies between primary and secondary or primary and tertiary channels, respectively of propane and i-butane reactions and should not be disregarded

  14. A kinetic-theory approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, Michael A; Bond, Ryan B; Torczynski, John R

    2009-09-28

    Recently proposed molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction-rate information) are investigated for chemical reactions occurring in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows. The new models are in good agreement with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions and with both measured rates and other theoretical models for far-from-equilibrium conditions. Additionally, the new models are applied to representative combustion and ionization reactions and are in good agreement with available measurements and theoretical models. Thus, molecular-level chemistry modeling provides an accurate method for predicting equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates in gases.

  15. Radio-frequency wave enhanced runaway production rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.S.; McClain, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    Enhancement of runaway electron production (over that of an Ohmic discharge) can be achieved by the addition of radio-frequency waves. This effect is studied analytically and numerically using a two-dimensional Fokker--Planck quasilinear equation

  16. Stakeholder perspectives and reactions to "academic" cognitive enhancement: Unsuspected meaning of ambivalence and analogies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlini, Cynthia; Racine, Eric

    2012-07-01

    The existence of diverging discourses in the media and academia on the use of prescription medications to improve cognition in healthy individuals, i.e. "cognitive enhancement" (CE) creates the need to better understand perspectives from stakeholders. This qualitative focus-group study examined perspectives from students, parents and healthcare providers on CE. Stakeholders expressed ambivalence regarding CE (i.e. reactions to, definitions of, risks, and benefits). They were reluctant to adopt analogies to performance-enhancing steroids and caffeine though these analogies were useful in discussing concepts common to the use of different performance-enhancing substances. Media coverage of CE was criticized for lack of scientific rigor, ethical clarity, and inadvertent promotion of CE. Ambivalence of stakeholders suggests fundamental discomfort with economic and social driving forces of CE. Forms of public dialogue that voice the unease and ambivalence of stakeholders should be pursued to avoid opting hastily for permissive or restrictive health policies for CE.

  17. APPLE, Plot of 1-D Multigroup Neutron Flux and Gamma Flux and Reaction Rates from ANISN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Seki, Yasushi

    1983-01-01

    A - Description of problem or function: The APPLE-2 code has the following functions: (1) It plots multi-group energy spectra of neutron and/or gamma ray fluxes calculated by ANISN, DOT-3.5, and MORSE. (2) It gives an overview plot of multi-group neutron fluxes calculated by ANISN and DOT-3.5. The scalar neutron flux phi(r,E) is plotted with the spatial parameter r linear along the Y-axis, logE along the X-axis and log phi(r,E) in the Z direction. (3) It calculates the spatial distribution and region volume integrated values of reaction rates using the scalar flux calculated with ANISN and DOT-3.5. (4) Reaction rate distribution along the R or Z direction may be plotted. (5) An overview plot of reaction rates or scalar fluxes summed over specified groups may be plotted. R(ri,zi) or phi(ri,zi) is plotted with spatial parameters r and z along the X- and Y-axes in an orthogonal coordinate system. (6) Angular flux calculated by ANISN is rearranged and a shell source at any specified spatial mesh point may be punched out in FIDO format. The shell source obtained may be employed in solving deep penetration problems with ANISN, when the entire reactor system is divided into two or more parts and the neutron fluxes in two adjoining parts are connected by using the shell source. B - Method of solution: (a) The input data specification is made as simple as possible by making use of the input data required in the radiation transport code. For example, geometry related data in ANISN and DOT are transmitted to APPLE-2 along with scalar flux data so as to reduce duplicity and errors in reproducing these data. (b) Most the input data follow the free form FIDO format developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and used in the ANISN code. Furthermore, the mixture specifying method used in ANISN is also employed by APPLE-2. (c) Libraries for some standard response functions required in fusion reactor design have been prepared and are made available to users of the 42-group neutron

  18. Rate of information processing and reaction time of aircraft pilots and non-pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Barkhuizen

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Reaction time and rate of information processing are cited as critical components in the make-up of pilots. A need was identified to establish the validity of various chronometric measures in the selection of pilots. Fifty-eight military and commercial pilots and twenty non-pilots were subjected to Schepers’ Computerised Information Processing Test Battery, which measures reaction time, form discrimination time, colour discrimination time, rate of information processing (perceptual and rate of information processing (conceptual. Five hypotheses and one postulate were formulated and tested. The results indicate that pilots could be differentiated from non-pilots with 92,3% accuracy. However, the results need to be cross-validated before they are used for selection. Opsomming Reaksietyd en tempo van inligtingverwerking word as kritieke komponente in die samestelling van vlieëniers beskou. ‘n Behoefte is geïdentifiseer om die geldigheid van verskeie chronometriese metinge in vlieënierskeuring te bepaal. Agt en vyftig militêre en kommersiële vlieëniers en twintig nie-vlieëniers is onderwerp aan Schepers se Gerekenariseerde Inligtingverwerkingstoets-battery wat reaksietyd, vormdiskriminasietyd, kleurdiskriminasietyd, tempo van inligtingverwerking (perseptueel en tempo van inligtingverwerking (konseptueel meet. Vyf hipoteses en een postulaat is gestel en getoets. Die resultate dui daarop dat vlieëniers met 92,3% akkuraatheid van nievlieëniers onderskei kan word. Die resultate behoort egter eers gekruisvalideer te word voordat dit finaal vir keuring gebruik kan word.

  19. Oxidative removal of quinclorac by permanganate through a rate-limiting [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dean; Cheng, Hanyang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Sun, Huiqing; Kong, Fanyu; Liang, Rongning; Qiang, Zhimin; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2018-04-05

    Quinclorac, a widely used herbicide in agriculture, has been recognized as an emerging environmental pollutant owing to its long persistence and potential risk to humans. However, no related information is available on the degradation of quinclorac by employing oxidants. Herein, the reactivity of quinclorac with permanganate was systematically investigated in water by combining experimental and computational approaches. The reaction followed overall second-order kinetics pointing to a bimolecular rate-limiting step. The second-order rate constant was found to be 3.47 × 10-3 M-1 s-1 at 25 °C, which was independent of pH over the range from 5 to 9 and was dependent on temperature over the range from 19 to 35 °C. The initial product was identified by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS to be mono-hydroxylated quinclorac, which was more susceptible to further oxidation. The result could be supported by the complete simulation of the reaction process in DFT calculations, indicating the [3 + 2] cycloaddition oxidation of the benzene ring in the rate-limiting step. The plausible mechanism was then proposed, accompanied by the analysis of the HOMO indicating the hydroxylation position and of the ESP suggesting a more electron-rich moiety. Considering the high effectiveness and low toxicity, permanganate oxidation was considered to be a very promising technique for removing quinclorac from aquatic environments.

  20. PRICE REACTION TO CORPORATE GOVERNANCE RATING ANNOUNCEMENTS AT THE ISTANBUL STOCK EXCHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslıhan BOZCUK

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the price reaction to corporate governance rating announcements at the Istanbul Stock Exchange and to identify the factors which could be driving the results. Using an event study analysis framework, the cumulative abnormal returns (AR are calculated for various event windows surrounding the announcement day for each firm. The average AR is 0.5% on announcement day, followed by all positive average cumulative ARs for the next 18 days following the announcement. In the multivariate regression analysis, a number of variables are used to proxy for factors suggested as relevant by the agency theory and the corporate governance literature; such as the size of the Audit Committee, the size of the Board of Directors, Corporate Governance Rating of each firm, number of non-executive members on the board, percentage of firm’s stock traded on the market, number of blockholders, family ownership, the price-earnings ratio, the market-to-book ratio and firm size. Audit committee size (P: 0.012 and board size (P: 0.043 together explained 32% of the variation in announcement day returns (F: 5.215, P: 0.018. Surprisingly, the corporate governance rating per se was not found to be significant. Overall, the price reaction on announcement day tends to be higher for firms with larger boards and smaller audit committees.

  1. Rate Constant of the Reaction between CH3O2 Radicals and OH Radicals Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Song, Bo; Tomas, Alexandre; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2016-11-17

    The reaction between CH 3 O 2 and OH radicals has been studied in a laser photolysis cell using the reaction of F atoms with CH 4 and H 2 O for the simultaneous generation of both radicals, with F atoms generated through 248 nm photolysis of XeF 2 . An experimental setup combining cw-Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and high repetition rate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to a laser photolysis cell has been used. The absolute concentration of CH 3 O 2 was measured by cw-CRDS, while the relative concentration of OH(v = 0) radicals was determined by LIF. To remove dubiety from the quantification of CH 3 O 2 by cw-CRDS in the near-infrared, its absorption cross section has been determined at 7489.16 cm -1 using two different methods. A rate constant of k 1 = (1.60 ± 0.4) × 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 has been determined at 295 K, nearly a factor of 2 lower than an earlier determination from our group ((2.8 ± 1.4) × 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 ) using CH 3 I photolysis as a precursor. Quenching of electronically excited I atoms (from CH 3 I photolysis) in collision with OH(v = 0) is suspected to be responsible for a bias in the earlier, fast rate constant.

  2. Thermodynamic stability of elementary chemical reactions proceeding at finite rates revisited using Lyapunov function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burande, Chandrakant S.; Bhalekar, Anil A.

    2005-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of a few representative elementary chemical reactions proceeding at finite rates has been investigated using the recently proposed thermodynamic Lyapunov function and following the steps of Lyapunov's second method (also termed as the direct method) of stability of motion. The thermodynamic Lyapunov function; L s , used herein is the excess rate of entropy production in the thermodynamic perturbation space, which thereby inherits the dictates of the second law of thermodynamics. This Lyapunov function is not the same as the excess entropy rate that one encounters in thermodynamic (irreversible) literature. The model chemical conversions studied in this presentation are A+B→v x X and A+B↔ν x X. For the sake of simplicity, the thermal effects of chemical reactions have been considered as not adding to the perturbation as our main aim was to demonstrate how one should use systematically the proposed thermodynamic Lyapunov function following the steps of Lyapunov's second method of stability of motion. The domains of thermodynamic stability under the constantly acting small disturbances, thermodynamic asymptotic stability and thermodynamic instability in these model systems get established

  3. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  4. The 12C+α reaction rate from the elastic 16O breakup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiener, J.; Kraus, L.; Lefebvre, A.; Mittig, W.; Motobayashi, T.; De Oliveira-Santos, F.; Stephan, C.; Thibaud, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Evidence for direct elastic breakup of 16 O into the α- 12 C continuum with relative energies ranging from 900 to 1800 keV has been obtained in the scattering of 1527 MeV 16 O projectiles off 208 Pb. An interpretation of E2 breakup including nuclear and Coulomb contributions leads to reduced electromagnetic transition probabilities and astrophysical S E2 factors in reasonable agreement with direct measurements, showing that the method can be applied to extract the E2 part of the 12 C(α,γ) reaction rate. (orig.)

  5. Classical Wigner method with an effective quantum force: application to reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jens Aage; Li, Huaqing; Nyman, Gunnar

    2009-07-14

    We construct an effective "quantum force" to be used in the classical molecular dynamics part of the classical Wigner method when determining correlation functions. The quantum force is obtained by estimating the most important short time separation of the Feynman paths that enter into the expression for the correlation function. The evaluation of the force is then as easy as classical potential energy evaluations. The ideas are tested on three reaction rate problems. The resulting transmission coefficients are in much better agreement with accurate results than transmission coefficients from the ordinary classical Wigner method.

  6. Neutron spectra determination methods using the measured reaction rates in SAPIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondars, Kh.Ya.; Lapenas, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Mathematical basis of algorithms is given for methods of neutron spectra restoration in accordance with the measured reaction rates of the activation detectors included into the information-determination system SAIPS aimed at generalization of the most popular home and foreign neutron spectra determination methods as well as the establishment of their mutual relations. The following neutron spectra determination methods are described: SAND-II, CRYSTAL BALL, WINDOWS, SPECTRA, RESP, JUL; polynominal and directed divergence methods. The algorithms have been realized on the ES computer

  7. Redox reaction rates in shallow aquifers: Implications for nitrate transport in groundwater and streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoriero, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater age and water chemistry data along flow paths from recharge areas to streams were used to evaluate the trends and transformations of agricultural chemicals. Results from this analysis indicate that median nitrate recharge concentrations in these agricultural areas have increased markedly over the last 50 years from 4 mg N/L in samples collected prior to 1983 to 7.5 mg N/L in samples collected since 1983. The effect that nitrate accumulation in shallow aquifers will have on drinking water quality and stream ecosystems is dependent on the rate of redox reactions along flow paths and on the age distribution of nitrate discharging to supply wells and streams.

  8. Rate Constants for Reactions of Radiation-Produced Transients in Aqueous Solutions of Actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, S.; Sullivan, J.C.; Ross, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Rate constants have been critically compiled for reactions of ions of the actinides Am, Cf, Cm, Np, Pu, Th, and U, as well as the element Tc, in different oxidation states with various chemical species in aqueous solution. The reactants include products of the radiolysis of water (hydrated electrons, hydrogen atoms, hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide) and transient species derived from other solutes (e.g., carbonate radical). The data are useful in the estimation of migration properties of actinides, which are relevant to waste management studies

  9. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. Hydrated electron, supplemental data. [Reactions with transients from water, with inorganic solutes, and with solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, A.B.

