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Sample records for reaction mediated conversion

  1. Catalytic conversion reactions mediated by single-file diffusion in linear nanopores: hydrodynamic versus stochastic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David M; Wang, Jing; Wendel, Joseph H; Liu, Da-Jiang; Pruski, Marek; Evans, James W

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. Diffusion within the pores is subject to a strict single-file (no passing) constraint. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice-gas model for this reaction-diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction-diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction-diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion in this multispecies system. The h-RDE successfully describe nontrivial aspects of transient behavior, in contrast to the mf-RDE, and also correctly capture unreactive steady-state behavior in the pore interior. However, steady-state reactivity, which is localized near the pore ends when those regions are catalytic, is controlled by fluctuations not incorporated into the hydrodynamic treatment. The mf-RDE partly capture these fluctuation effects, but cannot describe scaling behavior of the reactivity.

  2. Reactions of N2O5 with Salty and Surfactant-Coated Glycerol: Interfacial Conversion of Br- to Br2 Mediated by Alkylammonium Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaloski, Michael A; Gord, Joseph R; Staudt, Sean; Quinn, Sarah L; Bertram, Timothy H; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2017-05-18

    Gas-liquid scattering and product-yield experiments are used to investigate reactions of N 2 O 5 with glycerol containing Br - and surfactant ions. N 2 O 5 oxidizes Br - to Br 2 for every solution tested: 2.7 M NaBr, 0.03 M tetrahexylammonium bromide (THABr), 0.03 M THABr + 0.5 M NaBr, 0.03 M THABr + 0.5 M NaCl, 0.03 M THABr + 0.01 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 0.01 M cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr). N 2 O 5 also reacts with glycerol itself to produce mono- and dinitroglycerin. Surface tension measurements indicate that 0.03 M THABr and 2.7 M NaBr have similar interfacial Br - concentrations, though their bulk Br - concentrations differ by 90-fold. We find that twice as much Br 2 is produced in the presence of THA + , implying that the conversion of Br - to Br 2 is initiated at the interface, perhaps mediated by the charged, hydrophobic pocket within the surface THA + cation. The addition of 0.5 M NaBr, 0.5 M NaCl, or 0.01 M SDS to 0.03 M THABr lowers the Br 2 production rate by 23%, 63%, and 67% of the THABr value, respectively. When CTA + is substituted for THA + , Br 2 production drops to 12% of the THABr value. The generation of Br 2 under such different conditions implies that trace amounts of surface-active alkylammonium ions can catalyze interfacial N 2 O 5 reactions, even when salts and other surfactants are present.

  3. Developing the conversation about workplace mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Treasa

    2014-01-01

    This article examines some of the latest writing and research in relation to conflict in work and workplace mediation. It considers three specific issues of size and sector of organisations, the attitude of organisations to conflict and the employee relations environment in organisations. It reviews the various views in relation to fundamental aspects of mediation such as the neutral third party, voluntarism, informality and confidentiality to inform thinking as well as practitioner and acade...

  4. Internal conversion mediated by specific nuclear motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Liv Bærenholdt; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2014-01-01

    the excitation energies, and the excitation in all cases is by a 200 nm photon, the S1 density-of-states in the Franck-Condon region will be high for the more N-alkylated amine. This, according to standard models, should lead to faster internal conversion. The experimental results are in contrast to this...

  5. Halogen-Mediated Conversion of Hydrocarbons to Commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ronghe; Amrute, Amol P; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2017-03-08

    Halogen chemistry plays a central role in the industrial manufacture of various important chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. It involves the reaction of halogens or halides with hydrocarbons, leading to intermediate compounds which are readily converted to valuable commodities. These transformations, predominantly mediated by heterogeneous catalysts, have long been successfully applied in the production of polymers. Recent discoveries of abundant conventional and unconventional natural gas reserves have revitalized strong interest in these processes as the most cost-effective gas-to-liquid technologies. This review provides an in-depth analysis of the fundamental understanding and applied relevance of halogen chemistry in polymer industries (polyvinyl chloride, polyurethanes, and polycarbonates) and in the activation of light hydrocarbons. The reactions of particular interest include halogenation and oxyhalogenation of alkanes and alkenes, dehydrogenation of alkanes, conversion of alkyl halides, and oxidation of hydrogen halides, with emphasis on the catalyst, reactor, and process design. Perspectives on the challenges and directions for future development in this exciting field are provided.

  6. Light energy conversion by photocatalytic reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujishima, Akira; Yamagata, Sadamu [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1989-01-01

    The photocatalytic reaction, to be made to a suspended semiconductor powder system, was explained in summary. By using semiconductor as an electrode for the electrolyzation, etc. and projecting light on it to generate photoelectromotive force, a photocell can be composed. eg., by composing titanium oxide electrode, n-type semiconductor and platinum electrode, and irradiating light on the former electrode to generate electric current, oxygen and hydrogen are produced from the titanium oxide electrode and platinum electrode, respectively, which means the possibility of obtainment of clean energy from water as raw material. Such a wet type photocell, easy to produce, is active also in research. With white titanium oxide powder being suspended in water solution, hydrogen is produced by projecting light into it. Such a semiconductor is called photocatalyst, in which the research has been widely developed, mainly by taking notice of the hydrogen production on reduction side, since 1972. The photocatalysis using colloid and, differently, that doing heteropolyacid are also taken notice of. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Subcritical hydrothermal conversion of organic wastes and biomass. Reaction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Amadeus Castro Vega

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal conversion is a procedure which emulates organic matter’s natural conversion into bio-crude having physical and chemical properties analogous to petroleum. The artificial transformation of biomass requi- res previous knowledge of the main reaction routes and product availability. The main component of biomass (depolymerisation by hydrolysis is presented in hydrothermal cellulose conversion, producing oligosaccharides which exhibit dehydration and retro-aldol condensation reactions for transforming into furfurals and carboxylic acids. Other biomass components (such as lignin, proteins, and fat esters present both hydrolysis and pyrolysis reaction routes. As long as biomass mainly contains carbohydrates, subcritical hydrothermal conversion products and their wastes will be fundamentally analogous to those displaying cellulose. These substances have added- value by far surpassing raw material’s acquisition cost. When the main hydrothermal conversion products’ O/C, H/C molar ratios as reported in literature are plotted, an evolutionary tralectory for conversion products appears to be closely or even overlapped with fossil fuels’ geological evolution.

  8. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li 2 O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li 2 O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li 2 O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive

  9. Classic Conversational Norms in Modern Computer-Mediated Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeberst, Aileen; Moskaliuk, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether conversational norms that have been observed for face-to-face communication also hold in the context of a specific type of computer-mediated communication: collaboration (such as in Wikipedia). Specifically, we tested adherence to Grice's (1975) maxim of relation--the implicit demand to contribute information that is…

  10. Contentious Conversations: Using Mediation Techniques in Difficult Clinical Ethics Consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Mediators utilize a wide range of skills in the process of facilitating dialogue and resolving conflicts. Among the most useful techniques for clinical ethics consultants (CECs)-and surely the least discussed-are those employed in acrimonious, hostile conversations between stakeholders. In the context of clinical ethics disputes or other bedside conflicts, good mediation skills can reverse the negative interactions that have prevented the creation of workable treatment plans or ethical consensus. This essay lays out the central framework mediators use in distinguishing positions from interests and describes a set of strategies for managing contentious ethics consultations or working with "difficult" patients, families, or patient-careprovider interactions. Copyright 2015 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Huber, George W.

    2011-06-03

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO₂, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C₁₂{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO₂, allene, C₂–C₆ olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 °C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450–600 °C). At low temperatures (450 °C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include Diels–Alder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water

  12. Nuclear (μ-,e+) conversion mediated by Majorana neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domin, P.; Kovalenko, S.; Faessler, Amand; Simkovic, F.

    2004-01-01

    We study the lepton number violating (LNV) process of (μ - ,e + ) conversion in nuclei mediated by the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos. Nuclear structure calculations have been carried out for the case of an experimentally interesting nucleus 48 Ti in the framework of a renormalized proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation. We demonstrate that the imaginary part of the amplitude of a light Majorana neutrino exchange mechanism gives an appreciable contribution to the (μ - ,e + ) conversion rate. This specific feature is absent in the allied case of 0νββ decay. Using the present neutrino oscillations, tritium beta decay, accelerator, and cosmological data, we derived the limits on the effective masses of light μe and heavy N -1 > μe neutrinos. The expected rates of nuclear (μ - ,e + ) conversion, corresponding to these limits, were found to be so small that even within a distant future the (μ - ,e + ) conversion experiments will hardly be able to detect the neutrino signal. Therefore, searches for this LNV process can only rely on the presence of certain physics beyond the trivial extension of the standard model by inclusion of massive Majorana neutrinos

  13. Modeling of the interplay between single-file diffusion and conversion reaction in mesoporous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. A strict single-file (no passing) constraint occurs in the diffusion within such narrow pores. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice–gas model for this reaction–diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction–diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction–diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion (SFD) in this multispecies system. Noting the shortcomings of mf-RDE and h-RDE, we then develop a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) formulation of appropriate gh-RDE which incorporates an unconventional description of chemical diffusion in mixed-component quasi-single-file systems based on a refined picture of tracer diffusion for finite-length pores. The gh-RDE elucidate the non-exponential decay of the steady-state reactant concentration into the pore and the non-mean-field scaling of the reactant penetration depth. Then an extended model of a catalytic conversion reaction within a functionalized nanoporous material is developed to assess the effect of varying the reaction product – pore interior interaction from attractive to repulsive. The analysis is performed utilizing the generalized hydrodynamic formulation of the reaction-diffusion equations which can reliably capture the complex interplay between reaction and restricted transport for both irreversible and reversible reactions.

  14. Comparison of techniques for the determination of conversion during suspension polymerization reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The determination of conversion during suspension polymerization reactions is not an easy task due to the heterogeneity of the reaction medium and the tendency of particles to agglomerate rapidly when stirring is stopped. Usually, bulk polymerization in ampoules is employed to study the kinetics of suspension polymerization reactions. In this work, a comparison of different techniques for the determination of conversion during suspension polymerization reactions is presented. Results showed a good agreement between the conversion obtained by gravimetry during styrene suspension polymerization and on-line conversion monitoring data using fiber-optic based Raman Spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the polymerization rate of styrene bulk polymerization carried out in ampoules was higher than the real reaction rate of styrene suspension polymerization due to slightly higher reaction temperatures. Simulation results using the experimental temperature data in a mathematical model confirmed these results.

  15. Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and loop-mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for diagnosis of Fusarium solani in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients. ... The test was carried out in 1 h reaction at 65°C in a heater block. The specificity of the test was 100% and its sensitivity was a ...

  16. A redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and application in immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ru-Jia; Ma, Wei; Peng, Mao-Pan; Bai, Zhi-Shan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-31

    A novel redox-mediated chromogenic reaction was demonstrated based on the reaction between HAuCl4 and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), which generate various color responses from red to green in the resulting solutions. Various redox substance could be used to mediate the reaction and trigger a distinct color response. We established a sensitive hydrogen peroxide colorimetric sensor based on the redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and depicted the application both in detection of enzyme and in an immunoassay. Combining the traditional chromogenic reagent with gold nanoparticles, our assay has the advantage in short response time (within three minutes), high sensitivity (10(-12) g mL(-1) for HBsAg) and stability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Flow Giese reaction using cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide Fukuyama

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tin-free Giese reactions, employing primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl iodides as radical precursors, ethyl acrylate as a radical trap, and sodium cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator, were examined in a continuous flow system. With the use of an automated flow microreactor, flow reaction conditions for the Giese reaction were quickly optimized, and it was found that a reaction temperature of 70 °C in combination with a residence time of 10–15 minutes gave good yields of the desired addition products.

  18. Stability of Transition-metal Carbides in Liquid Phase Reactions Relevant for Biomass-Based Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza Macêdo, L.; Stellwagen, D.R.; Teixeira da Silva, V.; Bitter, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal carbides have been employed for biobased conversions aiming to replace the rare noble metals. However, when reactions are in liquid phase, many authors have observed catalyst deactivation. The main routes of deactivation in liquid phase biobased conversions are coke deposition,

  19. Statistical properties of multistep enzyme-mediated reactions

    OpenAIRE

    de Ronde, Wiet H.; Daniels, Bryan C.; Mugler, Andrew; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Nemenman, Ilya

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme-mediated reactions may proceed through multiple intermediate conformational states before creating a final product molecule, and one often wishes to identify such intermediate structures from observations of the product creation. In this paper, we address this problem by solving the chemical master equations for various enzymatic reactions. We devise a perturbation theory analogous to that used in quantum mechanics that allows us to determine the first () and the second (variance) cumu...

  20. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K_C_A_T and K_C_A_T/K_M values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H_2O_2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H_2O_2 concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL"−"1 SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL"−"1 was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K_C_A_T) and catalytic efficiency (K_C_A_T/K_M) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment.

  1. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, Ya [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People’s Republic of China, Nanjing 210042 (China); Ji, Yuefei [College of Resources and Environmental Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gao, Shixiang, E-mail: ecsxg@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-06-05

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K{sub CAT} and K{sub CAT}/K{sub M} values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, while the optimal pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL{sup −1} SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL{sup −1} was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K{sub CAT}) and catalytic efficiency (K{sub CAT}/K{sub M}) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water

  2. Diversification of the Primary Antibody Repertoire by AID-Mediated Gene Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, Dennis K; Knight, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Gene conversion, mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), has been found to contribute to generation of the primary antibody repertoire in several vertebrate species. Generation of the primary antibody repertoire by gene conversion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes occurs primarily in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and is best described in chicken and rabbit. Here, we discuss current knowledge of the mechanism of gene conversion as well as the contribution of the microbiota in promoting gene conversion of Ig genes. Finally, we propose that the antibody diversification strategy used in GALT species, such as chicken and rabbit, is conserved in a subset of human and mouse B cells.

  3. Reaction mechanisms of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehaug, Astrid Elisabeth

    1995-12-31

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of saturated hydrocarbons, ethers, alkenes and alcohols. Several methods were used. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidations of adamantane and cis-decalin were studied in CCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 3}CN-H{sub 2}O and in acetone-water. The rate of reaction was found to be moderately influenced by the polarity of the solvent. Solvent properties other than the polarity were also found to influence the reaction rates. From the oxidations of adamantane and adamantane-1,3,5,7-d{sub 4} two primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects were found. These were comparable with the deuterium isotope effects found for the analogous oxidations of cis-decalin and cis-decalin-d{sub 18}. The results seem to exclude both a one step hydride abstraction reaction mechanism and a one step concerted mechanism, as well as a scheme where two such mechanisms compete. The observations may be explained by a two step reaction mechanism consisting of a pre-equilibrium with formation of a substrate-RuO{sub 4} complex followed by a concerted rate determining reaction. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidation of ethers was of kinetic second order with a small enthalpy of activation and a large negative entropy of activation. Oxidation of cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether gave methyl cyclopropanecarboxylate, no rearranged products were observed. On RuO{sub 4} oxidations in CCl{sub 4} with NaIO{sub 4} as stoichiometric oxidant, no chlorinated products were observed. Several observations not in agreement with a hydride or a hydrogen abstraction mechanism may be explained by assuming that the reaction proceeds by either a concerted reaction or by a reversible oxidative addition of the ether to RuO{sub 4} followed by a slow concerted step. 228 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. Reaction-transport simulations of non-oxidative methane conversion with continuous hydrogen removal: Homogeneous-heterogeneous methane reaction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lin; Borry, Richard W.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    Detailed kinetic-transport models were used to explore thermodynamic and kinetic barriers in the non-oxidative conversion of CH4 via homogeneous and homogeneous-heterogeneous pathways and the effects of continuous hydrogen removal and of catalytic sites on attainable yields of useful C2-C10 products. The homogeneous kinetic model combines separately developed models for low-conversion pyrolysis and for chain growth to form large aromatics and carbon. The H2 formed in the reaction decreases CH4 pyrolysis rates and equilibrium conversions and it favors the formation of lighter products. The removal of H2 along tubular reactors with permeable walls increases reaction rates and equilibrium CH4 conversions. C2-C10 yields reach values greater than 90 percent at intermediate values of dimensionless transport rates (delta=1-10), defined as the ratio hydrogen transport and methane conversion rates. Homogeneous reactions require impractical residence times, even with H2 removal, because of slow initiation and chain transfer rates. The introduction of heterogeneous chain initiation pathways using surface sites that form methyl radicals eliminates the induction period without influencing the homogeneous product distribution. Methane conversion, however, occurs predominately in the chain transfer regime, within which individual transfer steps and the formation of C2 intermediates become limited by thermodynamic constraints. Catalytic sites alone cannot overcome these constraints. Catalytic membrane reactors with continuous H2 removal remove these thermodynamic obstacles and decrease the required residence time. Reaction rates become limited by homogeneous reactions of C2 products to form C6+ aromatics. Higher delta values lead to subsequent conversion of the desired C2-C10 products to larger polynuclear aromatics. We conclude that catalytic methane pyrolysis at the low temperatures required for restricted chain growth and the elimination of thermodynamics constraints via

  5. IgE-mediated reaction to local anaesthetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartal, O.; Gulec, M.; Sener, O.; Caliskaner, A.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Local anaesthetics (LAs) are essential agents in daily practices of dentistry, minor surgery and dermatology. Although they have an impressive history of safety and efficacy, LAs also have the potential to produce adverse events, which are mainly of non-immune nature. The true IgE-mediated allergies are quite rare, but are more considerable in terms of ability to cause life-threatening outcomes. In this report, we present a case of IgE-mediated systemic reaction to LAs occurring during epidural anaesthesia for Cesarean section. (author)

  6. Rapid and Efficient Conversion of (11) CO2 to (11) CO through Silacarboxylic Acids: Applications in Pd-Mediated Carbonylations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordeman, Patrik; Friis, Stig D; Andersen, Thomas L; Audrain, Hélène; Larhed, Mats; Skrydstrup, Troels; Antoni, Gunnar

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we present a new rapid, efficient, and low-cost radiosynthetic protocol for the conversion of (11) CO2 to (11) CO and its subsequent application in Pd-mediated reactions of importance for PET applications. This room-temperature methodology, using readily available chemical reagents, is carried out in simple glass vials, thus eliminating the need for expensive and specialized high-temperature equipment to access (11) CO. With this fast and near-quantitative conversion of (11) CO2 into (11) CO, aryl and heteroaryl iodides were easily converted into a broad selection of biologically active amides in radiochemical yields ranging from 29-84 %. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Secondary reactions of tar during thermochemical biomass conversion[Dissertation 14341

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morf, P.O.

    2001-07-01

    This dissertation submitted to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich presents and discusses the results obtained during the examination of the processes involved in the formation and conversion of tar in biomass gasification plant. Details are given on the laboratory reactor system used to provide separated tar production and conversion for the purposes of the experiments carried out. The results of analyses made of the tar and the gaseous products obtained after its conversion at various temperatures are presented. The development of kinetic models using the results of the experiments that were carried out is described. The results of the experiments and modelling are compared with the corresponding results obtained using a full-scale down-draft, fixed-bed gasifier. The author is of the opinion that the reaction conditions found in full-scale gasifiers can be well simulated using heterogeneous tar conversion experiments using the lab reactor system.

  8. Reading Comprehension in Boys with ADHD: The Mediating Roles of Working Memory and Orthographic Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lauren M; Rapport, Mark D; Raiker, Joseph S; Orban, Sarah A; Eckrich, Samuel J

    2017-02-01

    Reading comprehension difficulties in children with ADHD are well established; however, limited information exists concerning the cognitive mechanisms that contribute to these difficulties and the extent to which they interact with one another. The current study examines two broad cognitive processes known to be involved in children's reading comprehension abilities-(a) working memory (i.e., central executive processes [CE], phonological short-term memory [PH STM], and visuospatial short-term memory [VS STM]) and (b) orthographic conversion (i.e., conversion of visually presented text to a phonological code)-to elucidate their unique and interactive contribution to ADHD-related reading comprehension differences. Thirty-one boys with ADHD-combined type and 30 typically developing (TD) boys aged 8 to 12 years (M = 9.64, SD = 1.22) were administered multiple counterbalanced tasks assessing WM and orthographic conversion processes. Relative to TD boys, boys with ADHD exhibited significant deficits in PH STM (d = -0.70), VS STM (d = -0.92), CE (d = -1.58), and orthographic conversion (d = -0.93). Bias-corrected, bootstrapped mediation analyses revealed that CE and orthographic conversion processes modeled separately mediated ADHD-related reading comprehension differences partially, whereas PH STM and VS STM did not. CE and orthographic conversion modeled jointly mediated ADHD-related reading comprehension differences fully wherein orthographic conversion's large magnitude influence on reading comprehension occurred indirectly through CE's impact on the orthographic system. The findings suggest that adaptive cognitive interventions designed to improve reading-related outcomes in children with ADHD may benefit by including modules that train CE and orthographic conversion processes independently and interactively.

  9. Tc1-mediated contact sensitivity reaction, its mechanism and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Zemelka-Wiącek

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The contact hypersensitivity reaction (CHS to haptens is a classic example of cell-mediated immune response. In the effector phase, two stages can be distinguished: an early component, that appears only 2 hours after subsequent contact with the hapten, and the late component that develops approximately 24 hours later which is mediated by TCRαβ+ cells. The effector lymphocytes may be CD4+ T helper 1 (Th1 cells or CD8+ T cytotoxic 1 (Tc1 cells, which depends on the employed hapten and/or mice strain. NKT lymphocytes play the crucial role in the CHS initiation, by supporting B1 cells in the antigen-specific IgM antibodies production. The development of an early component is essential for the recruitment of T effector (Teff cells to the side of hapten deposition and for the complete expansion of inflammatory reaction. The CHS reaction is under T regulatory (Treg cells control, both in the induction phase as well as in the effector phase. A new view of a negative regulation of the Tc1 mediated CHS response is based on the suppression induced by epicutaneous (EC application of protein antigen. The DNP-BSA skin application, on a gauze patch, leads to a state of immunosuppression. This maneuver results in rising the population of Treg cells with TCRαβ+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ phenotype. The mechanism of suppression requires direct contact between Treg cells and Teff cells and the participation of CTLA-4 molecule is also necessary. The described method of evoking immune tolerance via EC immunization may contribute to elaborate a new method of allergic contact dermatitis therapy. This is because of its effectiveness, ease of induction and non-invasive protein antigen application.

  10. Contact in Adoption and Adoptive Identity Formation: The Mediating Role of Family Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korff, Lynn Von; Grotevant, Harold D.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined adoption-related family conversation as a mediator of the association between adoptive parents’ facilitation of contact with birth relatives and adolescent adoptive identity formation. The sample consisted of 184 adoptive families. Data were collected in two waves from adoptive mothers and fathers, and adoptees (M = 15.68 years at adolescence; M = 24.95 years at emerging adulthood) using semistructured interviews and questionnaires. Structural equation models showed a good fit to sample data, and analyses supported the hypothesized mediation model. Contact with birth relatives is associated with more frequent adoption-related family conversation, which in turn is associated with the development of adoptive identity. These results highlight the importance of supporting activities such as contact that lead to adoption-related family conversation. PMID:21517175

  11. Contact in adoption and adoptive identity formation: the mediating role of family conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Korff, Lynn; Grotevant, Harold D

    2011-06-01

    The present study examined adoption-related family conversation as a mediator of the association between adoptive parents' facilitation of contact with birth relatives and adolescent adoptive identity formation. The sample consisted of 184 adoptive families. Data were collected in two waves from adoptive mothers and fathers, and adoptees (M = 15.68 years at adolescence; M = 24.95 years at emerging adulthood) using semistructured interviews and questionnaires. Structural equation models showed a good fit to sample data, and analyses supported the hypothesized mediation model. Contact with birth relatives is associated with more frequent adoption-related family conversation, which in turn is associated with the development of adoptive identity. These results highlight the importance of supporting activities such as contact that lead to adoption-related family conversation. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  12. Local cell-mediated immune reactions in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilynskij, B.T.; Vasil'ev, N.V.; Volod'ko, N.A.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Tomsk. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr)

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of 178 cases of stage I-II breast cancer showed morphological features of local cell-mediated immune reactions to be of limited prognostic value. A comparative evaluation of some characteristics of cell surface receptors, such as ability to spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes and sensitivty to theophylline, was carried out in lymphocyte samples obtained from tumor tissue and peripheral blood of 76 cancer patients subjected to preoperative radiotherapy. The said parameters were studied in breast cancer patients of rosette-forming cell reaction to theophylline were identified, the incidence of some of them being determined by the presence or absence of regional metastases. The level and functional activity of surface receptors of tumor mononuclear cells proved to influence prognosis

  13. The (μ-, e+) conversion in nuclei mediated by light Majorana neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simkovic, F.; Domin, P.; Kovalenko, S.G.; Faessler, A.

    2001-01-01

    The lepton number violating (μ - ,e + ) conversion in nuclei mediated by the exchange of virtual light Majorana neutrinos is studied. We found that a previously overlooked imaginary part of this amplitude plays an important role. The numerical calculation has been made for the experimentally interesting (μ - ,e + ) conversion in 48 Ti using realistic renormalized proton-neutron QRPA wave functions. We also discuss the very similar case of the neutrinoless double beta decay of 48 Ca. The ratio of (μ - ,e + ) conversion over the total μ - absorption has been computed taking into account the current constraints from neutrino oscillation phenomenology. We compare our results with the experimental limits as well as with previous theoretical predictions. We have found that the Majorana neutrino mode of (μ - ,e + ) conversion in 48 Ti is too small to be measurable in the foreseeable future

  14. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen.

  15. A parametric duration model of the reaction times of drivers distracted by mobile phone conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Md Mazharul; Washington, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile phones while driving is more prevalent among young drivers-a less experienced cohort with elevated crash risk. The objective of this study was to examine and better understand the reaction times of young drivers to a traffic event originating in their peripheral vision whilst engaged in a mobile phone conversation. The CARRS-Q advanced driving simulator was used to test a sample of young drivers on various simulated driving tasks, including an event that originated within the driver's peripheral vision, whereby a pedestrian enters a zebra crossing from a sidewalk. Thirty-two licensed drivers drove the simulator in three phone conditions: baseline (no phone conversation), hands-free and handheld. In addition to driving the simulator each participant completed questionnaires related to driver demographics, driving history, usage of mobile phones while driving, and general mobile phone usage history. The participants were 21-26 years old and split evenly by gender. Drivers' reaction times to a pedestrian in the zebra crossing were modelled using a parametric accelerated failure time (AFT) duration model with a Weibull distribution. Also tested where two different model specifications to account for the structured heterogeneity arising from the repeated measures experimental design. The Weibull AFT model with gamma heterogeneity was found to be the best fitting model and identified four significant variables influencing the reaction times, including phone condition, driver's age, license type (provisional license holder or not), and self-reported frequency of usage of handheld phones while driving. The reaction times of drivers were more than 40% longer in the distracted condition compared to baseline (not distracted). Moreover, the impairment of reaction times due to mobile phone conversations was almost double for provisional compared to open license holders. A reduction in the ability to detect traffic events in the periphery whilst distracted

  16. Quantum mechanical study of the proton exchange in the ortho-para H2 conversion reaction at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honvault, P; Jorfi, M; González-Lezana, T; Faure, A; Pagani, L

    2011-11-14

    Ortho-para H(2) conversion reactions mediated by the exchange of a H(+) proton have been investigated at very low energy for the first time by means of a time independent quantum mechanical (TIQM) approach. State-to-state probabilities and cross sections for H(+) + H(2) (v = 0, j = 0,1) processes have been calculated for a collision energy, E(c), ranging between 10(-6) eV and 0.1 eV. Differential cross sections (DCSs) for H(+) + H(2) (v = 0, j = 1) → H(+) + H(2) (v' = 0, j' = 0) for very low energies only start to develop a proper global minimum around the sideways scattering direction (θ≈ 90°) at E(c) = 10(-3) eV. Rate coefficients, a crucial information required for astrophysical models, are provided between 10 K and 100 K. The relaxation ortho-para process j = 1 → j' = 0 is found to be more efficient than the j = 0 → j' = 1 conversion at low temperatures, in line with the extremely small ratio between the ortho and para species of molecular hydrogen predicted at the temperature of interstellar cold molecular clouds. The results obtained by means of a statistical quantum mechanical (SQM) model, which has previously proved to provide an adequate description of the dynamics of the title reactions at a higher collision energy regime, have been compared with the TIQM results. A reasonable good agreement has been found with the only exception of the DCSs for the H(+) + H(2) (v = 0, j = 1) → H(+) + H(2) (v' = 0, j' = 0) process at very low energy. SQM cross sections are also slightly below the quantum results. Estimates for the rate coefficients, in good accord with the TIQM values, are a clear improvement with respect to pioneering statistical studies on the reaction.

  17. SiC Conversion Coating Prepared from Silica-Graphite Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Back-Sub Sung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The β-SiC conversion coatings were successfully synthesized by the SiO(v-graphite(s reaction between silica powder and graphite specimen. This paper is to describe the effects on the characteristics of the SiC conversion coatings, fabricated according to two different reaction conditions. FE-SEM, FE-TEM microstructural morphologies, XRD patterns, pore size distribution, and oxidation behavior of the SiC-coated graphite were investigated. In the XRD pattern and SAD pattern, the coating layers showed cubic SiC peak as well as hexagonal SiC peak. The SiC coatings showed somewhat different characteristics with the reaction conditions according to the position arrangement of the graphite samples. The SiC coating on graphite, prepared in reaction zone (2, shows higher intensity of beta-SiC main peak (111 in XRD pattern as well as rather lower porosity and smaller main pore size peak under 1 μm.

  18. Speaker transfer in children's peer conversation: completing communication-aid-mediated contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michael; Bloch, Steven; Wilkinson, Ray

    2013-03-01

    Managing the exchange of speakers from one person to another effectively is a key issue for participants in everyday conversational interaction. Speakers use a range of resources to indicate, in advance, when their turn will come to an end, and listeners attend to such signals in order to know when they might legitimately speak. Using the principles and findings from conversation analysis, this paper examines features of speaker transfer in a conversation between a boy with cerebral palsy who has been provided with a voice-output communication aid (VOCA), and a peer without physical or communication difficulties. Specifically, the analysis focuses on turn exchange, where a VOCA-mediated contribution approach completion, and the child without communication needs is due to speak next.

  19. Contact in Adoption and Adoptive Identity Formation: The Mediating Role of Family Conversation

    OpenAIRE

    Korff, Lynn Von; Grotevant, Harold D.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined adoption-related family conversation as a mediator of the association between adoptive parents’ facilitation of contact with birth relatives and adolescent adoptive identity formation. The sample consisted of 184 adoptive families. Data were collected in two waves from adoptive mothers and fathers, and adoptees (M = 15.68 years at adolescence; M = 24.95 years at emerging adulthood) using semistructured interviews and questionnaires. Structural equation models showed...

  20. Reversible aqueous zinc/manganese oxide energy storage from conversion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Huilin; Shao, Yuyan; Yan, Pengfei; Cheng, Yingwen; Han, Kee Sung; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Chongmin; Yang, Jihui; Li, Xiaolin; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Mueller, Karl T.; Liu, Jun

    2016-04-18

    Rechargeable aqueous batteries are attracting growing interest for energy storage due to their low cost and high safety. Fundamental understanding of highly reversible aqueous reactions is critical for building high-performance batteries. Herein, we studied the reversibility of Zn/MnO2 battery chemistry in mild aqueous MnSO4 electrolytes. α-MnO2 nanofibers were used as a high performance cathode. Our study provides good evidence for a conversion reaction mechanism through reversible formation of short nanorods and nanoparticle aggregates. This reversible conversion reaction provides an operating voltage of 1.44 V, high capacity of 285 mAh g-1, excellent rate and capacity retention of 92% after 5000 cycles. Zn metal anode also shows high reversibility in the mild aqueous MnSO4 electrolytes. The highly reversible and stable chemistries in aqueous Zn/MnO2 batteries open new opportunity for energy storage technologies with potentially high energy density, high safety, and low cost.

  1. Carbon dioxide/methanol conversion cycle based on cascade enzymatic reactions supported on superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATERINA G.C. MARQUES NETTO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The conversion of carbon dioxide into important industrial feedstock is a subject of growing interest in modern society. A possible way to achieve this goal is by carrying out the CO2/methanol cascade reaction, allowing the recycle of CO2 using either chemical catalysts or enzymes. Efficient and selective reactions can be performed by enzymes; however, due to their low stability, immobilization protocols are required to improve their performance. The cascade reaction to reduce carbon dioxide into methanol has been explored by the authors, using, sequentially, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FalDH, and formate dehydrogenase (FDH, powered by NAD+/NADH and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH as the co-enzyme regenerating system. All the enzymes have been immobilized on functionalized magnetite nanoparticles, and their reactions investigated separately in order to establish the best performance conditions. Although the stepwise scheme led to only 2.3% yield of methanol per NADH; in a batch system under CO2 pressure, the combination of the four immobilized enzymes increased the methanol yield by 64 fold. The studies indicated a successful regeneration of NADH in situ, envisaging a real possibility of using immobilized enzymes to perform the cascade CO2-methanol reaction.

  2. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Aymard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g−1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0 and the lowest electrode polarization (2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe− in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent

  3. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (lithium are subsequently detailed for MgH2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should

  4. Pathophysiology of neutrophil-mediated extracellular redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganjac, Morana; Cipak, Ana; Schaur, Rudolf Joerg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocyte leukocytes (neutrophils) play fundamental role in the innate immune response. In the presence of adequate stimuli, neutrophils release excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may induce cell and tissue injury. Oxidative burst of neutrophils acts as a double-edged sword. It may contribute to the pathology of atherosclerosis and brain injury but is also necessary in resolving infections. Moreover, neutrophil-derived ROS may also have both a tumor promoting and tumor suppressing role. ROS have a specific activities and diffusion distance, which is related to their short lifetime. Therefore, the manner in which ROS will act depends on the cells targeted and the intra- and extracellular levels of individual ROS, which can further cause production of reactive aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) that act as a second messengers of ROS. In this review we discuss the influence of neutrophil mediated extracellular redox reactions in ischemia reperfusion injury, transplant rejection and chronic diseases (atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer). At the end a brief overview of cellular mechanisms to maintain ROS homeostasis is given.

  5. Gas-to-particle conversion in the atmospheric environment by radiation-induced and photochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vohra, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years a fascinating new area of research involving ionizing radiations and photochemistry in gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere has been developing at a rapid pace. Two problems of major interest and concern in which this is of paramount importance are: (1) radiation induced and photochemical aerosol formation in the stratosphere and, (2) role of radiations and photochemistry in smog formation. The peak in cosmic ray intensity and significant solar UV flux in the stratosphere lead to complex variety of reactions involving major and trace constituents in this region of the atmosphere, and some of these reactions are of vital importance in aerosol formation. The problem is of great current interest because the pollutant gases from industrial sources and future SST operations entering the stratosphere could increase the aerosol burden in the stratosphere and affect the solar energy input of the troposphere with consequent ecological and climatic changes. On the other hand, in the nuclear era, the atmospheric releases from reactors and processing plants could lead to changes in the cloud nucleation behaviour of the environment and possible increase in smog formation in the areas with significant levels of radiations and conventional pollutants. A review of the earlier work, current status of the problem, and conventional pollutants. A review of the earlier work, current status of the problem, and some recent results of the experiments conducted in the author's laboratory are presented. The possible mechanisms of gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere have been explained

  6. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO 2 granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO 2 granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs

  7. Enhanced bimolecular exchange reaction through programmed coordination of a five-coordinate oxovanadium complex for efficient redox mediation in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyaizu, Kenichi; Hayo, Noriko; Sasada, Yoshito; Kato, Fumiaki; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-07

    Electrochemical reversibility and fast bimolecular exchange reaction found for VO(salen) gave rise to a highly efficient redox mediation to enhance the photocurrent of a dye-sensitized solar cell, leading to an excellent photovoltaic performance with a conversion efficiency of 5.4%. A heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant at an electrode (k0) and a second-order rate constant for an electron self-exchange reaction (k(ex)) were proposed as key parameters that dominate the charge transport property, which afforded a novel design concept for the mediators based on their kinetic aspects.

  8. Conversion of glucose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in different solvents and catalysts: Reaction kinetics and mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunshan Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF from glucose was done in H2O, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl catalyzed by metal (III chloride (FeCl3·6H2O, CrCl3·6H2O and AlCl3. The effects of solvent/catalyst system and temperature/time on the performance of the reaction are studied. HMF yield in the different solvents follows a decreasing order as DMSO > [Bmim]Cl > H2O. The highest HMF yield is achieved by CrCl3·6H2O, followed by AlCl3 and then FeCl3·6H2O. An optimal temperature/time is found at 393 K or 403 K and a time between 30 min and 480 min. Under the optimal reaction conditions, HMF yields of 54.43% and 52.86% are obtained in DMSO with CrCl3·6H2O at 403 K and 480 min and AlCl3 at 393 K and 240 min, respectively. The mechanism of the halide chlorides catalyzed glucose conversion reaction is proposed. The kinetic model is established to describe the HMF formation and the experimental data conform to the model.

  9. Stabilization of cartwheel-less centrioles for duplication requires CEP295-mediated centriole to centrosome conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Denisse; Wang, Won-Jing; Uryu, Kunihiro; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate centrioles lose their geometric scaffold, the cartwheel, during mitosis, concurrently with gaining the ability to recruit the pericentriolar material (PCM) and thereby function as the centrosome. Cartwheel removal has recently been implicated in centriole duplication, but whether “cartwheel-less” centrioles are intrinsically stable, or must be maintained through other modifications remains unclear. Here, we identify a newborn centriole-enriched protein, KIAA1731/CEP295, specifically mediating centriole-to-centrosome conversion but dispensable for cartwheel removal. In the absence of CEP295, centrioles form in S/G2 phase, and lose their associated cartwheel in mitosis, but cannot be converted to centrosomes, uncoupling the two events. Strikingly, centrioles devoid of both the PCM and cartwheel progressively lose centriolar components, whereas centrioles associating with either the cartwheel or PCM alone can exist stably. Thus, cartwheel removal can have grave repercussions to centriole stability, and centriole-to-centrosome conversion mediated by CEP295 must occur in parallel to maintain cartwheel-less centrioles for duplication. PMID:25131205

  10. Zeolite synthesis from the pyrrolidine containing system and their catalytic properties in the methanol conversion reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kunio; Kiyozumi, Yoshimichi; Shin, Shigemitsu; Ogawa, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Yasuyoshi; Watanabe, Hideo

    1987-12-18

    Systhesis of zeolite from a system containing cheaper pyrrolidine as a crystallization regulator than quaternary ammonium ion was carried out and the methanol conversion reaction was studied over the systhesized zeolite to get C/sub 2/ and C/sub 3/ olefins. Hydrous gels were prepared by adding and agitating pyrrolidine, water glass and sulfuric acid to aluminum sulfate solution; and aluminum nitrate, colloidal silica and pyrrolidine to NaOH solution. Five zeolite, that is, ZSM-5, ZSM-35, ZSM-39, ZSM-48 and KZ-1 were synthesized by changing gel components. X-ray powder diffraction, BET specific surface areas, micropore diameters, micropore volumes, oxygen contents by scanning electron photomicrographs and infra-red spectra were examined. The organic base in hydrous gels influenced greatly on the zeolite composition and structure. The ZSM-5 zeolite exhibited the superior performance as to a high selectivity of light olefins over the target of development. (12 figs, 1 tab, 20 refs)

  11. Tritium conversion in tritiated water: study of the involved reactions: a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1987-10-01

    According to ICRP publication 30, hazards due to molecular tritium are not significant in comparison to hazards due to the oxidated form: tritiated water. It is thus important to know the kinetics of tritium/tritiated water conversion to obtain a realistic evaluation of the risks for the environment at level of present facilities and of future nuclear fusion facilities. Laboratory experiments in static contained conditions have shown that tritiated water is produced by two mechanisms: gas phase oxidation, hydrogen isotopic exchange with water. The periods found are relatively long and difficult to specify. In terrestrial atmosphere, the two mechanisms intervening in tritiated water formation are photochemical oxidation and biochemical reactions occurring in soil and in vegetation aerial parts. The corresponding periods are of some years for the first one, of some hours for the second one [fr

  12. Controlling Solid–Liquid Conversion Reactions for a Highly Reversible Aqueous Zinc–Iodine Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Huilin; Li, Bin; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Guosheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Han, Kee Sung; Muller, Karl T.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2017-10-30

    Aqueous rechargeable batteries are desirable for many energy storage applications due to their low cost and high safety. However, low capacity and short cycle life are the significant obstacles to their practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a highly reversible aqueous zinc-iodine battery using encapsulated iodine in microporous active carbon fibers (ACFs) as cathode materials through the rational control of solid-liquid conversion reactions. The experiments and density function theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the effects of solvents and properties of carbon hosts, e.g. pore size, surface chemistries, on the adsorption of iodine species. The rational manipulation of the competition between the adsorption in carbon and solvation in electrolytes for iodine species is responsible for the high reversibility and cycling stability. The zinc-iodine batteries deliver a high capacity of 180 mAh g-1 at 1C and a stable cycle life over 3000 cycles with ~90% capacity retention as well as negligible self-discharge. We believe the principles for stabilizing the zinc-iodine system could provide new insight into conversion systems such as Li-S systems.

  13. Reaction limited aggregation in surfactant-mediated epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Bang-Gui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, E. G.

    2000-05-01

    A theoretical model for reaction limited aggregation (RLA) is introduced to study the effect of a monolayer of surfactant on the formation of two-dimensional islands in heteroepitaxial and homoepitaxial growth. In this model the basic atomic processes are considered as follows. A stable island consists of the adatoms that have exchanged positions with the surfactant atoms beneath them. Movable active adatoms may (a) diffuse on the surfactant terrace, (b) exchange positions with the surfactant atoms beneath them and become island seeds (seed exchange), or (c) stick to stable islands and become stuck but still active adatoms. The rate-limiting step for the formation of a stable island is the seed exchange. Furthermore, a stuck but still active adatom must overcome a sizable potential-energy barrier to exchange positions with the surfactant atom beneath it and become a member of the stable island (aided exchange). The seed exchange process can occur with an adatom or collectively with an addimer. In the case of dimer exchange, the diffusing adatoms on the surfactant terrace can meet and (after exchanging) form stable dimers, which can then become island seeds. Systematic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and rate-equation analysis of the model are carried out. The key finding of these simulations is that a counterintuitive fractal-to-compact island shape transition can be induced either by increasing deposition flux or by decreasing growth temperature. This major qualitative conclusion is valid for both the monomer and the dimer seed exchanges and for two different substrate lattices (square and triangular, respectively), although there are some quantitative differences in the flux and temperature dependence of the island density. The shape transition observed is contrary to the prediction of the classic diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) theory, but in excellent qualitative agreement with recent experiments. In rationalizing the main finding, it is crucial to realize

  14. The coupling effect of gas-phase chemistry and surface reactions on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion in ITM reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2015-08-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The effect of the coupling between heterogeneous catalytic reactions supported by an ion transport membrane (ITM) and gas-phase chemistry on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation in ITM reactors is examined. In ITM reactors, thermochemical reactions take place in the gas-phase and on the membrane surface, both of which interact with oxygen permeation. However, this coupling between gas-phase and surface chemistry has not been examined in detail. In this study, a parametric analysis using numerical simulations is conducted to investigate this coupling and its impact on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation rates. A thermochemical model that incorporates heterogeneous chemistry on the membrane surface and detailed chemical kinetics in the gas-phase is used. Results show that fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are strongly influenced by the simultaneous action of both chemistries. It is shown that the coupling somewhat suppresses the gas-phase kinetics and reduces fuel conversion, both attributed to extensive thermal energy transfer towards the membrane which conducts it to the air side and radiates to the reactor walls. The reaction pathway and products, in the form of syngas and C2 hydrocarbons, are also affected. In addition, the operating regimes of ITM reactors in which heterogeneous- or/and homogeneous-phase reactions predominantly contribute to fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are elucidated.

  15. Study of parameters affecting the conversion in a plug flow reactor for reactions of the type 2A→B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Prieto, Juan Carlos; Long, Nguyen Huynh Bach Son

    2018-04-01

    Modeling of chemical reactors is an important tool to quantify reagent conversion, product yield and selectivity towards a specific compound and to describe the behavior of the system. Proposal of differential equations describing the mass and energy balance are among the most important steps required during the modeling process as they play a special role in the design and operation of the reactor. Parameters governing transfer of heat and mass have a strong relevance in the rate of the reaction. Understanding this information is important for the selection of reactor and operating regime. In this paper we studied the irreversible gas-phase reaction 2A→B. We model the conversion that can be achieved as function of the reactor volume and feeding temperature. Additionally, we discuss the effect of activation energy and the heat of reaction on the conversion achieved in the tubular reactor. Furthermore, we considered that dimerization occurs instantaneously in the catalytic surface to develop equations for the determination of rate of reaction per unit area of three different catalytic surface shapes. This data can be combined with information about the global rate of conversion in the reactor to improve regent conversion and yield of product.

  16. Liquid-assisted grinding and ion pairing regulates percentage conversion and diastereoselectivity of the Wittig reaction under mechanochemical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Kendra Leahy; Ortiz-Trankina, Lianna; Carr, Preston; Benson, Kingsley; Waddell, Daniel C; Mack, James

    2018-01-01

    Mechanochemistry is maturing as a discipline and continuing to grow, so it is important to continue understanding the rules governing the system. In a mechanochemical reaction, the reactants are added into a vessel along with one or more grinding balls and the vessel is shaken at high speeds to facilitate a chemical reaction. The dielectric constant of the solvent used in liquid-assisted grinding (LAG) and properly chosen counter-ion pairing increases the percentage conversion of stilbenes in a mechanochemical Wittig reaction. Utilizing stepwise addition/evaporation of ethanol in liquid-assisted grinding also allows for the tuning of the diastereoselectivity in the Wittig reaction.

  17. Reaction kinetic model of the surface-mediated formation of PCDD/F from pyrolysis of 2-chlorophenol on a CuP/Silica suface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomnicki, S.; Khachatryan, L.; Dellinger, B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2004-09-15

    One of the major challenges in developing predictive models of the surface mediated pollutant formation and fuel combustion is the construction of reliable reaction kinetic mechanisms and models. While the homogeneous, gas-phase chemistry of various light fuels such as hydrogen and methane is relatively well-known large uncertainties exist in the reaction paths of surface mediated reaction mechanisms for even these very simple species. To date, no detailed kinetic consideration of the surface mechanisms of formation of complex organics such as PCDD/F have been developed. In addition to the complexity of the mechanism, a major difficulty is the lack of reaction kinetic parameters (pre-exponential factor and activation energy) of surface reactions, Consequently, numerical studies of the surface-mediated formation of PCDD/F have often been incorporated only a few reactions. We report the development of a numerical multiple-step surface model based on experimental data of surface mediated (5% CuO/SiO2) conversion of 2-monochlorphenol (2-MCP) to PCDD/F under pyrolytic or oxidative conditions. A reaction kinetic model of the catalytic conversion of 2-MCP on the copper oxide catalyst under pyrolytic conditions was developed based on a detailed multistep surface reaction mechanism developed in our laboratory. The performance of the chemical model is assessed by comparing the numerical predictions with experimental measurements. SURFACE CHEMKIN (version 3.7.1) software was used for modeling. Our results confirm the validity of previously published mechanism of the reaction and provides new insight concerning the formation of PCDD/F formation in combustion processes. This model successfully explains the high yields of PCDD/F at low temperatures that cannot be explained using a purely gas-phase mode.

  18. Defect-mediated photoluminescence up-conversion in cadmium sulfide nanobelts (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Yurii; Kuno, Masaru K.

