WorldWideScience

Sample records for reaction pathway based

  1. Parallel proton transfer pathways in aqueous acid-base reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base chloroacetate in aqueous solution. We investigate both proton and deuteron transfer reactions in solutions with base concentrations ranging from 0.25M to 4M. Using

  2. Exploring the Reaction Pathways of Bioglycerol Hydrodeoxygenation to Propene over Molybdena-Based Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharopoulou, Vasiliki; Vasiliadou, Efterpi S; Lemonidou, Angeliki A

    2018-01-10

    The one-step reaction of glycerol with hydrogen to form propene selectively is a particularly challenging catalytic pathway that has not yet been explored thoroughly. Molybdena-based catalysts are active and selective to C-O bond scission; propene is the only product in the gas phase under the standard reaction conditions, and further hydrogenation to propane is impeded. Within this context, this work focuses on the exploration of the reaction pathways and the investigation of various parameters that affect the catalytic performance, such as the role of hydrogen on the product distribution and the effect of the catalyst pretreatment step. Under a hydrogen atmosphere, propene is produced primarily via 2-propenol, whereas under an inert atmosphere propanal and glycerol dissociation products are formed mainly. The reaction most likely proceeds through a reverse Mars-van Krevelen mechanism as partially reduced Mo species drive the reaction to the formation of the desired product. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is a powerful technique for the evaluation of flux control within biochemical pathways. Its foundation is the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients (FCCs). On the basis of a thermokinetic description of reaction rates it is here shown...... that the elasticity coefficients can be calculated directly from the pool levels of metabolites at steady state. The only requirement is that one thermodynamic parameter be known, namely the reaction affinity at the intercept of the tangent in the inflection point of the curve of reaction rate against reaction...... of the thermokinetic description of reaction rates to include the influence of effecters. Here the reaction rate is written as a linear function of the logarithm of the metabolite concentrations. With this type of rate function it is shown that the approach of Delgado and Liao [Biochem. J. (1992) 282, 919-927] can...

  4. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  5. Explorations into Chemical Reactions and Biochemical Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-12-01

    A brief overview of the work in the research group of the present author on extracting knowledge from chemical reaction data is presented. Methods have been developed to calculate physicochemical effects at the reaction site. It is shown that these physicochemical effects can quite favourably be used to derive equations for the calculation of data on gas phase reactions and on reactions in solution such as aqueous acidity of alcohols or carboxylic acids or the hydrolysis of amides. Furthermore, it is shown that these physicochemical effects are quite effective for assigning reactions into reaction classes that correspond to chemical knowledge. Biochemical reactions constitute a particularly interesting and challenging task for increasing our understanding of living species. The BioPath.Database is a rich source of information on biochemical reactions and has been used for a variety of applications of chemical, biological, or medicinal interests. Thus, it was shown that biochemical reactions can be assigned by the physicochemical effects into classes that correspond to the classification of enzymes by the EC numbers. Furthermore, 3D models of reaction intermediates can be used for searching for novel enzyme inhibitors. It was shown in a combined application of chemoinformatics and bioinformatics that essential pathways of diseases can be uncovered. Furthermore, a study showed that bacterial flavor-forming pathways can be discovered. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Serpentinization reaction pathways: implications for modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janecky, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental seawater-peridotite reaction pathways to form serpentinites at 300/sup 0/C, 500 bars, can be accurately modeled using the EQ3/6 codes in conjunction with thermodynamic and kinetic data from the literature and unpublished compilations. These models provide both confirmation of experimental interpretations and more detailed insight into hydrothermal reaction processes within the oceanic crust. The accuracy of these models depends on careful evaluation of the aqueous speciation model, use of mineral compositions that closely reproduce compositions in the experiments, and definition of realistic reactive components in terms of composition, thermodynamic data, and reaction rates.

  7. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N 2 and H 2 O within ∼10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N 2 and H 2 O productions

  8. Identifying Reaction Pathways and their Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maronsson, Jon Bergmann

    Finding the mechanisms and estimating the rate of chemical reactions is an essential part of modern research of atomic scale systems. In this thesis, the application of well established methods for reaction rates and paths to important systems for hydrogen storage is considered before developing...... extensions to further identify the reaction environment for a more accurate rate. Complex borohydrides are materials of high hydrogen storage capacity and high thermodynamic stability (too high for hydrogen storage). In an effort to gain insight into the structural transitions of two such materials, Ca(BH4......-interstitial defects. In good agreement with the experiments, C3-type rotations activate at lower temperature than C2-type rotations. In order to investigate the environment of reaction pathways, a method for finding the ridge between first order saddle points on a multidimensional surface was developed...

  9. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)

    2014-11-17

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O within ∼10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O productions.

  10. Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, S. P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications to reactions leading to NOx and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  11. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformation through different reaction pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of organic micropollutants occurs via different reaction pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. We propose a mechanism-based modeling approach that provides a quantitative framework ...

  12. Pathway-based analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jack W

    2016-02-03

    New technologies for acquisition of genomic data, while offering unprecedented opportunities for genetic discovery, also impose severe burdens of interpretation and penalties for multiple testing. The Pathway-based Analyses Group of the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19 (GAW19) sought reduction of multiple-testing burden through various approaches to aggregation of highdimensional data in pathways informed by prior biological knowledge. Experimental methods testedincluded the use of "synthetic pathways" (random sets of genes) to estimate power and false-positive error rate of methods applied to simulated data; data reduction via independent components analysis, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-SNP interaction, and use of gene sets to estimate genetic similarity; and general assessment of the efficacy of prior biological knowledge to reduce the dimensionality of complex genomic data. The work of this group explored several promising approaches to managing high-dimensional data, with the caveat that these methods are necessarily constrained by the quality of external bioinformatic annotation.

  13. Aligning Metabolic Pathways Exploiting Binary Relation of Reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Huang

    Full Text Available Metabolic pathway alignment has been widely used to find one-to-one and/or one-to-many reaction mappings to identify the alternative pathways that have similar functions through different sets of reactions, which has important applications in reconstructing phylogeny and understanding metabolic functions. The existing alignment methods exhaustively search reaction sets, which may become infeasible for large pathways. To address this problem, we present an effective alignment method for accurately extracting reaction mappings between two metabolic pathways. We show that connected relation between reactions can be formalized as binary relation of reactions in metabolic pathways, and the multiplications of zero-one matrices for binary relations of reactions can be accomplished in finite steps. By utilizing the multiplications of zero-one matrices for binary relation of reactions, we efficiently obtain reaction sets in a small number of steps without exhaustive search, and accurately uncover biologically relevant reaction mappings. Furthermore, we introduce a measure of topological similarity of nodes (reactions by comparing the structural similarity of the k-neighborhood subgraphs of the nodes in aligning metabolic pathways. We employ this similarity metric to improve the accuracy of the alignments. The experimental results on the KEGG database show that when compared with other state-of-the-art methods, in most cases, our method obtains better performance in the node correctness and edge correctness, and the number of the edges of the largest common connected subgraph for one-to-one reaction mappings, and the number of correct one-to-many reaction mappings. Our method is scalable in finding more reaction mappings with better biological relevance in large metabolic pathways.

  14. Stepwise radical cation Diels-Alder reaction via multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Okada, Yohei; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Herein we disclose the radical cation Diels-Alder reaction of aryl vinyl ethers by electrocatalysis, which is triggered by an oxidative SET process. The reaction clearly proceeds in a stepwise fashion, which is a rare mechanism in this class. We also found that two distinctive pathways, including "direct" and "indirect", are possible to construct the Diels-Alder adduct.

  15. Enzyme sequence similarity improves the reaction alignment method for cross-species pathway comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovacik, Meric A. [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Androulakis, Ioannis P., E-mail: yannis@rci.rutgers.edu [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Biomedical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Pathway-based information has become an important source of information for both establishing evolutionary relationships and understanding the mode of action of a chemical or pharmaceutical among species. Cross-species comparison of pathways can address two broad questions: comparison in order to inform evolutionary relationships and to extrapolate species differences used in a number of different applications including drug and toxicity testing. Cross-species comparison of metabolic pathways is complex as there are multiple features of a pathway that can be modeled and compared. Among the various methods that have been proposed, reaction alignment has emerged as the most successful at predicting phylogenetic relationships based on NCBI taxonomy. We propose an improvement of the reaction alignment method by accounting for sequence similarity in addition to reaction alignment method. Using nine species, including human and some model organisms and test species, we evaluate the standard and improved comparison methods by analyzing glycolysis and citrate cycle pathways conservation. In addition, we demonstrate how organism comparison can be conducted by accounting for the cumulative information retrieved from nine pathways in central metabolism as well as a more complete study involving 36 pathways common in all nine species. Our results indicate that reaction alignment with enzyme sequence similarity results in a more accurate representation of pathway specific cross-species similarities and differences based on NCBI taxonomy.

  16. Enzyme sequence similarity improves the reaction alignment method for cross-species pathway comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovacik, Meric A.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2013-01-01

    Pathway-based information has become an important source of information for both establishing evolutionary relationships and understanding the mode of action of a chemical or pharmaceutical among species. Cross-species comparison of pathways can address two broad questions: comparison in order to inform evolutionary relationships and to extrapolate species differences used in a number of different applications including drug and toxicity testing. Cross-species comparison of metabolic pathways is complex as there are multiple features of a pathway that can be modeled and compared. Among the various methods that have been proposed, reaction alignment has emerged as the most successful at predicting phylogenetic relationships based on NCBI taxonomy. We propose an improvement of the reaction alignment method by accounting for sequence similarity in addition to reaction alignment method. Using nine species, including human and some model organisms and test species, we evaluate the standard and improved comparison methods by analyzing glycolysis and citrate cycle pathways conservation. In addition, we demonstrate how organism comparison can be conducted by accounting for the cumulative information retrieved from nine pathways in central metabolism as well as a more complete study involving 36 pathways common in all nine species. Our results indicate that reaction alignment with enzyme sequence similarity results in a more accurate representation of pathway specific cross-species similarities and differences based on NCBI taxonomy

  17. Kynurenine pathway metabolites and enzymes involved in redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Esquivel, D; Ramírez-Ortega, D; Pineda, B; Castro, N; Ríos, C; Pérez de la Cruz, V

    2017-01-01

    Oxido-reduction reactions are a fundamental part of the life due to support many vital biological processes as cellular respiration and glucose oxidation. In the redox reactions, one substance transfers one or more electrons to another substance. An important electron carrier is the coenzyme NAD + , which is involved in many metabolic pathways. De novo biosynthesis of NAD + is through the kynurenine pathway, the major route of tryptophan catabolism, which is sensitive to redox environment and produces metabolites with redox capacity, able to alter biological functions that are controlled by redox-responsive signaling pathways. Kynurenine pathway metabolites have been implicated in the physiology process and in the physiopathology of many diseases; processes that also share others factors as dysregulation of calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death, which impact the redox environment. This review examines in detail the available evidence in which kynurenine pathway metabolites participate in redox reactions and their effect on cellular redox homeostasis, since the knowledge of the main factors and mechanisms that lead to cell death in many neurodegenative disorders and other pathologies, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and kynurenines imbalance, will allow to develop therapies using them as targets. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A method for integrating and ranking the evidence for biochemical pathways by mining reactions from text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Makoto; Ohta, Tomoko; Rak, Rafal; Rowley, Andrew; Kell, Douglas B.; Pyysalo, Sampo; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: To create, verify and maintain pathway models, curators must discover and assess knowledge distributed over the vast body of biological literature. Methods supporting these tasks must understand both the pathway model representations and the natural language in the literature. These methods should identify and order documents by relevance to any given pathway reaction. No existing system has addressed all aspects of this challenge. Method: We present novel methods for associating pathway model reactions with relevant publications. Our approach extracts the reactions directly from the models and then turns them into queries for three text mining-based MEDLINE literature search systems. These queries are executed, and the resulting documents are combined and ranked according to their relevance to the reactions of interest. We manually annotate document-reaction pairs with the relevance of the document to the reaction and use this annotation to study several ranking methods, using various heuristic and machine-learning approaches. Results: Our evaluation shows that the annotated document-reaction pairs can be used to create a rule-based document ranking system, and that machine learning can be used to rank documents by their relevance to pathway reactions. We find that a Support Vector Machine-based system outperforms several baselines and matches the performance of the rule-based system. The success of the query extraction and ranking methods are used to update our existing pathway search system, PathText. Availability: An online demonstration of PathText 2 and the annotated corpus are available for research purposes at http://www.nactem.ac.uk/pathtext2/. Contact: makoto.miwa@manchester.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23813008

  19. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  20. Reaction pathways of the dissociation of methylal: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H -M; Beaud, P; Gerber, T; Mischler, B; Radi, P P; Tzannis, A -P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Schemata for modelling combustion processes do not yet include reaction rates for oxygenated fuels like methylal (DMM) which is considered as an additive or replacement for diesel due to its low sooting propensity. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of the possible reaction pathways for different dissociation steps of methylal are presented. Cleavage of a hydrogen bond to the methoxy group or the central carbon atom were simulated at the BLYP/6-311++G{sup **} level of theory. The results are compared to the experiment when dissociating and/or ionising DMM with femtosecond pulses. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 ref.

  1. Pathways of the Maillard reaction under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Christian; Glomb, Marcus A

    2016-08-01

    Initially investigated as a color formation process in thermally treated foods, nowadays, the relevance of the Maillard reaction in vivo is generally accepted. Many chronic and age-related diseases such as diabetes, uremia, atherosclerosis, cataractogenesis and Alzheimer's disease are associated with Maillard derived advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and α-dicarbonyl compounds as their most important precursors in terms of reactivity and abundance. However, the situation in vivo is very challenging, because Maillard chemistry is paralleled by enzymatic reactions which can lead to both, increases and decreases in certain AGEs. In addition, mechanistic findings established under the harsh conditions of food processing might not be valid under physiological conditions. The present review critically discusses the relevant α-dicarbonyl compounds as central intermediates of AGE formation in vivo with a special focus on fragmentation pathways leading to formation of amide-AGEs.

  2. Kinetic and reaction pathways of methanol oxidation on platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.W.; McCready, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol oxidation kinetics were measured on Pt wires in a flow reactor at pressures between 30 and 130 Pa. The kinetics were measured as a function of oxygen-to-methanol equivalence ratio phi and wire temperature. In methanol-lean feeds (phi 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were the only products; in methanol-rich feeds (phi > 1), CO, H 2 , H 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were observed. Experiments with 18 O 2 showed that the principal methanol oxidation pathway does not involve C-O bond dissociation. However, the 18 O 2 experiments, together with other features of the methanol oxidation data, also provided evidence for a minor oxidation pathway (accounting for less than 1% of the product CO 2 ) which proceeds through a carbon intermediate. A mathematical model is presented which describes the principal CH 3 OH oxidation pathway as a series reaction involving adsorbed H 2 CO and CO intermediates. Consistent with experimental results, the model predicts that inhibition by adsorbed CO should be weaker for CH 3 OH and H 2 CO oxidation than for CO oxidation. 34 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  3. Reaction paths based on mean first-passage times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sanghyun; Sener, Melih K.; Lu Deyu; Schulten, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Finding representative reaction pathways is important for understanding the mechanism of molecular processes. We propose a new approach for constructing reaction paths based on mean first-passage times. This approach incorporates information about all possible reaction events as well as the effect of temperature. As an application of this method, we study representative pathways of excitation migration in a photosynthetic light-harvesting complex, photosystem I. The paths thus computed provide a complete, yet distilled, representation of the kinetic flow of excitation toward the reaction center, thereby succinctly characterizing the function of the system

  4. Reaction of H2 with O2 in Excited Electronic States: Reaction Pathways and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelevkin, Alexey V; Loukhovitski, Boris I; Sharipov, Alexander S

    2017-12-21

    Comprehensive quantum chemical analysis with the use of the multireference state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field approach was carried out to study the reactions of H 2 with O 2 in a 1 Δ g , b 1 Σ g + , c 1 Σ u - , and A' 3 Δ u electronically excited states. The energetically favorable reaction pathways and possible intersystem crossings have been revealed. The energy barriers were refined employing the extended multiconfiguration quasi-degenerate second-order perturbation theory. It has been shown that the interaction of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (A' 3 Δ u ) with H 2 occurs through the H-abstraction process with relatively low activation barriers that resulted in the formation of the HO 2 molecule in A″ and A' electronic states, respectively. Meanwhile, molecular oxygen in singlet sigma states (b 1 Σ g + and c 1 Σ u - ) was proved to be nonreactive with respect to the molecular hydrogen. Appropriate rate constants for revealed reaction and quenching channels have been estimated using variational transition-state theory including corrections for the tunneling effect, possible nonadiabatic transitions, and anharmonicity of vibrations for transition states and reactants. It was demonstrated that the calculated reaction rate constant for the H 2 + O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) process is in reasonable agreement with known experimental data. The Arrhenius approximations for these processes have been proposed for the temperature range T = 300-3000 K.

  5. Reaction pathways for catalytic gas-phase oxidation of glycerol over mixed metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suprun, W.; Glaeser, R.; Papp, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2011-07-01

    Glycerol as a main by-product from bio-diesel manufacture is a cheap raw material with large potential for chemical or biochemical transformations to value-added C3-chemicals. One possible way of glycerol utilization involves its catalytic oxidation to acrylic acid as an alternative to petrochemical routes. However, this catalytic conversion exhibits various problems such as harsh reaction conditions, severe catalyst coking and large amounts of undesired by-products. In this study, the reaction pathways for gas-phase conversion of glycerol over transition metal oxides (Mo, V und W) supported on TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} were investigated by two methods: (i) steady state experiments of glycerol oxidation and possible reactions intermediates, i.e., acrolein, 3-hydroxy propionaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and (ii) temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) studies of glycerol conversion in the presence and in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. It is shown that the supported W-, V and Mo-oxides possess an ability to catalyze the oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid. These investigations allowed us to gain a deeper insight into the reaction mechanism. Thus, based on the obtained results, three possible reactions pathways for the selective oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid on the transition metal-containing catalysts are proposed. The major pathways in presence of molecular oxygen are a fast successive destructive oxidation of glycerol to CO{sub x} and the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein which is a rate-limiting step. (orig.)

  6. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformation through different reaction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of organic micropollutants occurs via different reaction pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. We propose a mechanism-based modeling approach that provides a quantitative framework to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. To demonstrate specific features of the modeling approach, we simulated the degradation of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model accurately reproduces the multi-element isotope data observed in previous experimental studies. Furthermore, it precisely captures the dual element isotope trends characteristic of different reaction pathways as well as their range of variation consistent with observed bulk isotope fractionation. It was also possible to directly validate the model capability to predict the evolution of position-specific isotope ratios with available experimental data. Therefore, the approach is useful both for a mechanism-based evaluation of experimental results and as a tool to explore transformation pathways in scenarios for which position-specific isotope data are not yet available. - Highlights: • Mechanism-based, position-specific isotope modeling of micropollutants degradation. • Simultaneous description of concentration and primary and secondary isotope effects. • Key features of the model are demonstrated with three illustrative examples. • Model as a tool to explore reaction mechanisms and to design experiments. - We propose a modeling approach incorporating mechanistic information and

  7. Hydrogen oxidation mechanisms on Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia anodes: Separation of reaction pathways by geometry variation of pattern electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, M. C.; Fleig, J.; Bram, M.; Opitz, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrodes are affecting the overall performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in general and strongly contribute to the cell resistance in case of novel metal supported SOFCs in particular. The electrochemical fuel conversion mechanisms in these electrodes are, however, still only partly understood. In this study, micro-structured Ni thin film electrodes on YSZ with 15 different geometries are utilized to investigate reaction pathways for the hydrogen electro-oxidation at Ni/YSZ anodes. From electrodes with constant area but varying triple phase boundary (TPB) length a contribution to the electro-catalytic activity is found that does not depend on the TPB length. This additional activity could clearly be attributed to a yet unknown reaction pathway scaling with the electrode area. It is shown that this area related pathway has significantly different electrochemical behavior compared to the TPB pathway regarding its thermal activation, sulfur poisoning behavior, and H2/H2O partial pressure dependence. Moreover, possible reaction mechanisms of this reaction pathway are discussed, identifying either a pathway based on hydrogen diffusion through Ni with water release at the TPB or a path with oxygen diffusion through Ni to be a very likely explanation for the experimental results.

  8. Unexpected Reaction Pathway for butyrylcholinesterase-catalyzed inactivation of “hunger hormone” ghrelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Yuan, Yaxia; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-02-01

    Extensive computational modeling and simulations have been carried out, in the present study, to uncover the fundamental reaction pathway for butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of ghrelin, demonstrating that the acylation process of BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of ghrelin follows an unprecedented single-step reaction pathway and the single-step acylation process is rate-determining. The free energy barrier (18.8 kcal/mol) calculated for the rate-determining step is reasonably close to the experimentally-derived free energy barrier (~19.4 kcal/mol), suggesting that the obtained mechanistic insights are reasonable. The single-step reaction pathway for the acylation is remarkably different from the well-known two-step acylation reaction pathway for numerous ester hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by a serine esterase. This is the first time demonstrating that a single-step reaction pathway is possible for an ester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by a serine esterase and, therefore, one no longer can simply assume that the acylation process must follow the well-known two-step reaction pathway.

  9. Reaction Pathways in Catechol/Primary Amine Mixtures: A Window on Crosslinking Chemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Yang

    Full Text Available Catechol chemistry is used as a crosslinking tool abundantly in both natural organisms (e.g. mussels, sandcastle worms and synthetic systems to achieve the desired mechanical properties. Despite this abundance and success, the crosslinking chemistry is still poorly understood. In this study, to simplify the system, yet to capture the essential chemistry, model compounds 4-methyl catechol and propylamine are used. The reaction of 4-methyl catechol (2 mM with propylamine (6 mM is carried out in the presence of NaIO4 (2 mM in 10 mM Na2CO3 aqueous solution. A variety of spectroscopic/spectrometric and chromatographic methods such as 1H NMR, LC-MS, and UV-VIS are used to track the reaction and identify the products/intermediates. It is found that the crosslinking chemistry of a catechol and an amine is both fast and complicated. Within five minutes, more than 60 products are formed. These products encompass 19 different masses ranging from molecular weight of 179 to 704. By combining time-dependent data, it is inferred that the dominant reaction pathways: the majority is formed via aryloxyl-phenol coupling and Michael-type addition, whereas a small fraction of products is formed via Schiff base reactions.

  10. Subcritical hydrothermal conversion of organic wastes and biomass. Reaction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Amadeus Castro Vega

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal conversion is a procedure which emulates organic matter’s natural conversion into bio-crude having physical and chemical properties analogous to petroleum. The artificial transformation of biomass requi- res previous knowledge of the main reaction routes and product availability. The main component of biomass (depolymerisation by hydrolysis is presented in hydrothermal cellulose conversion, producing oligosaccharides which exhibit dehydration and retro-aldol condensation reactions for transforming into furfurals and carboxylic acids. Other biomass components (such as lignin, proteins, and fat esters present both hydrolysis and pyrolysis reaction routes. As long as biomass mainly contains carbohydrates, subcritical hydrothermal conversion products and their wastes will be fundamentally analogous to those displaying cellulose. These substances have added- value by far surpassing raw material’s acquisition cost. When the main hydrothermal conversion products’ O/C, H/C molar ratios as reported in literature are plotted, an evolutionary tralectory for conversion products appears to be closely or even overlapped with fossil fuels’ geological evolution.

  11. Permanganate oxidation of α-amino acids: kinetic correlations for the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F

    2011-09-08

    The reactions of permanganate ion with seven α-amino acids in aqueous KH(2)PO(4)/K(2)HPO(4) buffers have been followed spectrophotometrically at two different wavelengths: 526 nm (decay of MnO(4)(-)) and 418 nm (formation of colloidal MnO(2)). All of the reactions studied were autocatalyzed by colloidal MnO(2), with the contribution of the autocatalytic reaction pathway decreasing in the order glycine > l-threonine > l-alanine > l-glutamic acid > l-leucine > l-isoleucine > l-valine. The rate constants corresponding to the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic pathways were obtained by means of either a differential rate law or an integrated one, the latter requiring the use of an iterative method for its implementation. The activation parameters for the two pathways were determined and analyzed to obtain statistically significant correlations for the series of reactions studied. The activation enthalpy of the nonautocatalytic pathway showed a strong, positive dependence on the standard Gibbs energy for the dissociation of the protonated amino group of the α-amino acid. Linear enthalpy-entropy correlations were found for both pathways, leading to isokinetic temperatures of 370 ± 21 K (nonautocatalytic) and 364 ± 28 K (autocatalytic). Mechanisms in agreement with the experimental data are proposed for the two reaction pathways.

  12. On the deduction of chemical reaction pathways from measurements of time series of concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilov, Michael; Arkin, Adam; Ross, John

    2001-03-01

    We discuss the deduction of reaction pathways in complex chemical systems from measurements of time series of chemical concentrations of reacting species. First we review a technique called correlation metric construction (CMC) and show the construction of a reaction pathway from measurements on a part of glycolysis. Then we present two new improved methods for the analysis of time series of concentrations, entropy metric construction (EMC), and entropy reduction method (ERM), and illustrate (EMC) with calculations on a model reaction system. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Effects of reaction-kinetic parameters on modeling reaction pathways in GaN MOVPE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zuo, Ran; Zhang, Guoyi

    2017-11-01

    In the modeling of the reaction-transport process in GaN MOVPE growth, the selections of kinetic parameters (activation energy Ea and pre-exponential factor A) for gas reactions are quite uncertain, which cause uncertainties in both gas reaction path and growth rate. In this study, numerical modeling of the reaction-transport process for GaN MOVPE growth in a vertical rotating disk reactor is conducted with varying kinetic parameters for main reaction paths. By comparisons of the molar concentrations of major Ga-containing species and the growth rates, the effects of kinetic parameters on gas reaction paths are determined. The results show that, depending on the values of the kinetic parameters, the gas reaction path may be dominated either by adduct/amide formation path, or by TMG pyrolysis path, or by both. Although the reaction path varies with different kinetic parameters, the predicted growth rates change only slightly because the total transport rate of Ga-containing species to the substrate changes slightly with reaction paths. This explains why previous authors using different chemical models predicted growth rates close to the experiment values. By varying the pre-exponential factor for the amide trimerization, it is found that the more trimers are formed, the lower the growth rates are than the experimental value, which indicates that trimers are poor growth precursors, because of thermal diffusion effect caused by high temperature gradient. The effective order for the contribution of major species to growth rate is found as: pyrolysis species > amides > trimers. The study also shows that radical reactions have little effect on gas reaction path because of the generation and depletion of H radicals in the chain reactions when NH2 is considered as the end species.

  14. Investigating multiple dysregulated pathways in rheumatoid arthritis based on pathway interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xian-Dong; Song, Xian-Xu; Liu, Gui-Bo; Ren, Chun-Hui; Sun, Yuan-Bo; Liu, Ke-Xin; Liu, Bo; Liang, Shuang; Zhu, Zhu

    2018-03-01

    The traditional methods of identifying biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have focussed on the differentially expressed pathways or individual pathways, which however, neglect the interactions between pathways. To better understand the pathogenesis of RA, we aimed to identify dysregulated pathway sets using a pathway interaction network (PIN), which considered interactions among pathways. Firstly, RA-related gene expression profile data, protein-protein interactions (PPI) data and pathway data were taken up from the corresponding databases. Secondly, principal component analysis method was used to calculate the pathway activity of each of the pathway, and then a seed pathway was identified using data gleaned from the pathway activity. A PIN was then constructed based on the gene expression profile, pathway data, and PPI information. Finally, the dysregulated pathways were extracted from the PIN based on the seed pathway using the method of support vector machines and an area under the curve (AUC) index. The PIN comprised of a total of 854 pathways and 1064 pathway interactions. The greatest change in the activity score between RA and control samples was observed in the pathway of epigenetic regulation of gene expression, which was extracted and regarded as the seed pathway. Starting with this seed pathway, one maximum pathway set containing 10 dysregulated pathways was extracted from the PIN, having an AUC of 0.8249, and the result indicated that this pathway set could distinguish RA from the controls. These 10 dysregulated pathways might be potential biomarkers for RA diagnosis and treatment in the future.

  15. NMR studies of stock process water and reaction pathways in hydrothermal carbonization of furfural residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Yue

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC is a valuable approach to convert furfural residue (FR into carbon material. The prepared biochars are usually characterized comprehensively, while the stock process water still remains to be studied in detail. Herein, a NMR study of the main components in stock process water generated at different HTC reaction conditions was reported. Various qualitative and quantitative NMR techniques (1H and 13C NMR, 1H–1H COSY and 1H13C HSQC etc. especially 1D selective gradient total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY NMR were strategically applied in the analysis of HTC stock process water. Without separation and purification, it was demonstrated that the main detectable compounds are 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, formic acid, methanol, acetic acid, levulinic acid, glycerol, hydroxyacetone and acetaldehyde in this complicate mixture. Furthermore, the relationship between the concentration of major products and the reaction conditions (180–240 °C at 8 h, and 1–24 h at 240 °C was established. Finally, reasonable reaction pathways for hydrothermal conversion of FR were proposed based on this result and our previously obtained characteristics of biochars. The routine and challenging NMR methods utilized here would be an alternative other than HPLC or GC for biomass conversion research and can be extended to more studies. Keywords: NMR, Hydrothermal carbonization, Furfural residue, Stock process water

  16. The Photoconversion of Phytochrome Includes an Unproductive Shunt Reaction Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrke, David; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Michael, Norbert; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2018-03-05

    Phytochromes are modular bimodal photoswitches that control gene expression for morphogenetic processes in plants. These functions are triggered by photoinduced conversions between the inactive and active states of the photosensory module, denoted as Pr and Pfr, respectively. In the present time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopic study of bacterial representatives of this photoreceptor family, we demonstrate that these phototransformations do not represent linear processes but include a branching reaction back to the initial state, prior to (de)activation of the output module. Thus, only a fraction of the photoreceptors undergoing the phototransformations can initiate the downstream signaling process, consistent with phytochrome's function as a sensor for more durable changes of light conditions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Laccase-catalyzed removal of the antimicrobials chlorophene and dichlorophen from water: Reaction kinetics, pathway and toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huanhuan; Peng, Jianbiao; Li, Jianhua; Mao, Liang; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-11-05

    As active agents in cleaning and disinfecting products, antimicrobials have been widely spread in the environment and have drawn extensive attention as potential threats to the ecological system and human health. In this study, the laccase-catalyzed removal of two emerging antimicrobials, chlorophene (CP) and dichlorophen (DCP), was investigated under simulated environmental conditions. Intrinsic reaction kinetics showed that the removal of CP and DCP followed second-order reaction kinetics, first-order with respect to both the enzyme and the substrate concentration. It was also found that fulvic acid could suppress the transformation of CP and DCP by reversing the oxidation reactions through its action as a scavenger of the free radical intermediates produced from reactions between laccase and the substrates. Several reaction products were identified by a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and detailed reaction pathways were proposed. For both CP and DCP, direct polymerization was the principal pathway, and the coupling patterns were further corroborated based on molecular modeling. The nucleophilic substitution of chlorine by the hydroxyl group was observed, and further oxidation products capable of coupling with each other were also found. Additionally, toxicity evaluation tests using Scenedesmus obliquus confirmed that the toxicity of CP and DCP was effectively eliminated during the reaction processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reaction time for trimolecular reactions in compartment-based reaction-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Chen, Minghan; Erban, Radek; Cao, Yang

    2018-05-01

    Trimolecular reaction models are investigated in the compartment-based (lattice-based) framework for stochastic reaction-diffusion modeling. The formulae for the first collision time and the mean reaction time are derived for the case where three molecules are present in the solution under periodic boundary conditions. For the case of reflecting boundary conditions, similar formulae are obtained using a computer-assisted approach. The accuracy of these formulae is further verified through comparison with numerical results. The presented derivation is based on the first passage time analysis of Montroll [J. Math. Phys. 10, 753 (1969)]. Montroll's results for two-dimensional lattice-based random walks are adapted and applied to compartment-based models of trimolecular reactions, which are studied in one-dimensional or pseudo one-dimensional domains.

  19. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformations through different reaction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Organic compounds are produced in vast quantities for industrial and agricultural use, as well as for human and animal healthcare [1]. These chemicals and their metabolites are frequently detected at trace levels in fresh water environments where they undergo degradation via different reaction pathways. Compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. Recent advances in analytical techniques have promoted the fast development and implementation of multi-element CSIA. However, quantitative frameworks to evaluate multi-element stable isotope data and incorporating mechanistic information on the degradation processes [2,3] are still lacking. In this study we propose a mechanism-based modeling approach to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. We validate the proposed approach with the concentration and multi-element isotope data of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model precisely captures the dual element isotope trends characteristic of different reaction pathways and their range of variation consistent with observed multi-element (C, N) bulk isotope fractionation. The proposed approach can also be used as a tool to explore transformation pathways in scenarios for which position-specific isotope data are not yet available. [1] Schwarzenbach, R.P., Egli, T., Hofstetter, T.B., von Gunten, U., Wehrli, B., 2010. Global Water Pollution and Human Health. Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. doi:10.1146/annurev-environ-100809-125342. [2] Jin, B., Haderlein, S.B., Rolle, M

  20. Automated pathway and reaction prediction facilitates in silico identification of unknown metabolites in human cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quell, Jan D; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Colombo, Marco; Krumsiek, Jan; Evans, Anne M; Mohney, Robert; Salomaa, Veikko; de Faire, Ulf; Groop, Leif C; Agakov, Felix; Looker, Helen C; McKeigue, Paul; Colhoun, Helen M; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2017-12-15

    Identification of metabolites in non-targeted metabolomics continues to be a bottleneck in metabolomics studies in large human cohorts. Unidentified metabolites frequently emerge in the results of association studies linking metabolite levels to, for example, clinical phenotypes. For further analyses these unknown metabolites must be identified. Current approaches utilize chemical information, such as spectral details and fragmentation characteristics to determine components of unknown metabolites. Here, we propose a systems biology model exploiting the internal correlation structure of metabolite levels in combination with existing biochemical and genetic information to characterize properties of unknown molecules. Levels of 758 metabolites (439 known, 319 unknown) in human blood samples of 2279 subjects were measured using a non-targeted metabolomics platform (LC-MS and GC-MS). We reconstructed the structure of biochemical pathways that are imprinted in these metabolomics data by building an empirical network model based on 1040 significant partial correlations between metabolites. We further added associations of these metabolites to 134 genes from genome-wide association studies as well as reactions and functional relations to genes from the public database Recon 2 to the network model. From the local neighborhood in the network, we were able to predict the pathway annotation of 180 unknown metabolites. Furthermore, we classified 100 pairs of known and unknown and 45 pairs of unknown metabolites to 21 types of reactions based on their mass differences. As a proof of concept, we then looked further into the special case of predicted dehydrogenation reactions leading us to the selection of 39 candidate molecules for 5 unknown metabolites. Finally, we could verify 2 of those candidates by applying LC-MS analyses of commercially available candidate substances. The formerly unknown metabolites X-13891 and X-13069 were shown to be 2-dodecendioic acid and 9

  1. Modeling reaction histories to study chemical pathways in condensed phase detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott Stewart, D.; Hernández, Alberto; Lee, Kibaek

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of pressure and temperature histories, which are required to understand chemical pathways in condensed phase explosives during detonation, is discussed. We argue that estimates made from continuum models, calibrated by macroscopic experiments, are essential to inform modern, atomistic-based reactive chemistry simulations at detonation pressures and temperatures. We present easy to implement methods for general equation of state and arbitrarily complex chemical reaction schemes that can be used to compute reactive flow histories for the constant volume, the energy process, and the expansion process on the Rayleigh line of a steady Chapman-Jouguet detonation. A brief review of state-of-the-art of two-component reactive flow models is given that highlights the Ignition and Growth model of Lee and Tarver [Phys. Fluids 23, 2362 (1980)] and the Wide-Ranging Equation of State model of Wescott, Stewart, and Davis [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 053514 (2005)]. We discuss evidence from experiments and reactive molecular dynamic simulations that motivate models that have several components, instead of the two that have traditionally been used to describe the results of macroscopic detonation experiments. We present simplified examples of a formulation for a hypothetical explosive that uses simple (ideal) equation of state forms and detailed comparisons. Then, we estimate pathways computed from two-component models of real explosive materials that have been calibrated with macroscopic experiments.

  2. A novel method to identify hub pathways of rheumatoid arthritis based on differential pathway networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shi-Tong; Sun, Yong-Hua; Zong, Shi-Hua

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify hub pathways of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using a novel method based on differential pathway network (DPN) analysis. The present study proposed a DPN where protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network was integrated with pathway‑pathway interactions. Pathway data was obtained from background PPI network and the Reactome pathway database. Subsequently, pathway interactions were extracted from the pathway data by building randomized gene‑gene interactions and a weight value was assigned to each pathway interaction using Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) to identify differential pathway interactions. Differential pathway interactions were visualized using Cytoscape to construct a DPN. Topological analysis was conducted to identify hub pathways that possessed the top 5% degree distribution of DPN. Modules of DPN were mined according to ClusterONE. A total of 855 pathways were selected to build pathway interactions. By filtrating pathway interactions of weight values >0.7, a DPN with 312 nodes and 791 edges was obtained. Topological degree analysis revealed 15 hub pathways, such as heparan sulfate/heparin‑glycosaminoglycan (HS‑GAG) degradation, HS‑GAG metabolism and keratan sulfate degradation for RA based on DPN. Furthermore, hub pathways were also important in modules, which validated the significance of hub pathways. In conclusion, the proposed method is a computationally efficient way to identify hub pathways of RA, which identified 15 hub pathways that may be potential biomarkers and provide insight to future investigation and treatment of RA.

  3. Methane coupling reaction in an oxy-steam stream through an OH radical pathway by using supported alkali metal catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Yin

    2014-03-24

    A universal reaction mechanism involved in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is demonstrated under oxy-steam conditions using alkali-metal-based catalysts. Rigorous kinetic measurements indicated a reaction mechanism that is consistent with OH radical formation from a H 2O-O2 reaction followed by C-H activation in CH 4 with an OH radical. Thus, the presence of water enhances both the CH4 conversion rate and the C2 selectivity. This OH radical pathway that is selective for the OCM was observed for the catalyst without Mn, which suggests clearly that Mn is not the essential component in a selective OCM catalyst. The experiments with different catalyst compositions revealed that the OH.-mediated pathway proceeded in the presence of catalysts with different alkali metals (Na, K) and different oxo anions (W, Mo). This difference in catalytic activity for OH radical generation accounts for the different OCM selectivities. As a result, a high C2 yield is achievable by using Na2WO4/SiO2, which catalyzes the OH.-mediated pathway selectively. Make it methane: A universal reaction mechanism involved in the oxidative coupling of methane is demonstrated under oxy-stream conditions by using alkali-metal-based catalysts. Rigorous kinetic measurements indicated a reaction mechanism that is consistent with OH radical formation from an H2O-O2 reaction, followed by C-H activation in CH4 with an OH radical. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Study of the optimal reaction conditions for assay of the mouse alternative complement pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, H. van; Rademaker, P.M.; Klerx, J.P.A.M.; Willers, J.M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The optimal reaction conditions for hemolytic assay of alternative complement pathway activity in mouse serum were investigated. A microtiter system was used, in which a number of 7.5×106 rabbit erythrocytes per test well appeared to be optimal. Rabbit erythrocytes were superior as target cells over

  5. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil : Model Studies on Reaction Pathways for the Carbohydrate Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, J.; Arentz, J.; Rasrendra, C. B.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil can be upgraded by a catalytic hydrotreatment (250-400 degrees C, 100-200 bar) using heterogeneous catalysts such as Ru/C to hydrocarbon-like products that can serve as liquid transportation fuels. Insight into the complex reaction pathways of the various component fractions

  6. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. For some dynamics methods, global potential energy surfaces are required. In this case, it is necessary to obtain the energy at a complete sampling of all the possible arrangements of the nuclei, which are energetically accessible, and then a fitting function must be obtained to interpolate between the computed points. In other cases, characterization of the stationary points and the reaction pathway connecting them is sufficient. These properties may be readily obtained using analytical derivative methods. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives usefull results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications including global potential energy surfaces, H + O2, H + N2, O(3p) + H2, and reaction pathways for complex reactions, including reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  7. Electrode Reaction Pathway in Oxide Anode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyuan

    the electrolyte to change 3PB kinetics. Compared to Ni, Co doping activates the bulk oxygen more significantly, promoting the reaction at 2PB. The active surface reaction zone is found to be enlarged by the electrolyte with high oxygen activity (SSZ vs. YSZ) when charge transfer is one of the RDS. Due to the larger exchange current for charge transfer in 3PB with SSZ electrolyte, the adsorption gradient zone is broadened, leading to enhanced surface reaction kinetics. The potential application of such finding is demonstrated on SSZ/YSZ/SSZ sandwich, showing largely improved electrode performance, opening a wide door for the utilization of electrolytes that are too expensive, fragile or instable to be used before. The bulk path way in 2PB reaction can be affected by overpotential in terms of local vacancy concentration, built-in electrical field and stability. It is proven that an uneven distribution of lattice oxygen is established under operation conditions with overpotential by both qualitative analysis and analytic solution. An electrostatic field force is present besides the concentration gradient in the anode lattice to control the motion of oxygen ions. Compared to the usual estimation based on chemical diffusion mechanism, the real deviation of ionic defects concentration under polarization from the equilibrium state near electrode/electrolyte interface is smaller with the built-in electrical field. The overpotential is demonstrated to be able to open up or shut down the bulk pathway depending on the ionic defects of electrodes. The analysis on the bulk pathway in terms of local charged species and various potentials provides new insight in anion diffusion and electrode stability.

  8. RhoA/ROCK Signaling Pathway Mediates Shuanghuanglian Injection-Induced Pseudo-allergic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiayin; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Yushi; Li, Chunying; Yi, Yan; Pan, Chen; Tian, Jingzhuo; Yang, Yifei; Cui, Hongyu; Wang, Lianmei; Liu, Suyan; Liu, Jing; Deng, Nuo; Liang, Aihua

    2018-01-01

    Background: Shuanghuanglian injection (SHLI) is a famous Chinese medicine used as an intravenous preparation for the treatment of acute respiratory tract infections. In the recent years, the immediate hypersensitivity reactions induced by SHLI have attracted broad attention. However, the mechanism involved in these reactions has not yet been elucidated. The present study aims to explore the characteristics of the immediate hypersensitivity reactions induced by SHLI and deciphers the role of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in these reactions. Methods: SHLI-immunized mice or naive mice were intravenously injected (i.v.) with SHLI (600 mg/kg) once, and vascular leakage in the ears was evaluated. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis test was conducted using sera collected from SHLI-immunized mice. Naive mice were administered (i.v.) with a single dose of 150, 300, or 600 mg/kg of SHLI, and vascular leakage, histamine release, and histopathological alterations in the ears, lungs, and intestines were tested. In vitro , human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer was incubated with SHLI (0.05, 0.1, or 0.15 mg/mL), and the changes in endothelial permeability and cytoskeleton were observed. Western blot analysis was performed and ROCK inhibitor was employed to investigate the contribution of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in SHLI-induced hypersensitivity reactions, both in HUVECs and in mice. Results: Our results indicate that SHLI was able to cause immediate dose-dependent vascular leakage, edema, and exudates in the ears, lungs, and intestines, and histamine release in mice. These were pseudo-allergic reactions, as SHLI-specific IgE was not elicited during sensitization. In addition, SHLI induced reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and disrupted the endothelial barrier. The administration of SHLI directly activated the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway both in HUVECs and in the ears, lungs, and intestines of mice. Fasudil hydrochloride, a ROCK inhibitor, ameliorated the

  9. Density Functional Theory Study of Competitive Reaction Pathways of Ti+ with Fluorinated Acetone in the Gas Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Kiryong; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the doublet and quartet potential energy surfaces associated with the gas-phase reaction between Ti + and CF 3 COCH 3 for two plausible reaction pathways, TiF 2 + and TiO + formation pathways by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The molecular structures of intermediates and transition states involved in these reaction pathways are optimized at the DFT level by using the PBE0 functional. All transition states are identified by using the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) method, and the resulting reaction coordinates describe how Ti + activates CF 3 COCH 3 and produces TiF 2 + and TiO + as products. On the basis of presented results, we propose the most favorable reaction pathway in the reaction between Ti + and CF 3 COCH 3

  10. A novel dysregulated pathway-identification analysis based on global influence of within-pathway effects and crosstalk between pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Li, Chunquan; Yang, Haixiu; Xu, Yanjun; Zhang, Chunlong; Ma, Jiquan; Shi, Xinrui; Liu, Wei; Shang, Desi; Yao, Qianlan; Zhang, Yunpeng; Su, Fei; Feng, Li; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Identifying dysregulated pathways from high-throughput experimental data in order to infer underlying biological insights is an important task. Current pathway-identification methods focus on single pathways in isolation; however, consideration of crosstalk between pathways could improve our understanding of alterations in biological states. We propose a novel method of pathway analysis based on global influence (PAGI) to identify dysregulated pathways, by considering both within-pathway effects and crosstalk between pathways. We constructed a global gene–gene network based on the relationships among genes extracted from a pathway database. We then evaluated the extent of differential expression for each gene, and mapped them to the global network. The random walk with restart algorithm was used to calculate the extent of genes affected by global influence. Finally, we used cumulative distribution functions to determine the significance values of the dysregulated pathways. We applied the PAGI method to five cancer microarray datasets, and compared our results with gene set enrichment analysis and five other methods. Based on these analyses, we demonstrated that PAGI can effectively identify dysregulated pathways associated with cancer, with strong reproducibility and robustness. We implemented PAGI using the freely available R-based and Web-based tools (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/PAGI). PMID:25551156

  11. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathway for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such observables as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method with the Dunning correlation consistent basis sets to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. Applications to complex reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion are discussed.

  12. The role of grain boundaries and transient porosity increase as fluid pathways for reaction front propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Laura; John, Timm; Geisler, Thorsten; Putnis, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The pseudomorphic replacement of Carrara marble by calcium phosphates was studied as a model system to examine the influence of different fluid pathways for reaction front propagation induced by fluid-rock interaction. In this model system, the grain boundaries present in the rock and the transient porosity structures developing throughout the replacement reaction enable the reaction front to progress further into the rock as well as to the center of each single grain until complete transformation. Hydrothermal treatment of the marble using phosphate bearing solutions at temperature levels of 150° C and 200° C for different durations lead to the formation of two product phases which were identified as hydroxyapatite [Ca5(PO4)3OH] as well as β-tricalcium phosphate [β-Ca3(PO4)2] (β-TCP). The formation of β-TCP was probably favored by the presence of ~0.6wt.% of Mg in the parent phase. Completely transformed single grains show a distinctive zoning, both in composition and texture. Whereas areas next to the grain boundary consist of nearly pure hydroxyapatite and show a coarse porosity, areas close to the center of the single grains show a high amount of β-TCP and a very fine porous microstructure. If F was added as an additional solution component, the formation of β-TCP was avoided and up to 3wt.% of F were incorporated into the product apatite. The use of the isotope 18O as a chronometer for the replacement reaction makes it possible to reconstruct the chronological development of the calcium phosphate reaction front. Raman analysis revealed that the incorporation of 18O in the PO4 tetrahedron of hydroxyapatite results in the development of distinct profiles in the calcium phosphate reaction front perpendicular to the grain boundaries of the marble. Through the use of the 18O chronometer, it is possible to estimate and compare the time effectiveness of the different fluid pathways in this model system. The results show that the grain boundaries serve as a

  13. Reaction-transport simulations of non-oxidative methane conversion with continuous hydrogen removal: Homogeneous-heterogeneous methane reaction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lin; Borry, Richard W.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    Detailed kinetic-transport models were used to explore thermodynamic and kinetic barriers in the non-oxidative conversion of CH4 via homogeneous and homogeneous-heterogeneous pathways and the effects of continuous hydrogen removal and of catalytic sites on attainable yields of useful C2-C10 products. The homogeneous kinetic model combines separately developed models for low-conversion pyrolysis and for chain growth to form large aromatics and carbon. The H2 formed in the reaction decreases CH4 pyrolysis rates and equilibrium conversions and it favors the formation of lighter products. The removal of H2 along tubular reactors with permeable walls increases reaction rates and equilibrium CH4 conversions. C2-C10 yields reach values greater than 90 percent at intermediate values of dimensionless transport rates (delta=1-10), defined as the ratio hydrogen transport and methane conversion rates. Homogeneous reactions require impractical residence times, even with H2 removal, because of slow initiation and chain transfer rates. The introduction of heterogeneous chain initiation pathways using surface sites that form methyl radicals eliminates the induction period without influencing the homogeneous product distribution. Methane conversion, however, occurs predominately in the chain transfer regime, within which individual transfer steps and the formation of C2 intermediates become limited by thermodynamic constraints. Catalytic sites alone cannot overcome these constraints. Catalytic membrane reactors with continuous H2 removal remove these thermodynamic obstacles and decrease the required residence time. Reaction rates become limited by homogeneous reactions of C2 products to form C6+ aromatics. Higher delta values lead to subsequent conversion of the desired C2-C10 products to larger polynuclear aromatics. We conclude that catalytic methane pyrolysis at the low temperatures required for restricted chain growth and the elimination of thermodynamics constraints via

  14. Reaction pathways of model compounds of biomass-derived oxygenates on Fe/Ni bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiting; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-10-01

    Controlling the activity and selectivity of converting biomass-derivatives to fuels and valuable chemicals is critical for the utilization of biomass feedstocks. There are primarily three classes of non-food competing biomass, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In the current work, glycolaldehyde, furfural and acetaldehyde are studied as model compounds of the three classes of biomass-derivatives. Monometallic Ni(111) and monolayer (ML) Fe/Ni(111) bimetallic surfaces are studied for the reaction pathways of the three biomass surrogates. The ML Fe/Ni(111) surface is identified as an efficient surface for the conversion of biomass-derivatives from the combined results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments. A correlation is also established between the optimized adsorption geometry and experimental reaction pathways. These results should provide helpful insights in catalyst design for the upgrading and conversion of biomass.

  15. Developmentally programmed DNA deletion in Tetrahymena thermophila by a transposition-like reaction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, S V; Cox, M M

    1996-01-01

    We provide a molecular description of key intermediates in the deletion of two internal eliminated sequences (IES elements), the M and R regions, during macronuclear development in Tetrahymena thermophila. Using a variety of PCR-based methods in vivo, double-strand breaks are detected that are generated by hydrolytic cleavage and correspond closely to the observed chromosomal junctions left behind in the macronuclei. The breaks exhibit a temporal and structural relationship to the deletion reaction that provides strong evidence that they are intermediates in the deletion pathway. Breaks in the individual strands are staggered by 4 bp, producing a four nucleotide 5' extension. Evidence is presented that breaks do not occur simultaneously at both ends. The results are most consistent with a deletion mechanism featuring initiation by double-strand cleavage at one end of the deleted element, followed by transesterification to generate the macronuclear junction on one DNA strand. An adenosine residue is found at all the nucleophilic 3' ends used in the postulated transesterification step. Evidence for the transesterification step is provided by detection of a 3' hydroxyl that would be liberated by such a step at a deletion boundary where no other DNA strand ends are detected. Images PMID:8654384

  16. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Model Studies on Reaction Pathways for the Carbohydrate Fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Wildschut, J.; Arentz, J.; Rasrendra, C. B.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil can be upgraded by a catalytic hydrotreatment (250-400 degrees C, 100-200 bar) using heterogeneous catalysts such as Ru/C to hydrocarbon-like products that can serve as liquid transportation fuels. Insight into the complex reaction pathways of the various component fractions during hydrotreatment is desirable to reduce the formation of by-products such as char and gaseous components. This paper deals with the catalytic hydrotreatment of representative model components for t...

  17. Investigating Students' Reasoning about Acid-Base Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Kouyoumdjian, Hovig; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry is central to a wide range of reactions. If students are able to understand how and why acid-base reactions occur, it should provide a basis for reasoning about a host of other reactions. Here, we report the development of a method to characterize student reasoning about acid-base reactions based on their description of…

  18. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Vázquez-Otero; Danila Khikhlukha; J. M. Solano-Altamirano; Raquel Dormido; Natividad Duro

    2016-01-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presente...

  19. Identification of altered pathways in breast cancer based on individualized pathway aberrance score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sheng-Hong; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Jing; Sun, Long

    2017-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify altered pathways in breast cancer based on the individualized pathway aberrance score (iPAS) method combined with the normal reference (nRef). There were 4 steps to identify altered pathways using the iPAS method: Data preprocessing conducted by the robust multi-array average (RMA) algorithm; gene-level statistics based on average Z ; pathway-level statistics according to iPAS; and a significance test dependent on 1 sample Wilcoxon test. The altered pathways were validated by calculating the changed percentage of each pathway in tumor samples and comparing them with pathways from differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A total of 688 altered pathways with Ppathways were involved in the total 688 altered pathways, which may validate the present results. In addition, there were 324 DEGs and 155 common genes between DEGs and pathway genes. DEGs and common genes were enriched in the same 9 significant terms, which also were members of altered pathways. The iPAS method was suitable for identifying altered pathways in breast cancer. Altered pathways (such as KIF and PLK mediated events) were important for understanding breast cancer mechanisms and for the future application of customized therapeutic decisions.

  20. DFT study of benzyl alcohol/TiO2 interfacial surface complex: reaction pathway and mechanism of visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Gu, Feng Long; Kim, Minjae; Miao, Maosheng; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2017-09-24

    We propose a new pathway for the adsorption of benzyl alcohol on the surface of TiO 2 and the formation of interfacial surface complex (ISC). The reaction free energies and reaction kinetics were thoroughly investigated by density functional calculations. The TiO 2 surfaces were modeled by clusters consisting of 4 Ti atoms and 18 O atoms passivated by H, OH group and H 2 O molecules. Compared with solid-state calculations utilizing the periodicity of the materials, such cluster modeling allows inclusion of the high-order correlation effects that seem to be essential for the adsorption of organic molecules onto solid surfaces. The effects of both acidity and solvation are included in our calculations, which demonstrate that the new pathway is competitive with a previous pathway. The electronic structure calculations based on the relaxed ISC structures reveal that the chemisorption of benzyl alcohol on the TiO 2 surface greatly alters the nature of the frontier molecular orbitals. The resulted reduced energy gap in ISC matches the energy of visible light, showing how the adsorption of benzyl alcohol sensitizes the TiO 2 surface. Graphical Abstract The chemisorption of benzyl alcohol on TiO 2 surface greatly alters the nature of the frontier molecular orbitals and the formed interfacial surface complex can be sensitized by visible light.

  1. Radical Rearrangement Chemistry in Ultraviolet Photodissociation of Iodotyrosine Systems: Insights from Metastable Dissociation, Infrared Ion Spectroscopy, and Reaction Pathway Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranka, Karnamohit; Zhao, Ning; Yu, Long; Stanton, John F; Polfer, Nicolas C

    2018-05-29

    We report on the ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) chemistry of protonated tyrosine, iodotyrosine, and diiodotyrosine. Distonic loss of the iodine creates a high-energy radical at the aromatic ring that engages in hydrogen/proton rearrangement chemistry. Based on UVPD kinetics measurements, the appearance of this radical is coincident with the UV irradiation pulse (8 ns). Conversely, sequential UVPD product ions exhibit metastable decay on ca. 100 ns timescales. Infrared ion spectroscopy is capable of confirming putative structures of the rearrangement products as proton transfers from the imine and β-carbon hydrogens. Potential energy surfaces for the various reaction pathways indicate that the rearrangement chemistry is highly complex, compatible with a cascade of rearrangements, and that there is no preferred rearrangement pathway even in small molecular systems like these. Graphical Abstract.

  2. De novo pathway-based biomarker identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcaraz, Nicolas; List, Markus; Batra, Richa

    2017-01-01

    in a large cohort of breast cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) revealed that MGs are considerably more stable than SG models, while also providing valuable insight into the cancer hallmarks that drive them. In addition, when tested on an independent benchmark non-TCGA dataset, MG features......Gene expression profiles have been extensively discussed as an aid to guide the therapy by predicting disease outcome for the patients suffering from complex diseases, such as cancer. However, prediction models built upon single-gene (SG) features show poor stability and performance on independent...... on their molecular subtypes can provide a detailed view of the disease and lead to more personalized therapies. We propose and discuss a novel MG approach based on de novo pathways, which for the first time have been used as features in a multi-class setting to predict cancer subtypes. Comprehensive evaluation...

  3. Pathway enrichment analysis approach based on topological structure and updated annotation of pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Wang, Shuyuan; Dai, Enyu; Zhou, Shunheng; Liu, Dianming; Liu, Haizhou; Meng, Qianqian; Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Wei

    2017-08-16

    Pathway enrichment analysis has been widely used to identify cancer risk pathways, and contributes to elucidating the mechanism of tumorigenesis. However, most of the existing approaches use the outdated pathway information and neglect the complex gene interactions in pathway. Here, we first reviewed the existing widely used pathway enrichment analysis approaches briefly, and then, we proposed a novel topology-based pathway enrichment analysis (TPEA) method, which integrated topological properties and global upstream/downstream positions of genes in pathways. We compared TPEA with four widely used pathway enrichment analysis tools, including database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery (DAVID), gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA), centrality-based pathway enrichment (CePa) and signaling pathway impact analysis (SPIA), through analyzing six gene expression profiles of three tumor types (colorectal cancer, thyroid cancer and endometrial cancer). As a result, we identified several well-known cancer risk pathways that could not be obtained by the existing tools, and the results of TPEA were more stable than that of the other tools in analyzing different data sets of the same cancer. Ultimately, we developed an R package to implement TPEA, which could online update KEGG pathway information and is available at the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN): https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/TPEA/. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Combustion modeling and kinetic rate calculations for a stoichiometric cyclohexane flame. 1. Major reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongzhi R; Huynh, Lam K; Kungwan, Nawee; Yang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shaowen

    2007-05-17

    The Utah Surrogate Mechanism was extended in order to model a stoichiometric premixed cyclohexane flame (P = 30 Torr). Generic rates were assigned to reaction classes of hydrogen abstraction, beta scission, and isomerization, and the resulting mechanism was found to be adequate in describing the combustion chemistry of cyclohexane. Satisfactory results were obtained in comparison with the experimental data of oxygen, major products and important intermediates, which include major soot precursors of C2-C5 unsaturated species. Measured concentrations of immediate products of fuel decomposition were also successfully reproduced. For example, the maximum concentrations of benzene and 1,3-butadiene, two major fuel decomposition products via competing pathways, were predicted within 10% of the measured values. Ring-opening reactions compete with those of cascading dehydrogenation for the decomposition of the conjugate cyclohexyl radical. The major ring-opening pathways produce 1-buten-4-yl radical, molecular ethylene, and 1,3-butadiene. The butadiene species is formed via beta scission after a 1-4 internal hydrogen migration of 1-hexen-6-yl radical. Cascading dehydrogenation also makes an important contribution to the fuel decomposition and provides the exclusive formation pathway of benzene. Benzene formation routes via combination of C2-C4 hydrocarbon fragments were found to be insignificant under current flame conditions, inferred by the later concentration peak of fulvene, in comparison with benzene, because the analogous species series for benzene formation via dehydrogenation was found to be precursors with regard to parent species of fulvene.