    1975-06-01

    A compilation of rates of reactions of hydrated electrons with other transients and with organic and inorganic solutes in aqueous solution appeared in NSRDS-NBS 43, and covered the literature up to early 1971. This supplement includes additional rates which have been published through July 1973.

  10. Calculation of rate coefficients of some proton-transfer ion-molecule reactions in weakly ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    A classical collision theory is used to describe thermal bimolecular rate coefficeints for reaction between positive and negative ions and polar molecules in a carrier gas. Special attention is paid to ion-molecule reaction in which proton transfer occurs. These reactions play an important role in terrestrial plasma devices, in ionosphere, in planetary atmospheres and in interstellar matter. The equilibrium rate coefficients of the reactions are calculated based on a microscopic reactive cross section derived from a long distance polar molecule-ion potential. The results are compared with experimental values of afterglow measurements. (D.Gy.)

  11. Kinetics of isotope exchange reactions involving intra- and intermolecular reactions: 1. Rate law for a system with two chemical compounds and three exchangeable atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuelei Chu; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    For an isotopic exchange reaction between two compounds (X and AB) in a homogeneous system, such as a gaseous or aqueous system, where one (AB) of them possesses two exchangeable atoms in non-equivalent positions and where one intramolecular isotope exchange (A ↔ B) and two intermolecular isotope exchange reactions (X ↔ A and X ↔ B) may occur, its rate law no longer obeys a pseudo-first order rate equation described for simple two-component systems by many previous investigators. The change with time of the δ value of each of the three components (X, A, and B) in a closed and homogeneous system is a complicated function of the initial δ values of the three components, the chemical concentrations of the two compounds, and the overall rate constants of the forward and reverse reactions involving the two intermolecular and one intramolecular reactions of isotope exchanges. Also, for some one of the three components, the change of its δ value with time may not be monotonic, and the relationship of 1n (1 - F) with time may be non-linear in a plot of 1n (1 - F) vs. t. In addition, the rate law of the isotope exchange reaction in this system also provides a quantitative method to estimate the overall rate constants for the one-intra-and two intermolecular isotope exchanges and the equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors among the three components

  12. Running quietly reduces ground reaction force and vertical loading rate and alters foot strike technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Xuan; Grisbrook, Tiffany L; Wernli, Kevin; Stearne, Sarah M; Davey, Paul; Ng, Leo

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine if a quantifiable relationship exists between the peak sound amplitude and peak vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) and vertical loading rate during running. It also investigated whether differences in peak sound amplitude, contact time, lower limb kinematics, kinetics and foot strike technique existed when participants were verbally instructed to run quietly compared to their normal running. A total of 26 males completed running trials for two sound conditions: normal running and quiet running. Simple linear regressions revealed no significant relationships between impact sound and peak vGRF in the normal and quiet conditions and vertical loading rate in the normal condition. t-Tests revealed significant within-subject decreases in peak sound, peak vGRF and vertical loading rate during the quiet compared to the normal running condition. During the normal running condition, 15.4% of participants utilised a non-rearfoot strike technique compared to 76.9% in the quiet condition, which was corroborated by an increased ankle plantarflexion angle at initial contact. This study demonstrated that quieter impact sound is not directly associated with a lower peak vGRF or vertical loading rate. However, given the instructions to run quietly, participants effectively reduced peak impact sound, peak vGRF and vertical loading rate.

  13. The Role of Compliance and Reaction Rate in Dehydration Weakening and Frictional Stability of Antigorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, E.; Okazaki, K.; Hirth, G.

    2017-12-01

    The complicated brittle-ductile rheology of antigorite at subduction zone pressures and temperatures, resulting from its anisotropic mechanical properties, low dehydration temperature, and high water content has made interpretation of dehydration weakening problematic. Recent analyses indicate that antigorite is both ductile and brittle at high temperatures, and follows effective pressure frictional laws while dehydrating. In this study we focus on the role of rig compliance and reaction kinetics on frictional weakening and frictional stability. In addition, we correlate the evolution of mechanical behavior with AE activity at conditions within and above the thermal stability limit of antigorite. We conducted experiments at confining pressures from 0.25 GPa to 1GPa in a Griggs apparatus and modified rig compliance by including compliant components within the loading frame. We also modeled in-situ reaction progress using parameters from Sawai et al. (2013) to quantify relationships between weakening and fluid production. Without modifying the compliance, low pressure runs show stable dehydration weakening. With a modified, low compliance, results were nearly identical to stable weakening at standard compliance at 1 GPa. However, at lower pressures, many acoustic emissions were recorded at peak reaction rates during temperature ramping, with a rapid failure event occurring several minutes afterward (with the caveat that we still need to verify that AEs occur within the sample). No AEs are observed during room temperature experiments in samples that fault, nor were any observed in the high temperature experiments at conditions within the antigorite stability field - consistent with prior studies. Our results demonstrate that understanding in-situ dehydration reaction kinetics and their feedback with rheology and system compliance are key to scaling laboratory antigorite rheology to earth.

  14. Origin of Enhanced Reactivity of a Microsolvated Nucleophile in Ion Pair SN2 Reactions: The Cases of Sodium p-Nitrophenoxide with Halomethanes in Acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang-Gen; Xu, Ke; Ren, Yi

    2015-04-30

    In a kinetic experiment on the SN2 reaction of sodium p-nitrophenoxide with iodomethane in acetone-water mixed solvent, Humeres et al. (J. Org. Chem. 2001, 66, 1163) found that the reaction depends strongly on the medium, and the fastest rate constant was observed in pure acetone. The present work tries to explore why acetone can enhance the reactivity of the title reactions. Accordingly, we make a mechanistic study on the reactions of sodium p-nitrophenoxide with halomethanes (CH3X, X = Cl, Br, I) in acetone by using a supramolecular/continuum model at the PCM-MP2/6-311+G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level, in which the ion pair nucleophile is microsolvated by one to three acetone molecules. We compared the reactivity of the microsolvated ion pair nucleophiles with solvent-free ion pair and anionic ones. Our results clearly reveal that the microsolvated ion pair nucleophile is favorable for the SN2 reactions; meanwhile, the origin of the enhanced reactivity induced by microsolvation of the nucleophile is discussed in terms of the geometries of transition state (TS) structures and activation strain model, suggesting that lower deformation energies and stronger interaction energies between the deformed reactants in the TS lead to the lower overall reaction barriers for the SN2 reaction of microsolvated sodium p-nitrophenoxide toward halomethanes in acetone.

  15. Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessler, J.P. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

  16. Enhancing Free-Recall Rates of Individuals with Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Michael T.; Soraci, Sal A.; Dennis, Nancy A.; Chechile, Nicholas A.; Loiselle, Raquel C.

    2001-01-01

    This study with 16 adolescents with mental retardation compared free-recall rates under two encoding conditions: (1) fade-in, initially presenting pictures out of focus then slowly fading them into focus; and (2) fade-out, slowly blurring originally clear pictures. Results indicated that free-recall rates were greater for the fade-in items for…

  17. Integrating User Reviews and Ratings for Enhanced Personalized Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuyue; Cai, Yi; Leung, Ho-fung; Huang, Dongping; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    With the development of e-commerce, websites such as Amazon and eBay have become very popular. Users post reviews of products and rate the helpfulness of reviews on these websites. Reviews written by a user and reviews rated by a user reflect the user's interests and disinterest. Thus, they are very useful for user profiling. In this study, the…

  18. On rates and mechanisms of OH and O3 reactions with isoprene-derived hydroxy nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lance; Teng, Alex P; Wennberg, Paul O; Crounse, John D; Cohen, Ronald C

    2014-03-06

    Eight distinct hydroxy nitrates are stable products of the first step in the atmospheric oxidation of isoprene by OH. The subsequent chemical fate of these molecules affects global and regional production of ozone and aerosol as well as the location of nitrogen deposition. We synthesized and purified 3 of the 8 isoprene hydroxy nitrate isomers: (E/Z)-2-methyl-4-nitrooxybut-2-ene-1-ol and 3-methyl-2-nitrooxybut-3-ene-1-ol. Oxidation of these molecules by OH and ozone was studied using both chemical ionization mass spectrometry and thermo-dissociation laser induced fluorescence. The OH reaction rate constants at 300 K measured relative to propene at 745 Torr are (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for both the E and Z isomers and (4.2 ± 0.7) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the third isomer. The ozone reaction rate constants for (E/Z)-2-methyl-4-nitrooxybut-2-ene-1-ol are (2.7 ± 0.5) × 10(-17) and (2.9 ± 0.5) × 10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. 3-Methyl-2-nitrooxybut-3-ene-1-ol reacts with ozone very slowly, within the range of (2.5-5) × 10(-19) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Reaction pathways, product yields, and implications for atmospheric chemistry are discussed. A condensed mechanism suitable for use in atmospheric chemistry models is presented.

  19. MURLI, 1-D Flux, Reaction Rate in Cylindrical Geometry Thermal Reactor Lattice by Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huria, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: MURLI is an integral transport theory code to calculate fluxes and reaction rates in one- dimensional cylindrical geometry lattice cells of a thermal reactor. For a specified buckling, it computes k-effective using few-group diffusion theory and a few-group collapsed set of Cross sections. The code can optionally be used to solve a first order differential equation for the number density of fissile, fertile and fission product nuclei as a function of time, and to recalculate fluxes, reaction rates and k-effective at different stages of burnup. A 27-group cross section data library is included. There are four pseudo-fission products each associated with the decay chains of plutonium and uranium isotopes in addition to Rh-105, Xe-135, Np-239, U-236, Am-241, Am-242 and Am-243. There is also data for one lumped pseudo-fission product. 2 - Method of solution: Multiple collision probabilities and escape probabilities are calculated for each cylindrical shell region assuming protons are born uniformly and isotropically over the entire region volume. The equations of integral transport theory can then be solved for neutron flux. The first order differential burnup equation is solved by a fourth order Runge-Kutta method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: There are maxima of 8 fissionable elements, 8 resonant elements, and 20 spatial regions

  20. Advanced methods comparisons of reaction rates in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Ott, K.O.

    1988-01-01

    A review of worldwide results revealed that reaction rates in the blanket region are generally underpredicted with the discrepancy increasing with penetration; however, these results vary widely. Experiments in the large uniform Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF) blanket yield an accurate quantification of this discrepancy. Using standard production code methods (diffusion theory with 50 group cross sections), a consistent Calculated/Experimental (C/E) drop-off was observed for various reaction rates. A 50% increase in the calculated results at the outer edge of the blanket is necessary for agreement with experiments. The usefulness of refined group constant generation utilizing specialized weighting spectra and transport theory methods in correcting this discrepancy was analyzed. Refined group constants reduce the discrepancy to half that observed using the standard method. The surprising result was that transport methods had no effect on the blanket deviations; thus, transport theory considerations do not constitute or even contribute to an explanation of the blanket discrepancies. The residual blanket C/E drop-off (about half the standard drop-off) using advanced methods must be caused by some approximations which are applied in all current methods. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. STEEP4 code for computation of specific thermonuclear reaction rates from pointwise cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Dei, D.E.; Husseiny, A.A.; Sabri, Z.A.; Hale, G.M.

    1976-05-01

    A code module, STEEP4, is developed to calculate the fusion reaction rates in terms of the specific reactivity [sigma v] which is the product of cross section and relative velocity averaged over the actual ion distributions of the interacting particles in the plasma. The module is structured in a way suitable for incorporation in thermonuclear burn codes to provide rapid and yet relatively accurate on-line computation of [sigma v] as a function of plasma parameters. Ion distributions are modified to include slowing-down contributions which are characterized in terms of plasma parameters. Rapid and accurate algorithms are used for integrating [sigma v] from cross sections and spectra. The main program solves for [sigma v] by the method of steepest descent. However, options are provided to use Gauss-Hermite and dense trapezoidal quadrature integration techniques. Options are also provided for rapid calculation of screening effects on specific reaction rates. Although such effects are not significant in cases of plasmas of laboratory interest, the options are included to increase the range of applicability of the code. Gamow penetration form, log-log interpolation, and cubic interpolation routines are included to provide the interpolated values of cross sections

  2. Kinetic Modeling of the Reaction Rate for Quartz and Carbon Black Pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2018-06-01

    The kinetic modeling for the carbothermal reduction reaction rate in quartz and carbon black pellets is studied at different temperatures, under varying CO partial pressures in ambient atmosphere, varying carbon contents, different quartz particle sizes, and different crucible opening areas. Carbon black is produced by the cracking of natural gas. The activation energy of the SiC-producing step was determined to be 594 kJ/mol. The averaged pre-exponential factor A obtained from 1898 K, 1923 K, and 1948 K (1625 °C, 1650 °C, and 1675 °C) is 2.62E+16 min-1. The reaction rate of the gas-solid interface factor, fix-C content ( X fix-C), temperature ( T), and CO partial pressure ( X CO) can be expressed as follows: {{d/pct}}{{{d}t}} = (1 - 0.40 × X_{{{fix} - C}}^{ - 0.86} × {pct}) × 2.62 × 10^{16} × \\exp ( { - 594000/RT} ) × (2.6 - 0.015 × X_{co} ).