    2017-02-01

    The concept of optical cooling of solids has existed for nearly 90 years ever since Pringsheim proposed a way to cool solids through the annihilation of phonons via phonon-assisted photoluminescence (PL) up-conversion. In this process, energy is removed from the solid by the emission of photons with energies larger than those of incident photons. However, actually realizing optical cooling requires exacting parameters from the condensed phase medium such as near unity external quantum efficiencies as well as existence of a low background absorption. Until recently, laser cooling has only been successfully realized in rare earth doped solids. In semiconductors, optical cooling has very recently been demonstrated in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanobelts as well as in hybrid lead halide perovskites. For the former, large internal quantum efficiencies, sub-wavelength thicknesses, which decrease light trapping, and low background absorption, all make near unity external quantum yields possible. Net cooling by as much as 40 K has therefore been possible with CdS nanobelts. In this study, we describe a detailed investigation of the nature of efficient anti-Stokes photoluminescence (ASPL) in CdS nanobelts. Temperature-dependent PL up-conversion and optical absorption studies on individual NBs together with frequency-dependent up-converted PL intensity spectroscopies suggest that ASPL in CdS nanobelts is defect-mediated through involvement of defect levels below the band gap.

  19. Mediated priming in the lexical decision task : Evidence from event-related potentials and reaction time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chwilla, DJ; Kolk, HHJ; Mulder, G

    Mediated priming (e.g., from LION to STRIPES vis TIGER) is predicted by spreading activation models hut only by some integration model. The goal of the present research was to localize mediated priming by assessing two-step priming effects on N400 and reaction times (RT). We propose that the N400

  20. S-methylmethionine conversion to dimethylsulfoniopropionate: evidence for an unusual transamination reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.; Gage, D.A.; Cooper, A.J.L.; Hanson, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Leaves of Wollastonia biflora (L.) DC. synthesize the osmoprotectant 3-dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) from methionine via S-methylmethionine (SMM) and 3-dimethylsulfoniopropionaldehyde (DMSP-ald); no other intermediates have been detected. To test whether the amino group of SMM is lost by transamination or deamination, [methyl-2H3, 15N]SMM was supplied to leaf discs, and 15N-labeling of amino acids was monitored, along with synthesis of [2H3]DMSP. After short incubations more 15N was incorporated into glutamate than into other amino acids, and the 15N abundance in glutamate exceeded that in the amide group of glutamine (Gln). This is more consistent with transamination than deamination, because deamination would be predicted to give greater labeling of Gln amide N due to reassimilation, via Gln synthetase, of the 15NH4+ released. This prediction was borne out by control experiments with 15NH4Cl. The transamination product of SMM, 4-dimethylsulfonio-2-oxobutyrate (DMSOB), is expected to be extremely unstable. This was confirmed by attempting to synthesize it enzymatically from SMM using L-amino acid oxidase or Gln transaminase K and from 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate using methionine S-methyltransferase. In each case, the reaction product decomposed rapidly, releasing dimethylsulfide. The conversion of SMM to DMSP-ald is therefore unlikely to involve a simple transamination that generates free DMSOB. Plausible alternatives are that DMSOB is channeled within a specialized transaminase-decarboxylase complex or that it exists only as the bound intermediate of a single enzyme catalyzing an unusual transamination-decarboxylation reaction

  1. Potential hepatic toxicity of buprofezin at sublethal concentrations: ROS-mediated conversion of energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaotong; Ku, Tingting; Zhu, Na; Ning, Xia; Wei, Wei; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-12-15

    Buprofezin is known for its broad-spectrum action and environmental safety. The popularity of buprofezin has raised concerns about its potentially adverse effects on human health and risk to the environment. In this study, we first identified the liver as one of the major organs in which buprofezin accumulated, and we detected a severe oxidative stress response. Next, we demonstrated that sublethal concentrations of buprofezin promoted the conversion of energy metabolism from the aerobic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis. Importantly, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation partially accounted for the shunting of the energy metabolism through the buprofezin-mediated inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase activity. ROS directly perturbed the activities of several key TCA cycle enzymes, stimulated glycolysis, and indirectly disturbed the activity of the respiratory chain complex by altering mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). These findings clarify the potential mechanisms of buprofezin toxicity and provide biomarkers for buprofezin-mediated hepatotoxicity at sublethal concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of vegetable oils fatty acid composition on reaction temperature and glycerides conversion to biodiesel during transesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzi, S; Gandía, L M; Arzamendi, G; Ruiz, J J; Dorado, M P

    2011-01-01

    Presence of unreacted glycerides in biodiesel may reduce drastically its quality. This is why conversion of raw material in biodiesel through transesterification needs to readjust reaction parameter values to complete. In the present work, monitoring of glycerides transformation in biodiesel during the transesterification of vegetable oils was carried out. To check the influence of the chemical composition on glycerides conversion, selected vegetable oils covered a wide range of fatty acid composition. Reactions were carried out under alkali-transesterification in the presence of methanol. In addition, a multiple regression model was proposed. Results showed that kinetics depends on chemical and physical properties of the oils. It was found that the optimal reaction temperature depends on both length and unsaturation degree of vegetable oils fatty acid chains. Vegetable oils with higher degree of unsaturation exhibit faster monoglycerides conversion to biodiesel. It can be concluded that fatty acid composition influences reaction parameters and glycerides conversion, hence biodiesel yield and economic viability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The coupling effect of gas-phase chemistry and surface reactions on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion in ITM reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup; Kirchen, Patrick; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The effect of the coupling between heterogeneous catalytic reactions supported by an ion transport membrane (ITM) and gas-phase chemistry on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation in ITM reactors is examined. In ITM reactors

  4. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated DNA fingerprinting for epidemiological studies on Campylobacter spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesendorf, B A; Goossens, H; Niesters, H G; Van Belkum, A; Koeken, A; Endtz, H P; Stegeman, H; Quint, W G

    The applicability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated DNA typing, with primers complementary to dispersed repetitive DNA sequences and arbitrarily chosen DNA motifs, to study the epidemiology of campylobacter infection was evaluated. With a single PCR reaction and simple gel electrophoresis,

  5. Honesty mediates the relationship between serotonin and reaction to unfairness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidehiko; Takano, Harumasa; Camerer, Colin F; Ideno, Takashi; Okubo, Shigetaka; Matsui, Hiroshi; Tamari, Yuki; Takemura, Kazuhisa; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Yamada, Makiko; Eguchi, Yoko; Murai, Toshiya; Okubo, Yoshiro; Kato, Motoichiro; Ito, Hiroshi; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2012-03-13

    How does one deal with unfair behaviors? This subject has long been investigated by various disciplines including philosophy, psychology, economics, and biology. However, our reactions to unfairness differ from one individual to another. Experimental economics studies using the ultimatum game (UG), in which players must decide whether to accept or reject fair or unfair offers, have also shown that there are substantial individual differences in reaction to unfairness. However, little is known about psychological as well as neurobiological mechanisms of this observation. We combined a molecular imaging technique, an economics game, and a personality inventory to elucidate the neurobiological mechanism of heterogeneous reactions to unfairness. Contrary to the common belief that aggressive personalities (impulsivity or hostility) are related to the high rejection rate of unfair offers in UG, we found that individuals with apparently peaceful personalities (straightforwardness and trust) rejected more often and were engaged in personally costly forms of retaliation. Furthermore, individuals with a low level of serotonin transporters in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are honest and trustful, and thus cannot tolerate unfairness, being candid in expressing their frustrations. In other words, higher central serotonin transmission might allow us to behave adroitly and opportunistically, being good at playing games while pursuing self-interest. We provide unique neurobiological evidence to account for individual differences of reaction to unfairness.

  6. Solvent-free microwave-mediated Michael addition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    obviously difficult to scale up. In this context ... eco-friendly features such as, (i) no solvent is required to conduct the ... water soluble, addition of reaction mixture after com- ..... Yield: 855 mg (89%; viscous liquid). 3.4 Ethyl .... Jung M E 1993 Comprehensive organic synthesis ... Leshcheva I F and Bundel Y G 1997 Mendeleev.

  7. Exploring Graphene Quantum Dots/TiO2 interface in photoelectrochemical reactions: Solar to fuel conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudhagar, Pitchaimuthu; Herraiz-Cardona, Isaac; Park, Hun; Song, Taesup; Noh, Seung Hyun; Gimenez, Sixto; Sero, Ivan Mora; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Bisquert, Juan; Terashima, Chiaki; Paik, Ungyu; Kang, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    photoelectrochemical fuel generation systems. In this work, we demonstrate direct assembly of surface modified graphene quantum dots (∼2 nm particle size) onto TiO 2 hollow nanowire (∼3 μm in length and ∼100 to 250 nm in diameter) by electrostatic attraction and examine the photocarrier accumulation and recombination processes leading to device operation. Optical characterization reveals that GQDs absorbed light photons at visible light wavelength up to 600 nm. Hybrid TiO 2 -GQDs heterostructures show a photocurrent enhancement of ∼70% for water oxidation compared to pristine TiO 2 using sacrificial-free electrolyte, which is further validated by incident photon to current efficiency. Additionally, the charge accumulation processes and charge transfer characteristics are investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. These results provide the platform to understand the insights of graphene quantum dots/metal oxide interfaces in PEC reactions and discuss the feasibility of graphene quantum dots in wide range of electrochemical and photoelectrochemical based fuel conversion devices.

  8. Engaging unactivated alkyl, alkenyl and aryl iodides in visible-light-mediated free radical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, John D.; D'Amato, Erica M.; Narayanam, Jagan M. R.; Stephenson, Corey R. J.

    2012-10-01

    Radical reactions are a powerful class of chemical transformations. However, the formation of radical species to initiate these reactions has often required the use of stoichiometric amounts of toxic reagents, such as tributyltin hydride. Recently, the use of visible-light-mediated photoredox catalysis to generate radical species has become popular, but the scope of these radical precursors has been limited. Here, we describe the identification of reaction conditions under which photocatalysts such as fac-Ir(ppy)3 can be utilized to form radicals from unactivated alkyl, alkenyl and aryl iodides. The generated radicals undergo reduction via hydrogen atom abstraction or reductive cyclization. The reaction protocol utilizes only inexpensive reagents, occurs under mild reaction conditions, and shows exceptional functional group tolerance. Reaction efficiency is maintained upon scale-up and decreased catalyst loading, and the reaction time can be significantly shortened when the reaction is performed in a flow reactor.

  9. Copper-Mediated Reactions of Nitriles with Nitromethanes: Aza-Henry Reactions and Nitrile Hydrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Jun; Sawada, Yoshiharu; Yoshimatsu, Mitsuhiro

    2018-02-16

    In this study, the first aza-Henry reaction of nitriles with nitromethane in a CuI/Cs 2 CO 3 /DBU system is described. The process was conveniently and directly used for the synthesis of β-aminonitroalkenes 2a-x and tolerated aryl-, alkyl-, hetaryl-, alkenyl-, and alkynylnitriles. The resulting aminonitroalkenes 2 could be successfully transformed to the corresponding 2-nitroacetophenones, 2-amino-1-halonitroalkenes, 2-alkylaminonitroalkenes, or 3-nitropyridines. In the presence of H 2 O, the aza-Henry reaction turned the reaction path to the nitrile hydration to exclusively yield the amides 3a-s.

  10. Plasmon-mediated Energy Conversion in Metal Nanoparticle-doped Hybrid Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R.

    Climate change and population growth demand long-term solutions for clean water and energy. Plasmon-active nanomaterials offer a promising route towards improved energetics for efficient chemical separation and light harvesting schemes. Two material platforms featuring highly absorptive plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are advanced herein to maximize photon conversion into thermal or electronic energy. Optical extinction, attributable to diffraction-induced internal reflection, was enhanced up to 1.5-fold in three-dimensional polymer films containing AuNPs at interparticle separations approaching the resonant wavelength. Comprehensive methods developed to characterize heat dissipation following plasmonic absorption was extended beyond conventional optical and heat transfer descriptions, where good agreement was obtained between measured and estimated thermal profiles for AuNP-polymer dispersions. Concurrently, in situ reduction of AuNPs on two-dimensional semiconducting tungsten disulfide (WS2) addressed two current material limitations for efficient light harvesting: low monolayer content and lack of optoelectronic tunability. Order-of-magnitude increases in WS2 monolayer content, enhanced broadband optical extinction, and energetic electron injection were probed using a combination of spectroscopic techniques and continuum electromagnetic descriptions. Together, engineering these plasmon-mediated hybrid nanomaterials to facilitate local exchange of optical, thermal, and electronic energy supports design and implementation into several emerging sustainable water and energy applications.

  11. AAPH-mediated antioxidant reactions of secoisolariciresinol and SDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinian, Farah S; Muir, Alister D; Westcott, Neil D; Krol, Ed S

    2007-02-21

    Secoisolariciresinol (SECO ) is the major lignan found in flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) and is present in a polymer that contains secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG ). SECO, SDG and the polymer are known to have a number of health benefits, including reduction of serum cholesterol levels, delay in the onset of type II diabetes and decreased formation of breast, prostate and colon cancers. The health benefits of SECO and SDG may be partially attributed to their antioxidant properties. To better understand their antioxidant properties, SECO and SDG were oxidized using 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane), an in vitro model of radical scavenging. The major lignan radical-scavenging oxidation products and their formation over time were determined. SDG was converted to four major products, which were the result of a phenoxyl radical intermediate. One of these products, a dimer of SDG, decomposed under the reaction conditions to form two of the other major products, and . SECO was converted to five major products, two of which were also the result of a phenoxyl radical intermediate. The remaining products were the result of an unexpected alkoxyl radical intermediate. The phenol oxidation products were stable under the reaction conditions, whereas two of the alcohol oxidation products decomposed. In general, only one phenol group on the lignans was oxidized, suggesting that the number of phenols per molecule may not predict radical scavenging antioxidant ability of lignans. Finally, SECO is a superior antioxidant to SDG, and it may be that the additional alcohol oxidation pathway contributes to its greater antioxidant ability.

  12. Photodegradable, Photoadaptable Hydrogels via Radical-Mediated Disulfide Fragmentation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Benjamin D; Singh, Samir P; Bowman, Christopher N; Anseth, Kristi S

    2011-04-26

    Various techniques have been adopted to impart a biological responsiveness to synthetic hydrogels for the delivery of therapeutic agents as well as the study and manipulation of biological processes and tissue development. Such techniques and materials include polyelectrolyte gels that swell and deswell with changes in pH, thermosensitive gels that contract at physiological temperatures, and peptide cross-linked hydrogels that degrade upon peptidolysis by cell-secreted enzymes. Herein we report a unique approach to photochemically deform and degrade disulfide cross-linked hydrogels, mitigating the challenges of light attenuation and low quantum yield, permitting the degradation of hydrogels up to 2 mm thick within 120 s at low light intensities (10 mW/cm(2) at 365 nm). Hydrogels were formed by the oxidation of thiol-functionalized 4-armed poly(ethylene glycol) macromolecules. These disulfide cross-linked hydrogels were then swollen in a lithium acylphosphinate photoinitiator solution. Upon exposure to light, photogenerated radicals initiate multiple fragmentation and disulfide exchange reactions, permitting and promoting photodeformation, photowelding, and photodegradation. This novel, but simple, approach to generate photoadaptable hydrogels portends the study of cellular response to mechanically and topographically dynamic substrates as well as novel encapsulations by the welding of solid substrates. The principles and techniques described herein hold implications for more than hydrogel materials but also for photoadaptable polymers more generally.

  13. Radical-mediated annulation reactions. A versatile strategy for the preparation of a series of carbocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, M P; Chen, J; Rheault, T R

    2001-11-15

    [reaction--see text] A series of novel 6-endo [4 + 2] and 7-endo [5 + 2] radical-mediated annulation reactions are described. These annulation sequences involve an intermolecular radical addition followed by intramolecular trapping with an allyltin moiety incorporated into the radical precursor fragment. This methodology allows for access to functionalized 6- and 7-membered carbocycles as well as bicyclic compounds with good to excellent levels of stereocontrol.

  14. Directed surfaces structures and interfaces for enhanced electrocatalyst activity, selectivity, and stability for energy conversion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Shriram Center

    2016-04-20

    In this project, we have employed a systematic approach to develop active, selective, and stable catalyst materials for important electrochemical reactions involving energy conversion. In particular, we have focused our attention on developing active catalyst materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). HER: We have synthesized and investigated several highly active and acid stable non-precious metal HER catalysts, including: [Mo3S13]2- nanoclusters (Nature Chemistry, 2014) and molybdenum phosphosulfide (MoP|S) (Angewandte Chemie, 2014). We have also aimed to engineer these catalyst formulations in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for fundamental studies of water electrolysis at high current densities, approximately 1 A/cm2 (ChemSusChem, 2015). We furthermore investigated transition metal phosphide (TMP) catalysts for HER by a combined experimental–theoretical approach (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). By synthesizing different TMPs and comparing experimentally determined HER activities with the hydrogen adsorption free energies, ΔGH, calculated by density functional theory, we showed that the TMPs follow a volcano relationship for the HER. Using our combined experimental–theoretical model, we predicted that the mixed metal TMP, Fe0.5Co0.5P, should have a near-optimal ΔGH. We synthesized several mixtures of Co and Fe phosphides alloys and confirmed that Fe0.5Co0.5P exhibits the highest HER activity of the investigated TMPs (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). The understanding gained as to how to improve catalytic activity for the HER, particularly for non-precious metal materials, is important to DOE targets for sustainable H2 production. OER: We have developed a SrIrO3/IrOx catalyst for acidic conditions (submitted, 2016). The Sr

  15. Halogeno Aldol Reaction of Ethyl Vinyl Ketone and Aldehydes Mediated by Titanium Tetrachloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guigen Li

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A three-component halogeno aldol reaction has been developed by using titanium tetrachloride as the halogen source as well as the Lewis acid mediator. The dehydration and elimination of hydrogen chloride were inhibited by conducting the reaction at 0 °C in dichloromethane or at room temperature with a shortened reaction time. Seven examples were examined, giving good to high yields (61 - 92% and modest stereoselectivity (syn/anti: 2.2/1.0 - 8.4/1.0.

  16. Proanthocyanidin-rich Pinus radiata bark extract inhibits mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Ho; Song, Chang Ho; Mun, Sung Phil

    2018-02-01

    Mast cells play a critical role in the effector phase of immediate hypersensitivity and allergic reactions. Pinus radiata bark extract exerts multiple biological effects and exhibits immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. However, its role in mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we examined the effects of proanthocyanidin-rich water extract (PAWE) isolated from P. radiata bark on compound 48/80-induced or antidinitrophenyl (DNP) immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions in vivo. In addition, we evaluated the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of PAWE on mast cell activation, with a specific focus on histamine release, using rat peritoneal mast cells. PAWE attenuated compound 48/80-induced or anti-DNP IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reactions in mice, and it inhibited histamine release triggered by compound 48/80, ionophore A23187, or anti-DNP IgE in rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro. Moreover, PAWE suppressed compound 48/80-elicited calcium uptake in a concentration-dependent manner and promoted a transient increase in intracellular cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate levels. Together, these results suggest that proanthocyanidin-rich P. radiata bark extract effectively inhibits anaphylaxis-like reactions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Esterification Reaction Utilizing Sense of Smell and Eyesight for Conversion and Catalyst Recovery Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Nikki; Wee, Lik H.; Martens, Johan A.

    2014-01-01

    The esterification reaction of salicylic acid with ethanol is performed in presence of dissolved 12-tungstophosphoric Brønsted-Lowry acid catalyst, a Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM). The monitoring of the reaction with smell and the recovery of the catalyst with sight is presented. Formation of the sweet-scented ester is apparent from the smell.…

  18. Chemical Conversion Pathways and Kinetic Modeling for the OH-Initiated Reaction of Triclosan in Gas-Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As a widely used antimicrobial additive in daily consumption, attention has been paid to the degradation and conversion of triclosan for a long time. The quantum chemistry calculation and the canonical variational transition state theory are employed to investigate the mechanism and kinetic property. Besides addition and abstraction, oxidation pathways and further conversion pathways are also considered. The OH radicals could degrade triclosan to phenols, aldehydes, and other easily degradable substances. The conversion mechanisms of triclosan to the polychlorinated dibenzopdioxin and furan (PCDD/Fs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are clearly illustrated and the toxicity would be strengthened in such pathways. Single radical and diradical pathways are compared to study the conversion mechanism of dichlorodibenzo dioxin (DCDD. Furthermore, thermochemistry is discussed in detail. Kinetic property is calculated and the consequent ratio of kadd/ktotal and kabs/ktotal at 298.15 K are 0.955 and 0.045, respectively. Thus, the OH radical addition reactions are predominant, the substitute position of OH radical on triclosan is very important to generate PCDD and furan, and biradical is also a vital intermediate to produce dioxin.

  19. Chemical conversion pathways and kinetic modeling for the OH-initiated reaction of triclosan in gas-phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Xiaomin; Kang, Lingyan; Zhao, Yan

    2015-04-10

    As a widely used antimicrobial additive in daily consumption, attention has been paid to the degradation and conversion of triclosan for a long time. The quantum chemistry calculation and the canonical variational transition state theory are employed to investigate the mechanism and kinetic property. Besides addition and abstraction, oxidation pathways and further conversion pathways are also considered. The OH radicals could degrade triclosan to phenols, aldehydes, and other easily degradable substances. The conversion mechanisms of triclosan to the polychlorinated dibenzopdioxin and furan (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are clearly illustrated and the toxicity would be strengthened in such pathways. Single radical and diradical pathways are compared to study the conversion mechanism of dichlorodibenzo dioxin (DCDD). Furthermore, thermochemistry is discussed in detail. Kinetic property is calculated and the consequent ratio of k add/k total and k abs/k total at 298.15 K are 0.955 and 0.045, respectively. Thus, the OH radical addition reactions are predominant, the substitute position of OH radical on triclosan is very important to generate PCDD and furan, and biradical is also a vital intermediate to produce dioxin.

  20. A new magnetic spectrometer for the investigation of the internal conversion electron in capture reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Planning, development and manufacture of a new beta spectrometer for the investigation of the internal conversion electrons, from 0,02 to 10 MeV, emitted during the radioative capture process of the thermal neutrons. The resolution on the base of resolution curve is about 1,5 X 10 sup(-3) [pt

  1. A Reduced Reaction Scheme for Volatile Nitrogen Conversion in Coal Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Saaby; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    In pulverised coal flames, the most important volatile nitrogen component forming NOx is HCN. To be able to model the nitrogen chemistry in coal flames it is necessary to have an adequate model for HCN oxidation. The present work was concerned with developing a model for HCN/NH3/NO conversion based...... that the CO/H-2 chemistry was described adequately, the reduced HCN/NH3/NO model compared very well with the detailed model over a wide range of stoichiometries. Decoupling of the HCN chemistry from the CO/H-2 chemistry resulted in over-prediction of the HCN oxidation rate under fuel rich conditions, but had...... negligible effect on the CO/H-2 chemistry. Comparison with simplified HCN models from the literature revealed significant differences, indicating that these models should be used cautiously in modelling volatile nitrogen conversion....

  2. Direct conversion from Jerusalem artichoke to hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) using the Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Han, Jong-In

    2014-05-15

    A simple method for hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) production from non-crop biomass of the Jerusalem artichoke was developed using the Fenton reaction, in a mixture of 2-butanol and water. Four parameters (temperature, reaction time, Fe(2+) concentration, and H2O2 concentration) were identified as experimental factors, and HMF yield was selected as the response parameter. The experimental factors were optimised by employing Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The maximum HMF yield, of 46%, was obtained with a reaction time of 90 min, Fe(2+) concentration of 1.3 mM, and 0.47 M of H2O2 at 180 °C. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Effect of seven Indian plant extracts on Fenton reaction-mediated damage to DNA constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Indrani; Chattopadhyaya, Rajagopal

    2017-11-01

    The influences of substoichiometric amounts of seven plant extracts in the Fenton reaction-mediated damage to deoxynucleosides, deoxynucleoside monophosphates, deoxynucleoside triphosphates, and supercoiled plasmid DNA were studied to rationalize anticancer properties reported in some of these extracts. Extracts from Acacia catechu, Emblica officinalis, Spondias dulcis, Terminalia belerica, Terminalia chebula, as well as gallic acid, epicatechin, chebulagic acid and chebulinic acid enhance the extent of damage in Fenton reactions with all monomeric substrates but protect supercoiled plasmid DNA, compared to standard Fenton reactions. The damage to pyrimidine nucleosides/nucleotides is enhanced by these extracts and compounds to a greater extent than for purine ones in a concentration dependent manner. Dolichos biflorus and Hemidesmus indicus extracts generally do not show this enhancement for the monomeric substrates though they protect plasmid DNA. Compared to standard Fenton reactions for deoxynucleosides with ethanol, the presence of these five plant extracts render ethanol scavenging less effective as the radical is generated in the vicinity of the target. Since substoichiometric amounts of these extracts and the four compounds produce this effect, a catalytic mechanism involving the presence of a ternary complex of the nucleoside/nucleotide substrate, a plant compound and the hydroxyl radical is proposed. Such a mechanism cannot operate for plasmid DNA as the planar rings in the extract compounds cannot stack with the duplex DNA bases. These plant extracts, by enhancing Fenton reaction-mediated damage to deoxynucleoside triphosphates, slow down DNA replication in rapidly dividing cancer cells, thus contributing to their anticancer properties.

  4. Origin of Power Laws for Reactions at Metal Surfaces Mediated by Hot Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of experiments have established that certain chemical reactions at metal surfaces can be driven by multiple hot-electron-mediated excitations of adsorbates. A high transient density of hot electrons is obtained by means of femtosecond laser pulses and a characteristic feature of such...... density functional theory and the delta self-consistent field method. With a simplifying assumption, the power law becomes exact and we obtain a simple physical interpretation of the exponent n, which represents the number of adsorbate vibrational states participating in the reaction....

  5. Facile Conversion of Red Phosphorus into Soluble Polyphosphide Anions by Reaction with Potassium Ethoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragulescu-Andrasi, Alina; Miller, L Zane; Chen, Banghao; McQuade, D Tyler; Shatruk, Michael

    2016-03-14

    Soluble polyphosphide anions were successfully generated in a number of organic solvents by the reaction between shelf-stable red phosphorus and potassium ethoxide. The species were identified by (31)P NMR spectroscopy in solution and by X-ray crystal-structure determination of (Bu4N)2P16 in the solid state. The reaction was scaled up to gram quantities by using a flow-chemistry process. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C.H. McDonald

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn stem (XEN cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC. An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expression is sufficient to drive this fate change during which time cells transit through distinct intermediate states prior to the generation of functional XEN-like cells. To orchestrate this conversion process, Sox17 acts in autoregulatory and feedforward network motifs, regulating dynamic GRNs directing cell fate. Sox17-mediated XEN conversion helps to explain the regulation of cell-fate changes and reveals GRNs regulating lineage decisions in the mouse embryo.

  7. Stable and efficient nitrogen-containing-carbon based electrocatalysts for reactions in energy conversion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sicong; Teng, Zhenyuan; Wang, Chengyin; Wang, Guoxiu

    2018-05-17

    High activity and stability are crucial for practical electrocatalysts used for reactions in fuel cells, metal-air batteries and water electrolysis including ORR, HER, OER and oxidation reactions of formic acid and alcohols. N-C based electrocatalysts have shown promising prospects for catalyzing these reactions, however, there is no systematic review for strategies toward engineering active and stable N-C based electrocatalysts reported by far. Herein, a comprehensive comparison of recently reported N-C based electrocatalysts regarding both electrocatalytic activity and long-term stability is presented. In the first part of this review, relationships between electrocatalytic reactions and element selections for modifying N-C based materials are discussed. Afterwards, synthesis methods for N-C based electrocatalysts are summarized, and synthetic strategies for highly stable N-C based electrocatalysts are presented. Multiple tables containing data on crucial parameters for both electrocatalytic activity and stability are displayed in this review. Finally, constructing M-Nx moieties is proposed as the most promising engineering strategy for stable N-C based electrocatalysts. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Copper(II) catalysis in cyanide conversion into ethyl carbamate in spirits and relevant reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresta, M; Boscolo, M; Franco, D W

    2001-06-01

    The role of copper(II) species in the oxidation of inorganic cyanide to cyanate and in the conversion of cyanate or urea into ethyl carbamate was investigated. The oxidation process has been shown to be independent from the dissolved oxygen. Elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy have shown the formation of a mixed copper carbonate/hydroxide in the process of oxidation of cyanide to cyanate in water/ethanol. The complexation to Cu(II) of cyanate formed upon cyanide oxidation makes the former more susceptible to nucleophilic attack from ethanol, with conversion into ethyl carbamate. Comparatively, urea has a minor role with respect to cyanide in the formation of ethyl carbamate. Therefore, the urea present in some samples of Brazilian sugar cane spirit (cachaça) has been shown to have almost no influence on the ethyl carbamate content of cachaças, which comes essentially from cyanide. Fe(II,III) affords results similar to those found with Cu(II). Some suggestions are presented to avoid ethyl carbamate formation in spirits during distillation.

  9. Protective effect of chlorpromazine on TNF-mediated hapten-induced irritant reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erroi, A; Fantuzzi, G; Demitri, M T; Echtenacher, B; Gnocchi, P; Isetta, A; Ghezzi, P

    1995-01-01

    Picryl chloride-induced irritant reaction (IR) was shown to be mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies, but not interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 Ra), had a protective effect. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), an inhibitor of TNF synthesis, protected against IR and inhibited the IR-associated TNF induction in ear homogenates. Investigation of the role of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) in neutropenic mice showed that neutropenia did not prevent the development of the IR.

  10. Thermal Methane Conversion to Syngas Mediated by Rh1-Doped Aluminum Oxide Cluster Cations RhAl3O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Ke; Yuan, Zhen; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Chongyang; Liu, Qing-Yu; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-10-05

    Laser ablation generated RhAl 3 O 4 + heteronuclear metal oxide cluster cations have been mass-selected using a quadrupole mass filter and reacted with CH 4 or CD 4 in a linear ion trap reactor under thermal collision conditions. The reactions have been characterized by state-of-the-art mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry calculations. The RhAl 3 O 4 + cluster can activate four C-H bonds of a methane molecule and convert methane to syngas, an important intermediate product in methane conversion to value-added chemicals. The Rh atom is the active site for activation of the C-H bonds of methane. The high electron-withdrawing capability of Rh atom is the driving force to promote the conversion of methane to syngas. The polarity of Rh oxidation state is changed from positive to negative after the reaction. This study has provided the first example of methane conversion to syngas by heteronuclear metal oxide clusters under thermal collision conditions. Furthermore, the molecular level origin has been revealed for the condensed-phase experimental observation that trace amounts of Rh can promote the participation of lattice oxygen of chemically very inert support (Al 2 O 3 ) to oxidize methane to carbon monoxide.

  11. Conversion of KCl into KBH4 by Mechano-Chemical Reaction and its Catalytic Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Murat; Gürü, Metin; Çakanyildirim, Çetin

    2017-07-01

    Production of KBH4, in the presence of KCl, B2O3 and MgH2 by means of a mechanical reaction and a dehydrogenation kinetic, constitute the main parts of this study. Operating time and reactant ratio are considered as two parameters for the mechanical reaction to obtain the maximum yield. The production process was carried out in a ball milling reactor, and the product residue was purified with ethylene diamine (EDA) and subsequently characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and x-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses. Optimum time for mechano-chemical treatment and reactant ratio (MgH2/KCl) were obtained as 1000 min and 1.0, respectively. Synthesized and commercial KBH4 were compared by hydrolysis tests in the presence of Co1-xNix/Al2O3 heterogeneous catalyst. Hydrogen generation rates, activation energy and order of the KBH4 decomposition reaction were obtained as 1578 {mL}_{{{{H}}2 }} \\min^{ - 1} {g}_{{catalyst}}^{ - 1}, 39.2 kJ mol-1 and zero order, respectively.

  12. Feasibility of Traveling Wave Direct Energy Conversion of Fission Reaction Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, A. G.; George, J. A.; Miley, G. H.; Scott, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Fission fragment direct energy conversion has been considered in the past for the purpose of increasing nuclear power plant efficiency and for advanced space propulsion. Since the fragments carry electric charge (typically in the order of 20 e) and have 100 MeV-range kinetic energy, techniques utilizing very high-voltage DC electrodes have been considered. This study is focused on a different approach: the kinetic energy of the charged fission fragments is converted into alternating current by means of a traveling wave coupling scheme (Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter, TWDEC), thereby not requiring the utilization of high voltage technology. A preliminary feasibility analysis of the concept is introduced based on a conceptual level study and on a particle simulation model of the beam dynamics.

  13. Combined effect of x irradiation and cell-mediated immune reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.W.; Guertin, D.P.

    1978-01-01

    The combined effect of radiation and cell-mediated immune reaction on tumor cells was investigated in vitro. Mastocytoma P815-X2 cells of DBA mice either were irradiated first and subjected to immune lysis by immune splenic lymphocytes of C57Bl mice, or the tumor cells were subjected to immune reaction first and then irradiated. Cell survival was quantitated by colony formation in soft agar medium. It was observed that cellular immune damage to tumor cells did not influence the response of tumor cells to subsequent radiation. Irradiation of tumor cells first, followed by subjection of the cells to cellular immune reaction, slightly enhanced the death of the tumor cells. It appears that this enhanced death might have resulted from a relative increase in the ratio of the number of cytotoxic immune cells to the number of target tumor cells in the incubation mixture as a consequence of the decrease in the number of viable tumor cells by radiation

  14. Stabilization of cartwheel-less centrioles for duplication requires CEP295-mediated centriole-to-centrosome conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Denisse; Wang, Won-Jing; Uryu, Kunihiro; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2014-08-21

    Vertebrate centrioles lose their geometric scaffold, the cartwheel, during mitosis, concurrently with gaining the ability to recruit the pericentriolar material (PCM) and thereby function as the centrosome. Cartwheel removal has recently been implicated in centriole duplication, but whether "cartwheel-less" centrioles are intrinsically stable or must be maintained through other modifications remains unclear. Here, we identify a newborn centriole-enriched protein, KIAA1731/CEP295, specifically mediating centriole-to-centrosome conversion but dispensable for cartwheel removal. In the absence of CEP295, centrioles form in the S/G2 phase and lose their associated cartwheel in mitosis but cannot be converted to centrosomes, uncoupling the two events. Strikingly, centrioles devoid of both the PCM and the cartwheel progressively lose centriolar components, whereas centrioles associating with either the cartwheel or PCM alone can exist stably. Thus, cartwheel removal can have grave repercussions to centriole stability, and centriole-to-centrosome conversion mediated by CEP295 must occur in parallel to maintain cartwheel-less centrioles for duplication. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stabilization of Cartwheel-less Centrioles for Duplication Requires CEP295-Mediated Centriole-to-Centrosome Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisse Izquierdo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate centrioles lose their geometric scaffold, the cartwheel, during mitosis, concurrently with gaining the ability to recruit the pericentriolar material (PCM and thereby function as the centrosome. Cartwheel removal has recently been implicated in centriole duplication, but whether “cartwheel-less” centrioles are intrinsically stable or must be maintained through other modifications remains unclear. Here, we identify a newborn centriole-enriched protein, KIAA1731/CEP295, specifically mediating centriole-to-centrosome conversion but dispensable for cartwheel removal. In the absence of CEP295, centrioles form in the S/G2 phase and lose their associated cartwheel in mitosis but cannot be converted to centrosomes, uncoupling the two events. Strikingly, centrioles devoid of both the PCM and the cartwheel progressively lose centriolar components, whereas centrioles associating with either the cartwheel or PCM alone can exist stably. Thus, cartwheel removal can have grave repercussions to centriole stability, and centriole-to-centrosome conversion mediated by CEP295 must occur in parallel to maintain cartwheel-less centrioles for duplication.

  16. High lactic acid and fructose production via Mn2+-mediated conversion of inulin by Lactobacillus paracasei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Kaloyan; Popova, Luiza; Petrova, Penka

    2017-06-01

    Lactobacillus paracasei DSM 23505 is able to produce high amounts of lactic acid (LA) by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of inulin. Aiming to obtain the highest possible amounts of LA and fructose, the present study is devoted to evaluate the impact of bivalent metal ions on the process of inulin conversion. It was shown that Mn 2+ strongly increases the activity of the purified key enzyme β-fructosidase. In vivo, batch fermentation kinetics revealed that the high Mn 2+ concentrations accelerated inulin hydrolysis by raise of the inulinase activity, and increased sugars conversion to LA through enhancement of the whole glycolytic flux. The highest LA concentration and yield were reached by addition of 15 mM Mn 2+ -151 g/L (corresponding to 40% increase) and 0.83 g/g, respectively. However, the relative quantification by real-time reverse transcription assay showed that the presence of Mn 2+ decreases the expression levels of fosE gene encoding β-fructosidase. Contrariwise, the full exclusion of metal ions resulted in fosE gene expression enhancement, blocked fructose transport, and hindered fructose conversion thus leading to huge fructose accumulation. During fed-batch with optimized medium and fermentation parameters, the fructose content reached 35.9% (w/v), achieving yield of 467 g fructose from 675 g inulin containing chicory flour powder (0.69 g/g). LA received in course of the batch fermentation and fructose gained by the fed-batch are the highest amounts ever obtained from inulin, thus disclosing the key role of Mn 2+ as a powerful tool to guide inulin conversion to targeted bio-chemicals.

  17. Electrochemically enhanced microbial CO conversion to volatile fatty acids using neutral red as an electron mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chae Ho; Kim, Changman; Song, Young Eun; Oh, Sang-Eun; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Kim, Jung Rae

    2018-01-01

    Conversion of C1 gas feedstock, including carbon monoxide (CO), into useful platform chemicals has attracted considerable interest in industrial biotechnology. Nevertheless, the low conversion yield and/or growth rate of CO-utilizing microbes make it difficult to develop a C1 gas biorefinery process. The Wood-Ljungdahl pathway which utilize CO is a pathway suffered from insufficient electron supply, in which the conversion can be increased further when an additional electron source like carbohydrate or hydrogen is provided. In this study, electrode-based electron transference using a bioelectrochemical system (BES) was examined to compensate for the insufficient reducing equivalent and increase the production of volatile fatty acids. The BES including neutral red (BES-NR), which facilitated electron transfer between bacteria and electrode, was compared with BES without neutral red and open circuit control. The coulombic efficiency based on the current input to the system and the electrons recovered into VFAs, was significantly higher in BES-NR than the control. These results suggest that the carbon electrode provides a platform to regulate the redox balance for improving the bioconversion of CO, and amending the conventional C1 gas fermentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. In silico prediction of potential chemical reactions mediated by human enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Myeong-Sang; Lee, Hyang-Mi; Park, Aaron; Park, Chungoo; Ceong, Hyithaek; Rhee, Ki-Hyeong; Na, Dokyun

    2018-06-13

    Administered drugs are often converted into an ineffective or activated form by enzymes in our body. Conventional in silico prediction approaches focused on therapeutically important enzymes such as CYP450. However, there are more than thousands of different cellular enzymes that potentially convert administered drug into other forms. We developed an in silico model to predict which of human enzymes including metabolic enzymes as well as CYP450 family can catalyze a given chemical compound. The prediction is based on the chemical and physical similarity between known enzyme substrates and a query chemical compound. Our in silico model was developed using multiple linear regression and the model showed high performance (AUC = 0.896) despite of the large number of enzymes. When evaluated on a test dataset, it also showed significantly high performance (AUC = 0.746). Interestingly, evaluation with literature data showed that our model can be used to predict not only enzymatic reactions but also drug conversion and enzyme inhibition. Our model was able to predict enzymatic reactions of a query molecule with a high accuracy. This may foster to discover new metabolic routes and to accelerate the computational development of drug candidates by enabling the prediction of the potential conversion of administered drugs into active or inactive forms.

  19. A route to hydroxylfluorenes: TsOH-mediated condensation reactions of 1,3-diketones with propargylic alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Liangfeng; Tan, Davin; Miao, Xiaohe; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    An efficient method of preparing hydroxylfluorenes by TsOH-mediated tandem alkylation/rearrangements of propargylic alcohols with 1,3-diketones is described. These reactions are accomplished in moderate to good yields under mild conditions to offer

  20. Work-Family Conflict and Work-Related Attitude: The Mediating Effects of Stress Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Aisyah Binti Panatik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the relationship between work-family conflict (i.e.work-to-family and family-to-work and work-related attitudes (i.e. job satisfaction,affective commitment and turnover intentions among academician in Malaysia.Mediationeffects of stress reactionswhich arebehavioral stress, somatic stress andcognitive stresswere also tested. A survey method using questionnaire was utilizedto obtain the data. A total of 267 respondents were participated, giving the return rateof 20% from the entire ofpopulation. Research data were analyzed using PASW18and AMOS SPSS18.Result indicated that onlywork-to-family conflict wassignificantly related to stress reactions.While, behavioral stress mediates the effectsof work-to-family conflict on job satisfaction, affective commitment and turnoverintentions. Cognitive stress only mediates the effects of work-to-family conflict onaffective commitment. This paper also discusses the implication of this study to theorganization and future research.

  1. Randomized, controlled trial of TNF-α antagonist in CTL-mediated severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuang-Wei; Yang, Lan-Yan; Chen, Chun-Bing; Ho, Hsin-Chun; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chang, Chee-Jen; Su, Shih-Chi; Hui, Rosaline Chung-Yee; Chin, See-Wen; Huang, Li-Fang; Lin, Yang Yu-Wei; Chang, Wei-Yang; Fan, Wen-Lang; Yang, Chin-Yi; Ho, Ji-Chen; Chang, Ya-Ching; Lu, Chun-Wei; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2018-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated (CTL-mediated) severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), are rare but life-threatening adverse reactions commonly induced by drugs. Although high levels of CTL-associated cytokines, chemokines, or cytotoxic proteins, including TNF-α and granulysin, were observed in SJS-TEN patients in recent studies, the optimal treatment for these diseases remains controversial. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and therapeutic mechanism of a TNF-α antagonist in CTL-mediated SCARs. We enrolled 96 patients with SJS-TEN in a randomized trial to compare the effects of the TNF-α antagonist etanercept versus traditional corticosteroids. Etanercept improved clinical outcomes in patients with SJS-TEN. Etanercept decreased the SCORTEN-based predicted mortality rate (predicted and observed rates, 17.7% and 8.3%, respectively). Compared with corticosteroids, etanercept further reduced the skin-healing time in moderate-to-severe SJS-TEN patients (median time for skin healing was 14 and 19 days for etanercept and corticosteroids, respectively; P = 0.010), with a lower incidence of gastrointestinal hemorrhage in all SJS-TEN patients (2.6% for etanercept and 18.2% for corticosteroids; P = 0.03). In the therapeutic mechanism study, etanercept decreased the TNF-α and granulysin secretions in blister fluids and plasma (45.7%-62.5% decrease after treatment; all P etanercept serves as an effective alternative for the treatment of CTL-mediated SCARs. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01276314. Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan.

  2. RhoA/ROCK Signaling Pathway Mediates Shuanghuanglian Injection-Induced Pseudo-allergic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiayin; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Yushi; Li, Chunying; Yi, Yan; Pan, Chen; Tian, Jingzhuo; Yang, Yifei; Cui, Hongyu; Wang, Lianmei; Liu, Suyan; Liu, Jing; Deng, Nuo; Liang, Aihua

    2018-01-01

    SHLI-induced hypersensitivity reactions in both endothelial cells and mice indicating its protective effect. SHLI-induced pseudo-allergic reactions were mediated by the activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. Conclusion : This study presents a novel mechanism of SHLI-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions and suggests a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent the associated adverse reactions.

  3. A Facile Conversion of Alcohols to Esters Mediated by Potassium Ferrate

    OpenAIRE

    Kooti, M.; Tarassoli, A.; Javadi, H. H.; Jorfi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Potassium ferrate in the presence of copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate can convert 1-phenyl ethanol, 4-chloro-1-phenyl ethanol and 2-phenyl ethanol into ester products with good or excellent yields.The reactions have been carried out in n-hexane at room temprature.The effect of other metal salts, as activators, have been also examined instead of copper sulfate.

  4. Food allergens inducing a lymphocyte-mediated immunological reaction in canine atopic-like dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    SUTO, Akemi; SUTO, Yukinori; ONOHARA, Nozomi; TOMIZAWA, Yu; YAMAMOTO-SUGAWARA, Yukiko; OKAYAMA, Taro; MASUDA, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Canine atopic-like dermatitis (ALD) is suspected to be associated with food allergies, particularly those mediated by lymphocytes. In this study, 54 cases were included as ALD dogs, based on the negative IgE test results. In the dogs, the percentage of activated cells in helper-T lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometry using cultured peripheral lymphocytes under food allergen stimulation. We observed that 49 of the 54 ALD dogs (90.7%) had positive lymphocyte reactions against one or more f...

  5. Food allergens inducing a lymphocyte-mediated immunological reaction in canine atopic-like dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Akemi; Suto, Yukinori; Onohara, Nozomi; Tomizawa, Yu; Yamamoto-Sugawara, Yukiko; Okayama, Taro; Masuda, Kenichi

    2015-02-01

    Canine atopic-like dermatitis (ALD) is suspected to be associated with food allergies, particularly those mediated by lymphocytes. In this study, 54 cases were included as ALD dogs, based on the negative IgE test results. In the dogs, the percentage of activated cells in helper-T lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometry using cultured peripheral lymphocytes under food allergen stimulation. We observed that 49 of the 54 ALD dogs (90.7%) had positive lymphocyte reactions against one or more food allergens. The most common food allergen was soybean, showing positive results in 21 dogs (42.9%), while the allergen to cause the lowest number of reactions was catfish (only 5 dogs, 10.2%). These results may be useful in considering elimination diets for ALD dogs.

  6. Assessing the reaction conditions to mediate the milkfat-soybean oil enzymatic interesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariela Veloso de Paula

    Full Text Available Summary A food grade lipase from Rhizopus oryzae immobilized on a hybrid polysiloxane-polyvinyl alcohol matrix (SiO2-PVA was used as the biocatalyst to mediate the interesterification reactions of a blend containing 65% milkfat and 35% soybean oil. All the reactions occurred in an inert nitrogen atmosphere in cylindrical glass reactors (80 mL with 40 g of the milkfat-soybean oil blend. The influence of the following variables was evaluated: biocatalyst loading (250-1500 activity units per gram of blend, biocatalyst moisture content (5-20%, temperature (45-60 °C and incubation time (2-48 h. The reactions were monitored by determining the free fatty acid content, triacylglycerol (TAGs composition in carbon species, and the consistency of the interesterified (IE products. The reaction conditions were set based on the parameters that provided a high interesterification yield and good consistency of the final product within the ideal range (200 to 800 gf cm-2. Hence the best results were obtained using a biocatalyst loading of 500 U g-1 of blend with 10% moisture content at 45 °C for 4 h. Under these conditions the consistency of the interesterified product was 539.7 ± 38 gf cm-2. The results demonstrated the potential of the immobilized lipase to alter the TAGs profile of the milkfat-soybean oil blend, allowing for the production of structured lipids.

  7. A Facile Conversion of Alcohols to Esters Mediated by Potassium Ferrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kooti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium ferrate in the presence of copper(II sulfate pentahydrate can convert 1-phenyl ethanol, 4-chloro-1-phenyl ethanol and 2-phenyl ethanol into ester products with good or excellent yields.The reactions have been carried out in n-hexane at room temprature.The effect of other metal salts, as activators, have been also examined instead of copper sulfate.

  8. Influence of electron-phonon interaction on soliton mediated spin-charge conversion effects in two-component polymer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeenkov, S.; Moraes, F.; Furtado, C.; Araujo-Moreira, F.M.

    2010-01-01

    By mapping a Hubbard-like model describing a two-component polymer in the presence of strong enough electron-phonon interactions (κ) onto the system of two coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations with U(2) symmetry group, some nontrivial correlations between topological solitons mediated charge Q and spin S degrees of freedom are obtained. Namely, in addition to a charge fractionalization and reentrant like behavior of both Q(κ) and S(κ), the model also predicts a decrease of soliton velocity with κ as well as spin-charge conversion effects which manifest themselves through an explicit S(Q,Ω) dependence (with Ω being a mixing angle between spin-up and spin-down electron amplitudes). A possibility to observe the predicted effects in low-dimensional systems with charge and spin soliton carriers is discussed.