  5. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  6. Silicon-based sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M. Allen; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  7. Degradation of ibuprofen by hydrodynamic cavitation: Reaction pathways and effect of operational parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musmarra, Dino; Prisciandaro, Marina; Capocelli, Mauro; Karatza, Despina; Iovino, Pasquale; Canzano, Silvana; Lancia, Amedeo

    2016-03-01

    Ibuprofen (IBP) is an anti-inflammatory drug whose residues can be found worldwide in natural water bodies resulting in harmful effects to aquatic species even at low concentrations. This paper deals with the degradation of IBP in water by hydrodynamic cavitation in a convergent-divergent nozzle. Over 60% of ibuprofen was degraded in 60 min with an electrical energy per order (EEO) of 10.77 kWh m(-3) at an initial concentration of 200 μg L(-1) and a relative inlet pressure pin=0.35 MPa. Five intermediates generated from different hydroxylation reactions were identified; the potential mechanisms of degradation were sketched and discussed. The reaction pathways recognized are in line with the relevant literature, both experimental and theoretical. By varying the pressure upstream the constriction, different degradation rates were observed. This effect was discussed according to a numerical simulation of the hydroxyl radical production identifying a clear correspondence between the maximum kinetic constant kOH and the maximum calculated OH production. Furthermore, in the investigated experimental conditions, the pH parameter was found not to affect the extent of degradation; this peculiar feature agrees with a recently published kinetic insight and has been explained in the light of the intermediates of the different reaction pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J M; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-03-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations.

  9. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Vázquez-Otero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations.

  10. Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Michael S.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris E.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, José M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3·nH2O) to goethite (α-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathway's contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ∼7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 μM, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14-89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ⩽50 μM when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64-89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within iron

  11. An Alternative Reaction Pathway for Iridium Catalyzed Water Oxidation Driven by CAN

    KAUST Repository

    Bucci, Alberto

    2016-06-10

    The generation of solar fuels by means of a photosynthetic apparatus strongly relies on the development of an efficient water oxidation catalyst (WOC). Cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) is the most commonly used sacrificial oxidant to explore the potentiality of WOCs. It is usually assumed that CAN has the unique role to oxidatively energize WOCs, making them capable to offer a low energy reaction pathway to transform H2O to O2. Herein we show that CAN might have a much more relevant and direct role in WO, mainly related to the capture and liberation of O–O containing molecular moieties.

  12. An Alternative Reaction Pathway for Iridium Catalyzed Water Oxidation Driven by CAN

    KAUST Repository

    Bucci, Alberto; Menendez Rodriguez, Gabriel; Bellachioma, Gianfranco; Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Macchioni, Alceo

    2016-01-01

    The generation of solar fuels by means of a photosynthetic apparatus strongly relies on the development of an efficient water oxidation catalyst (WOC). Cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) is the most commonly used sacrificial oxidant to explore the potentiality of WOCs. It is usually assumed that CAN has the unique role to oxidatively energize WOCs, making them capable to offer a low energy reaction pathway to transform H2O to O2. Herein we show that CAN might have a much more relevant and direct role in WO, mainly related to the capture and liberation of O–O containing molecular moieties.

  13. One-step simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry-FTIR microspectroscopy to quickly detect continuous pathways in the solid-state glucose/asparagine Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Deng-Fwu; Hsieh, Tzu-Feng; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2013-01-01

    The stepwise reaction pathway of the solid-state Maillard reaction between glucose (Glc) and asparagine (Asn) was investigated using simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)-FTIR microspectroscopy. The color change and FTIR spectra of Glc-Asn physical mixtures (molar ratio = 1:1) preheated to different temperatures followed by cooling were also examined. The successive reaction products such as Schiff base intermediate, Amadori product, and decarboxylated Amadori product in the solid-state Glc-Asn Maillard reaction were first simultaneously evidenced by this unique DSC-FTIR microspectroscopy. The color changed from white to yellow-brown to dark brown, and appearance of new IR peaks confirmed the formation of Maillard reaction products. The present study clearly indicates that this unique DSC-FTIR technique not only accelerates but also detects precursors and products of the Maillard reaction in real time.

  14. Heterogeneous reaction of particulate chlorpyrifos with NO3 radicals: Products, pathways, and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nana; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Bo; Shu, Jinian; Wang, Youfeng; Sun, Wanqi

    2014-08-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a typical chlorinated organophosphorus pesticide. The heterogeneous reaction of chlorpyrifos particles with NO3 radicals was investigated using a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS) and a real-time atmospheric gas analysis mass spectrometer. Chlorpyrifos oxon, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, O,O-diethyl O-hydrogen phosphorothioate, O,O-diethyl ester thiophosphoric acid, diethyl hydrogen phosphate and a phosphinyl disulfide compound were identified as the main degradation products. The heterogeneous reaction pathways were proposed and their kinetic processes were investigated via a mixed-phase relative rate method. The observed effective rate constant is 3.4 ± 0.2 × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  15. Elementary steps and reaction pathways in the aqueous phase alkylation of phenol with ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, Sebastian; Hintermeier, Peter H.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Liu, Yue; Baráth, Eszter; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2017-08-01

    The hydronium ion normalized reaction rate in aqueous phase alkylation of phenol with ethanol on H-MFI zeolites increases with decreasing concentration of acid sites. Higher rates are caused by higher concentrations of phenol in the zeolite pores, as the concentration of hydronium ions generated by zeolite Brønsted acid sites decreases. Considering the different concentrations of reacting species it is shown that the intrinsic rate constant for alkylation is independent of the concentration of hydronium ions in the zeolite pores. Alkylation at the aromatic ring of phenol and of toluene as well as O-alkylation of phenol have the same activation energy, 104 ± 5 kJ/mol. This is energetic barrier to form the ethyl carbenium ion from ethanol associated to the hydronium ion. Thus, in both the reaction pathways the catalyst involves a carbenium ion, which forms a bond to a nucleophilic oxygen (ether formation) or carbon (alkylation).

  16. Reaction pathways for reduction of nitrate ions on platinum, rhodium, and platinum-rhodium alloy electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, M.C.P.M. da; De Souza, J.P.I.; Nart, F.C.

    2000-01-01

    The reduction of nitrate ions on platinum, rhodium, and platinum-rhodium alloy electrodes has been investigated using differential electrochemical mass spectrometry and in situ FTIR measurements. For 3 M HNO 3 concentration it has been found that nitrate starts the reduction with partial N-O bond dissociation and N-N bond formation generating NO and N 2 O. At potentials lower than 0.2 V the reaction proceeds forming dissolved NH 4 + . For potentials lower than 0 V the reduction continues via a multiple pathway reaction leading to the nonselective production of N 2 , NH 2 OH, and N 2 H 2 . On the alloyed electrodes, the production of NO and N 2 O has been observed in both cathodic and anodic scans, while on pure platinum and rhodium electrodes the reaction has been observed only during the cathodic scan. Contrasting with the pure platinum and rhodium alloys, where the N-O bond break starts forming NO and N 2 O, on the alloys HNO 2 has been observed as the first reaction step. For alloys with higher rhodium composition, like Pt 75 Rh 25 , no N 2 has been detected for potentials lower than 0 V

  17. Electrophilic properties of patulin. Adduct structures and reaction pathways with 4-bromothiophenol and other model nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliege, R; Metzler, M

    2000-05-01

    The mycotoxin patulin (PAT) is believed to exert its cytotoxic and chromosome-damaging effects by forming covalent adducts with essential cellular thiols. Since the chemical structures of such adducts are unknown to date, we have studied the reaction of PAT and its O-acetylated derivative with the monofunctional thiol model compound 4-bromothiophenol (BTP), which was chosen due to analytical advantages. By means of analytical and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography, 16 adducts of PAT and 3 adducts of acetyl-PAT were isolated and their chemical structures elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR, IR, and UV spectroscopy. Time course studies and analysis of daughter product formation from isolated intermediate adducts led to a detailed scheme for the reaction of PAT with BTP. The structures of adducts of PAT formed with other model nucleophiles, e. g., the aliphatic thiol 2-mercaptoethanol and the aromatic amine 4-bromoaniline, were also elucidated and found to corroborate the reaction scheme. In addition, one further reaction pathway was observed with 2-mercaptoethanol, which appears to be independent from those found for BTP. Our study with model nucleophiles provides insights into the electrophilic reactivity of PAT and proved to be useful for the structure elucidation of PAT adducts with biological nucleophiles of toxicological relevance, as will be reported by Fliege and Metzler [(2000) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 13, 373-381].

  18. Modeling Ignition of a Heptane Isomer: Improved Thermodynamics, Reaction Pathways, Kinetic, and Rate Rule Optimizations for 2-Methylhexane

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Samah; Cai, Liming; Khaled, Fathi; Banyon, Colin; Wang, Zhandong; Rachidi, Mariam El; Pitsch, Heinz; Curran, Henry J.; Farooq, Aamir; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important to investigate the combustion behavior of real fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracies in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and the kinetic reaction mechanism for a gasoline surrogate component, 2-methylhexane, based on recently published thermodynamic group values and rate rules derived from quantum calculations and experiments. Alternative pathways for the isomerization of peroxy-alkylhydroperoxide (OOQOOH) radicals are also investigated. The effects of these updates are compared against new high-pressure shock tube and rapid compression machine ignition delay measurements. It is shown that rate constant modifications are required to improve agreement between kinetic modeling simulations and experimental data. We further demonstrate the ability to optimize the kinetic model using both manual and automated techniques for rate parameter tunings to improve agreement with the measured ignition delay time data. Finally, additional low temperature chain branching reaction pathways are shown to improve the model’s performance. The present approach to model development provides better performance across extended operating conditions while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  19. Modeling Ignition of a Heptane Isomer: Improved Thermodynamics, Reaction Pathways, Kinetic, and Rate Rule Optimizations for 2-Methylhexane

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Samah

    2016-03-21

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important to investigate the combustion behavior of real fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracies in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and the kinetic reaction mechanism for a gasoline surrogate component, 2-methylhexane, based on recently published thermodynamic group values and rate rules derived from quantum calculations and experiments. Alternative pathways for the isomerization of peroxy-alkylhydroperoxide (OOQOOH) radicals are also investigated. The effects of these updates are compared against new high-pressure shock tube and rapid compression machine ignition delay measurements. It is shown that rate constant modifications are required to improve agreement between kinetic modeling simulations and experimental data. We further demonstrate the ability to optimize the kinetic model using both manual and automated techniques for rate parameter tunings to improve agreement with the measured ignition delay time data. Finally, additional low temperature chain branching reaction pathways are shown to improve the model’s performance. The present approach to model development provides better performance across extended operating conditions while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  20. Reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huanxuan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wan, Jinquan, E-mail: ppjqwan@scut.edu.cn [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ma, Yongwen [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by persulfate (PS) activated with zero-valent iron (ZVI). The DBP degradation was studied at three pH values (acidic, neutral and basic) in the presence of different organic scavengers. Using a chemical probe method, both sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) were found to be primary oxidants at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0, respectively while ·OH was the major specie to oxidize DBP at pH 11.0. A similar result was found in an experiment of Electron Spin Resonance spin-trapping where in addition to ·OH, superoxide radical (O{sub 2}·{sup −}) was detected at pH 11.0. The transformation of degradation products including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), phthalic anhydride, and acetophenone exhibited diverse variation during the reaction processes. The phthalic anhydride concentration appeared to be maximum at all pHs. Another eleven intermediate products were also found at pH 3.0 by GC–MS and HPLC analysis, and their degradation mechanisms and pathways were proposed. It was suggested that dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation and hydrogen extraction were the dominant degradation mechanisms of DBP at pH 3.0. - Highlights: • Both SO{sub 4}{sup −}· and ·OH were found to be the major active species at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0. • ·OH and ·O2– were the primary oxidants pH 11.0. • The intermediate products were investigated as well as the degradation pathway. • Dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation, H-extraction were the major mechanisms.

  1. Conferring specificity in redox pathways by enzymatic thiol/disulfide exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Luis Eduardo S; de Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Tairum, Carlos A; da Silva Neto, José Freire

    2016-01-01

    Thiol-disulfide exchange reactions are highly reversible, displaying nucleophilic substitutions mechanism (S(N)2 type). For aliphatic, low molecular thiols, these reactions are slow, but can attain million times faster rates in enzymatic processes. Thioredoxin (Trx) proteins were the first enzymes described to accelerate thiol-disulfide exchange reactions and their high reactivity is related to the high nucleophilicity of the attacking thiol. Substrate specificity in Trx is achieved by several factors, including polar, hydrophobic, and topological interactions through a groove in the active site. Glutaredoxin (Grx) enzymes also contain the Trx fold, but they do not share amino acid sequence similarity with Trx. A conserved glutathione binding site is a typical feature of Grx that can reduce substrates by two mechanisms (mono and dithiol). The high reactivity of Grx enzymes is related to the very acid pK(a) values of reactive Cys that plays roles as good leaving groups. Therefore, although distinct oxidoreductases catalyze similar thiol–disulfide exchange reactions, their enzymatic mechanisms vary. PDI and DsbA are two other oxidoreductases, but they are involved in disulfide bond formation, instead of disulfide reduction, which is related to the oxidative environment where they are found. PDI enzymes and DsbC are endowed with disulfide isomerase activity, which is related with their tetra-domain architecture. As illustrative description of specificity in thiol-disulfide exchange, redox aspects of transcription activation in bacteria, yeast, and mammals are presented in an evolutionary perspective. Therefore, thiol-disulfide exchange reactions play important roles in conferring specificity to pathways, a required feature for signaling.

  2. Biotransformation pathways of fluorotelomer-based polyfluoroalkyl substances: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Craig M; Muir, Derek C G; Mabury, Scott A

    2014-02-01

    The study reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the biotransformation of fluorotelomer-based compounds, with a focus on compounds that ultimately degrade to form perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs). Most metabolism studies have been performed with either microbial systems or rats and mice, and comparatively few studies have used fish models. Furthermore, biotransformation studies thus far have predominately used the 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) as the substrate. However, there have been an increasing number of studies investigating 6:2 FTOH biotransformation as a result of industry's transition to shorter-chain fluorotelomer chemistry. Studies with the 8:2 FTOH metabolism universally show the formation of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and, to a smaller fraction, perfluorononanoate (PFNA) and lower-chain-length PFCAs. In general, the overall yield of PFOA is low, presumably because of the multiple branches in the biotransformation pathways, including conjugation reactions in animal systems. There have been a few studies of non-FTOH biotransformation, which include polyfluoroalkyl phosphates (PAPs), 8:2 fluorotelomer acrylate (8:2 FTAC), and fluorotelomer carboxylates (FTCAs, FTUCAs). The PAPs compounds and 8:2 FTAC were shown to be direct precursors to FTOHs and thus follow similar degradation pathways. © 2013 SETAC.

  3. Reaction pathways of producing and losing particles in atmospheric pressure methane nanosecond pulsed needle-plane discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuefeng; Wang, Chao; Li, Li; Wang, Lijuan; Pan, Jie

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional fluid model is built up to numerically investigate the reaction pathways of producing and losing particles in atmospheric pressure methane nanosecond pulsed needle-plane discharge plasma. The calculation results indicate that the electron collisions with CH4 are the key pathways to produce the neutral particles CH2 and CH as well as the charged particles e and CH3+. CH3, H2, H, C2H2, and C2H4 primarily result from the reactions between the neutral particles and CH4. The charge transfer reactions are the significant pathways to produce CH4+, C2H2+, and C2H4+. As to the neutral species CH and H and the charged species CH3+, the reactions between themselves and CH4 contribute to substantial losses of these particles. The ways responsible for losing CH3, H2, C2H2, and C2H4 are CH3 + H → CH4, H2 + CH → CH2 + H, CH4+ + C2H2 → C2H2+ + CH4, and CH4+ + C2H4 → C2H4+ + CH4, respectively. Both electrons and C2H4+ are consumed by the dissociative electron-ion recombination reactions. The essential reaction pathways of losing CH4+ and C2H2+ are the charge transfer reactions.

  4. Novel personalized pathway-based metabolomics models reveal key metabolic pathways for breast cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Sijia; Chong, Nicole; Lewis, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    diagnosis. We applied this method to predict breast cancer occurrence, in combination with correlation feature selection (CFS) and classification methods. Results: The resulting all-stage and early-stage diagnosis models are highly accurate in two sets of testing blood samples, with average AUCs (Area Under.......993. Moreover, important metabolic pathways, such as taurine and hypotaurine metabolism and the alanine, aspartate, and glutamate pathway, are revealed as critical biological pathways for early diagnosis of breast cancer. Conclusions: We have successfully developed a new type of pathway-based model to study...... metabolomics data for disease diagnosis. Applying this method to blood-based breast cancer metabolomics data, we have discovered crucial metabolic pathway signatures for breast cancer diagnosis, especially early diagnosis. Further, this modeling approach may be generalized to other omics data types for disease...

  5. Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Kinetics, reaction pathways, and formation of brominated by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yuefei [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Kong, Deyang [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Nanjing 210042 (China); Lu, Junhe, E-mail: jhlu@njau.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Jin, Hao; Kang, Fuxing; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhou, Quansuo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A. • Phenolic moiety was the reactive site for sulfate radical attack. • Pathways include β-scission, oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. • Brominated disinfection by-products were found during TBBPA degradation. • Humic acid inhibited TBBPA degradation but promoted DBPs formation. - Abstract: Degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a flame retardant widely spread in the environment, in Co(II) catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation process was systematically explored. The second-order-rate constant for reaction of sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}{sup ·−}) with TBBPA was determined to be 5.27 × 10{sup 10} M{sup −1} s{sup −1}. Apparently, degradation of TBBPA showed first-order kinetics to the concentrations of both Co(II) and PMS. The presence of humic acid (HA) and bicarbonate inhibited TBBPA degradation, most likely due to their competition for SO{sub 4}{sup ·−}. Degradation of TBBPA was initiated by an electron abstraction from one of the phenolic rings. Detailed transformation pathways were proposed, including β-scission of isopropyl bridge, phenolic ring oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. Further oxidative degradation of intermediates in Co(II)/PMS process yielded brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) such as bromoform and brominated acetic acids. Evolution profile of Br-DBPs showed an initially increasing and then decreasing pattern with maximum concentrations occurring around 6–10 h. The presence of HA enhanced the formation of Br-DBPs significantly. These findings reveal potentially important, but previously unrecognized, formation of Br-DBPs during sulfate radical-based oxidation of bromide-containing organic compounds that may pose toxicological risks to human health.

  6. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijuan Qu

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters.

  7. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghao; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters. PMID:26430733

  8. A kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction is proposed based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. Special attention was paid to reactants, intermediates and end products: -fructose, N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG), 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose and

  9. Synthetic Control of Kinetic Reaction Pathway and Cationic Ordering in High-Ni Layered Oxide Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dawei [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, State Key Laboratory Physical Chemistry Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 China; Kou, Ronghui [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Ren, Yang [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Sun, Cheng-Jun [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Zhao, Hu [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Zhang, Ming-Jian [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 P. R. China; Li, Yan [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Huq, Ashifia [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Ko, J. Y. Peter [The Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA; Pan, Feng [School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 P. R. China; Sun, Yang-Kook [Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 South Korea; Yang, Yong [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, State Key Laboratory Physical Chemistry Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 China; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Bai, Jianming [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Wang, Feng [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA

    2017-08-25

    Nickel-rich layered transition metal oxides, LiNi1-x(MnCo)(x)O-2 (1-x >= 0.5), are appealing candidates for cathodes in next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for electric vehicles and other large-scale applications, due to their high capacity and low cost. However, synthetic control of the structural ordering in such a complex quaternary system has been a great challenge, especially in the presence of high Ni content. Herein, synthesis reactions for preparing layered LiNi0.7Mn0.15Co0.15O2 (NMC71515) by solid-state methods are investigated through a combination of time-resolved in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy measurements. The real-time observation reveals a strong temperature dependence of the kinetics of cationic ordering in NMC71515 as a result of thermal-driven oxidation of transition metals and lithium/oxygen loss that concomitantly occur during heat treatment. Through synthetic control of the kinetic reaction pathway, a layered NMC71515 with low cationic disordering and a high reversible capacity is prepared in air. The findings may help to pave the way for designing high-Ni layered oxide cathodes for LIBs.

  10. Confirmation of the reaction pathway for obtaining 1-(stearamidoethyl-2-hepta-decyl-2-i midazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ružić Nenad Lj.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-lmidazolines are components of many products, used in industry and households. 1-(Stearamidoethyl-2-heptadecyl-2-imidazoline is a surface active compound, which after quaternization with dimethyl sulfate, is used in lubricants, detergents, shampoos, softeners and cosmetics products. Due to its importance, it was essential to establish the exact reaction pathway for obtaining this compound. Diethylene triamine and stearic acid were used as the starting components. Using titrimetric analysis, and IR and 1H NMR spectros-copic analysis, as well as UV-Vis spectrophotometry it was established that the main intermediate was the 1,3-diamide bis(stearamidoethylamine. Earlier investigations conducted by some authors, using exclusively titrimetric analysis, showed that the main intermediate was the 1,2-diamide. In this paper it was proved that the assumption of these authors that salicylaldehiyde would react only with the primary and not the secondary amine groups was wrong. 1,2-Diamide is the main product of the hydrolysis of 1-(stearamido-ethyl-2-heptadecyl-2-imidazoline. It was shown, in this paper that the reaction of diethylene triamine with stearic acid in xylene at the reflux temperature, yields the salt of 1-(stearamidoethyl-2-heptadecyl-2-imidazoline and stearic acid.

  11. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, S.; Peru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Goriely, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000 s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Reaction pathways of biomass-derived oxygenates on noble metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Jesse R.

    As the global demand for energy continues to rise, the environmental concerns associated with increased fossil fuel consumption have motivated the use of biomass as an alternative, carbon-renewable energy feedstock. Controlling reactive chemistry of the sugars that comprise biomass through the use of catalysis becomes essential in effectively producing green fuels and value-added chemicals. Recent work on biomass conversion catalysts have demonstrated the efficacy of noble metal catalyst systems for the reforming of biomass to hydrogen fuel, and the hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived compounds to value-added chemicals. In particular, Pt and Pd surfaces have shown considerable promise as reforming catalysts in preliminary aqueous phase reforming studies. It becomes important to understand the mechanisms by which these molecules react on the catalyst surfaces in order to determine structure-activity relationships and bond scission energetics as to provide a framework for engineering more active and selective catalysts. Fundamental surface science techniques provide the tools to do this; however, work in this field has been so far limited to simple model molecules like ethanol and ethylene glycol. Herein, temperature programmed desorption and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy are utilized in an ultra-high vacuum surface science study of the biomass-derived sugar glucose on Pt and Pd single crystal catalysts. Overall, it was determined that the aldehyde function of a ring-open glucose molecule plays an integral part in the initial bonding and reforming reaction pathway, pointing to the use of aldoses glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde as the most appropriate model compounds for future studies. Furthermore, the addition of adatom Zn to a Pt(111) surface was found to significantly decrease the C-H and C-C bond scission activity in aldehyde containing compounds, resulting in a preferred deoxygenation pathway in opposition to the decarbonylation pathway

  13. Pump-shaped dump optimal control reveals the nuclear reaction pathway of isomerization of a photoexcited cyanine dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzek, Benjamin; Brüggemann, Ben; Pascher, Torbjörn; Yartsev, Arkady

    2007-10-31

    Using optimal control as a spectroscopic tool we decipher the details of the molecular dynamics of the essential multidimensional excited-state photoisomerization - a fundamental chemical reaction of key importance in biology. Two distinct nuclear motions are identified in addition to the overall bond-twisting motion: Initially, the reaction is dominated by motion perpendicular to the torsion coordinate. At later times, a second optically active vibration drives the system along the reaction path to the bottom of the excited-state potential. The time scales of the wavepacket motion on a different part of the excited-state potential are detailed by pump-shaped dump optimal control. This technique offers new means to control a chemical reaction far from the Franck-Condon point of absorption and to map details of excited-state reaction pathways revealing unique insights into the underlying reaction mechanism.

  14. Kinetics of the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways: influences of pH and reactant initial concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A previously proposed kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways has been validated by changing the initial pH (4.8, 5.5, 6.0, 6.8 and 7.5) of the reaction and reactant initial concentrations (1:2 and 2:1 molar ratios were compared to the 1:1 ratio). The model consists of 10

  15. Methane coupling reaction in an oxy-steam stream through an OH radical pathway by using supported alkali metal catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Yin; Li, Zhikao; Nourdine, Mohamed; Shahid, Salman; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A universal reaction mechanism involved in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is demonstrated under oxy-steam conditions using alkali-metal-based catalysts. Rigorous kinetic measurements indicated a reaction mechanism that is consistent with OH

  16. Proton conduction based on intracrystalline chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, G.; Lechner, R.E.; Langer, K.

    2002-01-01

    Proton conductivity in M 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 crystals (M=K, Rb, Cs) is shown to be due to a dynamic disorder in the form of an intracrystalline chemical equilibrium reaction: alternation between the association of the monomers [HSeO 4 ] 1- and [SeO 4 ] 2- resulting in the dimer [H(SeO 4 ) 2 ] 3- (H-bond formation) and the dissociation of the latter into the two monomers (H-bond breaking). By a combination of quasielastic neutron scattering and FTIR spectroscopy, reaction rates were obtained, as well as rates of proton exchange between selenate ions, leading to diffusion. The results demonstrate that this reaction plays a central role in the mechanism of proton transport in these solid-state protonic conductors. (orig.)

  17. TRWG developmental pathway for biospecimen-based assessment modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Translational Research Working Group; Srivastava, Sudhir; Gray, Joe W.; Reid, Brian J.; Grad, Oren; Greenwood, Addison; Hawk, Ernest T.

    2008-09-03

    The Translational Research Working Group (TRWG) was created as a national initiative to evaluate the current status of NCI's investment in translational research and envision its future. The TRWG conceptualized translational research as a set of six developmental processes or pathways focused on various clinical goals. One of those pathways describes the development of biospecimen-based assays that utilize biomarkers for the detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and assessment of response to cancer treatment. The biospecimen-based assessment modality (BM) pathway was conceived not as comprehensive description of the corresponding real-world processes, but rather as a tool designed to facilitate movement of a candidate assay through the translational process to the point where it can be handed off for definitive clinical testing. This paper introduces the pathway in the context of prior work and discusses key challenges associated with the biomarker development process in light of the pathway.

  18. Laser spot detection based on reaction diffusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J. M.; Dormido, R.; Duro, N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2016), s. 1-11, č. článku 315. ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser spot detection * laser beam detection * reaction diffusion models * Fitzhugh-Nagumo model * reaction diffusion computation * Turing patterns Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.677, year: 2016

  19. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions and novel technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchreiber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH or the reduction of nitrite (NO2- to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO2- to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO2-, NH2OH and nitroxyl (HNO. Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser based absorption spectroscopy. In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build-up.

  20. Dealkylation of alkylbenzenes: a significant pathway in the toluene, o-, m-, p-xylene + OH reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Jun; Volkamer, Rainer; Molina, Mario J

    2009-09-03

    The OH-radical initiated oxidation of a series of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, o-, m-, and p-xylene) in the presence of oxygen and NO(x) was investigated in a flowtube coupled with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). OH-radical addition to the aromatic ring--the major reaction pathway--has previously been shown to have a particular sensitivity to experimental conditions. This is the first flowtube study that demonstrates the atmospheric relevance of product yields from the OH-addition channel on the millisecond time scale (35-75 ms); the phenol yield from benzene and cresol yields from toluene are found to be 51.0 +/- 4.3% and 17.7 +/- 2.1%, in excellent agreement with previous studies under close to atmospheric conditions. We further report unambiguous experimental evidence that dealkylation is a novel and significant pathway for toluene and o-, m-, and p-xylene oxidation. At 150 Torr of O2 partial pressure, toluene is found to dealkylate with a yield of 5.4 +/- 1.2% phenol; similarly, m-, o-, and p-xylene dealkylate with yields of 11.2 +/- 3.8%, 4.5 +/- 3.2%, and 4.3 +/- 3.1% cresol, respectively. A dealkylation mechanism via OH-addition in the ipso position is feasible (DeltaH = -9 kcal/mol for phenol formation from toluene) but does not lend itself easily to explain the significant isomer effect observed among xylenes; instead an alternative mechanism is presented that can explain this isomer effect and forms phenol and likely epoxide type products with identical m/z (indistinguishable in our CIMS analysis) via a carbene-type intermediate. Dealkylation adds to the atmospheric production of phenol- and likely epoxide-type products, with aldehydes as expected co-products, and helps improve the carbon balance in the initial stages of aromatic oxidation.

  1. Reactivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction: Distortion-Interaction Analysis along the Reaction Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingzi; Osuna, Sílvia; Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Qi, Xiaotian; Liu, Song; Houk, Kendall N; Lan, Yu

    2016-08-26

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition is one of the most powerful tools for the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Density functional theory at the B3-LYP level of theory has been used to investigate the reactivity of different-diameter SWCNTs (4-9,5) in Diels-Alder reactions with 1,3-butadiene; the reactivity was found to decrease with increasing SWCNT diameter. Distortion/interaction analysis along the whole reaction pathway was found to be a better way to explore the reactivity of this type of reaction. The difference in interaction energy along the reaction pathway is larger than that of the corresponding distortion energy. However, the distortion energy plots for these reactions show the same trend. Therefore, the formation of the transition state can be determined from the interaction energy. A lower interaction energy leads to an earlier transition state, which indicates a lower activation energy. The computational results also indicate that the original distortion of the SWCNTs leads to an increase in the reactivity of the SWCNTs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical reaction pathway calculation for aromatic hydroxylation by p-hydroxybenzoate-3-hydroxylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, L.; Mulholland, A.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Vervoort, J.

    1999-01-01

    The reaction pathway for the aromatic 3-hydroxylation of p-hydroxybenzoate by the reactive C4a-hydroperoxyflavin cofactor intermediate in p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) has been investigated by a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method. A structural model for the

  3. Wang-Landau Reaction Ensemble Method: Simulation of Weak Polyelectrolytes and General Acid-Base Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsgesell, Jonas; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2017-02-14

    We present a novel method for the study of weak polyelectrolytes and general acid-base reactions in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The approach combines the advantages of the reaction ensemble and the Wang-Landau sampling method. Deprotonation and protonation reactions are simulated explicitly with the help of the reaction ensemble method, while the accurate sampling of the corresponding phase space is achieved by the Wang-Landau approach. The combination of both techniques provides a sufficient statistical accuracy such that meaningful estimates for the density of states and the partition sum can be obtained. With regard to these estimates, several thermodynamic observables like the heat capacity or reaction free energies can be calculated. We demonstrate that the computation times for the calculation of titration curves with a high statistical accuracy can be significantly decreased when compared to the original reaction ensemble method. The applicability of our approach is validated by the study of weak polyelectrolytes and their thermodynamic properties.

  4. Development and implementation of a critical pathway for prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Keun Jo [Presbyterian Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Myeong Goo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Beong Gyu [Wonkwang Health Science College, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a critical pathway (CP) for the prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography. The CP was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary group is Seoul National University Hospital. The CP was applied to CT patients. Patients who underwent CT scanning were included in the CP group from March in 2004. The satisfaction of the patients with CP was compared with non-CP groups. We also investigated the degree of satisfaction among the radiological technologists and nurses. The degree of patient satisfaction with the care process increased patient information (24%), prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%), pre-cognitive effect of adverse reactions to contrast media (39%) and information degree of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%). This CP program can be used as one of the patient care tools for reducing the adverse reactions to contrast media and increasing the efficiency of care process in CT examination settings.

  5. Development and implementation of a critical pathway for prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Keun Jo; Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Myeong Goo; Yoo, Beong Gyu

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a critical pathway (CP) for the prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography. The CP was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary group is Seoul National University Hospital. The CP was applied to CT patients. Patients who underwent CT scanning were included in the CP group from March in 2004. The satisfaction of the patients with CP was compared with non-CP groups. We also investigated the degree of satisfaction among the radiological technologists and nurses. The degree of patient satisfaction with the care process increased patient information (24%), prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%), pre-cognitive effect of adverse reactions to contrast media (39%) and information degree of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%). This CP program can be used as one of the patient care tools for reducing the adverse reactions to contrast media and increasing the efficiency of care process in CT examination settings

  6. Isocyanide based multi component reactions in combinatorial chemistry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dömling, A.

    1998-01-01

    Although usually regarded as a recent development, the combinatorial approach to the synthesis of libraries of new drug candidates was first described as early as 1961 using the isocyanide-based one-pot multicomponent Ugi reaction. Isocyanide-based multi component reactions (MCR's) markedly differ

  7. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo A R S Latino

    Full Text Available The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF, the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure

  8. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latino, Diogo A R S; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1)H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1)H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of

  9. Fluid flow pathways through the oceanic crust: reaction permeability and isotopic tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaig, Andrew; Castelain, Teddy; Klein, Frieder

    2013-04-01

    It is generally assumed that the dominant means of creating permeability in ocean floor hydrothermal systems is fracturing, induced either by cooling or by tectonic stress. Here we show textural evidence that metamorphic reactions can create a hierarchy of permeable pathways through gabbroic rocks similar to a fracture hierarchy. Isotopic microsampling shows that just as with fractures, most flow occurs through the larger channelways, and that even at the microscale, flow can be extremely heterogeneous with alteration affecting only certain minerals in the framework, leaving others untouched. Reaction permeability is created in three ways; dissolution creating open porosity, microcracking due to volume increase reactions involving olivine, and expansion of water due to rapid heating in dyke margins, particularly when intruded into brecciated rocks. Our data comes from IODP Hole U1309D, which was drilled to 1400 mbsf in the footwall of the Atlantis Massif detachment fault at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge 30°N. The core is composed of gabbroic rocks interlayered with olivine rich troctolites, with several basalt/diabase sills in the top 130 m. The dominant alteration occurred in the greenschist facies, at depths at least 1 km below seafloor, and decreases in intensity downhole. Whole rock oxygen isotope values range from +5.5 permil to +1.5 permil, indicating variable degrees of interaction with seawater at temperatures generally > 250 °C. Gabbroic rocks and diabases exhibit a range of Sr isotope ratios from MORB values (0.70261) to intermediate ratios (0.70429). Microsampling shows that amphiboles are often more radiogenic than coexisting plagioclase and can sometimes be isotopically altered in the same rock as completely unaltered primary minerals. Large (10 cm) amphibole-filled vugs show values ranging up to 0.708, close to seawater. In some cases however the secondary minerals are virtually unaltered indicating low fluid fluxes in pervasive alteration. SEM textures in

  10. Overview of Light Hydrogen-Based Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George H.; Shrestha, Prajakti J.

    This paper reviews light water and hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) including the different methodologies used to study these reactions and the results obtained. Reports of excess heat production, transmutation reactions, and nuclear radiation emission are cited. An aim of this review is to present a summary of the present status of light water LENR research and provide some insight into where this research is heading.

  11. MRE: a web tool to suggest foreign enzymes for the biosynthesis pathway design with competing endogenous reactions in mind

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Alazmi, Meshari; Cui, Xuefeng; Gao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    To rationally design a productive heterologous biosynthesis system, it is essential to consider the suitability of foreign reactions for the specific endogenous metabolic infrastructure of a host. We developed a novel web server, called MRE, which, for a given pair of starting and desired compounds in a given chassis organism, ranks biosynthesis routes from the perspective of the integration of new reactions into the endogenous metabolic system. For each promising heterologous biosynthesis pathway, MRE suggests actual enzymes for foreign metabolic reactions and generates information on competing endogenous reactions for the consumption of metabolites. These unique, chassis-centered features distinguish MRE from existing pathway design tools and allow synthetic biologists to evaluate the design of their biosynthesis systems from a different angle. By using biosynthesis of a range of high-value natural products as a case study, we show that MRE is an effective tool to guide the design and optimization of heterologous biosynthesis pathways. The URL of MRE is http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/mre/.

  12. MRE: a web tool to suggest foreign enzymes for the biosynthesis pathway design with competing endogenous reactions in mind

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-29

    To rationally design a productive heterologous biosynthesis system, it is essential to consider the suitability of foreign reactions for the specific endogenous metabolic infrastructure of a host. We developed a novel web server, called MRE, which, for a given pair of starting and desired compounds in a given chassis organism, ranks biosynthesis routes from the perspective of the integration of new reactions into the endogenous metabolic system. For each promising heterologous biosynthesis pathway, MRE suggests actual enzymes for foreign metabolic reactions and generates information on competing endogenous reactions for the consumption of metabolites. These unique, chassis-centered features distinguish MRE from existing pathway design tools and allow synthetic biologists to evaluate the design of their biosynthesis systems from a different angle. By using biosynthesis of a range of high-value natural products as a case study, we show that MRE is an effective tool to guide the design and optimization of heterologous biosynthesis pathways. The URL of MRE is http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/mre/.

  13. Quantifying Fenton reaction pathways driven by self-generated H2O2 on pyrite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Lozano, C.; Davila, A. F.; Losa-Adams, E.; Fairén, A. G.; Gago-Duport, L.

    2017-03-01

    Oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) plays a significant role in the redox cycling of iron and sulfur on Earth and is the primary cause of acid mine drainage (AMD). It has been established that this process involves multi-step electron-transfer reactions between surface defects and adsorbed O2 and H2O, releasing sulfoxy species (e.g., S2O32-, SO42-) and ferrous iron (Fe2+) to the solution and also producing intermediate by-products, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, our understanding of the kinetics of these transient species is still limited. We investigated the kinetics of H2O2 formation in aqueous suspensions of FeS2 microparticles by monitoring, in real time, the H2O2 and dissolved O2 concentration under oxic and anoxic conditions using amperometric microsensors. Additional spectroscopic and structural analyses were done to track the dependencies between the process of FeS2 dissolution and the degradation of H2O2 through the Fenton reaction. Based on our experimental results, we built a kinetic model which explains the observed trend of H2O2, showing that FeS2 dissolution can act as a natural Fenton reagent, influencing the oxidation of third-party species during the long term evolution of geochemical systems, even in oxygen-limited environments.

  14. A mechanistic study on the reaction pathways leading to benzene and naphthalene in cellulose vapor phase cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norinaga, Koyo; Yang, Huamei; Tanaka, Ryota; Appari, Srinivas; Iwanaga, Keita; Takashima, Yuka; Kudo, Shinji; Shoji, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Jun-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    The reaction pathways leading to aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene in gas-phase reactions of multi-component mixtures derived from cellulose fast pyrolysis were studied both experimentally and numerically. A two-stage tubular reactor was used for evaluating the reaction kinetics of secondary vapor phase cracking of the nascent pyrolysates at temperature ranging from 400 to 900 °C, residence time from 0.2 to 4.3 s, and at 241 kPa. The products of alkyne and diene were identified from the primary pyrolysis of cellulose even at low temperature range 500–600 °C. These products include acetylene, propyne, propadiene, vinylacetylene, and cyclopentadiene. Experiments were also numerically validated by a detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of more than 8000 elementary step-like reactions with over 500 chemical species. Acceptable capabilities of the kinetic model in predicting concentration profiles of the products enabled us to assess reaction pathways leading to benzene and naphthalene via the alkyne and diene from primary pyrolysates of cellulose. C 3 alkyne and diene are primary precursors of benzene at 650 °C, while combination of ethylene and vinylacetylene produces benzene dominantly at 850 °C. Cyclopentadiene is a prominent precursor of naphthalene. Combination of acetylene with propyne or allyl radical leads to the formation of cyclopentadiene. Furan and acrolein are likely important alkyne precursors in cellulose pyrolysis at low temperature, whereas dehydrogenations of olefins are major route to alkyne at high temperatures. - Highlights: • Analytical pyrolysis experiments provided data for kinetic modeling. • Detailed chemical kinetic model was used and evaluated. • Alkyne and diene were important intermediates for aromatic hydrocarbon formation. • Reaction pathways leading to aromatic hydrocarbons were proposed

  15. Rule-Based Event Processing and Reaction Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Adrian; Kozlenkov, Alexander

    Reaction rules and event processing technologies play a key role in making business and IT / Internet infrastructures more agile and active. While event processing is concerned with detecting events from large event clouds or streams in almost real-time, reaction rules are concerned with the invocation of actions in response to events and actionable situations. They state the conditions under which actions must be taken. In the last decades various reaction rule and event processing approaches have been developed, which for the most part have been advanced separately. In this paper we survey reaction rule approaches and rule-based event processing systems and languages.

  16. Gas-Phase Reaction Pathways and Rate Coefficients for the Dichlorosilane-Hydrogen and Trichlorosilane-Hydrogen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Walch, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA Ames Research Center's Integrated Process Team on Device/Process Modeling and Nanotechnology our goal is to create/contribute to a gas-phase chemical database for use in modeling microelectronics devices. In particular, we use ab initio methods to determine chemical reaction pathways and to evaluate reaction rate coefficients. Our initial studies concern reactions involved in the dichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H2--H2) and trichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H-H2) systems. Reactant, saddle point (transition state), and product geometries and their vibrational harmonic frequencies are determined using the complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure method with the correlation consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set (cc-pVDZ). Reaction pathways are constructed by following the imaginary frequency mode of the saddle point to both the reactant and product. Accurate energetics are determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Using the data from the electronic structure calculations, reaction rate coefficients are obtained using conventional and variational transition state and RRKM theories.

  17. Roles of different initial Maillard intermediates and pathways in meat flavor formation for cysteine-xylose-glycine model reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Xie, Jianchun; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Mengyao; Fan, Mengdie; Xiao, Qunfei; Liang, Jingjing; Chen, Feng

    2017-10-01

    To explore initial Maillard reaction pathways and mechanisms for maximal formation of meaty flavors in heated cysteine-xylose-glycine systems, model reactions with synthesized initial Maillard intermediates, Gly-Amadori, TTCA (2-threityl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids) and Cys-Amadori, were investigated. Relative relativities were characterized by spectrophotometrically monitoring the development of colorless degradation intermediates and browning reaction products. Aroma compounds formed were determined by solid-phase microextraction combined with GC-MS and GC-olfactometry. Gly-Amadori showed the fastest reaction followed by Cys-Amadori then TTCA. Free glycine accelerated reaction of TTCA, whereas cysteine inhibited that of Gly-Amadori due to association forming relatively stable thiazolidines. Cys-Amadori/Gly had the highest reactivity in development of both meaty flavors and brown products. TTCA/Gly favored yielding meaty flavors, whereas Gly-Amadori/Cys favored generation of brown products. Conclusively, initial formation of TTCA and pathway involving TTCA with glycine were more applicable to efficiently produce processed-meat flavorings in a cysteine-xylose-glycine system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dexmedetomidine Inhibits Inflammatory Reaction in Lung Tissues of Septic Rats by Suppressing TLR4/NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Wu

    2013-01-01

    and 20 μg/kg significantly decreased mortality and pulmonary inflammation of septic rats, as well as suppressed CLP-induced elevation of TNF-α and IL-6 and inhibited TLR4/MyD88 expression and NF-κB activation. These results suggest that dexmedetomidine may decrease mortality and inhibit inflammatory reaction in lung tissues of septic rats by suppressing TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway.

  19. Leading coordinate analysis of reaction pathways in proton chain transfer: Application to a two-proton transfer model for the green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Sufan; Smith, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    The 'leading coordinate' approach to computing an approximate reaction pathway, with subsequent determination of the true minimum energy profile, is applied to a two-proton chain transfer model based on the chromophore and its surrounding moieties within the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using an ab initio quantum chemical method, a number of different relaxed energy profiles are found for several plausible guesses at leading coordinates. The results obtained for different trial leading coordinates are rationalized through the calculation of a two-dimensional relaxed potential energy surface (PES) for the system. Analysis of the 2-D relaxed PES reveals that two of the trial pathways are entirely spurious, while two others contain useful information and can be used to furnish starting points for successful saddle-point searches. Implications for selection of trial leading coordinates in this class of proton chain transfer reactions are discussed, and a simple diagnostic function is proposed for revealing whether or not a relaxed pathway based on a trial leading coordinate is likely to furnish useful information

  20. Transformation of aminopyrine in the presence of free available chlorine: Kinetics, products, and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Quan; Feng, Li; Zhang, Li-Qiu

    2017-03-01

    Aminopyrine (AMP) has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In this study, the transformation mechanism of AMP by free available chlorine (FAC) oxidation was investigated. The results showed that FAC reacted with AMP rapidly, and a 74% elimination was achieved for 1.30 μM AMP after 2 min at 14.08 μM FAC dose. AMP chlorination was strongly pH-dependent, and its reaction included second- and third-order kinetic processes. Three active FAC species, including chlorine monoxide (Cl 2 O), molecular chlorine (Cl 2 ), and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), were observed to contribute to AMP degradation. The intrinsic rate constants of each FAC species with neutral (AMP 0 ) and cation (AMP + ) species were obtained by kinetic fitting. Cl 2 O exhibited the highest reactivity with AMP 0 (k AMP0, Cl2O  = (4.33 ± 1.4) × 10 9  M -1 s -1 ). In addition, Cl 2 showed high reactivity (10 6 -10 7  M -1 s -1 ) in the presence of chloride, compared with HOCl (k AMP+, HOCl  = (5.73 ± 0.23) × 10 2  M -1 s -1 , k AMP0, HOCl  = (9.68 ± 0.96) × 10 2  M -1 s -1 ). At pH 6.15 and 14.08 μM FAC dose without chloride addition, the contribution of Cl 2 O reached to the maximum (33.3%), but in the whole pH range, HOCl was the main contributor (>66.6%) for AMP degradation. The significance of Cl 2 was noticeable in water containing chloride. Moreover, 11 transformation products were identified, and the main transformation pathways included pyrazole ring breakage, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and halogenation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling position-specific isotope fractionation of organic micropollutants degradation via different reaction pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    : dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model successfully reproduces the multi-element isotope data, and precisely captures the dual element isotope trends, characterizing the different degradation pathways. Besides illustrating the model capability of mechanistic evaluation...

  2. Diversion of the melanin synthetic pathway by dopamine product scavengers: A quantum chemical modeling of the reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Demissie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the stability and reactivity of the oxidation products as well as L-cysteine and N-acetylcysteine adducts of dopamine studied using quantum chemical calculations. The overall reactions studied were subdivided into four reaction channels. The first reaction channel is the oxidation of dopamine to form dopaminoquinone. The second reaction channel leads to melanin formation through subsequent reactions. The third and fourth reaction channels are reactions leading to the formation of dopaminoquinone adducts which are aimed to divert the synthesis of melanin. The results indicate that L-cysteine and N-acetylcysteine undergo chemical reactions mainly at C5 position of dopaminoquinone. The analyses of the thermodynamic energies indicate that L-cysteine and N-acetylcysteine covalently bind to dopaminoquinone by competing with the internal cyclization reaction of dopaminoquinone which leads to the synthesis of melanin. The analysis of the results, based on the reaction free energies, is also supported by the investigation of the natural bond orbitals of the reactants and products.

  3. Charting an Alternate Pathway to Reaction Orders and Rate Laws in Introductory Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Criswell, Brett A.; McAllister, Nicole D.; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Moore, Lamesha A.; Pierre, Michelle S.

    2014-01-01

    Reaction kinetics is an axiomatic topic in chemistry that is often addressed as early as the high school course and serves as the foundation for more sophisticated conversations in college-level organic, physical, and biological chemistry courses. Despite the fundamental nature of reaction kinetics, students can struggle with transforming their…

  4. Experimental Study of Na based Titanium Nanofluid-Water Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gunyeop; Kim, Soo Jae; Baek, Jehyun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Oh, Sun Ryung; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In KALIMER-600, a sodium-cooled fast reactor designed by KAERI, thermal energy is transported from high-temperature liquid Na (526 .deg. C at 0.1 MPa) to low temperature water (230 .deg. C at - 19.5 MPa) through a heat exchanger. If any leakage or rupture occurs during the operation of this heat exchanger, highly pressurized liquid water can penetrate into the liquid Na channels; this contact should instantly cause SWR. As reaction continues, liquid water is soon vaporized by pressure drop and huge amount of reaction heat. This generated water vapor expands large reaction area and increases sodium-water vapor reaction process. Therefore, the rapid generation of reaction product (like H{sub 2}) and water vapor increases the system pressure that can cause the system failure in SFR. To reduce this strong chemical reaction phenomena between Na and water, some we have focused on suppressing the chemical reactivity of liquid Na by dispersing nanoparticles (NPs). For the real application of NaTiNF, the pressure change induced by NaTiNF-water reaction is compared with Na-water reaction in the present study. NaTiNF contains 100nm of Ti NPs at 0.2 vol. %. The reaction rate of NaTiNF-water reaction is also investigated as reaction temperature increases. Sodium-water vapor reaction (SVR) will occur when an SWR accident occurs in SFR. In this manner, NaTiNF-water vapor reaction is experimentally performed for ensuring the suppression of chemical reactivity of NaTiNF in contact with water vapor. In the basic step for reducing risk of an SWR in SFR, we have experimentally verified the suppressed chemical reactivity of liquid sodium using Ti NPs through SWR and SVR experiments. In SWR, Na based titanium nanofluid (NaTiNF) shows lower pressure change than Na. As T{sub R} increases, P{sub max} in Na-water reaction increases while NaTiNF does not. The reaction rate of NaTiNF shows twice slower than that of Na. In SVR, NaTiNF shows slower temperature increase than Na. The distinct

  5. Transformation products and reaction pathways of carbamazepine during photocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelic, A.; Michael, I.; Achilleos, A.; Hapeshi, E.; Lambropoulou, D.; Perez, S.; Petrovic, M.; Fatta-Kassinos, D.; Barcelo, D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Degradation of CBZ during US, TiO 2 /UV and TiO 2 /UV/US processes has been evaluated. • The combined TiO 2 /UV/US oxidation resulted in significant enhancement of the CBZ degradation rate. • Transformation products were identified and the transformation pathways were proposed. • An acute toxicity test showed an increase in toxicity over the time-course of the studied processes. -- Abstract: This study examines the degradation of the antiepileptic carbamazepine (CBZ) by sonolysis, TiO 2 -based heterogeneous photocatalysis under UV-A and simulated solar irradiation, and by the combined use of UV-A and ultrasound irradiation (i.e. sonophotocatalysis) in demineralized water, ground water and effluent wastewater. The processes were compared with respect to substrate conversion rate and the extent of DOC reduction as a measure of mineralization. CBZ was degraded following a pseudo-first order kinetics. Sonophotocatalysis provided the highest rate of CBZ transformation over the time-course of the experiment while the degree of DOC removal in pure water was similar for all the studied treatments (around 40%), and always lower than CBZ conversion. This indicated that a considerable organic load remained in the treated solutions that could also be attributed to the presence of persistent oxidation products. UPLC–(+ESI)-QToF-MS was employed to determine major CBZ-related transformation products. Several recalcitrant hydroxy- and keto-derivatives of CBZ were tentatively identified. A Daphnia magna bioassay was used to evaluate the potential toxicity of the samples collected at different time points showing that the mixtures were highly toxic to D. magna

  6. Transformation products and reaction pathways of carbamazepine during photocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelic, A. [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Michael, I.; Achilleos, A.; Hapeshi, E. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1 Panepistimiou Avenue, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas, International Water Research Centre, University of Cyprus, 1 Panepistimiou Avenue, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Lambropoulou, D. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Perez, S., E-mail: spsqam@idaea.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Petrovic, M. [Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), H2O Building, Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, 101-E-17003 Girona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Passeig Lluis Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Fatta-Kassinos, D. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1 Panepistimiou Avenue, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas, International Water Research Centre, University of Cyprus, 1 Panepistimiou Avenue, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Barcelo, D. [Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), H2O Building, Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, 101-E-17003 Girona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Passeig Lluis Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Degradation of CBZ during US, TiO{sub 2}/UV and TiO{sub 2}/UV/US processes has been evaluated. • The combined TiO{sub 2}/UV/US oxidation resulted in significant enhancement of the CBZ degradation rate. • Transformation products were identified and the transformation pathways were proposed. • An acute toxicity test showed an increase in toxicity over the time-course of the studied processes. -- Abstract: This study examines the degradation of the antiepileptic carbamazepine (CBZ) by sonolysis, TiO{sub 2}-based heterogeneous photocatalysis under UV-A and simulated solar irradiation, and by the combined use of UV-A and ultrasound irradiation (i.e. sonophotocatalysis) in demineralized water, ground water and effluent wastewater. The processes were compared with respect to substrate conversion rate and the extent of DOC reduction as a measure of mineralization. CBZ was degraded following a pseudo-first order kinetics. Sonophotocatalysis provided the highest rate of CBZ transformation over the time-course of the experiment while the degree of DOC removal in pure water was similar for all the studied treatments (around 40%), and always lower than CBZ conversion. This indicated that a considerable organic load remained in the treated solutions that could also be attributed to the presence of persistent oxidation products. UPLC–(+ESI)-QToF-MS was employed to determine major CBZ-related transformation products. Several recalcitrant hydroxy- and keto-derivatives of CBZ were tentatively identified. A Daphnia magna bioassay was used to evaluate the potential toxicity of the samples collected at different time points showing that the mixtures were highly toxic to D. magna.

  7. Transformation of methylparaben during water chlorination: Effects of bromide and dissolved organic matter on reaction kinetics and transformation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoom, Hoonsik; Shin, Jaedon; Ra, Jiwoon; Son, Heejong; Ryu, Dongchoon; Kim, Changwon; Lee, Yunho

    2018-09-01

    The reaction kinetics, products, and pathways of methylparaben (MeP) during water chlorination with and without bromide (Br - ) were investigated to better understand the fate of parabens in chlorinated waters. During the chlorination of MeP-spiked waters without Br - , MeP was transformed into mono-Cl-MeP and di-Cl-MeP with apparent second-order rate constants (k app ) of 64M -1 s -1 and 243M -1 s -1 at pH7, respectively, while further chlorination of di-Cl-MeP was relatively slower (k app =1.3M -1 s -1 at pH7). With increasing Br - concentration, brominated MePs, such as mono-Br-MeP, Br-Cl-MeP, and di-Br-MeP, became major transformation products. The di-halogenated MePs (di-Cl-MeP, Br,Cl-MeP, and di-Br-MeP) showed relatively low reactivity to chlorine at pH7 (k app =1.3-4.6M -1 s -1 ) and bromine (k app =32-71M -1 s -1 ), which explains the observed high stability of di-halogenated MePs in chlorinated waters. With increasing pH from 7 to 8.5, the transformation of di-halogenated MePs was further slowed due to the decreasing reactivity of di-MePs to chlorine. The formation of the di-halogenated MePs and their further transformation become considerably faster at Br - concentrations higher than 0.5μM (40μg/L). Nonetheless, the accelerating effect of Br - diminishes in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extract (Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)) due to a more rapid consumption of bromine by DOM than chlorine. The effect of Br - on the fate of MeP was less in the tested real water matrices, possibly due to a more rapid bromine consumption by the real water DOM compared to SRHA. A kinetic model was developed based on the determined species-specific second-order rate constants for chlorination/bromination of MeP and its chlorinated and brominated MePs and the transformation pathway information, which could reasonably simulate the transformation of MePs during the chlorination of water in the presence of Br - and selected DOM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  8. Chemical Conversion Pathways and Kinetic Modeling for the OH-Initiated Reaction of Triclosan in Gas-Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As a widely used antimicrobial additive in daily consumption, attention has been paid to the degradation and conversion of triclosan for a long time. The quantum chemistry calculation and the canonical variational transition state theory are employed to investigate the mechanism and kinetic property. Besides addition and abstraction, oxidation pathways and further conversion pathways are also considered. The OH radicals could degrade triclosan to phenols, aldehydes, and other easily degradable substances. The conversion mechanisms of triclosan to the polychlorinated dibenzopdioxin and furan (PCDD/Fs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are clearly illustrated and the toxicity would be strengthened in such pathways. Single radical and diradical pathways are compared to study the conversion mechanism of dichlorodibenzo dioxin (DCDD. Furthermore, thermochemistry is discussed in detail. Kinetic property is calculated and the consequent ratio of kadd/ktotal and kabs/ktotal at 298.15 K are 0.955 and 0.045, respectively. Thus, the OH radical addition reactions are predominant, the substitute position of OH radical on triclosan is very important to generate PCDD and furan, and biradical is also a vital intermediate to produce dioxin.

  9. Chemical conversion pathways and kinetic modeling for the OH-initiated reaction of triclosan in gas-phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Xiaomin; Kang, Lingyan; Zhao, Yan

    2015-04-10

    As a widely used antimicrobial additive in daily consumption, attention has been paid to the degradation and conversion of triclosan for a long time. The quantum chemistry calculation and the canonical variational transition state theory are employed to investigate the mechanism and kinetic property. Besides addition and abstraction, oxidation pathways and further conversion pathways are also considered. The OH radicals could degrade triclosan to phenols, aldehydes, and other easily degradable substances. The conversion mechanisms of triclosan to the polychlorinated dibenzopdioxin and furan (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are clearly illustrated and the toxicity would be strengthened in such pathways. Single radical and diradical pathways are compared to study the conversion mechanism of dichlorodibenzo dioxin (DCDD). Furthermore, thermochemistry is discussed in detail. Kinetic property is calculated and the consequent ratio of k add/k total and k abs/k total at 298.15 K are 0.955 and 0.045, respectively. Thus, the OH radical addition reactions are predominant, the substitute position of OH radical on triclosan is very important to generate PCDD and furan, and biradical is also a vital intermediate to produce dioxin.