  3. Using chiral ionic liquid additives to enhance asymmetric induction in a Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, P; Nimal Gunaratne, H Q; Hall, L; Wang, Y; Jin, L; Muldoon, M J; Ribeiro, A P C; Pombeiro, A J L; Pârvulescu, V I; Davey, P; Hardacre, C

    2017-01-31

    A bis-oxazoline ligand has been complexed using Cu(ii) and Zn(ii) trifluoromethanesulfonate and a range of chiral ionic liquid (CIL) additives based on natural products were used as a co-catalyst for a Diels-Alder reaction. The catalytic performance of these systems was compared for the asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction between N-acryloyloxazolidinone and cyclopentadiene with and without the presence of a CIL additive. In the absence of the CIL, both catalysts resulted in low enantioselectivities in conventional solvents and ionic liquids. However, whilst only a minor effect of the CIL was observed for the Cu based catalyst, in the case of the Zn based catalyst, significant enhancements in endo enantioselectivity of up to 50% were found on the addition of a CIL.

  4. Enhancement of nitrite on heme-induced oxidative reactions: A potential toxicological implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Jingjie; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is one of the major end products of NO metabolism. Although the biological significance of heme/NO(2)(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration is a subject of great interest, the important roles of NO(2)(-) on heme-dependent redox reaction have been greatly underestimated. In this study, we investigated the influence of NO(2)(-) on heme -dependent oxidative reactions. It was found that NO(2)(-) had the capacity to act as a reducing agent to remove high oxidation states of heme iron. In the reduction of ferryl heme to ferric heme, NO(2)(-) was oxidized to a nitrating agent NO(2), and subsequently, tyrosine residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were nitrated. However, the presence of NO(2)(-) surprisingly exerted pro-oxidant effect on heme-H(2)O(2)-induced formation of BSA carbonyls at lower concentrations and enhanced the loss of HepG2 cell viability dose-dependently, which was probably due to the ability of this inorganic compound to efficiently enhance the peroxidase activity and oxidative degradation of heme. These data provide novel evidence that the dietary intake and experimental use of NO(2)(-) in vivo and in vitro would possess the pro-oxidant activity through interfering in heme-dependent oxidative reactions. Besides the classic role in protein tyrosine nitration, the deleterious effects on heme redox reactions may provide new insights into the toxicological implications of NO(2)(-) with cellular heme proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Atmospherically Important Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals with Methyl Nitrate: A Theoretical Study Involving the Calculation of Reaction Mechanisms, Enthalpies, Activation Energies, and Rate Coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2017-09-07

    A theoretical study, involving the calculation of reaction enthalpies, activation energies, mechanisms, and rate coefficients, was made of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with methyl nitrate, an important process for methyl nitrate removal in the earth's atmosphere. Four reaction channels were considered: formation of H 2 O + CH 2 ONO 2 , CH 3 OOH + NO 2 , CH 3 OH + NO 3 , and CH 3 O + HNO 3 . For all channels, geometry optimization and frequency calculations were performed at the M06-2X/6-31+G** level, while relative energies were improved at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level. The major channel is found to be the H abstraction channel, to give the products H 2 O + CH 2 ONO 2 . The reaction enthalpy (ΔH 298 K RX ) of this channel is computed as -17.90 kcal mol -1 . Although the other reaction channels are also exothermic, their reaction barriers are high (>24 kcal mol -1 ), and therefore these reactions do not contribute to the overall rate coefficient in the temperature range considered (200-400 K). Pathways via three transition states were identified for the H abstraction channel. Rate coefficients were calculated for these pathways at various levels of variational transition state theory including tunneling. The results obtained are used to distinguish between two sets of experimental rate coefficients, measured in the temperature range of 200-400 K, one of which is approximately an order of magnitude greater than the other. This comparison, as well as the temperature dependence of the computed rate coefficients, shows that the lower experimental values are favored. The implications of the results to atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  6. Studies on Rate Enhancement of Polymerization in NMRP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jian-ying; XU Miao-qing; YAN Ming-fa; CHEN Yi-hong; CHU Jia-yan; ZHUANG Jia-ming; DAI Li-zong; ZOU You-si

    2005-01-01

    In NMRP, the polymerization of MMA, the polymerization of St and the copolymerization of MMA with St were distinctly accelerated by the addition of a small amount of MN. The polymerization proceeds in a living fashion as indicated by the increase in molecular weight with the increase of time and conversion and a relatively low polydispersity. It has been found that the addition of MN results in a nearly one hundred times higher rate of the polymerization of MMA, a nearly twenty times higher rate of the polymerization of St and a nearly fifteen times higher rate of the copolymerization of St and MMA.

  7. Reaction Rate Benchmark Experiments with Miniature Fission Chambers at the Slovenian TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štancar, Žiga; Kaiba, Tanja; Snoj, Luka; Barbot, Loïc; Destouches, Christophe; Fourmentel, Damien; Villard, Jean-François AD(; )

    2018-01-01

    A series of fission rate profile measurements with miniature fission chambers, developed by the Commisariat á l'énergie atomique et auxénergies alternatives, were performed at the Jožef Stefan Institute's TRIGA research reactor. Two types of fission chambers with different fissionable coating (235U and 238U) were used to perform axial fission rate profile measurements at various radial positions and several control rod configurations. The experimental campaign was supported by an extensive set of computations, based on a validated Monte Carlo computational model of the TRIGA reactor. The computing effort included neutron transport calculations to support the planning and design of the experiments as well as calculations to aid the evaluation of experimental and computational uncertainties and major biases. The evaluation of uncertainties was performed by employing various types of sensitivity analyses such as experimental parameter perturbation and core reaction rate gradient calculations. It has been found that the experimental uncertainty of the measurements is sufficiently low, i.e. the total relative fission rate uncertainty being approximately 5 %, in order for the experiments to serve as benchmark experiments for validation of fission rate profiles. The effect of the neutron flux redistribution due to the control rod movement was studied by performing measurements and calculations of fission rates and fission chamber responses in different axial and radial positions at different control rod configurations. It was confirmed that the control rod movement affects the position of the maximum in the axial fission rate distribution, as well as the height of the local maxima. The optimal detector position, in which the redistributions would have minimum effect on its signal, was determined.

  8. Measurement from sun-synchronous orbit of a reaction rate controlling the diurnal NOx cycle in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dudhia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A reaction rate associated with the nighttime formation of an important diurnally varying species, N2O5, is determined from MIPAS-ENVISAT. During the day, photolysis of N2O5 in the stratosphere contributes to nitrogen-catalysed ozone destruction. However, at night concentrations of N2O5 increase, temporarily sequestering reactive NOx NO and NO2 in a natural cycle which regulates the majority of stratospheric ozone. In this paper, the reaction rate controlling the formation of N2O5 is determined from this instrument for the first time. The observed reaction rate is compared to the currently accepted rate determined from laboratory measurements. Good agreement is obtained between the observed and accepted experimental reaction rates within the error bars.

  9. Low-Temperature Experimental and Theoretical Rate Constants for the O(1D) + H2 Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Kevin M; Suleimanov, Yury V

    2017-03-09

    In the present joint experimental and theoretical study, we report thermal rate constants for the O( 1 D) + H 2 reaction within the 50-300 K temperature range. Experimental kinetics measurements were performed using a continuous supersonic flow reactor coupled with pulsed laser photolysis for O( 1 D) production and pulsed laser-induced fluorescence in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength range (VUV LIF) for O( 1 D) detection. Theoretical rate constants were obtained using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) approach over the two lowest potential energy surfaces 1 1 A' and 1 1 A″, which possess barrierless and thermally activated energy profiles, respectively. Both the experimental and theoretical rate constants exhibit a weak temperature dependence. The theoretical results show the dominant role of the 1 1 A' ground state and that contribution of the 1 1 A″ excited state to the total thermal rate decreases dramatically at lower temperature. Agreement between the experimental and theoretical results is good, and the discrepancy does not exceed 25%. It is argued that these differences are likely to be due to nonadiabatic couplings between the 1 1 A' and 2 1 A' surfaces.

  10. Complex ion kinetics. Reaction rates on ion-exchange resins compared to those in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liss, I.B.; Murmann, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison has been made between the rates in water and on an ion-exchange resin for the aquation of [(NH 3 ) 5 CoOReO 3 ] 2+ and [(H 2 O) 5 CrCl] 2+ and for the 18 O isotopic exchange of water with [(NH 3 ) 5 Co(OH 2 )] 3+ and ReO 4 - . The rate of water exchange on [(NH 3 ) 5 Co(OH 2 )] 3+ was not changed by association with Dowex 50W resins. Aquation of [(NH 3 ) 5 CoOReO 3 ] 2+ and water exchange on ReO 4 - had modified pH dependencies when associated with a resin. With the cobalt complex the rates were faster on the resin in the acidic region and slower on the resin in the basic region. A new term in the rate equation was observed when ReO 4 - was on the resin, first order in H + , while the other terms appear to be unchanged. Aquation of [(H 2 O) 5 CrCl] 2+ was much slower when it was absorbed on the resin. This was related to the known ionic strength effect of the reaction. (auth)

  11. Benzoylformate analogues exhibit differential rate-determining steps in the benzoylformate decarboxylase reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.A.; Weiss, P.M.; Cook, P.F.; Kenyon, G.L.; Cleland, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    Benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida is a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent enzyme which converts benzoylformate to benzaldehyde and CO 2 . The rate-determining step(s) in the benzoylformate decarboxylase reaction for a series of substituted benzoylformates (p-CH 3 O, p-CH 3 , p-Cl, and m-F) were studied using solvent deuterium and 13 C kinetic isotope effects. The normal substrate was found to have two partially rate-determining steps; initial tetrahedral adduct formation (D 2 O-sensitive) and decarboxylation ( 13 C-sensitive). D 2 O and 13 C isotope effects indicate that electron-withdrawing substituents (p-Cl and m-F) remove the rate dependence upon decarboxylation such that only a D 2 O effect on (V/K) is observed. Conversely, electron-donating substituents increase the rate-dependence upon decarboxylation such that a larger 13 (V/K) is seen while the D 2 O effects on (V) and (V/K) are not dramatically different from those for benzoylformate. All of the data are consistent with substituent stabilization or destabilization of the carbanionic intermediate formed upon decarboxylation

  12. Determination of the thermal rate coefficient, products, and branching ratios for the reaction of O/+/ /D-2/ with N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, D. G.; Torr, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite measurements are used to determine rate coefficients (RCs) for the following reactions: O(+)(D-2) + N2 yields N2(+) + O (reaction 1), O(+)(D-2) + N2 yields O(+)(S-4) + N2 (reaction 2), and O(+)(D-2) + N2 yields NO(+) + N (reaction 3). Results show the RC for reaction 1 to be 1 (plus 1 or minus 0.5) x 10 to the -10th cu cm per sec, for reaction 2 to be 3 (plus 1 or minus 2) x 10 to the -11th cu cm per sec, and 3 to be less than 5.5 x 10 to the -11th cu cm per sec. It is also found that the reaction of O(+)(D-2) with N2 does not constitute a detectable source of NO(+) ions in the thermosphere.

  13. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  14. Reaction Coordinate, Free Energy, and Rate of Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjib; Paul, Tanmoy Kumar; Taraphder, Srabani

    2018-03-22

    The role of structure and dynamics of an enzyme has been investigated at three different stages of its function including the chemical event it catalyzes. A one-pot computational method has been designed for each of these stages on the basis of classical and/or quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical molecular dynamics and transition path sampling simulations. For a pair of initial and final states A and B separated by a high free-energy barrier, using a two-stage selection process, several collective variables (CVs) are identified that can delineate A and B. However, these CVs are found to exhibit strong cross-coupling over the transition paths. A set of mutually orthogonal order parameters is then derived from these CVs and an optimal reaction coordinate, r, determined applying half-trajectory likelihood maximization along with a Bayesian information criterion. The transition paths are also used to project the multidimensional free energy surface and barrier crossing dynamics along r. The proposed scheme has been applied to the rate-determining intramolecular proton transfer reaction of the well-known enzyme human carbonic anhydrase II. The potential of mean force, F( r), in the absence of the chemical step is found to reproduce earlier results on the equilibrium population of two side-chain orientations of key residue His-64. Estimation of rate constants, k, from mean first passage times for the three different stages of catalysis shows that the rate-determining step of intramolecular proton transfer occurs with k ≃ 1.0 × 10 6 s -1 , in close agreement with known experimental results.

  15. Extrapolation of rate constants of reactions producing H2 and O2 in radiolysis of water at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, R.; Ghandi, K.; Hackman, B.; Liu, G.