  9. Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery by gas bubbles generated from a chemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungmun; Al-Kaabi, Leena; Mawart, Aurélie; Khandoker, Ahsan; Alsafar, Habiba; Jelinek, Herbert F; Khalaf, Kinda; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Highly echogenic and ultrasound-responsive microbubbles such as nitrogen and perfluorocarbons have been exploited as ultrasound-mediated drug carriers. Here, we propose an innovative method for drug delivery using microbubbles generated from a chemical reaction. In a novel drug delivery system, luminol encapsulated in folate-conjugated bovine serum albumin nanoparticles (Fol-BSAN) can generate nitrogen gas (N 2 ) by chemical reaction when it reacts with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), one of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer and elevated ROS have been observed in cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. High-intensity focussed ultrasound (HIFU) is used to burst the N 2 microbubbles, causing site-specific delivery of anticancer drugs such as methotrexate. In this research, the drug delivery system was optimised by using water-soluble luminol and Mobil Composition of Matter-41 (MCM-41), a mesoporous material, so that the delivery system was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of H 2 O 2 . HIFU increased the drug release from Fol-BSAN by 52.9 ± 2.9% in 10 minutes. The cytotoxicity of methotrexate was enhanced when methotrexate is delivered to MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line, using Fol-BSAN with HIFU. We anticipate numerous applications of chemically generated microbubbles for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

  10. Bridge mediated two-electron transfer reactions: Analysis of stepwise and concerted pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; May, V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of nonadiabatic donor (D)-acceptor (A) two-electron transfer (TET) mediated by a single regular bridge (B) is developed. The presence of different intermediate two-electron states connecting the reactant state D -- BA with the product state DBA -- results in complex multiexponential kinetics. The conditions are discussed at which a reduction to two-exponential as well as single-exponential kinetics becomes possible. For the latter case the rate K TET is calculated, which describes the bridge-mediated reaction as an effective two-electron D-A transfer. In the limit of small populations of the intermediate TET states D - B - A, DB -- A, D - BA - , and DB - A - , K TET is obtained as a sum of the rates K TET (step) and K TET (sup) . The first rate describes stepwise TET originated by transitions of a single electron. It starts at D -- BA and reaches DBA -- via the intermediate state D - BA - . These transitions cover contributions from sequential as well as superexchange reactions all including reduced bridge states. In contrast, a specific two-electron superexchange mechanism from D -- BA to DBA -- defines K TET (sup) . An analytic dependence of K TET (step) and K TET (sup) on the number of bridging units is presented and different regimes of D-A TET are studied

  11. Sox2-Mediated Conversion of NG2 Glia into Induced Neurons in the Injured Adult Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Heinrich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The adult cerebral cortex lacks the capacity to replace degenerated neurons following traumatic injury. Conversion of nonneuronal cells into induced neurons has been proposed as an innovative strategy toward brain repair. Here, we show that retrovirus-mediated expression of the transcription factors Sox2 and Ascl1, but strikingly also Sox2 alone, can induce the conversion of genetically fate-mapped NG2 glia into induced doublecortin (DCX+ neurons in the adult mouse cerebral cortex following stab wound injury in vivo. In contrast, lentiviral expression of Sox2 in the unlesioned cortex failed to convert oligodendroglial and astroglial cells into DCX+ cells. Neurons induced following injury mature morphologically and some acquire NeuN while losing DCX. Patch-clamp recording of slices containing Sox2- and/or Ascl1-transduced cells revealed that a substantial fraction of these cells receive synaptic inputs from neurons neighboring the injury site. Thus, NG2 glia represent a potential target for reprogramming strategies toward cortical repair.

  12. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Murmann

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  13. CONVERSATIONS IN THE TEACHING INTERNSHIP: THE EMERGENCE OF THE POTENTIAL OF VIRTUAL LEARNING OBJECTS BY PEDAGOGICAL MEDIATION IN PHYSICS TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice Vahl Vaniel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we attempt to explain a study experienced in Teaching Internship, of the Graduate Course in Physics, discipline of Physics Education Activities II, Federal University of Rio Grande-FURG. The activities developed aimed to experience teaching as an interactive and reflective process, and also investigate the potential of virtual learning objects (OV for educational activities in physics teaching. The concepts of recursion, recursiveness and structural coupling, present in Biology of Knowledge, subsidized the construction of the argument that there is a need of living, discussion and problematization in a recursive and recurring way of methodological issues related to the use of digital technologies in the context of Physics graduate courses. The analysis of this experience was based on the methodology of Discursive Textual Analysis, Moraes (2003, consisting of three phases: unitarization, categorization and meta-text. The results indicated by analysis are presented in two categories: Conversations about opportunities to teach Physics and Conversations on students’ production: the emergence of the potential of OV by pedagogical mediation, both guided by listening to the other and by recursive talk.

  14. Life on the line: the therapeutic potentials of computer-mediated conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J K; Gergen, K J

    1998-04-01

    In what ways are computer networking practices comparable to face-to-face therapy? With the exponential increase in computer-mediated communication and the increasing numbers of people joining topically based computer networks, the potential for grass-roots therapeutic (or antitherapeutic) interchange is greatly augmented. Here we report the results of research into exchanges on an electronic bulletin board devoted to the topic of suicide. Over an 11-month period participants offered each other valuable resources in terms of validation of experience, sympathy, acceptance, and encouragement. They also asked provocative questions and furnished broad-ranging advice. Hostile entries were rare. However, there were few communiques that parallel the change-inducing practices more frequent within many therapeutic settings. In effect, on-line dialogues seemed more sustaining than transforming. Further limits and potentials of on-line communication are explored.

  15. Vibrot, a simple device for the conversion of vibration into rotation mediated by friction: preliminary evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Altshuler

    Full Text Available While "vibrational noise" induced by rotating components of machinery is a common problem constantly faced by engineers, the controlled conversion of translational into rotational motion or vice-versa is a desirable goal in many scenarios ranging from internal combustion engines to ultrasonic motors. In this work, we describe the underlying physics after isolating a single degree of freedom, focusing on devices that convert a vibration along the vertical axis into a rotation around this axis. A typical Vibrot (as we label these devices consists of a rigid body with three or more cantilevered elastic legs attached to its bottom at an angle. We show that these legs are capable of transforming vibration into rotation by a "ratchet effect", which is caused by the anisotropic stick-slip-flight motion of the leg tips against the ground. Drawing an analogy with the Froude number used to classify the locomotion dynamics of legged animals, we discuss the walking regime of these robots. We are able to control the rotation frequency of the Vibrot by manipulating the shaking amplitude, frequency or waveform. Furthermore, we have been able to excite Vibrots with acoustic waves, which allows speculating about the possibility of reducing the size of the devices so they can perform tasks into the human body, excited by ultrasound waves from the outside.

  16. Reacciones transfusionales mediadas inmunológicamente immunologically mediated transfusional reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkín Ferdinand Cardona Duque

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Son muchas las complicaciones potenciales de la terapia transfusional, pero la mayoría se presentan en pacientes que requieren múltiples transfusiones. Los riesgos asociados con la transfusión de una unidad sanguínea son realmente bajos pero deben considerarse contra los beneficios que se buscan al ordenarla. Las reacciones transfusionales se pueden clasificar como inmunológicas y no inmunológicas. Muchas de las primeras son causadas por estimulación de los anticuerpos por parte de los antígenos presentes en la transfusión de glóbulos rojos, leucocitos, plaquetas o proteínas del plasma. Esa isoinmunización puede llevar a una reacción futura cuando dichos antígenos sean transfundidos nuevamente al paciente. Entre las posibilidades se incluyen la hemólisis por incompatibilidad; las reacciones febriles o pulmonares causadas por antígenos en las plaquetas o los leucocitos; los fenómenos alérgicos o anafilácticos debidos a anticuerpos que reaccionan con antígenos solubles, generalmente del tipo de proteínas plasmáticas, y otras de menor importancia. The potential complications of blood transfusion therapy are multiple but most of them occur only in patients requiring repeated transfusions. Risks associated with transfusion of a single unit of blood are low; however, they must be weighted against the benefits at the time each transfusion is ordered. Transfusion reactions can be classified as either immunologic or non-immunologic. Many immune reactions are caused by stimulation of antibody production by foreign alloantigens present on transfused red cells, leukocytes, platelets, or plasma proteins. Such alloimmunization may lead to future immunologically mediated reactions when transfusions carrying these antigens are administered. These include hemolytic reactions caused by red blood cell incompatibility; febrile or pulmonary reactions caused by leukocytes and platelet antigens; allergic or anaphylactic reactions caused by

  17. Cherenkov radiation conversion and collection considerations for a gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostic for the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Hans W; Mack, Joseph M; Young, Carlton S; Malone, Robert M; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Horsfield, Colin J

    2008-10-01

    Bang time and reaction history measurements are fundamental components of diagnosing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and will be essential contributors to diagnosing attempts at ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of fusion interaction rate without being compromised by Doppler spreading. Gamma-based gas Cherenkov detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to optical Cherenkov photons for collection by fast recording systems have been developed and fielded at Omega. These systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns. Bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF system design requirements. A comprehensive, validated numerical study of candidate systems is providing essential information needed to make a down selection based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF logistics. This paper presents basic design considerations arising from the two-step conversion process from gamma rays to relativistic electrons to UV/visible Cherenkov radiation.

  18. Cherenkov radiation conversion and collection considerations for a gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostic for the NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Mack, Joseph M.; Young, Carlton S.; Malone, Robert M.; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Horsfield, Colin J.

    2008-01-01

    Bang time and reaction history measurements are fundamental components of diagnosing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and will be essential contributors to diagnosing attempts at ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of fusion interaction rate without being compromised by Doppler spreading. Gamma-based gas Cherenkov detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to optical Cherenkov photons for collection by fast recording systems have been developed and fielded at Omega. These systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns. Bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF system design requirements. A comprehensive, validated numerical study of candidate systems is providing essential information needed to make a down selection based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF logistics. This paper presents basic design considerations arising from the two-step conversion process from γ rays to relativistic electrons to UV/visible Cherenkov radiation.

  19. One-step Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Succinic Acid Using I2/t-BuOK System: The Iodoform Reaction Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasumi, Ryosuke; Narita, Shodai; Miyamoto, Kazunori; Tominaga, Ken-Ichi; Takita, Ryo; Uchiyama, Masanobu

    2017-12-21

    The iodoform reaction has long been used as a qualitative test for acetyl and/or ethanol units in organic molecules. However, its synthetic applications are quite limited. Here, we describe a tuned iodoform reaction for oxidative demethylation reaction with I 2 and t-BuOK in t-BuOH, in which in situ-generated t-BuOI serves as the chemoselective iodinating agent. This system enables one-step conversion of levulinic acid to succinic acid, a major four-carbon chemical feedstock. This oxidative demethylation is also applicable to other compounds containing an acetyl group/ethanol unit, affording the corresponding carboxylic acids in a selective manner.

  20. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  1. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan A. Erkes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1 ex vivo haptenation, (2 in situ haptenation, (3 epifocal hapten application, and (4 antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field.

  2. Novel Chiral Bis-Phosphoramides as Organocatalysts for Tetrachlorosilane-Mediated Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rossi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The formation of novel chiral bidentate phosphoroamides structures able to promote Lewis base-catalyzed Lewis acid-mediated reactions was investigated. Two different classes of phosphoroamides were synthetized: the first class presents a phthalic acid/primary diamine moiety, designed with the aim to perform a self-assembly recognition process through hydrogen bonds; the second one is characterized by the presence of two phosphoroamides as side arms connected to a central pyridine unit, able to chelate SiCl4 in a 2:1 adduct. These species were tested as organocatalysts in the stereoselective allylation of benzaldehyde and a few other aromatic aldehydes with allyl tributyltin in the presence of SiCl4 with good results. NMR studies confirm that only pyridine-based phosphoroamides effectively coordinate tetrachlorosilane and may lead to the generation of a self-assembled entity that would act as a promoter of the reaction. Although further work is necessary to clarify and confirm the formation of the hypothesized adduct, the study lays the foundation for the design and the synthesis of chiral supramolecular organocatalysts.

  3. On the length dependence of bridge-mediated electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; Shevchenko, Ye.V.; May, V.

    2003-01-01

    Bridge-mediated nonadiabatic donor-acceptor (D-A) electron transfer (ET) is studied for the case of a regular molecular bridge of N identical units. It is shown that the multi-exponential ET kinetics reduces to a single-exponential transfer if, and only if, the integral population of the bridge remains small (less than 10 -2 ). An analytical expression for the overall D-A ET rate is derived and the necessary and sufficient conditions are formulated at which the rate is given as a sum of a superexchange and a sequential contribution. To describe experimental data on the N-dependence of ET reactions an approximate form of the overall transfer rate is derived. This expression is used to reproduce experimental data on distant ET through polyproline chains. Finally it is noted that the obtained analytical results can also be used for the description of more complex two-electron transfer reactions if the latter comprises separate single-electron pathways

  4. Enhancing cytochrome P450-mediated conversions in P. pastoris through RAD52 over-expression and optimizing the cultivation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wriessnegger, Tamara; Moser, Sandra; Emmerstorfer-Augustin, Anita; Leitner, Erich; Müller, Monika; Kaluzna, Iwona; Schürmann, Martin; Mink, Daniel; Pichler, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) play an essential role in the biosynthesis of various natural compounds by catalyzing regio- and stereospecific hydroxylation reactions. Thus, CYP activities are of great interest in the production of fine chemicals, pharmaceutical compounds or flavors and fragrances. Industrial applicability of CYPs has driven extensive research efforts aimed at improving the performance of these enzymes to generate robust biocatalysts. Recently, our group has identified CYP-mediated hydroxylation of (+)-valencene as a major bottleneck in the biosynthesis of trans-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone in Pichia pastoris. In the current study, we aimed at enhancing CYP-mediated (+)-valencene hydroxylation by over-expressing target genes identified through transcriptome analysis in P. pastoris. Strikingly, over-expression of the DNA repair and recombination gene RAD52 had a distinctly positive effect on trans-nootkatol formation. Combining RAD52 over-expression with optimization of whole-cell biotransformation conditions, i.e. optimized media composition and cultivation at higher pH value, enhanced trans-nootkatol production 5-fold compared to the initial strain and condition. These engineering approaches appear to be generally applicable for enhanced hydroxylation of hydrophobic compounds in P. pastoris as confirmed here for two additional membrane-attached CYPs, namely the limonene-3-hydroxylase from Mentha piperita and the human CYP2D6. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effect of Cell Phone Conversation on Drivers’ Reaction Time to Audio Stimulus: Investigating the Theory of Multiple Resources and Central Resource of Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Kazem Mousavi-Sadati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research was aimed at investigating the theory of multiple resources and central resource of attention on secondary task performance of talking with two types of cell phone during driving. Materials & Methods: Using disposal sampling, 25 male participants were selected and their reaction to auditory stimulus in three different driving conditions (no conversation with phone, conversation with handheld phone and hands-free phone were recorded. Driving conditions have been changed from a participant to another participant in order to control the sequence of tests and participants familiarity with the test conditions. Results: the results of data analysis with descriptive statistics and Mauchly’s Test of Sphericity, One- factor repeated measures ANOVA and Paired-Samples T test showed that different driving conditions can affect the reaction time (P0.001. Phone Conversation with hands-free phone increases drivers’ simple reaction time to auditory stimulus (P<0.001. Using handheld phone does not increase drivers’ reaction time to auditory stimulus over hands-free phone (P<0.001. Conclusion: The results confirmed that the performance quality of dual tasks and multiple tasks can be predicted by Four-dimensional multiple resources model of attention and all traffic laws in connection with the handheld phone also have to be spread to the use of hands-free phone.

  6. Modeling the Influence of Diffusion-Controlled Reactions and Residual Termination and Deactivation on the Rate and Control of Bulk ATRP at High Conversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Rabea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In high-conversion atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, all the reactions, such as radical termination, radical deactivation, dormant chain activation, monomer propagation, etc. could become diffusion controlled sooner or later, depending on relative diffusivities of the involved reacting species. These diffusion-controlled reactions directly affect the rate of polymerization and the control of polymer molecular weight. A model is developed to investigate the influence of diffusion-controlled reactions on the high conversion ATRP kinetics. Model simulation reveals that diffusion-controlled termination slightly increases the rate, but it is the diffusion-controlled deactivation that causes auto-acceleration in the rate (“gel effect” and loss of control. At high conversions, radical chains are “trapped” because of high molecular weight. However, radical centers can still migrate through (1 radical deactivation–activation cycles and (2 monomer propagation, which introduce “residual termination” reactions. It is found that the “residual termination” does not have much influence on the polymerization kinetics. The migration of radical centers through propagation can however facilitate catalytic deactivation of radicals, which improves the control of polymer molecular weight to some extent. Dormant chain activation and monomer propagation also become diffusion controlled and finally stop the polymerization when the system approaches its glass state.

  7. Palladium- and copper-mediated N-aryl bond formation reactions for the synthesis of biological active compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Koenig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Arylated aliphatic and aromatic amines are important substituents in many biologically active compounds. In the last few years, transition-metal-mediated N-aryl bond formation has become a standard procedure for the introduction of amines into aromatic systems. While N-arylation of simple aromatic halides by simple amines works with many of the described methods in high yield, the reactions may require detailed optimization if applied to the synthesis of complex molecules with additional functional groups, such as natural products or drugs. We discuss and compare in this review the three main N-arylation methods in their application to the synthesis of biologically active compounds: Palladium-catalysed Buchwald–Hartwig-type reactions, copper-mediated Ullmann-type and Chan–Lam-type N-arylation reactions. The discussed examples show that palladium-catalysed reactions are favoured for large-scale applications and tolerate sterically demanding substituents on the coupling partners better than Chan–Lam reactions. Chan–Lam N-arylations are particularly mild and do not require additional ligands, which facilitates the work-up. However, reaction times can be very long. Ullmann- and Buchwald–Hartwig-type methods have been used in intramolecular reactions, giving access to complex ring structures. All three N-arylation methods have specific advantages and disadvantages that should be considered when selecting the reaction conditions for a desired C–N bond formation in the course of a total synthesis or drug synthesis.

  8. Singlet versus Triplet Excited State Mediated Photoinduced Dehalogenation Reactions of Itraconazole in Acetonitrile and Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ruixue; Li, Ming-de; Du, Lili; Phillips, David Lee

    2017-04-06

    Photoinduced dehalogenation of the antifungal drug itraconazole (ITR) in acetonitrile (ACN) and ACN/water mixed solutions was investigated using femtosecond and nanosecond time-resolved transient absorption (fs-TA and ns-TA, respectively) and nanosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy (ns-TR 3 ) experiments. An excited resonance energy transfer is found to take place from the 4-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-one part of the molecule to the 1,3-dichlorobenzene part of the molecule when ITR is excited by ultraviolet light. This photoexcitation is followed by a fast carbon-halogen bond cleavage that leads to the generation of radical intermediates via either triplet and/or singlet excited states. It is found that the singlet excited state-mediated carbon-halogen cleavage is the predominant dehalogenation process in ACN solvent, whereas a triplet state-mediated carbon-halogen cleavage prefers to occur in the ACN/water mixed solutions. The singlet-to-triplet energy gap is decreased in the ACN/water mixed solvents and this helps facilitate an intersystem crossing process, and thus, the carbon-halogen bond cleavage happens mostly through an excited triplet state in the aqueous solutions examined. The ns-TA and ns-TR 3 results also provide some evidence that radical intermediates are generated through a homolytic carbon-halogen bond cleavage via predominantly the singlet excited state pathway in ACN but via mainly the triplet state pathway in the aqueous solutions. In strong acidic solutions, protonation at the oxygen and/or nitrogen atoms of the 1,2,4-triazole-3-one group appears to hinder the dehalogenation reactions. This may offer the possibility that the phototoxicity of ITR due to the generation of aryl or halogen radicals can be reduced by protonation of certain moieties in suitably designed ITR halogen-containing derivatives.

  9. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Václav; Baker, R. E.; Headon, D.; Gaffney, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 4 (2012), s. 935-957 ISSN 0092-8240 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : reaction-diffusion * receptor-mediated patterning * turing models Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.023, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/9713544x6871w4n6/?MUD=MP

  10. Precipitation of the rare earth double sodium and rare earths from the sulfuric liquor and the conversion into rare earth hydroxides through meta ethic reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Renata D.; Oliveira, Ester F.; Brito, Walter de; Morais, Carlos A.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the purification study of the rare earths through precipitation of rare earth and sodium (Na TR (SO 4 ) 2 . x H 2 O)) double sulfate and his conversion to rare earths hydroxide TR(OH) 3 by meta ethic reaction through the addition of sodium hydroxide solution to the solid double sulfate. The study used the sulfuric liquor as rare earth sample, generated in the chemical processing of the monazite with sulfuric acid by the Industrias Nucleares do Brasil - INB, Brazil, after the thorium and uranium extraction. The work investigated the influence of the main variables involved in the precipitation of Na TR(SO 4 ) 2 .xH 2 O and in the conversion for the TR(OH) 3 , as follows: type and excess of the precipitation agent, temperature and time reaction. The obtained solid composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared and chemical analysis. The double sulfate diffractogram indicated the Na TR(SO 4 ) 2 mono-hydrated. The characterization of the metatese products has shown that, for obtaining the complete conversion of NaTR(SO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O into TR(OH) 3 , the reaction must be hot processed (∼70 deg C) and with small excess of Na OH (≤ 5 percent). (author)

  11. Mediator profiles in tears during the conjunctival response induced by allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelikan, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    The allergic reaction occurring primarily in the nasal mucosa can induce a secondary conjunctival response of an immediate (SICR), late (SLCR), or delayed (SDYCR) type in some patients with allergic conjunctivitis (AC). To investigate the concentration changes of histamine, tryptase, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), leukotrienes (LTB 4, LTC4, LTE4), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5) in tears during the SICR, SLCR, and SDYCR. In 32 patients with AC, 11 SICR (ptears. The SICRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (ptears (ptears during the 32 PBS controls (p>0.1) or in the ten control patients (p>0.1). These results provide evidence for causal involvement of nasal allergy in some patients with AC, inducing secondary conjunctival response of immediate (SICR), late SLCR, or delayed SDYCR type, associated with different mediator, cytokine, and cellular profiles in the tears, suggesting involvement of different hypersensitivity mechanisms. These results also emphasize the diagnostic value of nasal allergen challenge combined with monitoring of the conjunctival response in some patients with AC.

  12. Glutaredoxin-2 is required to control oxidative phosphorylation in cardiac muscle by mediating deglutathionylation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Xuan, Jian Ying; McBride, Skye; Maharsy, Wael; Thorn, Stephanie; Holterman, Chet E; Kennedy, Christopher R J; Rippstein, Peter; deKemp, Robert; da Silva, Jean; Nemer, Mona; Lou, Marjorie; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2014-05-23

    Glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) modulates the activity of several mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue by catalyzing deglutathionylation reactions. However, it remains uncertain whether Grx2 is required to control mitochondrial ATP output in heart. Here, we report that Grx2 plays a vital role modulating mitochondrial energetics and heart physiology by mediating the deglutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins. Deletion of Grx2 (Grx2(-/-)) decreased ATP production by complex I-linked substrates to half that in wild type (WT) mitochondria. Decreased respiration was associated with increased complex I glutathionylation diminishing its activity. Tissue glucose uptake was concomitantly increased. Mitochondrial ATP output and complex I activity could be recovered by restoring the redox environment to that favoring the deglutathionylated states of proteins. Grx2(-/-) hearts also developed left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, and mice became hypertensive. Mitochondrial energetics from Grx2 heterozygotes (Grx2(+/-)) were also dysfunctional, and hearts were hypertrophic. Intriguingly, Grx2(+/-) mice were far less hypertensive than Grx2(-/-) mice. Thus, Grx2 plays a vital role in modulating mitochondrial metabolism in cardiac muscle, and Grx2 deficiency leads to pathology. As mitochondrial ATP production was restored by the addition of reductants, these findings may be relevant to novel redox-related therapies in cardiac disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Temperature dependence of He(2 3PJ) reactions: Collision-induced mixing and conversion to He2( 3Πg) molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X.; Soletsky, P.A.; Bryan, W.H.; Dunning, F.B.; Walters, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    The rate coefficients for mixing between He(2 3 P J, MJ) levels during collisions with ground-state helium atoms and for conversion of He(2 3 P J ) atoms to He 2 (b 3 Π g ) molecules via three-body reactions in helium gas have been investigated over the temperature range 1.6--300 K. The measured rate coefficients for collisionally induced P-state mixing decrease slowly with decreasing temperature, from (1.8±0.5)x10 -9 cm 3 s -1 at 300 K to (4.5±0.5)x10 -10 cm 3 s -1 at 4.2 K. The rate coefficients for the production of He 2 (b 3 Π g ) molecules via three-body reactions are observed to increase with decreasing temperature and are described by the relation k P congruent(2.5+267T -1 )x10 -32 cm 6 s -1 . This behavior, which is very different from that noted in earlier studies of the conversion of He(2 3 S 1 ) atoms to He 2 (a 3 Σ u + ) molecules through three-body reactions, suggests that the reaction is not thermally activated

  14. IgE- and IgG mediated severe anaphylactic platelet transfusion reaction in a known case of cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Shanthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic reactions occur commonly in transfusion practice. However, severe anaphylactic reactions are rare; anti-IgA (IgA: Immunoglobulin A in IgA-deficient patients is one of the well-illustrated and reported causes for such reactions. However, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction through blood component transfusion may be caused in parasitic hyperimmunization for IgG and IgE antibodies. Case Report: We have evaluated here a severe anaphylactic transfusion reaction retrospectively in an 18year-old male, a known case of cerebral malaria, developed after platelet transfusions. The examination and investigations revealed classical signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis along with a significant rise in the serum IgE antibody level and IgG by hemagglutination method. Initial mild allergic reaction was followed by severe anaphylactic reaction after the second transfusion of platelets. Conclusion: Based on these results, screening of patients and donors with mild allergic reactions to IgE antibodies may help in understanding the pathogenesis as well as in planning for preventive desensitization and measures for safe transfusion.

  15. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is dispensable for IgE-mediated cutaneous reaction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Xie, Zhongping; Li, Hua; Yue, Lei; Pang, Zheng; MacNeil, Adam J; Tremblay, Michel L; Tang, Jin-Tian; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play a critical role in allergic reactions. The cross-linking of FcεRI-bound IgE with multivalent antigen initiates a cascade of signaling events leading to mast cell activation. It has been well-recognized that cross linking of FcεRI mediates tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanism involved in tyrosine dephosphorylation in mast cells is less clear. Here we demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B)-deficient mast cells showed increased IgE-mediated phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and enhanced production of CCL9 (MIP-1γ) and IL-6 in IgE-mediated mast cells activation in vitro. However, IgE-mediated calcium mobilization, β-hexaosaminidase release (degranulation), and phosphorylation of IκB and MAP kinases were not affected by PTP1B deficiency. Furthermore, PTP1B deficient mice showed normal IgE-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and late phase cutaneous reactions in vivo. Thus, PTP1B specifically regulates IgE-mediated STAT5 pathway, but is redundant in influencing mast cell function in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of salmeterol and salbutamol on mediator release and skin responses in immediate and late phase allergic cutaneous reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Skov, P S

    1999-01-01

    on clinical and biochemical EAR and LPR in human skin. METHODS: Measurement of wheal and flare reactions to allergen, codeine, and histamine, and LPR (induration) to allergen. Assessment of histamine and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) release by microdialysis technique in EAR, and measurement of mediators in LPR......, myeloperoxidase, or eosinophil cationic protein in LPR. CONCLUSIONS: Salmeterol and salbutamol inhibited allergen-induced skin responses, and reduced mediator release in EAR but not LPR. In general, the anti-inflammatory effects of salmeterol did not differ from those induced by salbutamol....

  17. Mediating and Moderating Effects in Ageism and Depression among the Korean Elderly: The Roles of Emotional Reactions and Coping Reponses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Ho; Noh, Samuel; Chun, Heeran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the relationship between ageism and depression, exploring the stress-mediating and stress-moderating roles of emotional reactions and coping behaviors. Methods Data were from the 2013 Ageism and Health Study (n = 816), a cross-sectional survey of urban and rural community-dwelling seniors aged 60–89 years in South Korea. Participants with at least one experience of ageism reported on their emotional reactions and coping responses. The measure yielded two types of coping: problem-focused (taking formal action, confrontation, seeking social support) and emotion-focused (passive acceptance, emotional discharge). Results Although ageism was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (B = 0.27, p < 0.0001), the association was entirely mediated by emotional reactions such as anger, sadness, and powerlessness. Problem-focused coping, especially confrontation and social support, seemingly reduced the impact of emotional reactions on depression, whereas emotion-focused coping exacerbated the adverse effects. Conclusion These findings support the cultural characterization explanation of ageism and related coping processes among Korean elderly and suggest that regulating emotional reactions may determine the efficacy of coping with ageism. PMID:26981336

  18. Assault-related shame mediates the association between negative social reactions to disclosure of sexual assault and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCou, Christopher R; Cole, Trevor T; Lynch, Shannon M; Wong, Maria M; Matthews, Kathleen C

    2017-03-01

    Several studies have identified associations between social reactions to disclosure of sexual assault and psychological distress; however, no studies have evaluated shame as a mediator of this association. This study evaluated assault-related shame as a mediator of the associations between negative social reactions to disclosure of sexual assault and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and global distress and hypothesized that there would be an indirect effect of social reactions to disclosure upon symptoms of psychopathology via assault-related shame. Participants were 207 female psychology undergraduates who reported past history of completed or attempted sexual assault and had disclosed the assault to at least 1 other person. Participants completed self-report measures of social reactions to sexual assault disclosure, assault-related shame, and symptoms of psychopathology. Participants reported significant histories of attempted or completed sexual assault and indicated clinically significant symptoms of depression and subthreshold symptoms of PTSD and global distress, on average. Evaluation of structural models confirmed the hypothesized indirect effect of negative social reactions to sexual assault disclosure upon symptoms of PTSD (z = 5.85, p distress (z = 4.82, p disclosure among survivors of attempted or completed sexual assault. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Efficient Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to 1-Butanol via the Guerbet Reaction over Copper- and Nickel-Doped Porous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Zhuohua; Vasconcelos, Anais Couto; Bottari, Giovanni; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Bonura, Giuseppe; Cannilla, Catia; Frusteri, Francesco; Barta, Katalin

    The direct conversion of ethanol to higher value 1-butanol is a catalytic transformation of great interest in light of the expected wide availability of bioethanol originating from the fermentation of renewable resources. In this contribution we describe several novel compositions of porous metal

  20. Linear constraint relations in biochemical reaction systems: I. Classification of the calculability and the balanceability of conversion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, R T; Heijnen, J J; Hellinga, C; Romein, B; Luyben, K C

    1994-01-05

    Measurements provide the basis for process monitoring and control as well as for model development and validation. Systematic approaches to increase the accuracy and credibility of the empirical data set are therefore of great value. In (bio)chemical conversions, linear conservation relations such as the balance equations for charge, enthalpy, and/or chemical elements, can be employed to relate conversion rates. In a pactical situation, some of these rates will be measured (in effect, be calculated directly from primary measurements of, e.g., concentrations and flow rates), as others can or cannot be calculated from the measured ones. When certain measured rates can also be calculated from other measured rates, the set of equations, the accuracy and credibility of the measured rates can indeed be improved by, respectively, balancing and gross error diagnosis. The balanced conversion rates are more accurate, and form a consistent set of data, which is more suitable for further application (e.g., to calculate nonmeasured rates) than the raw measurements. Such an approach has drawn attention in previous studies. The current study deals mainly with the problem of mathematically classifying the conversion rates into balanceable and calculable rates, given the subset of measured rates. The significance of this problem is illustrated with some examples. It is shown that a simple matrix equation can be derived that contains the vector of measured conversion rates and the redundancy matrix R. Matrix R plays a predominant role in the classification problem. In supplementary articles, significance of the redundancy matrix R for an improved gross error diagnosis approach will be shown. In addition, efficient equations have been derived to calculate the balanceable and/or calculable rates. The method is completely based on matrix algebra (principally different from the graph-theoretical approach), and it is easily implemented into a computer program. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons

  1. Ultraselective electrochemiluminescence biosensor based on locked nucleic acid modified toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction and junction-probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Dongzhi; Liu, Zhijing; Cai, Shuxian; Chen, Mei; Zhao, Yanping; Li, Chunyan; Yang, Huanghao; Chen, Jinghua

    2014-12-07

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is applied in toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (TMSDR) to develop a junction-probe electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection in the BRCA1 gene related to breast cancer. More than 65-fold signal difference can be observed with perfectly matched target sequence to single-base mismatched sequence under the same conditions, indicating good selectivity of the ECL biosensor.

  2. A route to hydroxylfluorenes: TsOH-mediated condensation reactions of 1,3-diketones with propargylic alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Liangfeng

    2012-01-01

    An efficient method of preparing hydroxylfluorenes by TsOH-mediated tandem alkylation/rearrangements of propargylic alcohols with 1,3-diketones is described. These reactions are accomplished in moderate to good yields under mild conditions to offer a straightforward and convenient one step synthetic route to hydroxylfluorene derivatives through a plausible mechanism involving a sequence of dehydration, addition, rearrangement and aromatization. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  3. Low doses of cholera toxin and its mediator cAMP induce CTLA-2 secretion by dendritic cells to enhance regulatory T cell conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthia Silva-Vilches

    Full Text Available Immature or semi-mature dendritic cells (DCs represent tolerogenic maturation stages that can convert naive T cells into Foxp3+ induced regulatory T cells (iTreg. Here we found that murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs treated with cholera toxin (CT matured by up-regulating MHC-II and costimulatory molecules using either high or low doses of CT (CThi, CTlo or with cAMP, a known mediator CT signals. However, all three conditions also induced mRNA of both isoforms of the tolerogenic molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 2 (CTLA-2α and CTLA-2β. Only DCs matured under CThi conditions secreted IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23 leading to the instruction of Th17 cell polarization. In contrast, CTlo- or cAMP-DCs resembled semi-mature DCs and enhanced TGF-β-dependent Foxp3+ iTreg conversion. iTreg conversion could be reduced using siRNA blocking of CTLA-2 and reversely, addition of recombinant CTLA-2α increased iTreg conversion in vitro. Injection of CTlo- or cAMP-DCs exerted MOG peptide-specific protective effects in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE by inducing Foxp3+ Tregs and reducing Th17 responses. Together, we identified CTLA-2 production by DCs as a novel tolerogenic mediator of TGF-β-mediated iTreg induction in vitro and in vivo. The CT-induced and cAMP-mediated up-regulation of CTLA-2 also may point to a novel immune evasion mechanism of Vibrio cholerae.

  4. Degradation of sulfadimethoxine catalyzed by laccase with soybean meal extract as natural mediator: Mechanism and reaction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shangtao; Luo, Qi; Huang, Qingguo

    2017-08-01

    Natural laccase-mediator systems have been well recognized as an eco-friendly and energy-saving approach in environmental remediation, whose further application is however limited by the high cost of natural mediators and relatively long treatment time span. This study evaluated the water extract of soybean meal, a low-cost compound system, in mediating the laccase catalyzed degradation of a model contaminant of emerging concern, sulfadimethoxine (SDM), and demonstrated it as a promising alternative mediator for soil and water remediation. Removal of 73.3% and 65.6% was achieved in 9 h using soybean meal extract (SBE) as the mediating system for laccase-catalyzed degradation of sulfadimethoxine at the concentration of 1 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. Further degradation of sulfadimethoxine was observed with multiple SBE additions. Using SBE as mediator increased the 9-h removal of SDM at 1 ppm initial concentration by 52.9%, 49.4%, and 36.3% in comparison to the system mediated by 1-Hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT), p-Coumaric acid (COU) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), respectively. With the detection of stable coupling products formed with radical scavenger (5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide, DMPO), three phenolic compounds (vanillin, apocynin, and daidzein) in SBE were confirmed to serve as mediators for Trametes versicolor laccase. Reaction pathways were proposed based on the results of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. SO 2 excursion happened during SDM transformation, leading to elimination of antimicrobial activity. Therefore, as a natural, phenol rich, and affordable compound system, the future application of SBE in wastewater and soil remediation is worth exploring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Methanol conversion to light olefins over nanostructured CeAPSO-34 catalyst: Thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions and effect of template type on catalytic properties and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghamohammadi, Sogand [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reactor and Catalysis Research Center (RCRC), Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghighi, Mohammad, E-mail: haghighi@sut.ac.ir [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reactor and Catalysis Research Center (RCRC), Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Charghand, Mojtaba [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reactor and Catalysis Research Center (RCRC), Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: In this research nanostructured CeAPSO-34 was synthesized to explore the effect of TEAOH and morpholine on its physiochemical properties and MTO performance. Prepared catalysts were characterized with XRD, FESEM, BET, FTIR and NH3-TPD techniques. The results indicated that the nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. The catalyst obtained by using morpholine showed longer life time as well as sustaining light olefins selectivity at higher values. Furthermore, a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions network was carried out to address the major channels of methanol to olefins conversion. - Highlights: • Introduction of Ce into SAPO-34 framework. • Comparison of CeAPSO-34 synthesized using morpholine and TEAOH. • The nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34. • Morpholine enhances catalyst lifetime in MTO process. • Presenting a complete reaction network for MTO process. - Abstract: TEAOH and morpholine were employed in synthesis of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 molecular sieve and used in methanol to olefins conversion. Prepared samples were characterized by XRD, FESEM, EDX, BET, FTIR and NH{sub 3}-TPD techniques. XRD patterns reflected the higher crystallinity of the catalyst synthesized with morpholine. The FESEM results indicated that the nature of the template determines the morphology of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. There was a meaningful difference in the strength of both strong and weak acid sites for CeAPSO-34 catalysts synthesized with TEAOH and morpholine templates. The catalyst synthesized with morpholine showed higher desorption temperature of both weak and strong acid sites evidenced by NH{sub 3}-TPD characterization. The catalyst obtained using morpholine template had the longer lifetime and sustained desired light olefins at higher values. A comprehensive

  6. Methanol conversion to light olefins over nanostructured CeAPSO-34 catalyst: Thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions and effect of template type on catalytic properties and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghamohammadi, Sogand; Haghighi, Mohammad; Charghand, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In this research nanostructured CeAPSO-34 was synthesized to explore the effect of TEAOH and morpholine on its physiochemical properties and MTO performance. Prepared catalysts were characterized with XRD, FESEM, BET, FTIR and NH3-TPD techniques. The results indicated that the nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. The catalyst obtained by using morpholine showed longer life time as well as sustaining light olefins selectivity at higher values. Furthermore, a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions network was carried out to address the major channels of methanol to olefins conversion. - Highlights: • Introduction of Ce into SAPO-34 framework. • Comparison of CeAPSO-34 synthesized using morpholine and TEAOH. • The nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34. • Morpholine enhances catalyst lifetime in MTO process. • Presenting a complete reaction network for MTO process. - Abstract: TEAOH and morpholine were employed in synthesis of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 molecular sieve and used in methanol to olefins conversion. Prepared samples were characterized by XRD, FESEM, EDX, BET, FTIR and NH 3 -TPD techniques. XRD patterns reflected the higher crystallinity of the catalyst synthesized with morpholine. The FESEM results indicated that the nature of the template determines the morphology of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. There was a meaningful difference in the strength of both strong and weak acid sites for CeAPSO-34 catalysts synthesized with TEAOH and morpholine templates. The catalyst synthesized with morpholine showed higher desorption temperature of both weak and strong acid sites evidenced by NH 3 -TPD characterization. The catalyst obtained using morpholine template had the longer lifetime and sustained desired light olefins at higher values. A comprehensive thermodynamic

  7. High Zn/Al ratios enhance dehydrogenation vs hydrogen transfer reactions of Zn-ZSM-5 catalytic systems in methanol conversion to aromatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinilla-Herrero, Irene; Borfecchia, Elisa; Holzinger, Julian

    2018-01-01

    suggest that catalytic activity is associated with [Zn(H2O)n(OH)]+ species located in the exchange positions of the materials with little or no contribution of ZnO or metallic Zn. The effect of Zn/Al ratio on their catalytic performance in methanol conversion to aromatics has been investigated. In all...... cases, higher Zn content causes an increase in the yield of aromatics while keeping the production of alkanes low. For similar Zn contents, high densities of Al sites favour the hydrogen transfer reactions and alkane formation whereas in samples with low Al contents, and thus higher Zn/Al ratio...

  8. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    differentially activate multiple signaling pathways within the mast cells required for the generation and/or release of inflammatory mediators. Thus, the composition of the suite of mediators released and the physiologic ramifications of these responses are dependent on the stimuli and the microenvironment...

  9. Talking about suicide may not be enough: family reaction as a mediator between disclosure and interpersonal needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Laura M; Fulginiti, Anthony

    2017-08-01

    Although most people who make an attempt do not die, attempt survivors remain at particularly elevated risk for suicide in the short- and long-term. Moreover, the research on suicide-related disclosure and subsequent family reactions on risk factors for the development of suicidal desire is limited. This study examined the relationships between disclosure, family reaction and two interpersonal needs connected to the development of suicidal desire. Data from 74 attempt survivors who participated in a larger study were analyzed to assess the relationships between degree of suicide-related disclosure, quality of family reaction and thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Results indicated that higher rates of disclosure predicted more positive family reactions, which in turn predicted lower levels of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Although there was no direct relationship between disclosure and the outcome variables, bootstrapping analyses indicated that family reaction mediated the relationship between disclosure and both belongingness and burdensomeness. These findings suggest the need for more family interventions that promote healthy reactions following suicide-related disclosure in order to facilitate the recovery and treatment process.

  10. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  11. Exhaustive Conversion of Inorganic Nitrogen to Nitrogen Gas Based on a Photoelectro-Chlorine Cycle Reaction and a Highly Selective Nitrogen Gas Generation Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Jinhua; Bai, Jing; Shen, Zhaoxi; Li, Linsen; Xia, Ligang; Chen, Shuai; Zhou, Baoxue

    2018-02-06

    A novel method for the exhaustive conversion of inorganic nitrogen to nitrogen gas is proposed in this paper. The key properties of the system design included an exhaustive photoelectrochemical cycle reaction in the presence of Cl - , in which Cl· generated from oxidation of Cl - by photoholes selectively converted NH 4 + to nitrogen gas and some NO 3 - or NO 2 - . The NO 3 - or NO 2 - was finally reduced to nitrogen gas on a highly selective Pd-Cu-modified Ni foam (Pd-Cu/NF) cathode to achieve exhaustive conversion of inorganic nitrogen to nitrogen gas. The results indicated total nitrogen removal efficiencies of 30 mg L -1 inorganic nitrogen (NO 3 - , NH 4 + , NO 3 - /NH 4 + = 1:1 and NO 2 - /NO 3 - /NH 4 + = 1:1:1) in 90 min were 98.2%, 97.4%, 93.1%, and 98.4%, respectively, and the remaining nitrogen was completely removed by prolonging the reaction time. The rapid reduction of nitrate was ascribed to the capacitor characteristics of Pd-Cu/NF that promoted nitrate adsorption in the presence of an electric double layer, eliminating repulsion between the cathode and the anion. Nitrate was effectively removed with a rate constant of 0.050 min -1 , which was 33 times larger than that of Pt cathode. This system shows great potential for inorganic nitrogen treatment due to the high rate, low cost, and clean energy source.

  12. Carbohydrate carbocyclization by a zinc-mediated tandem reaction and ring-closing enyne metathesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Carina Storm; Madsen, Robert

    2002-01-01

    reaction, an amino group can be introduced in the 1,7-enyne products. Addition of 2-TMS-ethynylcerium(III) chloride after the reductive ring-opening produces the corresponding 1,6-enynes. Further annulation of the product 1,3-dienes can be achieved through a Diels-Alder reaction with good control of stereo...

  13. Cu-Mediated Stille Reactions of Sterically Congested Fragments: Towards the Total Synthesis of Zoanthamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas E.; Le Quement, Sebastian; Juhl, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A study on the Stille reaction of alkenyl iodides and starmanes with structural resemblance to retrosynthetic fragments of a projected total synthesis of the marine alkaloid zoanthamine was carried out. A range of reaction conditions was examined, and a protocol developed by Corey utilizing excess...

  14. Pyrovanadolysis: a Pyrophosphorolysis-like Reaction Mediated by Pyrovanadate MN2plus and DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Akabayov; A Kulczyk; S Akabayov; C Thiele; L McLaughlin; B Beauchamp; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    DNA polymerases catalyze the 3'-5'-pyrophosphorolysis of a DNA primer annealed to a DNA template in the presence of pyrophosphate (PP{sub i}). In this reversal of the polymerization reaction, deoxynucleotides in DNA are converted to deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates. Based on the charge, size, and geometry of the oxygen connecting the two phosphorus atoms of PP{sub i}, a variety of compounds was examined for their ability to carry out a reaction similar to pyrophosphorolysis. We describe a manganese-mediated pyrophosphorolysis-like activity using pyrovanadate (VV) catalyzed by the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. We designate this reaction pyrovanadolysis. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals a shorter Mn-V distance of the polymerase-VV complex than the Mn-P distance of the polymerase-PP{sub i} complex. This structural arrangement at the active site accounts for the enzymatic activation by Mn-VV. We propose that the Mn{sup 2+}, larger than Mg{sup 2+}, fits the polymerase active site to mediate binding of VV into the active site of the polymerase. Our results may be the first documentation that vanadium can substitute for phosphorus in biological processes.

  15. Interaction Involvement in Cross-Culture Computer-Mediated Communication: Examination of a Communication Process in Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Thao Duyen

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores how participants express and interpret verbal cues of interaction involvement in dyadic conversations via text-based Instant Messaging (IM). Moreover, it seeks to discover differences in the way American participants and Chinese participants use verbal cues when they are highly, or lowly involved. Based on previous…

  16. Green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using gallic acid: catalytic activity and conversion yield toward the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisu; Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2016-06-01

    In the present report, gallic acid was used as both a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesize gold and silver nanoparticles. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles exhibited characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 536 and 392 nm, respectively. Nanoparticles that were approximately spherical in shape were observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The hydrodynamic radius was determined to be 54.4 nm for gold nanoparticles and 33.7 nm for silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium. X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles possessed a face-centered cubic structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylic acid functional groups of gallic acid contributed to the electrostatic binding onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Zeta potential values of -41.98 mV for the gold nanoparticles and -53.47 mV for the silver nanoparticles indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles possess excellent stability. On-the-shelf stability for 4 weeks also confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles were quite stable without significant changes in their UV-visible spectra. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The rate constant of the silver nanoparticles was higher than that of the gold nanoparticles in the catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the conversion yield (%) of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 254 nm. The silver nanoparticles exhibited an excellent conversion yield (96.7-99.9 %), suggesting that the synthesized silver nanoparticles are highly efficient catalysts for the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  17. Green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using gallic acid: catalytic activity and conversion yield toward the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jisu; Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2016-01-01

    In the present report, gallic acid was used as both a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesize gold and silver nanoparticles. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles exhibited characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 536 and 392 nm, respectively. Nanoparticles that were approximately spherical in shape were observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The hydrodynamic radius was determined to be 54.4 nm for gold nanoparticles and 33.7 nm for silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium. X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles possessed a face-centered cubic structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylic acid functional groups of gallic acid contributed to the electrostatic binding onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Zeta potential values of −41.98 mV for the gold nanoparticles and −53.47 mV for the silver nanoparticles indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles possess excellent stability. On-the-shelf stability for 4 weeks also confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles were quite stable without significant changes in their UV–visible spectra. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The rate constant of the silver nanoparticles was higher than that of the gold nanoparticles in the catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the conversion yield (%) of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 254 nm. The silver nanoparticles exhibited an excellent conversion yield (96.7–99.9 %), suggesting that the synthesized silver nanoparticles are highly efficient catalysts for the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  18. Green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using gallic acid: catalytic activity and conversion yield toward the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jisu [Inje University, College of Pharmacy (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho [Seoul National University, Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Park, Youmie, E-mail: youmiep@inje.ac.kr [Inje University, College of Pharmacy (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In the present report, gallic acid was used as both a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesize gold and silver nanoparticles. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles exhibited characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 536 and 392 nm, respectively. Nanoparticles that were approximately spherical in shape were observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The hydrodynamic radius was determined to be 54.4 nm for gold nanoparticles and 33.7 nm for silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium. X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles possessed a face-centered cubic structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylic acid functional groups of gallic acid contributed to the electrostatic binding onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Zeta potential values of −41.98 mV for the gold nanoparticles and −53.47 mV for the silver nanoparticles indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles possess excellent stability. On-the-shelf stability for 4 weeks also confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles were quite stable without significant changes in their UV–visible spectra. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The rate constant of the silver nanoparticles was higher than that of the gold nanoparticles in the catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the conversion yield (%) of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 254 nm. The silver nanoparticles exhibited an excellent conversion yield (96.7–99.9 %), suggesting that the synthesized silver nanoparticles are highly efficient catalysts for the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  19. A copper-mediated reverse aromatic Finkelstein reaction in ionic liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh T.H. Nguyen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a general method for reverse aromatic Finkelstein reactions. Good reaction yields were obtained when aryl iodides or aryl bromides were treated with copper halide salts as promoters in a 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([BMIM]Br ionic liquid (IL solvent at 140 °C for 8 h. Preliminary investigation supported that the copper salts were also the halide sources in halogen exchange reactions. The optimized conditions are applicable to a variety of substrates and have excellent functional group tolerance. Additionally, the [BMIM]Br solvent showed good stability for at least 10 consecutive runs. Results indicated that the [BMIM]Br solvent was recyclable for reverse aromatic Finkelstein reactions.