  10. Degradation of sulfadimethoxine catalyzed by laccase with soybean meal extract as natural mediator: Mechanism and reaction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shangtao; Luo, Qi; Huang, Qingguo

    2017-08-01

    Natural laccase-mediator systems have been well recognized as an eco-friendly and energy-saving approach in environmental remediation, whose further application is however limited by the high cost of natural mediators and relatively long treatment time span. This study evaluated the water extract of soybean meal, a low-cost compound system, in mediating the laccase catalyzed degradation of a model contaminant of emerging concern, sulfadimethoxine (SDM), and demonstrated it as a promising alternative mediator for soil and water remediation. Removal of 73.3% and 65.6% was achieved in 9 h using soybean meal extract (SBE) as the mediating system for laccase-catalyzed degradation of sulfadimethoxine at the concentration of 1 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. Further degradation of sulfadimethoxine was observed with multiple SBE additions. Using SBE as mediator increased the 9-h removal of SDM at 1 ppm initial concentration by 52.9%, 49.4%, and 36.3% in comparison to the system mediated by 1-Hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT), p-Coumaric acid (COU) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), respectively. With the detection of stable coupling products formed with radical scavenger (5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide, DMPO), three phenolic compounds (vanillin, apocynin, and daidzein) in SBE were confirmed to serve as mediators for Trametes versicolor laccase. Reaction pathways were proposed based on the results of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. SO 2 excursion happened during SDM transformation, leading to elimination of antimicrobial activity. Therefore, as a natural, phenol rich, and affordable compound system, the future application of SBE in wastewater and soil remediation is worth exploring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, K.-C.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, S.-H.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2008-01-01

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH 2 CHCH 2 , a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH 2 CHCH 2 radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH 2 CHCH 2 radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcal/mol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH 2 CHCH 2 radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C 3 H 4 O (acrolein)+H, C 2 H 4 +HCO (formyl radical), and H 2 CO (formaldehyde)+C 2 H 3 . A small signal from C 2 H 2 O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at m/e=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C 2 H 5 +CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the acrolein+H product channel is consistent with the relative barriers en route to

  12. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2008-08-01

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH2CHCH2, a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH2CHCH2 radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcal/mol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C3H4O (acrolein)+H, C2H4+HCO (formyl radical), and H2CO (formaldehyde)+C2H3. A small signal from C2H2O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at m/e=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C2H5+CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the acrolein+H product channel is consistent with the relative barriers en route to each of these product channels

  13. Ontology aided modeling of organic reaction mechanisms with flexible and fragment based XML markup procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism models for primary organic reactions encoding the structural fragments undergoing substitution, addition, elimination, and rearrangements are developed. In the proposed models, each and every structural component of mechanistic pathways is represented with flexible and fragment based markup technique in XML syntax. A significant feature of the system is the encoding of the electron movements along with the other components like charges, partial charges, half bonded species, lone pair electrons, free radicals, reaction arrows, etc. needed for a complete representation of reaction mechanism. The rendering of reaction schemes described with the proposed methodology is achieved with a concise XML extension language interoperating with the structure markup. The reaction scheme is visualized as 2D graphics in a browser by converting them into SVG documents enabling the desired layouts normally perceived by the chemists conventionally. An automatic representation of the complex patterns of the reaction mechanism is achieved by reusing the knowledge in chemical ontologies and developing artificial intelligence components in terms of axioms.

  14. Nurse Educator Pathway Project: a competency-based intersectoral curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynne; Frost, Linda J; Bigl, Julie; Clauson, Marion; McRae, Cora; Scarborough, Kathy S; Murphy, Sue; Jillings, Carol; Gillespie, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we begin by providing an overview of the Educator Pathway Project (EPP), an education infrastructure that was developed in response to emerging critical nursing workplace issues, and the related demand for enhanced workplace education. We then describe the EPP competency-based curriculum designed to prepare nurses as preceptors, mentors, and educators to lead learning with diverse learner groups. This competency-based curriculum was developed through a collaboration of nurse leaders across practice, academic, and union sectors and drew from a widely embraced curriculum development model (Iwasiw, Goldenberg, & Andrusyzyn, 2005). The goal of the curriculum was to prepare nurses through a four-level career pathway model that contextualized practice and education theory to various education-related roles and levels of experience within the practice setting. Over 1,100 nurses participated in this innovative intersectoral nursing initiative.

  15. Reaction progress pathways for glass and spent fuel under unsaturated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.; Finn, P.; Bourcier, W.; Stout, R.

    1994-10-01

    The source term for the release of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository is the waste form. In order to assess the performance of the repository and the engineered barrier system (EBS) compared to regulations established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency it is necessary (1) to use available data to place bounding limits on release rates from the EBS, and (2) to develop a mechanistic predictive model of the radionuclide release and validate the model against tests done under a variety of different potential reaction conditions. The problem with (1) is that there is little experience to use when evaluating waste form reaction under unsaturated conditions such that errors in applying expert judgment to the problem may be significant. The second approach, to test and model the waste form reaction, is a more defensible means of providing input to the prediction of radionuclide release. In this approach, information related to the source term has a technical basis and provides a starting point to make reasonable assumptions for long-term behavior. Key aspects of this approach are an understanding of the reaction progress mechanism and the ability to model the tests using a geochemical code such as EQ3/6. Current knowledge of glass, UO 2 , and spent fuel reactions under different conditions are described below

  16. Consolidity: Stack-based systems change pathway theory elaborated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen Taher Dorrah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an elaborated analysis for investigating the stack-based layering processes during the systems change pathway. The system change pathway is defined as the path resulting from the combinations of all successive changes induced on the system when subjected to varying environments, activities, events, or any excessive internal or external influences and happenings “on and above” its normal stands, situations or set-points during its course of life. The analysis is essentially based on the important overall system paradigm of “Time driven-event driven-parameters change”. Based on this paradigm, it is considered that any affected activity, event or varying environment is intelligently self-recorded inside the system through an incremental consolidity-scaled change in system parameters of the stack-based layering types. Various joint stack-based mathematical and graphical approaches supported by representable case studies are suggested for the identification, extraction, and processing of various stack-based systems changes layering of different classifications and categorizations. Moreover, some selected real life illustrative applications are provided to demonstrate the (infinite stack-based identification and recognition of the change pathway process in the areas of geology, archeology, life sciences, ecology, environmental science, engineering, materials, medicine, biology, sociology, humanities, and other important fields. These case studies and selected applications revealed that there are general similarities of the stack-based layering structures and formations among all the various research fields. Such general similarities clearly demonstrate the global concept of the “fractals-general stacking behavior” of real life systems during their change pathways. Therefore, it is recommended that concentrated efforts should be expedited toward building generic modular stack-based systems or blocks for the mathematical

  17. Directing Reaction Pathways through Controlled Reactant Binding at Pd-TiO2 Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Bingwen; Nikolla, Eranda; Medlin, J Will

    2017-06-01

    Recent efforts to design selective catalysts for multi-step reactions, such as hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), have emphasized the preparation of active sites at the interface between two materials having different properties. However, achieving precise control over interfacial properties, and thus reaction selectivity, has remained a challenge. Here, we encapsulated Pd nanoparticles (NPs) with TiO 2 films of regulated porosity to gain a new level of control over catalyst performance, resulting in essentially 100 % HDO selectivity for two biomass-derived alcohols. This catalyst also showed exceptional reaction specificity in HDO of furfural and m-cresol. In addition to improving HDO activity by maximizing the interfacial contact between the metal and metal oxide sites, encapsulation by the nanoporous oxide film provided a significant selectivity boost by restricting the accessible conformations of aromatics on the surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Directing reaction pathways by catalyst active-site selection using self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Simon H; Schoenbaum, Carolyn A; Schwartz, Daniel K; Medlin, J Will

    2013-01-01

    One key route for controlling reaction selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is to prepare catalysts that exhibit only specific types of sites required for desired product formation. Here we show that alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers with varying surface densities can be used to tune selectivity to desired hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation products during the reaction of furfural on supported palladium catalysts. Vibrational spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the selectivity improvement is achieved by controlling the availability of specific sites for the hydrogenation of furfural on supported palladium catalysts through the selection of an appropriate alkanethiolate. Increasing self-assembled monolayer density by controlling the steric bulk of the organic tail ligand restricts adsorption on terrace sites and dramatically increases selectivity to desired products furfuryl alcohol and methylfuran. This technique of active-site selection simultaneously serves both to enhance selectivity and provide insight into the reaction mechanism.

  19. Reactions of carbonyl compounds with α,β-unsaturated nitriles as a convenient pathway to carbo- and heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharanin, Yu A; Goncharenko, M P; Litvinov, Victor P

    1998-01-01

    Published data on the methods for synthesis of carbo- and heterocyclic compounds based on reactions of α,β-unsaturated nitriles with carbonyl compounds and activated phenols are surveyed. It is demonstrated that all these reactions occur via nucleophilic addition of the carbanion generated from a carbonyl compound to the double bond of an unsaturated nitrile (the Michael reaction). The main routes of transformation of the adducts into carbo- and heterocyclic compounds are considered. The methods for regioselective preparation of fused 4H-pyrans or 1,4-dihydropyridines by varying conditions of cyclisation of Michael adducts are discussed. The bibliography includes 249 references.

  20. Aspartate aminotransferase: the kinetic barriers facing the covalent intermediates on the reaction pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, J.F.; Julin, D.A.; McLeish, M.; Wiesinger, H.

    1986-01-01

    The intermediates, aldimine (A), quinonoid (Q) and ketimine (K), along the transaminase reaction coordinate were probed by isotope transfer and solvent exchange kinetics. Less than 0.003% of 3 H is transferred from C/sub α/[ 3 H]-aspartate to pyridoxamine phosphate in the cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase (cAATase) reaction implying either that Q does not exist as a kinetically competent intermediate or that there is a rapid exchange of isotope with solvent. The ratio of the rate constants for C/sub α/ hydrogen exchange vs keto acid product formation (k/sub exge//k/sub prod/) are 2.5 and 0.5 for the reactions of cAATase with C/sub α/ [ 2 H]-aspartate and mitochondrial (m) AATase with C/sub α/[ 2 H]-glutamate respectively. The latter reaction was also probed from the α-keto-glutarate side with carbonyl 0-18 enriched keto acid. This experiment gave k/sub exge//k/sub prod/ = 1.0 for oxygen-18 exchange in α-ketoglutarate versus amino acid formation. The two exchange experiments with mAATase are interpreted in terms of a model in which the rate constant for diffusion of water from the active site is comparable with those for product forming steps

  1. Activation pathways taking place at molecular copper precatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, C.J.M.; Işık, F.; Verhoeven, T.W.G.M.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Hetterscheid, D.G.H.

    2017-01-01

    The activation processes of [CuII(bdmpza)2] in the water oxidation reaction were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Two different paths wherein CuO is formed were distinguished. [CuII(bdmpza)2] can be oxidized at high potentials to form CuO, which was observed by a slight

  2. Dysregulated Pathway Identification of Alzheimer's Disease Based on Internal Correlation Analysis of Genes and Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wei; Mou, Xiaoyang; Di, Benteng; Deng, Jin; Zhong, Ruxing; Wang, Shuaiqun

    2017-11-20

    Dysregulated pathway identification is an important task which can gain insight into the underlying biological processes of disease. Current pathway-identification methods focus on a set of co-expression genes and single pathways and ignore the correlation between genes and pathways. The method proposed in this study, takes into account the internal correlations not only between genes but also pathways to identifying dysregulated pathways related to Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia. In order to find the significantly differential genes for AD, mutual information (MI) is used to measure interdependencies between genes other than expression valves. Then, by integrating the topology information from KEGG, the significant pathways involved in the feature genes are identified. Next, the distance correlation (DC) is applied to measure the pairwise pathway crosstalks since DC has the advantage of detecting nonlinear correlations when compared to Pearson correlation. Finally, the pathway pairs with significantly different correlations between normal and AD samples are known as dysregulated pathways. The molecular biology analysis demonstrated that many dysregulated pathways related to AD pathogenesis have been discovered successfully by the internal correlation detection. Furthermore, the insights of the dysregulated pathways in the development and deterioration of AD will help to find new effective target genes and provide important theoretical guidance for drug design. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Reaction between peroxynitrite and boronates: EPR spin-trapping, HPLC analyses, and quantum mechanical study of the free radical pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Adam; Zielonka, Jacek; Lopez, Marcos; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Joseph, Joy; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recently we showed that peroxynitrite (ONOO−) reacts directly and rapidly with aromatic and aliphatic boronic acids (k ≈ 106 M−1s−1). Product analyses and substrate consumption data indicated that ONOO− reacts stoichiometrically with boronates, yielding the corresponding phenols as the major product (~85–90%), and the remaining products (10–15%) were proposed to originate from free radical intermediates (phenyl and phenoxyl radicals). Here we investigated in detail the minor, free radical pathway of boronate reaction with ONOO−. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique was used to characterize the free radical intermediates formed from the reaction between boronates and ONOO−. Using 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) and 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps, phenyl radicals were trapped and detected. Although phenoxyl radicals were not detected, the positive effects of molecular oxygen, and inhibitory effects of hydrogen atom donors (acetonitrile, and 2-propanol) and general radical scavengers (GSH, NADH, ascorbic acid and tyrosine) on the formation of phenoxyl radical-derived nitrated product, suggest that phenoxyl radical was formed as the secondary species. We propose that the initial step of the reaction involves the addition of ONOO− to the boron atom in boronates. The anionic intermediate undergoes both heterolytic (major pathway) and homolytic (minor pathway) cleavage of the peroxy (O-O) bond to form phenol and nitrite as a major product (via a non-radical mechanism), or a radical pair PhB(OH)2O•−…•NO2 as a minor product. It is conceivable that phenyl radicals are formed by the fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion. According to the DFT quantum mechanical calculations, the energy barrier for the dissociation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion to form phenyl radicals is only a few kcal/mol, suggesting rapid and spontaneous fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion

  4. Evaluation of a setting reaction pathway in the novel composite TiHA-CSD bone cement by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, Czesława; Czechowska, Joanna; Ślósarczyk, Anna; Paszkiewicz, Zofia

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a setting reaction pathway in a novel, surgically handy implant material, based on calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) and titanium doped hydroxyapatite (TiHA). The previous studies confirmed superior biological properties of TiHA in comparison to the undoped hydroxyapatite (HA) what makes it highly attractive for future medical applications. In this study the three types of titanium modified HA powders: untreated, calcined at 800 °C, sintered at 1250 °C and CSH were used to produce bone cements. The Fourier Transform-InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were applied to evaluate processes taking place during the setting of the studied materials. Our results undoubtedly confirmed that the reaction pathways and the phase compositions differed significantly for set cements and were dependent on the initial heat treatment of TiHA powder. Final materials were multiphase composites consisting of calcium sulfate dihydrate, bassanite, tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and calcium titanate (perovskite). The FT-IR and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) measurements performed after the incubation of the cement samples in the simulated body fluid (SBF), indicate on high bioactive potential of the obtained bone cements.

  5. Oxidation of β-lactam antibiotics by peracetic acid: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejia; Zhou, Xinyan; Du, Penghui; Zhang, Tuqiao; Cai, Meiquan; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2017-10-15

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfection oxidant used in many industries including wastewater treatment. β-Lactams, a group of widely prescribed antibiotics, are frequently detected in wastewater effluents and surface waters. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven β-lactams (cefalexin (CFX), cefadroxil (CFR), cefapirin (CFP), cephalothin (CFT), ampicillin (AMP), amoxicillin (AMX) and penicillin G (PG)) toward PAA were investigated to elucidate the behavior of β-lactams during PAA oxidation processes. The reaction follows second-order kinetics and is much faster at pH 5 and 7 than at pH 9 due to speciation of PAA. Reactivity to PAA follows the order of CFR ∼ CFX > AMP ∼ AMX > CFT ∼ CFP ∼ PG and is related to β-lactam's nucleophilicity. The thioether sulfur of β-lactams is attacked by PAA to generate sulfoxide products. Presence of the phenylglycinyl amino group on β-lactams can significantly influence electron distribution and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) location and energy in ways that enhance the reactivity to PAA. Reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to accurately model the decay of β-lactams by PAA in surface water matrix and only slightly overestimate the decay in wastewater matrix. Results of this study indicate that the oxidative transformation of β-lactams by PAA can be expected under appropriate wastewater treatment conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Process for carrying out analyses based on concurrent reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J S; Shepherd, B P

    1980-01-03

    The invention refers to a process for carrying out analyses based on concurrent reactions. A part of a compound to be analysed is subjected with a standard quantity of this compound in a labelled form to a common reaction with a standard quantity of a reagent, which must be less than the sum of the two parts of the reacting compound. The parts of the marked reaction compound and the labelled final compound resulting from the concurrence are separated in a tube (e.g. by centrifuging) after forced phase change (precipitation, absorption etc.) and the radio-activity of both phases in contact is measured separately. The shielded measuring device developed for this and suitable for centrifuge tubes of known dimensions is also included in the patent claims. The insulin concentration of a defined serum is measured as an example of the applications of the method (Radioimmunoassay).

  7. An MHD heat source based on intermetallic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadjian, H.; Zavitsanos, P. (General Sciences, Inc., Souderton, PA (United States)); Marston, C.H. (Villanova Univ., PA (United States))

    1991-05-06

    The main objective of this program was the development of an MHD heat source of potential use in Space - Based Multi Megawatt, MHD Power Systems. The approach is based on extension of high temperature chemical/ion release technology developed by the General Sciences, Incorporated (GSI) team and successfully applied in other Space Applications. Solid state reactions have been identified which can deliver energy densities and electrons in excess of those from high energy explosives as well as other conventional fuels. The use of intermetallic reactions can be used to generate hot hydrogen plasma from the reaction, to create a high level of seedant ionization, can be packaged as a cartridge type fuels for discrete pulses. The estimated weight for energizing a (100 MW - 1000 sec) Pulsed MHD Power System can range from 12 to 25 {times} 10{sup 3} kg depending on reaction system and strength of the magnetic field. The program consisted of two major tasks with eight subtasks designed to systematically evaluate these concepts in order to reduce fuel weight requirements. Laboratory measurements on energy release, reaction product identification and levels of ionization were conducted in the first task to screen candidate fuels. The second task addressed the development of a reaction chamber in which conductivity, temperature and pressure were measured. Instrumentation was developed to measure these parameters under high temperature pulsed conditions in addition to computer programs to reduce the raw data. Measurements were conducted at GSI laboratories for fuel weights of up to 120 grams and at the Franklin Research Center* for fuel weights up to 1 kilogram. The results indicate that fuel weight can be scaled using modular packaging. Estimates are presented for fuel weight requirements. 15 refs.

  8. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  9. Synergistic reaction between SO2 and NO2 on mineral oxides: a potential formation pathway of sulfate aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Ma, Qingxin; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; He, Hong

    2012-02-07

    Sulfate is one of the most important aerosols in the atmosphere. A new sulfate formation pathway via synergistic reactions between SO(2) and NO(2) on mineral oxides was proposed. The heterogeneous reactions of SO(2) and NO(2) on CaO, α-Fe(2)O(3), ZnO, MgO, α-Al(2)O(3), TiO(2), and SiO(2) were investigated by in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS) at ambient temperature. Formation of sulfate from adsorbed SO(2) was promoted by the coexisting NO(2), while surface N(2)O(4) was observed as the crucial oxidant for the oxidation of surface sulfite. This process was significantly promoted by the presence of O(2). The synergistic effect between SO(2) and NO(2) was not observed on other mineral particles (such as CaCO(3) and CaSO(4)) probably due to the lack of the surface reactive oxygen sites. The synergistic reaction between SO(2) and NO(2) on mineral oxides resulted in the formation of internal mixtures of sulfate, nitrate, and mineral oxides. The change of mixture state will affect the physicochemical properties of atmospheric particles and therefore further influence their environmental and climate effects.

  10. Progranulin protects vascular endothelium against atherosclerotic inflammatory reaction via Akt/eNOS and nuclear factor-κB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hwan-Jin; Jung, Tae Woo; Hong, Ho Cheol; Choi, Hae Yoon; Seo, Ji-A; Kim, Sin Gon; Kim, Nan Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Choi, Dong Seop; Baik, Sei Hyun; Yoo, Hye Jin

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, initiated by activation and dysfunction of the endothelium. Recently, progranulin has been regarded as an important modulator of inflammatory processes; however, the role for prgranulin in regulating inflammation in vascular endothelial cells has not been described. Signaling pathways mediated by progranulin were analyzed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with progranulin. Progranulin significantly induced Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in HUVECs, an effect that was blocked with Akt inhibitor. Furthermore, nitric oxide (NO) level, the end product of Akt/eNOS pathway, was significantly upregulated after progranulin treatment. Next, we showed that progranulin efficiently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling. LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκB and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) levels decreased after progranulin treatment. Also, progranulin blocked translocation of NF-κB from the cytosol to the nucleus. In addition, progranulin significantly reduced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by inhibiting binding of NF- κB to their promoter regions and blocked attachment of monocytes to HUVECs. Progranulin also significantly reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-α (TNF-α) and monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1), the crucial inflammatory molecules known to aggravate atherosclerosis. Progranulin efficiently inhibited LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling in endothelial cells through activation of the Akt/eNOS pathway and attenuation of the NF-κB pathway, suggesting its protective roles in vascular endothelium against inflammatory reaction underlying atherosclerosis.

  11. Progranulin protects vascular endothelium against atherosclerotic inflammatory reaction via Akt/eNOS and nuclear factor-κB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan-Jin Hwang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, initiated by activation and dysfunction of the endothelium. Recently, progranulin has been regarded as an important modulator of inflammatory processes; however, the role for prgranulin in regulating inflammation in vascular endothelial cells has not been described. METHOD AND RESULTS: Signaling pathways mediated by progranulin were analyzed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs treated with progranulin. Progranulin significantly induced Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS phosphorylation in HUVECs, an effect that was blocked with Akt inhibitor. Furthermore, nitric oxide (NO level, the end product of Akt/eNOS pathway, was significantly upregulated after progranulin treatment. Next, we showed that progranulin efficiently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling. LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκB and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB levels decreased after progranulin treatment. Also, progranulin blocked translocation of NF-κB from the cytosol to the nucleus. In addition, progranulin significantly reduced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 by inhibiting binding of NF- κB to their promoter regions and blocked attachment of monocytes to HUVECs. Progranulin also significantly reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1, the crucial inflammatory molecules known to aggravate atherosclerosis. CONCLUSION: Progranulin efficiently inhibited LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling in endothelial cells through activation of the Akt/eNOS pathway and attenuation of the NF-κB pathway, suggesting its protective roles in vascular endothelium against inflammatory reaction underlying atherosclerosis.

  12. Impact of organic-mineral matter interactions on thermal reaction pathways for coal model compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Struss, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    Coal is a complex, heterogeneous solid that includes interdispersed mineral matter. However, knowledge of organic-mineral matter interactions is embryonic, and the impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction is incomplete. Clay minerals, for example, are known to be effective catalysts for organic reactions. Furthermore, clays such as montmorillonite have been proposed to be key catalysts in the thermal alteration of lignin into vitrinite during the coalification process. Recent studies by Hatcher and coworkers on the evolution of coalified woods using microscopy and NMR have led them to propose selective, acid-catalyzed, solid state reaction chemistry to account for retained structural integrity in the wood. However, the chemical feasibility of such reactions in relevant solids is difficult to demonstrate. The authors have begun a model compound study to gain a better molecular level understanding of the effects in the solid state of organic-mineral matter interactions relevant to both coal formation and processing. To satisfy the need for model compounds that remain nonvolatile solids at temperatures ranging to 450 C, model compounds are employed that are chemically bound to the surface of a fumed silica (Si-O-C{sub aryl}linkage). The organic structures currently under investigation are phenethyl phenyl ether (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OC{sub 6}H{sub 5}) derivatives, which serve as models for {beta}-alkyl aryl ether units that are present in lignin and lignitic coals. The solid-state chemistry of these materials at 200--450 C in the presence of interdispersed acid catalysts such as small particle size silica-aluminas and montmorillonite clay will be reported. Initial focus will be on defining the potential impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction.

  13. The role of reaction pathways and support interactions in the development of high activity hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Henrik; Hinnemann, Berit; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    structures may be present as single sulfide sheets. Thus, stacking is not an essential feature of Type II catalysts. The article illustrates how the new scientific insight has aided the introduction of the new high activity BRIM (TM) type catalysts for FCC pre-treatment and production of ultra low sulfur...... exhibiting a metallic character are observed to be involved in adsorption, hydrogenation and C-S bond cleavage. The insight is seen to provide a new framework for understanding the DDS and HYD pathways and the role of steric hindrance and poisons. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have illustrated...... how support interactions may influence the activity of sulfided catalysts. The brim sites and the tendency to form vacancies are seen to differ in types I and II Co-Mo-S. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) studies show that the high activity Type II...

  14. Reaction pathway towards formation of cobalt single chain magnets and nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, G.; Desilva, Rohini M.; Palshin, V. [Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Desilva, N. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Palmer, G. [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Rice University, MS 140, 6100 Main street, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Kumar, Challa S.S.R., E-mail: ckumar1@lsu.ed [Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    With the advent of molecular magnets the quest for suitable high density magnetic storage materials has fuelled further research in this area. Here in this report, we present a detailed mechanistic investigation of thermal decomposition of cyclopentadienyl cobalt [CoCp(CO){sub 2}] precursor where Cp is the cyclopentadienyl moiety. The reaction revealed the formation of cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NPs) through an isolable reaction intermediate characterized as a Single Chain Magnet (SCM), [Co(Cp){sub 2}]{sub 2}CoCl{sub 4} (1). The SQUID magnetic measurements showed the presence of very strong antiferromagnetic interactions between Co{sup 2+} ions. The zero-field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) magnetization curves branch out below 5 K and there is evidence for frequency dependent complex susceptibility along with a maximum observed around 2.5 K. The optical studies indicated that the Co{sup 2+} d-d transition is influenced by the polarity of the solvents. The cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NPs) were obtained, either directly from 1 or from its precursor. They are spherical in shape with a mean size 15 nm, have fcc crystal structure and were found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature.

  15. Possible reaction pathways of the lincomycin molecule according to the DFT calculation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Bahar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human-used antibiotics are eliminated from the body with little or no transformation at all. Traces of eliminated antibiotics enter the receiving environment directly since they cannot be treated in prevalent wastewater treatment facilities. Thus, wastewaters containing traces of antibiotics have to be treated accordingly. Lincomycin is subsequently isolated from Streptomyces lincolnensis. Lincomycin and its derivatives are antibiotics exhibiting biological activity against Gram-positive bacteria, and are natural antibiotics in the environment as pollutants. This study aims to predict the degradation mechanism of lincomycin molecule in the gaseous phase and aqueous media. Probable reaction path of lincomycin molecule with OH radicals was analyzed. Optimized geometry was calculated via Gauss View 5. Subsequently, the lowest energy status was determined through geometric optimization via Gaussian 09 program. Aiming to determine the intermediates in photocatalytic degradation mechanism of lincomycin, geometric optimization of the molecule was realized through DFT method. Activation energy for the probable reaction path was calculated, and their most stable state from the thermodynamic perspective determined for the gaseous phase and aqueous media. Impact of water solvent was investigated using the conductor-like screening solvation model (COSMO. The predicted mechanism was confirmed by comparison with experimental results on simple structures reported in literature.

  16. Bridge mediated two-electron transfer reactions: Analysis of stepwise and concerted pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; May, V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of nonadiabatic donor (D)-acceptor (A) two-electron transfer (TET) mediated by a single regular bridge (B) is developed. The presence of different intermediate two-electron states connecting the reactant state D -- BA with the product state DBA -- results in complex multiexponential kinetics. The conditions are discussed at which a reduction to two-exponential as well as single-exponential kinetics becomes possible. For the latter case the rate K TET is calculated, which describes the bridge-mediated reaction as an effective two-electron D-A transfer. In the limit of small populations of the intermediate TET states D - B - A, DB -- A, D - BA - , and DB - A - , K TET is obtained as a sum of the rates K TET (step) and K TET (sup) . The first rate describes stepwise TET originated by transitions of a single electron. It starts at D -- BA and reaches DBA -- via the intermediate state D - BA - . These transitions cover contributions from sequential as well as superexchange reactions all including reduced bridge states. In contrast, a specific two-electron superexchange mechanism from D -- BA to DBA -- defines K TET (sup) . An analytic dependence of K TET (step) and K TET (sup) on the number of bridging units is presented and different regimes of D-A TET are studied

  17. Elucidation of reaction mechanism for m -cresol hydrodeoxygenation over Fe based catalysts: A kinetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yongchun; Wang, Yong

    2017-09-01

    Fe based catalysts are promising for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of lignin derived phenolics due to their high selectivity for aromatics. In this work, the reaction mechanism of m-cresol HDO on Fe catalysts and the kinetic consequence with Pd addition were elucidated by examining the effect of H2, H2O and m-cresol pressures on toluene formation rate on Fe and PdFe catalysts. A direct CO bond cleavage mechanism is proposed for HDO catalysis on both Fe and PdFe catalysts, while Pd provides a facilitated reaction pathway at the PdFe interface and therefore promotes the catalysis on Fe without changing the high selectivity towards aromatics.

  18. A Pathway to Psychological Difficulty: Perceived Chronic Social Adversity and Its Symptomatic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cody; Zhang, Jingqiu; Yang, Dong

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to predict and explain psychological maladjustment or difficulty. Specifically, we discuss the concept of perceived chronic social adversity, and we expect that such perceived chronic social adversity may potentially lead to chronic stress responses. Accordingly, we propose the symptomatic reactions of perceived chronic social adversity. We put forward a set of hypotheses regarding the relationships between perceived chronic social adversity and those chronic stress responses, and we further hypothesize a mediating role of individualized negative essentialism brought by perceived chronical social adversity. Resilience and individual differences in the ability to cope with perceived adversity are discussed. Future research and prevention need to pay more attention to effects of subjective personal experiences on psychological difficulty, focusing on the importance of exploring daily social experiences in improving cognitive construction processes and developing appropriate preventions.

  19. Kinetic and Reaction Pathway Analysis in the Application of Botulinum Toxin A for Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. Lebeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new approach in the treatment of specific wounds in animal models and in patients with type A botulinum toxin is the focus of this paper. The indications or conditions include traumatic wounds (experimental and clinical, surgical (incision wounds, and wounds such as fissures and ulcers that are signs/symptoms of disease or other processes. An objective was to conduct systematic literature searches and take note of the reactions involved in the healing process and identify corresponding pharmacokinetic data. From several case reports, we developed a qualitative model of how botulinum toxin disrupts the vicious cycle of muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, decreased blood flow, and ischemia. We transformed this model into a minimal kinetic scheme for healing chronic wounds. The model helped us to estimate the rate of decline of this toxin's therapeutic effect by calculating the rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms after a wound-healing treatment with this neurotoxin.

  20. A Pathway to Psychological Difficulty: Perceived Chronic Social Adversity and Its Symptomatic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we attempt to predict and explain psychological maladjustment or difficulty. Specifically, we discuss the concept of perceived chronic social adversity, and we expect that such perceived chronic social adversity may potentially lead to chronic stress responses. Accordingly, we propose the symptomatic reactions of perceived chronic social adversity. We put forward a set of hypotheses regarding the relationships between perceived chronic social adversity and those chronic stress responses, and we further hypothesize a mediating role of individualized negative essentialism brought by perceived chronical social adversity. Resilience and individual differences in the ability to cope with perceived adversity are discussed. Future research and prevention need to pay more attention to effects of subjective personal experiences on psychological difficulty, focusing on the importance of exploring daily social experiences in improving cognitive construction processes and developing appropriate preventions.

  1. Effect of temperature on the reaction pathway of calcium carbonate formation via precursor phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Konrad, Florian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It has been earlier postulated that some biogenic and sedimentary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals (e.g. calcite and aragonite) are secondary in origin and have originally formed via a metastable calcium carbonate precursor phase (e.g. amorphous CaCO3, [1-2]). Such formation pathways are likely affected by various physicochemical parameters including aqueous Mg and temperature. In an effort to improve our understanding on the formation mechanism of CaCO3 minerals, precipitation experiments were carried out by the addition of a 0.6 M (Ca,Mg)Cl2 solution at distinct Mg/Ca ratios (1/4 and 1/8) into a 1 M NaHCO3 solution under constant pH conditions(8.3 ±0.1). The formation of CaCO3 was systematically examined as a function of temperature (6, 12, 18 and 25 ±0.3° C). During the experimental runs mineral precipitation was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy as well as by continuous sampling and analyzing of precipitates and reactive solutions. The results revealed two pathways of CaCO3 formation depending on the initial Mg/Ca ratio and temperature: (i) In experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/4 at ≤ 12° C as well as in experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/8 at ≤ 18° C, ikaite (CaCO3 6H2O) acts as a precursor phase for aragonite formation. (ii) In contrast higher temperatures induced the formation of Mg-rich amorphous CaCO3 (Mg-ACC) which was subsequently transformed to Mg-rich calcite. In situ Raman spectra showed that the transformation of Mg-ACC to Mg-calcite occurs at a higher rate (˜ 8 min) compared to that of ikaite to aragonite (> 2 h). Thus, the formation of aragonite rather than of Mg-calcite occurs due to the slower release of Ca2+and CO32- ions into the Mg-rich reactive solution during retarded ikaite dissolution. This behavior is generally consistent with the observation that calcite precipitation is inhibited at elevated aqueous Mg/Ca ratios. [1] Addadi L., Raz S. and Weiner S. (2003) Advanced Materials 15, 959-970. [2] Rodriguez-Blanco J. D

  2. A critical assessment of theoretical methods for finding reaction pathways and transition states of surface processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimes, JirI; Michaelides, Angelos; Bowler, David R

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a variety of techniques for locating transition states on potential energy surfaces is evaluated within the density functional theory framework. Diffusion of a water molecule across NaCl(001) and HCl bond breaking on the same surface are treated as general test cases; the former is an example of a low barrier diffusion process and the latter an example of a relatively high barrier covalent bond rupture event. The methods considered include the nudged elastic band (NEB), Dewar, Healy and Stewart (DHS), dimer, constrained optimization (CO), activation-relaxation technique (ART) and one-side growing string (OGS) as well as novel combinations of the DHS with growing string (DHS + GS) and DHS plus climbing image (CI-DHS). A key conclusion to come from this study is that the NEB method is relatively fast, especially when just a single (climbing) image is used. Indeed, using more images represents an unnecessary computational burden for our set of processes. The dimer method exhibits variable performance; being poor for the water diffusion processes, which have small activation energies, but much more efficient for the HCl bond breaking process which has a higher barrier. When only a poor initial guess of the transition state geometry is available, the CI-DHS scheme is one of the most efficient techniques considered. And as a means to quickly establish an approximate minimum energy pathway the DHS + GS scheme offers some potential.

  3. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO−2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO−2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO−2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build

  4. Reaction pathway of the degradation of the p-hydroxybenzoic acid by sulfate radical generated by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criquet, Justine; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) in aqueous solutions by ionizing radiation was studied. The phenolic pollutant was easily removed by the electron beam irradiation, as more than 80% of the initial 100 µM introduced was degraded for a dose of 600 Gy. It was shown that the addition of persulfate, producing the sulfate radical as additional reactive species, induced a change in the reaction pathway. LC–MS analyses were performed in order to identify the different by-products formed. In the absence of persulfate, the main by-product formed was 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, while in presence of persulfate, 1,4-benzoquinone was detected and the hydroxylated by-products were not present. A reaction pathway of HBA degradation by hydroxyl and sulfate radicals was proposed from the identification of the chemical structure of the different by-products detected. The influences of pH and dissolved oxygen were also studied. A high decline of HBA degradation was observed at pH 11 compared to pH 4.5, this decrease was minimized in the presence of persulfate. The dissolved oxygen concentration was found to be a limiting parameter of HBA degradation, however an excess of dissolved oxygen in solution did not improve the degradation to a large extent. - Highlights: • p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) is easily removed by e-beam irradiation. • The sulfate radicals formed from persulfate induce loss of the benzoic acid skeleton. • The dissolved oxygen concentration is a limiting parameter of the HBA degradation. • The effect of pH is minimized in presence of persulfate

  5. Formation of nitrogen-containing compounds during microwave pyrolysis of microalgae: Product distribution and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Tahmasebi, Arash; Maliutina, Kristina; Yu, Jianglong

    2017-12-01

    The formation of nitrogen-containing compounds in bio-oil during microwave pyrolysis of Chlorella and Spirulina microalgae has been investigated in this study. Activated carbon (AC) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) were used as microwave receptors during microwave pyrolysis experiments. It has been found that the use of Fe 3 O 4 increased the total yield of bio-oil. The use of different microwave receptors did not seem to have affected the total yield of nitrogen-containing compounds in the bio-oil. However, Fe 3 O 4 promoted the formation of nitrogen-containing aliphatics, thereby reducing the formation of nitrogen-containing aromatics. The use of AC promoted the dehydration reactions during amino acid decomposition, thereby enhancing the formation of nitrogen-containing aromatics during pyrolysis. From the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis results, the major high-value nitrogen-containing compounds in the pyrolysis bio-oil of Chlorella and Spirulina were identified as indole and dodecamide. The formation mechanisms of nitrogen-containing compounds were proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reaction pathways of photoexcited retinal in proteorhodopsin studied by pump-dump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupenyan, Alisa; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Arents, Jos C; van Grondelle, Rienk; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Groot, Marie Louise

    2009-12-17

    Proteorhodopsin (pR) is a membrane-embedded proton pump from the microbial rhodopsin family. Light absorption by its retinal chromophore initiates a photocycle, driven by trans/cis isomerization on the femtosecond to picosecond time scales. Here, we report a study on the photoisomerization dynamics of the retinal chromophore of pR, using dispersed ultrafast pump-dump-probe spectroscopy. The application of a pump pulse initiates the photocycle, and with an appropriately tuned dump pulse applied at a time delay after the dump, the molecules in the initial stages of the photochemical process can be de-excited and driven back to the ground state. In this way, we were able to resolve an intermediate on the electronic ground state that represents chromophores that are unsuccessful in isomerization. In particular, the fractions of molecules that undergo slow isomerization (20 ps) have a high probability to enter this state rather than the isomerized K-state. On the ground state reaction surface, return to the stable ground state conformation via a structural or vibrational relaxation occurs in 2-3 ps. Inclusion of this intermediate in the kinetic scheme led to more consistent spectra of the retinal-excited state, and to a more accurate estimation of the quantum yield of isomerization (Phi = 0.4 at pH 6).

  7. Nuclear reactions video (knowledge base on low energy nuclear physics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagrebaev, V.; Kozhin, A.

    1999-01-01

    The NRV (nuclear reactions video) is an open and permanently extended global system of management and graphical representation of nuclear data and video-graphic computer simulation of low energy nuclear dynamics. It consists of a complete and renewed nuclear database and well known theoretical models of low energy nuclear reactions altogether forming the 'low energy nuclear knowledge base'. The NRV solves two main problems: 1) fast and visualized obtaining and processing experimental data on nuclear structure and nuclear reactions; 2) possibility for any inexperienced user to analyze experimental data within reliable commonly used models of nuclear dynamics. The system is based on the realization of the following principal things: the net and code compatibility with the main existing nuclear databases; maximal simplicity in handling: extended menu, friendly graphical interface, hypertext description of the models, and so on; maximal visualization of input data, dynamics of studied processes and final results by means of real three-dimensional images, plots, tables and formulas and a three-dimensional animation. All the codes are composed as the real Windows applications and work under Windows 95/NT

  8. One-electron oxidation reactions of purine and pyrimidine bases in cellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this survey is to critically review the available information on one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases in cellular DNA with emphasis on damage induced through the transient generation of purine and pyrimidine radical cations. Since the indirect effect of ionizing radiation mediated by hydroxyl radical is predominant in cells, efforts have been made to selectively ionize bases using suitable one-electron oxidants that consist among others of high intensity UVC laser pulses. Thus, the main oxidation product in cellular DNA was found to be 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine as a result of direct bi-photonic ionization of guanine bases and indirect formation of guanine radical cations through hole transfer reactions from other base radical cations. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine and other purine and pyrimidine degradation products was rationalized in terms of the initial generation of related radical cations followed by either hydration or deprotonation reactions in agreement with mechanistic pathways inferred from detailed mechanistic studies. The guanine radical cation has been shown to be implicated in three other nucleophilic additions that give rise to DNA-protein and DNA-DNA cross-links in model systems. Evidence was recently provided for the occurrence of these three reactions in cellular DNA. There is growing evidence that one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases whose mechanisms have been characterized in model studies involving aqueous solutions take place in a similar way in cells. It may also be pointed out that the above cross-linked lesions are only produced from the guanine radical cation and may be considered as diagnostic products of the direct effect of ionizing radiation.

  9. Thermal runaway reaction hazards and mechanisms of hydroxylamine with acid/base contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Chunyang; Saraf, Sanjeev R.; Rogers, William J.; Sam Mannan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Hydroxylamine (HA) has been involved in two incidents since 1999 because of its thermal instability and incompatibility. In this study, thermal runaway reactions of hydroxylamine with various concentrations of KOH and HCl were studied using the reactive system screening tool (RSST) and automatic pressure tracking adiabatic calorimeter (APTAC). The thermokinetic data, such as onset temperature, heat of reaction, maximum self-heat rate, maximum pressure rate, and non-condensable gas pressure, were compared with those of hydroxylamine solution without added impurity. Our study shows that the thermal decomposition behavior of hydroxylamine is affected by the presence of acid/base, and mixing of hydroxylamine with acid/base may cause thermal decomposition at lower temperatures. Different decomposition pathways can be initiated by hydrogen ion and hydroxide ion. The decomposition mechanisms of hydroxylamine in alkaline and acidic solutions are proposed based on the products, information from the literature, and quantum mechanical calculations. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the proposed reaction mechanisms

  10. An unexpected reaction pathway in the synthesis of the ABCE framework of strychnine-type alkaloids - A multidisciplinary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šoral, Michal; Markus, Jozef; Doháňošová, Jana; Šoralová, Stanislava; Dvoranová, Dana; Chyba, Andrej; Moncol, Ján; Berkeš, Dušan; Liptaj, Tibor

    2017-01-01

    Acid-catalyzed cyclization of spirocyclic 1‧-benzyl-2‧-(prop-2-en-1-yl)spiro[indole-3,3‧-pyrrolidine]-5‧-one (1) was performed. The pentacyclic product of Povarov-like imino-Diels-Alder reaction was isolated in high yield instead of expected tetracyclic aza-Prins intermediate. The unusual exotic alkaloid-type structure of the resulting molecule 2 was unambiguously confirmed by a detailed NMR analysis using a set of 2D NMR spectra including an INADEQUATE experiment. The relative configuration of 2 was predicted from the synthesis mechanism and DFT geometry calculations and independently confirmed using NOESY and residual dipolar coupling (RDC) assisted NMR analysis in stretched crosslinked polystyrene gels. The reversibility of the cycloaddition in aprotic solvents was observed. A new reaction pathway yielding a rare 6-5-5-5 tetracyclic spiroindoline 3 was suggested. The relative configuration within the tetracyclic framework was ultimately proved using Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of compound 4.

  11. Reaction pathways of furfural, furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran on Cu(111) and NiCu bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke; Wan, Weiming; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is an important reaction for converting biomass-derived furfural to value-added 2-methylfuran, which is a promising fuel additive. In this work, the HDO of furfural to produce 2-methylfuran occurred on the NiCu bimetallic surfaces prepared on either Ni(111) or Cu(111). The reaction pathways of furfural were investigated on Cu(111) and Ni/Cu(111) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experiments. These studies provided mechanistic insights into the effects of bimetallic formation on enhancing the HDO activity. Specifically, furfural weakly adsorbed on Cu(111), while it strongly adsorbed on Ni/Cu(111) through an η2(C,O) configuration, which led to the HDO of furfural on Ni/Cu(111). The ability to dissociate H2 on Ni/Cu(111) is also an important factor for enhancing the HDO activity over Cu(111).

  12. Research progress on trifluoromethyl-based radical reaction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hao

    2017-12-01

    Due to the unique properties imparted by the trifluoromethyl group, such as high electron density and strong lipotropy, which effectively improve acidity, lipophilicity and metabolic stability of the molecule itself, trifluoromethyl-substituted organic compounds are becoming increasingly important as structural motifs in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. In this review, we present several methods developed for the direct introduction of a trifluoromethyl group, beginning with its rich and storied history. Then the present article addresses mechanism and process in carbon-carbon bond forming reaction based on radical process which is divided into three parts according to the way of CF3 radical generation. Finally, challenges and opportunities of researches on trifluoromethylation reactions facing are prospected.

  13. Selective mutism: a consensus based care pathway of good practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, D V; Fonseca, S; Wintgens, A

    2008-10-01

    Selective mutism (SM) now acknowledged as an anxiety condition, tends to be a poorly understood, highly complex and vastly under-recognised clinical entity. Children with SM are a vulnerable group as the condition is not the remit of any one professional group. This inevitably leads to delay in formal diagnosis and management. There is a lack of systematic research on which to base guidelines for management. To develop, agree and validate key principles underlying the management of SM through a consensus process involving international experts, in order to create a local care pathway. A local multi-agency consultation process developed 11 statements, which were felt to be the key principles underpinning a potential care pathway for managing SM. Thirteen recognised experts from North America, Europe and Australia participated in a modified Delphi process involving two rounds using a Likert-scale and free commentary. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses were used in the validation or revision of the statements at each stage. Response rates were 100% for Round 1 and 84.6% for Round 2. Despite the differing professional backgrounds and service contexts, by successive revision and/or revalidation of statements, it was possible to arrive at a consensus about key principles relating to early recognition, assessment and intervention. The agreed key principles are presented together with the resulting local care pathway. Through a Delphi process, agreement was reached by a multidisciplinary group of professionals, on key principles that underpin the timely identification, assessment and management of children with SM. These include the potential for staff in school/preschool settings to identify SM and that intervention programmes should generally be based in these settings. Children with SM should receive assessment for possible coexisting disorders, whether developmental, emotional or behavioural and additional specific intervention given for these. Agreement was

  14. Maillard reaction in mild-based foods: nutritional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzoferrato, L; Manzi, P; Vivanti, V; Nicoletti, I; Corradini, C; Cogliandro, E

    1998-02-01

    Chemical reactions occurring during industrial treatments or storage foods can lead to the formation of epsilon-deoxyketosyl compounds, the Amadori products. Food protein value can be adversely affected by these reactions, and in particular lysine, an essential amino acid having on its side chain a free amino group, can be converted to nonbioavailable N-substituted lysine or blocked lysine. by acid hydrolysis of epsilon-deoxyketosyl compounds, furosine is formed. In this paper furosine prepared from milk-based commercial products has been evaluated by use of a recently developed HPLC method using a microbore column and phosphate buffer as the mobile phase at controlled temperature. Furosine levels have been used, together with protein, total amino acids, and lysine content, as an estimate of protein quality of a few different products such as cooked-cream dessert, yogurt mousse, white chocolate, milk chocolate, milk chocolate with a soft nougat and caramel center, milk chocolate with a whipped white center, chocolate spread, part-skim milk tablets, milk-based dietetic meals, and baby foods. The protein content of the analyzed products ranged from 34.3 gxkg(-1) (milk nougat) to 188.4 g x kg(-1) (milk tablets). The Maillard reaction caused a loss in available lysine that varied from 2.5% (cooked cream) to 36.2% (condensed milk). The contribution to the lysine average daily requirement is heavily affected by this reaction and varied from 13% (milk tablets and soft nougat) to 61% (dietetic meal). Variable results were also obtained for the other essential amino acids.

  15. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Goulding, Celia W., E-mail: celia.goulding@uci.edu [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); UC Irvine, 2302 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  16. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  17. Role of sugar in controlling reaction pathways: A study with thymine and thymidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Adity [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Sarkar, Achintya K. [Department of Chemistry, Presidency College, 86/1 College street, Kolkata 700 073 (India); Basu, Samita, E-mail: samita.basu@saha.ac.i [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2009-10-15

    Magnetic field effect in conjunction with laser flash photolysis have been used for studying interactions of 9,10-anthraquinone and 2-methyl 1,4-naphthoquinone (menadione) with a DNA base, thymine (Thy) and its nucleoside, thymidine (dThd). Irrespective of medium Thy has been found to support both electron transfer (ET) and hydrogen abstraction with the quinones while dThd has exhibited a complete reluctance towards ET. This unique behavior of dThd has been attributed to a failure in attaining aromaticity by virtue of keto-enol tautomerism upon addition of a sugar moiety. Electron withdrawing effect of sugar unit is also considered responsible for reduction of ET from dThd. Again both Thy and dThd have exhibited hydrogen abstraction in homogeneous medium, which is normally unexpected. The above behaviors of the bases have been explained on the basis of their chemical structures.

  18. Role of sugar in controlling reaction pathways: A study with thymine and thymidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, Adity; Sarkar, Achintya K.; Basu, Samita

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic field effect in conjunction with laser flash photolysis have been used for studying interactions of 9,10-anthraquinone and 2-methyl 1,4-naphthoquinone (menadione) with a DNA base, thymine (Thy) and its nucleoside, thymidine (dThd). Irrespective of medium Thy has been found to support both electron transfer (ET) and hydrogen abstraction with the quinones while dThd has exhibited a complete reluctance towards ET. This unique behavior of dThd has been attributed to a failure in attaining aromaticity by virtue of keto-enol tautomerism upon addition of a sugar moiety. Electron withdrawing effect of sugar unit is also considered responsible for reduction of ET from dThd. Again both Thy and dThd have exhibited hydrogen abstraction in homogeneous medium, which is normally unexpected. The above behaviors of the bases have been explained on the basis of their chemical structures.

  19. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles.

  20. Acceleration of Intended Pozzolanic Reaction under Initial Thermal Treatment for Developing Cementless Fly Ash Based Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Hee Kwon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Without using strong alkaline solution or ordinary Portland cement, a new structural binder consisting of fly ash and hydrated lime was hardened through an intensified pozzolanic reaction. The main experimental variables are the addition of silica fume and initial thermal treatment (60 °C for 3 days. A series of experiments consisting of mechanical testing (compressive and flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, X-ray diffraction, and measurements of the heat of hydration, pore structure, and shrinkage were conducted. These tests show that this new fly ash-based mortar has a compressive strength of 15 MPa at 91 days without any silica fume addition or initial thermal treatment. The strength increased to over 50 MPa based on the acceleration of the intensified pozzolanic reaction from the silica fume addition and initial thermal treatment. This is explained by a significant synergistic effect induced by the silica fume. It intensifies the pozzolanic reaction under thermal treatment and provides a space filling effect. This improved material performance can open a new pathway to utilize the industrial by-product of fly ash in cementless construction materials.

  1. COEL: A Cloud-based Reaction Network Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eBanda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Reaction Networks (CRNs are a formalism to describe the macroscopic behavior of chemical systems. We introduce COEL, a web- and cloud-based CRN simulation framework that does not require a local installation, runs simulations on a large computational grid, provides reliable database storage, and offers a visually pleasing and intuitive user interface. We present an overview of the underlying software, the technologies, and the main architectural approaches employed. Some of COEL's key features include ODE-based simulations of CRNs and multicompartment reaction networks with rich interaction options, a built-in plotting engine, automatic DNA-strand displacement transformation and visualization, SBML/Octave/Matlab export, and a built-in genetic-algorithm-based optimization toolbox for rate constants.COEL is an open-source project hosted on GitHub (http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.46544, which allows interested research groups to deploy it on their own sever. Regular users can simply use the web instance at no cost at http://coel-sim.org. The framework is ideally suited for a collaborative use in both research and education.

  2. Biosensing strategies based on enzymatic reactions and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Buitrago, Beatriz; Briz, Nerea; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Pavlov, Valeri

    2018-04-16

    Enzymes are pivotal elements in bioanalysis due to their specificity and extremely high catalytic activity. The sensitivity of bioanalytical assays depends mainly on the capacity of an observer to detect the product(s) of a biocatalytic reaction. Both natural and artificial compounds have been traditionally used to evaluate enzymatic activities. The drawbacks of chromogenic and fluorogenic organic enzymatic substrates are their high cost and low stability, resulting in high background signals. We review here state of the art assays in the detection of enzymatic activities using recent advances in nanoscience. Novel methods based on the use of nanoparticles lead to increased sensitivity and decreased costs for bioanalysis based on enzymes as recognition elements and signal amplifiers in Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA). Novel approaches toward the detection of enzymatic activities are based on biocatalytic synthesis, modulation, etching, and aggregation of nanoparticles under physiological conditions.

  3. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-α observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-α induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-α induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-α induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  4. Hi-Jack: a novel computational framework for pathway-based inference of host–pathogen interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios A.

    2015-03-09

    Motivation: Pathogens infect their host and hijack the host machinery to produce more progeny pathogens. Obligate intracellular pathogens, in particular, require resources of the host to replicate. Therefore, infections by these pathogens lead to alterations in the metabolism of the host, shifting in favor of pathogen protein production. Some computational identification of mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions have been proposed, but it seems the problem has yet to be approached from the metabolite-hijacking angle. Results: We propose a novel computational framework, Hi-Jack, for inferring pathway-based interactions between a host and a pathogen that relies on the idea of metabolite hijacking. Hi-Jack searches metabolic network data from hosts and pathogens, and identifies candidate reactions where hijacking occurs. A novel scoring function ranks candidate hijacked reactions and identifies pathways in the host that interact with pathways in the pathogen, as well as the associated frequent hijacked metabolites. We also describe host-pathogen interaction principles that can be used in the future for subsequent studies. Our case study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) revealed pathways in human-e.g. carbohydrate metabolism, lipids metabolism and pathways related to amino acids metabolism-that are likely to be hijacked by the pathogen. In addition, we report interesting potential pathway interconnections between human and Mtb such as linkage of human fatty acid biosynthesis with Mtb biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, or linkage of human pentose phosphate pathway with lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Mtb. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrochemical degradation of sulfonamides at BDD electrode: Kinetics, reaction pathway and eco-toxicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabiańska, Aleksandra; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Stepnowski, Piotr [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Stolte, Stefan [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); UFT-Centre of Environmental Research and Sustainable Technology, University of Bremen, Leobener Straße UFT, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Siedlecka, Ewa Maria, E-mail: ewa.siedlecka@ug.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • SNs were electrochemically oxidized at BDD in one compartment reactor. • The efficiency of SN degradation was the highest in effluents from municipal WWTP. • The electro-degradation SNs based on oxidation but reduction was also possible. • Electrochemical oxidation of SNs led in some cases to mixtures toxic to L. minor. - Abstract: The investigation dealt with electrochemical oxidation of five sulfonamides (SNs): sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfathiazole (STZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfamethazine (SMN) and sulfadimethoxine (SDM) in aqueous solution at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. All studied sulfonamides were degraded according to a pseudo first order kinetics. The structure of SNs had no significant effect on the values of pseudo first order rate constants. Increased degradation efficiency was observed in higher temperature and in acidic pH. Due to the presence of chlorine and nitrate SNs were more effectively oxidized from municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents than from pure supporting electrolyte Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The intermediates identified by LC–MS and GC–MS analysis suggested that the hydroxyl radicals attack mainly the S-N bond, but also the aromatic ring systems (aniline, pyrimidine or triazole) of SNs. Finally, the toxicity of the SNs solutions and effluents after electrochemical treatment was assessed through the measurement of growth inhibition of green algae (Scenedesmus vacualatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). Toxicity of SMR, STZ, SMN solutions before and after electrochemical oxidation and SDM solution after the process in L. minor test was observed. No significant toxicity of studied SNs was observed in algae test.

  6. Electrochemical degradation of sulfonamides at BDD electrode: Kinetics, reaction pathway and eco-toxicity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabiańska, Aleksandra; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Stepnowski, Piotr; Stolte, Stefan; Siedlecka, Ewa Maria

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • SNs were electrochemically oxidized at BDD in one compartment reactor. • The efficiency of SN degradation was the highest in effluents from municipal WWTP. • The electro-degradation SNs based on oxidation but reduction was also possible. • Electrochemical oxidation of SNs led in some cases to mixtures toxic to L. minor. - Abstract: The investigation dealt with electrochemical oxidation of five sulfonamides (SNs): sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfathiazole (STZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfamethazine (SMN) and sulfadimethoxine (SDM) in aqueous solution at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. All studied sulfonamides were degraded according to a pseudo first order kinetics. The structure of SNs had no significant effect on the values of pseudo first order rate constants. Increased degradation efficiency was observed in higher temperature and in acidic pH. Due to the presence of chlorine and nitrate SNs were more effectively oxidized from municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents than from pure supporting electrolyte Na 2 SO 4 . The intermediates identified by LC–MS and GC–MS analysis suggested that the hydroxyl radicals attack mainly the S-N bond, but also the aromatic ring systems (aniline, pyrimidine or triazole) of SNs. Finally, the toxicity of the SNs solutions and effluents after electrochemical treatment was assessed through the measurement of growth inhibition of green algae (Scenedesmus vacualatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). Toxicity of SMR, STZ, SMN solutions before and after electrochemical oxidation and SDM solution after the process in L. minor test was observed. No significant toxicity of studied SNs was observed in algae test

  7. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly; Kim, Young Jin; Jardine, Philip M.; Watson, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M. partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M. species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions

  8. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  9. Integrated pathway-based transcription regulation network mining and visualization based on gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibinge, Nelson; Ono, Naoaki; Horie, Masafumi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Saito, Akira; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2016-06-01

    Conventionally, workflows examining transcription regulation networks from gene expression data involve distinct analytical steps. There is a need for pipelines that unify data mining and inference deduction into a singular framework to enhance interpretation and hypotheses generation. We propose a workflow that merges network construction with gene expression data mining focusing on regulation processes in the context of transcription factor driven gene regulation. The pipeline implements pathway-based modularization of expression profiles into functional units to improve biological interpretation. The integrated workflow was implemented as a web application software (TransReguloNet) with functions that enable pathway visualization and comparison of transcription factor activity between sample conditions defined in the experimental design. The pipeline merges differential expression, network construction, pathway-based abstraction, clustering and visualization. The framework was applied in analysis of actual expression datasets related to lung, breast and prostrate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Iron based superconductors and related compounds synthesized by solid state metathesis and high temperature reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankovsky, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The results of this thesis can be divided into three major topics, which can also be seen as different approaches of solid state chemistry to reveal interesting features of known and unknown compounds and to develop alternative synthesis routes. Firstly, known compounds with related structural motifs to the superconducting iron-arsenides were investigated regarding their structural and physical properties. In case of La 3 Pd 4 Ge 4 the influence of Fe doping on the properties was studied, whereas in the series ZrMAs (M=Ti,V) the physical properties have not yet been reported at all and were investigated for the first time. Secondly, an alternative synthesis route has been developed for the synthesis of superconducting LaFeAsO 1-x F x . This solid state metathesis reaction distinctly increased the quality of the samples compared to conventionally prepared products. Furthermore, the reaction pathway was investigated and clarified, which helps to understand the processes during high temperature solid state metathesis reactions in general. Thirdly, this alternative synthesis route was expanded to other systems and new compounds like co-substituted LaFe 1-x Mn x AsO 1-y F y were prepared and thoroughly investigated. This led to a complex study of the interplay of magnetism, electronic and structural conditions and the occurrence of superconducting properties. The investigation and understanding of such complex coherences will probably be decisive for the further understanding of the superconducting mechanism in iron based superconductors.