    2014-01-01

    One target of our research is to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions and add corrections to estimate the rate constants at the higher temperatures reached by the SCWR reactors. The focus of this work was to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions that produce Hydrogen or Oxygen with a rate constant below 10 10 mol -1 s -1 at room temperature. The extrapolation is done taking into account the change in the diffusion rate of the interacting species and the cage effect with thermodynamic conditions. The extrapolations are done over a wide temperature range and under isobaric conditions. (author)

  16. The reaction rate for dissociative adsorption of N-2 on stepped Ru(0001): Six-dimensional quantum calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Harrevelt, Rob; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of the reaction rate for dissociative adsorption of N-2 on stepped Ru(0001) are presented. Converged six-dimensional quantum calculations for this heavy-atom reaction have been performed using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. A potential...

  17. Reaction rate studies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in sections of rat liver using four tetrazolium salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butcher, R. G.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reaction rate of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in liver sections from fed and starved rats has been monitored by the continuous measurement at 37 degrees C of the reaction product as it is formed using scanning and integrating microdensitometry. Control media lacked either substrate

  18. Stress-associated cardiovascular reaction masks heart rate dependence on physical load in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev-Andrievskiy, A A; Popova, A S; Borovik, A S; Dolgov, O N; Tsvirkun, D V; Custaud, M; Vinogradova, O L

    2014-06-10

    When tested on the treadmill mice do not display a graded increase of heart rate (HR), but rather a sharp shift of cardiovascular indices to high levels at the onset of locomotion. We hypothesized that under test conditions cardiovascular reaction to physical load in mice is masked with stress-associated HR increase. To test this hypothesis we monitored mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate in C57BL/6 mice after exposure to stressful stimuli, during spontaneous locomotion in the open-field test, treadmill running or running in a wheel installed in the home cage. Mice were treated with β1-adrenoblocker atenolol (2mg/kg ip, A), cholinolytic ipratropium bromide (2mg/kg ip, I), combination of blockers (A+I), anxiolytic diazepam (5mg/kg ip, D) or saline (control trials, SAL). MAP and HR in mice increased sharply after handling, despite 3weeks of habituation to the procedure. Under stressful conditions of open field test cardiovascular parameters in mice were elevated and did not depend on movement speed. HR values did not differ in I and SAL groups and were reduced with A or A+I. HR was lower at rest in D pretreated mice. In the treadmill test HR increase over speeds of 6, 12 and 18m/min was roughly 1/7-1/10 of HR increase observed after placing the mice on the treadmill. HR could not be increased with cholinolytic (I), but was reduced after sympatholytic (A) or A+I treatment. Anxiolytic (D) reduced heart rate at lower speeds of movement and its overall effect was to unmask the dependency of HR on running speed. During voluntary running in non-stressful conditions of the home cage HR in mice linearly increased with increasing running speeds. We conclude that in test situations cardiovascular reactions in mice are governed predominantly by stress-associated sympathetic activation, rendering efforts to evaluate HR and MAP reactions to workload unreliable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Practical enhancement factor model based on GM for multiple parallel reactions: Piperazine (PZ) CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    Reactive absorption is a key process for gas separation and purification and it is the main technology for CO2 capture. Thus, reliable and simple mathematical models for mass transfer rate calculation are essential. Models which apply to parallel interacting and non-interacting reactions, for all......, desorption and pinch conditions.In this work, we apply the GM model to multiple parallel reactions. We deduce the model for piperazine (PZ) CO2 capture and we validate it against wetted-wall column measurements using 2, 5 and 8 molal PZ for temperatures between 40 °C and 100 °C and CO2 loadings between 0.......23 and 0.41 mol CO2/2 mol PZ. We show that overall second order kinetics describes well the reaction between CO2 and PZ accounting for the carbamate and bicarbamate reactions. Here we prove the GM model for piperazine and MEA but we expect that this practical approach is applicable for various amines...

  20. Enhancement of solubility and dissolution rate of atorvastatin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the formation of atorvastatin calcium (AC) co-crystal to improve its solubility and dissolution rate. Method: Co-crystallization of AC in equimolar ratio with isonicotinamide (INA) was carried out by slow solvent evaporation method using methanol. The solid obtained was characterized by powder x-ray ...

  1. Enhancement of solubility and dissolution rate of atorvastatin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    solvent evaporation method using methanol. ... crystal significantly increases in solubility with a dissolution rate 2 - 3 times faster than that of ... considered one of the most effective synthetic .... temperature of 37 ± 0.5 °C. The test was carried.

  2. Search for an explanation for neutralization rates of atomic ion-ion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas M.; Wiens, Justin P.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2016-09-01

    We have measured well over a hundred rate coefficients k for cation-anion mutual neutralization reactions at thermal energies. For molecular ions, the k at 300 K tend not to vary more than a factor of two or three, presumably because a great many neutral states cross the incoming Coulombic potential energy curve. Atomic-atomic systems, for which there are few favorable curve crossings between the neutral and Coulombic curves, show variation of at least a factor of 60 in the measured k values at 300 K. For reactions involving the noble-gas cations, we assume that the final state is the lowest excited state of the neutral, plus the ground state of the neutralized anion, because otherwise the crossing distance R is so small that the curve-crossing probability is nil. We plotted measured k values (in cm3/s) vs the distance R (in bohr) at which the neutral and Coulombic curves cross, the found that the data are fairly well fit by a power law for k, 10-4R - 2 . 8 . The question is, is there a physical explanation for the observed dependence on R? We will discuss the data and the expectations of Landau-Zener theory. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR-2303EP).

  3. Monte carlo simulations of Yttrium reaction rates in Quinta uranium target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchopár M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The international collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste (E&T RAW performed intensive studies of several simple accelerator-driven system (ADS setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite which were irradiated by relativistic proton and deuteron beams in the past years at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR in Dubna, Russia. The most recent setup called Quinta, consisting of natural uranium target-blanket and lead shielding, was irradiated by deuteron beams in the energy range between 1 and 8 GeV in three accelerator runs at JINR Nuclotron in 2011 and 2012 with yttrium samples among others inserted inside the setup to measure the neutron flux in various places. Suitable activation detectors serve as one of possible tools for monitoring of proton and deuteron beams and for measurements of neutron field distribution in ADS studies. Yttrium is one of such suitable materials for monitoring of high energy neutrons. Various threshold reactions can be observed in yttrium samples. The yields of isotopes produced in the samples were determined using the activation method. Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction rates leading to production of different isotopes were performed in the MCNPX transport code and compared with the experimental results obtained from the yttrium samples.

  4. Monte carlo simulations of Yttrium reaction rates in Quinta uranium target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchopár, M.; Wagner, V.; Svoboda, O.; Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Tichý, P.; Kugler, A.; Adam, J.; Závorka, L.; Baldin, A.; Furman, W.; Kadykov, M.; Khushvaktov, J.; Solnyshkin, A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Bielewicz, M.; Kilim, S.; Strugalska-Gola, E.; Szuta, M.

    2017-03-01

    The international collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste (E&T RAW) performed intensive studies of several simple accelerator-driven system (ADS) setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite which were irradiated by relativistic proton and deuteron beams in the past years at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. The most recent setup called Quinta, consisting of natural uranium target-blanket and lead shielding, was irradiated by deuteron beams in the energy range between 1 and 8 GeV in three accelerator runs at JINR Nuclotron in 2011 and 2012 with yttrium samples among others inserted inside the setup to measure the neutron flux in various places. Suitable activation detectors serve as one of possible tools for monitoring of proton and deuteron beams and for measurements of neutron field distribution in ADS studies. Yttrium is one of such suitable materials for monitoring of high energy neutrons. Various threshold reactions can be observed in yttrium samples. The yields of isotopes produced in the samples were determined using the activation method. Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction rates leading to production of different isotopes were performed in the MCNPX transport code and compared with the experimental results obtained from the yttrium samples.

  5. Combustion modeling and kinetic rate calculations for a stoichiometric cyclohexane flame. 1. Major reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongzhi R; Huynh, Lam K; Kungwan, Nawee; Yang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shaowen

    2007-05-17

    The Utah Surrogate Mechanism was extended in order to model a stoichiometric premixed cyclohexane flame (P = 30 Torr). Generic rates were assigned to reaction classes of hydrogen abstraction, beta scission, and isomerization, and the resulting mechanism was found to be adequate in describing the combustion chemistry of cyclohexane. Satisfactory results were obtained in comparison with the experimental data of oxygen, major products and important intermediates, which include major soot precursors of C2-C5 unsaturated species. Measured concentrations of immediate products of fuel decomposition were also successfully reproduced. For example, the maximum concentrations of benzene and 1,3-butadiene, two major fuel decomposition products via competing pathways, were predicted within 10% of the measured values. Ring-opening reactions compete with those of cascading dehydrogenation for the decomposition of the conjugate cyclohexyl radical. The major ring-opening pathways produce 1-buten-4-yl radical, molecular ethylene, and 1,3-butadiene. The butadiene species is formed via beta scission after a 1-4 internal hydrogen migration of 1-hexen-6-yl radical. Cascading dehydrogenation also makes an important contribution to the fuel decomposition and provides the exclusive formation pathway of benzene. Benzene formation routes via combination of C2-C4 hydrocarbon fragments were found to be insignificant under current flame conditions, inferred by the later concentration peak of fulvene, in comparison with benzene, because the analogous species series for benzene formation via dehydrogenation was found to be precursors with regard to parent species of fulvene.

  6. Prompt gamma ray diagnostics and enhanced hadron-therapy using neutron-free nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Picciotto, A.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a series of simulations about the potential use of Boron isotopes to trigger neutron-free (aneutronic) nuclear reactions in cancer cells through the interaction with an incoming energetic proton beam, thus resulting in the emission of characteristic prompt gamma radiation (429 keV, 718 keV and 1435 keV). Furthermore assuming that the Boron isotopes are absorbed in cancer cells, the three alpha-particles produced in each p-11B aneutronic nuclear fusion reactions can potentially result in the enhancement of the biological dose absorbed in the tumor region since these multi-MeV alpha-particles are stopped inside the single cancer cell, thus allowing to spare the surrounding tissues. Although a similar approach based on the use of 11B nuclei has been proposed in [Yoon et al. Applied Physics Letters 105, 223507 (2014)], our work demonstrate, using Monte Carlo simulations, the crucial importance of the use of 10B nuclei (in a solution containing also 11B) for the generation of prompt gamma-rays, which can be applied to medical imaging. In fact, we demonstrate that the use of 10B nuclei can enhance the intensity of the 718 keV gamma-ray peak more than 30 times compared to the solution containing only 11B nuclei. A detailed explanation of the origin of the different prompt gamma-rays, as well as of their application as real-time diagnostics during a potential cancer treatment, is here discussed.

  7. A combination of quantitative marinating and Maillard reaction to enhance volatile flavor in Chinese marinated chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiuli; Wang, Chunqing; Zhang, Chunhui; Li, Xia; Wang, Jinzhi; Li, Hai; Tang, Chunhong

    2017-02-01

    A combination of quantitative marinating and Maillard reaction was investigated by adding d-xylose, l-cysteine and thiamine to the marinated brine of quantitative marinating, which was expected to enhance the volatile flavor of Chinese marinated chicken. Response surface methodology was used to optimize parameters, in which response was sensory evaluation scores of marinated chicken. A Box-Behnken center design was applied to the optimized added contents. The optimized contents were d-xylose (1-5‰), l-cysteine (1-5‰) and thiamine (1-3‰). Analysis of variance indicated that a second-order polynomial equation could predict the experimental data well (R 2  = 0.94), and sensory evaluation scores were significantly affected by the added amount of d-xylose, l-cysteine and thiamine. The optimal conditions that maximized the sensory evaluation score of Chinese marinated chicken were found to be 4.96‰ d-xylose, 2.28‰ l-cysteine and 2.66‰ thiamine (w/w). Given these optimal conditions, a number of meat-like flavor compounds such as 2-pentyl-furan, benzothiazole and 4-methyl-5-thiazoleethanol were identified by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. Our results suggested that a combination of quantitative marinating and Maillard reaction might be a promising method to enhance the volatile flavor, especially meat-like flavor, of Chinese marinated chicken. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Enhancement of deuteron-fusion reactions in metals and experimental implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huke, A.; Heide, P.; Czerski, K.; Ruprecht, G.; Targosz, N.; Zebrowski, W.