  20. Stratum corneum profiles of inflammatory mediators in patch test reactions to common contact allergens and sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, S A; Ljubojevic Hadzavdic, S; Jakasa, I; Franceschi, N; Jurakić Tončić, R; Marinović, B; Brans, R; Gibbs, S; Frings-Dresen, M H W; Rustemeyer, T; Kezic, S

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated allergen-specific differences in the gene expression of inflammatory mediators in patch tested skin. To determine levels of various inflammatory mediators in the stratum corneum (SC) after patch testing with common contact allergens and the skin irritant sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). In total, 27 individuals who had previously patch tested positive to nickel, chromium, methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI) or para-phenylenediamine were retested and then patch tested with SLS and petrolatum, with petrolatum serving as the patch test control. At 72 h, the test sites were clinically graded and the SC samples collected on adhesive tape. The levels of 18 of the 32 quantified mediators differed significantly from that of the control patches for at least one of the tested substances. SLS and MCI/MI induced the largest number of immunomediators. Interleukin (IL)-16 levels were significantly higher in patch test reactions in all allergens than they were in the controls, while no significant difference was detected for SLS. Furthermore, a strong negative correlation was found between strength of patch test reaction and IL-1α levels. Cytokine profiles in the SC of patch tested skin did not show a distinct allergen-specific pattern. However, MCI/MI induced a larger and wider immune response than the other allergens, perhaps due to its potency as an irritant. The levels of IL-16 were significantly increased in patch test reactions to allergens but not to SLS; thus, they may help clinicians to differentiate between allergic contact dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  2. Optimization of the THP-1 activation assay to detect pharmaceuticals with potential to cause immune mediated drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Daniele; Galbiati, Valentina; Gatti, Nicolò; Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L; Corsini, Emanuela

    2015-10-01

    Despite important impacts of systemic hypersensitivity induced by pharmaceuticals, for such endpoint no reliable preclinical approaches are available. We previously established an in vitro test to identify contact and respiratory allergens based on interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in THP-1 cells. Here, we challenged it for identification of pharmaceuticals associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions, with the idea that drug sensitizers share common mechanisms of cell activation. Cells were exposed to drugs associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions (streptozotocin, sulfamethoxazole, neomycin, probenecid, clonidine, procainamide, ofloxacin, methyl salicylate), while metformin was used as negative drug. Differently to chemicals, drugs tested were well tolerated, except clonidine and probenecid, with no signs of cytotoxicity up to 1-2mg/ml. THP-1 activation assay was adjusted, and conditions, that allow identification of all sensitizing drugs tested, were established. Next, using streptozotocin and selective inhibitors of PKC-β and p38 MAPK, two pathways involved in chemical allergen-induced cell activation, we tested the hypothesis that similar pathways were also involved in drug-induced IL-8 production and CD86 upregulation. Results indicated that drugs and chemical allergens share similar activation pathways. Finally, we made a structure-activity hypothesis related to hypersensitivity reactions, trying to individuate structural requisite that can be involved in immune mediated adverse reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Considering a Threshold Energy in Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbially Mediated Redox Reactions in an Arsenic-Affected Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Rotiroti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The reductive dissolution of Fe-oxide driven by organic matter oxidation is the primary mechanism accepted for As mobilization in several alluvial aquifers. These processes are often mediated by microorganisms that require a minimum Gibbs energy available to conduct the reaction in order to sustain their life functions. Implementing this threshold energy in reactive transport modeling is rarely used in the existing literature. This work presents a 1D reactive transport modeling of As mobilization by the reductive dissolution of Fe-oxide and subsequent immobilization by co-precipitation in iron sulfides considering a threshold energy for the following terminal electron accepting processes: (a Fe-oxide reduction, (b sulfate reduction, and (c methanogenesis. The model is then extended by implementing a threshold energy on both reaction directions for the redox reaction pairs Fe(III reduction/Fe(II oxidation and methanogenesis/methane oxidation. The optimal threshold energy fitted in 4.50, 3.76, and 1.60 kJ/mol e− for sulfate reduction, Fe(III reduction/Fe(II oxidation, and methanogenesis/methane oxidation, respectively. The use of models implementing bidirectional threshold energy is needed when a redox reaction pair can be transported between domains with different redox potentials. This may often occur in 2D or 3D simulations.

  4. Miswak mediated green synthesized palladium nanoparticles as effective catalysts for the Suzuki coupling reactions in aqueous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujeeb Khan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Green and eco-friendly synthesis of palladium nanoparticles NPs is carried out under facile and eco-friendly conditions using an aqueous solution of Salvadora persica L. (SP root extract (RE as a bioreductant, which is commonly known as Miswak. The as-synthesized Pd NPs were characterized using various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, including, UV–Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, XRD, ICP-MS and TEM. Detailed investigations of the Pd NPs have confirmed that the polyphenolic phytomolecules present in the RE of Miswak not only act as a bioreductant by facilitating the reduction and growth of Pd NPs, but they also functionalize the surface of Pd NPs and stabilized them in various solvents. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of the green synthesized Pd NPs was also tested toward the Suzuki coupling reactions of various aryl halides in aqueous media. The as-prepared Pd NPs exhibited superior catalytic activity and reusability for the Suzuki coupling reaction in aqueous and aerobic conditions. The kinetics of the reaction studied by GC revealed that the conversion of various aryl halides to biphenyl takes place in a short time.

  5. Effects of Synchronous and Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) Oral Conversations on English Language Learners' Discourse Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuSeileek, Ali Farhan; Qatawneh, Khaleel

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of synchronous and asynchronous computer mediated communication (CMC) oral discussions on question types and strategies used by English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners. The participants were randomly assigned to two treatment conditions/groups; the first group used synchronous CMC, while the second…

  6. Silica Gel-Mediated Organic Reactions under Organic Solvent-Free Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoaki Onitsuka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Silica gel was found to be an excellent medium for some useful organic transformations under organic solvent-free conditions, such as (1 the Friedel-Crafts-type nitration of arenes using commercial aqueous 69% nitric acid alone at room temperature, (2 one-pot Wittig-type olefination of aldehydes with activated organic halides in the presence of tributyl- or triphenylphosphine and Hunig’s base, and (3 the Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction of aldehydes with methyl acrylate. After the reactions, the desired products were easily obtained in good to excellent yields through simple manipulation.

  7. Deactivation of solid catalysts in liquid media: the case of leaching of active sites in biomass conversion reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sádaba, Irantzu; Lopez Granados, Manuel; Riisager, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This review is aimed to be a brief tutorial covering the deactivation of solid catalysts in the liquid phase, with specific focus on leaching, which can be especially helpful to researchers not familiarized with catalytic processes in the liquid phase. Leaching refers to the loss of active species....... However, as a consequence of the development of new processes for biorefineries, an increasing number of reactions deal with liquid media, and thus, the stability and reusability of a solid catalyst in this situation represent a huge challenge that requires specific attention. Leaching of active phases...... is particularly problematic because of its irreversibility and it can be one of the main causes of catalyst deactivation in liquid media, threatening the sustainability of the process. This tutorial review presents a survey of the main aspects concerning the deactivation due to leaching of active species from...

  8. A high-performance liquid chromatography-electronic circular dichroism online method for assessing the absolute enantiomeric excess and conversion ratio of asymmetric reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Mingchao; Li, Li; Yin, Dali

    2017-03-01

    Asymmetric reactions often need to be evaluated during the synthesis of chiral compounds. However, traditional evaluation methods require the isolation of the individual enantiomer, which is tedious and time-consuming. Thus, it is desirable to develop simple, practical online detection methods. We developed a method based on high-performance liquid chromatography-electronic circular dichroism (HPLC-ECD) that simultaneously analyzes the material conversion ratio and absolute optical purity of each enantiomer. In particular, only a reverse-phase C18 column instead of a chiral column is required in our method because the ECD measurement provides a g-factor that describes the ratio of each enantiomer in the mixtures. We used our method to analyze the asymmetric hydrosilylation of β-enamino esters, and we discussed the advantage, feasibility, and effectiveness of this new methodology.

  9. Computational Chemical Kinetics for the Reaction of Criegee Intermediate CH2OO with HNO3 and Its Catalytic Conversion to OH and HCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, P; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lin, M C

    2017-05-25

    The kinetics and mechanisms for the reaction of the Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with HNO 3 and the unimolecular decomposition of its reaction product CH 2 (O)NO 3 are important in atmospheric chemistry. The potential-energy profile of the reactions predicted with the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method shows that the initial association yields a prereaction complex that isomerizes by H migration to yield excited intermediate nitrooxymethyl hydroperoxide NO 3 CH 2 OOH* with internal energy ∼44 kcal mol -1 . A fragmentation of this excited intermediate produces CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH with its transition state located 5.0 kcal mol -1 below that of the reactants. Further decomposition of CH 2 (O)NO 3 produces HCO + HNO 3 , forming a catalytic cycle for destruction of CH 2 OO by HNO 3 . The rate coefficients and product-branching ratios were calculated in the temperature range 250-700 K at pressure 20-760 Torr (N 2 ) using the variational-transition-state and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theories. The predicted total rate coefficient for reaction CH 2 OO + HNO 3 at 295 K, 5.1 × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , agrees satisfactorily with the experimental value, (5.4 ± 1.0) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . The predicted branching ratios at 295 K are 0.21 for the formation of NO 3 CH 2 OOH and 0.79 for CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH at a pressure of 40 Torr (N 2 ), and 0.79 for the formation of NO 3 CH 2 OOH and 0.21 for CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH at 760 Torr (N 2 ). This new catalytic conversion of CH 2 OO to HCO + OH by HNO 3 might have significant impact on atmospheric chemistry.

  10. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namratha Pai Kotebagilu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%, methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%, and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55% in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r=0.816 and low-density lipoprotein (r=0.948 and Costus speciosus in brain (r=0.977, polyphenols, and r=0.949, flavonoids correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates.

  11. Impression Management Messages and Reactions to Organizational Reward Allocations: The Mediating Influence of Fairness and Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Jasmine; Rhodes, Susan R.

    1996-01-01

    Examines relationships among impression-management messages, evaluations of reward allocations (fairness and responsibility), and reaction to rewards (anger, approval of manager, and overall job satisfaction). Finds that impression-management messages directly influence fairness and responsibility, and indirectly influence anger and approval. (SR)

  12. Interrogating the catalytic mechanism of nanoparticle mediated Stille coupling reactions employing bio-inspired Pd nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacardo, Dennis B.; Slocik, Joseph M.; Kirk, Kyle C.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Knecht, Marc R.

    2011-05-01

    To address issues concerning the global environmental and energy state, new catalytic technologies must be developed that translate ambient and efficient conditions to heavily used reactions. To achieve this, the structure/function relationship between model catalysts and individual reactions must be critically discerned to identify structural motifs responsible for the reactivity. This is especially true for nanoparticle-based systems where this level of information remains limited. Here we present evidence indicating that peptide-capped Pd nanoparticles drive Stille C-C coupling reactions via Pd atom leaching. Through a series of reaction studies, the materials are shown to be optimized for reactivity under ambient conditions where increases in temperature or catalyst concentration deactivate reactivity due to the leaching process. A quartz crystal microbalance analysis demonstrates that Pd leaching occurs during the initial oxidative addition step at the nanoparticle surface by aryl halides. Together, this suggests that peptide-based materials may be optimally suited for use as model systems to isolate structural motifs responsible for the generation of catalytically reactive materials under ambient synthetic conditions.

  13. Interrogating the catalytic mechanism of nanoparticle mediated Stille coupling reactions employing bio-inspired Pd nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacardo, Dennis B; Slocik, Joseph M; Kirk, Kyle C; Naik, Rajesh R; Knecht, Marc R

    2011-05-01

    To address issues concerning the global environmental and energy state, new catalytic technologies must be developed that translate ambient and efficient conditions to heavily used reactions. To achieve this, the structure/function relationship between model catalysts and individual reactions must be critically discerned to identify structural motifs responsible for the reactivity. This is especially true for nanoparticle-based systems where this level of information remains limited. Here we present evidence indicating that peptide-capped Pd nanoparticles drive Stille C-C coupling reactions via Pd atom leaching. Through a series of reaction studies, the materials are shown to be optimized for reactivity under ambient conditions where increases in temperature or catalyst concentration deactivate reactivity due to the leaching process. A quartz crystal microbalance analysis demonstrates that Pd leaching occurs during the initial oxidative addition step at the nanoparticle surface by aryl halides. Together, this suggests that peptide-based materials may be optimally suited for use as model systems to isolate structural motifs responsible for the generation of catalytically reactive materials under ambient synthetic conditions. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  14. Modelling and simulation of a transketolase mediated reaction: Sensitivity analysis of kinetic parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayar, N.A.; Chen, B.H.; Lye, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have used a proposed mathematical model, describing the carbon-carbon bond format ion reaction between beta-hydroxypyruvate and glycolaldehyde to synthesise L-erythrulose, catalysed by the enzyme transketolase, for the analysis of the sensitivity of the process to its kinetic...

  15. Exciplex mediated photoinduced electron transfer reactions of phthalocyanine-fullerene dyads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemi, Marja; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Efimov, Alexander; Lehtivuori, Heli; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Lemmetyinen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Evidences of an intramolecular exciplex intermediate in a photoinduced electron transfer (ET) reaction of double-linked free-base and zinc phthalocyanine-C-60 dyads were found. This was the first time for a dyad with phthalocyanine donor. Excitation of the phthalocyanine moiety of the dyads results

  16. An Adaptor Domain-Mediated Auto-Catalytic Interfacial Kinase Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaoli; Su, Jing; Mrksich, Milan

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a model system for studying the auto-catalytic phosphorylation of an immobilized substrate by a kinase enzyme. This work uses self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold to present the peptide substrate on a planar surface. Treatment of the monolayer with Abl kinase results in phosphorylation of the substrate. The phosphorylated peptide then serves as a ligand for the SH2 adaptor domain of the kinase and thereby directs the kinase activity to nearby peptide substrates. This directed reaction is intramolecular and proceeds with a faster rate than does the initial, intermolecular reaction, making this an auto-catalytic process. The kinetic non-linearity gives rise to properties that have no counterpart in the corresponding homogeneous phase reaction: in one example, the rate for phosphorylation of a mixture of two peptides is faster than the sum of the rates for phosphorylation of each peptide when presented alone. This work highlights the use of an adaptor domain in modulating the activity of a kinase enzyme for an immobilized substrate and offers a new approach for studying biochemical reactions in spatially inhomogeneous settings. PMID:19821459

  17. Effect of long-term fertilization on humic redox mediators in multiple microbial redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Zhang, Chunfang; Wang, Yi; Yu, Xinwei; Zhang, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongdong

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of different long-term fertilizations on humic substances (HSs), humic acids (HAs) and humins, functioning as redox mediators for various microbial redox biotransformations, including 2,2',4,4',5,5'- hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153 ) dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, and their electron-mediating natures. The redox activity of HSs for various microbial redox metabolisms was substantially enhanced by long-term application of organic fertilizer (pig manure). As a redox mediator, only humin extracted from soils with organic fertilizer amendment (OF-HM) maintained microbial PCB 153 dechlorination activity (1.03 μM PCB 153 removal), and corresponding HA (OF-HA) most effectively enhanced iron reduction and nitrate reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens. Electrochemical analysis confirmed the enhancement of their electron transfer capacity and redox properties. Fourier transform infrared analysis showed that C=C and C=O bonds, and carboxylic or phenolic groups in HSs might be the redox functional groups affected by fertilization. This research enhances our understanding of the influence of anthropogenic fertility on the biogeochemical cycling of elements and in situ remediation ability in agroecosystems through microorganisms' metabolisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Universal, colorimetric microRNA detection strategy based on target-catalyzed toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonkyung; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kang, Shinyoung; Kim, Hansol; Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we developed a novel, label-free, and enzyme-free strategy for the colorimetric detection of microRNA (miRNA), which relies on a target-catalyzed toehold-mediated strand displacement (TMSD) reaction. The system employs a detection probe that specifically binds to the target miRNA and sequentially releases a catalyst strand (CS) intended to trigger the subsequent TMSD reaction. Thus, the presence of target miRNA releases the CS that mediates the formation of an active G-quadruplex DNAzyme which is initially caged and inactivated by a blocker strand. In addition, a fuel strand that is supplemented for the recycling of the CS promotes another TMSD reaction, consequently generating a large number of active G-quadruplex DNAzymes. As a result, a distinct colorimetric signal is produced by the ABTS oxidation promoted by the peroxidase mimicking activity of the released G-quadruplex DNAzymes. Based on this novel strategy, we successfully detected miR-141, a promising biomarker for human prostate cancer, with high selectivity. The diagnostic capability of this system was also demonstrated by reliably determining target miR-141 in human serum, showing its great potential towards real clinical applications. Importantly, the proposed approach is composed of separate target recognition and signal transduction modules. Thus, it could be extended to analyze different target miRNAs by simply redesigning the detection probe while keeping the same signal transduction module as a universal signal amplification unit, which was successfully demonstrated by analyzing another target miRNA, let-7d.

  19. Reclassifying Anaphylaxis to Neuromuscular Blocking Agents Based on the Presumed Patho-Mechanism: IgE-Mediated, Pharmacological Adverse Reaction or “Innate Hypersensitivity”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Spoerl

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of perioperative anaphylactic reactions are thought to be immunoglobulin IgE mediated, whereas 40% are thought to be non-IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions (both considered non-dose-related type B adverse drug reactions. In both cases, symptoms are elicited by mast cell degranulation. Also, pharmacological reactions to drugs (type A, dose-related may sometimes mimic symptoms triggered by mast cell degranulation. In case of hypotension, bronchospasm, or urticarial rash due to mast cell degranulation, identification of the responsible mechanism is complicated. However, determination of the type of the underlying adverse drug reaction is of paramount interest for the decision of whether the culprit drug may be re-administered. Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA are among the most frequent cause of perioperative anaphylaxis. Recently, it has been shown that NMBA may activate mast cells independently from IgE antibodies via the human Mas-related G-protein-coupled receptor member X2 (MRGPRX2. In light of this new insight into the patho-mechanism of pseudo-allergic adverse drug reactions, in which as drug-receptor interaction results in anaphylaxis like symptoms, we critically reviewed the literature on NMBA-induced perioperative anaphylaxis. We challenge the dogma that NMBA mainly cause IgE-mediated anaphylaxis via an IgE-mediated mechanism, which is based on studies that consider positive skin test to be specific for IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. Finally, we discuss the question whether MRGPRX2 mediated pseudo-allergic reactions should be re-classified as type A adverse reactions.

  20. o-Iodoxybenzoic acid mediated oxidative desulfurization initiated domino reactions for synthesis of azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pramod S; Pathare, Sagar P; Akamanchi, Krishnacharaya G

    2012-04-20

    A systematic exploration of thiophilic ability of o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) for oxidative desulfurization to trigger domino reactions leading to new methodologies for synthesis of different azoles is described. A variety of highly substituted oxadiazoles, thiadiazoles, triazoles, and tetrazoles have been successfully synthesized in good to excellent yields, starting from readily accessible thiosemicarbazides, bis-diarylthiourea, 1,3-disubtituted thiourea, and thioamides. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  1. Exciplex mediated photoinduced electron transfer reactions of phthalocyanine-fullerene dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Marja; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Efimov, Alexander; Lehtivuori, Heli; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Lemmetyinen, Helge

    2008-07-31

    Evidences of an intramolecular exciplex intermediate in a photoinduced electron transfer (ET) reaction of double-linked free-base and zinc phthalocyanine-C60 dyads were found. This was the first time for a dyad with phthalocyanine donor. Excitation of the phthalocyanine moiety of the dyads results in rapid ET from phthalocyanine to fullerene via an exciplex state in both polar and nonpolar solvents. Relaxation of the charge-separated (CS) state Pc(*+)-C60(*-) in a polar solvent occurs directly to the ground state in 30-70 ps. In a nonpolar solvent, roughly 20% of the molecules undergo transition from the CS state to phthalocyanine triplet state (3)Pc*-C60 before relaxation to the ground state. Formation of the CS state was confirmed with electron spin resonance measurements at low temperature in both polar and nonpolar solvent. Reaction schemes for the photoinduced ET reactions of the dyads were completed with rate constants obtained from the time-resolved absorption and emission measurements and with state energies obtained from the fluorescence, phosphorescence, and voltammetric measurements.

  2. Advanced reactors and novel reactions for the conversion of triglyceride based oils into high quality renewable transportation fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnen, Michael James

    Sustainable energy continues to grow more important to all societies, leading to the research and development of a variety of alternative and renewable energy technologies. Of these, renewable liquid transportation fuels may be the most visible to consumers, and this visibility is further magnified by the long-term trend of increasingly expensive petroleum fuels that the public consumes. While first-generation biofuels such as biodiesel and fuel ethanol have been integrated into the existing fuel infrastructures of several countries, the chemical differences between them and their petroleum counterparts reduce their effectiveness. This gives rise to the development and commercialization of second generation biofuels, many of which are intended to have equivalent properties to those of their petroleum counterparts. In this dissertation, the primary reactions for a second-generation biofuel process, known herein as the University of North Dakota noncatalytic cracking process (NCP), have been studied at the fundamental level and improved. The NCP is capable of producing renewable fuels and chemicals that are virtually the same as their petroleum counterparts in performance and quality (i.e., petroleum-equivalent). In addition, a novel analytical method, FIMSDIST was developed which, within certain limitations, can increase the elution capabilities of GC analysis and decrease sample processing times compared to other high resolution methods. These advances are particularly useful for studies of highly heterogeneous fuel and/or organic chemical intermediates, such as those studied for the NCP. However the data from FIMSDIST must be supplemented with data from other methods such as for certain carboxylic acid, to provide accurate, comprehensive results, From a series of TAG cracking experiments that were performed, it was found that coke formation during cracking is most likely the result of excessive temperature and/or residence time in a cracking reactor. Based on this

  3. IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to cannabis in laboratory personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzinger, T; Schöpf, P; Przybilla, B; Ruëff, F

    2011-01-01

    There have been sporadic reports of hypersensitivity reactions to plants of the Cannabinaceae family (hemp and hops), but it has remained unclear whether these reactions are immunologic or nonimmunologic in nature. We examined the IgE-binding and histamine-releasing properties of hashish and marijuana extracts by CAP-FEIA and a basophil histamine release test. Two workers at a forensic laboratory suffered from nasal congestion, rhinitis, sneezing and asthmatic symptoms upon occupational contact with hashish or marijuana, which they had handled frequently for 25 and 16 years, respectively. Neither patient had a history of atopic disease. Serum was analyzed for specific IgE antibodies to hashish or marijuana extract by research prototype ImmunoCAP, and histamine release from basophils upon exposure to hashish or marijuana extracts was assessed. Results were matched to those of 4 nonatopic and 10 atopic control subjects with no known history of recreational or occupational exposure to marijuana or hashish. Patient 1 had specific IgE to both hashish and marijuana (CAP class 2), and patient 2 to marijuana only (CAP class 2). Controls proved negative for specific IgE except for 2 atopic individuals with CAP class 1 to marijuana and 1 other atopic individual with CAP class 1 to hashish. Stimulation of basophils with hashish or marijuana extracts elicited histamine release from basophils of both patients and 4 atopic control subjects. Our results suggest an IgE-related pathomechanism for hypersensitivity reactions to marijuana or hashish. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. RuO4-mediated oxidation of secondary amines 2. imines as main reaction intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florea Cristina A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation by RuO4 (generated in situ from RuO2 and NaIO4 of secondary amines such as Bn–NH–CH2R (1; R=H, Me gave complex reaction mixtures, but mainly amides. In the presence of cyanide, the leading products were α-aminonitriles. Comparison of the oxidation products of 1 with those from the corresponding imines PhCH=N–CH2R and Bn–N=CH–R showed that formation of the indicated imines is the first main step in the oxidation of 1. A detailed mechanism is proposed.

  5. Optimization of Si–C reaction temperature and Ge thickness in C-mediated Ge dot formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yuhki, E-mail: yu-ki@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Itoh, Yuhki; Kawashima, Tomoyuki; Washio, Katsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    To form Ge dots on a Si substrate, the effect of thermal reaction temperature of sub-monolayer C with Si (100) was investigated and the deposited Ge thickness was optimized. The samples were prepared by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy with an electron-beam gun for C sublimation and a Knudsen cell for Ge evaporation. C of 0.25 ML was deposited on Si (100) at a substrate temperature of 200 °C, followed by a high-temperature treatment at the reaction temperature (T{sub R}) of 650–1000 °C to create Si–C bonds. Ge equivalent to 2 to 5 nm thick was subsequently deposited at 550 °C. Small and dense dots were obtained for T{sub R} = 750 °C but the dot density decreased and the dot diameter varied widely in the case of lower and higher T{sub R}. A dot density of about 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} was achieved for Ge deposition equivalent to 3 to 5 nm thick and a standard deviation of dot diameter was the lowest of 10 nm for 5 nm thick Ge. These results mean that C-mediated Ge dot formation was strongly influenced not only by the c(4 × 4) reconstruction condition through the Si–C reaction but also the relationship between the Ge deposition thickness and the exposed Si (100)-(2 × 1) surface area. - Highlights: • The effect of Si–C reaction temperature on Ge dot formation was investigated. • Small and dense dots were obtained for T{sub R} = 750 °C. • The dot density of about 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} was achieved for Ge = 3 to 5 nm. • The standard deviation of dot diameter was the lowest of 10 nm at Ge = 5 nm.

  6. Discrimination of Arcobacter butzleri isolates by polymerase chain reaction-mediated DNA fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atabay, H. I.; Bang, Dang Duong; Aydin, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: The objective of this study was to subtype Arcobacter butzleri isolates using RAPD-PCR. Methods and Results: Thirty-five A. butzleri isolates obtained from chicken carcasses were examined. PCR-mediated DNA fingerprinting technique with primers of the variable sequence motifs was used...... to detect polymorphism within the isolates. Eleven distinct DNA profiles were obtained as follows: Of the 35 strains, 10 as profile 4; seven as profile 1; five as profile 3; three as profiles 2 and 9; two as profile 10; one as profiles 5, 6, 7, 8 and 11. Conclusions: Chicken carcasses sold in markets were...... found to be contaminated with several different strains of A. butzleri . RAPD-PCR technique was found to be a useful technique for distinguishing A. butzleri isolates. Significance and Impact of the Study: The presence of several different A. butzleri strains on chicken carcasses may indicate multiple...

  7. Synthesis of Pyrroloquinones via a CAN Mediated Oxidative Free Radical Reaction of 1,3-Dicarbonyl Compounds with Aminoquinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thao Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrroloquinone ring systems are important structural units present in many biologically active molecules including a number of marine alkaloids. For example, they are found in a series of marine metabolites, such as tsitsikammamines, zyzzyanones, wakayin, and terreusinone. Several of these alkaloids have exhibited antimicrobial, antimalarial, antifungal, antitumor, and photoprotecting activities. Synthesis of pyrroloquinone unit is the key step in the synthesis of many of these important organic molecules. Here, we present a ceric (IV ammonium nitrate (CAN mediated oxidative free radical cyclization reaction of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with aminoquinones as a facile methodology for making various substituted pyrroloquinones. 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds used in this study are ethyl acetoacetate, acetylacetone, benzoyl acetone, and N,N-dimethyl acetoacetamide. The aminoquinones used in this study are 2-(benzylaminonaphthalene-1,4-dione and 6-(benzylamino-1-tosyl-1H-indole-4,7-dione. The yields of the synthesized pyrroloquinones ranged from 23–91%.

  8. 1,5-Asymmetric induction in the boron-mediated aldol reaction of β-oxygenated methyl ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Luiz C.

    2007-01-01

    High levels of substrate-based 1,5-stereo induction are obtained in the boron-mediated aldol reactions of β-oxygenated methyl ketones with achiral and chiral aldehydes. Remote induction from the boron enolates gives the 1,5-anti adducts, with the enolate pi-facial selectivity critically dependent upon the nature of the beta-alkoxy protecting group. This 1,5-anti aldol methodology has been strategically employed in the total synthesis of several natural products. At present, the origin of the high level of 1,5-anti induction obtained with the boron enolates is unclear, although a model based on a hydrogen bonding between the alkoxy oxygen and the formyl hydrogen has been recently proposed. (author)

  9. Developmental endothelial locus-1 modulates platelet-monocyte interactions and instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction in islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Kotlabova, Klara; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ferreira, Anaisa; Chen, Lan-Sun; Gercken, Bettina; Steffen, Anja; Kemter, Elisabeth; Klotzsche-von Ameln, Anne; Waskow, Claudia; Hosur, Kavita; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Ludwig, Barbara; Wolf, Eckhard; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2016-04-01

    Platelet-monocyte interactions are strongly implicated in thrombo-inflammatory injury by actively contributing to intravascular inflammation, leukocyte recruitment to inflamed sites, and the amplification of the procoagulant response. Instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) represents thrombo-inflammatory injury elicited upon pancreatic islet transplantation (islet-Tx), thereby dramatically affecting transplant survival and function. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is a functionally versatile endothelial cell-derived homeostatic factor with anti-inflammatory properties, but its potential role in IBMIR has not been previously addressed. Here, we establish Del-1 as a novel inhibitor of IBMIR using a whole blood-islet model and a syngeneic murine transplantation model. Indeed, Del-1 pre-treatment of blood before addition of islets diminished coagulation activation and islet damage as assessed by C-peptide release. Consistently, intraportal islet-Tx in transgenic mice with endothelial cell-specific overexpression of Del-1 resulted in a marked decrease of monocytes and platelet-monocyte aggregates in the transplanted tissues, relative to those in wild-type recipients. Mechanistically, Del-1 decreased platelet-monocyte aggregate formation, by specifically blocking the interaction between monocyte Mac-1-integrin and platelet GPIb. Our findings reveal a hitherto unknown role of Del-1 in the regulation of platelet-monocyte interplay and the subsequent heterotypic aggregate formation in the context of IBMIR. Therefore, Del-1 may represent a novel approach to prevent or mitigate the adverse reactions mediated through thrombo-inflammatory pathways in islet-Tx and perhaps other inflammatory disorders involving platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation.

  10. Bacterial discrimination by means of a universal array approach mediated by LDR (ligase detection reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consolandi Clarissa

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes provides the most comprehensive and flexible means of sampling bacterial communities. Sequence analysis of these cloned fragments can provide a qualitative and quantitative insight of the microbial population under scrutiny although this approach is not suited to large-scale screenings. Other methods, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, heteroduplex or terminal restriction fragment analysis are rapid and therefore amenable to field-scale experiments. A very recent addition to these analytical tools is represented by microarray technology. Results Here we present our results using a Universal DNA Microarray approach as an analytical tool for bacterial discrimination. The proposed procedure is based on the properties of the DNA ligation reaction and requires the design of two probes specific for each target sequence. One oligo carries a fluorescent label and the other a unique sequence (cZipCode or complementary ZipCode which identifies a ligation product. Ligated fragments, obtained in presence of a proper template (a PCR amplified fragment of the 16s rRNA gene contain either the fluorescent label or the unique sequence and therefore are addressed to the location on the microarray where the ZipCode sequence has been spotted. Such an array is therefore "Universal" being unrelated to a specific molecular analysis. Here we present the design of probes specific for some groups of bacteria and their application to bacterial diagnostics. Conclusions The combined use of selective probes, ligation reaction and the Universal Array approach yielded an analytical procedure with a good power of discrimination among bacteria.

  11. Time Course of Detection of Human Male DNA from Stained Blood Sample on Various Surfaces by Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification and Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panan Kanchanaphum

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores determining the sex of humans from blood stains taken from different surfaces and compares the time course of detection with the conventional PCR, Conventional Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP, and LAMP-Lateral Flow Dipstick (LFD. For the DNA templates, 7 male and 7 female blood stained samples were extracted and added to LAMP and PCR reaction solution to amplify the SRY gene. The DNA samples were extracted from the following blood stained materials: cloth, wood, clay, and tile. Then, the samples were stored at room temperature for 1, 7, 30, and 60 day(s. After the DNA amplification, the gel electrophoresis process was applied to detect LAMP product. The LFD was combined with the LAMP to detect LAMP product on the male cloth samples. For the male samples, the time course of detection on the first and seventh days indicated positive for both LAMP and PCR products on all the surfaces while no DNA amplification was found on any of the female samples. On day 30, positive LAMP product was still found on all the male samples. However, it had faded on the tiles. Moreover, all the male samples, which had tested positive for PCR product, were blurred and unclear. On day 60, LAMP product was still found on all the male samples. Conversely, the PCR method resulted in no bands showing for any of the male samples. However, the LAMP-LFD method detected product on all the male samples of cloth. The results show that the LAMP is an effective, practical, and reliable molecular-biological method. Moreover, the LFD can increase the efficiency and sensitivity of the LAMP, making it more suitable for field studies because gel electrophoresis apparatus is not required.

  12. Metal oxide nanoparticle mediated enhanced Raman scattering and its use in direct monitoring of interfacial chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Hutter, Tanya; Finnemore, Alexander S; Huang, Fu Min; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Elliott, Stephen R; Steiner, Ullrich; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2012-08-08

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) have widespread usage across many disciplines, but monitoring molecular processes at their surfaces in situ has not been possible. Here we demonstrate that MONPs give highly enhanced (×10(4)) Raman scattering signals from molecules at the interface permitting direct monitoring of their reactions, when placed on top of flat metallic surfaces. Experiments with different metal oxide materials and molecules indicate that the enhancement is generic and operates at the single nanoparticle level. Simulations confirm that the amplification is principally electromagnetic and is a result of optical modulation of the underlying plasmonic metallic surface by MONPs, which act as scattering antennae and couple light into the confined region sandwiched by the underlying surface. Because of additional functionalities of metal oxides as magnetic, photoelectrochemical and catalytic materials, enhanced Raman scattering mediated by MONPs opens up significant opportunities in fundamental science, allowing direct tracking and understanding of application-specific transformations at such interfaces. We show a first example by monitoring the MONP-assisted photocatalytic decomposition reaction of an organic dye by individual nanoparticles.

  13. Mechanism of the Suzuki–Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reaction Mediated by [Pd(NHC)(allyl)Cl] Precatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Meconi, Giulia Magi

    2017-05-24

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the activation mechanism for the precatalyst series [Pd]-X-1–4 derived from [Pd(IPr)(R-allyl)X] species by substitutions at the terminal position of the allyl moiety ([Pd] = Pd(IPr); R = H (1), Me (2), gem-Me2 (3), Ph (4), X = Cl, Br). Next, we have investigated the Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reaction for the active catalyst species IPr-Pd(0) using 4-chlorotoluene and phenylboronic acid as substrates and isopropyl alcohol as a solvent. Our theoretical findings predict an upper barrier trend, corresponding to the activation mechanism for the [Pd]-Cl-1–4 series, in good agreement with the experiments. They indeed provide a quantitative explanation of the low yield (12%) displayed by [Pd]-Cl-1 species (ΔG⧧ ≈ 30.0 kcal/mol) and of the high yields (≈90%) observed in the case of [Pd]-Cl-2–4 complexes (ΔG⧧ ≈ 20.0 kcal/mol). Additionally, the studied Suzuki–Miyaura reaction involving the IPr-Pd(0) species is calculated to be thermodynamically favorable and kinetically facile. Similar investigations for the [Pd]-Br-1–4 series, derived from [Pd(IPr)(R-allyl)Br], indicate that the oxidative addition step for IPr-Pd(0)-mediated catalysis with 4-bromotoluene is kinetically more favored than that with 4-chlorotoluene. Finally, we have explored the potential of Ni-based complexes [Ni((IPr)(R-allyl)X] (X = Cl, Br) as Suzuki–Miyaura reaction catalysts. Apart from a less endergonic reaction energy profile for both precatalyst activation and catalytic cycle, a steep increase in the predicted upper energy barriers (by 2.0–15.0 kcal/mol) is calculated in the activation mechanism for the [Ni]-X-1–4 series compared to the [Pd]-X-1–4 series. Overall, these results suggest that Ni-based precatalysts are expected to be less active than the Pd-based precatalysts for the studied Suzuki–Miyaura reaction.

  14. Agmatine, an endogenous ligand at imidazoline binding sites, does not antagonize the clonidine-mediated blood pressure reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, Walter; Schäfer, Ulrich; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Dominiak, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Since agmatine has been identified as a clonidine displacing substance (CDS), the aim of this study was to investigate whether agmatine can mimic CDS-induced cardiovascular reactions in organ bath experiments, pithed spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and anaesthetized SHR.Intravenously-administered agmatine significantly reduced the blood pressure and heart rate of anaesthetized SHR at doses higher than 1 and 3 mg kg−1, respectively. These effects are probably mediated via central mechanisms, since there was an approximate 8 fold rightward shift of the dose-response curve in the pithed SHR (indicating a weakened cardiovascular effect). Moreover, in organ bath experiments, agmatine failed to alter the contractility of intact or endothelium-denuded aortal rings. When agmatine was administered i.c.v. to anaesthetized SHR, blood pressure was increased without any alteration of heart rate, whereas blood pressure was unchanged and heart rate was increased after injection into the 4th brain ventricle. This suggests that haemodynamic reaction patterns after central application are related to distinct influences on central cardiovascular mechanisms.Agmatine reduces noradrenaline release in pithed SHR while α2-adrenoceptors are irreversibly blocked with phenoxybenzamine, but not while I1-binding sites are selectively blocked with AGN192403. This suggests that agmatine may modulate noradrenaline release in the same way that clonidine does, i.e. via imidazoline binding sites; this involves a reduction in sympathetic tone which in turn reduces blood pressure and heart rate.Finally, CDS-like cardiovascular activity appears not to be due to agmatine, since (i) blood pressure in anaesthetized SHR is decreased by agmatine and clonidine, and (ii) agmatine did not antagonize the blood pressure reaction to clonidine in pithed or anaesthetized SHR. PMID:11834614

  15. Toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction-dependent fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yushu; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2017-03-15

    Sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) activity is beneficial for evaluating the repairing process of DNA lesions. Here, toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (TSDR)-dependent fluorescent strategy was constructed for sensitive detection of UDG activity. A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe with two uracil bases and a trigger sequence were designed. A hairpin probe with toehold domain was designed, and a reporter probe was also designed. Under the action of UDG, two uracil bases were removed from ssDNA probe, generating apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. Then, the AP sites could inhibit the TSDR between ssDNA probe and hairpin probe, leaving the trigger sequence in ssDNA probe still free. Subsequently, the trigger sequence was annealed with the reporter probe, initiating the polymerization and nicking amplification reaction. As a result, numerous G-quadruplex (G4) structures were formed, which could bind with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX (NMM) to generate enhanced fluorescent signal. In the absence of UDG, the ssDNA probe could hybridize with the toehold domain of the hairpin probe to initiate TSDR, blocking the trigger sequence, and then the subsequent amplification reaction would not occur. The proposed strategy was successfully implemented for detecting UDG activity with a detection limit of 2.7×10 -5 U/mL. Moreover, the strategy could distinguish UDG well from other interference enzymes. Furthermore, the strategy was also applied for detecting UDG activity in HeLa cells lysate with low effect of cellular components. These results indicated that the proposed strategy offered a promising tool for sensitive quantification of UDG activity in UDG-related function study and disease prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The relative role of cognitive and emotional reactions in mediating the effects of a social comparison sun protection intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Heike I M

    2018-02-01

    This experiment examined the cognitive and emotional impact of two social comparison-based sun protection interventions in a sample of Southern California college students (N = 223). One of the interventions employed comparison UV photos of peers who had either much more (downward social comparison) or much less (upward social comparison) skin damage than did participants themselves. The second intervention consisted of descriptive norms information suggesting that a large majority of the participants' peer group regularly protect their skin from the sun. Participants were randomly assigned to one of eight conditions in a 4 (Social Comparison Information: no photo vs. no comparison photos vs. upward comparison photos vs. downward comparison photos) × 2 (Descriptive Norms Information: Received vs. not received) design. Emotional reactions (e.g. worry, embarrassment, relief) and sun-related cognitive reactions (perceived susceptibility, sun protection intentions) were assessed immediately. Sun protection behaviours were assessed in a surprise telephone follow-up five weeks following the intervention. The results demonstrated that the combination of seeing photos of peers who had very little sun damage and learning that a majority of one's peers engage in regular sun protection resulted in reliably greater subsequent sun protection than all other conditions. Further, there was relatively direct evidence that both negative emotional reactions and sun protection intentions mediated this effect. These findings add to the growing literature suggesting the importance of thoroughly examining the role of emotions in health behaviour decisions. Both theory and intervention efficacy would benefit from a better understanding of the relative role of cognitions and emotions in behaviour change.

  17. Analysis of the Efficiency of Surfactant-Mediated Stabilization Reactions of EGaIn Nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenauer, Lauren R; Lu, Qingyun; Hakem, Ilhem F; Majidi, Carmel; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2017-09-26

    A methodology based on light scattering and spectrophotometry was developed to evaluate the effect of organic surfactants on the size and yield of eutectic gallium/indium (EGaIn) nanodroplets formed in organic solvents by ultrasonication. The process was subsequently applied to systematically evaluate the role of headgroup chemistry as well as polar/apolar interactions of aliphatic surfactant systems on the efficiency of nanodroplet formation. Ethanol was found to be the most effective solvent medium in promoting the formation and stabilization of EGaIn nanodroplets. For the case of thiol-based surfactants in ethanol, the yield of nanodroplet formation increased with the number of carbon atoms in the aliphatic part. In the case of the most effective surfactant system-octadecanethiol-the nanodroplet yield increased by about 370% as compared to pristine ethanol. The rather low overall efficiency of the reaction process along with the incompatibility of surfactant-stabilized EGaIn nanodroplets in nonpolar organic solvents suggests that the stabilization mechanism differs from the established self-assembled monolayer formation process that has been widely observed in nanoparticle formation.

  18. Morphological control of strontium oxalate particles by PSMA-mediated precipitation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Jiaguo [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)]. E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com; Tang Hua [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Cheng Bei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2005-05-15

    In this paper, strontium oxalate particles with different morphologies could be easily obtained by a precipitation reaction of sodium oxalate with strontium chloride in the absence and presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA). The as-prepared products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The effects of pH, aging time and concentration of PSMA on the phase structures and morphologies of the as-prepared strontium oxalate particles were investigated and discussed. The results showed that strontium oxalate particles with various morphologies, such as, bi-pyramids, rods, peanuts, and spherical particles, etc., could be obtained by varying the experimental conditions. PSMA promoted the formation of strontium oxalate dihydrate (SOD) phase. Suitable pH values (pH 7 and 8) favor the formation of the peanut-shaped SrC{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles. This research may provide new insight into the control of morphologies and phase structures of strontium oxalate particles and the biomimetic synthesis of novel inorganic materials.

  19. AFM Imaging of Hybridization Chain Reaction Mediated Signal Transmission between Two DNA Origami Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Sarah; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-10-23

    Signal transfer is central to the controlled exchange of information in biology and advanced technologies. Therefore, the development of reliable, long-range signal transfer systems for artificial nanoscale assemblies is of great scientific interest. We have designed such a system for the signal transfer between two connected DNA nanostructures, using the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). Two sets of metastable DNA hairpins, one of which is immobilized at specific points along tracks on DNA origami structures, are polymerized to form a continuous DNA duplex, which is visible using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Upon addition of a designed initiator, the initiation signal is efficiently transferred more than 200 nm from a specific location on one origami structure to an end point on another origami structure. The system shows no significant loss of signal when crossing from one nanostructure to another and, therefore, has the potential to be applied to larger multi-component DNA assemblies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Radiotherapy-Induced Skin Reactions Induce Fibrosis Mediated by TGF-β1 Cytokine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherley Borba Vieira de Andrade

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to investigate radiation-induced lesions on the skin in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: Cutaneous wounds were induced in Wistar rats by 4 MeV energy electron beam irradiation, using a dose rate of 240 cGy/min, for 3 different doses (10 Gy, 40 Gy, and 60 Gy. The skin was observed 5, 10, and 25 days (D after ionizing radiation exposition. Results: Infiltrate inflammatory process was observed in D5 and D10, for the 40 Gy and 60 Gy groups, and a progressive increase of transforming growth factor β1 is associated with this process. It could also be noted a mischaracterization of collagen fibers at the high-dose groups. Conclusion: It was observed that the lesions caused by ionizing radiation in rats were very similar to radiodermatitis in patients under radiotherapy treatment. Advances in Knowledge: This study is important to develop strategies to prevent radiation-induced skin reactions.

  1. The Modification of Cellulosic Surface with Fatty Acids via Plasma Mediated Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Ahmed Ali Ahmed

    Much attention has been paid recently to understand the healing process made by the human body, in order to develop new approaches for promoting healing. The wound healing process includes four main phases, namely, hemostatic, inflammatory, proliferation, and remodeling, which take place successively. The human body can provide all the requirements of the healing process in normal wounds, unless there is a kind of deficiency of the skin function or massive fluid losses of vast wounds. Therefore, wound care of non-healing wounds has recently been the growing concern of many applications. The goal of this work is to explore the development of a new cellulose-based wound dressing composite that contain or release wound healing agents attained via dry textile chemical finishing techniques (thermal curing-plasma treatment). The synthesis of different wound healing agents derived from fatty acids and attached chemically to cellulose or even delivered through cyclodextrine modified cellulose are reported in this work. First, free fatty acids, which are obtained from commercial vegetable oils, were identified as wound healing agents. Many of these free acids are known to bind with and deactivate the proteases associated with inflammation at a wound site. Linoleic acid is extracted from commercial products of safflower seed oil while ricinoleic acid is obtained from castor oil. Conjugated linoleic acid was synthesized. Un-conjugated linoleic acid was used to prepare two derivatives namely linoleic azide and allylic ketone of linoleic acid. Different cellulose derivatives such as cellulose peroxide, iododeoxycellulose and cellulose diazonium salt in different degree of substitutions were synthesized in order to facilitate the free radical reaction with the fatty acid derivatives. New modified cellulosic products were synthesized by reacting the cellulosic and the linoleic acid derivatives via thermal or plasma technique and characterized by FT-IR ATR, the wettability test

  2. Microwave-assisted ionic liquid-mediated rapid catalytic conversion of non-edible lignocellulosic Sunn hemp fibres to biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Souvik Kumar; Chakraborty, Saikat

    2018-04-01

    Sunn hemp fibre - a cellulose-rich crystalline non-food energy crop, containing 75.6% cellulose, 10.05% hemicellulose, 10.32% lignin, with high crystallinity (80.17%) and degree of polymerization (650) - is identified as a new non-food substrate for lignocellulosic biofuel production. Microwave irradiation is employed to rapidly rupture the cellulose's glycosidic bonds and enhance glucose yield to 78.7% at 160 °C in only 46 min. The reactants - long-chain cellulose, ionic liquid, transition metal catalyst, and water - form a polar supramolecular complex that rotates under the microwave's alternating polarity and rapidly dissipates the electromagnetic energy through molecular collisions, thus accelerating glycosidic bond breakage. In 46 min, 1 kg of Sunn hemp fibres containing 756 g of cellulose produces 595 g of glucose at 160 °C, and 203 g of hydroxymethyl furfural (furanic biofuel precursor) at 180 °C. Yeast mediated glucose fermentation produces 75.6% bioethanol yield at 30 °C, and the ionic liquid is recycled for cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Doxycycline inhibits experimental cerebral malaria by reducing inflammatory immune reactions and tissue-degrading mediators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim E Schmidt

    Full Text Available Malaria ranks among the most important infectious diseases worldwide and affects mostly people living in tropical countries. Mechanisms involved in disease progression are still not fully understood and specific treatments that might interfere with cerebral malaria (CM are limited. Here we show that administration of doxycycline (DOX prevented experimental CM (ECM in Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA-infected C57BL/6 wildtype (WT mice in an IL-10-independent manner. DOX-treated mice showed an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB and attenuated brain inflammation. Importantly, if WT mice were infected with a 20-fold increased parasite load, they could be still protected from ECM if they received DOX from day 4-6 post infection, despite similar parasitemia compared to control-infected mice that did not receive DOX and developed ECM. Infiltration of T cells and cytotoxic responses were reduced in brains of DOX-treated mice. Analysis of brain tissue by RNA-array revealed reduced expression of chemokines and tumour necrosis factor (TNF in brains of DOX-treated mice. Furthermore, DOX-administration resulted in brains of the mice in reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2 and granzyme B, which are both factors associated with ECM pathology. Systemic interferon gamma production was reduced and activated peripheral T cells accumulated in the spleen in DOX-treated mice. Our results suggest that DOX targeted inflammatory processes in the central nervous system (CNS and prevented ECM by impaired brain access of effector T cells in addition to its anti-parasitic effect, thereby expanding the understanding of molecular events that underlie DOX-mediated therapeutic interventions.