  11. Comparative study on gene set and pathway topology-based enrichment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerlová, Michaela; Jung, Klaus; Kramer, Frank; Klemm, Florian; Bleckmann, Annalen; Beißbarth, Tim

    2015-10-22

    Enrichment analysis is a popular approach to identify pathways or sets of genes which are significantly enriched in the context of differentially expressed genes. The traditional gene set enrichment approach considers a pathway as a simple gene list disregarding any knowledge of gene or protein interactions. In contrast, the new group of so called pathway topology-based methods integrates the topological structure of a pathway into the analysis. We comparatively investigated gene set and pathway topology-based enrichment approaches, considering three gene set and four topological methods. These methods were compared in two extensive simulation studies and on a benchmark of 36 real datasets, providing the same pathway input data for all methods. In the benchmark data analysis both types of methods showed a comparable ability to detect enriched pathways. The first simulation study was conducted with KEGG pathways, which showed considerable gene overlaps between each other. In this study with original KEGG pathways, none of the topology-based methods outperformed the gene set approach. Therefore, a second simulation study was performed on non-overlapping pathways created by unique gene IDs. Here, methods accounting for pathway topology reached higher accuracy than the gene set methods, however their sensitivity was lower. We conducted one of the first comprehensive comparative works on evaluating gene set against pathway topology-based enrichment methods. The topological methods showed better performance in the simulation scenarios with non-overlapping pathways, however, they were not conclusively better in the other scenarios. This suggests that simple gene set approach might be sufficient to detect an enriched pathway under realistic circumstances. Nevertheless, more extensive studies and further benchmark data are needed to systematically evaluate these methods and to assess what gain and cost pathway topology information introduces into enrichment analysis. Both

  12. Bioelectrocatalytic dechlorination of trichloroacetic acid at gel-immobilized hemoglobin on multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified graphite electrode: Kinetic modeling and reaction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qi; Yu, Jianming; Xu, Yinghua; Wang, Jiade; Ying, Le; Song, Xinxin; Zhou, Gendi; Chen, Jianmeng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The electrons transfer from enzyme in the electrode to COCs was the key step. ► The average current efficiency was influenced by pH and temperature of the systems. ► The most favourable degradation conditions for TCA were found to be pH 3 and 310 K. ► The activation energy of 26.2 kJ mol −1 was also calculated by the Arrhenius equation. ► Bioelectrocatalytic mechanism of TCA was verified by kinetic expressions. -- Abstract: In bioelectrochemically reductive dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds (COCs), the electrons transfer from enzyme in the electrode to COCs was the key step, which determined the average current efficiency (CE) and was influenced by the pH and temperature of the systems. In this work, the effect of temperature (288–318 K) and pH (2–11) of the electrolyte on decholrination of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was investigated in the sodium alginate/hemoglobin-multiwalled carbon nanotubes-graphite composite electrode (Hb/SA–MWCNT–GE). The results showed that the most favourable degradation conditions for TCA by Hb/SA–MWCNT–GE were found to be pH 3 and 310 K. By varying the pH of the systems, it was found that a proton accompanied with an electron transfer between the electrode and heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) of Hb during the reaction. Additionally, the activation energy of 26.2 kJ mol −1 was also calculated by the Arrhenius equation for the reaction. The total mass balance of the reactant and the products was in the range of 97–105% during the bioelectrochemically reductive reaction. The CE only decreased from 87% to 83% when the Hb/SA–MWCNT–GE was used 5 times. Based on the intermediates detected, a pathway was proposed for TCA degradation in which it underwent dechlorination process. The main degradation mechanism described by a parallel reaction rather than by a sequential reaction for dechlorination of TCA in Hb/SA–MWCNT–GE system was proposed. These data provided relevant information about the

  13. System of gait analysis based on ground reaction force assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Vaverka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biomechanical analysis of gait employs various methods used in kinematic and kinetic analysis, EMG, and others. One of the most frequently used methods is kinetic analysis based on the assessment of the ground reaction forces (GRF recorded on two force plates. Objective: The aim of the study was to present a method of gait analysis based on the assessment of the GRF recorded during the stance phase of two steps. Methods: The GRF recorded with a force plate on one leg during stance phase has three components acting in directions: Fx - mediolateral, Fy - anteroposterior, and Fz - vertical. A custom-written MATLAB script was used for gait analysis in this study. This software displays instantaneous force data for both legs as Fx(t, Fy(t and Fz(t curves, automatically determines the extremes of functions and sets the visual markers defining the individual points of interest. Positions of these markers can be easily adjusted by the rater, which may be necessary if the GRF has an atypical pattern. The analysis is fully automated and analyzing one trial takes only 1-2 minutes. Results: The method allows quantification of temporal variables of the extremes of the Fx(t, Fy(t, Fz(t functions, durations of the braking and propulsive phase, duration of the double support phase, the magnitudes of reaction forces in extremes of measured functions, impulses of force, and indices of symmetry. The analysis results in a standardized set of 78 variables (temporal, force, indices of symmetry which can serve as a basis for further research and diagnostics. Conclusions: The resulting set of variable offers a wide choice for selecting a specific group of variables with consideration to a particular research topic. The advantage of this method is the standardization of the GRF analysis, low time requirements allowing rapid analysis of a large number of trials in a short time, and comparability of the variables obtained during different research measurements.

  14. Intensified Pozzolanic Reaction on Kaolinite Clay-Based Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Hee Kwon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to develop and characterize kaolinite clay-based structural mortar. The pozzolanic reaction induced from two mineral additives, i.e., calcium hydroxide and silica fume (SF, and the physical filling effect from SF, were found to be effective on the enhancement of structural properties. Based on several preliminary experiments, 7:3 ratio of kaolinite clay/calcium hydroxide was selected as a basic binder. Then, the amount of SF was chosen as 0%, 7.5%, and 15% of the total binder to consider both the chemical and physical effects. The results showed that compressive strengths of samples with 7.5% and 15% SF are significantly increased by approximately 200% and 350%, respectively, at 28 days compared to the sample without SF. However, based on the results of the sample with 15% SF, it is found that excessive addition of SF causes long-term strength loss, possibly owing to micro cracks. With the careful consideration on this long-term behavior, this suggested new mix design can be further extended to develop sustainable structural materials using natural minerals or waste materials with nonbinding properties.

  15. Elucidating the hard/soft acid/base principle: A perspective based on half-reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, Paul W.; Parr, Robert G.; Pearson, Ralph G.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis is presented for the acid-base double-exchange reaction as well as the associated acid-displacement and base-displacement 'half-reactions' with the goal of elucidating the meaning of the hard/soft acid/base (HSAB) principle and the conditions for its validity. When electron-transfer effects are important and other effects are negligible, the HSAB principle is driven by the surpassing stability of the soft acid/soft base product. When electrostatic effects dominate the reactivity, the HSAB principle is driven by the surpassing stability of the hard acid/hard base product. Because electron-transfer effects favor soft/soft interactions, while electrostatic effects favor hard/hard interactions, acid-base exchange reactions may be used to determine whether a reagent's reactivity is dominated by electron-transfer or by electrostatic effects. Because electron-transfer and electrostatic considerations separately favor the HSAB principle whenever the electronic chemical potentials of the acids and bases involved in the reaction are similar, our analysis provides strong support for the HSAB principle. The electronic chemical potential measures the intrinsic strength of acids and bases

  16. Late adverse reactions to intravascular iodine based contrast media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellin, Marie-France; Stacul, Fulvio; Webb, Judith A W

    2011-01-01

    DEFINITION: Late adverse reactions (LAR) to contrast media (CM) are defined as reactions occurring 1 h to 1 week after exposure. NEED FOR REVIEW: In view of more prospective studies of LAR and new data about their pathophysiology, the Contrast Medium Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society...... or delayed reading intradermal). The main risk factors for LAR are a previous reaction to contrast medium, a history of allergy, and interleukin-2 treatment. Most skin reactions are mild or moderate and self-limiting. MANAGEMENT: Management is symptomatic and similar to the management of other drug......-induced skin reactions. To reduce the risk of repeat reactions avoidance of the relevant CM and any cross-reacting agents identified by skin testing is recommended....

  17. Pathway-based identification of biomarkers for targeted therapeutics: personalized oncology with PI3K pathway inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jannik N; Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Di Bacco, Alessandra; Chi, An; Zhang, Theresa; Chen, Albert H; Dolinski, Brian; Kraus, Manfred; Roberts, Brian; Arthur, William; Klinghoffer, Rich A; Gargano, Diana; Li, Lixia; Feldman, Igor; Lynch, Bethany; Rush, John; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Paweletz, Cloud P

    2010-08-04

    Although we have made great progress in understanding the complex genetic alterations that underlie human cancer, it has proven difficult to identify which molecularly targeted therapeutics will benefit which patients. Drug-specific modulation of oncogenic signaling pathways in specific patient subpopulations can predict responsiveness to targeted therapy. Here, we report a pathway-based phosphoprofiling approach to identify and quantify clinically relevant, drug-specific biomarkers for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway inhibitors that target AKT, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), and PI3K-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We quantified 375 nonredundant PI3K pathway-relevant phosphopeptides, all containing AKT, PDK1, or mitogen-activated protein kinase substrate recognition motifs. Of these phosphopeptides, 71 were drug-regulated, 11 of them by all three inhibitors. Drug-modulated phosphoproteins were enriched for involvement in cytoskeletal reorganization (filamin, stathmin, dynamin, PAK4, and PTPN14), vesicle transport (LARP1, VPS13D, and SLC20A1), and protein translation (S6RP and PRAS40). We then generated phosphospecific antibodies against selected, drug-regulated phosphorylation sites that would be suitable as biomarker tools for PI3K pathway inhibitors. As proof of concept, we show clinical translation feasibility for an antibody against phospho-PRAS40(Thr246). Evaluation of binding of this antibody in human cancer cell lines, a PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10)-deficient mouse prostate tumor model, and triple-negative breast tumor tissues showed that phospho-PRAS40(Thr246) positively correlates with PI3K pathway activation and predicts AKT inhibitor sensitivity. In contrast to phosphorylation of AKT(Thr308), the phospho-PRAS40(Thr246) epitope is highly stable in tissue samples and thus is ideal for immunohistochemistry. In summary, our study illustrates a rational approach for discovery of drug

  18. Late adverse reactions to intravascular iodine based contrast media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellin, Marie-France; Stacul, Fulvio; Webb, Judith A W

    2011-01-01

    DEFINITION: Late adverse reactions (LAR) to contrast media (CM) are defined as reactions occurring 1 h to 1 week after exposure. NEED FOR REVIEW: In view of more prospective studies of LAR and new data about their pathophysiology, the Contrast Medium Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Societ...

  19. COMPUGIRLS: Stepping Stone to Future Computer-Based Technology Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Husman, Jenefer; Scott, Kimberly A.; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D.

    2015-01-01

    The COMPUGIRLS: Culturally relevant technology program for adolescent girls was developed to promote underrepresented girls' future possible selves and career pathways in computer-related technology fields. We hypothesized that the COMPUGIRLS would promote academic possible selves and self-regulation to achieve these possible selves. We compared…

  20. The concern of emergence of multi-station reaction pathways that might make stepwise the mechanism of the 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of azides and alkynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtat, Bita; Siadati, Seyyed Amir; Khalilzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Zareyee, Daryoush

    2018-03-01

    After hot debates on the concerted or stepwise nature of the mechanism of the catalyst-free 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions (DC)s, nowadays, it is being believed that for the reaction of each dipole and dipolarophile, there is a possibility that the reaction mechanism becomes stepwise, intermediates emerge, and the reaction becomes non-stereospecific. Yield of even minimal amounts of unwanted side products or stereoisomers as impurities could bring many troubles like difficult purification steps. In this project, we have made attempts to study all probable reaction channels of the azide cycloadditions with two functionalized alkynes, in order to answer this question: "is there any possibility that intermediates evolve in the catalyst-free click 1,3-DC reaction of azide-alkynes?". During the calculations, several multi-station reaction pathways supporting the stepwise and concerted mechanisms were detected. Also, the born-oppenheimer molecular dynamic (BOMD) simulation was used to find trustable geometries which could be emerged during the reaction coordinate.

  1. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production via Terbium Oxide Based Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic modeling of the terbium oxide based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting (Tb-WS cycle is reported. The 1st step of the Tb-WS cycle involves thermal reduction of TbO2 into Tb and O2, whereas the 2nd step corresponds to the production of H2 through Tb oxidation by water splitting reaction. Equilibrium compositions associated with the thermal reduction and water splitting steps were determined via HSC simulations. Influence of oxygen partial pressure in the inert gas on thermal reduction of TbO2 and effect of water splitting temperature (TL on Gibbs free energy related to the H2 production step were examined in detail. The cycle (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion (ηsolar-to-fuel efficiency of the Tb-WS cycle were determined by performing the second-law thermodynamic analysis. Results obtained indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar-to-fuel increase with the decrease in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas and thermal reduction temperature (TH. It was also realized that the recuperation of the heat released by the water splitting reactor and quench unit further enhances the solar reactor efficiency. At TH=2280 K, by applying 60% heat recuperation, maximum ηcycle of 39.0% and ηsolar-to-fuel of 47.1% for the Tb-WS cycle can be attained.

  2. An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999

  3. Network pharmacology-based identification of key pharmacological pathways of Yin-Huang-Qing-Fei capsule acting on chronic bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guohua; Zhang, Yanqiong; Ren, Weiqiong; Dong, Ling; Li, Junfang; Geng, Ya; Zhang, Yi; Li, Defeng; Xu, Haiyu; Yang, Hongjun

    2017-01-01

    For decades in China, the Yin-Huang-Qing-Fei capsule (YHQFC) has been widely used in the treatment of chronic bronchitis, with good curative effects. Owing to the complexity of traditional Chinese herbal formulas, the pharmacological mechanism of YHQFC remains unclear. To address this problem, a network pharmacology-based strategy was proposed in this study. At first, the putative target profile of YHQFC was predicted using MedChem Studio, based on structural and functional similarities of all available YHQFC components to the known drugs obtained from the DrugBank database. Then, an interaction network was constructed using links between putative YHQFC targets and known therapeutic targets of chronic bronchitis. Following the calculation of four topological features (degree, betweenness, closeness, and coreness) of each node in the network, 475 major putative targets of YHQFC and their topological importance were identified. In addition, a pathway enrichment analysis based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database indicated that the major putative targets of YHQFC are significantly associated with various pathways involved in anti-inflammation processes, immune responses, and pathological changes caused by asthma. More interestingly, eight major putative targets of YHQFC (interleukin [IL]-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, FCER1G, CCL11, and EPX) were demonstrated to be associated with the inflammatory process that occurs during the progression of asthma. Finally, a molecular docking simulation was performed and the results exhibited that 17 pairs of chemical components and candidate YHQFC targets involved in asthma pathway had strong binding efficiencies. In conclusion, this network pharmacology-based investigation revealed that YHQFC may attenuate the inflammatory reaction of chronic bronchitis by regulating its candidate targets, which may be implicated in the major pathological processes of the asthma pathway.

  4. Investigating Ionic Effects Applied to Water Based Organocatalysed Aldol Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua P. Delaney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Saturated aqueous solutions of various common salts were examined for their effect on aqueous aldol reactions catalysted by a highly active C2-symmetric diprolinamide organocatalyst developed in our laboratory. With respect to the aldol reaction between cyclohexanone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, deionised water was always a superior medium to salt solutions though some correlation to increasing anion size and depression in enantiomeric excess could be observed. Additionally, the complete inhibition of catalyst activity observed when employing tap water could be alleviated by the inclusion of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA into the aqueous media prior to reaction initiation. Extension of these reaction conditions demonstrated that these ionic effects vary on a case-to-case basis depending on the ketone/aldehyde combination.

  5. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid- based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems the ... For many years, the disadvantage in these investigations ... fusion or breakup reaction, preferred with large forward-peaked cross-sections. To transfer the ...

  6. Freestanding eggshell membrane-based electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors and oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jing; Wu, Hao; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M.; Elzatahry, Ahmed A.; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2015-08-01

    A type of freestanding, light-weight eggshell membrane-based electrode is demonstrated for supercapacitors and for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysis. As a widely available daily waste, eggshell membranes have unique porous three-dimensional grid-like fibrous structures with relatively high surface area and abundant macropores, allowing for effective conjugation of carbon nanotubes and growth of NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays, an effective supercapacitor material and OER catalyst. The three-dimensional fibrous eggshell membrane frameworks with carbon nanotubes offer efficient pathways for charge transport, and the macropores between adjacent fibers are fully accessible for electrolytes and bubble evolution. As a supercapacitor, the eggshell membrane/carbon nanotube/NiCo2O4 electrode shows high specific capacitances at current densities from 1 to 20 A g-1, with excellent capacitance retention (>90%) at 10 A g-1 for over 10 000 cycles. When employed as an OER catalyst, this eggshell membrane-based electrode exhibits an OER onset potential of 1.53 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), and a stable catalytic current density of 20 mA cm-2 at 1.65 V vs. the RHE.A type of freestanding, light-weight eggshell membrane-based electrode is demonstrated for supercapacitors and for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysis. As a widely available daily waste, eggshell membranes have unique porous three-dimensional grid-like fibrous structures with relatively high surface area and abundant macropores, allowing for effective conjugation of carbon nanotubes and growth of NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays, an effective supercapacitor material and OER catalyst. The three-dimensional fibrous eggshell membrane frameworks with carbon nanotubes offer efficient pathways for charge transport, and the macropores between adjacent fibers are fully accessible for electrolytes and bubble evolution. As a supercapacitor, the eggshell membrane/carbon nanotube/NiCo2O4 electrode shows high specific

  7. Dynamic pathways to mediate reactions buried in thermal fluctuations. I. Time-dependent normal form theory for multidimensional Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2009-12-14

    We present a novel theory which enables us to explore the mechanism of reaction selectivity and robust functions in complex systems persisting under thermal fluctuation. The theory constructs a nonlinear coordinate transformation so that the equation of motion for the new reaction coordinate is independent of the other nonreactive coordinates in the presence of thermal fluctuation. In this article we suppose that reacting systems subject to thermal noise are described by a multidimensional Langevin equation without a priori assumption for the form of potential. The reaction coordinate is composed not only of all the coordinates and velocities associated with the system (solute) but also of the random force exerted by the environment (solvent) with friction constants. The sign of the reaction coordinate at any instantaneous moment in the region of a saddle determines the fate of the reaction, i.e., whether the reaction will proceed through to the products or go back to the reactants. By assuming the statistical properties of the random force, one can know a priori a well-defined boundary of the reaction which separates the full position-velocity space in the saddle region into mainly reactive and mainly nonreactive regions even under thermal fluctuation. The analytical expression of the reaction coordinate provides the firm foundation on the mechanism of how and why reaction proceeds in thermal fluctuating environments.

  8. Base-catalyzed tandem Michael/dehydro-Diels-Alder reaction of α,α-dicyanoolefins with electron-deficient 1,3-conjugated enynes: a facile entry to angularly fused polycycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingrui; Zhang, Junliang

    2014-01-07

    Angularly fused carbocyclic frameworks and their heteroatom-substituted analogues exist in many natural products that display a broad and interesting range of biological activities. Preparation of polycyclic products by cycloaddition reactions have been the long-standing hot topic in the synthetic community. Dehydro-Diels-Alder (DDA) reactions are one class of dehydropericyclic reactions that are derived conceptually by systematic removal of hydrogen atom pairs. A base-promoted tandem Michael addition and DDA reaction of α,α-dicyanoolefins with electron-deficient 1,3-conjugated enynes was realized in which a DDA reaction takes place between the arylalkynes and electron-deficient tetrasubstituted olefin. The control experiments support the stepwise anionic reaction pathway rather than the concerted reaction pathway. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Mechanisms for the inversion of chirality: Global reaction route mapping of stereochemical pathways in a probable chiral extraterrestrial molecule, 2-aminopropionitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Vikas

    2015-01-01

    2-Aminopropionitrile (APN), a probable candidate as a chiral astrophysical molecule, is a precursor to amino-acid alanine. Stereochemical pathways in 2-APN are explored using Global Reaction Route Mapping (GRRM) method employing high-level quantum-mechanical computations. Besides predicting the conventional mechanism for chiral inversion that proceeds through an achiral intermediate, a counterintuitive flipping mechanism is revealed for 2-APN through chiral intermediates explored using the GRRM. The feasibility of the proposed stereochemical pathways, in terms of the Gibbs free-energy change, is analyzed at the temperature conditions akin to the interstellar medium. Notably, the stereoinversion in 2-APN is observed to be more feasible than the dissociation of 2-APN and intermediates involved along the stereochemical pathways, and the flipping barrier is observed to be as low as 3.68 kJ/mol along one of the pathways. The pathways proposed for the inversion of chirality in 2-APN may provide significant insight into the extraterrestrial origin of life

  10. Well-to-wheels analysis of hydrogen based fuel-cell vehicle pathways in Shanghai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhijia; Zhang Xu

    2006-01-01

    Due to high energy efficiency and zero emissions, some believe fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) could revolutionize the automobile industry by replacing internal combustion engine technology, and first boom in China. However, hydrogen infrastructure is one of the major barriers. Because different H 2 pathways have very different energy and emissions effects, the well-to-wheels (WTW) analyses are necessary for adequately evaluating fuel/vehicle systems. The pathways used to supply H 2 for FCVs must be carefully examined by their WTW energy use, greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions, total criteria pollutions emissions, and urban criteria pollutions emissions. Ten hydrogen pathways in Shanghai have been simulated. The results include well-to-wheels energy use, GHGs emissions, total criteria pollutions and urban criteria pollutions. A fuel-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory-called the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model-was used to evaluate well-to-wheels energy and emissions impacts of hydrogen pathways in this study. Because the initial GREET model had no coal and naphtha-based hydrogen pathways, four hydrogen pathway computer programs were added to GREET in the research. To analyze uncertain impacts, commercial software, Crystal Ball(TM) was used to conduct Monte Carlo simulations. Hence, instead of point estimates, the results of this study were probability distributions. Through the research of H 2 pathways in Shanghai, the following conclusions were achieved:(1)All the pathways have significant reductions in WTW petroleum use, except two H 2 pathways from naphtha, which achieve about 20% reductions in WTW petroleum. (2)All the pathways have significant reductions in WTW urban criteria pollutions emissions, except two H 2 pathways from coal, which result in significant increases in WTW urban SO X emissions. (3)The NG-based H 2 pathways have the best WTW energy efficiencies, and the electrolysis H 2 pathways

  11. Xtalk: a path-based approach for identifying crosstalk between signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegge, Allison N.; Sharp, Nicholas; Murali, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Cells communicate with their environment via signal transduction pathways. On occasion, the activation of one pathway can produce an effect downstream of another pathway, a phenomenon known as crosstalk. Existing computational methods to discover such pathway pairs rely on simple overlap statistics. Results: We present Xtalk, a path-based approach for identifying pairs of pathways that may crosstalk. Xtalk computes the statistical significance of the average length of multiple short paths that connect receptors in one pathway to the transcription factors in another. By design, Xtalk reports the precise interactions and mechanisms that support the identified crosstalk. We applied Xtalk to signaling pathways in the KEGG and NCI-PID databases. We manually curated a gold standard set of 132 crosstalking pathway pairs and a set of 140 pairs that did not crosstalk, for which Xtalk achieved an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.65, a 12% improvement over the closest competing approach. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve varied with the pathway, suggesting that crosstalk should be evaluated on a pathway-by-pathway level. We also analyzed an extended set of 658 pathway pairs in KEGG and to a set of more than 7000 pathway pairs in NCI-PID. For the top-ranking pairs, we found substantial support in the literature (81% for KEGG and 78% for NCI-PID). We provide examples of networks computed by Xtalk that accurately recovered known mechanisms of crosstalk. Availability and implementation: The XTALK software is available at http://bioinformatics.cs.vt.edu/~murali/software. Crosstalk networks are available at http://graphspace.org/graphs?tags=2015-bioinformatics-xtalk. Contact: ategge@vt.edu, murali@cs.vt.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26400040

  12. A potential role of substrate as a base for deprotonation pathway in Rh-catalysed C-H amination of heteroArenes: DFT insights

    KAUST Repository

    Ajitha, Manjaly John

    2016-03-29

    The possibility of direct introduction of a new functionality through C–H bond activation is an attractive strategy in covalent synthesis. Here, we investigated the mechanism of Rh-catalysed C-H amination of the hetero-aryl substrate (2-phenylpyridine) using phenyl azide as nitrogen source by density functional theory (DFT). For the deprotocyclometallation and protodecyclometallation processes of the title reaction, we propose a stepwise base-assisted mechanism (pathway I) instead of previously reported concerted mechanism (pathway II). In the new mechanism proposed here, 2-phenylpyridine acts as a base in the initial deprotonation step (C-H bond cleavage) and transports the proton towards the final protonation step. In fact, the N-H bond of the strong conjugate acid (formed during initial C-H bond cleavage) considered in pathway I (via TS4) is more acidic than the C-H bond of the neutral substrate considered in pathway II (via TS5). The higher activation barrier of TS5 mainly originates from the ring strain of the four membered cyclic transition state. The vital role of base, as disclosed here, can potentially have broader mechanistic implications for the development of reaction conditions of transition metal catalysed reactions.

  13. Accelerating rejection-based simulation of biochemical reactions with bounded acceptance probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Zunino, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.zunino@unitn.it [Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2016-06-14

    Stochastic simulation of large biochemical reaction networks is often computationally expensive due to the disparate reaction rates and high variability of population of chemical species. An approach to accelerate the simulation is to allow multiple reaction firings before performing update by assuming that reaction propensities are changing of a negligible amount during a time interval. Species with small population in the firings of fast reactions significantly affect both performance and accuracy of this simulation approach. It is even worse when these small population species are involved in a large number of reactions. We present in this paper a new approximate algorithm to cope with this problem. It is based on bounding the acceptance probability of a reaction selected by the exact rejection-based simulation algorithm, which employs propensity bounds of reactions and the rejection-based mechanism to select next reaction firings. The reaction is ensured to be selected to fire with an acceptance rate greater than a predefined probability in which the selection becomes exact if the probability is set to one. Our new algorithm improves the computational cost for selecting the next reaction firing and reduces the updating the propensities of reactions.

  14. Wave Packet Based Statistical Approach to Complex-Forming Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hua [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2017-12-06

    Combustion represents a key chemical process in energy consumption in modern societies and a clear and comprehensive understanding of the elemental reactions in combustion is of great importance to a number of challenging areas such as engine efficiency and environmental protection. In this award, we proposed to develop new theoretical tools to understand elemental chemical processes in combustion environments. With the support of this DOE grant, we have made significant advances in developing new and more efficient and accurate algorithms to characterize reaction dynamics.

  15. Pathway Relevance Ranking for Tumor Samples through Network-Based Data Integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieven P C Verbeke

    Full Text Available The study of cancer, a highly heterogeneous disease with different causes and clinical outcomes, requires a multi-angle approach and the collection of large multi-omics datasets that, ideally, should be analyzed simultaneously. We present a new pathway relevance ranking method that is able to prioritize pathways according to the information contained in any combination of tumor related omics datasets. Key to the method is the conversion of all available data into a single comprehensive network representation containing not only genes but also individual patient samples. Additionally, all data are linked through a network of previously identified molecular interactions. We demonstrate the performance of the new method by applying it to breast and ovarian cancer datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas. By integrating gene expression, copy number, mutation and methylation data, the method's potential to identify key pathways involved in breast cancer development shared by different molecular subtypes is illustrated. Interestingly, certain pathways were ranked equally important for different subtypes, even when the underlying (epi-genetic disturbances were diverse. Next to prioritizing universally high-scoring pathways, the pathway ranking method was able to identify subtype-specific pathways. Often the score of a pathway could not be motivated by a single mutation, copy number or methylation alteration, but rather by a combination of genetic and epi-genetic disturbances, stressing the need for a network-based data integration approach. The analysis of ovarian tumors, as a function of survival-based subtypes, demonstrated the method's ability to correctly identify key pathways, irrespective of tumor subtype. A differential analysis of survival-based subtypes revealed several pathways with higher importance for the bad-outcome patient group than for the good-outcome patient group. Many of the pathways exhibiting higher importance for the bad

  16. A Pathway Based Classification Method for Analyzing Gene Expression for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyle, Nicola; Keohane, Aoife; Newhouse, Stephen; Lunnon, Katie; Johnston, Caroline; Soininen, Hilkka; Kloszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Hodges, Angela; Kiddle, Steven; Dobson, Richard Jb

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that gene expression levels in blood may be able to differentiate subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from normal elderly controls and mild cognitively impaired (MCI) subjects. However, there is limited replicability at the single marker level. A pathway-based interpretation of gene expression may prove more robust. This study aimed to investigate whether a case/control classification model built on pathway level data was more robust than a gene level model and may consequently perform better in test data. The study used two batches of gene expression data from the AddNeuroMed (ANM) and Dementia Case Registry (DCR) cohorts. Our study used Illumina Human HT-12 Expression BeadChips to collect gene expression from blood samples. Random forest modeling with recursive feature elimination was used to predict case/control status. Age and APOE ɛ4 status were used as covariates for all analysis. Gene and pathway level models performed similarly to each other and to a model based on demographic information only. Any potential increase in concordance from the novel pathway level approach used here has not lead to a greater predictive ability in these datasets. However, we have only tested one method for creating pathway level scores. Further, we have been able to benchmark pathways against genes in datasets that had been extensively harmonized. Further work should focus on the use of alternative methods for creating pathway level scores, in particular those that incorporate pathway topology, and the use of an endophenotype based approach.

  17. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Benjamin B; Savee, John D; Trevitt, Adam J; Osborn, David L; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-08-28

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e.˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (-H = 27%, -CH3 = 73%) and (-H = 14%, -CH3 = 86%), respectively. Together, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.

  18. Clinical Pathways and the Patient Perspective in the Pursuit of Value-Based Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Jennifer L; Nadler, Eric; Freeman-Daily, Janet; Mazharuddin, Samir; Kim, Edward S

    2017-01-01

    The art of practicing oncology has evolved substantially in the past 5 years. As more and more diagnostic tests, biomarker-directed therapies, and immunotherapies make their way to the oncology marketplace, oncologists will find it increasingly difficult to keep up with the many therapeutic options. Additionally, the cost of cancer care seems to be increasing. Clinical pathways are a systematic way to organize and display detailed, evidence-based treatment options and assist the practitioner with best practice. When selecting which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway, considerations must include the efficacy and safety, as well as costs, of the therapy. Pathway treatment regimens must be continually assessed and modified to ensure that the most up-to-date, high-quality options are incorporated. Value-based models, such as the ASCO Value Framework, can assist providers in presenting economic evaluations of clinical pathway treatment options to patients, thus allowing the patient to decide the overall value of each treatment regimen. Although oncologists and pathway developers can decide which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway based on the efficacy of the treatment, assessment of the value of that treatment regimen ultimately lies with the patient. Patient definitions of value will be an important component to enhancing current value-based oncology care models and incorporating new, high-quality, value-based therapeutics into oncology clinical pathways.

  19. Visualization of reaction mechanism by CG based on quantum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, the change in the molecular configuration in fundamental chemical reactions such as, F + HCl ¨ HF + Cl, I + H2¨ HI + H, OH- + CH3Cl ¨ CH3OH + Cl-, and esterification of acetic acid and ethyl alcohol were visualized by the quantum chemical calculation MOPAC with PM5 Hamiltonian. The CG teaching material ...

  20. A general A3: coupling reaction based on functionalized alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendler, Edison P.; Santos, Alcindo A. dos

    2013-01-01

    A range of hydroxypropargylpiperidones were efficiently obtained by a one-pot three-component coupling reaction of aldehydes, alkynols, and a primary amine equivalent (4-piperidone hydrochloride hydrate) in ethyl acetate using copper(I) chloride as a catalyst. The developed protocol proved to be equally efficient using a range of aliphatic aldehydes, including paraformaldehyde, and using protected and unprotected alkynols. (author)

  1. Network-based identification of biomarkers coexpressed with multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Nancy Lan; Wan, Ying-Wooi

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling complex molecular interactions and networks and incorporating clinical information in modeling will present a paradigm shift in molecular medicine. Embedding biological relevance via modeling molecular networks and pathways has become increasingly important for biomarker identification in cancer susceptibility and metastasis studies. Here, we give a comprehensive overview of computational methods used for biomarker identification, and provide a performance comparison of several network models used in studies of cancer susceptibility, disease progression, and prognostication. Specifically, we evaluated implication networks, Boolean networks, Bayesian networks, and Pearson's correlation networks in constructing gene coexpression networks for identifying lung cancer diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. The results show that implication networks, implemented in Genet package, identified sets of biomarkers that generated an accurate prediction of lung cancer risk and metastases; meanwhile, implication networks revealed more biologically relevant molecular interactions than Boolean networks, Bayesian networks, and Pearson's correlation networks when evaluated with MSigDB database.

  2. Freestanding eggshell membrane-based electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jing; Wu, Hao; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2015-09-14

    A type of freestanding, light-weight eggshell membrane-based electrode is demonstrated for supercapacitors and for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysis. As a widely available daily waste, eggshell membranes have unique porous three-dimensional grid-like fibrous structures with relatively high surface area and abundant macropores, allowing for effective conjugation of carbon nanotubes and growth of NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays, an effective supercapacitor material and OER catalyst. The three-dimensional fibrous eggshell membrane frameworks with carbon nanotubes offer efficient pathways for charge transport, and the macropores between adjacent fibers are fully accessible for electrolytes and bubble evolution. As a supercapacitor, the eggshell membrane/carbon nanotube/NiCo2O4 electrode shows high specific capacitances at current densities from 1 to 20 A g(-1), with excellent capacitance retention (>90%) at 10 A g(-1) for over 10,000 cycles. When employed as an OER catalyst, this eggshell membrane-based electrode exhibits an OER onset potential of 1.53 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), and a stable catalytic current density of 20 mA cm(-2) at 1.65 V vs. the RHE.

  3. Vapor-Phase Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol to Aromatics over Pt/HBeta: Identification of the Role of Acid Sites and Metal Sites on the Reaction Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Lei [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 P.R. China; Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Peng, Bo [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Zhu, Xinli [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 P.R. China

    2018-02-05

    Hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol, a phenolic compound derived from lignin fraction of biomass, over a Pt/HBeta catalyst at 350 °C and atmospheric pressure produces benzene, toluene, xylenes, and C9+ aromatics with yield of 42%, 29%, 12%, and 5%, respectively. Reaction pathways for conversion of two functional groups (hydroxyl and methoxyl) over the bifunctional catalyst were studied. Both guaiacol and intermediate products (catechol and cyclopentanone) were fed onto zeolite HBeta and Pt/SiO2 to identify the individual role of acid site and metal site. Acid sites (mainly Brønsted acid site, BAS) catalyze transalkylation and dehydroxylation reactions in sequence, producing phenol, cresols and xylenols as the major products at high conversion. Pt sites catalyze demethylation reaction resulting in catechol as the primary product, which can either be deoxygenated to phenol followed by phenol to benzene, or decarbonylated to cyclopentanone and further to butane. The close proximity of Pt and BAS in bifunctional Pt/HBeta enables both transalkylation and deoxygenation reactions with inhibited demethylation and decarbonylation reactions, producing aromatics as major final products with a total yield > 85%. Both activity and stability of bifunctional Pt/HBeta during hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol is improved compared to HBeta and Pt/SiO2. The addition of water to the feed further improves the activity and stability via hydrolysis of O-CH3 bond of guaiacol on BAS and removing coke around Pt.

  4. High-pressure vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived oxygenates to hydrocarbons by a PtMo bimetallic catalyst: Product selectivity, reaction pathway, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohe, Sara L.; Choudhari, Harshavardhan J.; Mehta, Dhairya D.; Dietrich, Paul J.; Detwiler, Michael D.; Akatay, Cem M.; Stach, Eric A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Agrawal, Rakesh; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-12-01

    High-pressure, vapor-phase, hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions of dihydroeugenol (2-methoxy-4-propylphenol), as well as other phenolic, lignin-derived compounds, were investigated over a bimetallic platinum and molybdenum catalyst supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (5%Pt2.5%Mo/MWCNT). Hydrocarbons were obtained in 100% yield from dihydroeugenol, including 98% yield of the hydrocarbon propylcyclohexane. The final hydrocarbon distribution was shown to be a strong function of hydrogen partial pressure. Kinetic analysis showed three main dihydroeugenol reaction pathways: HDO, hydrogenation, and alkylation. The major pathway occurred via Pt catalyzed hydrogenation of the aromatic ring and methoxy group cleavage to form 4-propylcyclohexanol, then Mo catalyzed removal of the hydroxyl group by dehydration to form propylcyclohexene, followed by hydrogenation of propylcyclohexene on either the Pt or Mo to form the propylcyclohexane. Transalkylation by the methoxy group occurred as a minor side reaction. Catalyst characterization techniques including chemisorption, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the catalyst structure. Catalyst components identified were Pt particles, bimetallic PtMo particles, a Mo carbide-like phase, and Mo oxide phases.

  5. Associations of genetic risk scores based on adult adiposity pathways with childhood growth and adiposity measures

    OpenAIRE

    Monnereau, Claire; Vogelezang, Suzanne; Kruithof, Claudia J.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Felix, Janine F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified many loci and biological pathways that influence adult body mass index (BMI). We aimed to identify if biological pathways related to adult BMI also affect infant growth and childhood adiposity measures. Methods We used data from a population-based prospective cohort study among 3,975 children with a mean age of 6?years. Genetic risk scores were constructed based on the 97 SNPs associated with adult BMI previously identi...

  6. Efficient rejection-based simulation of biochemical reactions with stochastic noise and delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento (Italy); Zunino, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.zunino@unitn.it [Department of Mathematics, University of Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-07

    We propose a new exact stochastic rejection-based simulation algorithm for biochemical reactions and extend it to systems with delays. Our algorithm accelerates the simulation by pre-computing reaction propensity bounds to select the next reaction to perform. Exploiting such bounds, we are able to avoid recomputing propensities every time a (delayed) reaction is initiated or finished, as is typically necessary in standard approaches. Propensity updates in our approach are still performed, but only infrequently and limited for a small number of reactions, saving computation time and without sacrificing exactness. We evaluate the performance improvement of our algorithm by experimenting with concrete biological models.

  7. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  8. Driving Ability of HMX based Aluminized Explosive Affected by the Reaction Degree of Aluminum Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yingliang

    2017-06-01

    Due to the time scale of aluminum reaction, the detonation process of the aluminized explosive becomes very complex, and there is less agreement on the reaction mechanism of aluminum powder. If the reaction of aluminum occurs in the reaction zone, the energy released will further strengthen the work ability of detonation wave. So it is very important for characterizing the detonation parameters and detonation driving ability to accurately understand the role of aluminum powder in the reaction zone. In this paper, detonation driving process of HMX based aluminized explosive was studied by cylinder test, obtaining the expansion track of cylinder wall. In order to further research the reaction degree (λ) of aluminum in the reaction zone, the thermodynamic program VHL was used to calculate the detonation process at different reaction degrees, obtaining the parameters of detonation products thermodynamic state. Using the dynamic software LS-DYNA and the JWL equation of state by fitting the pressure and relative volume relationship, the cylinder test was simulated. Compared with the experimental results, when the reaction degree is 20%, the driving ability is found to be in agreement with measured ones. It is concluded that the driving ability of HMX based aluminized explosive can be more accurately characterized by considering the reaction degree of aluminum powder in the reaction zone.

  9. Comparison of pathways associated with hepatitis B- and C-infected hepatocellular carcinoma using pathway-based class discrimination method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Young; Song, Kwang Hoon; Koo, Imhoi; Lee, Kee-Ho; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Bu-Yeo

    2012-06-01

    Molecular signatures causing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from chronic infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) are not clearly known. Using microarray datasets composed of HCV-positive HCC or HBV-positive HCC, pathways that could discriminate tumor tissue from adjacent non-tumor liver tissue were selected by implementing nearest shrunken centroid algorithm. Cancer-related signaling pathways and lipid metabolism-related pathways were predominantly enriched in HCV-positive HCC, whereas functionally diverse pathways including immune-related pathways, cell cycle pathways, and RNA metabolism pathways were mainly enriched in HBV-positive HCC. In addition to differentially involved pathways, signaling pathways such as TGF-β, MAPK, and p53 pathways were commonly significant in both HCCs, suggesting the presence of common hepatocarcinogenesis process. The pathway clustering also verified segregation of pathways into the functional subgroups in both HCCs. This study indicates the functional distinction and similarity on the pathways implicated in the development of HCV- and/or HBV-positive HCC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Theoretical investigation of the oxidation pathways of the Cl-initiated reaction of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weichao; Zhang, Dongju

    2012-12-01

    The mechanism and products of the reaction of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232) with Cl atoms in the presence of O2 have been elucidated by performing high-level quantum chemistry calculations. The geometries of the reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products are optimized at the MP2(full)/6-311G(d, p) level, and their single-point energies are refined at the CCSD(T)/6-311 + G(d, p) level. The potential energy surface profiles have been constructed at the CCSD(T)/6-311 + G(d, p)//MP2(full)/6-311G(d, p) + 0.95 × ZPE level of theory, and the possible channels involved in the reaction are also discussed. The calculations indicate that the reaction predominantly proceeds via the addition of Cl atoms to the double bond rather than the direct abstraction of the H atoms in MBO232. The nascent adducts (CH3)2C(OH)CHCH2Cl (IM1) and (CH3)2C(OH)CHClCH2 (IM2) do not undergo subsequent isomerization and dissociation reactions, but rather react with O2. The theoretical results show that the major products are CH2ClCHO and CH3C(O)CH3 for the reaction of MBO232 + Cl in the presence of O2, which is in good agreement with the experimental finding.

  11. Identification of core pathways based on attractor and crosstalk in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Xiufang; Liu, Aijuan

    2018-02-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of mortality and disability around the world. It is an important task to identify dysregulated pathways which infer molecular and functional insights existing in high-throughput experimental data. Gene expression profile of E-GEOD-16561 was collected. Pathways were obtained from the database of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Retrieval of Interacting Genes was used to download protein-protein interaction sets. Attractor and crosstalk approaches were applied to screen dysregulated pathways. A total of 20 differentially expressed genes were identified in ischemic stroke. Thirty-nine significant differential pathways were identified according to Ppathways were identified with RPpathways were identified with impact factor >250. On the basis of the three criteria, 11 significant dysfunctional pathways were identified. Among them, Epstein-Barr virus infection was the most significant differential pathway. In conclusion, with the method based on attractor and crosstalk, significantly dysfunctional pathways were identified. These pathways are expected to provide molecular mechanism of ischemic stroke and represents a novel potential therapeutic target for ischemic stroke treatment.

  12. Computer-assisted study on the reaction between pyruvate and ylide in the pathway leading to lactyl-ThDP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Omar; Jaña, Gonzalo; Delgado, Eduardo J

    2012-08-01

    In this study the formation of the lactyl-thiamin diphosphate intermediate (L-ThDP) is addressed using density functional theory calculations at X3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory. The study includes potential energy surface scans, transition state search, and intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations. Reactivity is analyzed in terms of Fukui functions. The results allow to conclude that the reaction leading to the formation of L-ThDP occurs via a concerted mechanism, and during the nucleophilic attack on the pyruvate molecule, the ylide is in its AP form. The calculated activation barrier for the reaction is 19.2 kcal/mol, in agreement with the experimental reported value.

  13. A case report on a severe anaphylaxis reaction to Gadolinium-based MR contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Juil; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Chang Min; Yoon, Soon Ho; Lee, Whal; Kang, Hye Ryun; Choi, Young Hun [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Acute hypersensitivity reactions to gadolinium-based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media have been shown to have a much lower incidence and they are generally milder in terms of severity than acute adverse reactions associated with the use of iodinated contrast media for computed tomography scans. However, even though it is rare, a severe hypersensitivity reaction to MR contrast media can occur. Here we present the case of a 66-year-old woman who experienced a severe hypersensitivity reaction after administration of gadolinium-based contrast media without a previous history of allergies.

  14. Network pharmacology-based identification of key pharmacological pathways of Yin–Huang–Qing–Fei capsule acting on chronic bronchitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu GH

    2016-12-01

    -5, IL-10, IL-13, FCER1G, CCL11, and EPX were demonstrated to be associated with the inflammatory process that occurs during the progression of asthma. Finally, a molecular docking simulation was performed and the results exhibited that 17 pairs of chemical components and candidate YHQFC targets involved in asthma pathway had strong binding efficiencies. In conclusion, this network pharmacology-based investigation revealed that YHQFC may attenuate the inflammatory reaction of chronic bronchitis by regulating its candidate targets, which may be implicated in the major pathological processes of the asthma pathway. Keywords: traditional Chinese medicine, Yin–Huang–Qing–Fei capsule, chronic bronchitis, network pharmacology, asthma pathway

  15. Pathways for the OH + Br2 → HOBr + Br and HOBr + Br → HBr + BrO Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Qiu, Yudong; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-02-11

    The OH radical reaction with Br2 and the subsequent reaction HOBr + Br are of exceptional importance to atmospheric chemistry and environmental chemistry. The entrance complex, transition state, and exit complex for both reactions have been determined using the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations CCSD(T) with correlation consistent basis sets up to size cc-pV5Z and cc-pV5Z-PP. Coupled cluster effects with full triples (CCSDT) and full quadruples (CCSDTQ) are explicitly investigated. Scalar relativistic effects, spin-orbit coupling, and zero-point vibrational energy corrections are evaluated. The results from the all-electron basis sets are compared with those from the effective core potential (ECP) pseudopotential (PP) basis sets. The results are consistent. The OH + Br2 reaction is predicted to be exothermic 4.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol, compared to experiment, 3.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. The entrance complex HO···BrBr is bound by 2.2 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. The transition state lies similarly well below the reactants OH + Br2. The exit complex HOBr···Br is bound by 2.7 ± 0.6 kcal/mol relative to separated HOBr + Br. The endothermicity of the reaction HOBr + Br → HBr + BrO is 9.6 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, compared with experiment 8.7 ± 0.3 kcal/mol. For the more important reverse (exothermic) HBr + BrO reaction, the entrance complex BrO···HBr is bound by 1.8 ± 0.6 kcal/mol. The barrier for the HBr + BrO reaction is 6.8 ± 0.9 kcal/mol. The exit complex (Br···HOBr) for the HBr + BrO reaction is bound by 1.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol with respect to the products HOBr + Br.

  16. An Intramolecular Heck reaction that Prefers a 5-endo- to a 6-exo-trig Cyclization Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vital, Paulo; Norrby, Per-Ola; Tanner, David Ackland

    2006-01-01

    A regioselective aromatic Claisen rearrangement was used to prepare 17a, the precursor of triflate 17e. The intramolecular Heck reaction of 17e is promoted only by bidentate phosphine ligands, giving exclusively and in excellent yield 20, the product of a 5-endo-trig cyclization, despite the poss......A regioselective aromatic Claisen rearrangement was used to prepare 17a, the precursor of triflate 17e. The intramolecular Heck reaction of 17e is promoted only by bidentate phosphine ligands, giving exclusively and in excellent yield 20, the product of a 5-endo-trig cyclization, despite...

  17. Reactions of ferrate(VI) with iodide and hypoiodous acid: kinetics, pathways, and implications for the fate of iodine during water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaedon; von Gunten, Urs; Reckhow, David A; Allard, Sebastien; Lee, Yunho

    2018-06-01

    Oxidative treatment of iodide-containing waters can form iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs) that are more toxic than the regulated DBPs. To better understand the fate of iodine during water treatment with ferrate(VI), kinetics, products, and stoichiometries for the reactions of ferrate(VI) with iodide (I - ) and hypoiodous acid (HOI) were determined. Ferrate(VI) showed considerable reactivities to both I - and HOI with higher reactivities at lower pH. Interestingly, the reaction of ferrate(VI) with HOI ( k = 6.0×10 3 M -1 s -1 at pH 9) was much faster than with I - ( k = 5.6×10 M -1 s -1 at pH 9). The main reaction pathway during treatment of I - -containing waters was the oxidation of I - to HOI and its further oxidation to IO 3 - by ferrate(VI). However, for pH > 9, the HOI disproportionation catalyzed by ferrate(VI) became an additional transformation pathway forming I - and IO 3 - . The reduction of HOI by hydrogen peroxide ( k = 2.0×10 8 M -1 s -1 for the reaction, HOI + HO 2 - → I - + O 2 + 2H + ), the latter being produced from ferrate(VI) decomposition, also contributes to the I - regeneration in the pH range 9 - 11. A kinetic model was developed that could well simulate the fate of iodine in the ferrate(VI)-I - system. Overall, due to a rapid oxidation of I - to IO 3 - with short-lifetimes of HOI, ferrate(VI) oxidation appears to be a promising option for I-DBP mitigation during treatment of I - -containing waters.

  18. Protective Effects of Maillard Reaction Products of Whey Protein Concentrate against Oxidative Stress through an Nrf2-Dependent Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Min Cheol; Yang, Sung-Yong; Chun, Su-Hyun; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC), which contains α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, is utilized widely in the food industry. The Maillard reaction is a complex reaction that produces Maillard reaction products (MRPs), which are associated with the formation of antioxidant compounds. In this study, the hepatoprotection activity of MRPs of WPC against oxidative stress through the nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant pathway in HepG2 cells was examined. Glucose-whey protein concentrate conjugate (Glc-WPC) was obtained from Maillard reaction between WPC and glucose. The fluorescence intensity of Glc-WPC increased after 7 d compared to native WPC, and resulted in loss of 48% of the free amino groups of WPC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns of Glc-WPC showed the presence of a high-molecular-weight portion. Treatment of HepG2 cells with Glc-WPC increased cell viability in the presence of oxidative stress, inhibited the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), and increased the glutathione level. Nrf2 translocation and Nrf2, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H)-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NOQ1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutamate-L-cysteine ligase (GCL)M and GCLC mRNA levels were increased by Glc-WPC. Also, Glc-WPC increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The results of this study demonstrate that Glc-WPC activates the Nrf2-dependent pathway through the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK in HepG2 cells, and induces production of antioxidant enzymes and phase II enzymes.

  19. A Review of Pathway-Based Analysis Tools That Visualize Genetic Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Cirillo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pathway analysis is a powerful method for data analysis in genomics, most often applied to gene expression analysis. It is also promising for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data analysis, such as genome-wide association study data, because it allows the interpretation of variants with respect to the biological processes in which the affected genes and proteins are involved. Such analyses support an interactive evaluation of the possible effects of variations on function, regulation or interaction of gene products. Current pathway analysis software often does not support data visualization of variants in pathways as an alternate method to interpret genetic association results, and specific statistical methods for pathway analysis of SNP data are not combined with these visualization features. In this review, we first describe the visualization options of the tools that were identified by a literature review, in order to provide insight for improvements in this developing field. Tool evaluation was performed using a computational epistatic dataset of gene–gene interactions for obesity risk. Next, we report the necessity to include in these tools statistical methods designed for the pathway-based analysis with SNP data, expressly aiming to define features for more comprehensive pathway-based analysis tools. We conclude by recognizing that pathway analysis of genetic variations data requires a sophisticated combination of the most useful and informative visual aspects of the various tools evaluated.

  20. When Failure Is Not An Option: Designing Competency-Based Pathways for Next Generation Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgis, Chris; Patrick, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This exploration into competency-based innovation at the school, district, and state levels suggests that competency-based pathways are a re-engineering of this nation's education system around learning--a re-engineering designed for success in which failure is no longer an option. Competency-based approaches build upon standards reforms, offering…

  1. Use of ESI-MS to determine reaction pathway for hydrogen sulphide scavenging with 1,3,5-tri-(2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydro-s-triazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Henrik T; Søgaard, Erik G

    2012-01-01

    To study the reaction between hydrogen sulphide and 1,3,5-tri-(2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydro-s-triazine, which is an often used hydrogen sulphide scavenger, electro spray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used. The investigation was carried out in positive mode, and tandem mass spectrometry was used to investigate the nature of unknown peaks in the mass spectra. The reaction was found to proceed as expected from theory with the triazine reacting with hydrogen sulphide to form the corresponding thiadiazine. This species subsequently reacted with a second hydrogen sulphide molecule to form the dithiazine species, hereby confirming previously obtained results and showing the ability of the ESI-MS method for studying the scavenging reaction. The final theoretical product s-trithiane was not detected. Furthermore, fragmentation products of thiadiazine and dithiazine were detected in the solution, and possible pathways and structures were suggested to describe the observed fragments. In these, thiadiazine fragmented to 2-(methylidene amino)-ethanol and 2-(1,3-thiazetidin-3-yl)-ethanol and N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-(sulfanylmethyl)-ethaniminium, which underwent a further fragmentation to N-methyl-N-(2-oxoethyl)-methaniminium. Dithiazine fragmented to N-methyl-N-(2-oxoethyl)-methaniminium as well. The by-product from this reaction is methanedithiol, which was not detected due to its low polarity.

  2. Primary Metabolic Pathways and Metabolic Flux Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter introduces the metabolic flux analysis (MFA) or stoichiometry-based MFA, and describes the quantitative basis for MFA. It discusses the catabolic pathways in which free energy is produced to drive the cell-building anabolic pathways. An overview of these primary pathways provides...... the reader who is primarily trained in the engineering sciences with atleast a preliminary introduction to biochemistry and also shows how carbon is drained off the catabolic pathways to provide precursors for cell mass building and sometimes for important industrial products. The primary pathways...... to be examined in the following are: glycolysis, primarily by the EMP pathway, but other glycolytic pathways is also mentioned; fermentative pathways in which the redox generated in the glycolytic reactions are consumed; reactions in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which produce biomass precursors and redox...

  3. Data base for terrestrial food pathways dose commitment calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program is under development to allow calculation of the dose-to-man in Georgia and South Carolina from ingestion of radionuclides in terrestrial foods resulting from deposition of airborne radionuclides. This program is based on models described in Regulatory Guide 1.109 (USNRC, 1977). The data base describes the movement of radionuclides through the terrestrial food chain, growth and consumption factors for a variety of radionuclides

  4. BlenX-based compositional modeling of complex reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Zámborszky

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions are wired in a fascinating way resulting in complex behavior of biological systems. Theoretical modeling provides a useful framework for understanding the dynamics and the function of such networks. The complexity of the biological networks calls for conceptual tools that manage the combinatorial explosion of the set of possible interactions. A suitable conceptual tool to attack complexity is compositionality, already successfully used in the process algebra field to model computer systems. We rely on the BlenX programming language, originated by the beta-binders process calculus, to specify and simulate high-level descriptions of biological circuits. The Gillespie's stochastic framework of BlenX requires the decomposition of phenomenological functions into basic elementary reactions. Systematic unpacking of complex reaction mechanisms into BlenX templates is shown in this study. The estimation/derivation of missing parameters and the challenges emerging from compositional model building in stochastic process algebras are discussed. A biological example on circadian clock is presented as a case study of BlenX compositionality.