    2008-01-01

    Recent measurements of the reaction 2 H(d,p) 3 H in metallic environments at very low energies performed by different experimental groups point to an enhanced electron screening effect. However, the resulting screening energies differ strongly for diverse host metals and different experiments. Here, we present new experimental results and investigations of interfering processes in the irradiated targets. These measurements inside metals set special challenges and pitfalls that make them and the data analysis particularly error prone. There are multiparameter collateral effects that are crucial for the correct interpretation of the observed experimental yields. They mainly originate from target surface contaminations owing to residual gases in the vacuum as well as from inhomogeneities and instabilities in the deuteron density distribution in the targets. To address these problems an improved differential analysis method beyond the standard procedures has been implemented. Profound scrutiny of the other experiments demonstrates that the observed unusual changes in the reaction yields are mainly due to deuteron density dynamics simulating the alleged screening energy values. The experimental results are compared with different theoretical models of the electron screening in metals. The Debye-Hueckel model that has been previously proposed to explain the influence of the electron screening on both nuclear reactions and radioactive decays can be clearly excluded

  9. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Plasmonic photocatalytic reactions enhanced by hot electrons in a one-dimensional quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The plasmonic endothermic oxidation of ammonium ions in a spinning disk reactor resulted in light energy transformation through quantum hot charge carriers (QHC, or quantum hot electrons, during a chemical reaction. It is demonstrated with a simple model that light of various intensities enhance the chemical oxidization of ammonium ions in water. It was further observed that light illumination, which induces the formation of plasmons on a platinum (Pt thin film, provided higher processing efficiency compared with the reaction on a bare glass disk. These induced plasmons generate quantum hot electrons with increasing momentum and energy in the one-dimensional quantum well of a Pt thin film. The energy carried by the quantum hot electrons provided the energy needed to catalyze the chemical reaction. The results indicate that one-dimensional confinement in spherical coordinates (i.e., nanoparticles is not necessary to provide an extra excited state for QHC generation; an 8 nm Pt thin film for one-dimensional confinement in Cartesian coordinates can also provide the extra excited state for the generation of QHC.

  11. SGV: a code to evaluate plasma reaction rates to a specified accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoto, R.S.; Hanson, J.D.

    1978-09-22

    A FORTRAN code to evaluate binary reaction rates (sigmav) for a plasma to a specified accuracy is described. Distribution functions permitted are (1) two Maxwellian species at different temperatures, (2) beam-Maxwellian, (3) cold gas with Maxwellian, and (4) beam-plasma with mirror distribution of the form f(v) varies as f(v) M (cos theta). Several functional forms are permitted for f(v) and M(cos theta). Cross-section subroutines for a number of interactions involving hydrogen, helium, and electrons are included, as is a routine allowing input of numerical data. The code is written as a subroutine to allow ready incorporation into larger plasma codes.

  12. Reactivity and reaction rate measurements in U--D2O lattices with coaxial fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellarin, D.J.; Morris, B.M.

    1976-12-01

    Integral reaction rate parameters, intracell thermal neutron flux profiles, and material bucklings were measured for D 2 O-moderated uniform lattices in the exponential facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. Two different slightly enriched coaxial uranium fuel assemblies were examined over a wide range of triangular lattice pitches. Integral parameters are reported for inner and outer fuel separately providing data for a more detailed and rigorous comparison with computation than has been previously available. Results are compared with RAHAB calculations using ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Large discrepancies in agreement between calculation and experiment, outside of experimental errors and uncertainties in the input cross sections, probably result from the resonance capture models used by RAHAB

  13. Measurement for the Leak Rate enhanced by a Improved Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Young-San; Kim, Young-Ki; Lee, Yong-Sub; Jung, Hoan-Sung

    2007-01-01

    The leak rate measurement of the HANARO such as a research reactor that adopts a confinement concept for a reactor hall is very important one during a period inspection. This test verifies whether the reactor building could maintain the negative pressure or not when radiation is perceived by abnormal accidents. Of course, this may not cause a problem in a reactor operation only if it can satisfy the design requirement, but it is necessary to have some margin of a limitation value because a reactor hall should be managed more conservatively than the design reference. To meet the requirements of this strict design condition, previous method was changed to a new type of test with more stable and robust measuring method. The new leak rate measurement method is briefly introduced and the merits of this proposed method are shown through the data analyzed for last 3 years

  14. Enhanced photon production rate on the light-cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurenche, P.; Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy; Gelis, F.; Kobes, R.; Petitgirard, E.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies of the high temperature soft photon production rate on the light cone using Braaten-Pisarski resummation techniques have found collinear divergences present. It is shown that there exist a class of terms outside the Braaten-Pisarski framework which, although also divergent, dominate over these previously considered terms. The divergences in these new terms may be alleviated by application of a recently developed resummation scheme for processes sensitive to the light-cone. (author)

  15. Cybersickness provoked by head-mounted display affects cutaneous vascular tone, heart rate and reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalivaiko, Eugene; Davis, Simon L; Blackmore, Karen L; Vakulin, Andrew; Nesbitt, Keith V

    2015-11-01

    Evidence from studies of provocative motion indicates that motion sickness is tightly linked to the disturbances of thermoregulation. The major aim of the current study was to determine whether provocative visual stimuli (immersion into the virtual reality simulating rides on a rollercoaster) affect skin temperature that reflects thermoregulatory cutaneous responses, and to test whether such stimuli alter cognitive functions. In 26 healthy young volunteers wearing head-mounted display (Oculus Rift), simulated rides consistently provoked vection and nausea, with a significant difference between the two versions of simulation software (Parrot Coaster and Helix). Basal finger temperature had bimodal distribution, with low-temperature group (n=8) having values of 23-29 °C, and high-temperature group (n=18) having values of 32-36 °C. Effects of cybersickness on finger temperature depended on the basal level of this variable: in subjects from former group it raised by 3-4 °C, while in most subjects from the latter group it either did not change or transiently reduced by 1.5-2 °C. There was no correlation between the magnitude of changes in the finger temperature and nausea score at the end of simulated ride. Provocative visual stimulation caused prolongation of simple reaction time by 20-50 ms; this increase closely correlated with the subjective rating of nausea. Lastly, in subjects who experienced pronounced nausea, heart rate was elevated. We conclude that cybersickness is associated with changes in cutaneous thermoregulatory vascular tone; this further supports the idea of a tight link between motion sickness and thermoregulation. Cybersickness-induced prolongation of reaction time raises obvious concerns regarding the safety of this technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancing transformer dynamic rating through grid application of photovoltaic arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Gasseir, M.M.; Sayer, M.A.; Alteneder, K.P.; McCulla, G.A.; Bigger, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that exact matching between the substation's peak-day load profile and the profile of coincident net output generation of the PV array is unjustifiable and will unduly lead to overlooking many investment deferment opportunities that would otherwise be major components of high value applications of PV arrays. Further, the paper shows how and to what extent the load matchability requirement could be relaxed. Because of the thermal inertia of transformers, the output of an adequately sized and located photovoltaic array can both delay and reduce transformer temperature rise even in cases where load peak occurs after sunset. The time lag due to thermal inertia and ambient temperature decline allow overloading of the transformer beyond its normal rating without significant loss of life. Simulations depicting the interplay between PV array capacity, ambient temperature, transformer size, oil and winding temperature rise, peak load magnitude, load profile and loss of life, have been conducted. Tradeoffs between PV array capacity and transformer over-rating gains have been assessed. The impacts of PV generation on the over-rating potential of an actual 22.4-MVA bank transformer of a Salt River Project (SRP) distribution substation in Phoenix, Arizona were evaluated

  17. Enhanced emission of high-energy photons perpendicular to the reaction plane in α+Th reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegner, P.; Marianski, B.; Morsch, H.P.; Rogge, M.; Bargholtz, C.; Decowski, P.; Zemlo, L.

    1991-01-01

    High-energy photon and neutron emission has been measured in coincidence with fission fragments in α+ 232 Th reactions at 170 MeV. From measurements parallel and perpendicular to the fission plane, anisotropies relative to the reaction plane were determined. The in-plane/out-of-plane intensity ratio is 0.72(7) for photons with energies above 20 MeV and 11(3) for neutrons at 35 MeV. The result for high-energy photons can be explained by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung if the initial flow of nucleons has a correlation to the reaction plane similar to the one observed for fast neutrons

  18. Decomposition reaction rate of BCl3-C3H6(propene)-H2 in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jun; Su, Kehe; Liu, Yan; Ren, Hongjiang; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2012-07-05

    The decomposition reaction rate in the BCl(3)-C(3)H(6)-H(2) gas phase reaction system in preparing boron carbides was investigated based on the most favorable reaction pathways proposed by Jiang et al. [Theor. Chem. Accs. 2010, 127, 519] and Yang et al. [J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2012, 11, 53]. The rate constants of all the elementary reactions were evaluated with the variational transition state theory. The vibrational frequencies for the stationary points as well as the selected points along the minimum energy paths (MEPs) were calculated with density functional theory at the B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level and the energies were refined with the accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2). For the elementary reaction associated with a transition state, the MEP was obtained with the intrinsic reaction coordinates, while for the elementary reaction without transition state, the relaxed potential energy surface scan was employed to obtain the MEP. The rate constants were calculated for temperatures within 200-2000 K and fitted into three-parameter Arrhenius expressions. The reaction rates were investigated by using the COMSOL software to solve numerically the coupled differential rate equations. The results show that the reactions are, consistent with the experiments, appropriate at 1100-1500 K with the reaction time of 30 s for 1100 K, 1.5 s for 1200 K, 0.12 s for 1300 K, 0.011 s for 1400 K, or 0.001 s for 1500 K, for propene being almost completely consumed. The completely dissociated species, boron carbides C(3)B, C(2)B, and CB, have very low concentrations, and C(3)B is the main product at higher temperatures, while C(2)B is the main product at lower temperatures. For the reaction time 1 s, all these concentrations approach into a nearly constant. The maximum value (in mol/m(3)) is for the highest temperature 1500 K with the orders of -13, -17, and -23 for C(3)B, C(2)B, and CB, respectively. It was also found that the logarithm of the overall reaction rate and reciprocal

  19. Enhanced low dose rate radiation effect test on typical bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Minbo; Chen Wei; Yao Zhibin; He Baoping; Huang Shaoyan; Sheng Jiangkun; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun

    2014-01-01

    Two types of bipolar transistors and nine types bipolar integrated circuit were selected in the irradiation experiment at different "6"0Co γ dose rate. The base current of bipolar transistor and input bias current of amplifier and comparator was measured, low dose enhance factor of test device was obtained. The results show that bipolar device have enhanced low dose rate sensitivity, enhancement factor of bipolar integrated circuit was bigger than that of transistor, and enhanced low dose rate sensitivity greatly varied with different structure and process of bipolar device. (authors)

  20. Rate-limiting reaction in papain action as derived from the reaction of the enzyme with chloroacetic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyterman, L.A.A.E.

    1968-01-01

    Chloroacetic acid reacts with the essential thiol group of papain (EC 3.4.4.10) and inactivates the enzyme. The rate of inactivation, k, at pH 6.0, 25°, was determined in the absence and presence of the substrates benzoylarginine ethyl ester (BAEE) and benzoylglycine ethyl ester (BGEE). The rate was

  1. Capture and photonuclear reaction rates involving charged-particles: Impacts of nuclear ingredients and future measurement on ELI-NP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Y.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The astrophysical p-process is an important way of nucleosynthesis to produce the stable and proton-rich nuclei beyond Fe which can not be reached by the s- and r-processes. In the present study, the impact of nuclear ingredients, especially the nuclear potential, level density and strength function, to the astrophysical re-action rates of (p,γ, (α,γ, (γ,p, and (γ,α reactions are systematically studied. The calculations are performed basad on the modern reaction code TALYS for about 3000 stable and proton-rich nuclei with 12≤Z≤110. In particular, both of the Wood-Saxon potential and the microscopic folding potential are taken into account. It is found that both the capture and photonuclear reaction rates are very sensitive to the nuclear potential, thus the better determination of nuclear potential would be important to reduce the uncertainties of reaction rates. Meanwhile, the Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP facility is being developed, which will provide the great opportunity to experimentally study the photonuclear reactions in p-process. Simulations of the experimental setup for the measurements of the photonuclear reactions 96Ru(γ,p and 96Ru(γ,α are performed. It is shown that the experiments of photonuclear reactions in p-process based on ELI-NP are quite promising.

  2. Capture and photonuclear reaction rates involving charged-particles: Impacts of nuclear ingredients and future measurement on ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Goriely, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Guardo, G. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lan, H. Y.; Lattuada, D.; Luo, W.; Matei, C.

    2018-05-01

    The astrophysical p-process is an important way of nucleosynthesis to produce the stable and proton-rich nuclei beyond Fe which can not be reached by the s- and r-processes. In the present study, the impact of nuclear ingredients, especially the nuclear potential, level density and strength function, to the astrophysical re-action rates of (p,γ), (α,γ), (γ,p), and (γ,α) reactions are systematically studied. The calculations are performed basad on the modern reaction code TALYS for about 3000 stable and proton-rich nuclei with 12≤Z≤110. In particular, both of the Wood-Saxon potential and the microscopic folding potential are taken into account. It is found that both the capture and photonuclear reaction rates are very sensitive to the nuclear potential, thus the better determination of nuclear potential would be important to reduce the uncertainties of reaction rates. Meanwhile, the Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility is being developed, which will provide the great opportunity to experimentally study the photonuclear reactions in p-process. Simulations of the experimental setup for the measurements of the photonuclear reactions 96Ru(γ,p) and 96Ru(γ,α) are performed. It is shown that the experiments of photonuclear reactions in p-process based on ELI-NP are quite promising.