  4. Doxycycline inhibits experimental cerebral malaria by reducing inflammatory immune reactions and tissue-degrading mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kim E; Kuepper, Janina M; Schumak, Beatrix; Alferink, Judith; Hofmann, Andrea; Howland, Shanshan W; Rénia, Laurent; Limmer, Andreas; Specht, Sabine; Hoerauf, Achim

    2018-01-01

    Malaria ranks among the most important infectious diseases worldwide and affects mostly people living in tropical countries. Mechanisms involved in disease progression are still not fully understood and specific treatments that might interfere with cerebral malaria (CM) are limited. Here we show that administration of doxycycline (DOX) prevented experimental CM (ECM) in Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-infected C57BL/6 wildtype (WT) mice in an IL-10-independent manner. DOX-treated mice showed an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) and attenuated brain inflammation. Importantly, if WT mice were infected with a 20-fold increased parasite load, they could be still protected from ECM if they received DOX from day 4-6 post infection, despite similar parasitemia compared to control-infected mice that did not receive DOX and developed ECM. Infiltration of T cells and cytotoxic responses were reduced in brains of DOX-treated mice. Analysis of brain tissue by RNA-array revealed reduced expression of chemokines and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in brains of DOX-treated mice. Furthermore, DOX-administration resulted in brains of the mice in reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and granzyme B, which are both factors associated with ECM pathology. Systemic interferon gamma production was reduced and activated peripheral T cells accumulated in the spleen in DOX-treated mice. Our results suggest that DOX targeted inflammatory processes in the central nervous system (CNS) and prevented ECM by impaired brain access of effector T cells in addition to its anti-parasitic effect, thereby expanding the understanding of molecular events that underlie DOX-mediated therapeutic interventions.

  5. Rapid determination of eight bioactive alkaloids in Portulaca oleracea L. by the optimal microwave extraction combined with positive-negative conversion multiple reaction monitor (+/-MRM) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Tian, Jinlong; Li, Lingzhi; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Qingyi; Gao, Pinyi; Song, Shaojiang

    2014-03-01

    A rapid and reliable microwave extraction and the triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the determination of eight alkaloids in Portulaca oleracea L. The optimal microwave extraction (MWE) condition was performed at 60 °C for 12 min with ethanol-water (70:30, v/v) as the extracting solvent, and the solvent to solid ratio was 30:1. The alkaloids were first detected simultaneously by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry under positive-negative conversion multiple reaction monitor ((+/-)MRM) technique. With investigating three different columns, samples were separated in only 8 min on a Waters ACQUITY UPLC HSS T3 (50 × 2.1 mm(2), 1.8 μm) column using acetonitrile and formic acid-water solution as a mobile phase with a flow rate at 0.2 mL/min. All calibration curves showed good linearity (r>0.999) within the test ranges. The method developed was validated with acceptable sensitivity, intra- and inter-day precision, reproducibility, and extraction recoveries. It was successfully applied to the determination of eight alkaloids in Portulaca oleracea L. from different sources and different harvest periods. The method also provide a reference for extraction and determination of alkaloids in other complex systems. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Polyarene mediators for mediated redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, Frank M.; Ingersoll, David; Liang, Chengdu

    2018-01-02

    The fundamental charge storage mechanisms in a number of currently studied high energy redox couples are based on intercalation, conversion, or displacement reactions. With exception to certain metal-air chemistries, most often the active redox materials are stored physically in the electrochemical cell stack thereby lowering the practical gravimetric and volumetric energy density as a tradeoff to achieve reasonable power density. In a general embodiment, a mediated redox flow battery includes a series of secondary organic molecules that form highly reduced anionic radicals as reaction mediator pairs for the reduction and oxidation of primary high capacity redox species ex situ from the electrochemical cell stack. Arenes are reduced to stable anionic radicals that in turn reduce a primary anode to the charged state. The primary anode is then discharged using a second lower potential (more positive) arene. Compatible separators and solvents are also disclosed herein.

  7. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knezevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of

  8. Soft-template mediated synthesis of GaOOH nanorod-shelled microspheres and thermal conversion to beta-Ga2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Qi; Qiu, Xiaohui; He, Yujian; Liu, Wei

    2010-07-01

    Micrometer-scale hollow spheres self-assembled by GaOOH nanorods were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions using gallium nitrate and sodium hydroxide as starting materials. The structures and morphologies of the products were studied by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Time-dependent experiments revealed three stages involved in the process of reaction including the initial stage of formation of surfactant vesicles which can be considered as soft templates, followed by the nucleation of GaOOH nanoclusters, and the assembling and growth of nanorods under the modulation of the spherical vesicles. The growth kinetics of the GaOOH nanorods was systematically investigated. Based on the experimental observation, a template-mediated assembling mechanism was proposed. We further demonstrated that the GaOOH nanorods could be converted to gallium oxide (beta-Ga2O3) nanorods by calcination without changing the spherical morphology of the assemblies.

  9. Basophil histamine release to Amoxicilloyl-poly-L-lysine compared to amoxicillin in patients with IgE-mediated allergic reactions to amoxicillin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arribas, F; Falkencrone, S; Sola, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amoxicillin (AX) is the betalactam most often involved in IgE-mediated reactions and the diagnosis is mainly based on skin testing (ST) although without optimal sensitivity. We have produced a newly AX derivative, amoxicilloyl-poly-L-lysine (APL), and have analysed its IgE recognition...... with AX or APL. Histamine released was determined and expressed as ng of histamine release/mL blood. RESULTS: Patients clinical symptoms were anaphylaxis (N=9), urticaria (N=7), erythema (N=2) and not defined immediate reactions (N=1). The median time interval between reaction and study was 90 days (IQR...

  10. Physiological and cognitive mediators for the association between self-reported depressed mood and impaired choice stepping reaction time in older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvelde, T.; Pijnappels, M.A.G.M.; Delbaere, K.; Close, J.C.; Lord, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to use path analysis to test a theoretical model proposing that the relationship between self-reported depressed mood and choice stepping reaction time (CSRT) is mediated by psychoactive medication use, physiological performance, and cognitive ability.A total of

  11. IBX-mediated oxidation of unactivated cyclic amines: application in highly diastereoselective oxidative Ugi-type and aza-Friedel-Crafts reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, C; Bensch, L; van Lint, Matthijs J; Ruijter, E; Orru, R V A

    2015-10-28

    The first o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) mediated oxidation of unactivated amines to imines is described. A range of meso-pyrrolidines were shown to be suitable substrates. The chemical space was further explored with one-pot oxidative Ugi-type and aza-Friedel-Crafts reactions, which proved to be highly diastereoselective.

  12. Optimal conditions to use Pfu exo(-) DNA polymerase for highly efficient ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angers, M; Cloutier, J F; Castonguay, A; Drouin, R

    2001-08-15

    Ligation-Mediated Polymerase Chain Reaction (LMPCR) is the most sensitive sequencing technique available to map single-stranded DNA breaks at the nucleotide level of resolution using genomic DNA. LMPCR has been adapted to map DNA damage and reveal DNA-protein interactions inside living cells. However, the sequence context (GC content), the global break frequency and the current combination of DNA polymerases used in LMPCR affect the quality of the results. In this study, we developed and optimized an LMPCR protocol adapted for Pyrococcus furiosus exo(-) DNA polymerase (Pfu exo(-)). The relative efficiency of Pfu exo(-) was compared to T7-modified DNA polymerase (Sequenase 2.0) at the primer extension step and to Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase (Taq) at the PCR amplification step of LMPCR. At all break frequencies tested, Pfu exo(-) proved to be more efficient than Sequenase 2.0. During both primer extension and PCR amplification steps, the ratio of DNA molecules per unit of DNA polymerase was the main determinant of the efficiency of Pfu exo(-), while the efficiency of Taq was less affected by this ratio. Substitution of NaCl for KCl in the PCR reaction buffer of Taq strikingly improved the efficiency of the DNA polymerase. Pfu exo(-) was clearly more efficient than Taq to specifically amplify extremely GC-rich genomic DNA sequences. Our results show that a combination of Pfu exo(-) at the primer extension step and Taq at the PCR amplification step is ideal for in vivo DNA analysis and DNA damage mapping using LMPCR.

  13. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Emily A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address

  14. Immunological Reaction in TNF-α-Mediated Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Kitaura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α is a cytokine produced by monocytes, macrophages, and T cells and is induced by pathogens, endotoxins, or related substances. TNF-α may play a key role in bone metabolism and is important in inflammatory bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Cells directly involved in osteoclastogenesis include macrophages, which are osteoclast precursor cells, osteoblasts, or stromal cells. These cells express receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL to induce osteoclastogenesis, and T cells, which secrete RANKL, promote osteoclastogenesis during inflammation. Elucidating the detailed effects of TNF-α on bone metabolism may enable the identification of therapeutic targets that can efficiently suppress bone destruction in inflammatory bone diseases. TNF-α is considered to act by directly increasing RANK expression in macrophages and by increasing RANKL in stromal cells. Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin- (IL- 12, IL-18, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ strongly inhibit osteoclast formation. IL-12, IL-18, and IFN-γ induce apoptosis in bone marrow cells treated with TNF-α  in vitro, and osteoclastogenesis is inhibited by the interactions of TNF-α-induced Fas and Fas ligand induced by IL-12, IL-18, and IFN-γ. This review describes and discusses the role of cells concerned with osteoclast formation and immunological reactions in TNF-α-mediated osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

  15. La conversion des résidus et huiles lourdes : au carrefour du thermique et du catalytique Conversion of Residues and Heavy Oils At the Crossroads of Thermal Cracking and Catalytic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Page J. F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article passe en revue les diverses familles de procédés de conversion des résidus et huiles lourdes. Tous les résultats semblent converger pour accréditer l'idée que dans tous ces procédés, y compris les procédés dits catalytiques, l'essentiel de la conversion des espèces de poids moléculaire élevé, résines et asphaltènes, procède par mécanisme radicalaire : la clef de la conversion profonde, c'est paradoxalement la maîtrise de la condensation radicalaire de ces espèces. Hydrogène seul, hydrogène en présence de solvant donneur, d'additifs ou encore mieux de catalyseurs, sont les armes dont dispose tout raffineur pour affirmer cette maîtrise, dans la mesure où il ne tient pas à fabriquer du coke. Tous ces procédés de conversion des résidus donnent par ailleurs naissance à des produits craqués dont la nature et la distribution rappellent celles des produits de première distillation du pétrole brut dont est issu le résidu soumis au craquage. This article reviews the different families of conversion processes for residues and heavy oils. All the results seem to converge to support the idea that in all these processes, including so-called catalytic processes, most of the conversion of high-molecular-weight species (resins and asphaltenes operates by a radical mechanism. The key to in-depth conversion is, paradoxically, the mastery of the radical condensation of these species. Hydrogen alone, hydrogen in the presence of a donor solvent, of additives or, better yet, of catalysts, are the arms at the disposal of all refiners to assert this mastery, to the extent that they do not want to manufacture coke. All such conversion processes for residues also give rise to cracked products whose nature and distribution recall those of first-distillation products of crude oil, from which the residue comes that is subjected to cracking.

  16. Evidence that the periaqueductal gray matter mediates the facilitation of panic-like reactions in neonatally-isolated adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyce Willig Quintino-dos-Santos

    Full Text Available Plenty of evidence suggests that childhood separation anxiety (CSA predisposes the subject to adult-onset panic disorder (PD. As well, panic is frequently comorbid with both anxiety and depression. The brain mechanisms whereby CSA predisposes to PD are but completely unknown in spite of the increasing evidence that panic attacks are mediated at midbrain's dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG. Accordingly, here we examined whether the neonatal social isolation (NSI, a model of CSA, facilitates panic-like behaviors produced by electrical stimulations of DPAG of rats as adults. Eventual changes in anxiety and depression were also assessed in the elevated plus-maze (EPM and forced-swimming test (FST respectively. Male pups were subjected to 3-h daily isolations from post-natal day 2 (PN2 until weaning (PN21 allotting half of litters in individual boxes inside a sound-attenuated chamber (NSI, n = 26 whilst siblings (sham-isolated rats, SHAM, n = 27 and dam were moved to another box in a separate room. Non-handled controls (CTRL, n = 18 remained undisturbed with dams until weaning. As adults, rats were implanted with electrodes into the DPAG (PN60 and subjected to sessions of intracranial stimulation (PN65, EPM (PN66 and FST (PN67-PN68. Groups were compared by Fisher's exact test (stimulation sites, likelihood ratio chi-square tests (stimulus-response threshold curves and Bonferroni's post hoc t-tests (EPM and FST, for P<0.05. Notably, DPAG-evoked panic-like responses of immobility, exophthalmus, trotting, galloping and jumping were markedly facilitated in NSI rats relative to both SHAM and CTRL groups. Conversely, anxiety and depression scores either did not change or were even reduced in neonatally-handled groups relative to CTRL, respectively. Data are the first behavioral evidence in animals that early-life separation stress produces the selective facilitation of panic-like behaviors in adulthood. Most importantly, results implicate

  17. Radical O-O coupling reaction in diferrate-mediated water oxidation studied using multireference wave function theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Saitow, Masaaki; Chalupský, Jakub; Yanai, Takeshi

    2014-06-28

    The O-O (oxygen-oxygen) bond formation is widely recognized as a key step of the catalytic reaction of dioxygen evolution from water. Recently, the water oxidation catalyzed by potassium ferrate (K2FeO4) was investigated on the basis of experimental kinetic isotope effect analysis assisted by density functional calculations, revealing the intramolecular oxo-coupling mechanism within a di-iron(vi) intermediate, or diferrate [Sarma et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 15371]. Here, we report a detailed examination of this diferrate-mediated O-O bond formation using scalable multireference electronic structure theory. High-dimensional correlated many-electron wave functions beyond the one-electron picture were computed using the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method along the O-O bond formation pathway. The necessity of using large active space arises from the description of complex electronic interactions and varying redox states both associated with two-center antiferromagnetic multivalent iron-oxo coupling. Dynamic correlation effects on top of the active space DMRG wave functions were additively accounted for by complete active space second-order perturbation (CASPT2) and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) based methods, which were recently introduced by our group. These multireference methods were capable of handling the double shell effects in the extended active space treatment. The calculations with an active space of 36 electrons in 32 orbitals, which is far over conventional limitation, provide a quantitatively reliable prediction of potential energy profiles and confirmed the viability of the direct oxo coupling. The bonding nature of Fe-O and dual bonding character of O-O are discussed using natural orbitals.

  18. Sodium sulfite pH-buffering effect for improved xylose-phenylalanine conversion to N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine during an aqueous Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Heping; Duhoranimana, Emmanuel; Karangwa, Eric; Jia, Chengsheng; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2018-04-25

    The yield of the Maillard reaction intermediate (MRI), prepared in aqueous medium, is usually unsatisfactory. However, the addition of sodium sulfite could improve the conversion of xylose-phenylalanine (Xyl-Phe) to the MRI (N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine) in aqueous medium. Sodium sulfite (Na 2 SO 3 ) showed a significant pH-buffering effect during the Maillard reaction, which accounted for its facilitation of the N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine yield. The results revealed that the pH could be maintained at a relatively high level (above 7.0) for an optimized pH-buffering effect when Na 2 SO 3 (4.0%) was added before the reaction of Xyl-Phe. Thus, the conversion of Xyl-Phe to N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine increased from 47.23% to 74.86%. Furthermore, the addition moment of Na 2 SO 3 and corresponding solution pH were crucial factors in regulating the pH-buffering effect of Na 2 SO 3 on N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine yield. Based on the pH-buffering effect of Na 2 SO 3 and maintaining the optimal pH 7.4 relatively stable, the conversion of Xyl-Phe to N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine was successfully improved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. tri-n-butyltin hydride-mediated radical reaction of a 2-iodobenzamide: formation of an unexpected carbon-tin bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcelo T.; Alves, Rosemeire B.; Cesar, Amary; Prado, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Alves, Ricardo J.; Queiroga, Carla G.; Santos, Leonardo S.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2007-01-01

    The tri-n-butyltin hydride-mediated reaction of methyl 2,3-di-O-benzyl-4-O-trans-cinnamyl- 6-deoxy-6-(2-iodobenzoylamino)-α-D-galactopyranoside afforded an unexpected aryltributyltin compound. The structure of this new tetraorganotin(IV) product has been elucidated by 1 H, 13 C NMR spectroscopy, COSY and HMQC experiments and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The formation of this new compound via a radical coupling reaction and a radical addition-elimination process is discussed. (author)

  20. Time Course of Detection of Human Male DNA from Stained Blood Sample on Various Surfaces by Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification and Polymerase Chain Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Panan Kanchanaphum

    2018-01-01

    This study explores determining the sex of humans from blood stains taken from different surfaces and compares the time course of detection with the conventional PCR, Conventional Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP), and LAMP-Lateral Flow Dipstick (LFD). For the DNA templates, 7 male and 7 female blood stained samples were extracted and added to LAMP and PCR reaction solution to amplify the SRY gene. The DNA samples were extracted from the following blood stained materials: cloth, w...

  1. Stratum corneum profiles of inflammatory mediators in patch test reactions to common contact allergens and sodium lauryl sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppes, S. A.; Ljubojevic Hadzavdic, S.; Jakasa, I.; Franceschi, N.; Jurakić Tončić, R.; Marinović, B.; Brans, R.; Gibbs, S.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.; Rustemeyer, T.; Kezic, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated allergen-specific differences in the gene expression of inflammatory mediators in patch tested skin. Objectives To determine levels of various inflammatory mediators in the stratum corneum (SC) after patch testing with common contact allergens and the skin

  2. Dynamic pathways to mediate reactions buried in thermal fluctuations. I. Time-dependent normal form theory for multidimensional Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2009-12-14

    We present a novel theory which enables us to explore the mechanism of reaction selectivity and robust functions in complex systems persisting under thermal fluctuation. The theory constructs a nonlinear coordinate transformation so that the equation of motion for the new reaction coordinate is independent of the other nonreactive coordinates in the presence of thermal fluctuation. In this article we suppose that reacting systems subject to thermal noise are described by a multidimensional Langevin equation without a priori assumption for the form of potential. The reaction coordinate is composed not only of all the coordinates and velocities associated with the system (solute) but also of the random force exerted by the environment (solvent) with friction constants. The sign of the reaction coordinate at any instantaneous moment in the region of a saddle determines the fate of the reaction, i.e., whether the reaction will proceed through to the products or go back to the reactants. By assuming the statistical properties of the random force, one can know a priori a well-defined boundary of the reaction which separates the full position-velocity space in the saddle region into mainly reactive and mainly nonreactive regions even under thermal fluctuation. The analytical expression of the reaction coordinate provides the firm foundation on the mechanism of how and why reaction proceeds in thermal fluctuating environments.

  3. Influence of the Reaction Temperature on the Nature of the Active and Deactivating Species during Methanol to Olefins Conversion over H-SSZ-13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borodina, E.; Meirer, F.; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I.; Mokhtar, M.; Asiri, A. M.; Al-Thabaiti, S. A.; Basahel, S. N.; Ruiz-Martinez, J.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    The formation of hydrocarbon species during the methanol to olefins (MTO) reaction over zeolite H-SSZ-13 has been systematically studied at reaction temperatures between 573 and 723 K with a combination of operando UV-vis spectroscopy and online gas chromatography. It was found that the applied

  4. "Assault-related shame mediates the association between negative social reactions to disclosure of sexual assault and psychological distress": Correction to Decou et al. (2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Reports an error in "Assault-related shame mediates the association between negative social reactions to disclosure of sexual assault and psychological distress" by Christopher R. DeCou, Trevor T. Cole, Shannon M. Lynch, Maria M. Wong and Kathleen C. Matthews ( Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy , 2017[Mar], Vol 9[2], 166-172). In the article, there was an error in the coding of missing values thus effecting the abstract, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections. The frequency counts for sexual assault victimization, reactions to social disclosure, and assault-related shame were calculated incorrectly due to an error in the coding of missing values, and have been corrected in the description of participants and in the results and discussion sections. In addition, the sample size was incorrectly reported as N = 207, and should have appeared as "N = 208." The sample size and corresponding percentages have been corrected throughout the text. Two transcription errors for the indirect effects via PTSD and global distress were also corrected. These indirect effects were incorrectly reported as "PCL-C; β = .27," and "OQ-45.2;β = .21," and should have appeared as "PCL-C;β = .26," and "OQ-45.2; β = .20." (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-43136-001.) Objective: Several studies have identified associations between social reactions to disclosure of sexual assault and psychological distress; however, no studies have evaluated shame as a mediator of this association. This study evaluated assault-related shame as a mediator of the associations between negative social reactions to disclosure of sexual assault and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and global distress and hypothesized that there would be an indirect effect of social reactions to disclosure upon symptoms of psychopathology via assault-related shame. Participants were 207 female psychology undergraduates who reported past

  5. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    KAUST Repository

    Klika, Vá clav; Baker, Ruth E.; Headon, Denis; Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2011-01-01

    formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework

  6. Biochemical identification of residues that discriminate between 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde synthase-mediated reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing; Han, Qian; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong

    2017-12-01

    In available insect genomes, there are several L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) decarboxylase (DDC)-like or aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) sequences. This contrasts to those of mammals whose genomes contain only one DDC. Our previous experiments established that two DDC-like proteins from Drosophila actually mediate a complicated decarboxylation-oxidative deamination process of dopa in the presence of oxygen, leading to the formation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DHPA), CO 2 , NH 3, and H 2 O 2 . This contrasts to the typical DDC-catalyzed reaction, which produces CO 2 and dopamine. These DDC-like proteins were arbitrarily named DHPA synthases based on their critical role in insect soft cuticle formation. Establishment of reactions catalyzed by these AAAD-like proteins solved a puzzle that perplexed researchers for years, but to tell a true DHPA synthase from a DDC in the insect AAAD family remains problematic due to high sequence similarity. In this study, we performed extensive structural and biochemical comparisons between DHPA synthase and DDC. These comparisons identified several target residues potentially dictating DDC-catalyzed and DHPA synthase-catalyzed reactions, respectively. Comparison of DHPA synthase homology models with crystal structures of typical DDC proteins, particularly residues in the active sites, provided further insights for the roles these identified target residues play. Subsequent site-directed mutagenesis of the tentative target residues and activity evaluations of their corresponding mutants determined that active site His192 and Asn192 are essential signature residues for DDC- and DHPA synthase-catalyzed reactions, respectively. Oxygen is required in DHPA synthase-mediated process and this oxidizing agent is reduced to H 2 O 2 in the process. Biochemical assessment established that H 2 O 2 , formed in DHPA synthase-mediated process, can be reused as oxidizing agent and this active oxygen species is reduced to H 2

  7. Production of Organic Grain Coatings by Surface-Mediated Reactions and the Consequences of This Process for Meteoritic Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO are exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these reactions. The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic material. Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  8. Conversion Disorder Presenting As Neuritic Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayal SK

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder is not normally listed amongst the conditions in differential diagnosis of leprosy neuropathy. A case conversion reaction who was initially diagnosed as neuritic leprosy is reported. Patient responded to narcosuggestion and psychotherapy.

  9. Synthesis of 2-iodobenzamides and 3-(iodoacetamide)benzamides linked to D-galactose and their tri-n-butyltin hydride-mediated radical carbocyclization reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, Daniel Henriques Soares; Queiroga, Carla Graziella; Pires, Magno Carvalho; Prado, Maria Auxiliadra Fontes; Alves, Ricardo Jose; Cesar, Amary

    2009-01-01

    Starting from methyl 6-O-allyl-4-azido-2,3-di-O-benzyl-4-deoxy-a-D-galactopyranoside, four new derivatives containing 2-iodobenzamide and 3-(iodoacetamide)benzamido groups were synthesized. These four compounds were submitted to tri-n-butyltin hydride mediated radical cyclization reactions, resulting in two macrolactams from 11- and 15-endo aryl radical cyclization. The corresponding four hydrogenolysis products were also obtained. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, DEPT, COSY, HMQC and HMBC experiments. (author)

  10. Unravelling Mechanistic Aspects of the Gas-Phase Ethanol Conversion: An Experimental and Computational Study on the Thermal Reactions of MO2 (+) (M=Mo, W) with Ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Schlangen, Maria; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-02-24

    The ion/molecule reactions of molybdenum and tungsten dioxide cations with ethanol have been studied by Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Dehydration of ethanol has been found as the dominant reaction channel, while generation of the ethyl cation corresponds to a minor product. Cleary, the reactions are mainly governed by the Lewis acidity of the metal center. Computational results, together with isotopic labeling experiments, show that the dehydration of ethanol can proceed either through a conventional concerted [1,2]-elimination mechanism or a step-wise process; the latter occurs via a hydroxyethoxy intermediate. Formation of C2 H5 (+) takes place by transfer of OH(-) from ethanol to the metal center of MO2 (+) . The molybdenum and tungsten dioxide cations exhibit comparable reactivities toward ethanol, and this is reflected in similar reaction rate constants and branching ratios. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Enzymatic conversion of sucrose to glucose and its anomerization by quantitative NMR spectroscopy: Application of a simple consecutive reaction rates approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep; Her, Cheenou; Krishnan, V. V.

    2018-02-01

    The anomerization of carbohydrates is an essential process that determines the relative stabilization of stereoisomers in an aqueous solution. In a typical real-time enzyme kinetics experiment, the substrate (sucrose) is converted to glucose and fructose by the enzyme invertase. The product (α-D-glucose) starts to convert to β-D-glucose immediately by hydrolysis. Though the anomerization process is independent of the enzyme catalysis, the progress curve describing the production of β-D-glucose from α-D-glucose is directly affected by the kinetics of consecutive reactions. When α-D-glucose is continually converted to β-D-glucose, by the enzymatic action, the time course of both α- and β-D-glucose is influenced by the enzyme kinetics. Thus, a reversible first-order rate equation is not adequate to model the reaction mechanism, leading to erroneous results on the rates of formation of the glucose anomers. In this manuscript, we incorporate an approximate method to address consecutive general reactions involving enzyme kinetics and first-order reaction processes. The utility of the approach is demonstrated in the real-time NMR measurement of the anomerization process of α-D-glucose (enzymatically produced from sucrose) to β-D-glucose, as a function of invertase enzyme concentration. Variable temperature experiments were used to estimate the thermodynamic parameters of the anomerization process and are consistent with literature values.

  12. Organocatalyzed, Visible-Light Photoredox-Mediated, One-Pot Minisci Reaction Using Carboxylic Acids via N-(Acyloxy)phthalimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Trevor C; Li, Ning; Yazdani, Aliza N; Dhar, T G Murali

    2018-03-02

    An improved, one-pot Minisci reaction has been developed using visible light, an organic photocatalyst, and carboxylic acids as radical precursors via the intermediacy of in situ-generated N-(acyloxy)phthalimides. The conditions employed are mild, demonstrate a high degree of functional group tolerance, and do not require a large excess of the carboxylic acid reactant. As a result, this reaction can be applied to drug-like scaffolds and molecules with sensitive functional groups, enabling late-stage functionalization, which is of high interest to medicinal chemistry.

  13. Mechanism of the Suzuki–Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reaction Mediated by [Pd(NHC)(allyl)Cl] Precatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Meconi, Giulia Magi; Vummaleti, Sai V. C.; Luque-Urrutia, Jesú s Antonio; Belanzoni, Paola; Nolan, Steven P.; Jacobsen, Heiko; Cavallo, Luigi; Solà , Miquel; Poater, Albert

    2017-01-01

    (IPr); R = H (1), Me (2), gem-Me2 (3), Ph (4), X = Cl, Br). Next, we have investigated the Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reaction for the active catalyst species IPr-Pd(0) using 4-chlorotoluene and phenylboronic acid as substrates and isopropyl alcohol as a

  14. Cell-mediated immunity to histocompatibility antigens : controlling factors, with emphasis on Graft-versus-host reactions in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bril (Herman)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractGraft-versus-Host (GvH) disease is characterized by weight loss, diarrhea, skin lesions, hypofunction of the immune system with concomitant infections, etc. This syndrome is potentially lethal. GvH reactions, which underly this disease, may occur when immunocompetent T lymphocytes are

  15. L-Selectride-Mediated Highly Diastereoselective Asymmetric Reductive Aldol Reaction: Access to an Important Subunit for Bioactive Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Kass, Jorden; Anderson, David D.; Xu, Xiaoming; Marian, Christine

    2008-01-01

    L-Selectride reduction of a chiral or achiral enone followed by reaction of the resulting enolate with optically active α-alkoxy aldehydes proceeded with excellent diastereoselectivity. The resulting α,α-dimethyl-β-hydroxy ketones are inherent to a variety of biologically active natural products.

  16. L-selectride-mediated highly diastereoselective asymmetric reductive aldol reaction: access to an important subunit for bioactive molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arun K; Kass, Jorden; Anderson, David D; Xu, Xiaoming; Marian, Christine

    2008-11-06

    L-selectride reduction of a chiral or achiral enone followed by reaction of the resulting enolate with optically active alpha-alkoxy aldehydes proceeded with excellent diastereoselectivity. The resulting alpha,alpha-dimethyl-beta-hydroxy ketones are inherent to a variety of biologically active natural products.

  17. Pyrovanadolysis, a Pyrophosphorolysis-like Reaction Mediated by Pyrovanadate, Mn2+, and DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akabayov, Barak; Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Akabayov, Sabine R.; Theile, Christopher; McLaughlin, Larry W.; Beauchamp, Benjamin; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    DNA polymerases catalyze the 3'-5'-pyrophosphorolysis of a DNA primer annealed to a DNA template in the presence of pyrophosphate (PPi). In this reversal of the polymerization reaction, deoxynucleotides in DNA are converted to deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates. Based on the charge, size, and geometry

  18. Micro dynamics in mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Boserup, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The author has identified a number of styles in mediation, which lead to different processes and different outcomes. Through discourse and conversation analysis he examines the micro dynamics in three of these, the postmodern styles: systemic, transformative and narrative mediation. The differences between the three mediation ideologies and practice is illustrated through role play scripts enacted in each style. Mediator and providers of mediation and trainers in mediation are encouraged to a...

  19. Homogeneous conversion of methane to methanol. 2. Catalytic activation of methane by cis- and trans-platin: A density functional study of the Shilov type reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mylvaganam, K.; Bacskay, G.B.; Hush, N.S.

    2000-03-08

    The C-H activation of methane catalyzed by cis- and trans-platin in aqueous solution has been studied by density functional based computational methods. By analogy with the Shilov reaction, the initial step is the replacement of an ammonia ligand by methane, followed by the formation of a methyl complex and the elimination o a proton. The computations utilize the B3LYP hybrid functionals, effective core potentials, and double-{zeta} to polarized double-{zeta} basis sets and include solvation effects by a dielectric continuum method. In contrast with the Shilov reaction studied by Seigbahn and Crabtree (J.Am.Chem.Soc. 1996, 118, 4443), in the platins the replacement of an ammonia ligand by methane is found to be effectively rate determining, in that the energy barriers to C-H activation are comparable with those of the initial substitution reaction, viz. {approximately} 34 and 44 kcal/mol for cis- and trans-platin, respectively. Several reaction pathways for C-H activation and subsequent proton elimination were identified. For cis-platin the energy barriers associated with the oxidative addition and {sigma}-bond metathesis type mechanisms were found to be comparable, while for trans-platin oxidative addition is predicted to be strongly preferred over {sigma}-bond metathesis, which, interestingly, also proceeds through a Pt(IV) methyl hydrido complex as reaction intermediate. In line with accepted ideas on trans influence, the methyl and hydride ligands in the Pt(IV) complexes that arise in the oxidative addition reactions were always found to be cis to each other. On the basis of the population analyses on the Pt(IV) complexes it is suggested that the Pt-H and Pt-CH{sub 3} bonds are best described as covalent bonds and, further, that the preference of the hydride and methyl anions to be cis to each other is a consequence of such covalent bonding. In light of these findings, the energies of several methyl Pt(IV) hydrido bisulfate complexes were also recalculated

  20. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Larry B.; Hladik, Michelle L.; Vajda, Alan M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin C.; Douville, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m 3 d −1 design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L −1 ; n = 5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L −1 ), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L −1 ) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative

  1. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Larry B. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Hladik, Michelle L. [U.S. Geological Survey, 6000 J Street Placer Hall, Sacramento, CA 95819 (United States); Vajda, Alan M. [University of Colorado, Department of Integrative Biology, CB 171, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); Fitzgerald, Kevin C. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); AECOM, 500 West Jefferson St., Ste. 1600, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Douville, Chris [City of Boulder, 4049 75th Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m{sup 3} d{sup −1} design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L{sup −1}; n = 5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L{sup −1}), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L{sup −1}) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had

  2. Dynamically biased statistical model for the ortho/para conversion in the H2 + H3+ → H3+ + H2 reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Carrasco, Susana; González-Sánchez, Lola; Aguado, Alfredo; Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Zanchet, Alexandre; Roncero, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a dynamically biased statistical model to describe the evolution of the title reaction from statistical to a more direct mechanism, using quasi-classical trajectories (QCT). The method is based on the one previously proposed by Park and Light [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 044305 (2007)10.1063/1.2430711]. A recent global potential energy surface is used here to calculate the capture probabilities, instead of the long-range ion-induced dipole interactions. The dynamical constrain...

  3. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  4. Adaptive Feedback Improving Learningful Conversations at Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Matteo; Mangione, Giuseppina Rita; Miranda, Sergio; Orciuoli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes the definition of an Adaptive Conversation-based Learning System (ACLS) able to foster computer-mediated tutorial dialogues at the workplace in order to increase the probability to generate meaningful learning during conversations. ACLS provides a virtual assistant selecting the best partner to involve in the conversation and…

  5. Cobalt-mediated [3 + 2]-annulation reaction of alkenes with alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones and imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Jennifer M; Toste, F Dean; Bergman, Robert G

    2009-08-20

    The utility of cobalt dinitrosyl complexes for the [3 + 2] annulation of alkenes with unsaturated enones and ketimines has been demonstrated. Reaction of a series of cobalt dinitrosyl/alkene adducts with conjugate acceptors in the presence of Sc(OTf)(3)/LHMDS formed two new C-C bonds at the carbons alpha to the nitrosyl groups of the substrate, leading to unusual tri- and tetracycles. Retrocycloaddition of these products in the presence of norbornadiene yielded functionalized tetrasubstituted bicyclic olefins.

  6. Expedient construction of small molecule macroarrays via sequential palladium- and copper-mediated reactions and their ex situ biological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Reto; Breitbach, Anthony S; Blackwell, Helen E

    2012-05-01

    We report the highly efficient syntheses of a series of focused libraries in the small molecule macroarray format using Suzuki-Miyaura and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (or "click") reactions. The libraries were based on stilbene and triazole scaffolds, which are known to have a broad range of biological activities, including quorum-sensing (QS) modulation in bacteria. The library products were generated in parallel on the macroarray in extremely short reaction times (~10-20 min) and isolated in excellent purities. Biological testing of one macroarray library post-cleavage (ex situ) revealed several potent agonists of the QS receptor, LuxR, in Vibrio fischeri. These synthetic agonists, in contrast to others that we have reported, were only active in the presence of the native QS signal in V. fischeri, which is suggestive of a different mode of activity. Notably, the results presented herein showcase the ready compatibility of the macroarray platform with chemical reactions that are commonly utilized in small molecule probe and drug discovery today. As such, this work serves to expand the utility of the small molecule macroarray as a rapid and operationally straightforward approach toward the synthesis and screening of bioactive agents.

  7. Measurement of conversion electrons with the $^{208}Pb(p,n)^{208}Bi$ reaction and derivation of the shell model proton neutron hole interaction from the properties of $^{208}Bi$

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, K H; Dracoulis, G D; Boutachkov, P; Aprahamian, A; Byrne, A P; Davidson, P M; Lane, G L; Marie-Jeanne, Mélanie; Nieminen, P; Watanabe, H

    2007-01-01

    Conversion electrons from 208Bi have been measured using singles and coincidence techniques with the 208Pb(p,n)208Bi reaction at 9 MeV. The new information on multipolarities and spins complements that available from recent gamma-gamma-coincidence studies with the same reaction [Boutachkov et al., Nucl. Phys. A768, 22 (2006)]. The results on electromagnetic decays taken together with information on spectroscopic factors from earlier single-particle transfer reaction measurements represent an extensive data set on the properties of the one-proton one-neutron-hole states below 3 MeV, a spectrum which is virtually complete. Comparison of the experimental observables, namely, energies, spectroscopic factors, and gamma-branching ratios, with those calculated within the shell model allows extraction of the matrix elements of the shell model residual interaction. More than 100 diagonal and nondiagonal elements can be determined in this way, through a least squares fit to the experimental data. This adjustment of the...

  8. Conversation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the current state of research in conversation analysis, referring primarily to six different perspectives that have developed from the philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics disciplines. These include pragmatics; speech act theory; interactional sociolinguistics; ethnomethodology; ethnography of communication; and…

  9. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Hladik, Michelle; Vajda, Alan M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin C.; Douville, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m3 d−1 design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L−1; n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L−1), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L−1) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative

  10. Modeling of chemical reactions in micelle: water-mediated keto-enol interconversion as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marracino, Paolo; Amadei, Andrea; Apollonio, Francesca; d'Inzeo, Guglielmo; Liberti, Micaela; di Crescenzo, Antonello; Fontana, Antonella; Zappacosta, Romina; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2011-06-30

    The effect of a zwitterionic micelle environment on the efficiency of the keto-enol interconversion of 2-phenylacetylthiophene has been investigated by means of a joint application of experimental and theoretical/computational approaches. Results have revealed a reduction of the reaction rate constant if compared with bulk water essentially because of the different solvation conditions experienced by the reactant species, including water molecules, in the micelle environment. The slight inhibiting effect due to the application of a static electric field has also been theoretically investigated and presented.

  11. AFM Imaging of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Mediated Signal Transmission Between two DNA Origami Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmig, Sarah Wendelbo; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-01-01

    transfer between two connected DNA nanostructures, using the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). Two sets of metastable DNA hairpins - of which one is immobilized in specific points along tracks on DNA origami structures - are polymerized to form a continuous DNA duplex, which is visible using atomic force...... microscopy (AFM). Upon addition of a designed initiator, the initiation signal is efficiently transferred >200 nm from a specific location on one origami structure to an end point on another origami structure. The system shows no significant loss of signal when crossing from one nanostructure to another...

  12. Cobalt-Mediated [3+2]-Annulation Reaction of Alkenes with α,β-Unsaturated Ketones and Imines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Jennifer M.; Toste, F. Dean; Bergman, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The utility of cobalt dinitrosyl complexes for the [3+2] annulation of alkenes with unsaturated enones and ketimines has been demonstrated. Reaction of a series of cobalt dinitrosyl/alkene adducts with conjugate acceptors in the presence of Sc(OTf)3/LHMDS formed two new C-C bonds at the carbons α to the nitrosyl groups of the substrate, leading to unusual tri- and tetracycles. Retrocycloaddition of these products in the presence of norbornadiene yielded functionalized tetrasubstituted bicyclic olefins. PMID:19639989

  13. Quantitative DFT modeling of product concentration in organometallic reactions: Cu-mediated pentafluoroethylation of benzoic acid chlorides as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover, Jesús

    2017-11-08

    DFT calculations are widely used for computing properties, reaction mechanisms and energy profiles in organometallic reactions. A qualitative agreement between the experimental and the calculated results seems to usually be enough to validate a computational methodology but recent advances in computation indicate that a nearly quantitative agreement should be possible if an appropriate DFT study is carried out. Final percent product concentrations, often reported as yields, are by far the most commonly reported properties in experimental metal-mediated synthesis studies but reported DFT studies have not focused on predicting absolute product amounts. The recently reported stoichiometric pentafluoroethylation of benzoic acid chlorides (R-C 6 H 4 COCl) with [(phen)Cu(PPh 3 )C 2 F 5 ] (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, PPh 3 = triphenylphosphine) has been used as a case study to check whether the experimental product concentrations can be reproduced by any of the most popular DFT approaches with high enough accuracy. To this end, the Gibbs energy profile for the pentafluoroethylation of benzoic acid chloride has been computed using 14 different DFT methods. These computed Gibbs energy profiles have been employed to build kinetic models predicting the final product concentration in solution. The best results are obtained with the D3-dispersion corrected B3LYP functional, which has been successfully used afterwards to model the reaction outcomes of other simple (R = o-Me, p-Me, p-Cl, p-F, etc.) benzoic acid chlorides. The product concentrations of more complex reaction networks in which more than one position of the substrate may be activated by the copper catalyst (R = o-Br and p-I) are also predicted appropriately.

  14. Synthesis of naturally occurring iminosugars from D-fructose by the use of a zinc-mediated fragmentation reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Anne; Madsen, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A short synthesis of 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) and a formal synthesis of australine are described. In both cases, D-fructose is employed as the starting material and converted into a protected methyl 6-deoxy-6-iodo-furanoside. Zinc-mediated fragmentation produces an unsaturated...... ketone which serves as a key building block for both syntheses. Ozonolysis, reductive amination with benzylamine and deprotection affordfs 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol in only 7 steps and 11% overall yield from D-fructose. Alternatively, reductive amination with homoallylamine, ring......-closing metathesis and protecting group manipulations give rise to an intermediate which can be converted into australine in 3 steps. The intermediate is prepared by two different strategies both of which use a total of 9 steps. The first strategy utilizes benzyl ethers for protection of fructose while the second...

  15. More than a feeling: discrete emotions mediate the relationship between relative deprivation and reactions to workplace furloughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Danny; Smith, Heather J; Huo, Yuen J

    2012-05-01

    A key insight from investigations of individual relative deprivation (IRD) is that people can experience objective disadvantages differently. In this study, university faculty (N = 953) who reported greater IRD in response to a mandatory furlough (i.e., involuntary pay reductions) were more likely to (a) voice options designed to improve the university (voice), (b) consider leaving their job (exit), and (c) neglect their work responsibilities (neglect), but were (d) less likely to express loyalty to the university (loyalty). Consistent with the emotions literature, (a) anger mediated the relationship between IRD and voice, (b) fear between IRD and exit, (c) sadness between IRD and neglect, and (d) gratitude between IRD and loyalty. IRD was inversely associated with self-reported physical and mental health via these different emotional pathways. These results show how discrete emotions can explain responses to IRD and, in turn, contribute to organizational viability and the health of its members.

  16. A smart hydrogel-based time bomb triggers drug release mediated by pH-jump reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prapatsorn Techawanitchai, Naokazu Idota, Koichiro Uto, Mitsuhiro Ebara and Takao Aoyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a timed explosive drug release from smart pH-responsive hydrogels by utilizing a phototriggered spatial pH-jump reaction. A photoinitiated proton-releasing reaction of o-nitrobenzaldehyde (o-NBA was integrated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide (P(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm hydrogels. o-NBA-hydrogels demonstrated the rapid release of protons upon UV irradiation, allowing the pH inside the gel to decrease to below the pKa value of P(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm. The generated protons diffused gradually toward the non-illuminated area, and the diffusion kinetics could be controlled by adjusting the UV irradiation time and intensity. After irradiation, we observed the enhanced release of entrapped L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA from the gels, which was driven by the dissociation of DOPA from CIPAAm. Local UV irradiation also triggered the release of DOPA from the non-illuminated area in the gel via the diffusion of protons. Conventional systems can activate only the illuminated region, and their response is discontinuous when the light is turned off. The ability of the proposed pH-jump system to permit gradual activation via proton diffusion may be beneficial for the design of predictive and programmable devices for drug delivery.

  17. The effect of caffeine to increase reaction time in the rat during a test of attention is mediated through antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Guy A; Grzelak, Michael E; Pond, Annamarie J; Cohen-Williams, Mary E; Hodgson, Robert A; Varty, Geoffrey B

    2007-12-11

    Caffeine produces effects on cognitive function particularly relating to aspects of attention such as reaction time. Considering the plasma exposure levels following regular caffeine intake, and the affinity of caffeine for known protein targets, these effects are likely mediated by either the adenosine A(1) or A(2A) receptor. In the present studies, two rat strains [Long-Evans (LE) and CD] were trained to asymptote performance in a test of selective attention, the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT). Next, the effects of caffeine were compared to the selective A(2A) antagonists, SCH 412348 and KW-6002 (Istradefylline), and the A(1) antagonist, DPCPX. Further studies compared the psychostimulant effects of each drug. Finally, we tested the A(2A) agonist, CGS-21680, on 5-CSRTT performance and given the antipsychotic potential of this drug class, studied the interaction between CGS-21680 and amphetamine in this task. Caffeine (3-10mg/kg IP) increased reaction time in both LE and CD rats, with no effect on accuracy, an effect replicated by SCH 412348 (0.1-1mg/kg PO) and KW-6002 (1-3mg/kg PO), but not DPCPX (3-30 mg/kg PO). At least with SCH 412348, these effects were at doses that were not overtly psychostimulant. In contrast, CGS-21680 (0.03-0. 3mg/kg IP) slowed reaction speed and increased omissions. Interestingly, at a comparatively low dose of 0.03 mg/kg, CGS-21680 attenuated the increased premature responding produced by amphetamine (1mg/kg IP). The present results suggest that the attention-enhancing effects of caffeine are mediated through A(2A) receptor blockade, and selective A(2A) receptor antagonists may have potential as therapies for attention-related disorders. Furthermore, the improvement in response control in amphetamine-treated rats following CGS-21680 pretreatment supports the view that A(2A) agonists have potential as novel antipsychotics.