  5. Mining pathway associations for disease-related pathway activity analysis based on gene expression and methylation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeonjeong; Shin, Miyoung

    2017-01-01

    The problem of discovering genetic markers as disease signatures is of great significance for the successful diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of complex diseases. Even if many earlier studies worked on identifying disease markers from a variety of biological resources, they mostly focused on the markers of genes or gene-sets (i.e., pathways). However, these markers may not be enough to explain biological interactions between genetic variables that are related to diseases. Thus, in this study, our aim is to investigate distinctive associations among active pathways (i.e., pathway-sets) shown each in case and control samples which can be observed from gene expression and/or methylation data. The pathway-sets are obtained by identifying a set of associated pathways that are often active together over a significant number of class samples. For this purpose, gene expression or methylation profiles are first analyzed to identify significant (active) pathways via gene-set enrichment analysis. Then, regarding these active pathways, an association rule mining approach is applied to examine interesting pathway-sets in each class of samples (case or control). By doing so, the sets of associated pathways often working together in activity profiles are finally chosen as our distinctive signature of each class. The identified pathway-sets are aggregated into a pathway activity network (PAN), which facilitates the visualization of differential pathway associations between case and control samples. From our experiments with two publicly available datasets, we could find interesting PAN structures as the distinctive signatures of breast cancer and uterine leiomyoma cancer, respectively. Our pathway-set markers were shown to be superior or very comparable to other genetic markers (such as genes or gene-sets) in disease classification. Furthermore, the PAN structure, which can be constructed from the identified markers of pathway-sets, could provide deeper insights into

  6. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  7. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosyntetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  8. Influence of Ligand Architecture in Tuning Reaction Bifurcation Pathways for Chlorite Oxidation by Non-Heme Iron Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barman, Prasenjit; Faponle, Abayomi S; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Angelone, Davide; Löhr, Anna-Maria; Browne, Wesley R; Comba, Peter; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Reaction bifurcation processes are often encountered in the oxidation of substrates by enzymes and generally lead to a mixture of products. One particular bifurcation process that is common in biology relates to electron transfer versus oxygen atom transfer by high-valent iron(IV)-oxo complexes,

  9. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low energy nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, George H.; Shrestha, Prajakti J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews light water and hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) including the different methodologies used to study these reactions and the results obtained. Reports of excess heat production, transmutation reactions, and nuclear radiation emission are cited. An aim of this review is to present a summary of the present status of light water LENR research and provide some insight into where this research is heading. (author)

  10. Identifying novel glioma associated pathways based on systems biology level meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yangfan; Li, Jinquan; Yan, Wenying; Chen, Jiajia; Li, Yin; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2013-01-01

    With recent advances in microarray technology, including genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, it brings a great challenge for integrating this "-omics" data to analysis complex disease. Glioma is an extremely aggressive and lethal form of brain tumor, and thus the study of the molecule mechanism underlying glioma remains very important. To date, most studies focus on detecting the differentially expressed genes in glioma. However, the meta-analysis for pathway analysis based on multiple microarray datasets has not been systematically pursued. In this study, we therefore developed a systems biology based approach by integrating three types of omics data to identify common pathways in glioma. Firstly, the meta-analysis has been performed to study the overlapping of signatures at different levels based on the microarray gene expression data of glioma. Among these gene expression datasets, 12 pathways were found in GeneGO database that shared by four stages. Then, microRNA expression profiles and ChIP-seq data were integrated for the further pathway enrichment analysis. As a result, we suggest 5 of these pathways could be served as putative pathways in glioma. Among them, the pathway of TGF-beta-dependent induction of EMT via SMAD is of particular importance. Our results demonstrate that the meta-analysis based on systems biology level provide a more useful approach to study the molecule mechanism of complex disease. The integration of different types of omics data, including gene expression microarrays, microRNA and ChIP-seq data, suggest some common pathways correlated with glioma. These findings will offer useful potential candidates for targeted therapeutic intervention of glioma.

  11. Pathway Processor 2.0: a web resource for pathway-based analysis of high-throughput data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrame, Luca; Bianco, Luca; Fontana, Paolo; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2013-07-15

    Pathway Processor 2.0 is a web application designed to analyze high-throughput datasets, including but not limited to microarray and next-generation sequencing, using a pathway centric logic. In addition to well-established methods such as the Fisher's test and impact analysis, Pathway Processor 2.0 offers innovative methods that convert gene expression into pathway expression, leading to the identification of differentially regulated pathways in a dataset of choice. Pathway Processor 2.0 is available as a web service at http://compbiotoolbox.fmach.it/pathwayProcessor/. Sample datasets to test the functionality can be used directly from the application. duccio.cavalieri@fmach.it Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Theoretical investigation of the mechanism of tritiated methane dehydrogenation reaction using nickel-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Jiamao; Deng, Bing; Yang, Yong; Wang, Heyi [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Weiyi [School of Physics and Chemistry, Xihua University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Li, Shuo, E-mail: lishuo@cqut.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Tan, Zhaoyi, E-mail: tanzhaoyi@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Four-step dehydrogenation of CT{sub 4} catalyzed by Ni to form Ni–C by releasing T{sub 2}. • The process of Ni + CT{sub 4} → NiCT{sub 2} + T{sub 2} is more achievable than that of NiCT{sub 2} → NiC + T{sub 2}. • TNiCT → T{sub 2}NiC step is the RDS with the rate constant of k = 2.8 × 10{sup 13} exp(−313,136/RT). • The hydrogen isotope effect value of k{sub H}/k{sub T} is 2.94, and k{sub D}/k{sub T} is 1.39. • CH{sub 4} and CD{sub 4} dehydrogenations are likely to occur, accompanied by the CT{sub 4} cracking. - Abstract: The mechanism of tritiated methane dehydrogenation reaction catalyzed by nickel-based catalyst was investigated in detail by density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/[6-311++G(d, p), SDD] level. The computational results indicated that the dehydrogenation of tritiated methane is endothermic. The decomposition of tritiated methane catalyzed by Ni to form Ni-based carbon (Ni–C) after a four-step dehydrogenation companied with releasing tritium. After the first and second dehydrogenation steps, Ni + CT{sub 4} formed NiCT{sub 2}. After the third and fourth dehydrogenation steps, NiCT{sub 2} formed NiC. The first and second steps of dehydrogenation occurred on both the singlet and triplet states, and the lowest energy route is Ni + CT{sub 4} → {sup 1}COM → {sup 1}TS1 → {sup 3}IM1 → {sup 3}TS2 → {sup 3}IM2. The third and fourth steps of dehydrogenation occurred on both the singlet and quintet states, and the minimum energy reaction pathway appeared to be IM3 → {sup 1}TS4 → {sup 5}IM4 → {sup 5}TS5 → {sup 5}IM5 → {sup 5}pro + T{sub 2}. The fourth step of dehydrogenation TNiCT → T{sub 2}NiC was the rate-determining step of the entire reaction with the rate constant of k{sub 2} = 2.8 × 10{sup 13} exp(−313,136/RT) (in cm{sup 3} mol{sup −1} s{sup −1}), and its activation energy barrier was calculated to be 51.8 kcal/mol. The Ni-catalyzed CH{sub 4} and CD{sub 4} cracking

  13. Pathway-Based Kernel Boosting for the Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manitz, Juliane; Burger, Patricia; Amos, Christopher I.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Kneib, Thomas; Bickeböller, Heike

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) benefits from the investigation of biologically meaningful gene sets, such as gene-interaction networks (pathways). We propose an extension to a successful kernel-based pathway analysis approach by integrating kernel functions into a powerful algorithmic framework for variable selection, to enable investigation of multiple pathways simultaneously. We employ genetic similarity kernels from the logistic kernel machine test (LKMT) as base-learners in a boosting algorithm. A model to explain case-control status is created iteratively by selecting pathways that improve its prediction ability. We evaluated our method in simulation studies adopting 50 pathways for different sample sizes and genetic effect strengths. Additionally, we included an exemplary application of kernel boosting to a rheumatoid arthritis and a lung cancer dataset. Simulations indicate that kernel boosting outperforms the LKMT in certain genetic scenarios. Applications to GWAS data on rheumatoid arthritis and lung cancer resulted in sparse models which were based on pathways interpretable in a clinical sense. Kernel boosting is highly flexible in terms of considered variables and overcomes the problem of multiple testing. Additionally, it enables the prediction of clinical outcomes. Thus, kernel boosting constitutes a new, powerful tool in the analysis of GWAS data and towards the understanding of biological processes involved in disease susceptibility. PMID:28785300

  14. Pathway-Based Kernel Boosting for the Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichs, Stefanie; Manitz, Juliane; Burger, Patricia; Amos, Christopher I; Risch, Angela; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Kneib, Thomas; Bickeböller, Heike; Hofner, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) benefits from the investigation of biologically meaningful gene sets, such as gene-interaction networks (pathways). We propose an extension to a successful kernel-based pathway analysis approach by integrating kernel functions into a powerful algorithmic framework for variable selection, to enable investigation of multiple pathways simultaneously. We employ genetic similarity kernels from the logistic kernel machine test (LKMT) as base-learners in a boosting algorithm. A model to explain case-control status is created iteratively by selecting pathways that improve its prediction ability. We evaluated our method in simulation studies adopting 50 pathways for different sample sizes and genetic effect strengths. Additionally, we included an exemplary application of kernel boosting to a rheumatoid arthritis and a lung cancer dataset. Simulations indicate that kernel boosting outperforms the LKMT in certain genetic scenarios. Applications to GWAS data on rheumatoid arthritis and lung cancer resulted in sparse models which were based on pathways interpretable in a clinical sense. Kernel boosting is highly flexible in terms of considered variables and overcomes the problem of multiple testing. Additionally, it enables the prediction of clinical outcomes. Thus, kernel boosting constitutes a new, powerful tool in the analysis of GWAS data and towards the understanding of biological processes involved in disease susceptibility.

  15. Theoretical study of the oxidation mechanisms of naphthalene initiated by hydroxyl radicals: the O2 addition reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroudi, A; Deleuze, M S; Canneaux, S

    2015-05-28

    Atmospheric oxidation of the naphthalene-OH adduct [C10H8OH]˙ (R1) by molecular oxygen in its triplet electronic ground state has been studied using density functional theory along with the B3LYP, ωB97XD, UM05-2x and UM06-2x exchange-correlation functionals. From a thermodynamic viewpoint, the most favourable process is O2 addition at the C2 position in syn mode, followed by O2 addition at the C2 position in anti mode, O2 addition at the C4 position in syn mode, and O2 addition at the C4 position in anti mode, as the second, third and fourth most favourable processes. The syn modes of addition at these positions are thermodynamically favoured over the anti ones by the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and peroxy substituents. Analysis of the computed structures, bond orders and free energy profiles demonstrate that the reaction steps involved in the oxidation of the naphthalene-OH adduct by O2 satisfy Hammond's principle. Kinetic rate constants and branching ratios under atmospheric pressure and in the fall-off regime have been supplied, using transition state and RRKM theories. By comparison with experiment, these data confirm the relevance of a two-step reaction mechanism. Whatever the addition mode, O2 addition in C4 position is kinetically favoured over O2 addition in C2 position, in contrast with the expectations drawn from thermodynamics and reaction energies. Under a kinetic control of the reaction, and in line with the computed reaction energy barriers, the most efficient process is O2 addition at the C4 position in syn mode, followed by O2 addition at the C2 position in syn mode, O2 addition at the C4 position in anti mode, and O2 addition at the C2 position in anti mode as the second, third and fourth most rapid processes. The computed branching ratios also indicate that the regioselectivity of the reaction decreases with increasing temperatures and decreasing pressures.

  16. Pathways for the reaction of the butadiene radical cation, [C{sub 4}H{sub 6}]{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}+}, with ethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, M.; Schaefer, H.F. III

    1999-11-04

    The Diels-Alder (DA) reaction, a [4+2] cycloaddition used to build six membered rings, is one of the most valuable cycloadditions in organic chemistry. In cases where the ene does not add to the diene (even with the help of Lewis acids which may reduce the electron density of one reactant by complexation) one electron oxidation (by an oxidizing agent or by photoinduced electron transfer (PET)) may accelerate the reaction. Reaction pathways for the addition of ethylene, 1, to butadiene radical cation, 2, involving H-shifts have been investigated at the coupled cluster UCCSD(T)/DZP//UMP2(fc)/DZP + ZPE level of theory. Activation energies are relatively low for [1,2]- (10.0 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-4/20) and [1,5]-hydrogen shifts (7.7 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-4/26) but are relatively high for [1,4]-(33.8 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-4/14) and [1,3]-H shifts (e.g., 42.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-12/13; 57.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-16/21). Several rearrangement reactions have been found to occur below the energy limit of separated 1 + 2. The cyclopentenyl cation, [C{sub 5}{sub 7}]{sup +}, 18, experimentally observed as reaction product of the butadiene radical cation, 2, and ethylene, 1, in the gas phase may origin from various reaction pathways. The following reaction sequence has been identified as the lowest in energy path from 1 + 2 to 18 with all relative energies ({Delta}E{degree}) of transition structures below that of 1 + 2: (a) ethylene adds to the butadiene radical cation to form an open-chain distonic intermediate, that undergoes a [1,5]-H shift to the 1,4-hexadiene radical cation; (b) intramolecular [2+1] cycloaddition to methyl-cyclopenta-1,3-diyl intermediates, which can interconvert through a bicyclo[2.1.0]pentane radical cation; (c) [1,2]-H shift to the 3-methyl cyclopentene radical cation; (d) methyl radical loss to give cyclopenten-3-yl cation. Along this reaction pathway, {Delta}H{sup 298} is below that of 1 + 2; max. ({Delta}G{sup 298} by

  17. Kinetic modelling of Amadori N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-glycine degradation pathways. Part I - Reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    The fate of the Amadori compound N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG) was studied in aqueous model systems as a function of pH and temperature. The samples were heated at 100 and 120 °C with initial reaction pH of 5.5 and 6.8. Special attention was paid to the formation of the free amino acid,

  18. [Effects and mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction related to NASH and induced by activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Xiaomei; Li, Fuqiang; Tang, Cuilan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects and mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction related to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and induced by activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. A mouse model of NASH was established by feeding a high-fat and high-sugar diet.Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway was achieved by nicotine administration to the NASH modeled mice and normal controls. Liver biopsies were taken and the concentrations of cytokines were measured. Isolated liver primary Kupffer cells and RAw264.7 cells were cultured, pre-treated or not with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and exposed to nicotine, after which the supernatant concentrations of IL-6 and TNFa were determined by ELISA. The protein expression levels of phosphorylated (p)-NF-kB and I k B were detected in primary cultured Kupffer cells by western blotting. The mouse model of NASH was successfully established, as evidenced by findings from liver biopsy and serum liver function tests. The degree of liver inflammation in the NASH mice decreased after nicotine administration, and the level of serum TNFa also significantly decreased. The levels of serum TNFa were 21.95+/-0.8 pg/mL in nicotine-treated mice and 38.07+/-1.7 pg/mL in the non-nicotine-treated NASH mice (P less than 0.05). The nicotine treatment also significantly reduced the concentration of TNFa in the culture supernatants of Kupffer cells after LPS stimulation; moreover, the supernatant level of TNFa decreased significantly after the nicotine treatment (Pless than 0.05). LPS stimulation of the RAw264.7 cells led to an increased level ofp-NF-kB and a reduced level ofI-kB, suggesting that the NF-kB pathway had been activated; different doses of nicotine pre-treatment led to down-regulation of the p-NF-kB level and up-regulation of the I-kB level, both in dose-dependent manners. Activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway inhibits the NASH-related inflammatory reaction, and the mechanism for this inhibition

  19. Dissociation pathways of a single dimethyl disulfide on Cu(111): Reaction induced by simultaneous excitation of two vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motobayashi, Kenta, E-mail: kmotobayashi@cat.hokudai.ac.jp [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Kim, Yousoo [Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Arafune, Ryuichi [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Ohara, Michiaki; Ueba, Hiromu; Kawai, Maki, E-mail: maki@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-05-21

    We present a novel reaction mechanism for a single adsorbed molecule that proceeds via simultaneous excitation of two different vibrational modes excited by inelastic tunneling electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope. Specifically, we analyze the dissociation of a single dimethyl disulfide (DMDS, (CH{sub 3}S){sub 2}) molecule on Cu(111) by using a versatile theoretical method, which permits us to simulate reaction rates as a function of sample bias voltage. The reaction is induced by the excitation of C-H stretch and S-S stretch modes by a two-electron process at low positive bias voltages. However, at increased voltages, the dissociation becomes a single-electron process that excites a combination mode of these stretches, where excitation of the C-H stretch is the energy source and excitation of the S-S stretch mode enhances the anharmonic coupling rate. A much smaller dissociation yield (few orders of magnitude) at negative bias voltages is understood in terms of the projected density of states of a single DMDS on Cu(111), which reflects resonant excitation through the molecular orbitals.

  20. Proctalgia fugax, an evidence-based management pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyarajah, Santhini; Chow, Andre; Ziprin, Paul; Tilney, Henry; Purkayastha, Sanjay

    2010-09-01

    Proctalgia fugax (PF) is a benign anorectal condition which has been described in the literature since the nineteenth century commonly presenting to general surgeons. There is little high level evidence on the subject and its therapeutic modalities. We aimed through this systematic literature review to outline the definition and diagnostic criteria of this condition, the aetiology and differential diagnoses and describe the different treatment modalities that have been attempted and their success. A literature search of Google Scholar and Medline using Pubmed as the search engine was used to identify all studies directly related to the definition, aetiology and treatment options for this condition (latest at 12 August 2008) was performed. The search produced 61 references with three others obtained from the references of these papers. The prevalence of PF in the general population ranges from 4% to 18%. The diagnosis is based on the presence of characteristic symptoms as defined by Rome III guidelines and physical examination. The mainstay of treatment is reassurance and careful counselling with evidence in the literature for warm baths, topical treatment with glyceryl trinitrate or diltiazem and salbutamol inhalation. In persistent cases, local anaesthetic blocks, clonidine or Botox injections can be considered after clarification of risk and benefit. Based on this we suggest that diagnosis should be made through exclusion of common organic causes such as haemorrhoids, anal fissure or anorectal carcinoma and on the fulfillment of Rome III criteria. The main treatment for this benign condition remains reassurance and topical treatment.

  1. Generic Model-Based Tailor-Made Design and Analysis of Biphasic Reaction Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata

    systems have a broad range of application, such as the manufacture of petroleum based chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and agro-bio products. Major considerations in the design and analysis of biphasic reaction systems are physical and chemical equilibria, kinetic mechanisms, and reaction rates. The primary...... contribution of this thesis is the development of a systematic modelling framework for the biphasic reaction system. The developed framework consists of three modules describing phase equilibria, reactions and mass transfer, and material balances of such processes. Correlative and predictive thermodynamic......Biphasic reaction systems are composed of immiscible aqueous and organic liquid phases where reactants, products, and catalysts are partitioned. These biphasic conditions point to novel synthesis paths, higher yields, and faster reactions, as well as facilitate product separation. The biphasic...

  2. When Success Is the Only Option: Designing Competency-Based Pathways for Next Generation Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgis, Chris; Patrick, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This exploration into competency-based innovation at the school, district, and state levels suggests that competency-based pathways are a re-engineering of this nation's education system around learning--a re-engineering designed for success in which failure is no longer viable. This discussion draws on interviews and site visits with innovators…

  3. Comprehensive logic based analyses of Toll-like receptor 4 signal transduction pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kumar Padwal

    Full Text Available Among the 13 TLRs in the vertebrate systems, only TLR4 utilizes both Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR-domain-containing adapter interferon-β-inducing Factor (TRIF adaptors to transduce signals triggering host-protective immune responses. Earlier studies on the pathway combined various experimental data in the form of one comprehensive map of TLR signaling. But in the absence of adequate kinetic parameters quantitative mathematical models that reveal emerging systems level properties and dynamic inter-regulation among the kinases/phosphatases of the TLR4 network are not yet available. So, here we used reaction stoichiometry-based and parameter independent logical modeling formalism to build the TLR4 signaling network model that captured the feedback regulations, interdependencies between signaling kinases and phosphatases and the outcome of simulated infections. The analyses of the TLR4 signaling network revealed 360 feedback loops, 157 negative and 203 positive; of which, 334 loops had the phosphatase PP1 as an essential component. The network elements' interdependency (positive or negative dependencies in perturbation conditions such as the phosphatase knockout conditions revealed interdependencies between the dual-specific phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 and the kinases in MAPK modules and the role of PP2A in the auto-regulation of Calmodulin kinase-II. Our simulations under the specific kinase or phosphatase gene-deficiency or inhibition conditions corroborated with several previously reported experimental data. The simulations to mimic Yersinia pestis and E. coli infections identified the key perturbation in the network and potential drug targets. Thus, our analyses of TLR4 signaling highlights the role of phosphatases as key regulatory factors in determining the global interdependencies among the network elements; uncovers novel signaling connections; identifies potential drug targets for

  4. [Polyketone Reaction in Biosynthetic Pathways of 2, 3, 5, 4'-Tetrahydroxy Stilhene-2-O-β-D-glucoside in Polygonum multiflorum by Biocatalysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Xia, Wan-xia; Shao, Li; Zhao, Shu-jin

    2015-10-01

    2, 3, 5, 4'-Tetrahydroxy stilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (THSG), the active ingredient of Polygonum multiflorum, its polyketone reaction in the biosynthesis pathways was studied by biocatalysis method. The substrates 4-coumaroyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA were catalyzed in vitro by the crude enzyme extracted from Polygonum multiflorum callus, then the products were verified by HPLC and LC-MS methods. And the crude enzyme was analyzed by ammonium sulfate precipitation method and SDS-PAGE. HPLC chromatogram showed the same retention time of both the product and resveratrol standards; LC-MS spectra showed that the m/z of product was 227, which was consistent with resveratrol standards under the mode of negative ion; Ammonium sulfate (AS) precipitation method showed AS of 40% - 70% had catalytic activity,and 50% - 60% was the optimum; SDS-PAGE showed protein bands were obviously different among different AS concentration between 20% - 80%, the protein band of 42 kDa was found in AS of 50% - 60%, which had the same molecular weight with stilbene synthase. The product of polyketone reaction in the biosynthesis of THSG is resveratrol rather than THSG, so it is speculated that THSG is the conversion product of resveratrol instead of the direct product of the polyketone reaction.

  5. Electrochemistry of acid-base reactions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, J.P.; Devynck, J.; Tremillon, B.

    1975-01-01

    Electrochemical studies were made in following media: water-HF mixtures, anhydrous HF and KF solutions in HF, solutions of the SbF5 type in HF. The acidity level of these solutions was evaluated using the R(H) functions based on the strehlow hypotheses. From the pH measurement in anhydrous HF, it was possible to get acid-base titration curves and pH buffers. The behavior of quinones in anhydrous HF is presented [fr

  6. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and structurally related amines by chlorine dioxide: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; He, Yi-Liang; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a group of widely prescribed antibiotics and have been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven FQs (ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL), lomefloxacin (LOM), pipemidic acid (PIP) and flumequine (FLU)) and three structurally related amines (1-phenylpiperazine (PP), N-phenylmorpholine (PM) and 4-phenylpiperidine (PD)) toward chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) were investigated to elucidate the behavior of FQs during ClO(2) disinfection processes. The reaction kinetics are highly pH-dependent, can be well described by a second-order kinetic model incorporating speciation of FQs, and follow the trend of OFL > ENR > CIP ∼ NOR ∼ LOM > > PIP in reactivity. Comparison among FQs and related amines and product characterization indicate that FQs' piperazine ring is the primary reactive center toward ClO(2). ClO(2) likely attacks FQ's piperazinyl N4 atom followed by concerted fragmentation involving piperazinyl N1 atom, leading to dealkylation, hydroxylation and intramolecular ring closure at the piperazine moiety. While FQs with tertiary N4 react faster with ClO(2) than FQs with secondary N4, the overall reactivity of the piperazine moiety also depends strongly on the quinolone ring through electronic effects. The reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to model the decay of CIP by ClO(2) in surface water samples, but overestimate the decay in wastewater samples. Overall, transformation of FQs, particularly for those with tertiary N4 amines, could be expected under typical ClO(2) disinfection conditions. However, the transformation may not eliminate antibacterial activity because of little destruction at the quinolone ring. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MicroRNA-124-3p expression and its prospective functional pathways in hepatocellular carcinoma: A quantitative polymerase chain reaction, gene expression omnibus and bioinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Quan; Yang, Xia; Liang, Liang; Chen, Gang; Ma, Jie

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed to explore the potential clinical significance of microRNA (miR)-124-3p expression in the hepatocarcinogenesis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as well as the potential target genes of functional HCC pathways. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to evaluate the expression of miR-124-3p in 101 HCC and adjacent non-cancerous tissue samples. Additionally, the association between miR-124-3p expression and clinical parameters was also analyzed. Differentially expressed genes identified following miR-124-3p transfection, the prospective target genes predicted in silico and the key genes of HCC obtained from Natural Language Processing (NLP) were integrated to obtain potential target genes of miR-124-3p in HCC. Relevant signaling pathways were assessed with protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Protein Annotation Through Evolutionary Relationships (PANTHER) pathway enrichment analysis. miR-124-3p expression was significantly reduced in HCC tissues compared with expression in adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. In HCC, miR-124-3p was demonstrated to be associated with clinical stage. The mean survival time of the low miR-124-3p expression group was reduced compared with that of the high expression group. A total of 132 genes overlapped from differentially expressed genes, miR-124-3p predicted target genes and NLP identified genes. PPI network construction revealed a total of 109 nodes and 386 edges, and 20 key genes were identified. The major enriched terms of three GO categories included regulation of cell proliferation, positive regulation of cellular biosynthetic processes, cell leading edge, cytosol and cell projection, protein kinase activity, transcription activator activity and enzyme binding. KEGG analysis revealed pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and non-small cell lung cancer as the

  8. Potential pyrolysis pathway assessment for microalgae-based aviation fuel based on energy conversion efficiency and life cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Fang; Wang, Xin; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • High lipid content in microalgae increases energy conversion efficiency. • Indirect pathway has the highest mass ratio, energy ratio and energy efficiency. • The Isochrysis indirect pathway produces most kerosene component precursor. • The Isochrysis indirect pyrolysis pathway shows the best performance in LCA. - Abstract: Although the research of microalgae pyrolysis has been conducted for many years, there is a lack of investigations on energy efficiency and life cycle assessment. In this study, we investigated the biocrude yield and energy efficiency of direct pyrolysis, microalgae residue pyrolysis after lipid extraction (indirect pyrolysis), and different microalgae co-pyrolysis. This research also investigated the life cycle assessment of the three different pyrolysis pathways. A system boundary of Well-to-Wake (WTWa) was defined and included sub-process models, such as feedstock production, fuel production and pump-to-wheels (PTW) stages. The pathway of Isochrysis indirect pyrolysis shows the best performance in the mass ratio and energy ratio, produces the most kerosene component precursor, has the lowest WTWa total energy input, fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, and resultes in the best energy efficiency. All the evidence indicates that Isochrysis R2 pathway is a potential and optimal pyrolysis pathway to liquid biofuels. The mass ratio of pyrolysis biocrude is shown to be the decisive factor for different microalgae species. The sensitivity analysis results also indicates that the life cycle indicators are particularly sensitive to the mass ratio of pyrolysis biocrude for microalgae-based hydrotreated pyrolysis aviation fuel.

  9. Structures and reaction pathways of the molybdenum centres of sulfite-oxidizing enzymes by pulsed EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enemark, John H; Astashkin, Andrei V; Raitsimring, Arnold M

    2008-12-01

    SOEs (sulfite-oxidizing enzymes) are physiologically vital and occur in all forms of life. During the catalytic cycle, the five-co-ordinate square pyramidal oxo-molybdenum active site passes through the Mo(V) state, and intimate details of the structure can be obtained from variable frequency pulsed EPR spectroscopy through the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interactions of nearby magnetic nuclei. By employing variable spectrometer operational frequencies, it is possible to optimize the measurement conditions for difficult quadrupolar nuclei of interest (e.g. (17)O, (33)S, (35)Cl and (37)Cl) and to simplify the interpretation of the spectra. Isotopically labelled model Mo(V) compounds provide further insight into the electronic and geometric structures and chemical reactions of the enzymes. Recently, blocked forms of SOEs having co-ordinated sulfate, the reaction product, were detected using (33)S (I=3/2) labelling. This blocking of product release is a possible contributor to fatal human sulfite oxidase deficiency in young children.

  10. Constraint-based modeling and kinetic analysis of the Smad dependent TGF-beta signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhike Zi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigation of dynamics and regulation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway is central to the understanding of complex cellular processes such as growth, apoptosis, and differentiation. In this study, we aim at using systems biology approach to provide dynamic analysis on this pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We proposed a constraint-based modeling method to build a comprehensive mathematical model for the Smad dependent TGF-beta signaling pathway by fitting the experimental data and incorporating the qualitative constraints from the experimental analysis. The performance of the model generated by constraint-based modeling method is significantly improved compared to the model obtained by only fitting the quantitative data. The model agrees well with the experimental analysis of TGF-beta pathway, such as the time course of nuclear phosphorylated Smad, the subcellular location of Smad and signal response of Smad phosphorylation to different doses of TGF-beta. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The simulation results indicate that the signal response to TGF-beta is regulated by the balance between clathrin dependent endocytosis and non-clathrin mediated endocytosis. This model is useful to be built upon as new precise experimental data are emerging. The constraint-based modeling method can also be applied to quantitative modeling of other signaling pathways.

  11. Structure-reactivity modeling using mixture-based representation of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Pavel; Madzhidov, Timur; Gimadiev, Timur; Bodrov, Andrey; Nugmanov, Ramil; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-09-01

    We describe a novel approach of reaction representation as a combination of two mixtures: a mixture of reactants and a mixture of products. In turn, each mixture can be encoded using an earlier reported approach involving simplex descriptors (SiRMS). The feature vector representing these two mixtures results from either concatenated product and reactant descriptors or the difference between descriptors of products and reactants. This reaction representation doesn't need an explicit labeling of a reaction center. The rigorous "product-out" cross-validation (CV) strategy has been suggested. Unlike the naïve "reaction-out" CV approach based on a random selection of items, the proposed one provides with more realistic estimation of prediction accuracy for reactions resulting in novel products. The new methodology has been applied to model rate constants of E2 reactions. It has been demonstrated that the use of the fragment control domain applicability approach significantly increases prediction accuracy of the models. The models obtained with new "mixture" approach performed better than those required either explicit (Condensed Graph of Reaction) or implicit (reaction fingerprints) reaction center labeling.

  12. Use of chemistry software to teach and assess model-based reaction and equation knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Pyatt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the challenges students face when learning chemical reactions in a first-year chemistry course and the effectiveness of a curriculum and software implementation that was used to teach and assess student understanding of chemical reactions and equations. This study took place over a two year period in a public suburban high-school, in southwestern USA. Two advanced placement (AP chemistry classes participated, referred to here as study group A (year 1, N = 14; and study group B (year 2, N = 21. The curriculum for a first-year chemistry course (group A was revised to include instruction on reaction-types. The second year of the study involved the creation and implementation of a software solution which promoted mastery learning of reaction-types. Students in both groups benefited from the reaction-type curriculum and achieved proficiency in chemical reactions and equations.  The findings suggest there was an added learning benefit to using the reaction-type software solution. This study also found that reaction knowledge was a moderate to strong predictor of chemistry achievement. Based on regression analysis, reaction knowledge significantly predicted chemistry achievement for both groups.

  13. Chemical reactions on platinum-group metal surfaces studied by synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Ikuyo; Nagasaka, Masanari; Amemiya, Kenta; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A new version of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray spectroscopy, wave-length-dispersive near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (dispersive-NEXAFS), and fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been applied to mechanistic studies on several surface catalytic reactions on platinum-group-metal surfaces. In this review, our approach using above techniques to understand the reaction mechanism and actual application studies on three well-known catalytic surface reactions, CO oxidation on Pt(111) and Pd(111), NO reduction on Rh(111), and H 2 O formation on Pt(111), are introduced. Spectroscopic monitoring of the progress of the surface reactions enabled us to detect reaction intermediates and analyze the reaction kinetics quantitatively which provides information on reaction order, rate constant, pre-exponential factor, activation energy and etc. Such quantitative analyses combined with scanning tunneling microscopy and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant contribution of the adsorbate configurations and their dynamic changes to the reaction mechanisms of the above fundamental catalytic surface reactions. (author)

  14. Degradation of γ-HCH spiked soil using stabilized Pd/Fe0 bimetallic nanoparticles: Pathways, kinetics and effect of reaction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ritu; Misra, Virendra; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Singh, Rana Pratap

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study explores the potential of CMC-Pd/nFe 0 to degrade γ-HCH in spiked soil. ► Sorption–desorption characteristics and partitioning of γ-HCH is investigated. ► Three degradation pathways has been proposed and discussed. ► γ-HCH degradation mechanism and kinetics is elucidated. ► Activation energy reveals that γ-HCH degradation is a surface mediated reaction. - Abstract: This study investigates the degradation pathway of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) in spiked soil using carboxymethyl cellulose stabilized Pd/Fe 0 bimetallic nanoparticles (CMC-Pd/nFe 0 ). GC–MS analysis of γ-HCH degradation products showed the formation of pentachlorocyclohexene, tri- and di-chlorobenzene as intermediate products while benzene was formed as the most stable end product. On the basis of identified intermediates and final products, degradation pathway of γ-HCH has been proposed. Batch studies showed complete γ-HCH degradation at a loading of 0.20 g/L CMC-Pd/nFe 0 within 6 h of incubation. The surface area normalized rate constant (k SA ) was found to be 7.6 × 10 −2 L min −1 m −2 . CMC-Pd/nFe 0 displayed ∼7-fold greater efficiency for γ-HCH degradation in comparison to Fe 0 nanoparticles (nFe 0 ), synthesized without CMC and Pd. Further studies showed that increase in CMC-Pd/nFe 0 loading and reaction temperature facilitates γ-HCH degradation, whereas a declining trend in degradation was noticed with the increase in pH, initial γ-HCH concentration and in the presence of cations. The data on activation energy (33.7 kJ/mol) suggests that γ-HCH degradation is a surface mediated reaction. The significance of the study with respect to remediation of γ-HCH contaminated soil using CMC-Pd/nFe 0 has been discussed.

  15. 55 cases of allergic reactions to hair dye: a descriptive, consumer complaint-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søsted, H; Agner, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2002-01-01

    themselves, and adverse reactions to hair dye may not necessarily be recorded by the health care system, unless the reactions are especially severe. Based on this assumption, we suspected that hair dye dermatitis was occurring more frequently than reported in the literature. Consumer complaint-based data......Severe facial and scalp dermatitis following the use of permanent hair dyes has been reported in several cases. Para-phenylenediamine (PPD) is known as a potent contact allergen, and PPD is allowed in hair dye at a concentration of 6%. Hair dye reactions are usually diagnosed by the patients...

  16. A simple thermometric technique for reaction-rate determination of inorganic species, based on the iodide-catalysed cerium(IV)-arsenic(III) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, F; Forteza, R; March, J G; Cerda, V

    1985-02-01

    A very simple reaction-rate thermometric technique is used for determination of iodide (5-20 ng ml ), based on its catalytic action on the cerium(IV)-arsenic(III) reaction, and for determination of mercury(II) (1.5-10 ng ml ) and silver(I) (2-10 ng ml ), based on their inhibitory effect on this reaction. The reaction is followed by measuring the rate of temperature increase. The method suffers from very few interferences and is applied to determination of iodide in biological and inorganic samples, and Hg(II) and Ag(I) in pharmaceutical products.

  17. Palladium-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reaction in DEFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, L.P.R. de; Elsheikh, A.; Silva, E. L. da; Radtke, C.; Amico, S.C.; Malfatti, C.F.

    2014-01-01

    Direct ethanol fuel cells require the use of electrocatalysts to promote bond cleavage of the ethanol molecule in an efficient way. Currently, most electrocatalysts contain platinum, which enables improved catalytic activity and stability in acidic media. However platinum presents high cost and low availability. Based on that, novel catalysts have been developed, such as those based on palladium and its alloys, which have attained excellent results in the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline media. In this work, Pd, PdSn and PdNiSn catalysts supported on Vulcan XC72R carbon were synthesized via impregnation/reduction. The electrocatalysts were characterized by RBS, XRD and cyclic voltammetry. The X-ray diffraction results showed the formation of an alloy and not the deposition of isolated elements. The synthesized catalysts displayed good catalytic activity, as observed by cyclic voltammetry, being the best electrochemical performance achieved by the ternary alloy. (author)

  18. Modality-Based Organization of Ascending Somatosensory Axons in the Direct Dorsal Column Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jingwen; Ding, Long; Li, Jian J.; Kim, Hyukmin; Liu, Jiakun; Li, Haipeng; Moberly, Andrew; Badea, Tudor C.; Duncan, Ian D.; Son, Young-Jin; Scherer, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    The long-standing doctrine regarding the functional organization of the direct dorsal column (DDC) pathway is the “somatotopic map” model, which suggests that somatosensory afferents are primarily organized by receptive field instead of modality. Using modality-specific genetic tracing, here we show that ascending mechanosensory and proprioceptive axons, two main types of the DDC afferents, are largely segregated into a medial–lateral pattern in the mouse dorsal column and medulla. In addition, we found that this modality-based organization is likely to be conserved in other mammalian species, including human. Furthermore, we identified key morphological differences between these two types of afferents, which explains how modality segregation is formed and why a rough “somatotopic map” was previously detected. Collectively, our results establish a new functional organization model for the mammalian direct dorsal column pathway and provide insight into how somatotopic and modality-based organization coexist in the central somatosensory pathway. PMID:24198362

  19. Coprecipitation of {sup 14}C and Sr with carbonate precipitates: The importance of reaction kinetics and recrystallization pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodkin, David J. [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Stewart, Douglas I. [School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Graham, James T. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Burke, Ian T., E-mail: I.T.Burke@leeds.ac.uk [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated the simultaneous removal of Sr{sup 2+} and {sup 14}CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} from pH > 12 Ca(OH){sub 2} solution by the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Initial Ca{sup 2+}:CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} ratios ranged from 10:1 to 10:100 (mM:mM). Maximum removal of {sup 14}C and Sr{sup 2+} both occurred in the system containing 10 mM Ca{sup 2+} and 1 mM CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} (99.7% and 98.6% removal respectively). A kinetic model is provided that describes {sup 14}C and Sr removal in terms of mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions. The removal of {sup 14}C was achieved during the depletion of the initial TIC in solution, and was subsequently significantly affected by recrystallization of the calcite precipitate from an elongate to isotropic morphology. This liberated > 46% of the {sup 14}C back to solution. Sr{sup 2+} removal occurred as Ca{sup 2+} became depleted in solution and was not significantly affected by the recrystallization process. The proposed reaction could form the basis for low cost remediation scheme for {sup 90}Sr and {sup 14}C in radioactively contaminated waters (<$0.25 reagent cost per m{sup 3} treated). - Highlights: • 99.7% of {sup 14}C and 98.6% of Sr removed from aqueous solution by CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. • Remobilization of {sup 14}C observed during calcium carbonate recrystallization. • Sr displayed variable distribution coefficient (possibly affected by Ca:Sr ratio). • Reagent cost of $0.22/m{sup 3} of treated groundwater.

  20. A study of fundamental reaction pathways for transition metal alkyl complexes. I. The reaction of a nickel methyl complex with alkynes. Ii. The mechanism of aldehyde formation in the reaction of a molybdenum hydride with molybdenum alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, John Mitchell [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1980-06-12

    I. This study reports the rapid reaction under mild conditions of internal or terminal alkynes with methyl (acetyl-acetonato) (triphenylphosphine) nickel (1) in either aromatic or ether solvents. In all cases vinylnickel products 2 are formed by insertion of the alkyne into the nickel=methyl bond. These complexes may be converted into a variety of organic products (e.g. alkenes, esters, vinyl halides) by treatment with appropriate reagents. Unsymmetrical alkynes give selectively the one regioisomer with the sterically largest substituent next to the nickel atom. In order to investigate the stereochemistry of the initial insertion, a x-ray diffraction study of the reaction of 1 with diphenylacetylene was carried out. This showed that the vinylnickel complex formed by overall trans insertion was the product of the reaction. Furthermore, subsequent slow isomerization of this complex, to a mixture of it and the corresponding cis isomer, demonstrated that this trans addition product is the kinetic product of the reaction. In studies with other alkynes, the product of trans addition was not always exclusively (or even predominantly) formed, but the ratio of the stereoisomers formed kinetically was substantially different from the thermodynamic ratio. Isotope labeling, added phosphine, and other experiments have allowed us to conclude that the mechanism of this reaction does involve initial cis addition. However, a coordinatively unsaturated vinylnickel complex is initially formed which can undergo rapid, phosphine-catalyzed cis-trans isomerization in competition with its conversion to the isolable phosphine-substituted kinetic reaction products. II. The reaction of CpMo(CO)3H (1a) with CpMo(CO)3R (2, R= CH3, C2H5) at 50°C in THF gives the aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO)3]2 (3a) and [CpMo(CO)2]2 (4a). Labeling one of the reactants with a methylcyclopentadienyl ligand

  1. SNP-based pathway enrichment analysis for genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potkin Steven G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently we have witnessed a surge of interest in using genome-wide association studies (GWAS to discover the genetic basis of complex diseases. Many genetic variations, mostly in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, have been identified in a wide spectrum of diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and psychiatric diseases. A common theme arising from these studies is that the genetic variations discovered by GWAS can only explain a small fraction of the genetic risks associated with the complex diseases. New strategies and statistical approaches are needed to address this lack of explanation. One such approach is the pathway analysis, which considers the genetic variations underlying a biological pathway, rather than separately as in the traditional GWAS studies. A critical challenge in the pathway analysis is how to combine evidences of association over multiple SNPs within a gene and multiple genes within a pathway. Most current methods choose the most significant SNP from each gene as a representative, ignoring the joint action of multiple SNPs within a gene. This approach leads to preferential identification of genes with a greater number of SNPs. Results We describe a SNP-based pathway enrichment method for GWAS studies. The method consists of the following two main steps: 1 for a given pathway, using an adaptive truncated product statistic to identify all representative (potentially more than one SNPs of each gene, calculating the average number of representative SNPs for the genes, then re-selecting the representative SNPs of genes in the pathway based on this number; and 2 ranking all selected SNPs by the significance of their statistical association with a trait of interest, and testing if the set of SNPs from a particular pathway is significantly enriched with high ranks using a weighted Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We applied our method to two large genetically distinct GWAS data sets of schizophrenia, one

  2. TLR4-HMGB1 signaling pathway affects the inflammatory reaction of autoimmune myositis by regulating MHC-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zemin; Zhang, Xiujuan; Peng, Anping; He, Min; Lei, Zhenhua; Wang, Yunxiu

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the effects of TLR4 on the expression of the HMGB1, MHC-I and downstream cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, and to investigate the biological role of the TLR4-HMGB1 signaling pathway in the development of the autoimmune myositis. We built mice models with experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM) and used the inverted screen experiment to measure their muscle endurance; we also examined inflammatory infiltration of muscle tissues after HE staining; and we assessed the expression of MHC-I using immunohistochemistry. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were extracted and flow cytometry was utilized to detect the effect of IFN-γ on the expression of MHC-I. Furthermore, PBMCs were treated with IFN-γ, anti-TLR4, anti-HMGB1 and anti-MHC-I. Real-time PCR and western blotting were employed to examine the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1 and MHC-I in different groups. The ELISA method was also utilized to detect the expression of the downstream cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. The expressions of TLR4, HMGB1 and MHC-I in muscle tissues from mice with EAM were significantly higher than those in the control group (all Pmyositis inflammation by regulating the expression of MHC-I and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Proton exchange in acid–base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Proton exchange in acid–base complexes is studied. ► The structures, binding energies, and normal mode vibrations are calculated. ► Transition state structures of proton exchange mechanism are determined. ► In the complexes studied, the reaction coordinate involves heavy atom rocking. ► The reaction coordinate is not simply localized in the proton movements. - Abstract: We extend previous work on nitric acid–ammonia and nitric acid–alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid–strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are −1 . This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm −1 . Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  4. Fatal anaphylactic reaction to intravenous gadobutrol, a gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Franckenberg, MD

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the rare case of a fatal anaphylactic reaction to gadobutrol, a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, in a 42-year-old man. The patient underwent elective magnetic resonance imaging for diagnostic clarification of a suspicious finding in the abdomen. The patient had undergone contrast-enhanced computed tomography previously without the occurrence of any adverse effects. Adverse drug reactions in gadobutrol have a very low prevalence of 0.32%-3.5%, with serious adverse drug reactions in <0.1%. There are only a few cases of fatal anaphylactoid reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents in general. However, if an anaphylactoid reaction occurs, it can present itself with a fulminant course within minutes.

  5. Ultrasonic and densimetric titration applied for acid-base reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakowski, Andrzej; Gliński, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Classical acoustic acid-base titration was monitored using sound speed and density measurements. Plots of these parameters, as well as of the adiabatic compressibility coefficient calculated from them, exhibit changes with the volume of added titrant. Compressibility changes can be explained and quantitatively predicted theoretically in terms of Pasynski theory of non-compressible hydrates combined with that of the additivity of the hydration numbers with the amount and type of ions and molecules present in solution. It also seems that this development could be applied in chemical engineering for monitoring the course of chemical processes, since the applied experimental methods can be carried out almost independently on the medium under test (harmful, aggressive, etc.).

  6. PhreeqcRM: A reaction module for transport simulators based on the geochemical model PHREEQC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Wissmeier, Laurin

    2015-01-01

    PhreeqcRM is a geochemical reaction module designed specifically to perform equilibrium and kinetic reaction calculations for reactive transport simulators that use an operator-splitting approach. The basic function of the reaction module is to take component concentrations from the model cells of the transport simulator, run geochemical reactions, and return updated component concentrations to the transport simulator. If multicomponent diffusion is modeled (e.g., Nernst–Planck equation), then aqueous species concentrations can be used instead of component concentrations. The reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of the reaction capabilities of PHREEQC. In each cell, the reaction module maintains the composition of all of the reactants, which may include minerals, exchangers, surface complexers, gas phases, solid solutions, and user-defined kinetic reactants.PhreeqcRM assigns initial and boundary conditions for model cells based on standard PHREEQC input definitions (files or strings) of chemical compositions of solutions and reactants. Additional PhreeqcRM capabilities include methods to eliminate reaction calculations for inactive parts of a model domain, transfer concentrations and other model properties, and retrieve selected results. The module demonstrates good scalability for parallel processing by using multiprocessing with MPI (message passing interface) on distributed memory systems, and limited scalability using multithreading with OpenMP on shared memory systems. PhreeqcRM is written in C++, but interfaces allow methods to be called from C or Fortran. By using the PhreeqcRM reaction module, an existing multicomponent transport simulator can be extended to simulate a wide range of geochemical reactions. Results of the implementation of PhreeqcRM as the reaction engine for transport simulators PHAST and FEFLOW are shown by using an analytical solution and the reactive transport benchmark of MoMaS.

  7. Creating a Structured Adverse Outcome Pathway Knowledgebase via Ontology-Based Annotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is increasingly used to integrate data based on traditional and emerging toxicity testing paradigms. As the number of AOP descriptions has increased, so has the need to define the AOP in computable terms. Herein, we present a comprehens...

  8. Differences between Drug-Induced and Contrast Media-Induced Adverse Reactions Based on Spontaneously Reported Adverse Drug Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, JiHyeon; Lee, HeeYoung; Suh, JinUk; Yang, MyungSuk; Kang, WonKu; Kim, EunYoung

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed differences between spontaneously reported drug-induced (not including contrast media) and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Adverse drug reactions reported by an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center (St. Mary's teaching hospital, Daejeon, Korea) from 2010-2012 were classified as drug-induced or contrast media-induced. Clinical patterns, frequency, causality, severity, Schumock and Thornton's preventability, and type A/B reactions were recorded. The trends among causality tools measuring drug and contrast-induced adverse reactions were analyzed. Of 1,335 reports, 636 drug-induced and contrast media-induced adverse reactions were identified. The prevalence of spontaneously reported adverse drug reaction-related admissions revealed a suspected adverse drug reaction-reporting rate of 20.9/100,000 (inpatient, 0.021%) and 3.9/100,000 (outpatients, 0.004%). The most common adverse drug reaction-associated drug classes included nervous system agents and anti-infectives. Dermatological and gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions were most frequently and similarly reported between drug and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Compared to contrast media-induced adverse reactions, drug-induced adverse reactions were milder, more likely to be preventable (9.8% vs. 1.1%, p contrast media-induced adverse reactions (56.6%, p = 0.066). Causality patterns differed between the two adverse reaction classes. The World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality evaluation and Naranjo algorithm results significantly differed from those of the Korean algorithm version II (p contrast media-induced adverse reactions. The World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre and Naranjo algorithm causality evaluation afforded similar results.

  9. Novel pathway of SO2 oxidation in the atmosphere: reactions with monoterpene ozonolysis intermediates and secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianhuai; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2018-04-01

    Ozonolysis of monoterpenes is an important source of atmospheric biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA). While enhanced BSOA formation has been associated with sulfate-rich conditions, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work, the interactions between SO2 and reactive intermediates from monoterpene ozonolysis were investigated under different humidity conditions (10 % vs. 50 %). Chamber experiments were conducted with ozonolysis of α-pinene or limonene in the presence of SO2. Limonene SOA formation was enhanced in the presence of SO2, while no significant changes in SOA yields were observed during α-pinene ozonolysis. Under dry conditions, SO2 primarily reacted with stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) produced from ozonolysis, but at 50 % RH heterogeneous uptake of SO2 onto organic aerosol was found to be the dominant sink of SO2, likely owing to reactions between SO2 and organic peroxides. This SO2 loss mechanism to organic peroxides in SOA has not previously been identified in experimental chamber studies. Organosulfates were detected and identified using an electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-IMS-TOF) when SO2 was present in the experiments. Our results demonstrate the synergistic effects between BSOA formation and SO2 oxidation through sCI chemistry and SO2 uptake onto organic aerosol and illustrate the importance of considering the chemistry of organic and sulfur-containing compounds holistically to properly account for their reactive sinks.

  10. Degradation of a cationic dye (Rhodamine 6G) using hydrodynamic cavitation coupled with other oxidative agents: Reaction mechanism and pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajoriya, Sunil; Bargole, Swapnil; Saharan, Virendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, decolorization and mineralization of a cationic dye, Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G), has been carried out using hydrodynamic cavitation (HC). Two cavitating devices such as slit and circular venturi were used to generate cavitation in HC reactor. The process parameters such as initial dye concentration, solution pH, operating inlet pressure, and cavitation number were investigated in detail to evaluate their effects on the decolorization efficiency of Rh6G. Decolorization of Rh6G was marginally higher in the case of slit venturi as compared to circular venturi. The kinetic study showed that decolorization and mineralization of the dye fitted first-order kinetics. The loadings of H 2 O 2 and ozone have been optimized to intensify the decolorization and mineralization efficiency of Rh6G using HC. Nearly 54% decolorization of Rh6G was obtained using a combination of HC and H 2 O 2 at a dye to H 2 O 2 molar ratio of 1:30. The combination of HC with ozone resulted in 100% decolorization in almost 5-10min of processing time depending upon the initial dye concentration. To quantify the extent of mineralization, total organic carbon (TOC) analysis was also performed using various processes and almost 84% TOC removal was obtained using HC coupled with 3g/h of ozone. The degradation by-products formed during the complete degradation process were qualitatively identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and a detailed degradation pathway has been proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton reactions catalyzed by iron-based materials: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Yang, Xiaofang; Men, Bin; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous Fenton reaction can generate highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH) from reactions between recyclable solid catalysts and H2O2 at acidic or even circumneutral pH. Hence, it can effectively oxidize refractory organics in water or soils and has become a promising environmentally friendly treatment technology. Due to the complex reaction system, the mechanism behind heterogeneous Fenton reactions remains unresolved but fascinating, and is crucial for understanding Fenton chemistry and the development and application of efficient heterogeneous Fenton technologies. Iron-based materials usually possess high catalytic activity, low cost, negligible toxicity and easy recovery, and are a superior type of heterogeneous Fenton catalysts. Therefore, this article reviews the fundamental but important interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton reactions catalyzed by iron-based materials. OH, hydroperoxyl radicals/superoxide anions (HO2/O2(-)) and high-valent iron are the three main types of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with different oxidation reactivity and selectivity. Based on the mechanisms of ROS generation, the interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton systems can be classified as the homogeneous Fenton mechanism induced by surface-leached iron, the heterogeneous catalysis mechanism, and the heterogeneous reaction-induced homogeneous mechanism. Different heterogeneous Fenton systems catalyzed by characteristic iron-based materials are comprehensively reviewed. Finally, related future research directions are also suggested. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Electrophysiological Correlates of Changes in Reaction Time Based on Stimulus Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Bimal; Vette, Albert H.; Mansfield, Avril; Miyasike-daSilva, Veronica; McIlroy, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although reaction time is commonly used as an indicator of central nervous system integrity, little is currently understood about the mechanisms that determine processing time. In the current study, we are interested in determining the differences in electrophysiological events associated with significant changes in reaction time that could be elicited by changes in stimulus intensity. The primary objective is to assess the effect of increasing stimulus intensity on the latency and amplitude of afferent inputs to the somatosensory cortex, and their relation to reaction time. Methods Median nerve stimulation was applied to the non-dominant hand of 12 healthy young adults at two different stimulus intensities (HIGH & LOW). Participants were asked to either press a button as fast as possible with their dominant hand or remain quiet following the stimulus. Electroencephalography was used to measure somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and event related potentials (ERPs). Electromyography from the flexor digitorum superficialis of the button-pressing hand was used to assess reaction time. Response time was the time of button press. Results Reaction time and response time were significantly shorter following the HIGH intensity stimulus compared to the LOW intensity stimulus. There were no differences in SEP (N20 & P24) peak latencies and peak-to-peak amplitude for the two stimulus intensities. ERPs, locked to response time, demonstrated a significantly larger pre-movement negativity to positivity following the HIGH intensity stimulus over the Cz electrode. Discussion This work demonstrates that rapid reaction times are not attributable to the latency of afferent processing from the stimulated site to the somatosensory cortex, and those latency reductions occur further along the sensorimotor transformation pathway. Evidence from ERPs indicates that frontal planning areas such as the supplementary motor area may play a role in transforming the elevated sensory

  13. Glider-based computing in reaction-diffusion hexagonal cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Wuensche, Andrew; De Lacy Costello, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    A three-state hexagonal cellular automaton, discovered in [Wuensche A. Glider dynamics in 3-value hexagonal cellular automata: the beehive rule. Int J Unconvention Comput, in press], presents a conceptual discrete model of a reaction-diffusion system with inhibitor and activator reagents. The automaton model of reaction-diffusion exhibits mobile localized patterns (gliders) in its space-time dynamics. We show how to implement the basic computational operations with these mobile localizations, and thus demonstrate collision-based logical universality of the hexagonal reaction-diffusion cellular automaton

  14. Simulating Chemical Kinetics Without Differential Equations: A Quantitative Theory Based on Chemical Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shirong; Skodje, Rex T

    2017-08-17

    A new approach is presented for simulating the time-evolution of chemically reactive systems. This method provides an alternative to conventional modeling of mass-action kinetics that involves solving differential equations for the species concentrations. The method presented here avoids the need to solve the rate equations by switching to a representation based on chemical pathways. In the Sum Over Histories Representation (or SOHR) method, any time-dependent kinetic observable, such as concentration, is written as a linear combination of probabilities for chemical pathways leading to a desired outcome. In this work, an iterative method is introduced that allows the time-dependent pathway probabilities to be generated from a knowledge of the elementary rate coefficients, thus avoiding the pitfalls involved in solving the differential equations of kinetics. The method is successfully applied to the model Lotka-Volterra system and to a realistic H 2 combustion model.

  15. Formation of iodo-trihalomethanes, iodo-acetic acids, and iodo-acetamides during chloramination of iodide-containing waters: Factors influencing formation and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shaogang [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuang-qing Road, Beijing, 100085 (China); Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Food Safety and Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Chemistry and Engineering of Forest Products, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530006, Guangxi (China); Li, Zhenlin [Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Food Safety and Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Chemistry and Engineering of Forest Products, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530006, Guangxi (China); Dong, Huiyu [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuang-qing Road, Beijing, 100085 (China); Goodman, Bernard A. [College of Physical Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources, Guangxi University, Nanning, 520004, Guangxi (China); Qiang, Zhimin, E-mail: qiangz@rcees.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuang-qing Road, Beijing, 100085 (China)

    2017-01-05

    This study investigated systematically the factors influencing the formation of iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs) during chloramination of I{sup −}-containing waters, including reaction time, NH{sub 2}Cl dose, I{sup −} concentration, pH, natural organic matter (NOM) concentration, Br{sup −}/I{sup −} molar ratio, and water matrix. Among the I-DBPs detected, iodoform (CHI{sub 3}), iodoacetic acid (IAA), diiodoacetic acid (DIAA), triiodoacetic acid (TIAA), and diiodoacetamide (DIAcAm) were the major species produced from reactions between reactive iodine species (HOI/I{sub 2}) and NOM. A kinetic model involving the reactions of NH{sub 2}Cl auto-decomposition, iodine species transformation and NOM consumption was developed, which could well describe NH{sub 2}Cl decay and HOI/I{sub 2} evolution. Higher concentrations of CHI{sub 3}, IAA, DIAA, TIAA, and DIAcAm were observed in chloramination than in chlorination, whereas IO{sub 3}{sup −} was only formed significantly in chlorination. Maximum formation of I-DBPs occurred at pH 8.0, but acidic conditions favored the formation of iodinated haloacetic acids and DIAcAm. Increasing Br{sup −}/I{sup −} molar ratio from 1 to 10 did not increase the total amount of I-DBPs, but produced more bromine-substituting species. In addition, chloramination of 18 model compounds indicated that low-SUVA{sub 254} (specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm) NOM generally favored the formation of I-DBPs compared to high-SUVA{sub 254} NOM. Finally, potential pathways for I-DBPs formation from chloramination of NOM were proposed.

  16. User Interface Requirements for Web-Based Integrated Care Pathways: Evidence from the Evaluation of an Online Care Pathway Investigation Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balatsoukas, Panos; Williams, Richard; Davies, Colin; Ainsworth, John; Buchan, Iain

    2015-11-01

    Integrated care pathways (ICPs) define a chronological sequence of steps, most commonly diagnostic or treatment, to be followed in providing care for patients. Care pathways help to ensure quality standards are met and to reduce variation in practice. Although research on the computerisation of ICP progresses, there is still little knowledge on what are the requirements for designing user-friendly and usable electronic care pathways, or how users (normally health care professionals) interact with interfaces that support design, analysis and visualisation of ICPs. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to address this gap by evaluating the usability of a novel web-based tool called COCPIT (Collaborative Online Care Pathway Investigation Tool). COCPIT supports the design, analysis and visualisation of ICPs at the population level. In order to address the aim of this study, an evaluation methodology was designed based on heuristic evaluations and a mixed method usability test. The results showed that modular visualisation and direct manipulation of information related to the design and analysis of ICPs is useful for engaging and stimulating users. However, designers should pay attention to issues related to the visibility of the system status and the match between the system and the real world, especially in relation to the display of statistical information about care pathways and the editing of clinical information within a care pathway. The paper concludes with recommendations for interface design.