  3. Rate Coefficient for the (4)Heμ + CH4 Reaction at 500 K: Comparison between Theory and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseneau, Donald J; Fleming, Donald G; Li, Yongle; Li, Jun; Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-03

    The rate constant for the H atom abstraction reaction from methane by the muonic helium atom, Heμ + CH4 → HeμH + CH3, is reported at 500 K and compared with theory, providing an important test of both the potential energy surface (PES) and reaction rate theory for the prototypical polyatomic CH5 reaction system. The theory used to characterize this reaction includes both variational transition-state (CVT/μOMT) theory (VTST) and ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations on a recently developed PES, which are compared as well with earlier calculations on different PESs for the H, D, and Mu + CH4 reactions, the latter, in particular, providing for a variation in atomic mass by a factor of 36. Though rigorous quantum calculations have been carried out for the H + CH4 reaction, these have not yet been extended to the isotopologues of this reaction (in contrast to H3), so it is important to provide tests of less rigorous theories in comparison with kinetic isotope effects measured by experiment. In this regard, the agreement between the VTST and RPMD calculations and experiment for the rate constant of the Heμ + CH4 reaction at 500 K is excellent, within 10% in both cases, which overlaps with experimental error.

  4. Measurements and calculations of 10B(n,He) reaction rates in a control rod in ZPPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumbach, S.B.; Collins, P.J.; Grasseschi, G.L.; Oliver, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    The helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) technique has been used to measure the 10 B(n,He) reaction rate within B 4 C pellets in a control rod in ZPPR. Knowledge of this reaction rate is important to control rod design studies because helium production leads to control rod swelling, buildup of gas pressure and a reduction in thermal conductivity which can limit the lifetime of a control rod. We believe these to be the first measurements of boron capture within boron pins in a fast reactor spectrum. Previously reported measurements used 235 U foils to measure fission rates in a control rod, and to infer boron capture rates

  5. Effects of network dissolution changes on pore-to-core upscaled reaction rates for kaolinite and anorthite reactions under acidic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang; Lindquist, W. Brent

    2013-01-01

    new connections. The computed changes were based upon a mineral map from an X-ray computed tomography image of a sandstone core. We studied the effect of these changes on upscaled (pore-scale to core-scale) reaction rates and compared against

  6. The reaction O((3)P) + HOBr: Temperature dependence of the rate constant and importance of the reaction as an HOBr stratospheric loss process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, F. L.; Monks, P. S.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.; Toumi, R.

    1995-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction O((3)P) + HOBr has been measured between T = 233K and 423K using the discharge-flow kinetic technique coupled to mass spectrometric detection. The value of the rate coefficient at room temperature is (2.5 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -11)cu cm/molecule/s and the derived Arrhenius expression is (1.4 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp -10) exp((-430 +/- 260)/T)cu cm/molecule/s. From these rate data the atmospheric lifetime of HOBr with respect to reaction with O((3)P) is about 0.6h at z = 25 km which is comparable to the photolysis lifetime based on recent measurements of the UV cross section for HOBr. Implications for HOBr loss in the stratosphere have been tested using a 1D photochemical box model. With the inclusion of the rate parameters and products for the O + HOBr reaction, calculated concentration profiles of BrO increase by up to 33% around z = 35 km. This result indicates that the inclusion of the O + HOBr reaction in global atmospheric chemistry models may have an impact on bromine partitioning in the middle atmosphere.

  7. Estimating reaction rate constants from a two-step reaction: a comparison between two-way and three-way methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, S.; Smilde, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, two different spectral datasets are used in order to estimate reaction rate constants using different algorithms. Dataset 1 consists of short-wavelength near-infrared (SW NIR) spectra taken in time of the two-step epoxidation of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone using tert-butyl

  8. The rate of the reaction between C2H and C2H2 at interstellar temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, E.; Woon, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction between the radical C2H and the stable hydrocarbon C2H2 is one of the simplest neutral-neutral hydrocarbon reactions in chemical models of dense interstellar clouds and carbon-rich circumstellar shells. Although known to be rapid at temperatures > or = 300 K, the reaction has yet to be studied at lower temperatures. We present here ab initio calculations of the potential surface for this reaction and dynamical calculations to determine its rate at low temperature. Despite a small potential barrier in the exit channel, the calculated rate is large, showing that this reaction and, most probably, more complex analogs contribute to the formation of complex organic molecules in low-temperature sources.

  9. Rate constant for reaction of vitamin C with protein radicals in γ-irradiated aqueous albumin solution at 295K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Yoshimura, Toru; Mita, Kazuya; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1995-01-01

    When an aqueous solution of albumin (0.1 kg dm -3 ) is irradiated by γ-rays at 295 K, albumin radicals with a long lifetime are observed by ESR. The reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals has been studied at 295 K in the albumin solution, which is considered as a model of cells. The rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals was measured as 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 S -1 , which is much smaller than the reported constants (10 6 -10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ) for the reaction of vitamin C with radicals in a dilute aqueous solution. The small rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C is ascribed to the reaction in polymer coils in the albumin solution, since vitamin C and albumin radicals diffuse very slowly in the coils. (author)

  10. The effects of H sub 2 addition on the enhanced deposition rate and high quality Cu films by MOCVD

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J H; Park, S J; Choi, S Y

    1998-01-01

    High-quality Cu thin films were deposited on the TiN/Si substrate from the hexafluoroacetylacetonate Copper thrmethylvinylsilane [Cu (hfac) (tmvs)] source using a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. The optimum deposition condition is with a substrate temperature of 200 .deg. C and the hydrogen flow rate of 80 sccm. The deposition rate, electrical resistivity, surface morphology, grain size, and optical properties of the deposited Cu films were investigated by the AES, four-point probe, SEM, XRD, and the visible spectrophotometer as a function of hydrogen gas flow rate, The results indicated that additional hydrogen gas affects the CVD hydrogen reduction reaction improving the purity, deposition rate, and electrical resistivity of Cu thin films. A prospective idea will be discussed for the preparation of Cu thin films showing a more enhanced electromigration resistance applicable to the next-generation interconnection.

  11. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N 2 flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure

  12. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V., E-mail: e.kustova@spbu.ru [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr. 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M., E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N{sub 2} flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  13. Impact of New Gadolinium Cross Sections on Reaction Rate Distributions in 10 * 10 BWR Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, G.; Murphy, M.F.; Jatuff, F.; Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst, CH-5232 Villigen, (Switzerland); Sublet, J.Ch.; Bouland, O. [DEN, Commissariat Energie Atom, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France); Chawla, R. [Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    Radial distributions of the total fission rate and the {sup 238}U-capture-to-total-fission (C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}) ratio were measured in SVEA-96+ and SVEA-96 Optima2 assemblies during the LWR-PROTEUS program. Fission rates predicted using MCNPX with JEFF-3.1 cross sections underestimated the measured values in the gadolinium-poisoned pins of the SVEA-96 Optima2 assembly; similarly, C{sub 8}/F{sub tot} ratios were overestimated in some gadolinium-poisoned pins of the SVEA-96+ assembly. A considerable effort was invested at the Paul Scherrer Institut to explain the discrepancies in gadolinium pins, without success. Recently, gadolinium cross sections were measured at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute by Leinweber et al. and differed significantly from current library values. ENDF/B-VII.0 gadolinium cross sections have currently been modified to include the new measurements, and these data have been processed with NJOY to yield files usable by MCNPX. Fission rates in the gadolinium-poisoned fuel pins of the SVEA-96 Optima2 pins were increased by 1.4 to 2.0% using the newly produced cross sections, yielding to a better agreement with the experimental values. Predicted C{sub 8}/F{sub tot} ratios were decreased on average by 1.7% in both clustered and un-clustered groups of gadolinium-poisoned fuel pins of the SVEA-96+ assembly correcting the over predictions previously reported in the clustered gadolinium pins. Earlier reported discrepancies observed in PROTEUS integral experiments, between measured and calculated reaction rates in the gadolinium-poisoned pins, might thus be due to inaccurate gadolinium cross sections. The PROTEUS results support the new thermal and epithermal gadolinium data measured by Leinweber et al. (authors)

  14. A mathematical analysis of Prx2-STAT3 disulfide exchange rate constants for a bimolecular reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Troy F; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2018-03-22

    Appreciation of peroxiredoxins as the major regulators of H 2 O 2 concentrations in human cells has led to a new understanding of redox signaling. In addition to their status as the primary reducers of H 2 O 2 to water, the oxidized peroxiredoxin byproduct of this reaction has recently been shown capable of participation in H 2 O 2 -mediated signaling pathways through disulfide exchange reactions with the transcription factor STAT3. The dynamics of peroxidase-transcription factor disulfide exchange reactions have not yet been considered in detail with respect to how these reactions fit into the larger network of competing reactions in human cells. In this study, we used a kinetic model of oxidation and reduction reactions related to H 2 O 2 metabolism in the cytosol of human cells to study the dynamics of peroxiredoxin-2 mediated oxidation of the redox-regulated transcription factor STAT3. In combination with previously reported experimental data, the model was used to estimate the rate coefficient of a biomolecular reaction between Prx2 and STAT3 for two sets of assumptions that constitute lower and upper bound cases. Using these estimates, we calculated the relative rates of the reaction of oxidized peroxiredoxin-2 and STAT3 and other competing reactions in the cytosol. These calculations revealed that peroxiredoxin-2-mediated oxidation of STAT3 likely occurs at a much slower rate than competing reactions in the cytosol. This analysis suggests the existence of more complex mechanisms, potentially involving currently unknown protein-protein recognition partners, which facilitate disulfide exchange reactions between peroxiredoxin-2 and STAT3. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced cosmological GRB rates and implications for cosmogenic neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yueksel, Hasan; Kistler, Matthew D.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, which are among the most violent events in the Universe, are one of the few viable candidates to produce ultra high-energy cosmic rays. Recently, observations have revealed that GRBs generally originate from metal-poor, low-luminosity galaxies and do not directly trace cosmic star formation, as might have been assumed from their association with core-collapse supernovae. Several implications follow from these findings. The redshift distribution of observed GRBs is expected to peak at higher redshift (compared to cosmic star formation), which is supported by the mean redshift of the Swift GRB sample, ∼3. If GRBs are, in fact, the source of the observed UHECR, then cosmic-ray production would evolve with redshift in a stronger fashion than has been previously suggested. This necessarily leads, through the GZK process, to an enhancement in the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos, providing a near-term approach for testing the gamma-ray burst-cosmic-ray connection with ongoing and proposed UHE neutrino experiments

  16. Recovery rates, enhanced oil recovery and technological limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggeridge, Ann; Cockin, Andrew; Webb, Kevin; Frampton, Harry; Collins, Ian; Moulds, Tim; Salino, Peter

    2014-01-13

    Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques can significantly extend global oil reserves once oil prices are high enough to make these techniques economic. Given a broad consensus that we have entered a period of supply constraints, operators can at last plan on the assumption that the oil price is likely to remain relatively high. This, coupled with the realization that new giant fields are becoming increasingly difficult to find, is creating the conditions for extensive deployment of EOR. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the nature, status and prospects for EOR technologies. It explains why the average oil recovery factor worldwide is only between 20% and 40%, describes the factors that contribute to these low recoveries and indicates which of those factors EOR techniques can affect. The paper then summarizes the breadth of EOR processes, the history of their application and their current status. It introduces two new EOR technologies that are beginning to be deployed and which look set to enter mainstream application. Examples of existing EOR projects in the mature oil province of the North Sea are discussed. It concludes by summarizing the future opportunities for the development and deployment of EOR.

  17. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    12 janv. 2012 ... Key words: Métastase, rate, colon, carcinome. Received: 28/12/2011 - Accepted: 09/01/2012 - Published: ... tomodensitométriques au moment du diagnostic du cancer primitif ou lors du suivi radiologique régulier des patients atteints de cancers. Le recours à la TEP-FDG couplée au scanner serait d'un ...

  18. Atmospheric reaction of Cl + methacrolein: a theoretical study on the mechanism, and pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuihong; Xu, Baoen; Zhang, Shaowen

    2014-05-22

    Methacrolein is a major degradation product of isoprene, the reaction of methacrolein with Cl atoms may play some roles in the degradation of isoprene where these species are relatively abundant. However, the energetics and kinetics of this reaction, which govern the reaction branching, are still not well understood so far. In the present study, two-dimensional potential energy surfaces were constructed to analyze the minimum energy path of the barrierless addition process between Cl and the C═C double bond of methacrolein, which reveals that the terminal addition intermediate is directly formed from the addition reaction. The terminal addition intermediate can further yield different products among which the reaction paths abstracting the aldehyde hydrogen atom and the methyl hydrogen atom are dominant reaction exits. The minimum reaction path for the direct aldehydic hydrogen atom abstraction is also obtained. The reaction kinetics was calculated by the variational transition state theory in conjunction with the master equation method. From the theoretical model we predicted that the overall rate constant of the Cl + methacrolein reaction at 297 K and atmospheric pressure is koverall = 2.3× 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the branching ratio of the aldehydic hydrogen abstraction is about 12%. The reaction is pressure dependent at P pressure limit at about 100 Torr. The calculated results could well account for the experimental observations.