  18. Dynamically biased statistical model for the ortho/para conversion in the H2 + H3+ → H3+ + H2 reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Carrasco, Susana; González-Sánchez, Lola; Aguado, Alfredo; Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Zanchet, Alexandre; Roncero, Octavio

    2012-09-07

    In this work we present a dynamically biased statistical model to describe the evolution of the title reaction from statistical to a more direct mechanism, using quasi-classical trajectories (QCT). The method is based on the one previously proposed by Park and Light [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 044305 (2007)]. A recent global potential energy surface is used here to calculate the capture probabilities, instead of the long-range ion-induced dipole interactions. The dynamical constraints are introduced by considering a scrambling matrix which depends on energy and determine the probability of the identity/hop/exchange mechanisms. These probabilities are calculated using QCT. It is found that the high zero-point energy of the fragments is transferred to the rest of the degrees of freedom, what shortens the lifetime of H(5)(+) complexes and, as a consequence, the exchange mechanism is produced with lower proportion. The zero-point energy (ZPE) is not properly described in quasi-classical trajectory calculations and an approximation is done in which the initial ZPE of the reactants is reduced in QCT calculations to obtain a new ZPE-biased scrambling matrix. This reduction of the ZPE is explained by the need of correcting the pure classical level number of the H(5)(+) complex, as done in classical simulations of unimolecular processes and to get equivalent quantum and classical rate constants using Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory. This matrix allows to obtain a ratio of hop/exchange mechanisms, α(T), in rather good agreement with recent experimental results by Crabtree et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 194311 (2011)] at room temperature. At lower temperatures, however, the present simulations predict too high ratios because the biased scrambling matrix is not statistical enough. This demonstrates the importance of applying quantum methods to simulate this reaction at the low temperatures of astrophysical interest.

  19. Dynamically biased statistical model for the ortho/para conversion in the H2+H3+ --> H3++ H2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Carrasco, Susana; González-Sánchez, Lola; Aguado, Alfredo; Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Zanchet, Alexandre; Roncero, Octavio

    2012-09-01

    In this work we present a dynamically biased statistical model to describe the evolution of the title reaction from statistical to a more direct mechanism, using quasi-classical trajectories (QCT). The method is based on the one previously proposed by Park and Light [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 044305 (2007), 10.1063/1.2430711]. A recent global potential energy surface is used here to calculate the capture probabilities, instead of the long-range ion-induced dipole interactions. The dynamical constraints are introduced by considering a scrambling matrix which depends on energy and determine the probability of the identity/hop/exchange mechanisms. These probabilities are calculated using QCT. It is found that the high zero-point energy of the fragments is transferred to the rest of the degrees of freedom, what shortens the lifetime of H_5^+ complexes and, as a consequence, the exchange mechanism is produced with lower proportion. The zero-point energy (ZPE) is not properly described in quasi-classical trajectory calculations and an approximation is done in which the initial ZPE of the reactants is reduced in QCT calculations to obtain a new ZPE-biased scrambling matrix. This reduction of the ZPE is explained by the need of correcting the pure classical level number of the H_5^+ complex, as done in classical simulations of unimolecular processes and to get equivalent quantum and classical rate constants using Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory. This matrix allows to obtain a ratio of hop/exchange mechanisms, α(T), in rather good agreement with recent experimental results by Crabtree et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 194311 (2011), 10.1063/1.3587246] at room temperature. At lower temperatures, however, the present simulations predict too high ratios because the biased scrambling matrix is not statistical enough. This demonstrates the importance of applying quantum methods to simulate this reaction at the low temperatures of astrophysical interest.

  20. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue, conventional polymerase chain reaction and real-time PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Balne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is a comparative evaluation (Chi-square test of a closed tube loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue dye (HNB-LAMP, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and conventional PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis. Considering clinical presentation as the gold standard in 33 patients, the sensitivity of HNB-LAMP assay (75.8% was higher (not significant, P value 0.2 than conventional PCR (57.6% and lower than real-time PCR (90.9%. Specificity was 100% by all three methods. No amplification was observed in negative controls (n = 20 by all three methods. The cost of the HNB-LAMP assay was Rs. 500.00 and it does not require thermocycler, therefore, it can be used as an alternative to conventional PCR in resource-poor settings.

  1. Galvanic replacement mediated synthesis of hollow Pt nanocatalysts: Significance of residual Ag for the H{sub 2} evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, Vipul; O' Mullane, Anthony P.; Bhargava, Suresh K. [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2009-08-15

    With the increasing popularity of the galvanic replacement approach towards the development of bimetallic nanocatalysts, special emphasis has been focused on minimizing the use of expensive metal (e.g. Pt), in the finally formed nanomaterials (e.g. Ag/Pt system as a possible catalyst for fuel cells). However, the complete removal of the less active sacrificial template is generally not achieved during galvanic replacement, and its residual presence may significantly impact on the electrocatalytic properties of the final material. Here, we investigate the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity of Ag nanocubes replaced with different amounts of Pt, and demonstrate how the bimetallic composition significantly affects the activity of the alloyed nanomaterial. (author)

  2. Effect of Green Tea Extract on T cell Mediated Hypersensitivity Reaction in BALB/c Mice Exposed to Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, A.M.; Ismail Al-kadey, M.M.I.; Shabon, M.H.; Hussien, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma radiation is widely used in the treatment of malignant neoplasms. However, it deprives the host immune function which may retard tumor rejection by the immune response. The main purpose of the present study is to test the ability of green tea dry extract to restore the T cell hypersensitivity reaction in gamma irradiated BALB/c mice. It aims also to elucidate the possible mechanism of action of ionizing radiation and green tea dry extract in the immune function. Four groups of BALB/c mice, each of ten, have been used in each experiment. The first group served as a control, the second group received green tea dry extract and the third group was exposed to 2 Gy gamma irradiation, while the fourth group received green tea dry extract before and after gamma irradiation. The following parameters were determined, the contact sensitivity reaction by the mouse ear swelling response, local dendritic cell migration, local lymph node weight, lymphocyte proliferation, spleen and thymus weight with their lymphocyte count. The effect of gamma irradiation and green tea dry extract on the elicitation phase of contact sensitivity was also determined. Data from the present study showed that gamma irradiation caused a significant decrease of the mouse ear swelling response and retarded dendritic cell migration. They also showed a significant decline in the lymphocytes proliferation in lymph node draining the contact sensitizer application. Total body exposure to 2 Gy gamma irradiation induced marked decline of thymus weight and thymocyte count, while it reduced spleen weight and spleenocyte count to a lesser extent. Exposure to gamma irradiation enhanced the elicitation phase of contact sensitivity. Administration of green tea dry extract partially preserved the contact sensitivity response to oxazolone in gamma irradiated BALB/c mice. It markedly minimized the enhancement of the elicitation phase of ear swelling. In conclusion, the present study heralds a beneficial role of

  3. The mediation reaction between the external couple Ferri/Ferrocyanide and Os(II) bipyridile poly-vinylpyridile films coated onto glassy carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ybarra, Gabriel; Moina, Carlos [Centro de Investigacion sobre Electrodeposicion y Procesos Superficiales, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Industrial, CC 157, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Florit, M. Ines [INIFTA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, Suc. 4, CC 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Posadas, Dionisio [INIFTA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, Suc. 4, CC 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: dposadas@inifta.unlp.edu.ar

    2008-05-30

    The oxidation-reduction of the Ferri/Ferrocyanide couple in solution onto modified glassy carbon Rotating Disk Electrodes (RDE) covered by Os(II) bipyridile poly-vinylpyridile (OsBPP) polymer was studied at room temperature. Steady state polarization curves were carried out as a function of the rotation speed, the polymer thickness and the concentration of redox centers within the polymer. This system has the characteristic that the formal redox potentials of both the external redox couple (E{sup 0}'(Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-}) = + 0.225 V vs. SCE) and the mediator polymer (E{sup 0}'(OsBPP) = 0.260 V vs. SCE) lie very close. It is demonstrated that diffusion of the Ferri/Ferrocyanide inside the polymer can be ruled out. Since the processes of charge transfer at the metal/polymer and the mediating reaction are fast, the experimental results can be interpreted in terms of a kinetics in which the charge transport in the polymer or the diffusion in the solution may be the rate determining step, according to the experimental conditions. A simple model is considered that allows interpreting the experimental results quantitatively. Application of this model allows the determination of the diffusion coefficient of the electrons within the film, D{sub e} {approx} 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}.

  4. The E1 mechanism in photo-induced beta-elimination reactions for green-to-red conversion of fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Hideaki; Mizuno, Hideaki; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Furuta, Toshiaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2009-11-25

    KikGR is a fluorescent protein engineered to display green-to-red photoconvertibility that is induced by irradiation with ultraviolet or violet light. Similar to Kaede and EosFP, two naturally occurring photoconvertible proteins, KikGR contains a His(62)-Tyr(63)-Gly(64) tripeptide sequence, which forms a green chromophore that can be photoconverted to a red one via formal beta-elimination and subsequent extension of a pi-conjugated system. Using a crystallizable variant of KikGR, we determined the structures of both the green and red state at 1.55 A resolution. The double bond between His(62)-C(alpha) and His(62)-C(beta) in the red chromophore is in a cis configuration, indicating that rotation along the His(62) C(alpha)-C(beta) bond occurs following cleavage of the His(62) N(alpha)-C(alpha) bond. This structural rearrangement provides evidence that the beta-elimination reaction governing the green-to-red photoconversion of KikGR follows an E1 (elimination, unimolecular) mechanism.

  5. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    KAUST Repository

    Klika, Václav

    2011-11-10

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. © 2011 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  6. Long-term effect of whole-body X-irradiation on cell-mediated immune reaction in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimura, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Takehiko

    1989-01-01

    Age-related change in immunological activity was examined at 10 to 91 weeks following whole-body irradiation by determining the specific anti-tumor cell-mediated immunity in host mice induced and/or enhanced by local irradiation to transplanted tumor. Median survival time of the non-irradiated C3H/He female mice was 98.6 weeks while the median life-span of the mice exposed to two and four Gy of 250 kVp X-rays at the age of 10-12 weeks was shortened by 14.9 and 23.4 weeks, respectively. The rate of tumor reduction within two weeks after local irradiation to tumor and the growth inhibitory activitiy of spleen cells from tumor irradiated mice were reduced in a dose-dependent manner when assessed 10 weeks after whole-body irradiation, but recovered to the near-complete level of the non-irradiated controls within a few months, then gradually decreased with normal aging. These results suggest that the age-dependent decline of this immunological activity apears earlier in the irradiated mice as a result of whole-body X-irradiation at a young age, suggesting accelerated aging of the immune system. (author)

  7. Identification of ochratoxin A producing Aspergillus carbonarius and A. niger clade isolated from grapes using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storari, M; von Rohr, R; Pertot, I; Gessler, C; Broggini, G A L

    2013-04-01

    To develop two assays based on the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA for the quick and specific identification of Aspergillus carbonarius and ochratoxigenic strains of the Aspergillus niger clade isolated from grapes. Two sets of primers were designed based on the polyketide synthase genes involved or putatively involved in ochratoxin A (OTA) biosynthesis in A. carbonarius and A. niger clade. Hydroxynaphthol blue was used as indirect method to indicate DNA amplification. The limit of detection of both assays was comparable to that of a PCR reaction. Specificities of the reactions were tested using DNA from different black aspergilli isolated from grapes. The two LAMP assays were then used to identify A. carbonarius and ochratoxigenic A. niger and A. awamori grown in pure cultures without a prior DNA extraction. The two LAMP assays permitted to quickly and specifically identify DNA from OTA-producing black aspergilli, as well as isolates grown in pure culture. Monitoring vineyards for the presence of OTA-producing strains is part of the measures to minimize the occurrence of OTA in grape products. The two LAMP assays developed here could be potentially used to speed the screening process of vineyards for the presence of OTA-producing black aspergilli. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. A Roadmap for Achieving Sustainable Energy Conversion and Storage: Graphene-Based Composites Used Both as an Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reactions and an Electrode Material for a Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Huo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on its unique features including 2D planar geometry, high specific surface area and electron conductivity, graphene has been intensively studied as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR electrocatalyst and supercapacitor material. On the one hand, graphene possesses standalone electrocatalytic activity. It can also provide a good support for combining with other materials to generate graphene-based electrocatalysts, where the catalyst-support structure improves the stability and performance of electrocatalysts for ORR. On the other hand, graphene itself and its derivatives demonstrate a promising electrochemical capability as supercapacitors including electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs and pseudosupercapacitors. A hybrid supercapacitor (HS is underlined and the advantages are elaborated. Graphene endows many materials that are capable of faradaic redox reactions with an outstanding pseudocapacitance behavior. In addition, the characteristics of graphene-based composite are also utilized in many respects to provide a porous 3D structure, formulate a novel supercapacitor with innovative design, and construct a flexible and tailorable device. In this review, we will present an overview of the use of graphene-based composites for sustainable energy conversion and storage.

  9. Toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction triggered isothermal DNA amplification for highly sensitive and selective fluorescent detection of single-base mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Ding, Yongshun; Liu, Xingti; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-09-15

    Highly sensitive and selective detection strategy for single-base mutations is essential for risk assessment of malignancy and disease prognosis. In this work, a fluorescent detection method for single-base mutation was proposed based on high selectivity of toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (TSDR) and powerful signal amplification capability of isothermal DNA amplification. A discrimination probe was specially designed with a stem-loop structure and an overhanging toehold domain. Hybridization between the toehold domain and the perfect matched target initiated the TSDR along with the unfolding of the discrimination probe. Subsequently, the target sequence acted as a primer to initiate the polymerization and nicking reactions, which released a great abundant of short sequences. Finally, the released strands were annealed with the reporter probe, launching another polymerization and nicking reaction to produce lots of G-quadruplex DNA, which could bind the N-methyl mesoporphyrin IX to yield an enhanced fluorescence response. However, when there was even a single base mismatch in the target DNA, the TSDR was suppressed and so subsequent isothermal DNA amplification and fluorescence response process could not occur. The proposed approach has been successfully implemented for the identification of the single-base mutant sequences in the human KRAS gene with a detection limit of 1.8 pM. Furthermore, a recovery of 90% was obtained when detecting the target sequence in spiked HeLa cells lysate, demonstrating the feasibility of this detection strategy for single-base mutations in biological samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Highly selective and sensitive detection of miRNA based on toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction and DNA tetrahedron substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Ding, Yongshun; Wang, Lei

    2015-09-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in a variety of biological processes and have been regarded as tumor biomarkers in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. In this work, a single-molecule counting method for miRNA analysis was proposed based on toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (SDR) and DNA tetrahedron substrate. Firstly, a specially designed DNA tetrahedron was assembled with a hairpin at one of the vertex, which has an overhanging toehold domain. Then, the DNA tetrahedron was immobilized on the epoxy-functional glass slide by epoxy-amine reaction, forming a DNA tetrahedron substrate. Next, the target miRNA perhybridized with the toehold domain and initiated a strand displacement reaction along with the unfolding of the hairpin, realizing the selective recognization of miRNA. Finally, a biotin labeled detection DNA was hybridized with the new emerging single strand and the streptavidin coated QDs were used as fluorescent probes. Fluorescent images were acquired via epi-fluorescence microscopy, the numbers of fluorescence dots were counted one by one for quantification. The detection limit is 5 fM, which displayed an excellent sensitivity. Moreover, the proposed method which can accurately be identified the target miRNA among its family members, demonstrated an admirable selectivity. Furthermore, miRNA analysis in total RNA samples from human lung tissues was performed, suggesting the feasibility of this method for quantitative detection of miRNA in biomedical research and early clinical diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Operando Solid-State NMR Observation of Solvent-Mediated Adsorption-Reaction of Carbohydrates in Zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Long; Alamillo, Ricardo; Elliott, William A.; Andersen, Amity; Hoyt, David W.; Walter, Eric D.; Han, Kee Sung; Washton, Nancy M.; Rioux, Robert M.; Dumesic, James A.; Scott, Susannah L.

    2017-04-18

    Liquid-phase processing of molecules using heterogeneous catalysts – an important strategy for obtaining renewable chemicals sustainably from biomass – involves reactions that occur at solid-liquid interfaces. In glucose isomerization catalyzed by basic faujasite zeolites, the catalytic activity depends strongly on the solvent composition: initially, it declines precipitously when water is mixed with a small amount of the organic co-solvent γ-valerolactone (GVL), then recovers as the GVL content increases. Using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, we observed glucose isomers located inside the zeolite pores directly, and followed their transformations into fructose and mannose in real time. At low GVL concentrations, glucose is depleted in the zeolite pores relative to the liquid phase, while higher GVL concentrations in solution drive glucose inside the pores, resulting in up to a 32 enhancement in the local glucose concentration. Although their populations exchange rapidly, molecules present at the reactive interface experience a significantly different environment from the bulk solution.

  12. Pictorial Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Kristina

    1982-01-01

    Provides the rationale for considering communication in a graphic domain and suggests a specific goal for designing work stations which provide graphic capabilities in educational settings. The central element of this recommendation is the "pictorial conversation", a highly interactive exchange that includes pictures as the central elements.…

  13. Conversion of Azides into Diazo Compounds in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ho-Hsuan; Raines, Ronald T.

    2013-01-01

    Diazo compounds are in widespread use in synthetic organic chemistry, but have untapped potential in chemical biology. We report on the design and optimization of a phosphinoester that mediates the efficient conversion of azides into diazo compounds in phosphate buffer at neutral pH and room temperature. High yields are maintained in the presence of common nucleophilic or electrophilic functional groups, and reaction progress can be monitored by colorimetry. As azido groups are easy to install and maintain in biopolymers or their ligands, this new mode of azide reactivity could have substantial utility in chemical biology. PMID:24053717

  14. Effect of reaction conditions on methyl red degradation mediated by boron and nitrogen doped TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galenda, A.; Crociani, L.; Habra, N. El; Favaro, M.; Natile, M.M.; Rossetto, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Boron and/or nitrogen-doped TiO 2 for photocatalytic wastewater treatment. • Methyl red degradation/mineralisation as a function of pH, acids and dopants. • Adsorption time influence on photocatalytic process. • Recovery of worn-out catalyst. - Abstract: Nowadays the employment of renewable and sustainable energy sources, and solar light as main option, becomes an urgent need. Photocatalytic processes received great attention in wastewater treatment due to their cheapness, environmental compatibility and optimal performances. Despite the general low selectivity of the photocatalysts, an accurate optimisation of the operational parameters needs to be carried out in order to maximise the process yield. Because of this reason, the present contribution aims to deepen either the knowledge in boron and/or nitrogen doped TiO 2 -based systems and their employment in methyl red removal from aqueous solutions. The samples were obtained by coprecipitation and characterised by XRD, SEM, BET specific surface area, UV–vis and XPS techniques. The catalytic activity was for the first time carefully evaluated with respect to methyl red photodegradation in different conditions as a function of working pH, counter-ions and pre-adsorption time. An ad-hoc study was performed on the importance of the pre-adsorption of the dye, suggesting that an extended adsorption is useless for the catalyst photoactivity, while a partial coverage is preferable. The photocatalytic tests demonstrate the positive influence of boron doping in photo-activated reactions and the great importance of the operational parameters with respect to the simple methyl red bleaching rather than the overall pollutant mineralisation. It is proved, indeed, that different working pH, acidifying means and substrate pre-adsorption time can enhance or limit the catalyst performances with respect to the complete pollutant degradation rather than its partial breakage

  15. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D- 3 He reaction and the p- 11 B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger βB 2 0 to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high β values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D- 3 He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D 3 He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D 3 He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion or liquid metal MHD conversion (LMMHD). For a D

  16. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D-{sup 3}He reaction and the p-{sup 11}B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger {beta}B{sup 2}{sub 0} to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high {beta} values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D-{sup 3}He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D{sub 3} He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D{sub 3} He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion

  17. Hydrogen photoproduction by photoelectrochemical conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The water-splitting reaction by photoelectrochemical processes has gained much more attention than any of many reactions proposed for solar generation of energy-rich molecules (fuels). The conversion efficiency of the photosystem is the key factor. The higher the efficiency, the more economically feasible will be the conversion scheme. The conversion efficiency is a function of the semiconductor properties, light intensity, spectral quality, properties of the electrolyte, counterelectrode, cell configuration, etc. The semiconductor parameters include band gap, absorption coefficient and diffusion length. The area and material used for a counterelectrode are important when considering polarization losses in a two-electrode system. Besides, the stability problem is also a very important one to meet the requirement for practical applications. This paper reviews some important issues on photoelectrochemical generation of hydrogen by water splitting. It includes energy conversion efficiency, market assessment and cost goal, state of the technology, and future directions for research

  18. Quantum conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Mazilu, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ICOAM 2015 The electromagnetic momentum transferred transferred to scattering particles is proportional to the intensity of the incident fields, however, the momentum of single photons ℏk does not naturally appear in these classical expressions. Here, we discuss an alternative to Maxwell's stress tensor that renders the classical electromagnetic field momentum compatible to the quantum mechanical one. This is achieved through the introduction of the quantum conversion which allows the tran...

  19. Conversational sensemaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Webberley, Will; Braines, Dave

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in natural language question-answering systems and context-aware mobile apps create opportunities for improved sensemaking in a tactical setting. Users equipped with mobile devices act as both sensors (able to acquire information) and effectors (able to act in situ), operating alone or in collectives. The currently- dominant technical approaches follow either a pull model (e.g. Apple's Siri or IBM's Watson which respond to users' natural language queries) or a push model (e.g. Google's Now which sends notifications to a user based on their context). There is growing recognition that users need more flexible styles of conversational interaction, where they are able to freely ask or tell, be asked or told, seek explanations and clarifications. Ideally such conversations should involve a mix of human and machine agents, able to collaborate in collective sensemaking activities with as few barriers as possible. Desirable capabilities include adding new knowledge, collaboratively building models, invoking specific services, and drawing inferences. As a step towards this goal, we collect evidence from a number of recent pilot studies including natural experiments (e.g. situation awareness in the context of organised protests) and synthetic experiments (e.g. human and machine agents collaborating in information seeking and spot reporting). We identify some principles and areas of future research for "conversational sensemaking".

  20. Conversational sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  1. Chromatin dynamics during cell cycle mediate conversion of DNA damage into chromatid breaks and affect formation of chromosomal aberrations: Biological and clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I.; Hatzi, Vasiliki I.; Donta-Bakoyianni, Catherine; Pantelias, Gabriel E.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of diverse chromosomal aberrations following irradiation and the variability in radiosensitivity at different cell-cycle stages remain a long standing controversy, probably because most of the studies have focused on elucidating the enzymatic mechanisms involved using simple DNA substrates. Yet, recognition, processing and repair of DNA damage occur within the nucleoprotein complex of chromatin which is dynamic in nature, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding. The present work reviews experimental work designed to investigate the impact of chromatin dynamics and chromosome conformation changes during cell-cycle in the formation of chromosomal aberrations. Using conventional cytogenetics and premature chromosome condensation to visualize interphase chromatin, the data presented support the hypothesis that chromatin dynamic changes during cell-cycle are important determinants in the conversion of sub-microscopic DNA lesions into chromatid breaks. Consequently, the type and yield of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations at a given cell-cycle-stage depends on the combined effect of DNA repair processes and chromatin dynamics, which is cell-cycle-regulated and subject to up- or down-regulation following radiation exposure or genetic alterations. This new hypothesis is used to explain the variability in radiosensitivity observed at various cell-cycle-stages, among mutant cells and cells of different origin, or among different individuals, and to revisit unresolved issues and unanswered questions. In addition, it is used to better understand hypersensitivity of AT cells and to provide an improved predictive G2-assay for evaluating radiosensitivity at individual level. Finally, experimental data at single cell level obtained using hybrid cells suggest that the proposed hypothesis applies only to the irradiated component of the hybrid.

  2. Highly selective detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms using a quartz crystal microbalance biosensor based on the toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingzhong; Tang, Wei; Wu, Xiaojie; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Gengjia; Chen, Qiang; Li, Na; Liu, Feng

    2012-08-21

    Toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (SDR) is first introduced to develop a simple quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor without an enzyme or label at normal temperature for highly selective and sensitive detection of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. A hairpin capture probe with an external toehold is designed and immobilized on the gold electrode surface of QCM. A successive SDR is initiated by the target sequence hybridization with the toehold domain and ends with the unfolding of the capture probe. Finally, the open-loop capture probe hybridizes with the streptavidin-coupled reporter probe as an efficient mass amplifier to enhance the QCM signal. The proposed biosensor displays remarkable specificity to target the p53 gene fragment against single-base mutant sequences (e.g., the largest discrimination factor is 63 to C-C mismatch) and high sensitivity with the detection limit of 0.3 nM at 20 °C. As the crucial component of the fabricated biosensor for providing the high discrimination capability, the design rationale of the capture probe is further verified by fluorescence sensing and atomic force microscopy imaging. Additionally, a recovery of 84.1% is obtained when detecting the target sequence in spiked HeLa cells lysate, demonstrating the feasibility of employing this biosensor in detecting SNPs in biological samples.

  3. Gold nanoparticle enhanced fluorescence anisotropy for the assay of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on toehold-mediated strand-displacement reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyi; Zou, Mingjian; Huang, Hongduan; Ren, Yuqian; Li, Limei; Yang, Xiaoda; Li, Na

    2013-03-15

    We developed a highly differentiating, homogeneous gold nanoparticle (AuNP) enhanced fluorescence anisotropic method for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection at nanomolar level using toehold-mediated strand-displacement reaction. The template strand, containing a toehold domain with an allele-specific site, was immobilized on the surface of AuNPs, and the solution fluorescence anisotropy was markedly enhanced when the fluorescein-labeled blocking DNA was attached to the AuNP via hybridization. Strand-displacement by the target ssDNA strand resulted in detachment of fluorescein-labeled DNA from AuNPs, and thus decreased fluorescence anisotropy. The drastic kinetic difference in strand-displacement from toehold design was used to distinguish between the perfectly matched and the single-base mismatched strands. Free energy changes were calculated to elucidate the dependence of the differentiation ability on the mutation site in the toehold region. A solid negative signal change can be obtained for single-base mismatched strand in the dynamic range of the calibration curve, and a more than 10-fold signal difference can still be observed in a mixed solution containing 100 times the single-base mismatched strand, indicating the good specificity of the method. This proposed method can be performed with a standard spectrofluorimeter in a homogeneous and cost-effective manner, and has the potential to be extended to the application of fluorescence anisotropy method of SNP detection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Live-Cell MicroRNA Imaging through MnO2 Nanosheet-Mediated DD-A Hybridization Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Min; Huang, Jin; Yang, Xiaohai; He, Xiaoxiao; Quan, Ke; Yang, Yanjing; Xie, Nuli; Li, Jing; Wang, Kemin

    2018-01-18

    Innovative techniques to visualize native microRNAs (miRNAs) in live cells can dramatically impact current research on the roles of miRNA in biology and medicine. Here, we report a novel approach for live-cell miRNA imaging using a biodegradable MnO 2 nanosheet-mediated DD-A FRET hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The MnO 2 nanosheets can adsorb DNA hairpin probes and deliver them into live cells. After entering cells, the MnO 2 nanosheets are degraded by cellular GSH. Then, the target miR-21 triggers cascaded assembly of the liberated hairpin probes into long dsDNA polymers, which brings each two FAMs (donor) and one TAMRA (acceptor) into close proximity to generate significantly enhanced DD-A FRET signals, which was discovered and proven by our previous report. We think the developed approach can serve as an excellent intracellular miRNAs detection tool, which promises the potential for biological and disease studies. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. dissemination during wastewater treatment and comparative detection via immunofluorescence assay (IFA), nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas-Lindemann, Carmen; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Plutzer, Judit; Noack, Michael J; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    Environmental water samples from the Lower Rhine area in Germany were investigated via immunofluorescence assays (IFAs), nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to detect the presence of Giardia spp. (n=185) and Cryptosporidium spp. (n=227). The samples were concentrated through filtration or flocculation, and oocysts were purified via centrifugation through a sucrose density gradient. For all samples, IFA was performed first, followed by DNA extraction for the nested PCR and LAMP assays. Giardia cysts were detected in 105 samples (56.8%) by IFA, 62 samples (33.5%) by nested PCR and 79 samples (42.7%) by LAMP. Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 69 samples (30.4%) by IFA, 95 samples (41.9%) by nested PCR and 99 samples (43.6%) by LAMP. According to these results, the three detection methods are complementary for monitoring Giardia and Cryptosporidium in environmental waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Likhtenshtein, Gertz I

    2012-01-01

    Finally filling a gap in the literature for a text that also adopts the chemist?s view of this hot topic, Prof Likhtenshtein, an experienced author and internationally renowned scientist, considers different physical and engineering aspects in solar energy conversion. From theory to real-life systems, he shows exactly which chemical reactions take place when converting light energy, providing an overview of the chemical perspective from fundamentals to molecular harvesting systems and solar cells. This essential guide will thus help researchers in academia and industry better understa

  7. A study for characterization of IgE-mediated cutaneous immediate and late-phase reactions in non-allergic domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Shanna L; Kearney, Michael; Del Piero, Fabio; Hammerberg, Bruce; Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M

    2014-05-15

    Immunoglobulin-E (IgE) mediated reactions can be induced by intradermal injection of anti-IgE antibodies in both humans and dogs. These reactions grossly and histologically mimic changes seen in naturally occurring allergic dermatitis in these species. Similar studies have not been conducted in the cat. Purified polyclonal rabbit-origin IgG specific for canine IgE (anti-IgE) and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) were injected intradermally in 7 non-allergic laboratory colony cats. Wheal measurements were obtained and biopsies collected before injection and at injection sites after 20 min, 6, 24, and 48 h. Injection of anti-IgE induced an immediate wheal response which was significantly larger than that seen after injection of rabbit IgG. Anti-IgE injected skin was also significantly thicker than IgG-injected skin. This corresponded with a significant increase in number of visibly degranulated mast cells in anti-IgE samples when compared to IgG samples. Injection of anti-IgE was associated with the rapid recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injected dermis. The number of inflammatory cells and mononuclear cells were significantly elevated after the injection of anti-IgE when compared to IgG-injected skin. Both eosinophils and neutrophils were significantly increased in anti-IgE samples relative to IgG, although neutrophils were only transiently increased. The high eosinophil and relatively low neutrophil cell counts in these samples were consistent with previously documented histologic features of naturally occurring feline allergic skin disease. Immunohistochemistry identified a significantly overall increased CD1a(+) cells after the intradermal injection of anti-IgE when compared to IgG and non-injected skin. CD3(+), CD8(+) and CD4(+) were also significantly increased overall in anti-IgE injected skin relative to IgG injected skin. These data document the gross and cellular response to injection of anti-IgE in the skin of healthy, non-allergic cats and support a

  8. A ratiometric electrochemical biosensor for the exosomal microRNAs detection based on bipedal DNA walkers propelled by locked nucleic acid modified toehold mediate strand displacement reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Liang-Liang; Hou, Mei-Feng; Xia, Yao-Kun; He, Wen-Hui; Yan, An; Weng, Yun-Ping; Zeng, Lu-Peng; Chen, Jing-Hua

    2018-04-15

    Sensitive and selective detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer cells derived exosomes have attracted rapidly growing interest owing to their potential in diagnostic and prognostic applications. Here, we design a ratiometric electrochemical biosensor based on bipedal DNA walkers for the attomolar detection of exosomal miR-21. In the presence of miR-21, DNA walkers are activated to walk continuously along DNA tracks, resulting in conformational changes as well as considerable increases of the signal ratio produced by target-respond and target-independent reporters. With the signal cascade amplification of DNA walkers, the biosensor exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity with the limit of detection (LOD) down to 67 aM. Furthermore, owing to the background-correcting function of target-independent reporters termed as reference reporters, the biosensor is robust and stable enough to be applied in the detection of exosomal miR-21 extracted from breast cancer cell lines and serums. In addition, because locked nucleic acid (LNA) modified toehold mediate strand displacement reaction (TMSDR) has extraordinary discriminative ability, the biosensor displays excellent selectivity even against the single-base-mismatched target. It is worth mentioning that our sensor is regenerative and stable for at least 5 cycles without diminution in sensitivity. In brief, the high sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility, together with cheap, make the proposed biosensor a promising approach for exosomal miRNAs detection, in conjunction with early point-of-care testing (POCT) of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Swi5-Sfr1 protein stimulates Rad51-mediated DNA strand exchange reaction through organization of DNA bases in the presynaptic filament.

    KAUST Repository

    Fornander, Louise H; Renodon-Corniè re, Axelle; Kuwabara, Naoyuki; Ito, Kentaro; Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Nordé n, Bengt; Takahashi, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The Swi5-Sfr1 heterodimer protein stimulates the Rad51-promoted DNA strand exchange reaction, a crucial step in homologous recombination. To clarify how this accessory protein acts on the strand exchange reaction, we have analyzed how the structure

  10. Water Mediated Wittig Reactions of Aldehydes in the Teaching Laboratory: Using Sodium Bicarbonate for the in Situ Formation of Stabilized Ylides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael J. B.; Fallot, Lucas B.; Gustafson, Jeffrey L.; Bergdahl, B. Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of alkenes using the Wittig reaction is a traditional part of many undergraduate organic chemistry teaching laboratory curricula. The aqueous medium version of the Wittig reaction presented is a reliable adaptation of this alkene formation reaction as a very safe alternative in the introductory organic chemistry laboratory. The…

  11. When curiosity breeds intimacy: Taking advantage of intimacy opportunities and transforming boring conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashdan, Todd B.; McKnight, Patrick E.; Fincham, Frank D.; Rose, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Curious people seek knowledge and new experiences. In three studies, we examined whether, when, and how curiosity contributes to positive social outcomes between unacquainted strangers. Study 1 showed that curious people expect to generate closeness during intimate conversations but not during small-talk; less curious people anticipated poor outcomes in both situations. We hypothesized that curious people underestimate their ability to bond with unacquainted strangers during mundane conversations. Studies 2 and 3 showed that curious people felt close to partners during intimate and small-talk conversations; less curious people only felt close when the situation offered relationship-building exercises. Surprise at the pleasure felt during this novel, uncertain situation partially mediated the benefits linked to curiosity. We found evidence of slight asymmetry between self and partner reactions. Results could not be attributed to physical attraction or positive affect. Collectively, results suggest that positive social interactions benefits from an open and curious mindset. PMID:22092143

  12. Interpreter-mediated dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Susan; Drew, Paul; Zayts, Olga; McGrath, Colman; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Wong, H M; Au, T K F

    2015-05-01

    The global movements of healthcare professionals and patient populations have increased the complexities of medical interactions at the point of service. This study examines interpreter mediated talk in cross-cultural general dentistry in Hong Kong where assisting para-professionals, in this case bilingual or multilingual Dental Surgery Assistants (DSAs), perform the dual capabilities of clinical assistant and interpreter. An initial language use survey was conducted with Polyclinic DSAs (n = 41) using a logbook approach to provide self-report data on language use in clinics. Frequencies of mean scores using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS) indicated that the majority of DSAs spoke mainly Cantonese in clinics and interpreted for postgraduates and professors. Conversation Analysis (CA) examined recipient design across a corpus (n = 23) of video-recorded review consultations between non-Cantonese speaking expatriate dentists and their Cantonese L1 patients. Three patterns of mediated interpreting indicated were: dentist designated expansions; dentist initiated interpretations; and assistant initiated interpretations to both the dentist and patient. The third, rather than being perceived as negative, was found to be framed either in response to patient difficulties or within the specific task routines of general dentistry. The findings illustrate trends in dentistry towards personalized care and patient empowerment as a reaction to product delivery approaches to patient management. Implications are indicated for both treatment adherence and the education of dental professionals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of influenza viruses by coupling multiplex reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification with cascade invasive reaction using nanoparticles as a sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yiyue Ge,1 Qiang Zhou,2 Kangchen Zhao,1 Ying Chi,1 Bin Liu,3 Xiaoyan Min,4 Zhiyang Shi,1 Bingjie Zou,2 Lunbiao Cui1 1Institute of Pathogenic Microbiology, Key Laboratories of Enteric Pathogenic Microbiology (Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2Department of Pharmacology, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Nanjing Medical University, 4Department of Geriatrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Influenza virus infections represent a worldwide public health and economic problem due to the significant morbidity and mortality caused by seasonal epidemics and pandemics. Sensitive and convenient methodologies for detection of influenza viruses are essential for further disease control. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP is the most commonly used method of nucleic acid isothermal amplification. However, with regard to multiplex LAMP, differentiating the ladder-like LAMP products derived from multiple targets is still challenging today. The requirement of specialized instruments has further hindered the on-site application of multiplex LAMP. We have developed an integrated assay coupling multiplex reverse transcription LAMP with cascade invasive reaction using nanoparticles (mRT-LAMP-CIRN as a sensor for the detection of three subtypes of influenza viruses: A/H1N1pdm09, A/H3 and influenza B. The analytic sensitivities of the mRT-LAMP-CIRN assay were 101 copies of RNA for both A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3, and 102 copies of RNA for influenza B. This assay demonstrated highly specific detection of target viruses and could differentiate them from other genetically or clinically related viruses. Clinical specimen analysis showed the mRT-LAMP-CIRN assay had an overall sensitivity and specificity of 98.3% and 100%, respectively. In summary, the mRT-LAMP-CIRN assay is

  14. Solar energy conversion. Chemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likhtenshtein, Gertz [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Finally filling a gap in the literature for a text that also adopts the chemist's view of this hot topic, Professor Likhtenshtein, an experienced author and internationally renowned scientist, considers different physical and engineering aspects in solar energy conversion. From theory to real-life systems, he shows exactly which chemical reactions take place when converting light energy, providing an overview of the chemical perspective from fundamentals to molecular harvesting systems and solar cells. This essential guide will thus help researchers in academia and industry better understand solar energy conversion, and so ultimately help this promising, multibillion euro/dollar field to expand. (orig.)

  15. Precipitation of the rare earth double sodium and rare earths from the sulfuric liquor and the conversion into rare earth hydroxides through meta ethic reaction; Precipitacao do sulfato duplo de terras raras e sodio a partir de licor sulfurico e sua conversao em hidroxido de terras raras mediante reacao metatetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Renata D.; Oliveira, Ester F.; Brito, Walter de; Morais, Carlos A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: rda@cdtn.br; esterfo@cdtn.br; britow@cdtn.br; cmorais@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    This work presents the purification study of the rare earths through precipitation of rare earth and sodium (Na TR (SO{sub 4}){sub 2}. x H{sub 2}O)) double sulfate and his conversion to rare earths hydroxide TR(OH){sub 3} by meta ethic reaction through the addition of sodium hydroxide solution to the solid double sulfate. The study used the sulfuric liquor as rare earth sample, generated in the chemical processing of the monazite with sulfuric acid by the Industrias Nucleares do Brasil - INB, Brazil, after the thorium and uranium extraction. The work investigated the influence of the main variables involved in the precipitation of Na TR(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O and in the conversion for the TR(OH){sub 3}, as follows: type and excess of the precipitation agent, temperature and time reaction. The obtained solid composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared and chemical analysis. The double sulfate diffractogram indicated the Na TR(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} mono-hydrated. The characterization of the metatese products has shown that, for obtaining the complete conversion of NaTR(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O into TR(OH){sub 3}, the reaction must be hot processed ({approx}70 deg C) and with small excess of Na OH ({<=} 5 percent). (author)

  16. Metylcyclohexane conversion to light olefins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCOFIELD C.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This study consists in the evaluation of the catalytic properties of zeolites with different structures in the conversion of methylcyclohexane to light olefins. Results obtained suggest that the steric constrictions of the catalysts used play an important role in hydrogen transfer reactions. Higher selectivities for light olefins (C3= and C4= were observed for zeolites having more closed structures, like MFI and ferrerite, when compared to those having more open ones, like beta, omega and faujasite.

  17. Metylcyclohexane conversion to light olefins

    OpenAIRE

    SCOFIELD, C.F.; BENAZZI, E.; CAUFFRIEZ, H.; MARCILLY, C.

    1998-01-01

    This study consists in the evaluation of the catalytic properties of zeolites with different structures in the conversion of methylcyclohexane to light olefins. Results obtained suggest that the steric constrictions of the catalysts used play an important role in hydrogen transfer reactions. Higher selectivities for light olefins (C3= and C4=) were observed for zeolites having more closed structures, like MFI and ferrerite, when compared to those having more open ones, like beta, omega and fa...

  18. evaluation of commercial FCC catalysts for hydrocarbon conversion. I. Physicochemical characterization and n-hexane conversion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brait, A.; Brait, A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lercher, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The physicochemical properties of six steam-stabilized, commercial FCC catalysts were compared in respect of their catalytic activity for n-hexane conversion. The conversion of n-hexane over these catalysts could be fully explained by three reaction pathways: protolytic cracking, protolytic

  19. Pd-catalyzed versus uncatalyzed, PhI(OAc)2-mediated cyclization reactions of N6-([1,1'-biaryl]-2-yl)adenine nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satishkumar, Sakilam; Poudapally, Suresh; Vuram, Prasanna K; Gurram, Venkateshwarlu; Pottabathini, Narender; Sebastian, Dellamol; Yang, Lijia; Pradhan, Padmanava; Lakshman, Mahesh K

    2017-11-09

    In this work we have assessed reactions of N 6 -([1,1'-biaryl]-2-yl)adenine nucleosides with Pd(OAc) 2 and PhI(OAc) 2 , via a Pd II /Pd IV redox cycle. The substrates are readily obtained by Pd/Xantphos-catalyzed reaction of adenine nucleosides with 2-bromo-1,1'-biaryls. In PhMe, the N 6 -biarylyl nucleosides gave C6-carbazolyl nucleoside analogues by C-N bond formation with the exocyclic N 6 nitrogen atom. In the solvent screening for the Pd-catalyzed reactions, an uncatalyzed process was found to be operational. It was observed that the carbazolyl products could also be obtained in the absence of a metal catalyst by reaction with PhI(OAc) 2 in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP). Thus, under Pd catalysis and in HFIP, reactions proceed to provide carbazolyl nucleoside analogues, with some differences. If reactions of N 6 -biarylyl nucleoside substrates were conducted in MeCN, formation of aryl benzimidazopurinyl nucleoside derivatives was observed in many cases by C-N bond formation with the N 1 ring nitrogen atom of the purine (carbazole and benzimidazole isomers are readily separated by chromatography). Whereas Pd II /Pd IV redox is responsible for carbazole formation under the metal-catalyzed conditions, in HFIP and MeCN radical cations and/or nitrenium ions can be intermediates. An extensive set of radical inhibition experiments was conducted and the data are presented.

  20. An efficient catalyst for asymmetric Reformatsky reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rate enantioselectivity using N,N-dialkylnorephedrines as chiral ligands. ..... temperatures also, there was no product conversion. ... Optimization of reaction conditions for asymmetric Reformatsky reaction between benzaldehyde and α-.

  1. [Hydroxylamine conversion by anammox enrichment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Anhui; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Huifeng; Ding, Shuang; Wang, Caihua

    2010-04-01

    Hydroxylamine is an important intermediate product of anammox. This study was focused on the characteristics of hydroxylamine and nitrite conversions by anammox enrichment. The changes of nitrogenous substrates and related products with time were measured using batch tests with anammox enrichment as inoculum. Since hydroxylamine didn't react with nitrite in uninoculated control culture, these two compounds were chemically stable. Both of them decreased with time in anammox enrichment inoculated cultures, in which ammonia as intermediate product would be produced and converted with the maximum concentration being 0.338 mg/L. The total nitrogen concentration decreased from 4.694 mmol/L to 0.812 mmol/L with conversion rate 82.7% in the end. When hydroxylamine and nitrite concentrations were about 2.5 mmol/L respectively, the maximum specific sludge conversion rates of hydroxylamine was 0.535 mmol/(gVSS.h), which was 1.81 times bigger than that of ammonia in ammonia reaction system; the maximum specific sludge rate of total nitrogen was slightly higher than that in ammonia reaction system. When hydroxylamine concentration increased to 5.0 mmol/L, the hydroxylamine and nitrite conversion rates promoted by 26.7% and 120.7% respectively; and the maximum ammonia accumulated was 1.810 mmol/L. When nitrite concentration increased to 5.0 mmol/L, the hydroxylamine and nitrite conversion rates promoted by 6.9% and 9.0% respectively; and the maximum ammonia accumulated was 0.795 mmol/L. Anammox enrichment was capable of converting hydroxylamine and nitrite simultaneously and had the higher conversion rate of hydroxylamine than ammonia conversion rate. Hydroxylamine and nitrite conversion rates were less affected by increase in nitrite concentration, but more significantly influenced by increase in hydroxylamine. The maximum ammonia concentration accumulated would rise as the result of increasing both hydroxylamine and nitrite. The result of experiment was consistent with pathway

  2. Synthesis of 3,3-disubstituted oxindoles by visible-light-mediated radical reactions of aryl diazonium salts with N-arylacrylamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weijun; Xu, Fengjuan; Fu, Yuqin; Zhu, Mei; Yu, Jiaqi; Xu, Chen; Zou, Dapeng

    2013-12-06

    A mild and efficient visible-light-mediated diarylation of N-arylacrylamides with aryl diazonium salts under mild conditions has been developed. This method provides convenient access to a variety of useful 3,3-disubstituted oxindoles by constructing two C-C bonds in one step.

  3. Role of mobile passenger lymphocytes in the rejection of renal and cardiac allografts in the rat. A passenger lymphocyte-mediated graft-versus-host reaction amplifies the host response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Vrieshilfgaarde, R.; Hermans, P.; Terpstra, J.L.; van Breda Viresman, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    It is demonstrated that passenger lymphocytes migrate out of rat renal allografts into host spleens in a radioresistant fashion. These mobile passenger lymphocytes within BN kidney and heart transplants are immunocompetent, since they elicit a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction in the spleens of (LEW x BN)F2 hybrid hosts. The greater GVH reaction in (LEW x BN)F1 recipients of BN kidneys reflects the greater number of mobile passenger lymphocytes in the kidney when compared to the heart. The mobile passenger lymphocytes within BN renal allografts also cause a proliferative response in the spleens of the LEW hosts as well as an accelerated rejection of BN renal allografts when compared to BN cardiac allografts, for the differences between BN kidney and heart, both in terms of splenomegaly elicited in LEW as well as tempo of rejection, are abolished by total body x-irradiation of the donor with 900 rad. Results indicate that a mobile passenger lymphocyte mediated GVH reaction in the central lymphoid organs of the host augments the host response to allogenic kidneys and contributes materially to first-set renal allograft rejection; this GVH reaction on the other hand is not conspicuously present in LEW recipients of BN cardiac allografts and has therefore little effect on first-set cardiac allograft rejection

  4. Swi5-Sfr1 protein stimulates Rad51-mediated DNA strand exchange reaction through organization of DNA bases in the presynaptic filament.

    KAUST Repository

    Fornander, Louise H

    2013-12-03

    The Swi5-Sfr1 heterodimer protein stimulates the Rad51-promoted DNA strand exchange reaction, a crucial step in homologous recombination. To clarify how this accessory protein acts on the strand exchange reaction, we have analyzed how the structure of the primary reaction intermediate, the Rad51/single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) complex filament formed in the presence of ATP, is affected by Swi5-Sfr1. Using flow linear dichroism spectroscopy, we observe that the nucleobases of the ssDNA are more perpendicularly aligned to the filament axis in the presence of Swi5-Sfr1, whereas the bases are more randomly oriented in the absence of Swi5-Sfr1. When using a modified version of the natural protein where the N-terminal part of Sfr1 is deleted, which has no affinity for DNA but maintained ability to stimulate the strand exchange reaction, we still observe the improved perpendicular DNA base orientation. This indicates that Swi5-Sfr1 exerts its activating effect through interaction with the Rad51 filament mainly and not with the DNA. We propose that the role of a coplanar alignment of nucleobases induced by Swi5-Sfr1 in the presynaptic Rad51/ssDNA complex is to facilitate the critical matching with an invading double-stranded DNA, hence stimulating the strand exchange reaction.

  5. Kinetics and thermodynamics of oxidation mediated reaction in L-cysteine and its methyl and ethyl esters in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Ryan J.; Singh, Jaideep; Krishnan, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    L-Cysteine (L-Cys), L-Cysteine methyl ester (L-CysME) or L-Cysteine ethyl ester (L-CysEE), when dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, undergoes an oxidation process. This process is slow enough and leads to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral changes that could be monitored in real time. The oxidation mediated transition is modeled as a pseudo-first order kinetics and the thermodynamic parameters are estimated using the Eyring's formulation. L-Cysteine and their esters are often used as biological models due to the remarkable thiol group that can be found in different oxidation states. This oxidation mediated transition is due to the combination of thiol oxidation to a disulfide followed by solvent-induced effects may be relevant in designing cysteine-based molecular models.