  17. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W; Holliday, Gemma L; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-07-01

    Extracting chemical features like Atom-Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder : asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Pathway-based outlier method reveals heterogeneous genomic structure of autism in blood transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Malcolm G; Kohane, Isaac S; Kong, Sek Won

    2013-09-24

    signal, and showed that outlier groups were distinct for each implicated pathway. Moreover, our results suggest that by seeking heterogeneity, pathway-based outlier analysis can reveal expression signals that are not apparent when considering only shared group differences.

  19. The Reactome pathway knowledgebase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, David; Mundo, Antonio Fabregat; Haw, Robin; Milacic, Marija; Weiser, Joel; Wu, Guanming; Caudy, Michael; Garapati, Phani; Gillespie, Marc; Kamdar, Maulik R; Jassal, Bijay; Jupe, Steven; Matthews, Lisa; May, Bruce; Palatnik, Stanislav; Rothfels, Karen; Shamovsky, Veronica; Song, Heeyeon; Williams, Mark; Birney, Ewan; Hermjakob, Henning; Stein, Lincoln; D'Eustachio, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Reactome (http://www.reactome.org) is a manually curated open-source open-data resource of human pathways and reactions. The current version 46 describes 7088 human proteins (34% of the predicted human proteome), participating in 6744 reactions based on data extracted from 15 107 research publications with PubMed links. The Reactome Web site and analysis tool set have been completely redesigned to increase speed, flexibility and user friendliness. The data model has been extended to support annotation of disease processes due to infectious agents and to mutation.

  20. A reaction-based fluorescent sensor for detection of cyanide in aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shan-Teng; Sie, Yi-Wun [Department of Chemistry, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 50058, Taiwan (China); Wan, Chin-Feng [School of Applied Chemistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 40201, Taiwan (China); Wu, An-Tai, E-mail: antai@cc.ncue.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 50058, Taiwan (China)

    2016-05-15

    A simple boronic acid derivative was utilized as a reaction-based receptor for CN{sup −} in aqueous solution. The receptor showed a selective and sensitive response to CN{sup −} over other various anions via nucleophilic addition of CN{sup −} to the imine moiety of the boronic-based receptor.

  1. A Comparative Study of French and Turkish Students' Ideas on Acid-Base Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this comparative study was to determine the knowledge that French and Turkish upper secondary-school students (grades 11 and 12) acquire on the concept of acid-base reactions. Following an examination of the relevant curricula and textbooks in the two countries, 528 students answered six written questions about the acid-base concept.…

  2. Boehmite-An Efficient and Recyclable Acid-Base Bifunctional Catalyst for Aldol Condensation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshma, P C Rajan; Vikneshvaran, Sekar; Velmathi, Sivan

    2018-06-01

    In this work boehmite was used as an acid-base bifunctional catalyst for aldol condensation reactions of aromatic aldehydes and ketones. The catalyst was prepared by simple sol-gel method using Al(NO3)3·9H2O and NH4OH as precursors. The catalyst has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), UV-visible spectroscopy (DRS), BET surface area analyses. Boehmite is successfully applied as catalyst for the condensation reaction between 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and acetone as a model substrate giving α, β-unsaturated ketones without any side product. The scope of the reaction is extended for various substituted aldehydes. A probable mechanism has been suggested to explain the cooperative behavior of the acidic and basic sites. The catalyst is environmentally friendly and easily recovered from the reaction mixture. Also the catalyst is reusable up to 3 catalytic cycles.

  3. Stable and efficient nitrogen-containing-carbon based electrocatalysts for reactions in energy conversion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sicong; Teng, Zhenyuan; Wang, Chengyin; Wang, Guoxiu

    2018-05-17

    High activity and stability are crucial for practical electrocatalysts used for reactions in fuel cells, metal-air batteries and water electrolysis including ORR, HER, OER and oxidation reactions of formic acid and alcohols. N-C based electrocatalysts have shown promising prospects for catalyzing these reactions, however, there is no systematic review for strategies toward engineering active and stable N-C based electrocatalysts reported by far. Herein, a comprehensive comparison of recently reported N-C based electrocatalysts regarding both electrocatalytic activity and long-term stability is presented. In the first part of this review, relationships between electrocatalytic reactions and element selections for modifying N-C based materials are discussed. Afterwards, synthesis methods for N-C based electrocatalysts are summarized, and synthetic strategies for highly stable N-C based electrocatalysts are presented. Multiple tables containing data on crucial parameters for both electrocatalytic activity and stability are displayed in this review. Finally, constructing M-Nx moieties is proposed as the most promising engineering strategy for stable N-C based electrocatalysts. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. An Unexpected Reaction between 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural and Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongbao K. Zhao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new compound was detected during the production of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF from glucose and cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl at high temperatures. Further experiments found that it was derived from the reaction of HMF with [Bmim]Cl. The structure of new compound was established as 1-butyl-2-(5’-methyl-2’-furoylimidazole (BMI based on nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry analysis, and a possible mechanism for its formation was proposed. Reactions of HMF with other imidazolium-based ionic liquids were performed to check the formation of BMI. Our results provided new insights in terms of side reactions between HMF and imidazolium-based ionic liquids, which should be valuable for designing better processes for the production of furans using biomass and related materials.

  5. New era of silicon technologies due to radical reaction based semiconductor manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, Tadahiro; Hirayama, Masaki; Teramoto, Akinobu

    2006-01-01

    Current semiconductor technology, the so-called the molecule reaction based semiconductor manufacturing, now faces a very severe standstill due to the drastic increase of gate leakage currents and drain leakage currents. Radical reaction based semiconductor manufacturing has been developed to completely overcome the current standstill by introducing microwave excited high density plasma with very low electron temperatures and without accompanying charge-up damage. The introduction of radical reaction based semiconductor manufacturing has made it possible to fabricate LSI devices on any crystal orientation Si substrate surface as well as (100) Si substrate surfaces, and to eliminate a very severe limitation to the antenna ratio in the circuit layout patterns, which is strictly limited to less than 100-200 in order to obtain a relatively high production yield. (topical review)

  6. Coupled transport-reaction pathways and distribution patterns between siliciclastic-carbonate sediments at the Ria de Vigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, T.; Velo, A.; Fernandez-Bastero, S.; Gago-Duport, L.; Santos, A.; Alejo, I.; Vilas, F.

    2005-02-01

    This paper examines the linkages between the space-distribution of grain sizes and the relative percentage of the amount of mineral species that result from the mixing process of siliciclastic and carbonate sediments at the Ria de Vigo (NW of Spain). The space-distribution of minerals was initially determined, starting from a detailed mineralogical study based on XRD-Rietveld analysis of the superficial sediments. Correlations between the maps obtained for grain sizes, average fractions of either siliciclastic or carbonates, as well as for individual-minerals, were further stabilised. From this analysis, spatially organized patterns were found between carbonates and several minerals involved in the siliciclastic fraction. In particular, a coupled behaviour is observed between plagioclases and carbonates, in terms of their relative percentage amounts and the grain size distribution. In order to explain these results a conceptual model is proposed, based on the interplay between chemical processes at the seawater-sediment interface and hydrodynamical factors. This model suggests the existence of chemical control mechanisms that, by selective processes of dissolution-crystallization, constrain the mixed environment's long-term evolution, inducing the formation of self-organized sedimentary patterns.

  7. A Chemical Activation Study of the Unimolecular Reactions of CD3CD2CHCl2 and CHCl2CHCl2 with Analysis of the 1,1-HCl Elimination Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Allie C; Nestler, Matthew J; Smith, Caleb A; Heard, George L; Setser, Donald W; Holmes, Bert E

    2016-10-03

    Chemically activated C2D5CHCl2 molecules were generated with 88 kcal mol-1 of vibrational energy by the recombination of C2D5 and CHCl2 radicals in a room temperature bath gas. The competing 2,1-DCl and 1,1-HCl unimolecular reactions were identified by the observation of the CD3CD=CHCl and CD3CD=CDCl products. The initial CD3CD2C-Cl carbene product from 1,1-HCl elimination rearranges to CD3CD=CDCl under the conditions of the experiments. The experimental rate constants were 2.7 x107 and 0.47 x107 s-1 for 2,1-DCl and 1,1-HCl elimination reactions, respectively, which corresponds to branching fractions of 0.84 and 0.16. The experimental rate constants were compared to calculated statistical rate constants to assign threshold energies of 54 and ≈ 66 kcal mol-1 for the 1,2-DCl and 1,1-HCl reactions, respectively. The statistical rate constants were obtained from models developed from electronic-structure calculations for the molecule and its transition states. The rate constant (5.3 x 107 s-1) for the unimolecular decomposition of CHCl2CHCl2 molecules formed with 82 kcal mol-1 of vibrational energy by the recombination of CHCl2 radicals also is reported. Based upon the magnitude of the calculated rate constant, 1,1-HCl elimination must contribute less than 15% to the reaction; 1,2-HCl elimination is the major reaction and the threshold energy is 59 kcal mol-1. Calculations also were done to analyze previously published rate constants for chemically activated CD2Cl-CHCl2 molecules with 86 kcal mol-1 of energy in order to obtain a better overall description of the nature of the 1,1-HCl pathway for 1,1-dichloroalkanes. The interplay of the threshold energies for the 2,1-HCl and 1,1-HCl reactions and the available energy determines the product branching fractions for individual molecules. The unusual nature of the transition state for 1,1-HCl elimination is discussed.

  8. Integrating eQTL data with GWAS summary statistics in pathway-based analysis with application to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chong; Pan, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Many genetic variants affect complex traits through gene expression, which can be exploited to boost statistical power and enhance interpretation in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) as demonstrated by the transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) approach. Furthermore, due to polygenic inheritance, a complex trait is often affected by multiple genes with similar functions as annotated in gene pathways. Here, we extend TWAS from gene-based analysis to pathway-based analysis: we integrate public pathway collections, expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data and GWAS summary association statistics (or GWAS individual-level data) to identify gene pathways associated with complex traits. The basic idea is to weight the SNPs of the genes in a pathway based on their estimated cis-effects on gene expression, then adaptively test for association of the pathway with a GWAS trait by effectively aggregating possibly weak association signals across the genes in the pathway. The P values can be calculated analytically and thus fast. We applied our proposed test with the KEGG and GO pathways to two schizophrenia (SCZ) GWAS summary association data sets, denoted by SCZ1 and SCZ2 with about 20,000 and 150,000 subjects, respectively. Most of the significant pathways identified by analyzing the SCZ1 data were reproduced by the SCZ2 data. Importantly, we identified 15 novel pathways associated with SCZ, such as GABA receptor complex (GO:1902710), which could not be uncovered by the standard single SNP-based analysis or gene-based TWAS. The newly identified pathways may help us gain insights into the biological mechanism underlying SCZ. Our results showcase the power of incorporating gene expression information and gene functional annotations into pathway-based association testing for GWAS. © 2018 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  9. A probabilistic atlas of human brainstem pathways based on connectome imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuchun; Sun, Wei; Toga, Arthur W; Ringman, John M; Shi, Yonggang

    2018-04-01

    for each subject, which were then used to calculate the probabilistic atlases in the MNI152 space for public release. In our experimental results, we demonstrate that our method yielded anatomically faithful reconstruction of the brainstem pathways and achieved improved performance in comparison with an existing atlas of cerebellar peduncles based on HCP data. These atlases have been publicly released on NITRIC (https://www.nitrc.org/projects/brainstem_atlas/) and can be readily used by brain imaging researchers interested in studying brainstem pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analyzing the genes related to Alzheimer's disease via a network and pathway-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan-Shi; Xin, Juncai; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ju

    2017-04-27

    means of network and pathway-based methodology, we explored the pathogenetic mechanism underlying AD at a systems biology level. Results from our work could provide valuable clues for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying AD. In addition, the framework proposed in this study could be used to investigate the pathological molecular network and genes relevant to other complex diseases or phenotypes.

  11. Pathways to diagnosis: a qualitative study of the experiences and emotional reactions of parents of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, David; Harden, Jeni; Waugh, Norman; Noyes, Kathryn; Barnard, Katharine D; Stephen, John; Robertson, Kenneth J; Bath, Louise; Robertson, Linda; Lawton, Julia

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore from parents' perspectives the circumstances and events which led to their child being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The objective was to understand reasons for delays in seeking treatment and parents' emotional reactions to diagnosis so others can be better informed and supported in future. In-depth interviews with 54 parents of children (aged ≤12 yr) with T1D were conducted. Data analysis used an inductive, thematic approach. Parents described a 'prompt' and a 'delayed' pathway to their child being diagnosed. Parents who considered the diagnosis to be 'prompt' reported how they, or other people, had recognized their child had developed symptoms of T1D which resulted in a rapid presentation to health care professionals. In contrast, parents who perceived their child's diagnosis to be 'delayed' did not recognize signs of T1D and attributed their child's deteriorating health to other conditions, being out of routines and/or their stage of development. These parents often only sought medical help when symptoms became extreme. All parents were distressed by their child's diagnosis; however, parents in the 'delayed' pathway expressed unresolved feelings of guilt, particularly when their child was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. Parents' and other people's knowledge about T1D can affect the duration between onset of their child's symptoms and diagnosis. Campaigns to raise awareness should ensure that parents are made aware of symptoms and that T1D can develop during childhood. Health care professionals could discuss with parents the events preceding their child's diagnosis to better determine their emotional support needs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Energy Landscape and Pathways for Transitions between Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen Base Pairing in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J

    2018-01-04

    The recent discovery that Hoogsteen (HG) base pairs are widespread in DNA across diverse sequences and positional contexts could have important implications for understanding DNA replication and DNA-protein recognition. While evidence is emerging that the Hoogsteen conformation could be a thermodynamically accessible conformation of the DNA duplex and provide a means to expand its functionality, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying the Watson-Crick (WC) to HG transition. In this Perspective, we describe pathways and kinetics for this transition at an atomic level of detail, using the energy landscape perspective. We show that competition between the duplex conformations results in a double funnel landscape, which explains some recent experimental observations. The interconversion pathways feature a number of intermediates, with a variable number of WC and HG base pairs. The relatively slow kinetics, with possible deviations from two-state behavior, suggest that this conformational switch is likely to be a challenging target for both simulation and experiment.

  13. Interfacial reactions in intermetallic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, L.B.; Clevenger, E.M.; Perepezko, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal stability of advanced composites is dominated by the behavior of internal interfaces. Analysis of these internal interfaces often involves consideration of at least ternary order phase equilibria. Limited thermodynamic data exists for ternary and higher order systems. However, a combined approach based upon the use of binary data to estimate ternary phase equilibria and experimentally determined reaction pathways is effective in the analysis of interface reactions in composite systems. In blended powder samples, thermal analysis was used to find possible reaction temperatures, while X-ray analysis, EDS, and EPMA of diffusion couples were used to assess interdiffusion reaction pathways. The approach is illustrated by compatibility studies between TiAl and TiSi 2 at 1,100 C, and in-situ reactions between B 4 C and TiAl at 1300 C where multiple reaction sequences have been analyzed to provide guidance for the design of in-situ reaction processing of composites

  14. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Hua [School of Urban Rail Transportation, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Li, Zhihu [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China); Xu, Yanhui, E-mail: xuyanhui@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  15. Integrative pathway knowledge bases as a tool for systems molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingyu

    2007-08-20

    There exists a sense of urgency to begin to generate a cohesive assembly of biomedical knowledge as the pace of knowledge accumulation accelerates. The urgency is in part driven by the emergence of systems molecular medicine that emphasizes the combination of systems analysis and molecular dissection in the future of medical practice and research. A potentially powerful approach is to build integrative pathway knowledge bases that link organ systems function with molecules.

  16. How are base excision DNA repair pathways deployed in vivo? [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasna Thapar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the base excision repair (BER system for DNA more than 40 years ago, new branches of the pathway have been revealed at the biochemical level by in vitro studies. Largely for technical reasons, however, the confirmation of these subpathways in vivo has been elusive. We review methods that have been used to explore BER in mammalian cells, indicate where there are important knowledge gaps to fill, and suggest a way to address them.

  17. A novel approach to select differential pathways associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy based on gene co‑expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Min; Feng, Ming-Jun; Shen, Cai-Jie; He, Bin; Du, Xian-Feng; Yu, Yi-Bo; Liu, Jing; Chu, Hui-Min

    2017-07-01

    The present study was designed to develop a novel method for identifying significant pathways associated with human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), based on gene co‑expression analysis. The microarray dataset associated with HCM (E‑GEOD‑36961) was obtained from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory‑European Bioinformatics Institute database. Informative pathways were selected based on the Reactome pathway database and screening treatments. An empirical Bayes method was utilized to construct co‑expression networks for informative pathways, and a weight value was assigned to each pathway. Differential pathways were extracted based on weight threshold, which was calculated using a random model. In order to assess whether the co‑expression method was feasible, it was compared with traditional pathway enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes, which were identified using the significance analysis of microarrays package. A total of 1,074 informative pathways were screened out for subsequent investigations and their weight values were also obtained. According to the threshold of weight value of 0.01057, 447 differential pathways, including folding of actin by chaperonin containing T‑complex protein 1 (CCT)/T‑complex protein 1 ring complex (TRiC), purine ribonucleoside monophosphate biosynthesis and ubiquinol biosynthesis, were obtained. Compared with traditional pathway enrichment analysis, the number of pathways obtained from the co‑expression approach was increased. The results of the present study demonstrated that this method may be useful to predict marker pathways for HCM. The pathways of folding of actin by CCT/TRiC and purine ribonucleoside monophosphate biosynthesis may provide evidence of the underlying molecular mechanisms of HCM, and offer novel therapeutic directions for HCM.

  18. Oxidation of Tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate in aqueous solution by UV-activated peroxymonosulfate: Kinetics, water matrix effects, degradation products and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinxin; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Wang, Zunyao

    2017-10-01

    The feasibility of UV-activated peroxymonosulfate (PMS) technology for the degradation of Tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) in an aqueous solution was investigated in this study. The conditions of [PMS] 0 : [TCEP] 0  = 20:1, T = 25 ± 2 °C and pH = 5.5 ± 0.5 cause a 94.6% removal of TCEP (1 mg L -1 ) after 30 min of Hg lamp irradiation. The effects of operating parameters (the oxidant doses, pH and presence of typical cations (Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , NH 4 + ), anions (Cl - , HCO 3 - , NO 3 - , HPO 4 2- ) and humic acid (HA)) were evaluated. It was found that an increase of the PMS dose and the presence of Fe 3+ could accelerate the reaction, while the anions and HA inhibited the reaction. Meanwhile, TCEP removal in various water matrices was compared, and the order for TCEP removal was as follows: ultrapure water > tap water > synthetic water > secondary clarifier effluent > Jiuxiang river water. Twenty-two oxidation products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and the degradation pathways mainly involved radicals' addition and CO bond cleavage. Furthermore, ECOSAR analysis revealed that the intermediate products during the TCEP oxidation process were generally not harmful to three typical aquatic species. Hence, UV/PMS can be used as an efficient technology to treat TCEP-containing water and wastewaters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pathway-based Analysis of the Hidden Genetic Heterogeneities in Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many cancers apparently showing similar phenotypes are actually distinct at the molecular level, leading to very different responses to the same treatment. It has been recently demonstrated that pathway-based approaches are robust and reliable for genetic analysis of cancers. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether such function-based approaches are useful in deciphering molecular heterogeneities in cancers. Therefore, we aimed to test this possibility in the present study. First, we used a NCI60 dataset to validate the ability of pathways to correctly partition samples. Next, we applied the proposed method to identify the hidden subtypes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Finally, the clinical significance of the identified subtypes was verified using survival analysis. For the NCI60 dataset, we achieved highly accurate partitions that best fit the clinical cancer phenotypes. Subsequently, for a DLBCL dataset, we identified three hidden subtypes that showed very different 10-year overall survival rates (90%, 46% and 20% and were highly significantly (P = 0.008 correlated with the clinical survival rate. This study demonstrated that the pathway-based approach is promising for unveiling genetic heterogeneities in complex human diseases.

  20. Characterization of reaction conditions providing rapid and specific cysteine alkylation for peptide-based mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulech, Jana; Solis, Nestor; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2013-01-01

    Alkylation converts Cys thiols to thioethers and prevents unwanted side reactions, thus facilitating mass spectrometric identification of Cys-containing peptides. Alkylation occurs preferentially at Cys due to its high nucleophilicity, however reactions at other such sites are possible. N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) shows rapid reaction kinetics with Cys and careful definition of reaction conditions results in little reactivity at other sites. Analysis of a protein standard alkylated under differing reaction conditions (pH, NEM concentrations and reaction times) was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) of NEM-modified and unmodified peptide pairs. Mis-alkylation sites at primary and secondary amines were identified and limited to one equivalent of NEM. No evidence for hydroxyl or thioether alkylation was observed. Improved specificity was achieved by restricting the pH below neutral, NEM concentration below 10mM and/or reaction time to below 5min. Maximal removal of Cys activity was observed in tissue homogenates at 40mM NEM within 1min, dependent upon efficient protein denaturation. SRM assays identified peptide-specific levels of mis-alkylation, indicating that NEM-modified to unmodified ratios did not exceed 10%, with the exception of Cys alkylation that proceeded to 100%, and some Lys residues that resulted in tryptic missed cleavages. High reactivity was observed for His residues considering their relatively low abundance. These data indicate that rapid and specific Cys alkylation is possible with NEM under relatively mild conditions, with more abrasive conditions leading to increased non-specific alkylation without appreciable benefit for MS-based proteomics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential proteomics analysis to identify proteins and pathways associated with male sterility of soybean using iTRAQ-based strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Ding, Xianlong; Han, Shaohuai; He, Tingting; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Longshu; Yang, Shouping; Gai, Junyi

    2016-04-14

    To further elucidate the molecular mechanism of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in soybean, a differential proteomic analysis was completed between the CMS line NJCMS1A and its maintainer NJCMS1B using iTRAQ-based strategy. As a result, 180 differential abundance proteins (DAPs) were identified, of which, 60 were down-regulated and 120 were up-regulated in NJCMS1A compared with NJCMS1B. Bioinformatic analysis showed that 167 DAPs were annotated in 41 Gene Ontology functional groups, 106 DAPs were classified into 20 clusters of orthologous groups of protein categories, and 128 DAPs were enrichment in 53 KEGG pathways. Fifteen differential level proteins/genes with the same expression pattern were identified in the further conjoint analysis of DAPs and the previously reported differential expression genes. Moreover, multiple reaction monitoring test, qRT-PCR analysis and enzyme activity assay validated that the iTRAQ results were reliable. Based on functional analysis of DAPs, we concluded that male sterility in NJCMS1A might be related to insufficiencies in energy supply, unbalance of protein synthesis and degradation, disruption of flavonoid synthesis, programmed cell death, abnormalities of substance metabolism, etc. These results might facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind CMS in soybean. Soybean is an important global crop that provides protein and oil. Heterosis is a significantly potential approach to increase the yield of soybean. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) plays a vital role in the production of hybrid seeds. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms of male sterility in soybean still need to be further elucidated. In the present paper, a differential proteomic analysis was carried out and the results showed that several key proteins involved in key pathways were associated with male sterility in soybean. This work provides a new insight to understand the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying CMS in soybean

  2. MbT-Tool: An open-access tool based on Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model to obtain microbial-metabolic reactions to be used in biotechnological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Pablo Granda; Gras, Anna; Ginovart, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Modelling cellular metabolism is a strategic factor in investigating microbial behaviour and interactions, especially for bio-technological processes. A key factor for modelling microbial activity is the calculation of nutrient amounts and products generated as a result of the microbial metabolism. Representing metabolic pathways through balanced reactions is a complex and time-consuming task for biologists, ecologists, modellers and engineers. A new computational tool to represent microbial pathways through microbial metabolic reactions (MMRs) using the approach of the Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model has been designed and implemented in the open-access framework NetLogo. This computational tool, called MbT-Tool (Metabolism based on Thermodynamics) can write MMRs for different microbial functional groups, such as aerobic heterotrophs, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, methanogens, sulphate reducers, sulphide oxidizers and fermenters. The MbT-Tool's code contains eighteen organic and twenty inorganic reduction-half-reactions, four N-sources (NH4 (+), NO3 (-), NO2 (-), N2) to biomass synthesis and twenty-four microbial empirical formulas, one of which can be determined by the user (CnHaObNc). MbT-Tool is an open-source program capable of writing MMRs based on thermodynamic concepts, which are applicable in a wide range of academic research interested in designing, optimizing and modelling microbial activity without any extensive chemical, microbiological and programing experience.

  3. MbT-Tool: An open-access tool based on Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model to obtain microbial-metabolic reactions to be used in biotechnological process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Araujo Granda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling cellular metabolism is a strategic factor in investigating microbial behaviour and interactions, especially for bio-technological processes. A key factor for modelling microbial activity is the calculation of nutrient amounts and products generated as a result of the microbial metabolism. Representing metabolic pathways through balanced reactions is a complex and time-consuming task for biologists, ecologists, modellers and engineers. A new computational tool to represent microbial pathways through microbial metabolic reactions (MMRs using the approach of the Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model has been designed and implemented in the open-access framework NetLogo. This computational tool, called MbT-Tool (Metabolism based on Thermodynamics can write MMRs for different microbial functional groups, such as aerobic heterotrophs, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, methanogens, sulphate reducers, sulphide oxidizers and fermenters. The MbT-Tool's code contains eighteen organic and twenty inorganic reduction-half-reactions, four N-sources (NH4+, NO3−, NO2−, N2 to biomass synthesis and twenty-four microbial empirical formulas, one of which can be determined by the user (CnHaObNc. MbT-Tool is an open-source program capable of writing MMRs based on thermodynamic concepts, which are applicable in a wide range of academic research interested in designing, optimizing and modelling microbial activity without any extensive chemical, microbiological and programing experience.

  4. Electrodeposition of Pd based binary catalysts on Carbon paper via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) continue to extensive attention as potential power sources for portable and stationary applications. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) involving the four electron transfer remains a challenge for DAFCs due to its...

  5. Cesium Carbonate as a Heterogeneous Base Catalyst for Synthesis of 2-Aminothiophenes via Gewald Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeinpour, Farid [Islamic Azad University, Bandar Abbas Branch, Abbas (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidinia, Raheleh; Dorostkar-Ahmadi, Nadieh; Khoshdeli, Bentalhoda [Islamic Azad University, Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We have reported a new simple catalytic method for the synthesis of 2-aminothiophenes via Gewald reaction using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as an efficient, reusable and green heterogeneous catalyst under heating conditions in refluxing ethanol. The catalyst could be recycled after a simple workup and reused at least three runs without appreciable reduction in its catalytic activity. Low catalyst loading, clean reaction profiles, simple experimental and workup procedures and high yields are some advantages of this protocol. The synthesis of substituted 2-aminothiophenes is attractive to chemical researchers as they are important intermediates in organic synthesis and frequently used as the scaffold motif of a variety of agrochemicals, dyes, and biologically active products. Thus, because of their wide utility, researchers have synthesized the substituted 2-aminothiophenes via efficient and convenient methods. The one-pot cyclocondensation of ketones with an activated α-hydrogen, a cyanomethylene containing an electron-withdrawing group such as cyanoacetate and elemental sulfur in the presence of organic base, for example, morpholine, diethylamine, etc, known as the Gewald reaction, has been one of the most well-studied multicomponent reactions in recent years. To extend the scope of the reaction, many alterations have been made to the original Gewald's base-catalyzed, two-component combination of α-mercapto ketones with cyanoacetate by varying the components and the conditions.

  6. Measurement of reaction heats using a polysilicon-based microcalorimetric sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vereshchagina, E.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a low-cost, low-power, small sample volume microcalorimetric sensor for the measurement of reaction heats. The polysilicon-based microcalorimetric sensor combines several advantages: (i) complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology (CMOS) for future integration; (ii)

  7. Web-Based Search and Plot System for Nuclear Reaction Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otuka, N.; Nakagawa, T.; Fukahori, T.; Katakura, J.; Aikawa, M.; Suda, T.; Naito, K.; Korennov, S.; Arai, K.; Noto, H.; Ohnishi, A.; Kato, K.

    2005-01-01

    A web-based search and plot system for nuclear reaction data has been developed, covering experimental data in EXFOR format and evaluated data in ENDF format. The system is implemented for Linux OS, with Perl and MySQL used for CGI scripts and the database manager, respectively. Two prototypes for experimental and evaluated data are presented

  8. A Laboratory Experiment, Based on the Maillard Reaction, Conducted as a Project in Introductory Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Olena; Elliott, Antony; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2005-01-01

    A simple laboratory experiment, based on the Maillard reaction, served as a project in Introductory Statistics for undergraduates in Food Science and Technology. By using the principles of randomization and replication and reflecting on the sources of variation in the experimental data, students reinforced the statistical concepts and techniques…

  9. DNA-based catalytic enantioselective intermolecular oxa-Michael addition reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Using the DNA-based catalysis concept, a novel Cu(II) catalyzed enantioselective oxa-Michael addition of alcohols to enones is reported. Enantioselectivities of up to 86% were obtained. The presence of water is important for the reactivity, possibly by reverting unwanted side reactions such as

  10. Enhancement of Nucleoside Production in Hirsutella sinensis Based on Biosynthetic Pathway Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Lin, Shan; Baker, Peter James; Chen, Mao-Sheng; Xue, Ya-Ping; Wu, Hui; Xu, Feng; Yuan, Shui-Jin; Teng, Yi; Wu, Ling-Fang

    2017-01-01

    To enhance nucleoside production in Hirsutella sinensis, the biosynthetic pathways of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides were constructed and verified. The differential expression analysis showed that purine nucleoside phosphorylase, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, and guanosine monophosphate synthase genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis were significantly upregulated 16.56-fold, 8-fold, and 5.43-fold, respectively. Moreover, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, uridine nucleosidase, uridine/cytidine monophosphate kinase, and inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase genes participating in pyrimidine nucleoside biosynthesis were upregulated 4.53-fold, 10.63-fold, 4.26-fold, and 5.98-fold, respectively. To enhance the nucleoside production, precursors for synthesis of nucleosides were added based on the analysis of biosynthetic pathways. Uridine and cytidine contents, respectively, reached 5.04 mg/g and 3.54 mg/g when adding 2 mg/mL of ribose, resulting in an increase of 28.6% and 296% compared with the control, respectively. Meanwhile, uridine and cytidine contents, respectively, reached 10.83 mg/g 2.12 mg/g when adding 0.3 mg/mL of uracil, leading to an increase of 176.3% and 137.1%, respectively. This report indicated that fermentation regulation was an effective way to enhance the nucleoside production in H. sinensis based on biosynthetic pathway analysis. PMID:29333435

  11. NemaPath: online exploration of KEGG-based metabolic pathways for nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhengyuan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nematode.net http://www.nematode.net is a web-accessible resource for investigating gene sequences from parasitic and free-living nematode genomes. Beyond the well-characterized model nematode C. elegans, over 500,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs and nearly 600,000 genome survey sequences (GSSs have been generated from 36 nematode species as part of the Parasitic Nematode Genomics Program undertaken by the Genome Center at Washington University School of Medicine. However, these sequencing data are not present in most publicly available protein databases, which only include sequences in Swiss-Prot. Swiss-Prot, in turn, relies on GenBank/Embl/DDJP for predicted proteins from complete genomes or full-length proteins. Description Here we present the NemaPath pathway server, a web-based pathway-level visualization tool for navigating putative metabolic pathways for over 30 nematode species, including 27 parasites. The NemaPath approach consists of two parts: 1 a backend tool to align and evaluate nematode genomic sequences (curated EST contigs against the annotated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG protein database; 2 a web viewing application that displays annotated KEGG pathway maps based on desired confidence levels of primary sequence similarity as defined by a user. NemaPath also provides cross-referenced access to nematode genome information provided by other tools available on Nematode.net, including: detailed NemaGene EST cluster information; putative translations; GBrowse EST cluster views; links from nematode data to external databases for corresponding synonymous C. elegans counterparts, subject matches in KEGG's gene database, and also KEGG Ontology (KO identification. Conclusion The NemaPath server hosts metabolic pathway mappings for 30 nematode species and is available on the World Wide Web at http://nematode.net/cgi-bin/keggview.cgi. The nematode source sequences used for the metabolic pathway

  12. Optimal processing pathway for the production of biodiesel from microalgal biomass: A superstructure based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Lee, Jay H.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we propose a mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) model for superstructure based optimization of biodiesel production from microalgal biomass. The proposed superstructure includes a number of major processing steps for the production of biodiesel from microalgal biomass......, such as the harvesting of microalgal biomass, pretreatments including drying and cell disruption of harvested biomass, lipid extraction, transesterification, and post-transesterfication purification. The proposed model is used to find the optimal processing pathway among the large number of potential pathways that exist...... for the production of biodiesel from microalgae. The proposed methodology is tested by implementing on a specific case with different choices of objective functions. The MINLP model is implemented and solved in GAMS using a database built in Excel. The results from the optimization are analyzed...

  13. Supporting transitions in medical career pathways: the role of simulation-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Patey, Rona; Thomas, Ian; Walker, Kenneth; O'Connor, Paul; Russ, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Transitions, or periods of change, in medical career pathways can be challenging episodes, requiring the transitioning clinician to take on new roles and responsibilities, adapt to new cultural dynamics, change behaviour patterns, and successfully manage uncertainty. These intensive learning periods present risks to patient safety. Simulation-based education (SBE) is a pedagogic approach that allows clinicians to practise their technical and non-technical skills in a safe environment to increase preparedness for practice. In this commentary, we present the potential uses, strengths, and limitations of SBE for supporting transitions across medical career pathways, discussing educational utility, outcome and process evaluation, and cost and value, and introduce a new perspective on considering the gains from SBE. We provide case-study examples of the application of SBE to illustrate these points and stimulate discussion.

  14. Metabolomics-based promising candidate biomarkers and pathways in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Lu, Jingli; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-05-01

    Pathologically, loss of synapses and neurons, extracellular senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are observed in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). These features are associated with changes Aβ (amyloid β) 40, Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau (p-tau), which are as definitely biomarkers for severe AD state. However, biomarkers for effectively diagnosing AD in the pre-clinical state for directing therapeutic strategies are lacking. Metabolic profiling as a powerful tool to identify new biomarkers is receiving increasing attention in AD. This review will focus on metabolomics-based detection of promising candidate biomarkers and pathways in AD to facilitate the discovery of new medicines and disease pathways.

  15. Automated retinofugal visual pathway reconstruction with multi-shell HARDI and FOD-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammen, Alexandra; Law, Meng; Tjan, Bosco S; Toga, Arthur W; Shi, Yonggang

    2016-01-15

    Diffusion MRI tractography provides a non-invasive modality to examine the human retinofugal projection, which consists of the optic nerves, optic chiasm, optic tracts, the lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN) and the optic radiations. However, the pathway has several anatomic features that make it particularly challenging to study with tractography, including its location near blood vessels and bone-air interface at the base of the cerebrum, crossing fibers at the chiasm, somewhat-tortuous course around the temporal horn via Meyer's Loop, and multiple closely neighboring fiber bundles. To date, these unique complexities of the visual pathway have impeded the development of a robust and automated reconstruction method using tractography. To overcome these challenges, we develop a novel, fully automated system to reconstruct the retinofugal visual pathway from high-resolution diffusion imaging data. Using multi-shell, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data, we reconstruct precise fiber orientation distributions (FODs) with high order spherical harmonics (SPHARM) to resolve fiber crossings, which allows the tractography algorithm to successfully navigate the complicated anatomy surrounding the retinofugal pathway. We also develop automated algorithms for the identification of ROIs used for fiber bundle reconstruction. In particular, we develop a novel approach to extract the LGN region of interest (ROI) based on intrinsic shape analysis of a fiber bundle computed from a seed region at the optic chiasm to a target at the primary visual cortex. By combining automatically identified ROIs and FOD-based tractography, we obtain a fully automated system to compute the main components of the retinofugal pathway, including the optic tract and the optic radiation. We apply our method to the multi-shell HARDI data of 215 subjects from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). Through comparisons with post-mortem dissection measurements, we demonstrate the retinotopic

  16. Adverse allergic reactions to linear ionic gadolinium-based contrast agents: experience with 194, 400 injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aran, S.; Shaqdan, K.W.; Abujudeh, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To report the authors' experience with the administration of four gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA; gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadofosveset trisodium, gadoxetate disodium and gadobenate dimeglumine) in a large study population at a single, large academic medical centre. Materials and methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study in which data in the electronic incident reporting system were searched. A total of 194, 400 intravenous administrations of linear ionic GBCAs were assessed for the incidence of adverse reactions and risk factors from 1 January 2007 to 14 January 2014. The severity of reactions (mild, moderate, and severe), patient type (outpatients, inpatients, and emergency), examination type, and treatment options were also investigated. Results: In total, 204/194400 (0.1%) patients (mean age 45.7 ± 14.9) showed adverse reactions, consisting of 6/746 (0.80%), 10/3200 (0.31%), 14/6236 (0.22%) and 174/184218 (0.09%), for gadofosveset trisodium, gadoxetate disodium, gadobenate dimeglumine, and gadopentetate dimeglumine, respectively. An overall significant difference was found between different GBCAs regarding the total number of reactions (p < 0.0001). When comparing the GBCAs together, significant differences were found between gadofosveset trisodium versus gadopentetate dimeglumine (p < 0.0001), gadofosveset trisodium versus gadobenate dimeglumine (p = 0.0051), gadoxetate disodium versus gadopentetate dimeglumine (p < 0.0001) and gadopentetate dimeglumine versus gadobenate dimeglumine (p = 0.0013). Rate of reaction was higher in females (F: 146/113187, 0.13%/M: 58/81213, 0.07%; p < 0.0001). Rate of reactions was higher in outpatient (180/158885, 0.11%), emergency (10/10413, 0.10%), and inpatients (14/25102, 0.05%), respectively (p < 0.0001). Most of the patients had mild symptoms 171/204 (83.8%). Abdomen–pelvis, liver, and thoracic examinations had highest rates of reactions (0.17 versus 0

  17. ReactionPredictor: prediction of complex chemical reactions at the mechanistic level using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-10-22

    Proposing reasonable mechanisms and predicting the course of chemical reactions is important to the practice of organic chemistry. Approaches to reaction prediction have historically used obfuscating representations and manually encoded patterns or rules. Here we present ReactionPredictor, a machine learning approach to reaction prediction that models elementary, mechanistic reactions as interactions between approximate molecular orbitals (MOs). A training data set of productive reactions known to occur at reasonable rates and yields and verified by inclusion in the literature or textbooks is derived from an existing rule-based system and expanded upon with manual curation from graduate level textbooks. Using this training data set of complex polar, hypervalent, radical, and pericyclic reactions, a two-stage machine learning prediction framework is trained and validated. In the first stage, filtering models trained at the level of individual MOs are used to reduce the space of possible reactions to consider. In the second stage, ranking models over the filtered space of possible reactions are used to order the reactions such that the productive reactions are the top ranked. The resulting model, ReactionPredictor, perfectly ranks polar reactions 78.1% of the time and recovers all productive reactions 95.7% of the time when allowing for small numbers of errors. Pericyclic and radical reactions are perfectly ranked 85.8% and 77.0% of the time, respectively, rising to >93% recovery for both reaction types with a small number of allowed errors. Decisions about which of the polar, pericyclic, or radical reaction type ranking models to use can be made with >99% accuracy. Finally, for multistep reaction pathways, we implement the first mechanistic pathway predictor using constrained tree-search to discover a set of reasonable mechanistic steps from given reactants to given products. Webserver implementations of both the single step and pathway versions of Reaction

  18. Recovery Of Valuable Metals In Tin-Based Anodic Slimes By Carbothermic Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chulwoong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the recovery of anodic slimes by carbothermic reaction in the temperature range of 973~1,273K and amount of carbon as a function of time. Tin anodic slime samples were collected from the bottom of the electrolytic cells during the electro-refining of tin. The anodic slimes are consisted of high concentrated tin, silver, copper and lead oxides. The kinetics of reduction were determined by means of the weight-loss measurement technique. In order to understand in detail of carbothermic reaction, thermodynamic calculation was carried out and compared with experiments. From thermodynamic calculation and experiment, it was confirmed that Sn-based anodic slime could be reduced by controlling temperature and amount of carbon. However, any tendency between the reduction temperature and carbon content for the reduction reaction was not observed.

  19. Acorn: A grid computing system for constraint based modeling and visualization of the genome scale metabolic reaction networks via a web interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushell Michael E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constraint-based approaches facilitate the prediction of cellular metabolic capabilities, based, in turn on predictions of the repertoire of enzymes encoded in the genome. Recently, genome annotations have been used to reconstruct genome scale metabolic reaction networks for numerous species, including Homo sapiens, which allow simulations that provide valuable insights into topics, including predictions of gene essentiality of pathogens, interpretation of genetic polymorphism in metabolic disease syndromes and suggestions for novel approaches to microbial metabolic engineering. These constraint-based simulations are being integrated with the functional genomics portals, an activity that requires efficient implementation of the constraint-based simulations in the web-based environment. Results Here, we present Acorn, an open source (GNU GPL grid computing system for constraint-based simulations of genome scale metabolic reaction networks within an interactive web environment. The grid-based architecture allows efficient execution of computationally intensive, iterative protocols such as Flux Variability Analysis, which can be readily scaled up as the numbers of models (and users increase. The web interface uses AJAX, which facilitates efficient model browsing and other search functions, and intuitive implementation of appropriate simulation conditions. Research groups can install Acorn locally and create user accounts. Users can also import models in the familiar SBML format and link reaction formulas to major functional genomics portals of choice. Selected models and simulation results can be shared between different users and made publically available. Users can construct pathway map layouts and import them into the server using a desktop editor integrated within the system. Pathway maps are then used to visualise numerical results within the web environment. To illustrate these features we have deployed Acorn and created a

  20. A comparison of approximation techniques for variance-based sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitivity analysis is an indispensable tool for the analysis of complex systems. In a recent paper, we have introduced a thermodynamically consistent variance-based sensitivity analysis approach for studying the robustness and fragility properties of biochemical reaction systems under uncertainty in the standard chemical potentials of the activated complexes of the reactions and the standard chemical potentials of the molecular species. In that approach, key sensitivity indices were estimated by Monte Carlo sampling, which is computationally very demanding and impractical for large biochemical reaction systems. Computationally efficient algorithms are needed to make variance-based sensitivity analysis applicable to realistic cellular networks, modeled by biochemical reaction systems that consist of a large number of reactions and molecular species. Results We present four techniques, derivative approximation (DA, polynomial approximation (PA, Gauss-Hermite integration (GHI, and orthonormal Hermite approximation (OHA, for analytically approximating the variance-based sensitivity indices associated with a biochemical reaction system. By using a well-known model of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade as a case study, we numerically compare the approximation quality of these techniques against traditional Monte Carlo sampling. Our results indicate that, although DA is computationally the most attractive technique, special care should be exercised when using it for sensitivity analysis, since it may only be accurate at low levels of uncertainty. On the other hand, PA, GHI, and OHA are computationally more demanding than DA but can work well at high levels of uncertainty. GHI results in a slightly better accuracy than PA, but it is more difficult to implement. OHA produces the most accurate approximation results and can be implemented in a straightforward manner. It turns out that the computational cost of the

  1. Semantic Mining based on graph theory and ontologies. Case Study: Cell Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Rangel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use concepts from graph theory and cellular biology represented as ontologies, to carry out semantic mining tasks on signaling pathway networks. Specifically, the paper describes the semantic enrichment of signaling pathway networks. A cell signaling network describes the basic cellular activities and their interactions. The main contribution of this paper is in the signaling pathway research area, it proposes a new technique to analyze and understand how changes in these networks may affect the transmission and flow of information, which produce diseases such as cancer and diabetes. Our approach is based on three concepts from graph theory (modularity, clustering and centrality frequently used on social networks analysis. Our approach consists into two phases: the first uses the graph theory concepts to determine the cellular groups in the network, which we will call them communities; the second uses ontologies for the semantic enrichment of the cellular communities. The measures used from the graph theory allow us to determine the set of cells that are close (for example, in a disease, and the main cells in each community. We analyze our approach in two cases: TGF-ß and the Alzheimer Disease.

  2. An optimization model for metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planes, F J; Beasley, J E

    2009-10-15

    Different mathematical methods have emerged in the post-genomic era to determine metabolic pathways. These methods can be divided into stoichiometric methods and path finding methods. In this paper we detail a novel optimization model, based upon integer linear programming, to determine metabolic pathways. Our model links reaction stoichiometry with path finding in a single approach. We test the ability of our model to determine 40 annotated Escherichia coli metabolic pathways. We show that our model is able to determine 36 of these 40 pathways in a computationally effective manner.

  3. Relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency of nanomachine-based targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingying; Li, Min; Luo, Jun

    2017-12-04

    In nanomachine applications towards targeted drug delivery, drug molecules released by nanomachines propagate and chemically react with tumor cells in aqueous environment. If the nanomachines release drug molecules faster than the tumor cells react, it will result in loss and waste of drug molecules. It is a potential issue associated with the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency. This paper aims to investigate the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency based on two drug reception models. We expect to pave a way for designing a control method of drug release. We adopted two analytical methods that one is drug reception process based on collision with tumors and another is based on Michaelis Menten enzymatic kinetics. To evaluate the analytical formulations, we used the well-known simulation framework N3Sim to establish simulations. The analytical results of the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency is obtained, which match well with the numerical simulation results in a 3-D environment. Based upon two drug reception models, the results of this paper would be beneficial for designing a control method of nanomahine-based drug release.

  4. Development and implementation of a clinical pathway approach to simulation-based training for foregut surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Kiyoyuki W; Buchholz, Joseph; LaMarra, Denise; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary demands on resident education call for integration of simulation. We designed and implemented a simulation-based curriculum for Post Graduate Year 1 surgery residents to teach technical and nontechnical skills within a clinical pathway approach for a foregut surgery patient, from outpatient visit through surgery and postoperative follow-up. The 3-day curriculum for groups of 6 residents comprises a combination of standardized patient encounters, didactic sessions, and hands-on training. The curriculum is underpinned by a summative simulation "pathway" repeated on days 1 and 3. The "pathway" is a series of simulated preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative encounters in following up a single patient through a disease process. The resident sees a standardized patient in the clinic presenting with distal gastric cancer and then enters an operating room to perform a gastrojejunostomy on a porcine tissue model. Finally, the resident engages in a simulated postoperative visit. All encounters are rated by faculty members and the residents themselves, using standardized assessment forms endorsed by the American Board of Surgery. A total of 18 first-year residents underwent this curriculum. Faculty ratings of overall operative performance significantly improved following the 3-day module. Ratings of preoperative and postoperative performance were not significantly changed in 3 days. Resident self-ratings significantly improved for all encounters assessed, as did reported confidence in meeting the defined learning objectives. Conventional surgical simulation training focuses on technical skills in isolation. Our novel "pathway" curriculum targets an important gap in training methodologies by placing both technical and nontechnical skills in their clinical context as part of managing a surgical patient. Results indicate consistent improvements in assessments of performance as well as confidence and support its continued usage to educate surgery residents

  5. Identification of Key Pathways and Genes in the Dynamic Progression of HCC Based on WGCNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Li; Cai, Zhihui; Zhu, Baoan; Xu, Cunshuan

    2018-02-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a devastating disease worldwide. Though many efforts have been made to elucidate the process of HCC, its molecular mechanisms of development remain elusive due to its complexity. To explore the stepwise carcinogenic process from pre-neoplastic lesions to the end stage of HCC, we employed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) which has been proved to be an effective method in many diseases to detect co-expressed modules and hub genes using eight pathological stages including normal, cirrhosis without HCC, cirrhosis, low-grade dysplastic, high-grade dysplastic, very early and early, advanced HCC and very advanced HCC. Among the eight consecutive pathological stages, five representative modules are selected to perform canonical pathway enrichment and upstream regulator analysis by using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) software. We found that cell cycle related biological processes were activated at four neoplastic stages, and the degree of activation of the cell cycle corresponded to the deterioration degree of HCC. The orange and yellow modules enriched in energy metabolism, especially oxidative metabolism, and the expression value of the genes decreased only at four neoplastic stages. The brown module, enriched in protein ubiquitination and ephrin receptor signaling pathways, correlated mainly with the very early stage of HCC. The darkred module, enriched in hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation, correlated with the cirrhotic stage only. The high degree hub genes were identified based on the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network and were verified by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The novel five high degree hub genes signature that was identified in our study may shed light on future prognostic and therapeutic approaches. Our study brings a new perspective to the understanding of the key pathways and genes in the dynamic changes of HCC progression. These findings shed light on further investigations.

  6. Soft tissue deformation modelling through neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinao; Zhong, Yongmin; Gu, Chengfan

    2018-05-30

    Soft tissue deformation modelling forms the basis of development of surgical simulation, surgical planning and robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery. This paper presents a new methodology for modelling of soft tissue deformation based on reaction-diffusion mechanics via neural dynamics. The potential energy stored in soft tissues due to a mechanical load to deform tissues away from their rest state is treated as the equivalent transmembrane potential energy, and it is distributed in the tissue masses in the manner of reaction-diffusion propagation of nonlinear electrical waves. The reaction-diffusion propagation of mechanical potential energy and nonrigid mechanics of motion are combined to model soft tissue deformation and its dynamics, both of which are further formulated as the dynamics of cellular neural networks to achieve real-time computational performance. The proposed methodology is implemented with a haptic device for interactive soft tissue deformation with force feedback. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methodology exhibits nonlinear force-displacement relationship for nonlinear soft tissue deformation. Homogeneous, anisotropic and heterogeneous soft tissue material properties can be modelled through the inherent physical properties of mass points. Graphical abstract Soft tissue deformation modelling with haptic feedback via neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

  7. Catalyst Influence on Undesired Side Reactions in the Polycondensation of Fully Bio-Based Polyester Itaconates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Schoon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bio-based unsaturated polyester resins derived from itaconic acid can be an alternative to established resins of this type in the field of radical-curing resins. However, one of the challenges of these polyester itaconates is the somewhat more elaborate synthetic process, especially under polycondensation conditions used on an industrial scale. The α,β-unsaturated double bond of the itaconic acid is prone to side reactions that can lead to the gelation of the polyester resin under standard conditions. This is especially true when bio-based diols such as 1,3-propanediol or 1,4-butanediol are used to obtain resins that are 100% derived from renewable resources. It was observed in earlier studies that high amounts of these aliphatic diols in the polyester lead to low conversion and gelation of the resins. In this work, a catalytic study using different diols was performed in order to elucidate the reasons for this behavior. It was shown that the choice of catalyst has a crucial influence on the side reactions occurring during the polycondensation reactions. In addition, the side reactions taking place were identified and suppressed. These results will allow for the synthesis of polyester itaconates on a larger scale, setting the stage for their industrial application.

  8. Computational intelligence-based polymerase chain reaction primer selection based on a novel teaching-learning-based optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Huei

    2014-12-01

    Specific primers play an important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments, and therefore it is essential to find specific primers of outstanding quality. Unfortunately, many PCR constraints must be simultaneously inspected which makes specific primer selection difficult and time-consuming. This paper introduces a novel computational intelligence-based method, Teaching-Learning-Based Optimisation, to select the specific and feasible primers. The specified PCR product lengths of 150-300 bp and 500-800 bp with three melting temperature formulae of Wallace's formula, Bolton and McCarthy's formula and SantaLucia's formula were performed. The authors calculate optimal frequency to estimate the quality of primer selection based on a total of 500 runs for 50 random nucleotide sequences of 'Homo species' retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The method was then fairly compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) and memetic algorithm (MA) for primer selection in the literature. The results show that the method easily found suitable primers corresponding with the setting primer constraints and had preferable performance than the GA and the MA. Furthermore, the method was also compared with the common method Primer3 according to their method type, primers presentation, parameters setting, speed and memory usage. In conclusion, it is an interesting primer selection method and a valuable tool for automatic high-throughput analysis. In the future, the usage of the primers in the wet lab needs to be validated carefully to increase the reliability of the method.

  9. Effects of urban air pollution on the inflammatory reaction: involvement of the chemokine pathways; Impact de la pollution atmospherique urbaine sur la reponse inflammatoire: implication des chimiokines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahy, O.

    2000-12-01

    Urban air pollution is both gaseous and particulate, and diesel exhausts are now the main source of particles. Diesel particles consist of a carbon core with multiple adsorbed organic compounds, among witch poly-aromatic hydrocarbons. These diesel particles and associated poly-aromatic hydrocarbons are likely to play a role in the recent increase in allergic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of diesel organic extracts on the initiation and the orientation of the allergen-dependent inflammatory reaction by analyzing the dis-regulation of a family of mediators involved in cellular recruitment: the chemokines. We demonstrated that mononuclear cells and alveolar macrophages from normal subjects displayed a dis-regulation in pro-inflammatory chemokine expression and production (IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES) when exposed to diesel organic extracts. In addition we observed a synergy between the effects of diesel and allergen when cells from allergic patients were exposed to both simultaneously, leading to a strong over-production of chemokines, and to the increased capacity of recruiting effector cells such as neutrophils and eosinophils. The MAP kinase pathways seemed largely involved in the transduction of diesel and allergen stimulus, since a specific inhibition almost abolished the dis-regulation of chemokine production. Diesel and allergen also appeared to favour the establishment of a type 2 immune response (pro-allergenic), by preferentially recruiting Th2 lymphocytes via the dis-regulation of chemokine expression (MDC and IP-10). Finally, the humanized SCID mouse model grafted with autologous human skin allowed the in vivo evaluation of a local over-production of chemokine, by analyzing the cellular recruitment in the skin after intra-dermal injection of recombinant chemokines. This model appears useful for the study of the mechanisms of cellular recruitment by chemokines and the potential therapeutic approaches. In conclusion, our study underlines the

  10. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  11. Optimal processing pathway selection for microalgae-based biorefinery under uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Zaman, Muhammad; Lee, Jay H.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a systematic framework for the selection of optimal processing pathways for a microalgaebased biorefinery under techno-economic uncertainty. The proposed framework promotes robust decision making by taking into account the uncertainties that arise due to inconsistencies among...... and shortage in the available technical information. A stochastic mixed integer nonlinear programming (sMINLP) problem is formulated for determining the optimal biorefinery configurations based on a superstructure model where parameter uncertainties are modeled and included as sampled scenarios. The solution...... the accounting of uncertainty are compared with respect to different objectives. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Coulometric bioelectrocatalytic reactions based on NAD-dependent dehydrogenases in tricarboxylic acid cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Jun; Tsujimura, Seiya; Kano, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of mediated electro-enzymatic electrolysis systems based on NAD-dependent dehydrogenase reactions in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. A micro-bulk electrolysis system with a carbon felt anode immersed in an electrolysis solution with a value of about 10 μL was constructed for coulometric analysis of the substrate oxidation. Diaphorase (DI) was used to couple the NAD-dependent dehydrogenase reaction with the anode reaction of a suitable redox mediator. We focused on three types of NAD-dependant dehydrogenases reactions in this research: (1) isocitrate oxidation, in which the standard Gibbs energy change (ΔG o ') is negative; (2) α-ketoglutarate oxidation, which involves an electrochemically active coenzyme A (CoA); and (3) malate oxidation, which is thermodynamically unfavorable because of a large positive ΔG o ' value. The complete electrolysis of isocitrate was easily achieved, supporting the effective re-oxidation of NADH in the diaphorase-catalyzed electrochemical reaction. CoA was unfavorably oxidized at the electrodes in the presence of some mediators. The electrocatalytic oxidation of CoA was suppressed and the quantitative electrochemical oxidation of α-ketoglutarate was achieved by selecting a suitable mediator with negligibly slow electron transfer kinetics with CoA. The uphill malate oxidation was susceptible to product inhibition in the bioelectrochemical system, although NADH generated in the malate dehydrogenase reaction was immediately oxidized in the electrochemical system. The inhibition was successfully suppressed by linking citrate synthase to quench oxaloacetate and to make the total ΔG o ' value negative

  13. Coulometric bioelectrocatalytic reactions based on NAD-dependent dehydrogenases in tricarboxylic acid cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Jun [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kano, Kenji [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2008-12-30

    This paper describes the characterization of mediated electro-enzymatic electrolysis systems based on NAD-dependent dehydrogenase reactions in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. A micro-bulk electrolysis system with a carbon felt anode immersed in an electrolysis solution with a value of about 10 {mu}L was constructed for coulometric analysis of the substrate oxidation. Diaphorase (DI) was used to couple the NAD-dependent dehydrogenase reaction with the anode reaction of a suitable redox mediator. We focused on three types of NAD-dependant dehydrogenases reactions in this research: (1) isocitrate oxidation, in which the standard Gibbs energy change ({delta}G{sup o}') is negative; (2) {alpha}-ketoglutarate oxidation, which involves an electrochemically active coenzyme A (CoA); and (3) malate oxidation, which is thermodynamically unfavorable because of a large positive {delta}G{sup o}' value. The complete electrolysis of isocitrate was easily achieved, supporting the effective re-oxidation of NADH in the diaphorase-catalyzed electrochemical reaction. CoA was unfavorably oxidized at the electrodes in the presence of some mediators. The electrocatalytic oxidation of CoA was suppressed and the quantitative electrochemical oxidation of {alpha}-ketoglutarate was achieved by selecting a suitable mediator with negligibly slow electron transfer kinetics with CoA. The uphill malate oxidation was susceptible to product inhibition in the bioelectrochemical system, although NADH generated in the malate dehydrogenase reaction was immediately oxidized in the electrochemical system. The inhibition was successfully suppressed by linking citrate synthase to quench oxaloacetate and to make the total {delta}G{sup o}' value negative.