  19. Reaction rate of the 13C(α,n)16O neutron source using the ANC of the -3 keV resonance measured with the THM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cognata, M; Spitaleri, C; Trippella, O; Kiss, G G; Guardo, G L; Puglia, S M R; Romano, S; Spartà, R; Rogachev, G V; Avila, M; Koshchiy, E; Kuchera, A; Santiago, D; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Lamia, L

    2016-01-01

    The s-process is responsible of the synthesis of most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ≤ A ≤ 208. It consists in a series of neutron capture reactions on seed nuclei followed by β-decays, since the neutron accretion rate is slower than the β-decay rate. Such small neutron flux is supplied by the 13 C(α,n) 16 O reaction. It is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures < 10 8 K, corresponding to an energy interval of 140–230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S (E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17 O. In this work, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the 13 C( 6 Li,n 16 O)d quasi-free reaction to extract the 6.356 MeV level resonance parameters, in particular the asymptotic normalization coefficient . A preliminary analysis of a partial data set has lead to , slightly larger than the values in the literature. However, the deduced 13 C(α, n) 16 O reaction rate is in agreement with most results in the literature at ∼ 10 8 K, with enhanced accuracy thanks to our innovative approach merging together ANC and THM. (paper)

  20. Exploration of the Role of Heat Activation in Enhancing Serpentine Carbon Sequestration Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKelvy, M.J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Diefenbacher, J.; Bearat, H.; Wolf, G.

    2005-01-01

    As compared with other candidate carbon sequestration technologies, mineral carbonation offers the unique advantage of permanent disposal via geologically stable and environmentally benign carbonates. The primary challenge is the development of an economically viable process. Enhancing feedstock carbonation reactivity is key. Heat activation dramatically enhances aqueous serpentine carbonation reactivity. Although the present process is too expensive to implement, the materials characteristics and mechanisms that enhance carbonation are of keen interest for further reducing cost. Simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) of the serpentine mineral lizardite was used to isolate a series of heat-activated materials as a function of residual hydroxide content at progressively higher temperatures. Their structure and composition are evaluated via TGA/DTA, X-ray powder diffraction (including phase analysis), and infrared analysis. The meta-serpentine materials that were observed to form ranged from those with longer range ordering, consistent with diffuse stage-2 like interlamellar order, to an amorphous component that preferentially forms at higher temperatures. The aqueous carbonation reaction process was investigated for representative materials via in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Magnesite was observed to form directly at 15 MPa CO 2 and at temperatures ranging from 100 to 125 C. Carbonation reactivity is generally correlated with the extent of meta-serpentine formation and structural disorder.

  1. Supersymmetric enhancement factor for the 1-jet cross-section in p-anti p reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Baulieu, L.; Delduc, F.

    1984-01-01

    We compare the 1-jet inclusive cross-section at high psub(perpendicular to) in proton-antiproton reaction at SPS collider predicted by standard QCD and by its simplest supersymmetric extension (SQCD). We first compute the total enhancement factor K between QCD and SQCD jets as a function of psub(perpendicular to). Then we compute the observable enhancement factor which is smaller than K since the transverse momentum of supersymmetric particles is not fully observable. We have analyzed two cases (i) psub(perpendicular to) is small compared to the masses of squarks and only light gluinos (2 GeV) are considered (ii) psub(perpendicular to) is large compared to the masses of squarks (17 GeV in our analysis) and both gluinos and squarks are taken into account. The observable enhancement factor between QCD and SQCD is found to be small (of order 1.3 to 1.5 for psub(perpendicular to)=100 GeV). Missing psub(perpendicular to) events with one ordinary jet and one jet due to the production of a supersymmetric particle are found to be non negligible with respect to those with two supersymmetric jets. We also display some interesting supersymmetric relations among parton cross-sections. (orig.)

  2. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-01-01

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity σv is calculated, where σ is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the TDF

  3. Standard and Nonstandard Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions Cross Sections and Event Rates to Neutrino Detection Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Papoulias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we explore ν-nucleus processes from a nuclear theory point of view and obtain results with high confidence level based on accurate nuclear structure cross sections calculations. Besides cross sections, the present study includes simulated signals expected to be recorded by nuclear detectors and differential event rates as well as total number of events predicted to be measured. Our original cross sections calculations are focused on measurable rates for the standard model process, but we also perform calculations for various channels of the nonstandard neutrino-nucleus reactions and come out with promising results within the current upper limits of the corresponding exotic parameters. We concentrate on the possibility of detecting (i supernova neutrinos by using massive detectors like those of the GERDA and SuperCDMS dark matter experiments and (ii laboratory neutrinos produced near the spallation neutron source facilities (at Oak Ridge National Lab by the COHERENT experiment. Our nuclear calculations take advantage of the relevant experimental sensitivity and employ the severe bounds extracted for the exotic parameters entering the Lagrangians of various particle physics models and specifically those resulting from the charged lepton flavour violating μ-→e- experiments (Mu2e and COMET experiments.

  4. Evaporation Rate Study and NDMA Formation from UDMH/NO2 Reaction Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Dee, Louis A.; Baker, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory samples of uns-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel/oxidizer (nitrogen dioxide) non-combustion reaction products (UFORP) were prepared using a unique permeation tube technology. Also, a synthetic UFORP was prepared from UDMH, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylammonium nitrate, sodium nitrite and purified water. The evaporation rate of UFORP and synthetic UFORP was determined under space vacuum (approx 10(exp -3) Torr) at -40 ?C and 0 ?C. The material remaining was analyzed and showed that the UFORP weight and NDMA concentration decreased over time; however, NDMA had not completely evaporated. Over 85% of the weight was removed by subjecting the UFORP to 10(-3) Torr for 7 hours at -40 ?C and 4 hours at 0 ?C. A mixture of dimethylammonium nitrate and sodium nitrite formed NDMA at a rapid rate in a moist air environment. A sample of UFORP residue was analyzed for formation of NDMA under various conditions. It was found that NDMA was not formed unless nitrite was added.

  5. Estimation of rate constants of PCB dechlorination reactions using an anaerobic dehalogenation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Filiz; Imamoglu, Ipek

    2017-02-15

    This study aims to estimate anaerobic dechlorination rate constants (k m ) of reactions of individual PCB congeners using data from four laboratory microcosms set up using sediment from Baltimore Harbor. Pathway k m values are estimated by modifying a previously developed model as Anaerobic Dehalogenation Model (ADM) which can be applied to any halogenated hydrophobic organic (HOC). Improvements such as handling multiple dechlorination activities (DAs) and co-elution of congeners, incorporating constraints, using new goodness of fit evaluation led to an increase in accuracy, speed and flexibility of ADM. DAs published in the literature in terms of chlorine substitutions as well as specific microorganisms and their combinations are used for identification of pathways. The best fit explaining the congener pattern changes was found for pathways of Phylotype DEH10, which has the ability to remove doubly flanked chlorines in meta and para positions, para flanked chlorines in meta position. The range of estimated k m values is between 0.0001-0.133d -1 , the median of which is found to be comparable to the few available published biologically confirmed rate constants. Compound specific modelling studies such as that performed by ADM can enable monitoring and prediction of concentration changes as well as toxicity during bioremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Temperature dependence of electrocatalytic and photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction rates using NiFe oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela; Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Qureshi, Muhammad; Dhawale, Dattatray Sadashiv; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The present work compares oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis in aqueous solutions using nanostructured NiFeOx as catalysts. The impacts of pH and reaction temperature on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic OER

  7. Dose Response Model of Biological Reaction to Low Dose Rate Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furikawa, C.; Hoshi, Y.; Kawakami, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to use reproducible and stable indicators to evaluate biological responses to long term irradiation at low dose-rate. They should be simple and quantitative enough to produce the results statistically accurate, because we have to analyze the subtle changes of biological responses around background level at low dose. For these purposes we chose micronucleus formation of U2OS, a human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological responses. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation rom bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide, respectively. the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was counted under a fluorescence microscope. Dose rate in the irradiation room was measured with PLD. Dose response of PLD is linear between 1 mGy to 10 Gy, and standard deviation of triplicate count was several percent of mean value. We fitted statistically dose response curves to the data, and they were plotted on the coordinate of linearly scale response and dose. The results followed to the straight line passing through the origin of the coordinate axes between 0.1-5 Gy, and dose and does rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) was less than 2 when cells were irradiated for 1-10 min. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose above 0.1 Gy when 5,000 binuclear cells were analyzed. In contrast, dose response curves never followed LNT, when cells were irradiated for 7 to 124 days. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose below 6 Gy, when cells were continuously irradiated for 124 days. These results suggest that dose response curve of biological reaction is remarkably affected by exposure

  8. A sensitivity study of s-process: the impact of uncertainties from nuclear reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyoles, N.; Serenelli, A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow neutron capture process (s-process) is responsible for the production of about half the elements beyond the Fe-peak. The production sites and the conditions under which the different components of s-process occur are relatively well established. A detailed quantitative understanding of s-process nucleosynthesis may yield light in physical processes, e.g. convection and mixing, taking place in the production sites. For this, it is important that the impact of uncertainties in the nuclear physics is well understood. In this work we perform a study of the sensitivity of s-process nucleosynthesis, with particular emphasis in the main component, on the nuclear reaction rates. Our aims are: to quantify the current uncertainties in the production factors of s-process elements originating from nuclear physics and, to identify key nuclear reactions that require more precise experimental determinations. In this work we studied two different production sites in which s-process occurs with very different neutron exposures: 1) a low-mass extremely metal-poor star during the He-core flash (nn reaching up to values of ∼ 1014cm-3); 2) the TP-AGB phase of a M⊙, Z=0.01 model, the typical site of the main s-process component (nn up to 108 — 109cm-3). In the first case, the main variation in the production of s-process elements comes from the neutron poisons and with relative variations around 30%-50%. In the second, the neutron poison are not as important because of the higher metallicity of the star that actually acts as a seed and therefore, the final error of the abundances are much lower around 10%-25%.

  9. Reaction rates and electrical resistivities of the hydrogen isotopes with, and their solubilities in, liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulham, R.J.; Adams, P.F.; Hubberstey, P.; Parry, G.; Thunder, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    The rate of reaction, k, of hydrogen and of deuterium with liquid lithium have been determined up to pressures of 20kNm -2 and at temperatures between 230 and 270 0 C. The reaction is first order with an apparent activation energy of 52.8 and 55.2 kJmol -1 for hydrogen and deuterium, respectively. The deuterium isotope effect, k/sub H/k/sub D/, decreases from 2.95 at 230 to 2.83 at 270 0 C. Tritium is predicted to react even more slowly than deuterium. The freezing point of lithium is depressed by 0.082 and 0.075 0 C, respectively, by dissolved hydride and deuteride giving eutectics at 0.016 mol percent H and 0.012 mol percent D in the metal-salt phase diagrams. The depression and eutectic concentration are expected to be less for tritium. The increase in the resistivity of liquid lithium caused by dissolved hydrogen isotopes is linear and relatively large, 5 x 10 -8 Ωm (mol percent H or D) -1 . The solubility of lithium hydride and deuteride was determined from the marked change in resistivity on saturation. The liquidus of the metal-salt phase diagram rises steeply from the eutectic point to meet the two-immiscible liquid region. Tritium is expected to be less soluble than deuterium. The partial molar enthalpies of solution are 44.2 and 55.0 kJmol -1 for hydrogen and deuterium, respectively. These values are used to calculate the solvation enthalpies of the isotope anions in the metal

  10. The rate constant of the reaction NCN + H2 and its role in NCN and NO modeling in low pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faßheber, Nancy; Lamoureux, Nathalie; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2015-06-28

    Bimolecular reactions of the NCN radical play a key role in modeling prompt-NO formation in hydrocarbon flames. The rate constant of the so-far neglected reaction NCN + H2 has been experimentally determined behind shock waves under pseudo-first order conditions with H2 as the excess component. NCN3 thermal decomposition has been used as a quantitative high temperature source of NCN radicals, which have been sensitively detected by difference UV laser absorption spectroscopy at [small nu, Greek, tilde] = 30383.11 cm(-1). The experiments were performed at two different total densities of ρ≈ 4.1 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) and ρ≈ 7.4 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) (corresponding to pressures between p = 324 mbar and p = 1665 mbar) and revealed a pressure independent reaction. In the temperature range 1057 K rate constant can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 4.1 × 10(13) exp(-101 kJ mol(-1)/RT) (Δlog k = ±0.11). The pressure independent reaction as well as the measured activation energy is consistent with a dominating H abstracting reaction channel yielding the products HNCN + H. The reaction NCN + H2 has been implemented together with a set of reactions for subsequent HNCN and HNC chemistry into the detailed GDFkin3.0_NCN mechanism for NOx flame modeling. Two fuel-rich low-pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames served as examples to quantify the impact of the additional chemical pathways. Although the overall NCN consumption by H2 remains small, significant differences have been observed for NO yields with the updated mechanism. A detailed flux analysis revealed that HNC, mainly arising from HCN/HNC isomerization, plays a decisive role and enhances NO formation through a new HNC → HNCO → NH2→ NH → NO pathway.