  6. A study into Stille cross-coupling reaction mediated by palladium catalysts deposited over siliceous supports bearing N-donor groups at the surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Semler, M.; Čejka, Jiří; Štěpnička, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2013), s. 353-360 ISSN 0268-2605 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0561 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : palladium * suppoerted catalysts * Stille reaction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.017, year: 2013

  7. Reversible conversion of valence-tautomeric copper metal-organic frameworks dependent single-crystal-to-single-crystal oxidation/reduction: a redox-switchable catalyst for C-H bonds activation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Wu, Jie; Song, Chuanjun; Ding, Ran; Qiao, Yan; Hou, Hongwei; Chang, Junbiao; Fan, Yaoting

    2015-06-28

    Upon single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) oxidation/reduction, reversible structural transformations take place between the anionic porous zeolite-like Cu(I) framework and a topologically equivalent neutral Cu(I)Cu(II) mixed-valent framework. The unique conversion behavior of the Cu(I) framework endowed it as a redox-switchable catalyst for the direct arylation of heterocycle C-H bonds.

  8. Special issue: Plasma Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Tu, X.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    With growing concern of energy and environmental issues, the combination of plasma and heterogeneous catalysts receives special attention in greenhouse gas conversion, nitrogen fixation and hydrocarbon chemistry. Plasma gas conversion driven by renewable electricity is particularly important for the

  9. A Model for Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres, Phil

    2012-01-01

    This essay discusses models. It examines what models are, the roles models perform and suggests various intentions that underlie their construction and use. It discusses how models act as a conversational partner, and how they support various forms of conversation within the conversational activity...

  10. Direct Conversion of Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, William R.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Direct energy conversion involves energy transformation without moving parts. The concepts of direct and dynamic energy conversion plus the laws governing energy conversion are investigated. Among the topics…

  11. Detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms using an ON-OFF switching of regenerated biosensor based on a locked nucleic acid-integrated and toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Ling, Yu; Lu, Lu; Chen, Ning Yu; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2014-03-04

    Although various strategies have been reported for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) detection, development of a time-saving, specific, and regenerated electrochemical sensing platform still remains a realistic goal. In this study, an ON-OFF switching of a regenerated biosensor based on a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-integrated and toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction technique is constructed for detection of SNPs. The LNA-integrated and methylene blue-labeled capture probe with an external toehold is designed to switch on the sensing system. The mutant-type DNA probe completes complementary with the capture probe to trigger the strand displacement reaction, which switches off the sensing system. However, when the single-base mismatched wild-type DNA probe is presented, the strand displacement reaction cannot be achieved; therefore, the sensing system still keeps the ON state. This DNA sensor is stable over five reuses. We further testify that the LNA-integrated sequence has better recognition ability for SNPs detection compared to the DNA-integrated sequence. Moreover, this DNA senor exhibits a remarkable discrimination capability of SNPs among abundant wild-type targets and 6000-fold (m/m) excess of genomic DNA. In addition, it is selective enough in complex and contaminant-ridden samples, such as human urine, soil, saliva, and beer. Overall, these results demonstrate that this reliable DNA sensor is easy to be fabricated, simple to operate, and stable enough to be readily regenerated.

  12. Elements of energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Elements of Energy Conversion brings together scattered information on the subject of energy conversion and presents it in terms of the fundamental thermodynamics that apply to energy conversion by any process. Emphasis is given to the development of the theory of heat engines because these are and will remain most important power sources. Descriptive material is then presented to provide elementary information on all important energy conversion devices. The book contains 10 chapters and opens with a discussion of forms of energy, energy sources and storage, and energy conversion. This is foll

  13. Iterated multidimensional wave conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizard, A. J.; Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D.; Kaufman, A. N.; Richardson, A. S.; Zobin, N.

    2011-01-01

    Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

  14. Enlightened protein: Fhit tumor suppressor protein structure and function and its role in the toxicity of protoporphyrin IX-mediated photodynamic reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawacka-Pankau, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    The Fhit tumor suppressor protein possesses Ap 3 A (diadenosine triphosphate - ApppA) hydrolytic activity in vitro and its gene is found inactive in many pre-malignant states due to gene inactivation. For several years Fhit has been a widely investigated protein as its cellular function still remains largely unsolved. Fhit was shown to act as a molecular 'switch' of cell death via cascade operating on the influence of ATR-Chk1 pathway but also through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Notably, Fhit was reported by our group to enhance the overall eradication effect of porphyrin-mediated photodynamic treatment (PDT). In this review the up-to-date findings on Fhit protein as a tumor suppressor and its role in PDT are presented.

  15. A Near-Infrared Photothermal Effect-Responsive Drug Delivery System Based on Indocyanine Green and Doxorubicin-Loaded Polymeric Micelles Mediated by Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Li, Junjie; Ke, Wendong; Ge, Zhishen

    2015-10-01

    Near-infrared light (NIR) possesses great advantages for light-responsive controllable drug release, such as deep tissue penetration and low damage to healthy tissues. Herein, a NIR-responsive drug delivery system is developed based on a NIR dye, indocyanine green (ICG), and anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded thermoresponsive block copolymer micelles, in which the drug release can be controlled via NIR irradiation. First, block copolymers, poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)-block-poly(furfuryl methacrylate) (POEGMA-b-PFMA), are synthesized by sequential reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization, followed by modification with N-octyl maleimide through Diels-Alder (DA) reaction to produce POEGMA-b-POMFMA. The self-assembly of POEGMA-b-POMFMA by nano-precipitation in aqueous solution affords the polymeric micelles which are used to simultaneously encapsulate ICG and DOX. Upon irradiation by NIR light (805 nm), the loaded DOX is released rapidly from the micelles due to partial retro DA reaction and local temperature increase-induced faster drug diffusion by the photothermal effect. Cytotoxicity evaluation and intracellular distribution observation demonstrate significant synergistic effects of NIR-triggered drug release, photothermal, and chemotherapy toward cancer cells under NIR irradiation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Degradation of anthracene by laccase of Trametes versicolor in the presence of different mediator compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, C; Majcherczyk, A; Hüttermann, A

    1996-10-01

    Laccase of Trametes versicolor was generally able to oxidize anthracene in vitro. After 72 h incubation about 35% of the anthracene was transformed stoichiometrically to 9,10-anthraquinone. Transformation of anthracene increased rapidly in the presence of different mediators that readily generate stable radicals: 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole. For the reaction, the presence of both the laccase and the mediator was necessary. In the presence of 0.005 mM 1-hydroxybenzotriazole this conversion had removed 47% of the anthracene after 72 h; 75% of the substrate was oxidized during this period when ABTS (1 mM) was used as mediator. In contrast to reactions without or with only low concentrations of a mediator, there was a discrepancy between the disappearance of anthracene and the formation of 9,10-anthraquinone in mediator-forced reactions. Coupling-products of mediators with anthracene degradation products were found. Anthracene disappeared nearly completely after incubation for 72 h with laccase in a 0.1 mM solution of 1-hydroxybenzotriazole and was transformed to 9,10-anthraquinone in about 80% yield; 90% of the substrate was transformed in the presence of ABTS (2.0 mM) resulting again in 80% quinone. Phenothiazine was not effective in this system.

  17. From dihydrated iron(III) phosphate to monohydrated ammonium-iron(II) phosphate: Solvothermal reaction mediated by acetone-urea mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, Belen F., E-mail: mbafernandez@uniovi.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Trobajo, Camino [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Pique, Carmen [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Garcia, Jose R. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Blanco, Jesus A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    By reaction between synthetic phosphosiderite FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, urea (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO, and acetone (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO, we report a novel solvothermal synthesis of polycrystalline NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O. The preparation of other two individual phases, NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, is also described. The obtained product is a function of the reaction time and the N/P molar ratio in the reagent mixture, and the existence of structural memory in the dissolution-precipitation processes is discussed. Below 25 K, NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O behaves magnetically in a complex way, because both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic signals are superimposed, suggesting the existence of a canting of iron(II) magnetic moments. - Graphical abstract: Solvothermal synthesis of polycrystalline NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O is presented. The preparation of other two individual phases, NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} as a function of the N/P molar ratio in the reagent mixture and the reaction time, is also described. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solvothermal synthesis of NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O from an Fe(III) phosphate: reduction process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of two intermediate metastable phases: phase diagram. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal decomposition in two steps: mass loss of both water and ammonia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic behaviour: AF+constant spontaneous magnetization.

  18. Separate photosensitizers mediate degradation of the 32-kDa photosystem II reaction center protein in the visible and UV spectral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Gaba, V.; Canaani, O.; Malkin, S.; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M.

    1989-01-01

    A component of the photosystem II reaction center, the 32-kDa protein, is rapidly turned over in the light. The mechanism of its light-dependent metabolism is largely unknown. We quantified the rate of 32-kDa protein degradation over a broad spectral range (UV, visible, and far red). The quantum yield for degradation was highest in the UVB (280-320 nm) region. Spectral evidence demonstrates two distinctly different photosensitizers for 32-kDa protein degradation. The data implicate the bulk photosynthetic pigments (primarily chlorophyll) in the visible and far red regions, and plastoquinone (in one or more of its redox states) in the UV region. A significant portion of 32-kDa protein degradation in sunlight is attributed to UVB irradiance

  19. Utility of loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay, polymerase chain reaction, and elisa for diagnosis of leptospirosis in South Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika Sengupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease which requires laboratory diagnosis for confirmation. Materials and Methods: In this study serum samples from adults with acute undifferentiated fever (duration ≤15 days were tested for IgM antibodies to Leptospira by ELISA, PCR for rrs gene and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for LipL32 and LipL41. Results: Among the 150 sera tested, three were positive by PCR, LAMP and IgM ELISA/modified Faines' criteria, two by only PCR; seven only by LAMP assay and forty fulfilled modified Faine's criteria (illness clinically compatible and IgM ELISA positive for leptospirosis. Clinical correlation revealed renal compromise, low platelet count and severe jaundice were significantly related to leptospirosis (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study suggests that LAMP assay could be useful for diagnosis of leptospirosis during the 1st week of illness whereas IgM ELISA forms the mainstay of diagnosis from the 2nd week onward. Further studies especially community based, comparing ELISA, PCR, LAMP, culture and microscopic agglutination test are required to evaluate the veracity of these findings.

  20. The mechanism of the modified Ullmann reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperotto, Elena; Klink, Gerard P.M. van; Koten, Gerard van; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2010-01-01

    The copper-mediated aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions developed by Fritz Ullmann and Irma Goldberg required stoichiometric amounts of copper and very high reaction temperatures. Recently, it was found that addition of relatively cheap ligands (diamines, aminoalcohols, diketones, diols)

  1. Computers and conversation

    CERN Document Server

    Luff, Paul; Gilbert, Nigel G

    1986-01-01

    In the past few years a branch of sociology, conversation analysis, has begun to have a significant impact on the design of human*b1computer interaction (HCI). The investigation of human*b1human dialogue has emerged as a fruitful foundation for interactive system design.****This book includes eleven original chapters by leading researchers who are applying conversation analysis to HCI. The fundamentals of conversation analysis are outlined, a number of systems are described, and a critical view of their value for HCI is offered.****Computers and Conversation will be of interest to all concerne

  2. Automated chromatographic laccase-mediator-system activity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Nico; Schelden, Maximilian; Roth, Simon; Spiess, Antje C

    2017-08-01

    To study the interaction of laccases, mediators, and substrates in laccase-mediator systems (LMS), an on-line measurement was developed using high performance anion exchange chromatography equipped with a CarboPac™ PA 100 column coupled to pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). The developed method was optimized for overall chromatographic run time (45 to 120 min) and automated sample drawing. As an example, the Trametes versicolor laccase induced oxidation of 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1,3-dihydroxypropane (adlerol) using 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT) as mediator was measured and analyzed on-line. Since the Au electrode of the PAD detects only hydroxyl group containing substances with a limit of detection being in the milligram/liter range, not all products are measureable. Therefore, this method was applied for the quantification of adlerol, and-based on adlerol conversion-for the quantification of the LMS activity at a specific T. versicolor laccase/HBT ratio. The automated chromatographic activity assay allowed for a defined reaction start of all laccase-mediator-system reactions mixtures, and the LMS reaction progress was automatically monitored for 48 h. The automatization enabled an integrated monitoring overnight and over-weekend and minimized all manual errors such as pipetting of solutions accordingly. The activity of the LMS based on adlerol consumption was determined to 0.47 U/mg protein for a laccase/mediator ratio of 1.75 U laccase/g HBT. In the future, the automated method will allow for a fast screening of combinations of laccases, mediators, and substrates which are efficient for lignin modification. In particular, it allows for a fast and easy quantification of the oxidizing activity of an LMS on a lignin-related substrate which is not covered by typical colorimetric laccase assays. ᅟ.

  3. Mathematical Simulation of High-Conversion Binary Copolymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiangWei; QinJiguang

    2005-01-01

    A new model for mathematical simulation of high-conversion binary copolymerization was established by combination of the concept of the three stage polymerization model (TSPM) proposed by Qin et al. for bulk free radical homopolymerization with the North equation to describe high-conversion copolymerization reaction exhibiting a strong gel effect, and the mathematical expressions of this new model were derived. Like TSPM, the new model also assmnes that the whole course of binary copolymerization can be divided into three different stages: low conversion, gel effect and glass effect stages. In addition, the reaction rate constants and the initiator efficiency at each copolymerization stage do not vary with conversion. Based on the expressions derived, a plot method for determining the overall rate constants and critical conversions was proposed. The literature data on conversion history for styrene (St)-methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA)-MMA copolymerizations were treated to examine the model, which shows that the model is satisfactory.

  4. Highly sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA hybridisation by coupling the chemical reduction of a redox label to the electrode reaction of a solution phase mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoensawat, Umphan; Rijiravanich, Patsamon; Somasundrum, Mithran; Surareungchai, Werasak

    2014-11-21

    We have described a highly sensitive method for detecting DNA hybridisation using a redox-labeled stem loop probe. The redox labels were poly(styrene-co-acrylic) (PSA) spheres of 454 nm diameter, modified by methylene blue (MB) deposited alternatively with poly(sodium 4-styrene sulphonate) (PSS) in a layer-by-layer process. Each PSA sphere carried approx. 3.7 × 10(5) molecules of MB, as determined optically. DIG-tagged stem loop probes were immobilised on screen printed electrodes bearing anti-DIG antibodies. Binding with the target enabled straightening of the stem loop, which made attachment to the MB-coated PSA spheres possible. For measuring the current from the direct reduction of MB by differential pulse voltammetry, a 30 mer DNA target common to 70 strains of Escherichia coli was calibrated across the range 1.0 fM to 100 pM (gradient = 3.2 × 10(-8) A (log fM)(-1), r(2) = 0.95, n = 60), with an LOD of ∼58 fM. By using Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as a solution phase mediator for the MB reduction, we were able to lower the LOD to ∼39 aM (gradient = 5.95 × 10(-8) A (log aM)(-1), r(2) = 0.96, n = 30), which corresponds to the detection of 0.76 ag (∼50 molecules) in the 2 μL analyte sample. We hypothesise that the lowering of the LOD was due to the fact that not all the MB labels were able to contact the electrode surface.

  5. Biomass Conversion over Heteropoly Acid Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2015-04-01

    Biomass is a natural resource that is both abundant and sustainable. Its efficient utilization has long been the focus of research and development efforts with the aim to substitute it for fossil-based feedstock. In addition to the production of biofuels (e.g., ethanol) from biomass, which has been to some degree successful, its conversion to high value-added chemicals is equally important. Among various biomass conversion pathways, catalytic conversion is usually preferred, as it provides a cost-effective and eco-benign route to the desired products with high selectivities. The research of this thesis is focused on the conversion of biomass to various chemicals of commercial interest by selective catalytic oxidation. Molecular oxygen is chosen as the oxidant considering its low cost and environment friendly features in comparison with commonly used hydrogen peroxide. However, the activation of molecular oxygen usually requires high reaction temperatures, leading to over oxidation and thus lower selectivities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop effective catalysts for such conversion systems. We use kegging-type heteropoly acids (HPAs) as a platform for catalysts design because of their high catalytic activities and ease of medication. Using HPA catalysts allows the conversion taking place at relatively low temperature, which is beneficial to saving production cost as well as to improving the reaction selectivity. The strong acidity of HPA promotes the hydrolysis of biomass of giant molecules (e.g. cellulose), which is the first as well as the most difficult step in the conversion process. Under certain circumstances, a HPA combines the merits of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, acting as an efficient homogeneous catalyst during the reaction while being easily separated as a heterogeneous catalyst after the reaction. We have successfully applied HPAs in several biomass conversion systems. Specially, we prepared a HPA-based bi-functional catalyst

  6. Biological and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars and Lignin Publications |

    Science.gov (United States)

    biorefinery lignins, ACS Sust. Chem. Eng. Lignin depolymerization with nitrate-intercalated hydrotalcite catalysts, ACS Catalysis Pyrolysis reaction networks for lignin model compounds: Unraveling thermal Free Energy, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic

  7. Emerging Roles for MAS-Related G Protein-Coupled Receptor-X2 in Host Defense Peptide, Opioid, and Neuropeptide-Mediated Inflammatory Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hydar

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue-resident immune cells that contribute to host defense but are best known for their roles in allergic and inflammatory diseases. In humans, MCs are divided into two subtypes based on the protease content of their secretory granules. Thus, human lung MCs contain only tryptase and are known as MC T , whereas skin MCs contain both tryptase and chymase and are known as MC TC . Patients with severe asthma display elevated MCs in the lung, which undergo phenotypic change from MC T to MC TC . Although the human genome contains four Mas related G protein coupled receptor X (MRGPRX) genes, an important feature of MC TC is that they selectively express MRGPRX2. It is activated by antimicrobial host defense peptides such as human β-defensins and the cathelicidin LL-37 and likely contributes to host defense. MRGPRX2 is also a receptor for the neuropeptide substance P, major basic protein, eosinophil peroxidase, opioids, and many FDA-approved cationic drugs. Increased expression of MRGPRX2 or enhanced downstream signaling likely contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis, chronic urticaria, and severe asthma. In this chapter, I will discuss the expression profile and function of MRGPRX1-4 and review the emerging roles of MRGPRX2 on host defense, chronic inflammatory diseases, and drug-induced pseudoallergic reactions. I will also examine the novel aspects of MRGPRX2 signaling in MCs as it related to degranulation and review the mechanisms of its regulation. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasensitive Single Fluorescence-Labeled Probe-Mediated Single Universal Primer-Multiplex-Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction for High-Throughput Genetically Modified Organism Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chenqi; Xu, Yuancong; Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Pengyu; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2018-05-01

    As genetically modified (GM) technology develops and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) become more available, GMOs face increasing regulations and pressure to adhere to strict labeling guidelines. A singleplex detection method cannot perform the high-throughput analysis necessary for optimal GMO detection. Combining the advantages of multiplex detection and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR), a single universal primer-multiplex-ddPCR (SUP-M-ddPCR) strategy was proposed for accurate broad-spectrum screening and quantification. The SUP increases efficiency of the primers in PCR and plays an important role in establishing a high-throughput, multiplex detection method. Emerging ddPCR technology has been used for accurate quantification of nucleic acid molecules without a standard curve. Using maize as a reference point, four heterologous sequences ( 35S, NOS, NPTII, and PAT) were selected to evaluate the feasibility and applicability of this strategy. Surprisingly, these four genes cover more than 93% of the transgenic maize lines and serve as preliminary screening sequences. All screening probes were labeled with FAM fluorescence, which allows the signals from the samples with GMO content and those without to be easily differentiated. This fiveplex screening method is a new development in GMO screening. Utilizing an optimal amplification assay, the specificity, limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were validated. The LOD and LOQ of this GMO screening method were 0.1% and 0.01%, respectively, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) < 25%. This method could serve as an important tool for the detection of GM maize from different processed, commercially available products. Further, this screening method could be applied to other fields that require reliable and sensitive detection of DNA targets.

  9. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Sulfide Oxidation by Oxygen: A Look at Inorganically Controlled Reactions and Biologically Mediated Processes in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, George W.; Findlay, Alyssa J.; MacDonald, Daniel J.; Owings, Shannon M.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Beinart, Roxanne A.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamics for the first electron transfer step for sulfide and oxygen indicates that the reaction is unfavorable as unstable superoxide and bisulfide radical ions would need to be produced. However, a two-electron transfer is favorable as stable S(0) and peroxide would be formed, but the partially filled orbitals in oxygen that accept electrons prevent rapid kinetics. Abiotic sulfide oxidation kinetics improve when reduced iron and/or manganese are oxidized by oxygen to form oxidized metals which in turn oxidize sulfide. Biological sulfur oxidation relies on enzymes that have evolved to overcome these kinetic constraints to affect rapid sulfide oxidation. Here we review the available thermodynamic and kinetic data for H2S and HS• as well as O2, reactive oxygen species, nitrate, nitrite, and NOx species. We also present new kinetic data for abiotic sulfide oxidation with oxygen in trace metal clean solutions that constrain abiotic rates of sulfide oxidation in metal free solution and agree with the kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, we present experimental data that give insight on rates of chemolithotrophic and photolithotrophic sulfide oxidation in the environment. We demonstrate that both anaerobic photolithotrophic and aerobic chemolithotrophic sulfide oxidation rates are three or more orders of magnitude higher than abiotic rates suggesting that in most environments biotic sulfide oxidation rates will far exceed abiotic rates due to the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints discussed in the first section of the paper. Such data reshape our thinking about the biotic and abiotic contributions to sulfide oxidation in the environment. PMID:21833317

  10. Energy conversion alternatives study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shure, L. T.

    1979-01-01

    Comparison of coal based energy systems is given. Study identifies and compares various advanced energy conversion systems using coal or coal derived fuels for baselaoad electric power generation. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS) reports provede government, industry, and general public with technically consistent basis for comparison of system's options of interest for fossilfired electric-utility application.

  11. Conversations in African Philosophy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    Conversational philosophy is articulated by Jonathan O. Chimakonam as the new wave of philosophical practice both in “place” and in “space”. This journal adopts and promotes this approach to philosophizing for African philosophy. Readers are encouraged to submit their conversational piece (maximum of 2000 words) ...

  12. Microwave plasma mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, H.S.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Villarroel, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of hot electrons during the process of laser-produced plasma is studied. The basic equations of mode conversion from electromagnetic waves to electrostatic waves are presented. It is shown by mode conversion, that, the resonant absorption and parametric instabilities appear simultaneously, but in different plasma regions. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Political conversations on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.

    2016-01-01

    Political conversations are according to theories on deliberative democracy essential to well-functioning democracies. Traditionally these conversations have taken place in face-to-face settings, in e.g. party meetings and town meetings. However, social media such as Facebook and Twitter offers new...... possibilities for online political conversations between citizens and politicians. This paper examines the presence on Facebook and Twitter of Members of the Danish national Parliament, the Folketing, and focusses on a quantitative mapping of the political conversation activities taking place in the threads...... following Facebook posts from Danish Members of Parliament (MPs). The paper shows that, in comparison with previous findings from other countries, Danish MPs have a relatively high degree of engagement in political conversations with citizens on Facebook – and that a large number of citizens follow MPs...

  14. Metal-Free Conversion of Carboxamides to Ureas Using Tertiary Amines and Iodosylmesitylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hoon; Chang, Suk Bok [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    A new synthetic route has been developed for the preparation of ureas from the reaction of carboxamides with tertiary amines with the use of iodosylmesitylene as a stoichiometric oxidant. Although the reaction proceeds under the mild conditions to afford urea products in moderate yields, further optimization studies are required to improve the reaction efficiency and regioselectivity in the dealkylative pathway. Ureas are recognized as an important synthetic building unit, finding a wide range of applications in the preparation of agrochemicals, petrochemicals, and pharmaceuticals. In addition, hydrogen bond-mediated communication between ureas and certain types of compounds is an important structural motif in asymmetric catalysis, molecular recognition, and crystal engineering. Although numerous procedures have been developed for the urea synthesis, the most commonly employed strategy involves the reaction of amine precursors with phosgene, or its surrogates, isocyanates, or carbamates. Whereas these traditional methods are operative under conventional reaction conditions, they often lead to incomplete conversion. Additional drawback of these protocols is that unsymmetric ureas are difficult to prepare in many cases.

  15. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions. Novel Design of an Ultra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscope System for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, David Chi-Wai

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope's (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 C). The design of a high pressure, high temperature scanning tunneling microscope system, that is capable of monitoring reactions in situ at conditions from UHV and ambient temperature up to 1 atm and 250 C, is briefly presented along with vibrational and thermal analysis, as this system serves as a template to improve upon during the design of the new ultra high pressure, high temperature STM. Using this existing high pressure scanning tunneling microscope we monitored the co-adsorption of hydrogen, ethylene and carbon dioxide on platinum (111) and rhodium (111) crystal faces in the mTorr pressure range at 300 K in equilibrium with the gas phase. During the catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane in the absence of CO the metal surfaces are covered by an adsorbate layer that is very mobile on the time scale of STM imaging. We found that the addition of CO poisons the hydrogenation reaction and induces ordered structures on the single crystal surfaces. Several ordered structures were observed upon CO addition to the surfaces pre-covered with hydrogen and ethylene: a rotated (√19 x √19)R23.4 o on Pt(111), and domains of c(4 x 2)-CO+C 2 H 3 , previously unobserved (4 x 2)-CO+3C 2 H 3 , and (2 x 2)-3CO on Rh(111). A mechanism for CO poisoning of ethylene hydrogenation on the metal single crystals was proposed, in which CO blocks surface metal sites and reduces adsorbate mobility to limit adsorption and reaction rate of ethylene and hydrogen. In order to observe heterogeneous catalytic reactions that occur well above ambient pressure and temperature that more closely

  16. A Map Enters the Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    Over the past decade STS scholars have been engaged in a continuous dialogue about the performativity of their methods and the interventions of their research practices. A frequently posed question is how STS can make a difference to its fields of study, what John Law has called its different...... 'modes of mattering'. In this paper I explore what difference digital cartography can make to STS practice. I draw on three examples from my own work where digitally mediated maps have entered the conversation and made critical, often surprising, differences to the research process. In my first example...... the map is brought along as an ethnographic device on a piece of fieldwork, in my second example it serves as the central collaborative object in a participatory design project, and in my third example the map becomes the object of contestation as it finds itself centre stage in the controversy...

  17. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  18. Conversion of hydrocarbon oils into motor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1937-11-09

    The abstract describes a process for producing lower boiling hydrocarbon motor fuels with a starting material of wide boiling range composed primarily of hydrocarbon oils boiling substantially above the boiling range of the desired product. Separate catalytic and pyrolytic conversion zones are simultaneously maintained in an interdependent relationship. Higher boiling constituents are separated from residual constituents by fractionation while desirable reaction conditions are maintained. All or at least a portion of the products from the catalytic and pyrolytic conversion zones are blended to yield the desired lower boiling hydrocarbons or motor fuels.

  19. Solar energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brownson, Jeffrey R S

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy conversion requires a different mind-set from traditional energy engineering in order to assess distribution, scales of use, systems design, predictive economic models for fluctuating solar resources, and planning to address transient cycles and social adoption. Solar Energy Conversion Systems examines solar energy conversion as an integrative design process, applying systems thinking methods to a solid knowledge base for creators of solar energy systems. This approach permits different levels of access for the emerging broad audience of scientists, engineers, architects, planners

  20. Energy conversion statics

    CERN Document Server

    Messerle, H K; Declaris, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Energy Conversion Statics deals with equilibrium situations and processes linking equilibrium states. A development of the basic theory of energy conversion statics and its applications is presented. In the applications the emphasis is on processes involving electrical energy. The text commences by introducing the general concept of energy with a survey of primary and secondary energy forms, their availability, and use. The second chapter presents the basic laws of energy conversion. Four postulates defining the overall range of applicability of the general theory are set out, demonstrating th

  1. Uranium Conversion & Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The isotopes of uranium that are found in nature, and hence in ‘fresh’ Yellowcake’, are not in relative proportions that are suitable for power or weapons applications. The goal of conversion then is to transform the U3O8 yellowcake into UF6. Conversion and enrichment of uranium is usually required to obtain material with enough 235U to be usable as fuel in a reactor or weapon. The cost, size, and complexity of practical conversion and enrichment facilities aid in nonproliferation by design.

  2. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Uranium conversion wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, R.; Dellamano, J.C.

    1989-12-01

    A set of mathematical equations was developed and used to estimate the radiological significance of each radionuclide potentially present in the uranium refining industry effluents. The equations described the evolution in time of the radionuclides activities in the uranium fuel cycle, from mining and milling, through the yellowcake, till the conversion effluents. Some radionuclides that are not usually monitored in conversion effluents (e.g. Pa-231 and Ac-227) were found to be potentially relevant from the radiological point of view in conversion facilities, and are certainly relevant in mining and milling industry, at least in a few waste streams. (author) [pt

  4. Freely flowing conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakjær, Marie Kirstejn; Andrade, David; Dexters, Peter

    and in regards to rehabilitation efforts. In the context of prisons UDI is inspired by the complexity approach (Stacey 2005). We seek to facilitate freely flowing conversations between inmates, staff and managers – pushing the boundaries of existing norms, roles and beliefs. In the end however we rely...... relations by changing conversations. Through the theoretical framework of the complexity approach, we discuss how this may lead to organizational change. Finally we suggest that inviting inmates to take part in conversations about core organizational development may be a fundamental strategy in trying...

  5. Iron(II) porphyrins induced conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting Ting; Liu, Yong Dong; Zhong, Ru Gang

    2015-09-01

    Nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by heme proteins was reported as a protective mechanism to hypoxic injury in mammalian physiology. In this study, the pathways of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrin (P) complexes, which were generally recognized as models for heme proteins, were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). In view of two type isomers of combination of nitrite and Fe(II)(P), N-nitro- and O-nitrito-Fe(II)-porphyrin complexes, and two binding sites of proton to the different O atoms of nitrite moiety, four main pathways for the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrins were proposed. The results indicate that the pathway of N-bound Fe(II)(P)(NO2) isomer into Fe(III)(P)(NO) and water is similar to that of O-bound isomer into nitric oxide and Fe(III)(P)(OH) in both thermodynamical and dynamical aspects. Based on the initial computational studies of five-coordinate nitrite complexes, the conversion of nitrite into NO mediated by Fe(II)(P)(L) complexes with 14 kinds of proximal ligands was also investigated. Generally, the same conclusion that the pathways of N-bound isomers are similar to those of O-bound isomer was obtained for iron(II) porphyrin with ligands. Different effects of ligands on the reduction reactions were also found. It is notable that the negative proximal ligands can improve reactive abilities of N-nitro-iron(II) porphyrins in the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide compared to neutral ligands. The findings will be helpful to expand our understanding of the mechanism of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by iron(II) porphyrins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mining Conversational Social Video

    OpenAIRE

    Biel, Joan-Isaac

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquity of social media in our daily life, the intense user participation, and the explo- sion of multimedia content have generated an extraordinary interest from computer and social scientists to investigate the traces left by users to understand human behavior online. From this perspective, YouTube can be seen as the largest collection of audiovisual human behavioral data, among which conversational video blogs (vlogs) are one of the basic formats. Conversational vlogs have evolved fro...

  7. Persuasion detection in conversation

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Henry T.

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In this thesis, we present a system for annotating persuasion in conversation based on a social-psychological model. We augmented the social model developed by James Cialdini with some of our own categories for annotators to label. The conversations consisted of 37 hostage negotiation transcripts from private and public sources, with all personal information removed from the private source transcripts. We evaluated the level of agre...

  8. Perspective on direct conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1963-10-15

    The objective of direct conversion is high electrical output for minimum total cost, and not always high conversion efficiency. The wide range of techniques embracing cryogenics and hot plasma derives from the special requirements of source, environment, and application. Sources include solar and other radiation, nuclear fission and fusion, chemical energy, and heat. Environments and applications range from space vehicles to submarines and from giant power networks to isolated buoys and pocket devices. (auth)

  9. Key Building Blocks via Enzyme-Mediated Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas; Pietruszka, Jörg

    Biocatalytic approaches to valuable building blocks in organic synthesis have emerged as an important tool in the last few years. While first applications were mainly based on hydrolases, other enzyme classes such as oxidoreductases or lyases moved into the focus of research. Nowadays, a vast number of biotransformations can be found in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries delivering fine chemicals or drugs. The mild reaction conditions, high stereo-, regio-, and chemoselectivities, and the often shortened reaction pathways lead to economical and ecological advantages of enzymatic conversions. Due to the enormous number of enzyme-mediated syntheses, the present chapter is not meant to be a complete review, but to deliver comprehensive insights into well established enzymatic systems and recent advances in the application of enzymes in natural product synthesis. Furthermore, it is focused on the most frequently used enzymes or enzyme classes not covered elsewhere in the present volume.

  10. Conversational flow promotes solidarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H

    2013-01-01

    Social interaction is fundamental to the development of various aspects of "we-ness". Previous research has focused on the role the content of interaction plays in establishing feelings of unity, belongingness and shared reality (a cluster of variables referred to as solidarity here). The present paper is less concerned with content, but focuses on the form of social interaction. We propose that the degree to which conversations flow smoothly or not is, of itself, a cue to solidarity. We test this hypothesis in samples of unacquainted and acquainted dyads who communicate via headsets. Conversational flow is disrupted by introducing a delay in the auditory feedback (vs. no delay). Results of three studies show that smoothly coordinated conversations (compared with disrupted conversations and a control condition) increase feelings of belonging and perceptions of group entitativity, independently of conversation content. These effects are driven by the subjective experience of conversational flow. Our data suggest that this process occurs largely beyond individuals' control. We conclude that the form of social interaction is a powerful cue for inferring group solidarity. Implications for the impact of modern communication technology on developing a shared social identity are discussed.

  11. Conversational flow promotes solidarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namkje Koudenburg

    Full Text Available Social interaction is fundamental to the development of various aspects of "we-ness". Previous research has focused on the role the content of interaction plays in establishing feelings of unity, belongingness and shared reality (a cluster of variables referred to as solidarity here. The present paper is less concerned with content, but focuses on the form of social interaction. We propose that the degree to which conversations flow smoothly or not is, of itself, a cue to solidarity. We test this hypothesis in samples of unacquainted and acquainted dyads who communicate via headsets. Conversational flow is disrupted by introducing a delay in the auditory feedback (vs. no delay. Results of three studies show that smoothly coordinated conversations (compared with disrupted conversations and a control condition increase feelings of belonging and perceptions of group entitativity, independently of conversation content. These effects are driven by the subjective experience of conversational flow. Our data suggest that this process occurs largely beyond individuals' control. We conclude that the form of social interaction is a powerful cue for inferring group solidarity. Implications for the impact of modern communication technology on developing a shared social identity are discussed.

  12. Allylthioketone Mediated Free Radical Polymerization of Methacrylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available By combination of high trapping free radical efficiency of the thioketone and resonance of the allylic radical, a new type of mediating agent, 1,3,3-triphenylprop-2-ene-1-thione (TPPT has been successfully synthesized, and then is used to study controlled free radical polymerization of methacrylates. Very stable TPPT radicals at the end of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA are detected in the polymerization of MMA using TPPT and AIBN as the control agent and initiator. The MALDI-TOF MS spectra are used to identify terminal groups of the resultant poly(glycidyl methacrylate (PGMA, and major component of the obtained polymer has the structure, (CH32(CNC-PGMA-C7H9O3. Chain extension reaction tests ascertain formation of the dead polymers during the polymer storage and purification process of the polymers. Owing to very slow fragmentation reaction of the TPPT-terminated polymethacrylate radical and addition reaction of this radical with a primary radical, the growing chain radicals are difficult to be regenerated, leading to an unobvious change of the molecular weight with monomer conversion. The molecular weights of polymers can be controlled by the ratios of monomer/initiator and TPPT/initiator. However, the first order kinetics of the polymerization and the polymers with narrow polydispersity are obtained, and these phenomena are discussed. This study provides useful information on how to design a better controlling agent.

  13. Direct evidence for a chronic CD8+-T-cell-mediated immune reaction to tax within the muscle of a human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1-infected patient with sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Simona; Cochet, Madeleine; Mikol, Jacqueline; Teixeira, Antonio; Gessain, Antoine; Pique, Claudine

    2004-10-01

    Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection can lead to the development of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), concomitantly with or without other inflammatory disorders such as myositis. These pathologies are considered immune-mediated diseases, and it is assumed that migration within tissues of both HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells and anti-HTLV-1 cytotoxic T cells represents a pivotal event. However, although HTLV-1-infected T cells were found in inflamed lesions, the antigenic specificity of coinfiltrated CD8(+) T cells remains to be determined. In this study, we performed both ex vivo and in situ analyses using muscle biopsies obtained from an HTLV-1-infected patient with HAM/TSP and sporadic inclusion body myositis. We found that both HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells directed to the dominant Tax antigen can be amplified from muscle cell cultures. Moreover, we were able to detect in two successive muscle biopsies both tax mRNA-positive mononuclear cells and T cells recognized by the Tax11-19/HLA-A*02 tetramer and positive for perforin. These findings provide the first direct demonstration that anti-Tax cytotoxic T cells are chronically recruited within inflamed tissues of an HTLV-1 infected patient, which validates the cytotoxic immune reaction model for the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated inflammatory disease.

  14. Natural gas conversion. Part VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesia, E.; Spivey, J.J.; Fleisch, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    This volume contains peer-reviewed manuscripts describing the scientific and technological advances presented at the 6th Natural Gas Conversion Symposium held in Alaska in June 2001. This symposium continues the tradition of excellence and the status as the premier technical meeting in this area established by previous meetings. The 6th Natural Gas Conversion Symposium is conducted under the overall direction of the Organizing Committee. The Program Committee was responsible for the review, selection, editing of most of the manuscripts included in this volume. A standing International Advisory Board has ensured the effective long-term planning and the continuity and technical excellence of these meetings. The titles of the contributions are: Impact of syngas generation technology selection on a GTL FPSO; Methane conversion via microwave plasma initiated by a metal initiator; Mechanism of carbon deposit/removal in methane dry reforming on supported metal catalysts; Catalyst-assisted oxidative dehydrogenation of light paraffins in short contact time reactors; Catalytic dehydrogenation of propane over a PtSn/SiO 2 catalyst with oxygen addition: selective oxidation of H2 in the presence of hydrocarbons; Hydroconversion of a mixture of long chain n-paraffins to middle distillate: effect of the operating parameters and products properties; Decomposition/reformation processes and CH4 combustion activity of PdO over Al2O3 supported catalysts for gas turbine applications; Lurgi's mega-methanol technology opens the door for a new era in down-stream applications;Expanding markets for GTL fuels and specialty products; Some critical issues in the analysis of partial oxidation reactions in monolith reactors

  15. Analysis of graphite gasification by water vapor at different conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaowei, Luo; Xiaoyu, Yu; Suyuan, Yu; Jean-Charles, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite was gasified at different conversions. • The reaction temperature influences on the dimensionless the reaction rate. • The thickness or radius influence on the dimensionless reaction rate. - Abstract: The gasification rate of porous solids varies with the conversions with the rate increasing to a maximum and then decreasing. Many graphite gasification experiments have illustrated that the maximum gasification rates occur at different conversions for different temperatures and sample geometries. Thus, the gasification rate is related to the conversion, temperature and geometry of the graphite. The influences of those factors were studied for the graphite gasification by water vapor. A theoretical analysis was done on the basis of several logical assumptions. The influence of temperatures on the reaction rate was investigated for plate-like and cylindrical graphite. The effects of thickness for a plate-like graphite sample and of radius for a cylindrical sample on the reaction rate were also studied theoretically. The results reveal that the maximum dimensionless reaction rate decreases with reaction temperature. The plate thickness or the cylinder radius also affects the maximum dimensionless reaction rate

  16. Catalysis of Nuclear Reactions by Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoglavšek, Matej

    2018-01-01

    Electron screening enhances nuclear reaction cross sections at low energies. We studied the nuclear reaction 1H(19F,αγ)16O in inverse kinematics in different solid hydrogen targets. Measured resonance strengths differed by up to a factor of 10 in different targets. We also studied the 2H(p,γ)3He fusion reaction and observed electrons emitted as reaction products instead of γ rays. In this case electron screening greatly enhances internal conversion probability.

  17. Intercultural Mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Marian Radulescu; Denisa Mitrut

    2012-01-01

    The Intercultural Mediator facilitates exchanges between people of different socio-cultural backgrounds and acts as a bridge between immigrants and national and local associations, health organizations, services and offices in order to foster integration of every single individual. As the use mediation increases, mediators are more likely to be involved in cross-cultural mediation, but only the best mediators have the opportunity to mediate cross border business disputes or international poli...

  18. Analytical solutions for non-linear conversion of a porous solid particle in a gas–I. Isothermal conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brem, Gerrit; Brouwers, J.J.H.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical description are presented for non-linear heterogeneous conversion of a porous solid particle reacting with a surrounding gas. Account has been taken of a reaction rate of general order with respect to gas concentration, intrinsic reaction surface area and pore diffusion, which change with

  19. Catalytic conversion of methane: Carbon dioxide reforming and oxidative coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Natural gas conversion remains one of the essential technologies for current energy needs. This review focuses on the mechanistic aspects of the development of efficient and durable catalysts for two reactions, carbon dioxide reforming and the oxidative coupling of methane. These two reactions have tremendous technological significance for practical application in industry. An understanding of the fundamental aspects and reaction mechanisms of the catalytic reactions reviewed in this study would support the design of industrial catalysts. CO 2 reforming of methane utilizes CO 2, which is often stored in large quantities, to convert as a reactant. Strategies to eliminate carbon deposition, which is the major problem associated with this reaction, are discussed. The oxidative coupling of methane directly produces ethylene in one reactor through a slightly exothermic reaction, potentially minimizing the capital cost of the natural gas conversion process. The focus of discussion in this review will be on the attainable yield of C 2 products by rigorous kinetic analyses.

  20. Electrocatalytic process for carbon dioxide conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Kutz, Robert

    2017-11-14

    An electrocatalytic process for carbon dioxide conversion includes combining a Catalytically Active Element and a Helper Polymer in the presence of carbon dioxide, allowing a reaction to proceed to produce a reaction product, and applying electrical energy to said reaction to achieve electrochemical conversion of said carbon dioxide reactant to said reaction product. The Catalytically Active Element can be a metal in the form of supported or unsupported particles or flakes with an average size between 0.6 nm and 100 nm. The reaction products comprise at least one of CO, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, (COOH).sub.2, (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and CF.sub.3COOH.

  1. Effect of CO on NO and N2O conversions in nonthermal argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Guibing; Argyle, Morris D.; Radosz, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    200-600 ppm of CO inhibit NO conversion in nonthermal Ar plasma, but do not produce N 2 O. However, 1.01% of CO has no effect on NO conversion, but produces N 2 O. In general, N 2 O conversion in Ar plasma decreases with increasing CO concentration. These experimental results cannot be explained by charge transfer reactions of Ar + . Selectivity analysis of all excited states of Ar possibly contributing to NO x conversion without and with CO suggests that only Ar( 3 P 2 ) contributes to NO x conversion and CO dissociation. A kinetic model of 43 reactions is required to model NO conversion or N 2 O conversion in Ar without CO, whereas 81 reactions are required to model NO conversion and N 2 O conversion in Ar with CO. At constant gas pressure, a single set of model parameters can predict NO conversion or N 2 O conversion without and with CO. All experimental results can be explained using a reaction mechanism in which excited neutral states of Ar are the only active species, which supports the conclusion that cations have a negligible impact on these nonthermal plasma reactions

  2. Boiler conversions for biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinni, J [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Boiler conversions from grate- and oil-fired boilers to bubbling fluidized bed combustion have been most common in pulp and paper industry. Water treatment sludge combustion, need for additional capacity and tightened emission limits have been the driving forces for the conversion. To accomplish a boiler conversion for biofuel, the lower part of the boiler is replaced with a fluidized bed bottom and new fuel, ash and air systems are added. The Imatran Voima Rauhalahti pulverized-peat-fired boiler was converted to bubbling fluidized bed firing in 1993. In the conversion the boiler capacity was increased by 10 % to 295 MWth and NO{sub x} emissions dropped. In the Kymmene Kuusankoski boiler, the reason for conversion was the combustion of high chlorine content biosludge. The emissions have been under general European limits. During the next years, the emission limits will tighten and the boilers will be designed for most complete combustion and compounds, which can be removed from flue gases, will be taken care of after the boiler. (orig.) 3 refs.

  3. Boiler conversions for biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinni, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Boiler conversions from grate- and oil-fired boilers to bubbling fluidized bed combustion have been most common in pulp and paper industry. Water treatment sludge combustion, need for additional capacity and tightened emission limits have been the driving forces for the conversion. To accomplish a boiler conversion for biofuel, the lower part of the boiler is replaced with a fluidized bed bottom and new fuel, ash and air systems are added. The Imatran Voima Rauhalahti pulverized-peat-fired boiler was converted to bubbling fluidized bed firing in 1993. In the conversion the boiler capacity was increased by 10 % to 295 MWth and NO{sub x} emissions dropped. In the Kymmene Kuusankoski boiler, the reason for conversion was the combustion of high chlorine content biosludge. The emissions have been under general European limits. During the next years, the emission limits will tighten and the boilers will be designed for most complete combustion and compounds, which can be removed from flue gases, will be taken care of after the boiler. (orig.) 3 refs.

  4. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  5. Thermal Conversion of Methane to Acetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fincke, James Russell; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Hyde, Timothy Allen; Wright, Randy Ben; Bewley, Randy Lee; Haggard, Delon C; Swank, William David

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the experimental demonstration of a process for the direct thermal conversion of methane to acetylene. The process utilizes a thermal plasma heat source to dissociation products react to form a mixture of acetylene and hydrogen. The use of a supersonic expansion of the hot gas is investigated as a method of rapidly cooling (quenching) the product stream to prevent further reaction or thermal decomposition of the acetylene which can lower the overall efficiency of the process.

  6. An optimized rapid bisulfite conversion method with high recovery of cell-free DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shaohua; Long, Fei; Cheng, Juanbo; Huang, Daixin

    2017-12-19

    Methylation analysis of cell-free DNA is a encouraging tool for tumor diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis. Sensitivity of methylation analysis is a very important matter due to the tiny amounts of cell-free DNA available in plasma. Most current methods of DNA methylation analysis are based on the difference of bisulfite-mediated deamination of cytosine between cytosine and 5-methylcytosine. However, the recovery of bisulfite-converted DNA based on current methods is very poor for the methylation analysis of cell-free DNA. We optimized a rapid method for the crucial steps of bisulfite conversion with high recovery of cell-free DNA. A rapid deamination step and alkaline desulfonation was combined with the purification of DNA on a silica column. The conversion efficiency and recovery of bisulfite-treated DNA was investigated by the droplet digital PCR. The optimization of the reaction results in complete cytosine conversion in 30 min at 70 °C and about 65% of recovery of bisulfite-treated cell-free DNA, which is higher than current methods. The method allows high recovery from low levels of bisulfite-treated cell-free DNA, enhancing the analysis sensitivity of methylation detection from cell-free DNA.

  7. Photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gottfried H

    2015-01-01

    This concise primer on photovoltaic solar energy conversion invites readers to reflect on the conversion of solar light into energy at the most fundamental level and encourages newcomers to the field to help find meaningful answers on how photovoltaic solar energy conversion can work (better), eventually contributing to its ongoing advancement. The book is based on lectures given to graduate students in the Physics Department at the University of Oldenburg over the last two decades, yet also provides an easy-to-follow introduction for doctoral and postdoctoral students from related disciplines such as the materials sciences and electrical engineering. Inspired by classic textbooks in the field, it reflects the author’s own ideas on how to understand, visualize and eventually teach the microscopic physical mechanisms and effects, while keeping the text as concise as possible so as to introduce interested readers to the field and balancing essential knowledge with open questions.