  14. Non-allergic cutaneous reactions in airborne chemical sensitivity--a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Nikolaj Drimer; Linneberg, Allan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Dirksen, Asger; Elberling, Jesper

    2011-06-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is characterised by adverse effects due to exposure to low levels of chemical substances. The aetiology is unknown, but chemical related respiratory symptoms have been found associated with positive patch test. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cutaneous reactions from patch testing and self-reported severity of chemical sensitivity to common airborne chemicals. A total of 3460 individuals participating in a general health examination, Health 2006, were patch tested with allergens from the European standard series and screened for chemical sensitivity with a standardised questionnaire dividing the participants into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity. Both allergic and non-allergic cutaneous reactions--defined as irritative, follicular, or doubtful allergic reactions--were analysed in relationship with severity of chemical sensitivity. Associations were controlled for the possible confounding effects of sex, age, asthma, eczema, atopic dermatitis, psychological and social factors, and smoking habits. In unadjusted analyses we found associations between allergic and non-allergic cutaneous reactions on patch testing and the two most severe groups of self-reported sensitivity to airborne chemicals. When adjusting for confounding, associations were weakened, and only non-allergic cutaneous reactions were significantly associated with individuals most severely affected by inhalation of airborne chemicals (odds ratio = 2.5, p = 0.006). Our results suggest that individuals with self-reported chemical sensitivity show increased non-allergic cutaneous reactions based on day 2 readings of patch tests. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Stoichiometric Representation of Gene–Protein–Reaction Associations Leverages Constraint-Based Analysis from Reaction to Gene-Level Phenotype Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Daniel; Herrgard, Markus; Rocha, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    only describe the metabolic phenotype at the reaction level, understanding the mechanistic link between genotype and phenotype is still hampered by the complexity of gene-protein-reaction associations. We implement a model transformation that enables constraint-based methods to be applied at the gene...... design methods are not actually feasible, and show how our approach allows using the same methods to obtain feasible gene-based designs. We also show, by extensive comparison with experimental 13C-flux data, how simple reformulations of different simulation methods with gene-wise objective functions...

  16. Heading in the right direction: thermodynamics-based network analysis and pathway engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Meric; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-12-01

    Thermodynamics-based network analysis through the introduction of thermodynamic constraints in metabolic models allows a deeper analysis of metabolism and guides pathway engineering. The number and the areas of applications of thermodynamics-based network analysis methods have been increasing in the last ten years. We review recent applications of these methods and we identify the areas that such analysis can contribute significantly, and the needs for future developments. We find that organisms with multiple compartments and extremophiles present challenges for modeling and thermodynamics-based flux analysis. The evolution of current and new methods must also address the issues of the multiple alternatives in flux directionalities and the uncertainties and partial information from analytical methods. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Language pathway tracking: comparing nTMS-based DTI fiber tracking with a cubic ROIs-based protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negwer, Chiara; Sollmann, Nico; Ille, Sebastian; Hauck, Theresa; Maurer, Stefanie; Kirschke, Jan S; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) fiber tracking (FT) has been widely used in glioma surgery in recent years. It can provide helpful information about subcortical structures, especially in patients with eloquent space-occupying lesions. This study compared the newly developed navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS)-based DTI FT of language pathways with the most reproducible protocol for language pathway tractography, using cubic regions of interest (ROIs) for the arcuate fascicle. METHODS Thirty-seven patients with left-sided perisylvian lesions underwent language mapping by repetitive nTMS. DTI FT was performed using the cubic ROIs-based protocol and the authors' nTMS-based DTI FT approach. The same minimal fiber length and fractional anisotropy were chosen (50 mm and 0.2, respectively). Both protocols were performed with standard clinical tractography software. RESULTS Both methods visualized language-related fiber tracts (i.e., corticonuclear tract, arcuate fascicle, uncinate fascicle, superior longitudinal fascicle, inferior longitudinal fascicle, arcuate fibers, commissural fibers, corticothalamic fibers, and frontooccipital fascicle) in all 37 patients. Using the cubic ROIs-based protocol, 39.9% of these language-related fiber tracts were detected in the examined patients, as opposed to 76.0% when performing nTMS-based DTI FT. For specifically tracking the arcuate fascicle, however, the cubic ROIs-based approach showed better results (97.3% vs 75.7% with nTMS-based DTI FT). CONCLUSIONS The cubic ROIs-based protocol was designed for arcuate fascicle tractography, and this study shows that it is still useful for this intention. However, superior results were obtained using the nTMS-based DTI FT for visualization of other language-related fiber tracts.

  18. Evidence-based educational pathway for the integration of first aid training in school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buck, Emmy; Van Remoortel, Hans; Dieltjens, Tessa; Verstraeten, Hans; Clarysse, Matthieu; Moens, Olaf; Vandekerckhove, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    "Calling for help, performing first aid and providing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)" is part of the educational goals in secondary schools in Belgium (Flanders). However, for teachers it is not always clear at what age children can be taught which aspects of first aid. In addition, it is not clear what constitutes "performing first aid" and we strongly advocate that the first aid curriculum is broader than CPR training alone. To develop an evidence-based educational pathway to enable the integration of first aid into the school curriculum by defining the goals to be achieved for knowledge, skills and attitudes, for different age groups. Studies were identified through electronic databases research (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase). We included studies on first aid education for children and adolescents up to 18 years old. A multidisciplinary expert panel formulated their practice experience and expert opinion and discussed the available evidence. We identified 5822 references and finally retained 30 studies (13 experimental and 17 observational studies), including studies concerning emergency call (7 studies), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (18 studies), AED (Automated External Defibrillator) use (6 studies), recovery position (5 studies), choking (2 studies), injuries (5 studies), and poisoning (2 studies). Recommendations (educational goals) were derived after carefully discussing the currently available evidence in the literature and balancing the skills and attitudes of children of different ages. An evidence-based educational pathway with educational goals concerning learning first aid for each age group was developed. This educational pathway can be used for the integration of first aid training in school curricula. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. A quantum theoretical study of reactions of methyldiazonium ion with DNA base pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Ganapathy, Vinay; Mishra, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Reactions of methyldiazonium ion at the different sites of the DNA bases in the Watson-Crick GC and AT base pairs were investigated employing density functional and second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theories. Display Omitted Highlights: → Methylation of the DNA bases is important as it can cause mutation and cancer. → Methylation reactions of the GC and AT base pairs with CH 3 N 2 + were not studied earlier theoretically. → Experimental observations have been explained using theoretical methods. - Abstract: Methylation of the DNA bases in the Watson-Crick GC and AT base pairs by the methyldiazonium ion was investigated employing density functional and second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theories. Methylation at the N3, N7 and O6 sites of guanine, N1, N3 and N7 sites of adenine, O2 and N3 sites of cytosine and the O2 and O4 sites of thymine were considered. The computed reactivities for methylation follow the order N7(guanine) > N3(adenine) > O6(guanine) which is in agreement with experiment. The base pairing in DNA is found to play a significant role with regard to reactivities of the different sites.

  20. Computing molecular fluctuations in biochemical reaction systems based on a mechanistic, statistical theory of irreversible processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasiri, Don

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the quantification of molecular fluctuations in the biochemical reaction systems within the context of intracellular processes associated with gene expression. We take the molecular reactions pertaining to circadian rhythms to develop models of molecular fluctuations in this chapter. There are a significant number of studies on stochastic fluctuations in intracellular genetic regulatory networks based on single cell-level experiments. In order to understand the fluctuations associated with the gene expression in circadian rhythm networks, it is important to model the interactions of transcriptional factors with the E-boxes in the promoter regions of some of the genes. The pertinent aspects of a near-equilibrium theory that would integrate the thermodynamical and particle dynamic characteristics of intracellular molecular fluctuations would be discussed, and the theory is extended by using the theory of stochastic differential equations. We then model the fluctuations associated with the promoter regions using general mathematical settings. We implemented ubiquitous Gillespie's algorithms, which are used to simulate stochasticity in biochemical networks, for each of the motifs. Both the theory and the Gillespie's algorithms gave the same results in terms of the time evolution of means and variances of molecular numbers. As biochemical reactions occur far away from equilibrium-hence the use of the Gillespie algorithm-these results suggest that the near-equilibrium theory should be a good approximation for some of the biochemical reactions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Isotope effects for base-promoted, gas-phase proton transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, J.J.; Cheng, Xueheng

    1991-01-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most basic, the most common and the most important of chemical transformations; despite their apparent simplicity, much is unknown about this most fundamental of all chemical processes. Active interest in understanding the underlying principles of organic proton transfer reactions continues because of efforts being made to develop the theory of elementary chemical processes, because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry and because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry processes, because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry and because of the dynamic role played by proton transfers in biochemical transformations. As organic chemists, the authors have used the flowing afterglow technique to gain an appreciation of the fundamental issues involved in reaction mechanisms by examining such processes in a solvent-free environment under thermally-equilibrated (300 K) conditions. Recent characterization of the facile production of both acetate and the monoenolate anion from the interaction of hydroxide or fluoride with acetic acid reinforces the idea that much yet must be learned about proton transfers/proton abstractions in general. Earlier work by Riveros and co-workers on competitive H vs D abstraction from α-d 1 -toluenes and by Noest and Nibbering on competitive H vs D abstraction from α,α,α-d 3 -acetone, in combination with the acetic acid results, challenged the author's to assemble a comprehensive picture of the competitive nature of proton transfer reactions for anionic base-promoted processes

  2. Person-based differences in pay reactions: A compensation-activation theory and integrative conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Ingrid Smithey; Shaw, Jason D

    2018-06-07

    Compensation research has focused traditionally on how pay design characteristics (e.g., pay level, individual or group incentives) relate to average employee outcomes and, in toto, on how these outcomes affect organizational performance. Recently, scholars have begun to pay more attention to how individuals vary in the strength of their reactions to pay. Empirical research in several disciplines examines how the interplay of pay systems and person-based characteristics (psychological individual differences, demographics, and relative performance or position in a group) relate to important work-related outcomes. We develop a compensation-activation theory that frames compensation design characteristics as workplace "situations" providing cues that activate individuals' corresponding fundamental social motives made salient due to chronic or transient person-based characteristics. Where activation occurs, stronger-than-average responses to the compensation "situation" are expected. Using the theory as a lens, we synthesize and reinterpret existing research on person-based reactions to pay characteristics, including sorting, incentive/motivational effects, and effects on collective pay system reactions and unit/organizational outcomes. We conclude with a research agenda aimed at refining compensation-activation theory and advancing the study of compensation as it affects individual and organizational outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Interfacial Redox Reactions Associated Ionic Transport in Oxide-Based Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Shah, Abdul Hadi; Du, Haiwei; Li, Sean

    2017-01-18

    As an alternative to transistor-based flash memories, redox reactions mediated resistive switches are considered as the most promising next-generation nonvolatile memories that combine the advantages of a simple metal/solid electrolyte (insulator)/metal structure, high scalability, low power consumption, and fast processing. For cation-based memories, the unavailability of in-built mobile cations in many solid electrolytes/insulators (e.g., Ta 2 O 5 , SiO 2 , etc.) instigates the essential role of absorbed water in films to keep electroneutrality for redox reactions at counter electrodes. Herein, we demonstrate electrochemical characteristics (oxidation/reduction reactions) of active electrodes (Ag and Cu) at the electrode/electrolyte interface and their subsequent ions transportation in Fe 3 O 4 film by means of cyclic voltammetry measurements. By posing positive potentials on Ag/Cu active electrodes, Ag preferentially oxidized to Ag + , while Cu prefers to oxidize into Cu 2+ first, followed by Cu/Cu + oxidation. By sweeping the reverse potential, the oxidized ions can be subsequently reduced at the counter electrode. The results presented here provide a detailed understanding of the resistive switching phenomenon in Fe 3 O 4 -based memory cells. The results were further discussed on the basis of electrochemically assisted cations diffusions in the presence of absorbed surface water molecules in the film.

  4. A D-D/D-T fusion reaction based neutron generator system for liver tumor BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivunoro, H.; Lou, T.P.; Leung, K. N.; Reijonen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiation treatment modality used for highly malignant tumor treatments. Prior to irradiation with low energetic neutrons, a 10B compound is located selectively in the tumor cells. The effect of the treatment is based on the high LET radiation released in the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction with thermal neutrons. BNCT has been used experimentally for brain tumor and melanoma treatments. Lately applications of other severe tumor type treatments have been introduced. Results have shown that liver tumors can also be treated by BNCT. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, various compact neutron generators based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions are being developed. The earlier theoretical studies of the D-D or D-T fusion reaction based neutron generators have shown that the optimal moderator and reflector configuration for brain tumor BNCT can be created. In this work, the applicability of 2.5 MeV neutrons for liver tumor BNCT application was studied. The optimal neutron energy for external liver treatments is not known. Neutron beams of different energies (1eV < E < 100 keV) were simulated and the dose distribution in the liver was calculated with the MCNP simulation code. In order to obtain the optimal neutron energy spectrum with the D-D neutrons, various moderator designs were performed using MCNP simulations. In this article the neutron spectrum and the optimized beam shaping assembly for liver tumor treatments is presented

  5. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics: applications to biomarker and metabolic pathway research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Yan, Guangli; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has become increasingly popular in molecular medicine. High-definition mass spectrometry (MS), coupled with pattern recognition methods, have been carried out to obtain comprehensive metabolite profiling and metabolic pathway of large biological datasets. This sets the scene for a new and powerful diagnostic approach. Analysis of the key metabolites in body fluids has become an important part of improving disease diagnosis. With technological advances in analytical techniques, the ability to measure low-molecular-weight metabolites in bio-samples provides a powerful platform for identifying metabolites that are uniquely correlated with a specific human disease. MS-based metabolomics can lead to enhanced understanding of disease mechanisms and to new diagnostic markers and has a strong potential to contribute to improving early diagnosis of diseases. This review will highlight the importance and benefit with certain characteristic examples of MS-metabolomics for identifying metabolic pathways and metabolites that accurately screen for potential diagnostic biomarkers of diseases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Automated tool for virtual screening and pharmacology-based pathway prediction and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandh Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The virtual screening is an effective tool for the lead identification in drug discovery. However, there are limited numbers of crystal structures available as compared to the number of biological sequences which makes (Structure Based Drug Discovery SBDD a difficult choice. The current tool is an attempt to automate the protein structure modelling and automatic virtual screening followed by pharmacology-based prediction and analysis. Starting from sequence(s, this tool automates protein structure modelling, binding site identification, automated docking, ligand preparation, post docking analysis and identification of hits in the biological pathways that can be modulated by a group of ligands. This automation helps in the characterization of ligands selectivity and action of ligands on a complex biological molecular network as well as on individual receptor. The judicial combination of the ligands binding different receptors can be used to inhibit selective biological pathways in a disease. This tool also allows the user to systemically investigate network-dependent effects of a drug or drug candidate.

  7. The base excision repair pathway is required for efficient lentivirus integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine E Yoder

    Full Text Available An siRNA screen has identified several proteins throughout the base excision repair (BER pathway of oxidative DNA damage as important for efficient HIV infection. The proteins identified included early repair factors such as the base damage recognition glycosylases OGG1 and MYH and the late repair factor POLß, implicating the entire BER pathway. Murine cells with deletions of the genes Ogg1, Myh, Neil1 and Polß recapitulate the defect of HIV infection in the absence of BER. Defective infection in the absence of BER proteins was also seen with the lentivirus FIV, but not the gammaretrovirus MMLV. BER proteins do not affect HIV infection through its accessory genes nor the central polypurine tract. HIV reverse transcription and nuclear entry appear unaffected by the absence of BER proteins. However, HIV integration to the host chromosome is reduced in the absence of BER proteins. Pre-integration complexes from BER deficient cell lines show reduced integration activity in vitro. Integration activity is restored by addition of recombinant BER protein POLß. Lentiviral infection and integration efficiency appears to depend on the presence of BER proteins.

  8. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  9. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  10. Conceptual Pathway Querying of Natural Logic Knowledge Bases from Text Bases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik; Nilsson, Jørgen Fischer

    2013-01-01

    language than predicate logic. Natural logic accommodates a variety of scientific parlance, ontologies and domain models. It also supports a semantic net or graph view of the knowledge base. This admits computation of relationships between concepts simultaneously through pathfinding in the knowledge base...

  11. Numerical solution of the unsteady diffusion-convection-reaction equation based on improved spectral Galerkin method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jiaqi; Zeng, Cheng; Yuan, Yupeng; Zhang, Yuzhe; Zhang, Ye

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an explicit numerical algorithm based on improved spectral Galerkin method for solving the unsteady diffusion-convection-reaction equation. The principal characteristics of this approach give the explicit eigenvalues and eigenvectors based on the time-space separation method and boundary condition analysis. With the help of Fourier series and Galerkin truncation, we can obtain the finite-dimensional ordinary differential equations which facilitate the system analysis and controller design. By comparing with the finite element method, the numerical solutions are demonstrated via two examples. It is shown that the proposed method is effective.

  12. GWAS-based pathway analysis differentiates between fluid and crystallized intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforou, A; Espeseth, T; Davies, G; Fernandes, C P D; Giddaluru, S; Mattheisen, M; Tenesa, A; Harris, S E; Liewald, D C; Payton, A; Ollier, W; Horan, M; Pendleton, N; Haggarty, P; Djurovic, S; Herms, S; Hoffman, P; Cichon, S; Starr, J M; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Deary, I J; Le Hellard, S

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive abilities vary among people. About 40-50% of this variability is due to general intelligence (g), which reflects the positive correlation among individuals' scores on diverse cognitive ability tests. g is positively correlated with many life outcomes, such as education, occupational status and health, motivating the investigation of its underlying biology. In psychometric research, a distinction is made between general fluid intelligence (gF) - the ability to reason in novel situations - and general crystallized intelligence (gC) - the ability to apply acquired knowledge. This distinction is supported by developmental and cognitive neuroscience studies. Classical epidemiological studies and recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have established that these cognitive traits have a large genetic component. However, no robust genetic associations have been published thus far due largely to the known polygenic nature of these traits and insufficient sample sizes. Here, using two GWAS datasets, in which the polygenicity of gF and gC traits was previously confirmed, a gene- and pathway-based approach was undertaken with the aim of characterizing and differentiating their genetic architecture. Pathway analysis, using genes selected on the basis of relaxed criteria, revealed notable differences between these two traits. gF appeared to be characterized by genes affecting the quantity and quality of neurons and therefore neuronal efficiency, whereas long-term depression (LTD) seemed to underlie gC. Thus, this study supports the gF-gC distinction at the genetic level and identifies functional annotations and pathways worthy of further investigation. © 2014 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. On the rejection-based algorithm for simulation and analysis of large-scale reaction networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research-University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Zunino, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.zunino@unitn.it [Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research-University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2015-06-28

    Stochastic simulation for in silico studies of large biochemical networks requires a great amount of computational time. We recently proposed a new exact simulation algorithm, called the rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)], to improve simulation performance by postponing and collapsing as much as possible the propensity updates. In this paper, we analyze the performance of this algorithm in detail, and improve it for simulating large-scale biochemical reaction networks. We also present a new algorithm, called simultaneous RSSA (SRSSA), which generates many independent trajectories simultaneously for the analysis of the biochemical behavior. SRSSA improves simulation performance by utilizing a single data structure across simulations to select reaction firings and forming trajectories. The memory requirement for building and storing the data structure is thus independent of the number of trajectories. The updating of the data structure when needed is performed collectively in a single operation across the simulations. The trajectories generated by SRSSA are exact and independent of each other by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We test our new improvement on real biological systems with a wide range of reaction networks to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency.

  14. An aptasensor for staphylococcus aureus based on nicking enzyme amplification reaction and rolling circle amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingguo; Guo, Jia; Maina, Sarah Wanjiku; Yang, Yumeng; Hu, Yimin; Li, Xuanxuan; Qiu, Jiarong; Xin, Zhihong

    2018-05-15

    An ultra-sensitive aptamer-based biosensor for the detection of staphylococcus aureus was established by adopting the nicking enzyme amplification reaction (NEAR) and the rolling circle amplification (RCA) technologies. Aptamer-probe (AP), containing an aptamer and a probe sequence, was developed to act as the recognition unit of the biosensor, which was specifically bound to S. aureus. The probe was released from AP and initiated into the subsequent DNA amplification reactions where S. aureus was present, converting the detection of S. aureus to the investigation of probe oligonucleotide. The RCA amplification products contained a G-quadruplex motif and formed a three dimensional structure in presence of hemin. The G4/hemin complex showed horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimic activity and catalyzed the chemiluminescence reaction of luminol mediated by H 2 O 2 . The results showed that the established biosensor could detect S. aureus specifically with a good linear correlation at 5-10 4  CFU/mL. The signal values based on NEAR-RCA two-step cycle were boosted acutely, much higher than that relied on one-cycle magnification. The limit of detection (LoD) was determined to be as low as 5 CFU/mL. The established aptasensor exhibited a good discrimination of living against dead S. aureus, and can be applied to detect S. aureus in the food industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Carbon nanotube-based substrates promote cardiogenesis in brown adipose-derived stem cells via β1-integrin-dependent TGF-β1 signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongyu; Mou, Yongchao; Li, Yi; Li, Xia; Chen, Zi; Duval, Kayla; Huang, Zhu; Dai, Ruiwu; Tang, Lijun; Tian, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy remains one of the promising approaches for cardiac repair and regeneration. However, its applications are restricted by the limited efficacy of cardiac differentiation. To address this issue, we examined whether carbon nanotubes (CNTs) would provide an instructive extracellular microenvironment to facilitate cardiogenesis in brown adipose-derived stem cells (BASCs) and to elucidate the underlying signaling pathways. In this study, we systematically investigated a series of cellular responses of BASCs due to the incorporation of CNTs into collagen (CNT-Col) substrates that promoted cell adhesion, spreading, and growth. Moreover, we found that CNT-Col substrates remarkably improved the efficiency of BASCs cardiogenesis by using fluorescence staining and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Critically, CNTs in the substrates accelerated the maturation of BASCs-derived cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism for promotion of BASCs cardiac differentiation by CNTs was determined by immunostaining, quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay. It is notable that β1-integrin-dependent TGF-β1 signaling pathway modulates the facilitative effect of CNTs in cardiac differentiation of BASCs. Therefore, it is an efficient approach to regulate cardiac differentiation of BASCs by the incorporation of CNTs into the native matrix. Importantly, our findings can not only facilitate the mechanistic understanding of molecular events initiating cardiac differentiation in stem cells, but also offer a potentially safer source for cardiac regenerative medicine. PMID:27660434

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Enzyme Compartments in UV-Cured Polyurethane-Based Materials and Their Application in Enzymatic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Uhrich

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and characterization of UV-cured polyurethane-based materials for the mild inclusion immobilization of enzymes was investigated. Full curing of the polymer precursor/enzyme solution mixture was realized by a short irradiation with UV-light at ambient temperatures. The included aqueous enzyme solution remains highly dispersed in the polymer material with an even size distribution throughout the polymer material. The presented concept provides stable enzyme compartments which were applied for an alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed reduction reaction in organic solvents. Cofactor regeneration was achieved by a substrate-coupled approach via 2-propanol or an enzyme-coupled approach by a glucose dehydrogenase. This reaction concept can also be used for a simultaneous application of contrary biocatalytic reaction conditions within an enzymatic cascade reaction. Independent polymer-based reaction compartments were provided for two incompatible enzymatic reaction systems (alcohol dehydrogenase and hydroxynitrile lyase, while the relevant reactants diffuse between the applied compartments.

  17. Immediate Adverse Reactions to Gadolinium-Based MR Contrast Media: A Retrospective Analysis on 10,608 Examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Granata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Contrast media (CM for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may determine the development of acute adverse reactions. Objective was to retrospectively assess the frequency and severity of adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs injection in patients who underwent MRI. Material and Methods. At our center 10608 MRI examinations with CM were performed using five different GBCAs: Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance, Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Gd-EOBDTPA (Primovist, Gd-DOTA (Dotarem, and Gd-BTDO3A (Gadovist. Results. 32 acute adverse reactions occurred, accounting for 0.3% of all administration. Twelve reactions were associated with Gd-DOTA injection (0.11%, 9 with Gd-BOPTA injection (0.08%, 6 with Gd-BTDO3A (0.056%, 3 with Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.028%, and 2 with Gd-DTPA (0.018%. Twenty-four reactions (75.0% were mild, four (12.5% moderate, and four (12.5% severe. The most severe reactions were seen associated with use of Gd-BOPTA, with 3 severe reactions in 32 total reactions. Conclusion. Acute adverse reactions are generally rare with the overall adverse reaction rate of 0.3%. The most common adverse reactions were not severe, consisting in skin rash and hives.

  18. Synthesis of Apoptotic New Quinazolinone-Based Compound and Identification of its Underlying Mitochondrial Signalling Pathway in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedifard, Maryam; Faraj, Fadhil Lafta; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hasandarvish, Pouya; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Majid, Nazia Abdul; Khalifa, Shaden A M; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; El-Seedi, Hesham R

    2015-01-01

    The anti-carcinogenic effect of the new quinazolinone compound, named MMD, was tested on MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The synthesis of quinazolinone-based compounds attracted strong attention over the past few decades as an alternative mean to produce analogues of natural products. Quinazolinone compounds sharing the main principal core structures are currently introduced in the clinical trials and pharmaceutical markets as anti-cancer agents. Thus, it is of high clinical interest to identify a new drug that could be used to control the growth and expansion of cancer cells. Quinazolinone is a metabolite derivative resulting from the conjugation of 2-aminobenzoyhydrazide and 5-methoxy-2- hydroxybenzaldehyde based on condensation reactions. In the present study, we analysed the influence of MMD on breast cancer adenoma cell morphology, cell cycle arrest, DNA fragmentation, cytochrome c release and caspases activity. MCF-7 is a type of cell line representing the breast cancer adenoma cells that can be expanded and differentiated in culture. Using different in vitro strategies and specific antibodies, we demonstrate a novel role for MMD in the inhibition of cell proliferation and initiation of the programmed cell death. MMD was found to increase cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol and this effect was enhanced over time with effective IC50 value of 5.85 ± 0.71 μg/mL detected in a 72-hours treatment. Additionally, MMD induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and caused DNA fragmentation with obvious activation of caspase-9 and caspases-3/7. Our results demonstrate a novel role of MMD as an anti-proliferative agent and imply the involvement of mitochondrial intrinsic pathway in the observed apoptosis.

  19. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  20. Theoretical predictions for hexagonal BN based nanomaterials as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyalin, Andrey; Nakayama, Akira; Uosaki, Kohei; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2013-02-28

    The catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of both the pristine and defect-possessing hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) monolayer and H-terminated nanoribbon have been studied theoretically using density functional theory. It is demonstrated that an inert h-BN monolayer can be functionalized and become catalytically active by nitrogen doping. It is shown that the energetics of adsorption of O(2), O, OH, OOH, and H(2)O on N atom impurities in the h-BN monolayer (N(B)@h-BN) is quite similar to that known for a Pt(111) surface. The specific mechanism of destructive and cooperative adsorption of ORR intermediates on the surface point defects is discussed. It is demonstrated that accounting for entropy and zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections results in destabilization of the ORR intermediates adsorbed on N(B)@h-BN, while solvent effects lead to their stabilization. Therefore, entropy, ZPE and solvent effects partly cancel each other and have to be taken into account simultaneously. Analysis of the free energy changes along the ORR pathway allows us to suggest that a N-doped h-BN monolayer can demonstrate catalytic properties for the ORR under the condition that electron transport to the catalytically active center is provided.

  1. Parametric sensitivity analysis for biochemical reaction networks based on pathwise information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, Yannis; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2013-10-22

    Stochastic modeling and simulation provide powerful predictive methods for the intrinsic understanding of fundamental mechanisms in complex biochemical networks. Typically, such mathematical models involve networks of coupled jump stochastic processes with a large number of parameters that need to be suitably calibrated against experimental data. In this direction, the parameter sensitivity analysis of reaction networks is an essential mathematical and computational tool, yielding information regarding the robustness and the identifiability of model parameters. However, existing sensitivity analysis approaches such as variants of the finite difference method can have an overwhelming computational cost in models with a high-dimensional parameter space. We develop a sensitivity analysis methodology suitable for complex stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters. The proposed approach is based on Information Theory methods and relies on the quantification of information loss due to parameter perturbations between time-series distributions. For this reason, we need to work on path-space, i.e., the set consisting of all stochastic trajectories, hence the proposed approach is referred to as "pathwise". The pathwise sensitivity analysis method is realized by employing the rigorously-derived Relative Entropy Rate, which is directly computable from the propensity functions. A key aspect of the method is that an associated pathwise Fisher Information Matrix (FIM) is defined, which in turn constitutes a gradient-free approach to quantifying parameter sensitivities. The structure of the FIM turns out to be block-diagonal, revealing hidden parameter dependencies and sensitivities in reaction networks. As a gradient-free method, the proposed sensitivity analysis provides a significant advantage when dealing with complex stochastic systems with a large number of parameters. In addition, the knowledge of the structure of the FIM can allow to efficiently address

  2. Development of a skeletal multi-component fuel reaction mechanism based on decoupling methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Balaji; Tay, Kun Lin; Yang, Wenming; Chua, Kian Jon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A compact multi-component skeletal reaction mechanism was developed. • Combined bio-diesel and PRF mechanism was proposed. • The mechanism consists of 68 species and 183 reactions. • Well validated against ignition delay times, flame speed and engine results. - Abstract: A new coupled bio-diesel surrogate and primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation skeletal mechanism has been developed. The bio-diesel surrogate sub-mechanism consists of oxidation sub-mechanisms of Methyl decanoate (MD), Methyl 9-decenoate (MD9D) and n-Heptane fuel components. The MD and MD9D are chosen to represent the saturated and unsaturated methyl esters respectively in bio-diesel fuels. Then, a reduced iso-Octane oxidation sub-mechanism is added to the bio-diesel surrogate sub-mechanism. Then, all the sub-mechanisms are integrated to a reduced C_2–C_3 mechanism, detailed H_2/CO/C_1 mechanism and reduced NO_x mechanism based on decoupling methodology. The final mechanism consisted of 68 species and 183 reactions. The mechanism was well validated with shock-tube ignition delay times, laminar flame speed and 3D engine simulations.

  3. Hypersensitivity reaction studies of a polyethoxylated castor oil-free, liposome-based alternative paclitaxel formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; Cheng, Guang; Du, Yuan; Ye, Liang; Chen, Wenzhong; Zhang, Leiming; Wang, Tian; Tian, Jingwei; Fu, Fenghua

    2013-03-01

    The commercial drug paclitaxel (Taxol) may introduce hypersensitivity reactions associated with the polyethoxylated castor oil-ethanol solvent. To overcome these problems, we developed a polyethoxylated castor oil-free, liposome-based alternative paclitaxel formulation, known as Lipusu. In this study, we performed in vitro and in vivo experiments to compare the safety profiles of Lipusu and Taxol, with special regard to hypersensitivity reactions. First, Swiss mice were used to determine the lethal dosages, and then to evaluate hypersensitivity reactions, followed by histopathological examination and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) of serum SC5b-9 and lung histamine. Additionally, healthy human serum was used to analyze in vitro complement activation. Finally, an MTT assay was used to determine the in vitro anti-proliferation activity. Our data clearly showed that Lipusu displayed a much higher safety margin and did not induce hypersensitivity or hypersensitivity-related lung lesions, which may be associated with the fact that Lipusu did not activate complement or increase histamine release in vivo. Moreover, Lipusu did not promote complement activation in healthy human serum in vitro, and demonstrated anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cells, similar to that of Taxol. Therefore, the improved formulation of paclitaxel, which exhibited a much better safety profile and comparable cytotoxic activity to Taxol, may bring a number of benefits to cancer patients.

  4. Effective acupuncture practice through diagnosis based on distribution of meridian pathways & related syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yemeng; Zheng, Xin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Qunce; Wang, Tianfang

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of acupuncture practice utilizing diagnosis and distribution of various meridians and connecting channels based on meridian theory. The meridian system is considered as basic anatomy for acupuncture, so the corresponding pathways and related syndromes of different channels should play a key role in differentiation, known as meridian-related pattern differentiation. Since this doctrine originated in ancient times and was not so well developed in later generations, many acupuncturists are not able to utilize it efficiently. The authors survey how this doctrine was weakened during the past century, especially in acupuncture education for foreigners, and how this important method is currently being reinvigorated. This article also lays out the ways this doctrine can be applied clinically and introduces examples of a variety of indications including some difficult cases, such as whiplash injury, intervertebral disc herniation, oculomotor nerve paralysis, and eczema, etc.

  5. Enhanced performance of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway by manipulation of redox reactions relevant to IspC, IspG, and IspH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia; Yang, Liyang; Wang, Chonglong; Choi, Eui-Sung; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-04-20

    The 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is a carbon-efficient route for synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the building blocks of isoprenoids. However, practical application of a native or recombinant MEP pathway for the mass production of isoprenoids in Escherichia coli has been unsatisfactory. In this study, the entire recombinant MEP pathway was established with plasmids and used for the production of an isoprenoid, protoilludene. E. coli harboring the recombinant MEP pathway plasmid (ME) and a protoilludene synthesis pathway plasmid (AO) produced 10.4mg/L of protoilludene after 48h of culture. To determine the rate-limiting gene on plasmid ME, each constituent gene of the MEP pathway was additionally overexpressed on the plasmid AO. The additional overexpression of IPP isomerase (IDI) enhanced protoilludene production to 67.4mg/L. Overexpression of the Fpr and FldA protein complex, which could mediate electron transfer from NADPH to Fe-S cluster proteins such as IspG and IspH of the MEP pathway, increased protoilludene production to 318.8mg/L. Given that it is required for IspC as well as IspG/H, the MEP pathway has high demand for NADPH. To increase the supply of NADPH, a NADH kinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (tPos5p) that converts NADH to NADPH was introduced along with the deletion of a promiscuous NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase (YjgB) that consumes NADPH. This resulted in a protoilludene production of 512.7mg/L. The results indicate that IDI, Fpr-FldA redox proteins, and NADPH regenerators are key engineering points for boosting the metabolic flux toward a recombinant MEP pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Internet based patient pathway as an educational tool for breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryhänen, Anne M; Rankinen, Sirkku; Tulus, Kirsi; Korvenranta, Heikki; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe the process of developing an Internet-based empowering patient education program for breast cancer patients and to evaluate the quality of the program from the perspective of patients. In this program, the patient pathway was used as an educational tool. The Breast Cancer Patient Pathway (BCPP) was developed and tested at one Finnish university hospital in 2005-2007. Thirty-eight newly diagnosed breast cancer patients used the program during their treatment process until the end of all treatments (average 9 months) in 2008-2010. After the treatments the patients evaluated the content, language and structure, instructiveness, external appearance and technical characteristics of the web site as subcategories with the Evaluating Internet Pages of Patient Education instrument, which is a 37-item Likert scale (1-4) questionnaire. Comparison between the subcategories was done with Friedman's test. Dependencies between demographic variables and evaluation values were tested with Pearson correlation coefficients. The mean value of all evaluation criteria was 3.40. However, patients' evaluations between different subcategories varied, being the highest in language and structure (mean 3.48) and lowest in content (mean 3.13). Language and structure, external appearance and technical characteristics were significantly better than content, and language and structure better than instructiveness. Significant correlations were not found between demographic variables and evaluation values. Patients evaluated the quality of the BCPP to be best in language and structure and weakest in content. In terms of future development of the BCPP, the most improvement is needed in content and instructiveness. There is also a need for further development and study of Internet-based patient education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic variation in the base excision repair pathway, environmental risk factors, and colorectal adenoma risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Corral

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking, high alcohol intake, and low dietary folate levels are risk factors for colorectal adenomas. Oxidative damage caused by these three factors can be repaired through the base excision repair pathway (BER. We hypothesized that genetic variation in BER might modify colorectal adenoma risk. In a sigmoidoscopy-based study, we examined associations between 182 haplotype tagging SNPs in 14 BER genes, and colorectal adenoma risk, and examined their potential role as modifiers of the effect cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, and dietary folate levels. Among all individuals, no statistically significant associations between BER SNPs and adenoma risk persisted after correction for multiple comparisons. However, among Asian-Pacific Islanders we observed two SNPs in FEN1 and one in NTHL1, and among African-Americans one SNP in APEX1 that were associated with colorectal adenoma risk. Significant associations were also observed between SNPs in the NEIL2 gene and rectal adenoma risk. Three SNPS modified the effect of smoking (MUTYH interaction p = 0.002; OGG1 interaction p = 0.013; FEN1 interaction p = 0.013, one SNP in LIG3 modified the effect of alcohol consumption (interaction p = 0.024 and two SNPs in LIG3 modified the effect of dietary folate (interaction p = 0.001 and p = 0.08 on colorectal adenoma risk. These findings support a role for genetic variants in the BER pathway as potential modifiers of colorectal adenoma risk. Our findings strengthen the role of oxidative damage induced by key lifestyle and dietary risk factors in colorectal adenoma formation.

  8. Systems-wide metabolic pathway engineering in Corynebacterium glutamicum for bio-based production of diaminopentane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Stefanie; Jeong, Weol Kyu; Schröder, Hartwig; Wittmann, Christoph

    2010-07-01

    In the present work the Gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum was engineered into an efficient, tailor-made production strain for diaminopentane (cadaverine), a highly attractive building block for bio-based polyamides. The engineering comprised expression of lysine decarboxylase (ldcC) from Escherichia coli, catalyzing the conversion of lysine into diaminopentane, and systems-wide metabolic engineering of central supporting pathways. Substantially re-designing the metabolism yielded superior strains with desirable properties such as (i) the release from unwanted feedback regulation at the level of aspartokinase and pyruvate carboxylase by introducing the point mutations lysC311 and pycA458, (ii) an optimized supply of the key precursor oxaloacetate by amplifying the anaplerotic enzyme, pyruvate carboxylase, and deleting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase which otherwise removes oxaloacetate, (iii) enhanced biosynthetic flux via combined amplification of aspartokinase, dihydrodipicolinate reductase, diaminopimelate dehydrogenase and diaminopimelate decarboxylase, and (iv) attenuated flux into the threonine pathway competing with production by the leaky mutation hom59 in the homoserine dehydrogenase gene. Lysine decarboxylase proved to be a bottleneck for efficient production, since its in vitro activity and in vivo flux were closely correlated. To achieve an optimal strain having only stable genomic modifications, the combination of the strong constitutive C. glutamicum tuf promoter and optimized codon usage allowed efficient genome-based ldcC expression and resulted in a high diaminopentane yield of 200 mmol mol(-1). By supplementing the medium with 1 mgL(-1) pyridoxal, the cofactor of lysine decarboxylase, the yield was increased to 300 mmol mol(-1). In the production strain obtained, lysine secretion was almost completely abolished. Metabolic analysis, however, revealed substantial formation of an as yet unknown by-product. It was identified as an

  9. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multizone Reaction Kinetics: Modeling of Decarburization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoffrey; Akbar Rhamdhani, M.; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Overbosch, Aart

    2018-03-01

    In a previous study by the authors (Rout et al. in Metall Mater Trans B 49:537-557, 2018), a dynamic model for the BOF, employing the concept of multizone kinetics was developed. In the current study, the kinetics of decarburization reaction is investigated. The jet impact and slag-metal emulsion zones were identified to be primary zones for carbon oxidation. The dynamic parameters in the rate equation of decarburization such as residence time of metal drops in the emulsion, interfacial area evolution, initial size, and the effects of surface-active oxides have been included in the kinetic rate equation of the metal droplet. A modified mass-transfer coefficient based on the ideal Langmuir adsorption equilibrium has been proposed to take into account the surface blockage effects of SiO2 and P2O5 in slag on the decarburization kinetics of a metal droplet in the emulsion. Further, a size distribution function has been included in the rate equation to evaluate the effect of droplet size on reaction kinetics. The mathematical simulation indicates that decarburization of the droplet in the emulsion is a strong function of the initial size and residence time. A modified droplet generation rate proposed previously by the authors has been used to estimate the total decarburization rate by slag-metal emulsion. The model's prediction shows that about 76 pct of total carbon is removed by reactions in the emulsion, and the remaining is removed by reactions at the jet impact zone. The predicted bath carbon by the model has been found to be in good agreement with the industrially measured data.

  10. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multizone Reaction Kinetics: Modeling of Decarburization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoffrey; Akbar Rhamdhani, M.; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Overbosch, Aart

    2018-06-01

    In a previous study by the authors (Rout et al. in Metall Mater Trans B 49:537-557, 2018), a dynamic model for the BOF, employing the concept of multizone kinetics was developed. In the current study, the kinetics of decarburization reaction is investigated. The jet impact and slag-metal emulsion zones were identified to be primary zones for carbon oxidation. The dynamic parameters in the rate equation of decarburization such as residence time of metal drops in the emulsion, interfacial area evolution, initial size, and the effects of surface-active oxides have been included in the kinetic rate equation of the metal droplet. A modified mass-transfer coefficient based on the ideal Langmuir adsorption equilibrium has been proposed to take into account the surface blockage effects of SiO2 and P2O5 in slag on the decarburization kinetics of a metal droplet in the emulsion. Further, a size distribution function has been included in the rate equation to evaluate the effect of droplet size on reaction kinetics. The mathematical simulation indicates that decarburization of the droplet in the emulsion is a strong function of the initial size and residence time. A modified droplet generation rate proposed previously by the authors has been used to estimate the total decarburization rate by slag-metal emulsion. The model's prediction shows that about 76 pct of total carbon is removed by reactions in the emulsion, and the remaining is removed by reactions at the jet impact zone. The predicted bath carbon by the model has been found to be in good agreement with the industrially measured data.

  11. Ultrasound-Accelerated Synthesis of Asymmetrical Thiosulfonate S-Esters by Base-Promoted Reaction of Sulfonyl Chlorides with Thiols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Hien Thi; Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan Thi; Duus, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Amberlyst A-26, Mg-Al hydrotalcite, potassium fluoride absorbed on alumina, triethylamine and pyridine have been tested as base catalysts and reagents for the reaction of sulfonyl chlorides with thiols to prepare thiosulfonate S-esters. The reactions were performed under solvent-free conditions...

  12. A Ligand Structure-Activity Study of DNA-Based Catalytic Asymmetric Hydration and Diels-Alder Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosati, F.; Roelfes, J.G.

    A structure-activity relationship study of the first generation ligands for the DNA-based asymmetric hydration of enones and Diels-Alder reaction in water is reported. The design of the ligand was optimized resulting in a maximum ee of 83% in the hydration reaction and 75% in the Diels-Alder

  13. ANAM4 TBI Reaction Time-Based Tests have Prognostic Utility for Acute Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    7:767. 2013 ANAM4 TBI Reaction Time-Based Tests Have Prognostic Utility for Acute Concussion LT Jacob N. Norris, MSC USN*; LCDR Waiter Carr, MSC USN...CDR Thomas Herzig, MSC USNf; CDR D. Waiter Labrie, MSC USNf; CDR Richard Sams, MC USN§ ABSTRACT The Concussion Restoration Care Center has used the...Work Unit No. N24LB. REFERENCES 1. Department of Defense: DoD Poiicy Guidance for Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion in the Deployed

  14. Sample preparation techniques based on combustion reactions in closed vessels - A brief overview and recent applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Erico M.M.; Barin, Juliano S.; Mesko, Marcia F.; Knapp, Guenter

    2007-01-01

    In this review, a general discussion of sample preparation techniques based on combustion reactions in closed vessels is presented. Applications for several kinds of samples are described, taking into account the literature data reported in the last 25 years. The operational conditions as well as the main characteristics and drawbacks are discussed for bomb combustion, oxygen flask and microwave-induced combustion (MIC) techniques. Recent applications of MIC techniques are discussed with special concern for samples not well digested by conventional microwave-assisted wet digestion as, for example, coal and also for subsequent determination of halogens

  15. Entropy-based critical reaction time for mixing-controlled reactive transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiogna, Gabriele; Rolle, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Entropy-based metrics, such as the dilution index, have been proposed to quantify dilution and reactive mixing in solute transport problems. In this work, we derive the transient advection dispersion equation for the entropy density of a reactive plume. We restrict our analysis to the case where...... the concentration distribution of the transported species is Gaussian and we observe that, even in case of an instantaneous complete bimolecular reaction, dilution caused by dispersive processes dominates the entropy balance at early times and results in the net increase of the entropy density of a reactive species...

  16. Chemical Reactions Catalyzed by Metalloporphyrin-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Aparecida Dias de Freitas Castro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthetic versatility and the potential application of metalloporphyrins (MP in different fields have aroused researchers’ interest in studying these complexes, in an attempt to mimic biological systems such as cytochrome P-450. Over the last 40 years, synthetic MPs have been mainly used as catalysts for homogeneous or heterogeneous chemical reactions. To employ them in heterogeneous catalysis, chemists have prepared new MP-based solids by immobilizing MP onto rigid inorganic supports, a strategy that affords hybrid inorganic-organic materials. More recently, materials obtained by supramolecular assembly processes and containing MPs as building blocks have been applied in a variety of areas, like gas storage, photonic devices, separation, molecular sensing, magnets, and heterogeneous catalysis, among others. These coordination polymers, known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, contain organic ligands or complexes connected by metal ions or clusters, which give rise to a 1-, 2- or 3-D network. These kinds of materials presents large surface areas, Brønsted or redox sites, and high porosity, all of which are desirable features in catalysts with potential use in heterogeneous phases. Building MOFs based on MP is a good way to obtain solid catalysts that offer the advantages of bioinspired systems and zeolitic materials. In this mini review, we will adopt a historical approach to present the most relevant MP-based MOFs applicable to catalytic reactions such as oxidation, reduction, insertion of functional groups, and exchange of organic functions.

  17. Chemical Transformation Motifs --- Modelling Pathways as Integer Hyperflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob L.; Flamm, Christoph; Merkle, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    analysis are discussed in detail. To demonstrate the applicability of the mathematical framework to real-life problems we first explore the design space of possible non-oxidative glycolysis pathways and show that recent manually designed pathways can be further optimised. We then use a model of sugar...... chemistry to investigate pathways in the autocatalytic formose process. A graph transformation-based approach is used to automatically generate the reaction networks of interest....

  18. Photonuclear reactions in astrophysical p-process: Theoretical calculations and experiment simulation based on ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Luo, Wen; Balabanski, Dimiter; Goriely, Stephane; Matei, Catalin; Tesileanu, Ovidiu

    2017-09-01

    The astrophysical p-process is an important way of nucleosynthesis to produce the stable and proton-rich nuclei beyond Fe which can not be reached by the s- and r-processes. In the present study, the astrophysical reaction rates of (γ,n), (γ,p), and (γ,α) reactions are computed within the modern reaction code TALYS for about 3000 stable and proton-rich nuclei with 12 Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility is being developed, which will provide the great opportunity to experimentally study the photonuclear reactions in p-process. Simulations of the experimental setup for the measurements of the photonuclear reactions 96Ru(γ,p) and 96Ru(γ,α) are performed. It is shown that the experiments of photonuclear reactions in p-process based on ELI-NP are quite promising.

  19. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-02-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field.

  20. Reconstructing biochemical pathways from time course data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srividhya, Jeyaraman; Crampin, Edmund J; McSharry, Patrick E; Schnell, Santiago

    2007-03-01

    Time series data on biochemical reactions reveal transient behavior, away from chemical equilibrium, and contain information on the dynamic interactions among reacting components. However, this information can be difficult to extract using conventional analysis techniques. We present a new method to infer biochemical pathway mechanisms from time course data using a global nonlinear modeling technique to identify the elementary reaction steps which constitute the pathway. The method involves the generation of a complete dictionary of polynomial basis functions based on the law of mass action. Using these basis functions, there are two approaches to model construction, namely the general to specific and the specific to general approach. We demonstrate that our new methodology reconstructs the chemical reaction steps and connectivity of the glycolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis from time course experimental data.

  1. A sensitive DNA biosensor based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction for capture probe immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingxiang; Ding, Yingtao; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Shulian; Zhang, Bin; Ni, Jiancong; Gao, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction between probe DNA and the sulfonic dye of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid that electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode. -- Highlights: •A versatile sulfonic dye of ANS was electrodeposited on a GCE. •A DNA biosensor was fabricated based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. •High probe DNA density of 3.18 × 10 13 strands cm −2 was determined. •A wide linear range and a low detection limit were obtained. -- Abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. First, the versatile sulfonic dye molecule of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonate (AN-SO 3 − ) was electrodeposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to form a steady and ordered AN-SO 3 − layer. Then the amino-terminated capture probe was covalently grafted to the surface of SO 3 − -AN deposited GCE through the sulfamide coupling reaction between the amino groups in the probe DNA and the sulfonic groups in the AN-SO 3 − . The step-by-step modification process was characterized by electrochemistry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Using Ru(NH 3 ) 6 3+ as probe, the probe density and the hybridization efficiency of the biosensor were determined to be 3.18 × 10 13 strands cm −2 and 86.5%, respectively. The hybridization performance of the biosensor was examined by differential pulse voltammetry using Co(phen) 3 3+/2+ (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) as the indicator. The selectivity experiments showed that the biosensor presented distinguishable response after hybridization with the three-base mismatched, non-complementary and complementary sequences. Under the optimal conditions, the oxidation peak currents of Co(phen) 3 3+/2+ increased linearly with the logarithm values of the concentration of the complementary sequences in the range from 1.0 × 10 −13 M to 1.0 × 10 −8 M with

  2. Strategies for improving the performance and stability of Ni-based catalysts for reforming reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuirong; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-11-07

    Owing to the considerable publicity that has been given to petroleum related economic, environmental, and political problems, renewed attention has been focused on the development of highly efficient and stable catalytic materials for the production of chemical/fuel from renewable resources. Supported nickel nanoclusters are widely used for catalytic reforming reactions, which are key processes for generating synthetic gas and/or hydrogen. New challenges were brought out by the extension of feedstock from hydrocarbons to oxygenates derivable from biomass, which could minimize the environmental impact of carbonaceous fuels and allow a smooth transition from fossil fuels to a sustainable energy economy. This tutorial review describes the recent efforts made toward the development of nickel-based catalysts for the production of hydrogen from oxygenated hydrocarbons via steam reforming reactions. In general, three challenges facing the design of Ni catalysts should be addressed. Nickel nanoclusters are apt to sinter under catalytic reforming conditions of high temperatures and in the presence of steam. Severe carbon deposition could also be observed on the catalyst if the surface carbon species adsorbed on metal surface are not removed in time. Additionally, the production of hydrogen rich gas with a low concentration of CO is a challenge using nickel catalysts, which are not so active in the water gas shift reaction. Accordingly, three strategies were presented to address these challenges. First, the methodologies for the preparation of highly dispersed nickel catalysts with strong metal-support interaction were discussed. A second approach-the promotion in the mobility of the surface oxygen-is favored for the yield of desired products while promoting the removal of surface carbon deposition. Finally, the process intensification via the in situ absorption of CO2 could produce a hydrogen rich gas with low CO concentration. These approaches could also guide the design

  3. Magnetic actuator for the control and mixing of magnetic bead-based reactions on-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguel-Alonso, Miguel; Granados, Xavier; Faraudo, Jordi; Alonso-Chamarro, Julián; Puyol, Mar

    2014-10-01

    While magnetic bead (MB)-based bioassays have been implemented in integrated devices, their handling on-chip is normally either not optimal--i.e. only trapping is achieved, with aggregation of the beads--or requires complex actuator systems. Herein, we describe a simple and low-cost magnetic actuator to trap and move MBs within a microfluidic chamber in order to enhance the mixing of a MB-based reaction. The magnetic actuator consists of a CD-shaped plastic unit with an arrangement of embedded magnets which, when rotating, generate the mixing. The magnetic actuator has been used to enhance the amplification reaction of an enzyme-linked fluorescence immunoassay to detect Escherichia coli O157:H7 whole cells, an enterohemorrhagic strain, which have caused several outbreaks in food and water samples. A 2.7-fold sensitivity enhancement was attained with a detection limit of 603 colony-forming units (CFU) /mL, when employing the magnetic actuator.

  4. Catalytic activity of calcium-based mixed metal oxides nanocatalysts in transesterification reaction of palm oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Noraakinah; Ismail, Kamariah Noor; Hamid, Ku Halim Ku; Hadi, Abdul

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, biodiesel has become the forefront development as an alternative diesel fuel derived from biological sources such as oils of plant and fats. Presently, the conventional transesterification of vegetable oil to biodiesel gives rise to some technological problem. In this sense, heterogeneous nanocatalysts of calcium-based mixed metal oxides were synthesized through sol-gel method. It was found that significant increase of biodiesel yield, 91.75 % was obtained catalyzed by CaO-NbO2 from palm oil compared to pure CaO of 53.99 % under transesterification conditions (methanol/oil ratio 10:1, reaction time 3 h, catalyst concentration 4 wt%, reaction temperature 60 °C, and mixing speed of 600 rpm). The phase structure and crystallinity as well as the texture properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and the textural properties were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption analysis. Sol-gel method has been known as versatile method in controlling the structural and chemical properties of the catalyst. Calcium-based mixed oxide synthesized from sol-gel method was found to exist as smaller crystallite size with high surface area.

  5. Cybernetic modeling based on pathway analysis for Penicillium chrysogenum fed-batch fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jun; Yuan, Jingqi

    2010-08-01

    A macrokinetic model employing cybernetic methodology is proposed to describe mycelium growth and penicillin production. Based on the primordial and complete metabolic network of Penicillium chrysogenum found in the literature, the modeling procedure is guided by metabolic flux analysis and cybernetic modeling framework. The abstracted cybernetic model describes the transients of the consumption rates of the substrates, the assimilation rates of intermediates, the biomass growth rate, as well as the penicillin formation rate. Combined with the bioreactor model, these reaction rates are linked with the most important state variables, i.e., mycelium, substrate and product concentrations. Simplex method is used to estimate the sensitive parameters of the model. Finally, validation of the model is carried out with 20 batches of industrial-scale penicillin cultivation.

  6. Bio-based self-healing coatings based on thermo-reversible Diels-Alder reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkenburg, D.H.; Durant, Y.; Fischer, H.R.

    2017-01-01

    Stimulated by the growing demand for greener and more sustainable polymer systems we have studied thermoreversible polymer networks composed largely (> 83% w/w) of diethylitaconate of bio-based origin. A series of coating materials has been synthesized consisting of linear chains of diethylitaconate

  7. Well-defined Polymethylene-Based Co/Terpolymers by Combining Anthracene/Maleimide Diels-Alder Reaction with Polyhomologation

    KAUST Repository

    Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos; Alkayal, Nazeeha

    2015-01-01

    A novel strategy towards well-defined polymethylene-based co/terpolymers, by combining anthracene/maleimide Diels-Alder reaction with polyhomologation, is presented. For the synthesis of diblock copolymers the following approach was applied: a

  8. Renal function, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and other adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canga, Ana; Kislikova, Maria; Martínez-Gálvez, María; Arias, Mercedes; Fraga-Rivas, Patricia; Poyatos, Cecilio; de Francisco, Angel L M

    2014-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder that affects patients with impaired renal function and is associated with the administration of gadolinium-based contrast media used in MRI. Despite being in a group of drugs that were considered safe, report about this potentially serious adverse reaction was a turning point in the administration guidelines of these contrast media. There has been an attempt to establish safety parameters to identify patients with risk factors of renal failure. The close pharmacovigilance and strict observation of current regulations, with special attention being paid to the value of glomerular filtration, have reduced the published cases involving the use of gadolinium-based contrast media. In a meeting between radiologists and nephrologists we reviewed the most relevant aspects currently and recommendations for its prevention.

  9. Nitrogen Detection in Bulk Samples Using a D-D Reaction-Based Portable Neutron Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Naqvi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen concentration was measured via 2.52 MeV nitrogen gamma ray from melamine, caffeine, urea, and disperse orange bulk samples using a newly designed D-D portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma ray setup. Inspite of low flux of thermal neutrons produced by D-D reaction-based portable neutron generator and interference of 2.52 MeV gamma rays from nitrogen in bulk samples with 2.50 MeV gamma ray from bismuth in BGO detector material, an excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated yields of nitrogen gamma rays indicates satisfactory performance of the setup for detection of nitrogen in bulk samples.

  10. Disruption of endolysosomal trafficking pathways in glioma cells by methuosis-inducing indole-based chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbah, Nneka E; Overmeyer, Jean H; Maltese, William A

    2017-06-01

    Methuosis is a form of non-apoptotic cell death involving massive vacuolization of macropinosome-derived endocytic compartments, followed by a decline in metabolic activity and loss of membrane integrity. To explore the induction of methuosis as a potential therapeutic strategy for killing cancer cells, we have developed small molecules (indole-based chalcones) that trigger this form of cell death in glioblastoma and other cancer cell lines. Here, we report that in addition to causing fusion and expansion of macropinosome compartments, the lead compound, 3-(5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (MOMIPP), disrupts vesicular trafficking at the lysosomal nexus, manifested by impaired degradation of EGF and LDL receptors, defective processing of procathepsins, and accumulation of autophagosomes. In contrast, secretion of the ectodomain derived from a prototypical type-I membrane glycoprotein, β-amyloid precursor protein, is increased rather than diminished. A closely related MOMIPP analog, which causes substantial vacuolization without reducing cell viability, also impedes cathepsin processing and autophagic flux, but has more modest effects on receptor degradation. A third analog, which causes neither vacuolization nor loss of viability, has no effect on endolysosomal trafficking. The results suggest that differential cytotoxicity of structurally similar indole-based chalcones is related, at least in part, to the severity of their effects on endolysosomal trafficking pathways.

  11. Premeditation and Sensation Seeking Moderate the Reasoned Action and Social Reaction Pathways in the Prototype/Willingness Model of Alcohol Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Matthew Gregory; King, Kevin M

    2016-05-11

    Drinking can occur because of expectations to drink (reasoned pathway) or because of willingness to drink under certain circumstances (reactive pathway). These pathways are thought to be influenced by different cognitions such as alcohol-related attitudes, norms, or drinking prototypes (Gerrard et al., 2008). Impulsive traits reflect individual differences in the influence of reasoned or reactive factors, however little research has investigated whether impulsivity moderates the effects of cognitive factors predicting alcohol use. We tested whether differences in three impulsivity traits (premeditation, sensation seeking and negative urgency) moderated associations of reasoned (risk/disapproval attitudes and social norms) and reactive (prototype) pathway variables on expectation/willingness to drink and recent alcohol use. We collected data from n = 409 college students; the sample was 67% female, 43% Asian American, with Mdnage = 19. Hypotheses were tested using multiple regression. Premeditation and sensation seeking moderated reasoned variable effects on expectation and drinking. Among those low on premeditation, risk attitudes were most associated with drinking expectation, with alcohol prototypes most related to recent drinking. These effects declined at higher premeditation levels. Among those high on sensation seeking, risk attitudes were most associated with expectation and drinking, declining at lower sensation seeking levels. There was little evidence of moderation predicting drinking willingness. Findings imply personality differences may explain association strength between reasoned but not reactive risk behavior pathways with alcohol outcomes. They have ramifications for personalized prevention programs to reduce drinking through cognition change, as alcohol-related cognition influence may differ depending on personality characteristics.