  11. Rate kernel theory for pseudo-first-order kinetics of diffusion-influenced reactions and application to fluorescence quenching kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mino

    2007-06-07

    Theoretical foundation of rate kernel equation approaches for diffusion-influenced chemical reactions is presented and applied to explain the kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions. A many-body master equation is constructed by introducing stochastic terms, which characterize the rates of chemical reactions, into the many-body Smoluchowski equation. A Langevin-type of memory equation for the density fields of reactants evolving under the influence of time-independent perturbation is derived. This equation should be useful in predicting the time evolution of reactant concentrations approaching the steady state attained by the perturbation as well as the steady-state concentrations. The dynamics of fluctuation occurring in equilibrium state can be predicted by the memory equation by turning the perturbation off and consequently may be useful in obtaining the linear response to a time-dependent perturbation. It is found that unimolecular decay processes including the time-independent perturbation can be incorporated into bimolecular reaction kinetics as a Laplace transform variable. As a result, a theory for bimolecular reactions along with the unimolecular process turned off is sufficient to predict overall reaction kinetics including the effects of unimolecular reactions and perturbation. As the present formulation is applied to steady-state kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions, the exact relation between fluorophore concentrations and the intensity of excitation light is derived.

  12. Control rod effects on reaction rate distributions in tight pitched PuO2-UO2 fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Okumura, Keisuke; Ishiguro, Yukio

    1991-11-01

    Investigations were made for the heterogeneity effects caused by insertion or withdrawal of a B 4 C control rod on fine structure of reaction rates distributions in a tight pitched PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel assembly. Analysis was carried out by using the VIM and SRAC codes with the libraries based on JENDL-2 for the hexagonal fuel assembly basically corresponding to the PROTEUS-LWHCR experimental core. The reaction rates are affected more remarkably by the withdrawal of the control rod rather than its insertion. The changes of the reaction rates were decomposed into three terms of spectrum shifts, the changes of effective cross sections with fine groups, and their higher order components. From the analysis, it is concluded that most changes of reaction rates are caused by spectral shifts. The SRAC code with fine group constants can predict the distribution of reaction rates and their ratios with the accuracy of about 5 % except for the values related to Pu-242 capture rate, as compared with the VIM results. To increase the accuracy, it is necessary to generate the effective cross sections of the fuel near control rods with consideration of the heterogeneities in the fuel assembly. (author)

  13. Biocatalytic production of psilocybin and derivatives in tryptophan synthase-enhanced reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blei, Felix; Baldeweg, Florian; Fricke, Janis; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2018-05-11

    Psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) is the main alkaloid of the fungal genus Psilocybe, the so-called "magic mushrooms". The pharmaceutical interest in this psychotropic natural product as a future medication to treat depression and anxiety is strongly re-emerging. Here, we present an enhanced enzymatic route of psilocybin production by adding TrpB, the tryptophan synthase of the mushroom Psilocybe cubensis, to the reaction. We capitalized on its substrate flexibility and show psilocybin formation from 4-hydroxyindole and L-serine, which are less cost-intensive substrates, compared to the previous method. Further, we show enzymatic production of 7-phosphoryloxytryptamine (isonorbaeocystin), a non-natural congener of the Psilocybe alkaloid norbaeocystin (4-phosphoryloxytryptamine), and of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) via the same in vitro approach. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Indirect glyphosate detection based on ninhydrin reaction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng-Lei; Gao, Yu; Li, Yali; Li, Xueliang; Zhang, Huanjie; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing; Su, Liang

    2018-05-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most commonly-used and non-selective herbicides in agriculture, which may directly pollute the environment and threaten human health. A simple and effective approach to assessment of its damage to the natural environment is thus quite necessary. However, traditional chromatography-based detection methods usually suffer from complex pretreatment procedures. Herein, we propose a simple and sensitive method for the determination of glyphosate by combining ninhydrin reaction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The product (purple color dye, PD) of the ninhydrin reaction is found to SERS-active and directly correlate with the glyphosate concentration. The limit of detection of the proposed method for glyphosate is as low as 1.43 × 10- 8 mol·L- 1 with a relatively wider linear concentration range (1.0 × 10- 7-1.0 × 10- 4 mol·L- 1), which demonstrates its great potential in rapid, highly sensitive concentration determination of glyphosate in practical applications for safety assessment of food and environment.

  15. Synergistically enhanced activity of nitrogen-doped carbon dots/graphene composites for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Zhao, Qingshan; Liu, Jingyan; Ma, Xiao; Rao, Yuan; Shao, Xiaodong; Li, Zhongtao; Wu, Wenting; Ning, Hui; Wu, Mingbo

    2017-11-01

    With rapid dissociative adsorption of oxygen, nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterials have been demonstrated to be efficient alternative catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Herein, we developed a mild hydrothermal strategy to construct nitrogen-doped carbon dots/graphene (NCDs-NG) composites towards ORR. Carbon dots (CDs) were derived from petroleum coke via acid oxidation while graphene oxide (GO) was obtained from graphite by modified Hummer's method. Graphene was employed as a conductive substrate to disperse CDs during hydrothermal reducing reaction while ammonia was utilized as N source to dope both graphene and CDs. The synergistic effects, i.e. CDs as pillars for graphene and catalytic sites for ORR, the high conductivity of graphene, the quick O2 adsorption on doped pyridinic nitrogen endow the NCDs-NG composites with enhanced ORR catalytic performance in alkaline electrolyte. The onset potential of -95 mV and kinetic current density of 12.7 mA cm-2 at -0.7 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) can be compared to those of the commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst. The electron transfer number is about 3.9, revealing a four-electron pathway for ORR. The optimal NCDs-NG catalyst shows superior durability and methanol tolerance than 20 wt% Pt/C. This work demonstrates a feasible and effective strategy to prepare metal-free efficient ORR electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications.

  16. Verification of dosimetry cross sections above 10 MeV based on measurement of activation reaction rates in fission neutron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odano, Naoteru; Miura, Toshimasa; Yamaji, Akio.

    1996-01-01

    To validate the dosimetry cross sections in fast neutron energy range, activation reaction rates were measured for 5 types of dosimetry cross sections which have sensitivity in the energy rage above 10 MeV utilizing JRR-4 reactor of JAERI. The measured reaction rates were compared with the calculations reaction rates by a continuous energy monte carlo code MVP. The calculated reaction rates were based on two dosimetry files, JENDL Dosimetry File and IRDF-90.2. (author)

  17. Astrophysical reaction rate for the neutron-generator reaction 13C(alpha,n)16O in asymptotic giant branch stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E D; Rogachev, G V; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Baby, L T; Brown, S; Cluff, W T; Crisp, A M; Diffenderfer, E; Goldberg, V Z; Green, B W; Hinners, T; Hoffman, C R; Kemper, K W; Momotyuk, O; Peplowski, P; Pipidis, A; Reynolds, R; Roeder, B T

    2006-11-10

    The reaction 13C(alpha,n) is considered to be the main source of neutrons for the s process in asymptotic giant branch stars. At low energies, the cross section is dominated by the 1/2+ 6.356 MeV subthreshold resonance in (17)O whose contribution at stellar temperatures is uncertain by a factor of 10. In this work, we performed the most precise determination of the low-energy astrophysical S factor using the indirect asymptotic normalization (ANC) technique. The alpha-particle ANC for the subthreshold state has been measured using the sub-Coulomb alpha-transfer reaction ((6)Li,d). Using the determined ANC, we calculated S(0), which turns out to be an order of magnitude smaller than in the nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates.

  18. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation reaction on Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs hybrid electro-catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouralishahi, Amideddin, E-mail: Nouralishahi@ut.ac.ir [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155/4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Caspian Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 43841-119, Rezvanshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Catalysis and Nanotechnology Research Division, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Ali Morad, E-mail: Rashidiam@ripi.ir [Catalysis and Nanotechnology Research Division, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, Yadollah, E-mail: Mortazav@ut.ac.ir [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155/4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi, Abbas Ali, E-mail: Khodadad@ut.ac.ir [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155/4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Choolaei, Mohammadmehdi, E-mail: Choolaeimm@ripi.ir [Catalysis and Nanotechnology Research Division, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-30

    Highlights: • Promoting effects of Cobalt oxide on methanol electro-oxidation over Pt/MWCNTs are investigated. • Higher activity, about 2.9 times, and enhanced stability are observed on Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs. • Electrochemical active surface area of Pt nanoparticles is significantly improved upon CoO{sub x} addition. • Bi-functional mechanism is facilitated in presence of CoO{sub x}. - Abstract: The electro-catalytic behavior of Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs in methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) is investigated and compared to that of Pt/MWCNTs. The electro-catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method using NaBH{sub 4} as the reducing agent. The morphological and physical characteristics of samples are examined by XRD, TEM, ICP and EDS techniques. In the presence of CoO{sub x}, Pt nanoparticles were highly distributed on the support with an average particle size of 2 nm, an obvious decrease from 5.1 nm for Pt/MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry, CO-stripping, Chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are used to study the electrochemical behavior of the electro-catalysts. The results revealed a considerable enhancement in the oxidation kinetics of CO{sub ads} on Pt active sites by the participation of CoO{sub x}. Compared to Pt/MWCNTs, Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs sample has a larger electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) and higher electro-catalytic activity and stability toward methanol electro-oxidation. According to the results of cyclic voltammetry, the forward anodic peak current density enhances more than 89% at the optimum atomic ratio of Pt:Co = 2:1. Furthermore, inclusion of cobalt oxide species causes the onset potential of methanol electro-oxidation reaction to shift 84 mV to negative values compared to that on Pt/MWCNTs. Based on EIS data, dehydrogenation of methanol is the rate-determining step of MOR on both Pt/MWCNTs and Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs, at small overpotentials. However, at higher overpotentials, the

  19. [Impact of sperm DNA and acrosome integrity and acrosome reaction rate on outcomes of rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongzhi; Li, Dawen; Cheng, Junping; Huo, Zhongchao; Huang, Hongyi; Xiao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of sperm DNA integrity rate, acrosome integrity rate and acrosome reaction rate on the outcomes of rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). This retrospective analysis was conducted among 97 infertile couples receiving rescue ICSI due to failure of in vitro fertilization procedures in our Reproductive Medicine Center. Of these 97 women, 41 had clinical pregnancy and 56 did not, and the effects of sperm DNA integrity rate (estimated by DNA fragmentation index, DFI), acrosome integrity rate and acrosome reaction rate on rescue ICSI outcomes were analyzed. No significant difference was found in paternal age, testosterone value, testicular volume, FSH, female patient' age or the number of eggs retrieved between the two groups (P>0.05), but the infertility years was significantly shorter in the pregnancy group than in the non-pregnancy group (Prate and cleavage rate were similar between the two groups (P>0.05), but the good embryo rate was significantly higher in the pregnancy group (Preaction rate did not differ significantly between the two groups (P>0.05), but the acrosome integrity rate was significantly higher in the pregnancy group (Prate, acrosome integrity or acrosome reaction rate were not correlated with the fertilization rate, cleavage rate or good embryo rate (P>0.05). The pregnancy rate, twin and single fetus rates were 42.3%, 10.3% and 32.0% in this cohort after recue ICSI, respectively. Rescue ICSI is an effective treatment after failed in vitro fertilization procedure, and sperm acrosome integrity rate is associated with the outcome of rescue ICSI.

  20. NanoPCR observation: different levels of DNA replication fidelity in nanoparticle-enhanced polymerase chain reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Cenchao; Yang Wenjuan; Ji Qiaoli; Zhang Zhizhou; Maki, Hisaji; Dong Anjie

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticle-assisted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) technology is getting more and more attention recently. It is believed that some of the DNA recombinant technologies will be upgraded by nanotechnology in the near future, among which DNA replication is one of the core manipulation techniques. So whether or not the DNA replication fidelity is compromised in nanoparticle-assisted PCR is a question. In this study, a total of 16 different metallic and non-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) were tested for their effects on DNA replication fidelity in vitro and in vivo. Sixteen types of nanomaterials were distinctly different in enhancing the PCR efficiency, and their relative capacity to retain DNA replication fidelity was largely different from each other based on rpsL gene mutation assay. Generally speaking, metallic nanoparticles induced larger error rates in DNA replication fidelity than non-metallic nanoparticles, and non-metallic nanomaterials such as carbon nanopowder or nanotubes were still safe as PCR enhancers because they did not compromise the DNA replication fidelity in the Taq DNA polymerase-based PCR system.