  12. Initial steps of the base excision repair pathway within the nuclear architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amouroux, R.

    2009-09-01

    Oxidative stress induced lesions threaten aerobic organisms by representing a major cause of genomic instability. A common product of guanine oxidation, 8-oxo-guanine (8- oxoG) is particularly mutagenic by provoking G to T transversions. Removal of oxidised bases from DNA is initiated by the recognition and excision of the damaged base by a DNA glycosylase, initiating the base excision repair (BER) pathway. In mammals, 8-oxoG is processed by the 8-oxoG-DNA-glycosylase I (OGG1), which biochemical mechanisms has been well characterised in vitro. However how and where this enzyme finds the modified base within the complex chromatin architecture is not yet understood. We show that upon induction of 8-oxoG, OGG1, together with at least two other proteins involved in BER, is recruited from a soluble fraction to chromatin. Formation kinetics of this patches correlates with 8-oxoG excision, suggesting a direct link between presence of this chromatin-associated complexes and 8-oxoG repair. More precisely, these repair patches are specifically directed to euchromatin regions, and completely excluded from heterochromatin regions. Inducing of artificial chromatin compaction results in a complete inhibition of the in vivo repair of 8-oxoG, probably by impeding the access of OGG1 to the lesion. Using OGG1 mutants, we show that OGG1 direct recognition of 8-oxoG did not trigger its re-localisation to the chromatin. We conclude that in response to the induction of oxidative DNA damage, the DNA glycosylase is actively recruited to regions of open chromatin allowing the access of the BER machinery to the lesions. (author)

  13. The evolutionary pathway from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis examined by comparison of the properties of photosystem II and bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J P; Williams, J C

    2011-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II.

  14. A New Pathway to 3-Hetaryl-2-oxo-2H-chromenes: On the Proposed Mechanisms for the Reaction of 3-Carbamoyl-2-iminochromenes with Dinucleophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav V. Bilokin

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The present account summarizes the author's studies to elucidate the mechanisms of the recently reported rearrangements resulting from inter- and/or intramolecular reactions of 2-imino-2H-chromene-3-carboxamides with different dinucleophiles.

  15. NO Reactions Over Ir-Based Catalysts in the Presence of O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxin Guo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of a series of Ir-based catalysts supported on SiO2, ZSM-5 and γ-Al2O3 with various Ir loadings prepared by impregnation method was conducted by temperature programmed reaction (TPR technique. The result implies that NO is oxidized to NO2 while simultaneously being reduced to N2 or N2O in the NO reactions over iridium catalysts. The surface active phase over iridium catalysts that promote the NO reactions is IrO2. The catalytic activity increases with the increase of the Ir loading and support materials have a little effect on the catalytic activity. When the loading is less than 0.1%, the catalytic activity was found to be dependent on the nature of support materials and in order: Ir/ZSM-5>Ir/γ-Al2O3>Ir/SiO2. When the loading is higher than 0.1%, the catalytic activity for NO oxidation is in order: Ir/ZSM-5>Ir/SiO2>Ir/γ -Al2O3, which is correlated with Ir dispersion on the surface of support materials and the catalytic activity for NO reduction is in sequence: Ir/γ -Al2O3>Ir/SiO2>Ir/ZSM-5, which is attributed to the adsorbed-dissociation of NO2. Compared to Pt/γ-Al2O3, Ir/γ-Al2O3 catalyst is more benefit for the NO reduction.

  16. Cirrus cloud mimic surfaces in the laboratory: organic acids, bases and NOx heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodeau, J.; Oriordan, B.

    2003-04-01

    CIRRUS CLOUD MIMIC SURFACES IN THE LABORATORY:ORGANIC ACIDS, BASES AND NOX HETEROGENEOUS REACTIONS. B. ORiordan, J. Sodeau Department of Chemistry and Environment Research Institute, University College Cork, Ireland j.sodeau@ucc.ie /Fax: +353-21-4902680 There are a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic sources for the simple carboxylic acids to be found in the troposphere giving rise to levels as high as 45 ppb in certain urban areas. In this regard it is of note that ants of genus Formica produce some 10Tg of formic acid each year; some ten times that produced by industry. The expected sinks are those generally associated with tropospheric chemistry: the major routes studied, to date, being wet and dry deposition. No studies have been carried out hitherto on the role of water-ice surfaces in the atmospheric chemistry of carboxylic acids and the purpose of this paper is to indicate their potential function in the heterogeneous release of atmospheric species such as HONO. The deposition of formic acid on a water-ice surface was studied using FT-RAIR spectroscopy over a range of temperatures between 100 and 165K. In all cases ionization to the formate (and oxonium) ions was observed. The results were confirmed by TPD (Temperature Programmed Desorption) measurements, which indicated that two distinct surface species adsorb to the ice. Potential reactions between the formic acid/formate ion surface and nitrogen dioxide were subsequently investigated by FT-RAIRS. Co-deposition experiments showed that N2O3 and the NO+ ion (associated with water) were formed as products. A mechanism is proposed to explain these results, which involves direct reaction between the organic acid and nitrogen dioxide. Similar experiments involving acetic acid also indicate ionization on a water-ice surface. The results are put into the context of atmospheric chemistry potentially occuring on cirrus cloud surfaces.

  17. A novel model to combine clinical and pathway-based transcriptomic information for the prognosis prediction of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Huang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide. With the increasing awareness of heterogeneity in breast cancers, better prediction of breast cancer prognosis is much needed for more personalized treatment and disease management. Towards this goal, we have developed a novel computational model for breast cancer prognosis by combining the Pathway Deregulation Score (PDS based pathifier algorithm, Cox regression and L1-LASSO penalization method. We trained the model on a set of 236 patients with gene expression data and clinical information, and validated the performance on three diversified testing data sets of 606 patients. To evaluate the performance of the model, we conducted survival analysis of the dichotomized groups, and compared the areas under the curve based on the binary classification. The resulting prognosis genomic model is composed of fifteen pathways (e.g., P53 pathway that had previously reported cancer relevance, and it successfully differentiated relapse in the training set (log rank p-value = 6.25e-12 and three testing data sets (log rank p-value < 0.0005. Moreover, the pathway-based genomic models consistently performed better than gene-based models on all four data sets. We also find strong evidence that combining genomic information with clinical information improved the p-values of prognosis prediction by at least three orders of magnitude in comparison to using either genomic or clinical information alone. In summary, we propose a novel prognosis model that harnesses the pathway-based dysregulation as well as valuable clinical information. The selected pathways in our prognosis model are promising targets for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Associations of genetic risk scores based on adult adiposity pathways with childhood growth and adiposity measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Monnereau; S. Vogelezang; C.J. Kruithof (Claudia); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); J.F. Felix (Janine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified many loci and biological pathways that influence adult body mass index (BMI). We aimed to identify if biological pathways related to adult BMI also affect infant growth and childhood adiposity measures. Methods:

  19. Extracting reaction networks from databases-opening Pandora's box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Liam G; Davis, Melissa J; Ragan, Mark A; Nielsen, Lars K

    2014-11-01

    Large quantities of information describing the mechanisms of biological pathways continue to be collected in publicly available databases. At the same time, experiments have increased in scale, and biologists increasingly use pathways defined in online databases to interpret the results of experiments and generate hypotheses. Emerging computational techniques that exploit the rich biological information captured in reaction systems require formal standardized descriptions of pathways to extract these reaction networks and avoid the alternative: time-consuming and largely manual literature-based network reconstruction. Here, we systematically evaluate the effects of commonly used knowledge representations on the seemingly simple task of extracting a reaction network describing signal transduction from a pathway database. We show that this process is in fact surprisingly difficult, and the pathway representations adopted by various knowledge bases have dramatic consequences for reaction network extraction, connectivity, capture of pathway crosstalk and in the modelling of cell-cell interactions. Researchers constructing computational models built from automatically extracted reaction networks must therefore consider the issues we outline in this review to maximize the value of existing pathway knowledge. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Hydrotreatment of solvolytically liquefied lignocellulosic biomass over NiMo/Al2O3 catalyst: Reaction mechanism, hydrodeoxygenation kinetics and mass transfer model based on FTIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grilc, M.; Likozar, B.; Levec, J.

    2014-01-01

    Raw residual wood biomass, containing cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, was liquefied at low temperature by ultrasound-assisted solvolysis and acidolysis by glycerol, diethylene glycol and p-toluenesulfonic acid. Liquefied biomass was consequently upgraded by hydrotreatment utilizing heterogeneous catalysis over NiMo/Al 2 O 3 bifunctional catalyst. Effects of temperature (200−350 °C), heating rate (2.5–10.0 K min −1 ), hydrogen/nitrogen pressure (2−8 MPa), mixing (250−1000 min −1 ), hydrogen donor solvent (tetralin) and catalyst contents on deoxygenation were established. Reactions of liquefaction products, such as levulinic acid, were quantified based on their functional groups by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, whereas catalyst was examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Chemical kinetics of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), decarbonylation and decarboxylation were determined by originally developed lumped model, based on reaction mechanisms and pathways, while the external mass transfer resistance proved to be negligible under the applied hydrodynamic conditions. The presence of hydrocracking reactions was confirmed by a decrease in product viscosity, and the upgrade for energetic or fuel applications by measurements of calorific value. - Highlights: • Liquefaction of waste lignocellulosic biomass with glycerol at low temperature. • Hydrotreatment, hydrocracking and hydrodeoxygenation of liquefied waste biomass. • Deoxygenation using heterogeneous catalysis over NiMo/Al 2 O 3 bifunctional catalyst. • Proposal of reaction mechanism; chemical kinetics and mass transfer considerations. • Effect of temperature, heating rate, pressure, mixing, solvent and catalyst content

  1. Indirect glyphosate detection based on ninhydrin reaction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng-Lei; Gao, Yu; Li, Yali; Li, Xueliang; Zhang, Huanjie; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing; Su, Liang

    2018-05-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most commonly-used and non-selective herbicides in agriculture, which may directly pollute the environment and threaten human health. A simple and effective approach to assessment of its damage to the natural environment is thus quite necessary. However, traditional chromatography-based detection methods usually suffer from complex pretreatment procedures. Herein, we propose a simple and sensitive method for the determination of glyphosate by combining ninhydrin reaction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The product (purple color dye, PD) of the ninhydrin reaction is found to SERS-active and directly correlate with the glyphosate concentration. The limit of detection of the proposed method for glyphosate is as low as 1.43 × 10- 8 mol·L- 1 with a relatively wider linear concentration range (1.0 × 10- 7-1.0 × 10- 4 mol·L- 1), which demonstrates its great potential in rapid, highly sensitive concentration determination of glyphosate in practical applications for safety assessment of food and environment.

  2. Phase transformations in the reaction cell of TiNi-based sintered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukhova, Nadezhda; Anikeev, Sergey; Yasenchuk, Yuriy; Chekalkin, Timofey; Gunther, Victor; Kaftaranova, Maria; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Soon

    2018-05-01

    The present work addresses the structural-phase state changes of porous TiNi-based compounds fabricated by reaction sintering (RS) of Ti and Ni powders with Co, Mo, and no additives introduced. The study also emphasizes the features of a reaction cell (RC) during the transition from the solid- to liquid-phase sintering. Mechanisms of phase transformations occurring in the solid phase, involving the low-melting Ti2Ni phase within the RC, have been highlighted. Also, the intermediate Ti2Ni phase had a crucial role to provide both the required RS behavior and modified phase composition of RS samples, and besides, it is found to be responsible for the near-equiatomic TiNi saturation of the melt. Both cobalt and molybdenum additives are shown to cause additional structuring of the transition zone (TZ) at the Ti2Ni‑TiNi interface and broadening of this zone. The impact of Co and Mo on the Ti2Ni phase is evident through fissuring of this phase layer, which is referred to solidified stresses increased in the layer due to post-alloying defects in the structure.

  3. Reaction-sintered porous mineral-based mullite ceramic membrane supports made from recycled materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yingchao; Zhou, Jian-Er; Lin, Bin; Wang, Yongqing; Wang, Songlin; Miao, Lifeng; Lang, Ying; Liu, Xingqin; Meng, Guangyao

    2009-12-15

    Bulk porous mullite supports for ceramic membranes were prepared directly using a mixture of industrial waste fly ash and bauxite by dry-pressing, followed by sintering between 1200 and 1550 degrees C. The effects of sintering temperature on the phase composition and shrinkage percent of porous mullite were studied. The XRD results indicate that secondary mullitization reaction took place above 1200 degrees C, and completed at 1450 degrees C. During sintering, the mixture samples first shrunk, then expanded abnormally between 1326 and 1477 degrees C, and finally shrunk again above 1477 degrees C. This unique volume self-expansion is ascribed to the secondary mullitization reaction between bauxite and fly ash. More especially, the micro-structural variations induced by this self-expansion sintering were verified by SEM, porosity, pore size distribution and nitrogen gas permeation flux. During self-expansion sintering, with increasing temperature, an abnormal increase in both open porosity and pore size is observed, which also results in the increase of nitrogen gas flux. The mineral-based mullite supports with increased open porosity were obtained. Furthermore, the sintered porous mullite membrane supports were characterized in terms of thermal expansion co-efficient and mechanical strength.

  4. Exclusive data-based modeling of neutron-nuclear reactions below 20 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Dmitry; Kosov, Mikhail

    2017-09-01

    We are developing CHIPS-TPT physics library for exclusive simulation of neutron-nuclear reactions below 20 MeV. Exclusive modeling reproduces each separate scattering and thus requires conservation of energy, momentum and quantum numbers in each reaction. Inclusive modeling reproduces only selected values while averaging over the others and imposes no such constraints. Therefore the exclusive modeling allows to simulate additional quantities like secondary particle correlations and gamma-lines broadening and avoid artificial fluctuations. CHIPS-TPT is based on the formerly included in Geant4 CHIPS library, which follows the exclusive approach, and extends it to incident neutrons with the energy below 20 MeV. The NeutronHP model for neutrons below 20 MeV included in Geant4 follows the inclusive approach like the well known MCNP code. Unfortunately, the available data in this energy region is mostly presented in ENDF-6 format and semi-inclusive. Imposing additional constraints on secondary particles complicates modeling but also allows to detect inconsistencies in the input data and to avoid errors that may remain unnoticed in inclusive modeling.

  5. Reaction kinetics and modeling of photoinitiated cationic polymerization of an alicyclic based diglycidyl ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikrishna, R.; Ponrathnam, S.; Tambe, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Photocationic polymerization of alicyclic based diglycidyl ether was carried out. • Kinetic parameters were influenced by gelation and diffusional restrictions. • Applicability of autocatalytic model was established by nonlinear regression. • System showed higher activation energy than cycloaliphatic and aromatic diepoxides. -- Abstract: Photoinitiated cationic polymerization of cycloaliphatic diepoxides had received tremendous attention, while studies with lesser polymerizable diglycidyl ethers are comparatively less reported. The present work deals with the photoinitiated cationic polymerization of cyclohexane dimethanol diglycidyl ether followed by estimation of kinetic parameters. The effects of concentration of photoinitiator and temperature on curing performance were studied using photo differential scanning calorimeter or photo DSC with polychromatic radiation. It was observed that the rate of polymerization as well as ultimate conversion increased with increasing concentration of photoinitiator and temperature. The influences of gelation as well as diffusional restrictions have remarkable effect on cure performance. The kinetic parameters as per autocatalytic kinetic model were studied by Levenberg–Marquardt nonlinear regression method instead of conventional linear method for obtaining more accurate values of apparent rate constant. It was observed that the model fits with data from initial stages to almost towards the end of the reaction. The activation energy was found to be higher than the values reported for more reactive cycloaliphatic diepoxides. The value of pre-exponential factor increased with increase in activation energy showing influence of gelation at early stages of reaction

  6. Boron-Based Catalysts for C-C Bond-Formation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Bin; Kinjo, Rei

    2018-05-02

    Because the construction of the C-C bond is one of the most significant reactions in organic chemistry, the development of an efficient strategy has attracted much attention throughout the synthetic community. Among various protocols to form C-C bonds, organoboron compounds are not just limited to stoichiometric reagents, but have also made great achievements as catalysts because of the easy modification of the electronic and steric impacts on the boron center. This review presents recent developments of boron-based catalysts applied in the field of C-C bond-formation reactions, which are classified into four kinds on the basis of the type of boron catalyst: 1) highly Lewis acidic borane, B(C 6 F 5 ) 3 ; 2) organoboron acids, RB(OH) 2 , and their ester derivatives; 3) borenium ions, (R 2 BL)X; and 4) other miscellaneous kinds. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Adaptive extended-state observer-based fault tolerant attitude control for spacecraft with reaction wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Dechao; Chen, Xiaoqian; de Ruiter, Anton; Xiao, Bing

    2018-04-01

    This study presents an adaptive second-order sliding control scheme to solve the attitude fault tolerant control problem of spacecraft subject to system uncertainties, external disturbances and reaction wheel faults. A novel fast terminal sliding mode is preliminarily designed to guarantee that finite-time convergence of the attitude errors can be achieved globally. Based on this novel sliding mode, an adaptive second-order observer is then designed to reconstruct the system uncertainties and the actuator faults. One feature of the proposed observer is that the design of the observer does not necessitate any priori information of the upper bounds of the system uncertainties and the actuator faults. In view of the reconstructed information supplied by the designed observer, a second-order sliding mode controller is developed to accomplish attitude maneuvers with great robustness and precise tracking accuracy. Theoretical stability analysis proves that the designed fault tolerant control scheme can achieve finite-time stability of the closed-loop system, even in the presence of reaction wheel faults and system uncertainties. Numerical simulations are also presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed control scheme over existing methodologies.

  8. Room Temperature, Hybrid Sodium-Based Flow Batteries with Multi-Electron Transfer Redox Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamie, Jack S.; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new concept of hybrid Na-based flow batteries (HNFBs) with a molten Na alloy anode in conjunction with a flowing catholyte separated by a solid Na-ion exchange membrane for grid-scale energy storage. Such HNFBs can operate at ambient temperature, allow catholytes to have multiple electron transfer redox reactions per active ion, offer wide selection of catholyte chemistries with multiple active ions to couple with the highly negative Na alloy anode, and enable the use of both aqueous and non-aqueous catholytes. Further, the molten Na alloy anode permits the decoupled design of power and energy since a large volume of the molten Na alloy can be used with a limited ion-exchange membrane size. In this proof-of-concept study, the feasibility of multi-electron transfer redox reactions per active ion and multiple active ions for catholytes has been demonstrated. The critical barriers to mature this new HNFBs have also been explored. PMID:26063629

  9. Investigating a multigene prognostic assay based on significant pathways for Luminal A breast cancer through gene expression profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haiyan; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate potential recurrence-risk biomarkers based on significant pathways for Luminal A breast cancer through gene expression profile analysis. Initially, the gene expression profiles of Luminal A breast cancer patients were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using a Limma package and the hierarchical clustering analysis was conducted for the DEGs. In addition, the functional pathways were screened using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analyses and rank ratio calculation. The multigene prognostic assay was exploited based on the statistically significant pathways and its prognostic function was tested using train set and verified using the gene expression data and survival data of Luminal A breast cancer patients downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. A total of 300 DEGs were identified between good and poor outcome groups, including 176 upregulated genes and 124 downregulated genes. The DEGs may be used to effectively distinguish Luminal A samples with different prognoses verified by hierarchical clustering analysis. There were 9 pathways screened as significant pathways and a total of 18 DEGs involved in these 9 pathways were identified as prognostic biomarkers. According to the survival analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve, the obtained 18-gene prognostic assay exhibited good prognostic function with high sensitivity and specificity to both the train and test samples. In conclusion the 18-gene prognostic assay including the key genes, transcription factor 7-like 2, anterior parietal cortex and lymphocyte enhancer factor-1 may provide a new method for predicting outcomes and may be conducive to the promotion of precision medicine for Luminal A breast cancer.

  10. A critique of the molecular target-based drug discovery paradigm based on principles of metabolic control: advantages of pathway-based discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerstein, Marc K

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary drug discovery and development (DDD) is dominated by a molecular target-based paradigm. Molecular targets that are potentially important in disease are physically characterized; chemical entities that interact with these targets are identified by ex vivo high-throughput screening assays, and optimized lead compounds enter testing as drugs. Contrary to highly publicized claims, the ascendance of this approach has in fact resulted in the lowest rate of new drug approvals in a generation. The primary explanation for low rates of new drugs is attrition, or the failure of candidates identified by molecular target-based methods to advance successfully through the DDD process. In this essay, I advance the thesis that this failure was predictable, based on modern principles of metabolic control that have emerged and been applied most forcefully in the field of metabolic engineering. These principles, such as the robustness of flux distributions, address connectivity relationships in complex metabolic networks and make it unlikely a priori that modulating most molecular targets will have predictable, beneficial functional outcomes. These same principles also suggest, however, that unexpected therapeutic actions will be common for agents that have any effect (i.e., that complexity can be exploited therapeutically). A potential operational solution (pathway-based DDD), based on observability rather than predictability, is described, focusing on emergent properties of key metabolic pathways in vivo. Recent examples of pathway-based DDD are described. In summary, the molecular target-based DDD paradigm is built on a naïve and misleading model of biologic control and is not heuristically adequate for advancing the mission of modern therapeutics. New approaches that take account of and are built on principles described by metabolic engineers are needed for the next generation of DDD.

  11. On Medium Chemical Reaction in Diffusion-Based Molecular Communication: a Two-Way Relaying Example

    OpenAIRE

    Farahnak-Ghazani, Maryam; Aminian, Gholamali; Mirmohseni, Mahtab; Gohari, Amin; Nasiri-Kenari, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Chemical reactions are a prominent feature of molecular communication (MC) systems, with no direct parallels in wireless communications. While chemical reactions may be used inside the transmitter nodes, receiver nodes or the communication medium, we focus on its utility in the medium in this paper. Such chemical reactions can be used to perform computation over the medium as molecules diffuse and react with each other (physical-layer computation). We propose the use of chemical reactions for...

  12. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence

  13. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence.

  14. Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kimura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin were investigated. The cure behavior of benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin was monitored by model reaction using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. As a result of the model reaction, the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring and thermal self-cyclotrimerization of cyanate ester group occurred, and then the phenolic hydoroxyl group generated by the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring co-reacted with cyanate ester group. The properties of the cured thermosetting resin were estimated by mechanical properties, electrical resistivity, water resistance and heat resistance. The cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and cyanate ester resin showed good heat resistance, high electrical resistivity and high water resistance, compared with the cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and epoxy resin.

  15. Cost unit accounting based on a clinical pathway: a practical tool for DRG implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyrer, R; Rösch, J; Weyand, M; Kunzmann, U

    2005-10-01

    Setting up a reliable cost unit accounting system in a hospital is a fundamental necessity for economic survival, given the current general conditions in the healthcare system. Definition of a suitable cost unit is a crucial factor for success. We present here the development and use of a clinical pathway as a cost unit as an alternative to the DRG. Elective coronary artery bypass grafting was selected as an example. Development of the clinical pathway was conducted according to a modular concept that mirrored all the treatment processes across various levels and modules. Using service records and analyses the process algorithms of the clinical pathway were developed and visualized with CorelTM iGrafix Process 2003. A detailed process cost record constituted the basis of the pathway costing, in which financial evaluation of the treatment processes was performed. The result of this study was a structured clinical pathway for coronary artery bypass grafting together with a cost calculation in the form of cost unit accounting. The use of a clinical pathway as a cost unit offers considerable advantages compared to the DRG or clinical case. The variance in the diagnoses and procedures within a pathway is minimal, so the consumption of resources is homogeneous. This leads to a considerable improvement in the value of cost unit accounting as a strategic control instrument in hospitals.

  16. Biomarker identification and pathway analysis of preeclampsia based on serum metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tingting; He, Ping; Tan, Yong; Xu, Dongying

    2017-03-25

    Preeclampsia presents serious risk of both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Biomarkers for the detection of preeclampsia are critical for risk assessment and targeted intervention. The goal of this study is to screen potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of preeclampsia and to illuminate the pathogenesis of preeclampsia development based on the differential expression network. Two groups of subjects, including healthy pregnant women, subjects with preeclampsia, were recruited for this study. The metabolic profiles of all of the subjects' serum were obtained by liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Correlation between metabolites was analyzed by bioinformatics technique. Results showed that the PC(14:0/00), proline betaine and proline were potential sensitive and specific biomarkers for preeclampsia diagnosis and prognosis. Perturbation of corresponding biological pathways, such as iNOS signaling, nitric oxide signaling in the cardiovascular system, mitochondrial dysfunction were responsible for the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. This study indicated that the metabolic profiling had a good clinical significance in the diagnosis of preeclampsia as well as in the study of its pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A pathway-based network analysis of hypertension-related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Hu, Jing-Bo; Xu, Chuan-Yun; Zhang, De-Hai; Yan, Qian; Xu, Ming; Cao, Ke-Fei; Zhang, Xu-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Complex network approach has become an effective way to describe interrelationships among large amounts of biological data, which is especially useful in finding core functions and global behavior of biological systems. Hypertension is a complex disease caused by many reasons including genetic, physiological, psychological and even social factors. In this paper, based on the information of biological pathways, we construct a network model of hypertension-related genes of the salt-sensitive rat to explore the interrelationship between genes. Statistical and topological characteristics show that the network has the small-world but not scale-free property, and exhibits a modular structure, revealing compact and complex connections among these genes. By the threshold of integrated centrality larger than 0.71, seven key hub genes are found: Jun, Rps6kb1, Cycs, Creb312, Cdk4, Actg1 and RT1-Da. These genes should play an important role in hypertension, suggesting that the treatment of hypertension should focus on the combination of drugs on multiple genes.

  18. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  19. A plasmonic colorimetric strategy for visual miRNA detection based on hybridization chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jie; Wang, Jingsheng; Guo, Jinyang; Gao, Huiguang; Han, Kun; Jiang, Chengmin; Miao, Peng

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a novel colorimetric strategy for miRNA analysis is proposed based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR)-mediated localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) variation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). miRNA in the sample to be tested is able to release HCR initiator from a solid interface to AgNPs colloid system by toehold exchange-mediated strand displacement, which then triggers the consumption of fuel strands with single-stranded tails for HCR. The final produced long nicked double-stranded DNA loses the ability to protect AgNPs from salt-induced aggregation. The stability variation of the colloid system can then be monitored by recording corresponding UV-vis spectrum and initial miRNA level is thus determined. This sensing system involves only four DNA strands which is quite simple. The practical utility is confirmed to be excellent by employing different biological samples.

  20. [Sensing of Cu²⁺ Based on Fenton Reaction and Unmodified Gold Nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yun-peng; Liu, Chun; Zhou, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Li-pei; Shi, Han-chang

    2015-11-01

    Heavy metal pollution has received great attentions in recent years. The traditional methods for heavy metal detection rely on the expensive laboratory instruments and need time-consuming preparation steps; therefore, it is urgent to develop quick and highly sensitive new technologies for heavy metal detection. The colorimetric method based on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) features with simple operation, high sensitivity and low cost, therefore, enabling it widely concerned and used in the environmental monitoring, food safety and chemical and biological sensing fields. This work developed a simple, rapid and highly sensitive strategy based on the Fenton reaction and unmodified AuNPs for the detection of Cu²⁺ in water samples. The hydroxyl radical ( · OH) generated by the Fenton reaction between the Cu²⁺ and sodium ascorbate (SA) oxidized the single stranded DNA (ssDNA) attached on the AuNPs surface into variable sequence fragments. The cleavage of ssDNA induced the aggregation of AuNPs in a certain salt solution, therefore, resulting in the changes on the absorbance of solution. The assay conditions were optimized to be pH value of 7.9, 11 mg · L⁻¹ ssDNA, 8 mmol · L⁻¹ SA and 70 mmol · L⁻¹ NaCl. Results showed that the absorbance ratio values at the wavelengths of 700 and 525 nm (A₇₀₀/A₅₂₅) were linearly correlated with the Cu²⁺ concentrations. The linear detection range was 0.1-10.0 µmol · L⁻¹ with a detection limit of 24 nmol · L⁻¹ (3σ). Spiked recoveries ranged from 87%-120% in three sorts of water, including drinking water, tap water and lake water, which confirmed that the potentials of the proposed assay for Cu²⁺ detection in reality.

  1. Goal, Objectives, and Responsibilities. Competency-Based Education (CBE): Pathways to College, Career, and Life Ready Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2018

    2018-01-01

    In 2012 Senate File 2284 approved competency-based education (CBE). In 2013 House File 215 provided $100,000 to be used as grants to districts/schools participating in a collaborative effort toward CBE pathways for their students and a framework toward statewide implementation. The Iowa CBE Collaborative will engage in collaborative inquiry to…

  2. Comprehensive School Mental Health: An Integrated "School-Based Pathway to Care" Model for Canadian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yifeng; Kutcher, Stan; Szumilas, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical period for the promotion of mental health and the treatment of mental disorders. Schools are well-positioned to address adolescent mental health. This paper describes a school mental health model, "School-Based Pathway to Care," for Canadian secondary schools that links schools with primary care providers and…

  3. Translating Evidence Based Violence and Drug Use Prevention to Obesity Prevention: Development and Construction of the Pathways Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Kari-Lyn K.; Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Effective school-based obesity prevention programs are needed to prevent and reduce the growing obesity risk among youth. Utilizing the evidence-rich areas of violence and substance use prevention, translation science may provide an efficient means for developing curricula across multiple health behaviors. This paper introduces Pathways to Health,…

  4. Secondary Resources in the Bio-Based Economy : A Computer Assisted Survey of Value Pathways in Academic Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Chris B.; Aid, Graham; Zhu, B.

    2017-01-01

    Research on value pathways for organic wastes has been steadily increasing in recent decades. There have been few considerably broad overview studies of such materials and their valuation potential in the bio-based economy in part because of the vast multitude of materials and processes that can

  5. Machine learning methods for metabolic pathway prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key challenge in systems biology is the reconstruction of an organism's metabolic network from its genome sequence. One strategy for addressing this problem is to predict which metabolic pathways, from a reference database of known pathways, are present in the organism, based on the annotated genome of the organism. Results To quantitatively validate methods for pathway prediction, we developed a large "gold standard" dataset of 5,610 pathway instances known to be present or absent in curated metabolic pathway databases for six organisms. We defined a collection of 123 pathway features, whose information content we evaluated with respect to the gold standard. Feature data were used as input to an extensive collection of machine learning (ML methods, including naïve Bayes, decision trees, and logistic regression, together with feature selection and ensemble methods. We compared the ML methods to the previous PathoLogic algorithm for pathway prediction using the gold standard dataset. We found that ML-based prediction methods can match the performance of the PathoLogic algorithm. PathoLogic achieved an accuracy of 91% and an F-measure of 0.786. The ML-based prediction methods achieved accuracy as high as 91.2% and F-measure as high as 0.787. The ML-based methods output a probability for each predicted pathway, whereas PathoLogic does not, which provides more information to the user and facilitates filtering of predicted pathways. Conclusions ML methods for pathway prediction perform as well as existing methods, and have qualitative advantages in terms of extensibility, tunability, and explainability. More advanced prediction methods and/or more sophisticated input features may improve the performance of ML methods. However, pathway prediction performance appears to be limited largely by the ability to correctly match enzymes to the reactions they catalyze based on genome annotations.

  6. Machine learning methods for metabolic pathway prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background A key challenge in systems biology is the reconstruction of an organism's metabolic network from its genome sequence. One strategy for addressing this problem is to predict which metabolic pathways, from a reference database of known pathways, are present in the organism, based on the annotated genome of the organism. Results To quantitatively validate methods for pathway prediction, we developed a large "gold standard" dataset of 5,610 pathway instances known to be present or absent in curated metabolic pathway databases for six organisms. We defined a collection of 123 pathway features, whose information content we evaluated with respect to the gold standard. Feature data were used as input to an extensive collection of machine learning (ML) methods, including naïve Bayes, decision trees, and logistic regression, together with feature selection and ensemble methods. We compared the ML methods to the previous PathoLogic algorithm for pathway prediction using the gold standard dataset. We found that ML-based prediction methods can match the performance of the PathoLogic algorithm. PathoLogic achieved an accuracy of 91% and an F-measure of 0.786. The ML-based prediction methods achieved accuracy as high as 91.2% and F-measure as high as 0.787. The ML-based methods output a probability for each predicted pathway, whereas PathoLogic does not, which provides more information to the user and facilitates filtering of predicted pathways. Conclusions ML methods for pathway prediction perform as well as existing methods, and have qualitative advantages in terms of extensibility, tunability, and explainability. More advanced prediction methods and/or more sophisticated input features may improve the performance of ML methods. However, pathway prediction performance appears to be limited largely by the ability to correctly match enzymes to the reactions they catalyze based on genome annotations. PMID:20064214

  7. Development of an evidence-based decision pathway for vestibular schwannoma treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Faina; Valappil, Benita; McAfee, Jacob; Goughnour, Sharon L; Hildrew, Douglas M; McCall, Andrew A; Linkov, Igor; Hirsch, Barry; Snyderman, Carl

    To integrate multiple sources of clinical information with patient feedback to build evidence-based decision support model to facilitate treatment selection for patients suffering from vestibular schwannomas (VS). This was a mixed methods study utilizing focus group and survey methodology to solicit feedback on factors important for making treatment decisions among patients. Two 90-minute focus groups were conducted by an experienced facilitator. Previously diagnosed VS patients were recruited by clinical investigators at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). Classical content analysis was used for focus group data analysis. Providers were recruited from practices within the UPMC system and were surveyed using Delphi methods. This information can provide a basis for multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) framework to develop a treatment decision support system for patients with VS. Eight themes were derived from these data (focus group + surveys): doctor/health care system, side effects, effectiveness of treatment, anxiety, mortality, family/other people, quality of life, and post-operative symptoms. These data, as well as feedback from physicians were utilized in building a multi-criteria decision model. The study illustrated steps involved in the development of a decision support model that integrates evidence-based data and patient values to select treatment alternatives. Studies focusing on the actual development of the decision support technology for this group of patients are needed, as decisions are highly multifactorial. Such tools have the potential to improve decision making for complex medical problems with alternate treatment pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abstract ID: 240 A probabilistic-based nuclear reaction model for Monte Carlo ion transport in particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Jose, Gonzalez Torres; Jürgen, Henniger

    2018-01-01

    In order to expand the Monte Carlo transport program AMOS to particle therapy applications, the ion module is being developed in the radiation physics group (ASP) at the TU Dresden. This module simulates the three main interactions of ions in matter for the therapy energy range: elastic scattering, inelastic collisions and nuclear reactions. The simulation of the elastic scattering is based on the Binary Collision Approximation and the inelastic collisions on the Bethe-Bloch theory. The nuclear reactions, which are the focus of the module, are implemented according to a probabilistic-based model developed in the group. The developed model uses probability density functions to sample the occurrence of a nuclear reaction given the initial energy of the projectile particle as well as the energy at which this reaction will take place. The particle is transported until the reaction energy is reached and then the nuclear reaction is simulated. This approach allows a fast evaluation of the nuclear reactions. The theory and application of the proposed model will be addressed in this presentation. The results of the simulation of a proton beam colliding with tissue will also be presented. Copyright © 2017.

  9. Use of ESI-MS to determine reaction pathway for hydrogen sulphide scavenging with 1,3,5-tri-(2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydro-s-triazine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2012-01-01

    To study the reaction between hydrogen sulphide and 1,3,5-tri-(2-hydroxyethyl)- hexahydro-s-triazine, which is an often used hydrogen sulphide scavenger, electro spray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used. The investigation was carried out in positive mode, and tandem mass spectrometry...... the dithiazine species, hereby confirming previously obtained results and showing the ability of the ESI-MS method for studying the scavenging reaction. The final theoretical product s-trithiane was not detected. Furthermore, fragmentation products of thiadiazine and dithiazine were detected in the solution...

  10. Theoretical study on keto-enol tautomerisation of glutarimide for exploration of the isomerisation reaction pathway of glutamic acid in proteins using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Nakayoshi, Tomoki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Oda, Akifumi

    2017-03-01

    In order to elucidate the reason why glutamic acid residues have lesser racemisation reactivity than asparaginic acid, we investigated the racemisation energy barrier of piperidinedione, which is the presumed intermediate of the isomerisation reaction of L-Glu to D-Glu, by density functional theory calculations. In two-water-molecule-assisted racemisation, the activation barrier for keto-enol isomerisation was 28.1 kcal/mol. The result showed that the activation barrier for the racemisation of glutamic acid residues was not different from that for the racemisation of aspartic acid residues. Thus, glutamic acid residues can possibly cause the racemisation reaction if the cyclic intermediate stably exists.

  11. Toxicity-pathway-based risk assessment: preparing for paradigm change : a symposium summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mantus, Ellen K

    In 2007, the National Research Council envisioned a new paradigm in which biologically important perturbations in key toxicity pathways would be evaluated with new methods in molecular biology, bio...

  12. Submicroscopic malaria parasite carriage: how reproducible are polymerase chain reaction-based methods?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Camargos Costa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods for the diagnosis of malaria infection are expected to accurately identify submicroscopic parasite carriers. Although a significant number of PCR protocols have been described, few studies have addressed the performance of PCR amplification in cases of field samples with submicroscopic malaria infection. Here, the reproducibility of two well-established PCR protocols (nested-PCR and real-time PCR for the Plasmodium 18 small subunit rRNA gene were evaluated in a panel of 34 blood field samples from individuals that are potential reservoirs of malaria infection, but were negative for malaria by optical microscopy. Regardless of the PCR protocol, a large variation between the PCR replicates was observed, leading to alternating positive and negative results in 38% (13 out of 34 of the samples. These findings were quite different from those obtained from the microscopy-positive patients or the unexposed individuals; the diagnosis of these individuals could be confirmed based on the high reproducibility and specificity of the PCR-based protocols. The limitation of PCR amplification was restricted to the field samples with very low levels of parasitaemia because titrations of the DNA templates were able to detect < 3 parasites/µL in the blood. In conclusion, conventional PCR protocols require careful interpretation in cases of submicroscopic malaria infection, as inconsistent and false-negative results can occur.

  13. An exonuclease-assisted amplification electrochemical aptasensor for Hg(2+) detection based on hybridization chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ting; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Xia, Qinghua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a novel electrochemical aptasensor was developed for Hg(2+) detection based on exonuclease-assisted target recycling and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) dual signal amplification strategy. The presence of Hg(2+) induced the T-rich DNA partly folded into duplex-like structure via the Hg(2+) mediated T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs, which triggered the activity of exonuclease III (Exo III). Exo III selectively digested the double-strand DNA containing multiple T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs from its 3'-end, the released Hg(2+) participated analyte recycle. With each digestion cycle, a digestion product named as help DNA was obtained, which acted as a linkage between the capture DNA and auxiliary DNA. The presence of help DNA and two auxiliary DNA collectively facilitated successful HCR process and formed long double-stranded DNA. [Ru(NH3)6](3+) was used as redox indicator, which electrostatically bound to the double strands and produced an electrochemical signal. Exo III-assisted target recycling and HCR dual amplification significantly improved the sensitivity for Hg(2+) with a detection limit of 0.12 pM (S/N=3). Furthermore, the proposed aptasensor had a promising potential for the application of Hg(2+) detection in real aquatic sample analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A web-based quantitative signal detection system on adverse drug reaction in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai; Deng, Jianxiong; Chen, Wenge; Wang, Suzhen; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Guanquan

    2009-07-01

    To establish a web-based quantitative signal detection system for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) based on spontaneous reporting to the Guangdong province drug-monitoring database in China. Using Microsoft Visual Basic and Active Server Pages programming languages and SQL Server 2000, a web-based system with three software modules was programmed to perform data preparation and association detection, and to generate reports. Information component (IC), the internationally recognized measure of disproportionality for quantitative signal detection, was integrated into the system, and its capacity for signal detection was tested with ADR reports collected from 1 January 2002 to 30 June 2007 in Guangdong. A total of 2,496 associations including known signals were mined from the test database. Signals (e.g., cefradine-induced hematuria) were found early by using the IC analysis. In addition, 291 drug-ADR associations were alerted for the first time in the second quarter of 2007. The system can be used for the detection of significant associations from the Guangdong drug-monitoring database and could be an extremely useful adjunct to the expert assessment of very large numbers of spontaneously reported ADRs for the first time in China.

  15. Predicting protein folding pathways at the mesoscopic level based on native interactions between secondary structure elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since experimental determination of protein folding pathways remains difficult, computational techniques are often used to simulate protein folding. Most current techniques to predict protein folding pathways are computationally intensive and are suitable only for small proteins. Results By assuming that the native structure of a protein is known and representing each intermediate conformation as a collection of fully folded structures in which each of them contains a set of interacting secondary structure elements, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the conformation space while still being able to predict the most energetically favorable folding pathway of large proteins with hundreds of residues at the mesoscopic level, including the pig muscle phosphoglycerate kinase with 416 residues. The model is detailed enough to distinguish between different folding pathways of structurally very similar proteins, including the streptococcal protein G and the peptostreptococcal protein L. The model is also able to recognize the differences between the folding pathways of protein G and its two structurally similar variants NuG1 and NuG2, which are even harder to distinguish. We show that this strategy can produce accurate predictions on many other proteins with experimentally determined intermediate folding states. Conclusion Our technique is efficient enough to predict folding pathways for both large and small proteins at the mesoscopic level. Such a strategy is often the only feasible choice for large proteins. A software program implementing this strategy (SSFold is available at http://faculty.cs.tamu.edu/shsze/ssfold.

  16. An efficient and pH-universal ruthenium-based catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Javeed; Li, Feng; Jung, Sun-Min; Okyay, Mahmut Sait; Ahmad, Ishfaq; Kim, Seok-Jin; Park, Noejung; Jeong, Hu Young; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2017-05-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a crucial step in electrochemical water splitting and demands an efficient, durable and cheap catalyst if it is to succeed in real applications. For an energy-efficient HER, a catalyst must be able to trigger proton reduction with minimal overpotential and have fast kinetics. The most efficient catalysts in acidic media are platinum-based, as the strength of the Pt-H bond is associated with the fastest reaction rate for the HER. The use of platinum, however, raises issues linked to cost and stability in non-acidic media. Recently, non-precious-metal-based catalysts have been reported, but these are susceptible to acid corrosion and are typically much inferior to Pt-based catalysts, exhibiting higher overpotentials and lower stability. As a cheaper alternative to platinum, ruthenium possesses a similar bond strength with hydrogen (˜65 kcal mol-1), but has never been studied as a viable alternative for a HER catalyst. Here, we report a Ru-based catalyst for the HER that can operate both in acidic and alkaline media. Our catalyst is made of Ru nanoparticles dispersed within a nitrogenated holey two-dimensional carbon structure (Ru@C2N). The Ru@C2N electrocatalyst exhibits high turnover frequencies at 25 mV (0.67 H2 s-1 in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution; 0.75 H2 s-1 in 1.0 M KOH solution) and small overpotentials at 10 mA cm-2 (13.5 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution; 17.0 mV in 1.0 M KOH solution) as well as superior stability in both acidic and alkaline media. These performances are comparable to, or even better than, the Pt/C catalyst for the HER.

  17. Free radical reaction pathway, thermohemistry of peracetic acid homolysis and its application for phenol degradation: spectroscopic sti=udy and quantum chemistry calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rokhina, E.V.; Makarova, K.; Golovina, E.A.; As, van H.; Virkutyte, J.

    2010-01-01

    The homolysis of peracetic acid (PAA) as a relevant source of free radicals (e.g., •OH) was studied in detail. Radicals formed as a result of chain radical reactions were detected with electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance spin trapping techniques and subsequently identified by

  18. Pathways and timescales of primary charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center as revealed by a simultaneous fit of time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Andrizhiyevskaya, E.G.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2005-01-01

    We model the dynamics of energy transfer and primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers. Different exciton models with specific site energies of the six core pigments and two peripheral chlorophylls (Chls) in combination with different charge transfer schemes have

  19. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important)

  20. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important).

  1. The Azomethine Ylide Route to Amine C–H Functionalization: Redox-Versions of Classic Reactions and a Pathway to New Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Redox-neutral methods for the functionalization of amine α-C–H bonds are inherently efficient because they avoid external oxidants and reductants and often do not generate unwanted byproducts. However, most of the current methods for amine α-C–H bond functionalization are oxidative in nature. While the most efficient variants utilize atmospheric oxygen as the terminal oxidant, many such transformations require the use of expensive or toxic oxidants, often coupled with the need for transition metal catalysts. Redox-neutral amine α-functionalizations that involve intramolecular hydride transfer steps provide viable alternatives to certain oxidative reactions. These processes have been known for some time and are particularly well suited for tertiary amine substrates. A mechanistically distinct strategy for secondary amines has emerged only recently, despite sharing common features with a range of classic organic transformations. Among those are such widely used reactions as the Strecker, Mannich, Pictet–Spengler, and Kabachnik–Fields reactions, Friedel–Crafts alkylations, and iminium alkynylations. In these classic processes, condensation of a secondary amine with an aldehyde (or a ketone) typically leads to the formation of an intermediate iminium ion, which is subsequently attacked by a nucleophile. The corresponding redox-versions of these transformations utilize identical starting materials but incorporate an isomerization step that enables α-C–H bond functionalization. Intramolecular versions of these reactions include redox-neutral amine α-amination, α-oxygenation, and α-sulfenylation. In all cases, a reductive N-alkylation is effectively combined with an oxidative α-functionalization, generating water as the only byproduct. Reactions are promoted by simple carboxylic acids and in some cases require no additives. Azomethine ylides, dipolar species whose usage is predominantly in [3 + 2] cycloadditions and other pericyclic

  2. The azomethine ylide route to amine C-H functionalization: redox-versions of classic reactions and a pathway to new transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Daniel

    2015-02-17

    Conspectus Redox-neutral methods for the functionalization of amine α-C-H bonds are inherently efficient because they avoid external oxidants and reductants and often do not generate unwanted byproducts. However, most of the current methods for amine α-C-H bond functionalization are oxidative in nature. While the most efficient variants utilize atmospheric oxygen as the terminal oxidant, many such transformations require the use of expensive or toxic oxidants, often coupled with the need for transition metal catalysts. Redox-neutral amine α-functionalizations that involve intramolecular hydride transfer steps provide viable alternatives to certain oxidative reactions. These processes have been known for some time and are particularly well suited for tertiary amine substrates. A mechanistically distinct strategy for secondary amines has emerged only recently, despite sharing common features with a range of classic organic transformations. Among those are such widely used reactions as the Strecker, Mannich, Pictet-Spengler, and Kabachnik-Fields reactions, Friedel-Crafts alkylations, and iminium alkynylations. In these classic processes, condensation of a secondary amine with an aldehyde (or a ketone) typically leads to the formation of an intermediate iminium ion, which is subsequently attacked by a nucleophile. The corresponding redox-versions of these transformations utilize identical starting materials but incorporate an isomerization step that enables α-C-H bond functionalization. Intramolecular versions of these reactions include redox-neutral amine α-amination, α-oxygenation, and α-sulfenylation. In all cases, a reductive N-alkylation is effectively combined with an oxidative α-functionalization, generating water as the only byproduct. Reactions are promoted by simple carboxylic acids and in some cases require no additives. Azomethine ylides, dipolar species whose usage is predominantly in [3 + 2] cycloadditions and other pericyclic processes, have been

  3. Lab-on-a-chip based total-phosphorus analysis device utilizing a photocatalytic reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dong Geon; Jung, Daewoong; Kong, Seong Ho

    2018-02-01

    A lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for total phosphorus (TP) analysis was fabricated for water quality monitoring. Many commercially available TP analysis systems used to estimate water quality have good sensitivity and accuracy. However, these systems also have many disadvantages such as bulky size, complex pretreatment processes, and high cost, which limit their application. In particular, conventional TP analysis systems require an indispensable pretreatment step, in which the fluidic analyte is heated to 120 °C for 30 min to release the dissolved phosphate, because many phosphates are soluble in water at a standard temperature and pressure. In addition, this pretreatment process requires elevated pressures of up to 1.1 kg cm-2 in order to prevent the evaporation of the heated analyte. Because of these limiting conditions required by the pretreatment processes used in conventional systems, it is difficult to miniaturize TP analysis systems. In this study, we employed a photocatalytic reaction in the pretreatment process. The reaction was carried out by illuminating a photocatalytic titanium dioxide (TiO2) surface formed in a microfluidic channel with ultraviolet (UV) light. This pretreatment process does not require elevated temperatures and pressures. By applying this simplified, photocatalytic-reaction-based pretreatment process to a TP analysis system, greater degrees of freedom are conferred to the design and fabrication of LOC devices for TP monitoring. The fabricated LOC device presented in this paper was characterized by measuring the TP concentration of an unknown sample, and comparing the results with those measured by a conventional TP analysis system. The TP concentrations of the unknown sample measured by the proposed LOC device and the conventional TP analysis system were 0.018 mgP/25 mL and 0.019 mgP/25 mL, respectively. The experimental results revealed that the proposed LOC device had a performance comparable to the conventional bulky TP analysis

  4. Development of interactive graphic user interfaces for modeling reaction-based biogeochemical processes in batch systems with BIOGEOCHEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.; Li, M.; Yeh, G.

    2010-12-01

    The BIOGEOCHEM numerical model (Yeh and Fang, 2002; Fang et al., 2003) was developed with FORTRAN for simulating reaction-based geochemical and biochemical processes with mixed equilibrium and kinetic reactions in batch systems. A complete suite of reactions including aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion-exchange, redox, precipitation/dissolution, acid-base reactions, and microbial mediated reactions were embodied in this unique modeling tool. Any reaction can be treated as fast/equilibrium or slow/kinetic reaction. An equilibrium reaction is modeled with an implicit finite rate governed by a mass action equilibrium equation or by a user-specified algebraic equation. A kinetic reaction is modeled with an explicit finite rate with an elementary rate, microbial mediated enzymatic kinetics, or a user-specified rate equation. None of the existing models has encompassed this wide array of scopes. To ease the input/output learning curve using the unique feature of BIOGEOCHEM, an interactive graphic user interface was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio and .Net tools. Several user-friendly features, such as pop-up help windows, typo warning messages, and on-screen input hints, were implemented, which are robust. All input data can be real-time viewed and automated to conform with the input file format of BIOGEOCHEM. A post-processor for graphic visualizations of simulated results was also embedded for immediate demonstrations. By following data input windows step by step, errorless BIOGEOCHEM input files can be created even if users have little prior experiences in FORTRAN. With this user-friendly interface, the time effort to conduct simulations with BIOGEOCHEM can be greatly reduced.

  5. The Application of the Weighted k-Partite Graph Problem to the Multiple Alignment for Metabolic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenbin; Hendrix, William; Samatova, Nagiza F

    2017-12-01

    The problem of aligning multiple metabolic pathways is one of very challenging problems in computational biology. A metabolic pathway consists of three types of entities: reactions, compounds, and enzymes. Based on similarities between enzymes, Tohsato et al. gave an algorithm for aligning multiple metabolic pathways. However, the algorithm given by Tohsato et al. neglects the similarities among reactions, compounds, enzymes, and pathway topology. How to design algorithms for the alignment problem of multiple metabolic pathways based on the similarity of reactions, compounds, and enzymes? It is a difficult computational problem. In this article, we propose an algorithm for the problem of aligning multiple metabolic pathways based on the similarities among reactions, compounds, enzymes, and pathway topology. First, we compute a weight between each pair of like entities in different input pathways based on the entities' similarity score and topological structure using Ay et al.'s methods. We then construct a weighted k-partite graph for the reactions, compounds, and enzymes. We extract a mapping between these entities by solving the maximum-weighted k-partite matching problem by applying a novel heuristic algorithm. By analyzing the alignment results of multiple pathways in different organisms, we show that the alignments found by our algorithm correctly identify common subnetworks among multiple pathways.

  6. Action-reaction based parameters identification and states estimation of flexible systems

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Islam; Kunt, Emrah Deniz; Şabanoviç, Asif; Sabanovic, Asif

    2012-01-01

    This work attempts to identify and estimate flexible system's parameters and states by a simple utilization of the Action-Reaction law of dynamical systems. Attached actuator to a dynamical system or environmental interaction imposes an action that is instantaneously followed by a dynamical system reaction. The dynamical system's reaction carries full information about the dynamical system including system parameters, dynamics and externally applied forces that arise due to system interaction...

  7. Action-reaction based parameters identification and states estimation of flexible systems

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Islam Shoukry Mohammed; Şabanoviç, Asif; Sabanovic, Asif

    2010-01-01

    This work attempts to identify and estimate flexible system’s parameters and states by a simple utilization of the Action-Reaction law of dynamical systems. Attached actuator to a dynamical system or environmental interaction imposes an action that is instantaneously followed by a dynamical system reaction. The dynamical system’s reaction carries full information about the dynamical system including system parameters, dynamics and externally applied forces that arise due to system interaction...

  8. Student reactions to problem-based learning in photonics technician education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Nicholas M.; Donnelly, Judith; Hanes, Fenna

    2014-07-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional approach in which students learn problem-solving and teamwork skills by collaboratively solving complex real-world problems. Research shows that PBL improves student knowledge and retention, motivation, problem-solving skills, and the ability to skillfully apply knowledge in new and novel situations. One of the challenges faced by students accustomed to traditional didactic methods, however, is acclimating to the PBL process in which problem parameters are often ill-defined and ambiguous, often leading to frustration and disengagement with the learning process. To address this problem, the New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE), funded by the National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education (NSF-ATE) program, has created and field tested a comprehensive series of industry-based multimedia PBL "Challenges" designed to scaffold the development of students' problem solving and critical thinking skills. In this paper, we present the results of a pilot study conducted to examine student reactions to the PBL Challenges in photonics technician education. During the fall 2012 semester, students (n=12) in two associate degree level photonics courses engaged in PBL using the PBL Challenges. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to assess student motivation, self-efficacy, critical thinking, metacognitive self-regulation, and peer learning using selected scales from the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Results showed positive gains in all variables. Follow-up focus group interviews yielded positive themes supporting the effectiveness of PBL in developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes of photonics technicians.

  9. Need for Uniqueness Determines Reactions to Web-Based Personalized Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglbauer, Barbara; Kovacs, Carrie

    2018-01-01

    The presented empirical study among a sample of n = 256 participants addressed the relationship between consumers' need for uniqueness and their reactions to web-based personalized advertising. Drawing on regulatory focus theory, we argue that the consumers' need for uniqueness dimensions creative choice and similarity avoidance may relate to promotion and prevention regulatory orientations, respectively. Accordingly, we hypothesized that creative choice and similarity avoidance would differentially predict self-reported approach and avoidance behavior toward personalized advertising. These direct relationships were further expected to be mediated by subjective evaluations of personalized advertising (i.e., perceived value and irritation). In line with these hypotheses, we found that creative choice predicted approach behavior through increased web-based personalized advertising value, whereas similarity avoidance predicted avoidance behavior through increased irritation. Creative choice also predicted decreased irritation, which in turn was related to decreased approach behavior. In sum, the results suggest that the consumers' need for uniqueness dimensions should not be investigated as a composite, as they seem to reflect different regulatory orientations and are therefore likely to evoke different affective, cognitive, and behavioral responses.

  10. Validating the Accuracy of Reaction Time Assessment on Computer-Based Tablet Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Philip; Ybarra, Vincent; Leitner, Donald

    2015-08-01

    Computer-based assessment has evolved to tablet-based devices. Despite the availability of tablets and "apps," there is limited research validating their use. We documented timing delays between stimulus presentation and (simulated) touch response on iOS devices (3rd- and 4th-generation Apple iPads) and Android devices (Kindle Fire, Google Nexus, Samsung Galaxy) at response intervals of 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 milliseconds (ms). Results showed significantly greater timing error on Google Nexus and Samsung tablets (81-97 ms), than Kindle Fire and Apple iPads (27-33 ms). Within Apple devices, iOS 7 obtained significantly lower timing error than iOS 6. Simple reaction time (RT) trials (250 ms) on tablet devices represent 12% to 40% error (30-100 ms), depending on the device, which decreases considerably for choice RT trials (3-5% error at 1,000 ms). Results raise implications for using the same device for serial clinical assessment of RT using tablets, as well as the need for calibration of software and hardware. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Fast Curing Bio-Based Phenolic Resins via Lignin Demethylated under Mild Reaction Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiongjiong Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Demethylation technique has been used to enhance lignin reactivity for preparation of phenolic resins. However, the demethylation efficiency and the demethylated lignin (DL reactivity were still unsatisfactory. To improve the demethylation efficiency, alkali lignin was demethylated under different mild conditions using sodium sulfite as a catalyst. Lignin and DL were characterized by 1H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy to determine the demethylation mechanism. With the demethylation of lignin, the methoxyl group content decreased from 1.93 m mol/g to 1.09 m mol/g, and the phenolic hydroxyl group content increased from 0.56 m mol/g to 0.82 m mol/g. These results revealed that methoxyl groups were attacked by SO32−, and some methoxyl groups were converted to phenolic hydroxyl groups by a nucleophilic substitution reaction, generating DL with high reactivity. The chemical properties of lignin-based phenolic resins were studied by 13C-NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy, and their physical properties were also investigated. The results indicated that lignin-based phenolic resins exhibited faster curing rate and shorter gel time. In addition, the bonding strength increased from 0.92 MPa to 1.07 MPa, and the formaldehyde emission decreased from 0.58 mg/L to 0.22 mg/L after lignin demethylated at the optimum condition.