  8. Catalytic Conversion of Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmundsen, Christian Mårup

    a renewable route to aromatics. The conversion of biomass by high temperature processes is a desirable prospect due to the high volumetric production rates which can be achieved, and the ability of these types of processes to convert a wide range of substrates. Current processes however typically have rather...... with the production of commodity chemicals from the most abundantly available renewable source of carbon, carbohydrates. The production of alkyl lactates by the Lewis acid catalyzed conversion of hexoses is an interesting alternative to current fermentation based processes. A range of stannosilicates were...... to be an efficient initial conversion step in the utilization of biomass for chemicals production. The shift from an oil based chemical industry to one based on renewable resources is bound to happen sooner or later, however the environmental problems associated with the burning of fossil resources means...

  9. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  10. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Takaguchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song et al., Science 327, 1018 (2010SCIEAS0036-8075] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  11. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a converse barrier certificate theorem for a generic dynamical system.We show that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system defined on a compact manifold. Other authors have developed a related result, by assuming that the dynamical system has no singular...... points in the considered subset of the state space. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with generic dynamical systems with multiple singularities. Afterwards, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorem and illustrate the differences between ours and previous work...

  12. Dose conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    The following is discussed in this report: concepts and quantities used in calculating radiation dose from internal and external exposure. Tabulations of dose conversion factor for internal and external exposure to radionuclides. Dose conversion factors give dose per unit intake (internal) or dose per unit concentration in environment (external). Intakes of radionuclides for internal exposure and concentrations of radionuclides in environment for external exposure are assumed to be known. Intakes and concentrations are obtained, e.g., from analyses of environmental transport and exposure pathways. differences between dosimetry methods for radionuclides and hazardous chemicals are highlighted

  13. Ocean wave energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    McCormick, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    This volume will prove of vital interest to those studying the use of renewable resources. Scientists, engineers, and inventors will find it a valuable review of ocean wave mechanics as well as an introduction to wave energy conversion. It presents physical and mathematical descriptions of the nine generic wave energy conversion techniques, along with their uses and performance characteristics.Author Michael E. McCormick is the Corbin A. McNeill Professor of Naval Engineering at the U.S. Naval Academy. In addition to his timely and significant coverage of possible environmental effects associa

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The object of this book is to present a review of the basic principles and practical aspects of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion. The author has tried to give qualitative semiphysical arguments where possible for the benefit of the reader who is unfamiliar with plasma physics. The aim of MHD energy conversion is to apply to a specific practical goal a part of what has become a vast area of science called plasma physics. The author has attempted to note in the text where a broader view might be fruitful and to give appropriate references

  15. Kinetics of Scheelite Conversion in Sulfuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Leiting; Li, Xiaobin; Zhou, Qiusheng; Peng, Zhihong; Liu, Guihua; Qi, Tiangui; Taskinen, Pekka

    2018-02-01

    Complete conversion of scheelite in H2SO4 solution plays a key role in exploration of cleaner technology for producing ammonium paratungstate. In this work, the factors influencing scheelite conversion were investigated experimentally to model its kinetics. The results indicated that the conversion rate increases with increasing temperature and reducing particle size, but is almost independent of stirring speed. Moreover, although the conversion rate increases with increasing initial H2SO4 concentration (≤ 1.25 mol/L), it decreases rapidly at 1.5 mol/L H2SO4 after 10 min due to formation of a H2WO4 layer. The experimental data agree quite well with the shrinking core model under chemical reaction control in ≤ 1.25 mol/L H2SO4 solution, and the kinetic equation was established as: 1- ( 1- α )^{ 1 / 3} = 2 2 2 5 4 6. 6\\cdot C_{{{H}_{ 2} {SO}_{ 4} }}^{ 1. 2 2 6} \\cdot r_{ 0}^{ - 1} \\cdot e^{{ - 3 9 2 6 0/RT}} \\cdot t (t, min). This work could contribute to better understanding of scheelite conversion in H2SO4 solution and development of a new route for ammonium paratungstate production.

  16. Four-body conversion of atomic helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Vries, C.P.; Oskam, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    The conversion of atomic helium ions into molecular ions was studied in pure helium and in helium-neon mixtures containing between 0.1 at. % and 50 at. % neon. The experiments showed that the termolecular conversion reaction, He + +2He → He 2 + +He, is augmented by the four-body conversion reaction He + +3He → products, where the products could include either He 2 + or He 3 + ions. Conversion rate coefficients of (5.7 +- 0.8) x 10 -32 cm 6 sec -1 and (2.6 +- 0.4) x 10 -49 cm 9 sec -1 were found for the termolecular and four-body conversion reactions, respectively. In addition, rate coefficients for the following Ne + conversion reactions were measured: Ne + +He+He → (HeNe) + +He, (2.3 +- 0.1) x 10 -32 cm 6 sec -1 ; Ne + +He+Ne → (HeNe) + +Ne or Ne 2 + +He, (8.0 +- 0.8) x 10 -32 cm 6 sec -1 ; and Ne + +Ne+Ne → Ne 2 + +Ne, (5.1 +- 0.3) x 10 -32 cm 6 sec -1 . All rate coefficients are at a gas temperature of 295 K

  17. Direct growth of metal-organic frameworks thin film arrays on glassy carbon electrode based on rapid conversion step mediated by copper clusters and hydroxide nanotubes for fabrication of a high performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokhian, Saeed; Khaki Sanati, Elnaz; Hosseini, Hadi

    2018-07-30

    The direct growth of self-supported metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) thin film can be considered as an effective strategy for fabrication of the advanced modified electrodes in sensors and biosensor applications. However, most of the fabricated MOFs-based sensors suffer from some drawbacks such as time consuming for synthesis of MOF and electrode making, need of a binder or an additive layer, need of expensive equipment and use of hazardous solvents. Here, a novel free-standing MOFs-based modified electrode was fabricated by the rapid direct growth of MOFs on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). In this method, direct growth of MOFs was occurred by the formation of vertically aligned arrays of Cu clusters and Cu(OH) 2 nanotubes, which can act as both mediator and positioning fixing factor for the rapid formation of self-supported MOFs on GCE surface. The effect of both chemically and electrochemically formed Cu(OH) 2 nanotubes on the morphological and electrochemical performance of the prepared MOFs were investigated. Due to the unique properties of the prepared MOFs thin film electrode such as uniform and vertically aligned structure, excellent stability, high electroactive surface area, and good availability to analyte and electrolyte diffusion, it was directly used as the electrode material for non-enzymatic electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose. Moreover, the potential utility of this sensing platform for the analytical determination of glucose concentration was evaluated by the amperometry technique. The results proved that the self-supported MOFs thin film on GCE is a promising electrode material for fabricating and designing non-enzymatic glucose sensors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight tandem mass spectrometry based quantitative structure-retention relationships of amino acid analogues derivatized via n-propyl chloroformate mediated reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritikos, Nikolaos; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Loukas, Yannis L; Dotsikas, Yannis

    2015-07-17

    In the current study, quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRR) were constructed based on data obtained by a LC-(ESI)-QTOF-MS/MS method for the determination of amino acid analogues, following their derivatization via chloroformate esters. Molecules were derivatized via n-propyl chloroformate/n-propanol mediated reaction. Derivatives were acquired through a liquid-liquid extraction procedure. Chromatographic separation is based on gradient elution using methanol/water mixtures from a 70/30% composition to an 85/15% final one, maintaining a constant rate of change. The group of examined molecules was diverse, including mainly α-amino acids, yet also β- and γ-amino acids, γ-amino acid analogues, decarboxylated and phosphorylated analogues and dipeptides. Projection to latent structures (PLS) method was selected for the formation of QSRRs, resulting in a total of three PLS models with high cross-validated coefficients of determination Q(2)Y. For this reason, molecular structures were previously described through the use of descriptors. Through stratified random sampling procedures, 57 compounds were split to a training set and a test set. Model creation was based on multiple criteria including principal component significance and eigenvalue, variable importance, form of residuals, etc. Validation was based on statistical metrics Rpred(2),QextF2(2),QextF3(2) for the test set and Roy's metrics rm(Av)(2) and rm(δ)(2), assessing both predictive stability and internal validity. Based on aforementioned models, simplified equivalent were then created using a multi-linear regression (MLR) method. MLR models were also validated with the same metrics. The suggested models are considered useful for the estimation of retention times of amino acid analogues for a series of applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  20. Electrochemical solar energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerischer, H.

    1991-01-01

    The principles of solar energy conversion in photoelectrochemical cells are briefly reviewed. Cells for the generation of electric power and for energy storage in form of electrochemical energy are described. These systems are compared with solid state photovoltaic devices, and the inherent difficulties for the operation of the electrochemical systems are analyzed. (author). 28 refs, 10 figs

  1. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system. Specifically, we prove converse barrier certificate theorems for a class of structurally stable dynamical systems. Other authors have developed a related result by assuming that the dynamical system has neither...

  2. Wavelength conversion devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Benny; Durhuus, Terji; Jørgensen, Carsten

    1996-01-01

    system requirements. The ideal wavelength converter should be transparent to the bit rate and signal format and provide an unchirped output signal with both a high extinction ratio and a large signal-to-noise ratio. It should allow conversion to both shorter and longer wavelengths with equal performance...

  3. Conversation and research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, Jan Gerrit; Veermans, K.H.

    2001-01-01

    Gordon Pask’s conversation theory was created in the 1970s. The theory encompasses a high-level framework for studying interactions between actors in artificial situations where people co-operate, have conflicts, follow rules, negotiate outcomes, invent new rules together, etc. Sadly, the theory is

  4. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  5. The Nanticoke conversion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    A study was conducted to assess the conversion of the Nanticoke coal-fired power plant to cleaner burning natural gas combined-cycle gas turbines. The Nanticoke Generating Station on Lake Erie is responsible for more than 50 per cent of Ontario Power Generation's (OPG) coal-fired electricity production. The OPG is proposing to work towards compliance with the newly signed Ozone Annex to the 1991 Canada-United States Air Quality Agreement which will require fossil-fueled power plants in southern Ontario to reduce their smog-causing nitrogen oxides emissions by about 50 per cent by 2007. This study assessed the emission reduction benefits and financial costs of conversion compared to continuing to operate Nanticoke as a coal-fired plant. The analysis includes a base case set of data on fuel prices, retrofit costs, fuel efficiencies, annual capacity factors and other parameters. It was determined that conversion would cost the average household less than $3 per month on their electricity bill. Conversion would also reduce emissions nitrogen oxide, a major smog pollutant, by 83 per cent and the particulates that form the most health-threatening portion of smog would be reduced by 100 per cent. 15 tabs., 1 fig.

  6. Leadership is a conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groysberg, Boris; Slind, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Globalization and new technologies have sharply reduced the efficacy of command-and-control management and its accompanying forms of corporate communication. In the course of a recent research project, the authors concluded that by talking with employees, rather than simply issuing orders, leaders can promote operational flexibility, employee engagement, and tight strategic alignment. Groysberg and Slind have identified four elements of organizational conversation that reflect the essential attributes of interpersonal conversation: intimacy, interactivity, inclusion, and intentionality. Intimacy shifts the focus from a top-down distribution of information to a bottom-up exchange of ideas. Organizational conversation is less corporate in tone and more casual. And it's less about issuing and taking orders than about asking and answering questions. Interactivity entails shunning the simplicity of monologue and embracing the unpredictable vitality of dialogue. Traditional one-way media-print and broadcast, in particular-give way to social media buttressed by social thinking. Inclusion turns employees into full-fledged conversation partners, entitling them to provide their own ideas, often on company channels. They can create content and act as brand ambassadors, thought leaders, and storytellers. Intentionality enables leaders and employees to derive strategically relevant action from the push and pull of discussion and debate.

  7. Predicting AD conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawu; Mattila, Jussi; Ruiz, Miguel �ngel Mu�oz

    2013-01-01

    To compare the accuracies of predicting AD conversion by using a decision support system (PredictAD tool) and current research criteria of prodromal AD as identified by combinations of episodic memory impairment of hippocampal type and visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) on MRI...

  8. Conversion tables. Appendix I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKerrell, H.

    1975-01-01

    Tables are presented for the conversion of standard (5568 year half-life) C-14 dates to calendar years. The major part of the data converts C-14 dates to tree-ring years: additional data are given, based on the Egyptian historical curve. (U.K.)

  9. Wavelength conversion technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian

    1998-01-01

    Optical wavelength conversion is currently attracting much interest. This is because it enables full flexibility and eases management of WDM fibre networks. The tutorial will review existing and potential application areas. Examples of node architectures and network demonstrators that use wavelen...

  10. Our Digital Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes their digital conversion initiative at Mooresville Graded School District. The project has placed a MacBook Air laptop in the hands of every 3rd through 12th grader and their teachers in the district over the past four years, with over 5,000 computers distributed. But they believe their academic successes have…

  11. Spin conversion induced by spin-orbit interaction in positronium collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, H; Nakayama, T; Hyodo, T

    2009-01-01

    The positronium spin conversion reaction induced by spin-orbit interaction is investigated. We obtain the reaction rates during positronium-Xe and positronium-Kr collisions by using the Zeeman mixing of positronium states. At thermal energies corresponding to room temperature, the reaction rate for spin conversion due to spin-orbit interaction is found to be almost twice that for the positronium pick-off reaction. We also study the energy dependence of the reaction rate. The mean energy of positronium is controlled by changing the gas temperature and using positronium in thermal equilibrium. We found that the reaction rate increases with the collision energy.

  12. Process systems engineering issues and applications towards reducing carbon dioxide emissions through conversion technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roh, Kosan; Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews issues and applications for design of sustainable carbon dioxide conversion processes, specifically through chemical conversion, and the integration of the conversion processes with other systems from a process systems engineering (PSE) view-point. Systematic and computer......-aided methods and tools for reaction network generation, processing route generation, process design/optimization, and sustainability analysis are reviewed with respect to carbon dioxide conversion. Also, the relevant gaps and opportunities are highlighted. In addition, the integration of carbon dioxide...

  13. Induction of Hypozincemia and Hepatic Metallothionein Synthesis in Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-19

    cells to produce endogenous pyrogen (EP), the mediator of febrile response. Controversial evidence exists, however , concerning the differentiation of LEM...hypersensitivity reactions, Kampschmid t and Pulliam (1) proposed that leukocytic endogenous mediator (LEN) is released from phagocytic cells after... endogenous mediator(s) such as LEN, no conclusive evidence is available to indicate a mRNA requirement for the production of potential mediator(s

  14. Doing statistical mediation and moderation

    CERN Document Server

    Jose, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    Written in a friendly, conversational style, this book offers a hands-on approach to statistical mediation and moderation for both beginning researchers and those familiar with modeling. Starting with a gentle review of regression-based analysis, Paul Jose covers basic mediation and moderation techniques before moving on to advanced topics in multilevel modeling, structural equation modeling, and hybrid combinations, such as moderated mediation. User-friendly features include numerous graphs and carefully worked-through examples; ""Helpful Suggestions"" about procedures and pitfalls; ""Knowled

  15. Application of Enzyme Coupling Reactions to Shift Thermodynamically Limited Biocatalytic Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu, Rohana; Woodley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    , it can be challenging to combine several engineered enzymes in vitro for the conversion of non-natural substrates. In this mini-review we focus on enzyme coupling reactions as a tool to alleviate thermodynamic constraints in synthetically useful biocatalytic reactions. The implications of thermodynamic...... shift the equilibrium of otherwise thermodynamically unfavourable reactions to give a higher conversion of the target product. By coupling an energetically unfavourable reaction with a more favourable one, the multi-enzyme cascade mimics the approach taken in nature in metabolic pathways. Nevertheless...

  16. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  17. Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWeele, T J; Vansteelandt, S

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the causal inference literature on mediation have extended traditional approaches to direct and indirect effects to settings that allow for interactions and non-linearities. In this paper, these approaches from causal inference are further extended to settings in which multiple mediators may be of interest. Two analytic approaches, one based on regression and one based on weighting are proposed to estimate the effect mediated through multiple mediators and the effects through other pathways. The approaches proposed here accommodate exposure-mediator interactions and, to a certain extent, mediator-mediator interactions as well. The methods handle binary or continuous mediators and binary, continuous or count outcomes. When the mediators affect one another, the strategy of trying to assess direct and indirect effects one mediator at a time will in general fail; the approach given in this paper can still be used. A characterization is moreover given as to when the sum of the mediated effects for multiple mediators considered separately will be equal to the mediated effect of all of the mediators considered jointly. The approach proposed in this paper is robust to unmeasured common causes of two or more mediators.

  18. Research and development of utilization technology of solar thermal system for industrial and other use. Research and development of key technology (energy conversion on technology using chemical reactions); Sangyoyo nado solar system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu. Yoso gijutsu no kenkyu (kagaku energy henkan gijutsu no kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takita, M [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Described herein are the results of the FY1994 research program for energy conversion technology using chemical reactions by the aid of solar energy. The demonstration runs were conducted by a bench-scale unit, which was operated stably for 100h, to produce promising results. The catalyst exhibits stable performance, without showing a sign of deactivation. It is found that the heat pump system works well, without being interfered with accumulated by-products. A heat of approximately 2,100kcal/h is recovered. It is confirmed that steam of 150{degree}C and 200{degree}C is generated from hot water of 80{degree}C and 95{degree}C, respectively. The bench-scale runs show a thermal efficiency of around 10%, which is lower than the target level. However, the runs with hydrogen-occluding alloy attain a process thermal efficiency of 30%. The system in which solar collector and chemical heat pump units are combined is evaluated with respect to its economic efficiency and operability for its eventual commercialization. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The Role of Learners' Field Dependence and Gender on the Effects of Conversational versus Non-Conversational Narrations in Multimedia Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liew Tze; Su-Mae, Tan; Wi, Tay Nuo

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to ascertain if the effectiveness of conversational narrations and non-conversational narrations in multimedia environment will be mediated by learners' field dependence and gender. 53 participants (25 field dependent and 28 field independent subjects) were randomly divided to interact with either one of…

  20. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  1. Wind energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longrigg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  2. Clinical linguistics: conversational reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal, David

    2013-04-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference participants during that time.

  3. Conversations with Miss Jane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Fabre

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the wide range of conversations in the autobiography, this essay will attempt to appraise the importance of these verbal exchanges in relation to the overall narrative structure of the book and to the prevalent oral tradition in Louisiana culture, as both an individual and communal expression. The variety of circumstances, the setting and staging, the interlocutors , and the complex intersection of time and place, of stories and History, will be examined; in these conversations with Miss Jane many actors participate, from  the interviewer-narrator, to most characters; even the reader becomes involved.Speaking, hearing, listening, keeping silent is an elaborate ritual that performs many functions; besides conveying news or rumors, it imparts information on the times and on the life of a “representative” woman whose existence - spanning a whole century- is both singular and emblematic. Most importantly this essay will analyse the resonance of an eventful and often dramatic era on her sensibility and conversely show how her evolving sensibility informs that history and draws attention to aspects that might have passed unnoticed or be forever silenced. Jane’s desire for liberty and justice is often challenged as she faces the possibilities of life or death.Conversations build up a complex, often contradictory, but compelling portrait: torn between silence and vehemence, between memories and the urge to meet the future, Jane summons body and mind to find her way through the maze of a fast changing world; self-willed and obstinate she claims her right to speak, to express with wit and wisdom her firm belief in the word, in the ability to express deep seated convictions and faith and a whole array of feelings and emotions.

  4. Plasma Thermal Conversion of Methane to Acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, James Russell; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Hyde, Timothy Allen; Detering, Brent Alan; Wright, Randy Ben; Bewley, Randy Lee; Haggard, Delon C; Swank, William David

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a re-examination of a known process for the direct plasma thermal conversion of methane to acetylene. Conversion efficiencies (% methane converted) approached 100% and acetylene yields in the 90-95% range with 2-4% solid carbon production were demonstrated. Specificity for acetylene was higher than in prior work. Improvements in conversion efficiency, yield, and specificity were due primarily to improved injector design and reactant mixing, and minimization of temperature gradients and cold boundary layers. At the 60-kilowatt scale cooling by wall heat transfer appears to be sufficient to quench the product stream and prevent further reaction of acetylene resulting in the formation of heavier hydrocarbon products or solid carbon. Significantly increasing the quenching rate by aerodynamic expansion of the products through a converging-diverging nozzle led to a reduction in the yield of ethylene but had little effect on the yield of other hydrocarbon products. While greater product selectivity for acetylene has been demonstrated, the specific energy consumption per unit mass of acetylene produced was not improved upon. A kinetic model that includes the reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of acetylene and heavier hydrocarbons, through benzene, is described

  5. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorri, J., E-mail: juha.m.t.sorri@jyu.fi [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyvaskyla (Finland); Greenlees, P.T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyvaskyla (Finland); Cox, D.M. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyvaskyla (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyvaskyla (Finland); Herzberg, R.-D. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P.J.; Barton, C.J.; Jenkins, D.G. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-11

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of {sup 154}Sm, {sup 152}Sm and {sup 166}Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  6. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P.T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D.M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P.J.; Barton, C.J.; Jenkins, D.G.

    2016-01-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of "1"5"4Sm, "1"5"2Sm and "1"6"6Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  7. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic reaction studies, because of their capability to microscopically probe nuclear structure, are still of considerable interest in heavy-ion reactions. The recent progress in understanding various aspects of the reaction mechanism make this aim appear closer. The relation between microscopic and macroscopic behavior, as suggested, for example, by the single proton transfer data to individual final states or averaged excitation energy intervals, needs to be explored. It seems particularly useful to extend measurements to higher incident energies, to explore and understand nuclear structure aspects up to the limit of the energy range where they are important

  8. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Danny H.; Elwood, Robert H. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC and A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC and A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC and A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC and A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC and A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC and A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A

  9. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Molecular Modeling Group, Organic Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology,. Hyderabad ... thus obtained are helpful to model the regioselectivity ... compromise to model Diels–Alder reactions involving ...... acceptance.

  10. Nuclear spin conversion in formaldehyde

    OpenAIRE

    Chapovsky, Pavel L.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical model of the nuclear spin conversion in formaldehyde (H2CO) has been developed. The conversion is governed by the intramolecular spin-rotation mixing of molecular ortho and para states. The rate of conversion has been found equal 1.4*10^{-4}~1/s*Torr. Temperature dependence of the spin conversion has been predicted to be weak in the wide temperature range T=200-900 K.

  11. Metal-catalyzed asymmetric aldol reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Luiz C.; Lucca Junior, Emilio C. de; Ferreira, Marco A. B.; Polo, Ellen C., E-mail: ldias@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-12-15

    The aldol reaction is one of the most powerful and versatile methods for the construction of C-C bonds. Traditionally, this reaction was developed in a stoichiometric version; however, great efforts in the development of chiral catalysts for aldol reactions were performed in recent years. Thus, in this review article, the development of metal-mediated chiral catalysts in Mukaiyama-type aldol reaction, reductive aldol reaction and direct aldol reaction are discussed. Moreover, the application of these catalysts in the total synthesis of complex molecules is discussed. (author)

  12. Microbial Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Merry [American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Washington, DC (United States); Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  13. Conversation Analysis in Computer-Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Lloret, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The use of Conversation Analysis (CA) in the study of technology-mediated interactions is a recent methodological addition to qualitative research in the field of Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL). The expansion of CA in Second Language Acquisition research, coupled with the need for qualitative techniques to explore how people interact…

  14. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...

  15. Infrared up-conversion telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented to an up-conversion infrared telescope (110) arranged for imaging an associated scene (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared telescope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein a first optical...

  16. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  17. Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    VanderWeele, T.J.; Vansteelandt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the causal inference literature on mediation have extended traditional approaches to direct and indirect effects to settings that allow for interactions and non-linearities. In this paper, these approaches from causal inference are further extended to settings in which multiple mediators may be of interest. Two analytic approaches, one based on regression and one based on weighting are proposed to estimate the effect mediated through multiple mediators and the effects throu...

  18. Fluid transport in reaction induced fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Sun, WaiChing; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-04-01

    The process of fracture formation due to a volume increasing chemical reaction has been studied in a variety of different settings, e.g. weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al. te{royne}, serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite by Rudge et al. te{rudge} and replacement reactions in silica-poor igneous rocks by Jamtveit et al. te{jamtveit}. It is generally assumed that fracture formation will increase the net permeability of the rock, and thus increase the reactant transport rate and subsequently the total rate of material conversion, as summarised by Kelemen et al. te{kelemen}. Ulven et al. te{ulven_1} have shown that for fluid-mediated processes the ratio between chemical reaction rate and fluid transport rate in bulk rock controls the fracture pattern formed, and Ulven et al. te{ulven_2} have shown that instantaneous fluid transport in fractures lead to a significant increase in the total rate of the volume expanding process. However, instantaneous fluid transport in fractures is clearly an overestimate, and achievable fluid transport rates in fractures have apparently not been studied in any detail. Fractures cutting through an entire domain might experience relatively fast advective reactant transport, whereas dead-end fractures will be limited to diffusion of reactants in the fluid, internal fluid mixing in the fracture or capillary flow into newly formed fractures. Understanding the feedback process between fracture formation and permeability changes is essential in assessing industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock, but little is seemingly known about how large the permeability change will be in reaction-induced fracturing. In this work, we study the feedback between fracture formation during volume expansion and fluid transport in different fracture settings. We combine a discrete element model (DEM) describing a volume expanding process and the related fracture formation with different models that describe the fluid transport in the

  19. The FLIC conversion codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basher, J.C.

    1965-05-01

    This report describes the FORTRAN programmes, FLIC 1 and FLIC 2. These programmes convert programmes coded in one dialect of FORTRAN to another dialect of the same language. FLIC 1 is a general pattern recognition and replacement programme whereas FLIC 2 contains extensions directed towards the conversion of FORTRAN II and S2 programmes to EGTRAN 1 - the dialect now in use on the Winfrith KDF9. FII or S2 statements are replaced where possible by their E1 equivalents; other statements which may need changing are flagged. (author)

  20. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  1. The FLIC conversion codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basher, J C [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1965-05-15

    This report describes the FORTRAN programmes, FLIC 1 and FLIC 2. These programmes convert programmes coded in one dialect of FORTRAN to another dialect of the same language. FLIC 1 is a general pattern recognition and replacement programme whereas FLIC 2 contains extensions directed towards the conversion of FORTRAN II and S2 programmes to EGTRAN 1 - the dialect now in use on the Winfrith KDF9. FII or S2 statements are replaced where possible by their E1 equivalents; other statements which may need changing are flagged. (author)

  2. Moodle 20 Course Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Wild, Ian

    2011-01-01

    With clear instructions and plenty of screenshots, this book provides all the support and guidance you will need as you begin to convert your teaching to Moodle. Step-by-step tutorials use real-world examples to show you how to convert to Moodle in the most efficient and effective ways possible. Moodle Course Conversion carefully illustrates how Moodle can be used to teach content and ideas and clearly demonstrates the advantages of doing so. This book is for teachers, tutors, and lecturers who already have a large body of teaching material and want to use Moodle to enhance their course, rathe

  3. Direct Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, N. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1963-01-15

    In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions and the kinds of final states in which DI effects dominate and in which CN effects may almost be forgotten. The DI cross-sections which are studied are often extremely large, comparable to elastic scattering cross-sections. (author)

  4. Conversion program in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, E.B. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    The conversion of the Swedish 50 MW R2 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel has been successfully accomplished over a 16 cycles long process. The conversion started in January 1991 with the introduction of 6 LEU assemblies in the 8*8 core. The first all LEU core was loaded in March 1993 and physics measurements were performed for the final licensing reports. A total of 142 LEU fuel assemblies have been irradiated up until September 1994 without any fuel incident. The operating licence for the R2 reactor was renewed in mid 1994 taking into account new fuel type. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) pointed out one crucial problem with the LEU operation, that the back end of the LEU fuel cycle has not yet been solved. For the HEU fuel Sweden had the reprocessing alternative. The country is now relying heavily on the success of the USDOEs Off Site Fuels Policy to take back the spent fuel from the research reactors. They have in the meantime increased their intermediate storage facilities. There is, however, a limit both in time and space for storage of MTR-type of assemblies in water. The penalty of the lower thermal neutron flux in LEU cores has been reduced by improvements of the new irradiation rigs and by fine tuning the core calculations. The Studsvik code package, CASMO-SIMULATE, widely used for ICFM in LWRs has been modified to suit the compact MTR type of core.

  5. Microbial conversion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, P. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Bioconversion and Sustainable Development

    2006-07-01

    Microbes are a biomass and an valuable resource. This presentation discussed microbial conversion technologies along with background information on microbial cells, their characteristics and microbial diversity. Untapped opportunities for microbial conversion were identified. Metagenomic and genome mining approaches were also discussed, as they can provide access to uncultivated or unculturable microorganisms in communal populations and are an unlimited resource for biocatalysts, novel genes and metabolites. Genome mining was seen as an economical approach. The presentation also emphasized that the development of microbial biorefineries would require significant insights into the relevant microorganisms and that biocatalysts were the ultimate in sustainability. In addition, the presentation discussed the natural fibres initiative for biochemicals and biomaterials. Anticipated outputs were identified and work in progress of a new enzyme-retting cocktail to provide diversity and/or consistency in fibre characteristics for various applications were also presented. It was concluded that it is necessary to leverage understanding of biological processes to produce bioproducts in a clean and sustainable manner. tabs., figs.

  6. Communal biomass conversion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Coordinating Committee set up by the Danish government in 1986 were given the responsibility of investigating the potentials for biomass conversion plants in Denmark, especially in relation to agricultural, environmental and energy aspects. The results of the Committee's plan of management for this project are presented. This main report covers 13 background reports which deal with special aspects in detail. The report describes the overall plan of management, the demonstration and follow-up programme and the individual biogas demonstration plants. Information gained from these investigations is presented. The current general status, (with emphasis on the technical and economical aspects) and the prospects for the future are discussed. The interest other countries have shown in Danish activities within the field of biogas production is described, and the possibilities for Danish export of technology and know-how in this relation are discussed. It is claimed that Denmark is the first country that has instigated a coordinated development programme for biomass conversion plants. (AB) 24 refs

  7. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  8. Triosephosphate isomerase: energetics of the reaction catalyzed by the yeast enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickbarg, E.B.; Knowles, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase from bakers' yeast, expressed in Escherichia coli strain DF502(p12), has been purified to homogeneity. The kinetics of the reaction in each direction have been determined at pH 7.5 and 30 degrees C. Deuterium substitution at the C-2 position of substrate (R)-glyceraldehyde phosphate and at the 1-pro-R position of substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate results in kinetic isotope effects on kcat of 1.6 and 3.4, respectively. The extent of transfer of tritium from [1(R)- 3 H]dihydroxyacetone phosphate to product (R)-glyceraldehyde phosphate during the catalyzed reaction is only 3% after 66% conversion to product, indicating that the enzymic base that mediates proton transfer is in rapid exchange with solvent protons. When the isomerase-catalyzed reaction is run in tritiated water in each direction, radioactivity is incorporated both into the remaining substrate and into the product. In the exchange-conversion experiment with dihydroxyacetone phosphate as substrate, the specific radioactivity of remaining dihydroxyacetone phosphate rises as a function of the extent of reaction with a slope of about 0.3, while the specific radioactivity of the products is 54% that of the solvent. In the reverse direction with (R)-glyceraldehyde phosphate as substrate, the specific radioactivity of the product formed is only 11% that of the solvent, while the radioactivity incorporated into the remaining substrate (R)-glyceraldehyde phosphate also rises as a function of the extent of reaction with a slope of 0.3. These results have been analyzed according to the protocol described earlier to yield the free energy profile of the reaction catalyzed by the yeast isomerase

  9. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-04-26

    With the increasing production of natural gas as a result of the advancement in the technology, methane conversion to more valuable products has become a must. One of the most attractive processes which allow the utilization of the world’s most abundant hydrocarbon is the oxidative coupling. The main advantage of this process is the ability of converting methane into higher paraffins and olefins (primarily C2) in a direct way using a single reactor. Nevertheless, low C2+ yields have prevented the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized in improving the catalysts’ performance. The reaction involves the formation of methyl radicals that undergo gas-phase radical reactions. CH4 activation is believed to be done the surface oxygen species. However, recent studies showed that, in addition to the surface oxygen mediated pathway, an OH radical mediated pathway have a large contribution on the CH4 activation. The experiments of Li/MgO, Sr/La2O3 and NaWO4/SiO2 catalysts revealed variation of behavior in activity and selectivity. In addition, water effect analysis showed that Li/MgO deactivate at the presence of water due to sintering phenomena and the loss of active sites. On the other hand, negative effect on the C2 yield and CH4 conversion rate was observed with Sr/La2O3 with increasing the water partial pressure. Na2WO4/SiO2 showed a positive behavior with water in terms of CH4 conversion and C2 yield. In addition, the increment in CH4 conversion rate was found to be proportional with PO2 ¼ PH2O ½ which is consistent with the formation of OH radicals and the OH-mediated pathway. Experiments of using ring-dye laser, which is used to detect OH in combustion experiments, were tried in order to detect OH radicals in the gas-phase of the catalyst. Nevertheless

  10. Surface tension mediated conversion of light to work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, David; Pastine, Stefan J; Zettl, Alexander K; Frechet, Jean M. J

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for converting light energy to mechanical energy by modification of surface tension on a supporting fluid. The apparatus comprises an object which may be formed as a composite object comprising a support matrix and a highly light absorptive material. The support matrix may comprise a silicon polymer. The highly light absorptive material may comprise vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VANTs) embedded in the support matrix. The composite object is supported on a fluid. By exposing the highly light absorptive material to light, heat is generated, which changes the surface tension of the composite object, causing it to move physically within the fluid.

  11. Laccase-mediator catalyzed conversion of model lignin compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laccases play an important role in the biological breakdown of lignin and have great potential in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic feedstocks. We examined a variety of laccases, both commercially prepared and crude extracts, for their ability to oxidize three model lignol compounds (p-coumaryl...

  12. CO2 utilization: Developments in conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdogan Alper

    2017-03-01

    The potential utilization of CO2, captured at power plants, should also been taken into consideration for sustainability. This CO2 source, which is potentially a raw material for the chemical industry, will be available at sufficient quality and at gigantic quantity upon realization of on-going tangible capture projects. Products resulting from carboxylation reactions are obvious conversions. In addition, provided that enough supply of energy from non-fossil resources, such as solar [1], is ensured, CO2 reduction reactions can produce several valuable commodity chemicals including multi-carbon compounds, such as ethylene and acrylic acid, in addition to C1 chemicals and polymers. Presently, there are only few developing technologies which can find industrial applications. Therefore, there is a need for concerted research in order to assess the viability of these promising exploratory technologies rationally.

  13. Allergic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that don't bother most people (such as venom from bee stings and certain foods, medicines, and pollens) can ... person. If the allergic reaction is from a bee sting, scrape the ... more venom. If the person has emergency allergy medicine on ...

  14. Conversation with Meir Sternberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Pianzola

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Below are the videos of the interview recorded the 21st May 2011 in Fribourg (CH, in occasion of the first RRN conference. Conversation with Meir Sternberg. Part 1 of 8 - Narratology: classical and postclassical studies. Part 2 of 8 - The development of an original theoretical framework. Part 3 of 8 - Sternberg and Genette: different ways for the same problems. Part 4 of 8 - «There are no forms except in terms of functions». Part 5 of 8 - A life writing articles: so many papers and just four books. Part 6 of 8 - Two arguments against mimetical approaches to narrative. Part 7 of 8 - «Narrative is not given, it is a construct». Part 8 of 8 - The proteus principle. the many-to-many correspondence between forms and functions.

  15. Thermodynamics and energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Struchtrup, Henning

    2014-01-01

    This textbook gives a thorough treatment of engineering thermodynamics with applications to classical and modern energy conversion devices.   Some emphasis lies on the description of irreversible processes, such as friction, heat transfer and mixing, and the evaluation of the related work losses. Better use of resources requires high efficiencies, therefore the reduction of irreversible losses should be seen as one of the main goals of a thermal engineer. This book provides the necessary tools.   Topics include: car and aircraft engines,  including Otto, Diesel and Atkinson cycles, by-pass turbofan engines, ramjet and scramjet;  steam and gas power plants, including advanced regenerative systems, solar tower, and compressed air energy storage; mixing and separation, including reverse osmosis, osmotic powerplants, and carbon sequestration; phase equilibrium and chemical equilibrium, distillation, chemical reactors, combustion processes, and fuel cells; the microscopic definition of entropy.    The book i...

  16. Communal biomass conversion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm-Nielsen, J.B.; Huntingford, S.; Halberg, N.

    1993-03-01

    The aim was to show the agricultural advantages of farmers being in connection with Communal Biogas Plant. Whether a more environmentally protectire distribution of plant nutrients from animal manure takes place through a biogas plants distribution system, whether the nitrogen in the digested slurry is better utilized and whether the connection results in slurry transportation-time reduction, are discussed. The average amount of nitrogen from animal manure used per hectare was reduced. The area of manure distribution was larger. The nitrogen efficiency was increased when using digested slurry and purchase of N mineral fertilizer decreased, resulting in considerable reduction in nitrogen leaching. The amount of slurry delivered to the local storage tanks was approximately 45 per cent of the total amount treated on the biogas plant. Conditions of manure transport improved greatly as this was now the responsibility of the communal biomass conversion plant administrators. (AB) (24 refs.)

  17. Power conversion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, M. A.

    1997-02-01

    The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

  18. Conversion of tritium gas to tritiated water in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kato, Shohei

    1985-01-01

    The literature on conversion of tritium gas to tritiated water in various environments is reviewed. The conversion mechanisms and the conversion rates are as follows. 1. In the oxidation with oxygen and the isotopic exchange with water, tritium β-rays and metal catalyst are effective. The oxidation rate is ∼ 0.02 %/day at initial tritium concentration ≤ 10 -2 Ci/l and ∼ 2 %/day at 1 Ci/l. In the presence of oxygen and water, it is not clear whether the exchange reaction occurs or not because of the small amount of data. 2. For biological conversion, soil microorganisms contribute significantly. The conversion rate is greater than 10 %/hr. The tritium gas deposition velocity, which includes the uptake rate of tritium gas by soil and the conversion rate, ranges from 0.0025 to 0.11 cm/sec and is influenced by temperature and moisture of the soil. 3. Tritium gas is converted to the tritiated water through the reaction with hydroxyl radical produced by sunlight in the atmosphere. (author)

  19. Current rectification by mediating electroactive polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ybarra, Gabriel; Moina, Carlos [Centro de Investigacion sobre Electrodeposicion y Procesos Superficiales, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Industrial, CC 157, (1650) San Martin (Argentina); Florit, M. Ines [INIFTA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, Suc. 4, CC 16, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Posadas, Dionisio [INIFTA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, Suc. 4, CC 16, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: dposadas@inifta.unlp.edu.ar

    2008-04-20

    In this work we briefly review the theoretical basis for the electrochemical rectification in mediated redox reactions at redox polymer modified electrodes. Electrochemical rectification may have two distinct origins. It is either caused by a slow kinetics of the reaction between the external redox couple and the mediator or it is originated by a slow electronic transport within the film under an unfavorable thermodynamic condition. We show experimental results for the redox mediation reaction of poly(o-aminophenol) (POAP) on the Fe{sup 2+/3+} and on the Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-} redox couples in solution that prove the proposed mechanisms of electrochemical rectification.

  20. Current rectification by mediating electroactive polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ybarra, Gabriel; Moina, Carlos; Florit, M. Ines; Posadas, Dionisio

    2008-01-01

    In this work we briefly review the theoretical basis for the electrochemical rectification in mediated redox reactions at redox polymer modified electrodes. Electrochemical rectification may have two distinct origins. It is either caused by a slow kinetics of the reaction between the external redox couple and the mediator or it is originated by a slow electronic transport within the film under an unfavorable thermodynamic condition. We show experimental results for the redox mediation reaction of poly(o-aminophenol) (POAP) on the Fe 2+/3+ and on the Fe(CN) 6 3-/4- redox couples in solution that prove the proposed mechanisms of electrochemical rectification

  1. The Role of Conversation Policy in Carrying Out Agent Conversations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, Hamilton E.; Phillips, Laurence R.

    1999-01-01

    Structured conversation diagrams, or conversation specifications, allow agents to have predictable interactions and achieve predefined information-based goals, but they lack the flexibility needed to function robustly in an unpredictable environment. We propose a mechanism that combines a typical conversation structure with a separately established policy to generate an actual conversation. The word ''policy'' connotes a high-level direction external to a specific planned interaction with the environment. Policies, which describe acceptable procedures and influence decisions, can be applied to broad sets of activity. Based on their observation of issues related to a policy, agents may dynamically adjust their communication patterns. The policy object describes limitations, constraints, and requirements that may affect the conversation in certain circumstances. Using this new mechanism of interaction simplifies the description of individual conversations and allows domain-specific issues to be brought to bear more easily during agent communication. By following the behavior of the conversation specification when possible and deferring to the policy to derive behavior in exceptional circumstances, an agent is able to function predictably under normal situations and still act rationally in abnormal situations. Different conversation policies applied to a given conversation specification can change the nature of the interaction without changing the specification

  2. Biologically mediated dissolution of volcanic glass in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudigel, H; Yayanos, A; Chastain, R; Davies, G.T.; Verdurmen, E.A Th; Schiffmann, P; Bourcier, R; de Baar, H.J.W.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effects of biological mediation on the dissolution of basaltic glass in seawater. Experiments with typical seawater microbial populations were contrasted with a sterile control, and reactions were monitored chemically and isotopically. Biologically mediated experiments produce twice

  3. Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose to Levulinic Acid by Metal Chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beixiao Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of various metal chlorides in the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid in liquid water at high temperatures was investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on the yield of levulinic acid were also explored. The results showed that alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides were not effective in conversion of cellulose, while transition metal chlorides, especially CrCl3, FeCl3 and CuCl2 and a group IIIA metal chloride (AlCl3, exhibited high catalytic activity. The catalytic performance was correlated with the acidity of the reaction system due to the addition of the metal chlorides, but more dependent on the type of metal chloride. Among those metal chlorides, chromium chloride was found to be exceptionally effective for the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid, affording an optimum yield of 67 mol % after a reaction time of 180 min, at 200 °C, with a catalyst dosage of 0.02 M and substrate concentration of 50 wt %. Chromium metal, most of which was present in its oxide form in the solid sample and only a small part in solution as Cr3+ ion, can be easily separated from the resulting product mixture and recycled. Finally, a plausible reaction scheme for the chromium chloride catalyzed conversion of cellulose in water was proposed.

  4. Paradoxical therapy in conversion disorder

    OpenAIRE

    ATAOĞLU, Ahmet

    1998-01-01

    Paradoxical therapy consists of suggesting that the patient intentionally engages in the unwanted behaviour, such as performing complusive ritual or bringing on a conversion attack. In this study paradoxical intention (PI) was used with to half of the patients with conversion disorders, while the other half were treated with diazepam in order to examine the efficiency of the PI versus diazepam in conversion disorder. Patients treated with PI appeared to have a greater improvement r...

  5. Discussion of the Investigation Method on the Reaction Kinetics of Metallurgical Reaction Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ruiling; Wu, Keng; Zhang, Jiazhi; Zhao, Yong

    Reaction kinetics of metallurgical physical chemistry which was successfully applied in metallurgy (as ferrous metallurgy, non-ferrous metallurgy) became an important theoretical foundation for subject system of traditional metallurgy. Not only the research methods were very perfect, but also the independent structures and systems of it had been formed. One of the important tasks of metallurgical reaction engineering was the simulation of metallurgical process. And then, the mechanism of reaction process and the conversion time points of different control links should be obtained accurately. Therefore, the research methods and results of reaction kinetics in metallurgical physical chemistry were not very suitable for metallurgical reaction engineering. In order to provide the definite conditions of transmission, reaction kinetics parameters and the conversion time points of different control links for solving the transmission and reaction equations in metallurgical reaction engineering, a new method for researching kinetics mechanisms in metallurgical reaction engineering was proposed, which was named stepwise attempt method. Then the comparison of results between the two methods and the further development of stepwise attempt method were discussed in this paper. As a new research method for reaction kinetics in metallurgical reaction engineering, stepwise attempt method could not only satisfy the development of metallurgical reaction engineering, but also provide necessary guarantees for establishing its independent subject system.

  6. Striatal lesions produce distinctive impairments in reaction time performance in two different operant chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasted, P J; Döbrössy, M D; Robbins, T W; Dunnett, S B

    1998-08-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a crucial role in mediating voluntary movement. Excitotoxic striatal lesions in rats have previously been shown to impair the initiation but not the execution of movement in a choice reaction time task in an automated lateralised nose-poke apparatus (the "nine-hole box"). Conversely, when a conceptually similar reaction time task has been applied in a conventional operant chamber (or "Skinner box"), striatal lesions have been seen to impair the execution rather than the initiation of the lateralised movement. The present study was undertaken to compare directly these two results by training the same group of rats to perform a choice reaction time task in the two chambers and then comparing the effects of a unilateral excitotoxic striatal lesion in both chambers in parallel. Particular attention was paid to adopting similar parameters and contingencies in the control of the task in the two test chambers. After striatal lesions, the rats showed predominantly contralateral impairments in both tasks. However, they showed a deficit in reaction time in the nine-hole box but an apparent deficit in response execution in the Skinner box. This finding confirms the previous studies and indicates that differences in outcome are not simply attributable to procedural differences in the lesions, training conditions or tasks parameters. Rather, the pattern of reaction time deficit after striatal lesions depends critically on the apparatus used and the precise response requirements for each task.

  7. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...... that have helped to enrich our understanding of mediated work and the design of computer mediation for such work....

  8. The Non-Ergodic Nature of Internal Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølling, Theis I.; Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Stephansen, Anne B.

    2014-01-01

    The absorption of light by molecules can induce ultrafast dynamics and coupling of electronic and nuclear vibrational motion. The ultrafast nature in many cases rests on the importance of several potential energy surfaces in guiding the nuclear motion—a concept of central importance in many aspects...... of chemical reaction dynamics. This Minireview focuses on the non-ergodic nature of internal conversion, that is, on the concept that the nuclear dynamics only sample a reduced phase space, potentially resulting in localization of the dynamics in real space. A series of results that highlight...... it takes to reach it. 2) Localization of energy into a single reactive mode, which is dictated by the internal conversion process. 3) Initiation of the internal conversion by activation of a single complex motion, which then specifically couples to a reactive mode. 4) Nonstatistical internal conversion...

  9. STRUCTURAL AND STRATEGIC ASPECTS OF PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED SPEECH OF A PSYCHOLOGIST MEDIATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Levchyk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents characteristic speech patterns of psychologist-mediator on the basis of five staged model of his professional speech behavior that involves the following five speech activities: introductory talks with the conflict parties; clarifying of the parties’ positions; finding the optimal solution to the problem; persuasion in the legality of a compromise; execution of the agreement between the parties. Each of these stages of the mediation process in terms of mental and speech activities of a specialist have been analyzed and subsequently the structure of mediator’s communication has been derived. The concept of a "strategy of verbal behavior" considering professional activity of a psychologist-mediator has been described in terms of its correlation with the type of negotiation behaviors of disputants. The basic types of opponents’ behavior in negotiations ‒ namely avoidance, concession, denial, aggression have been specified. The compliance of strategy of speech of mediator’s behavior to his chosen style of mediation has been discovered. The tactics and logic of mediator’s speech behavior according to the stages of mediation conversation have been determined. It has been found out that the mediator’s tactics implies application of specific professional speech skills to conduct a dialogue in accordance with the chosen strategy as well as emotional and verbal reaction of conflict sides in the process of communication.

  10. Oxygen-containing coke species in zeolite-catalyzed conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaohui; Dong, Xinglong; Liu, Xin; Han, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites are the most commonly used catalysts for methanol-to-hydrocarbon (MTH) conversion. Here, we identified two oxygen-containing compounds as coke species in zeolite catalysts after MTH reactions. We investigated the possible influences

  11. Iron Oxide Films Prepared by Rapid Thermal Processing for Solar Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickman, B.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Burrows, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Hematite is a promising and extensively investigated material for various photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes for energy conversion and storage, in particular for oxidation reactions. Thermal treatments during synthesis of hematite are found to affect the performance of hematite electrodes...

  12. Selective conversion of butane into liquid hydrocarbon fuels on alkane metathesis catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Szeto, Kaï Chung; Hardou, Lucie; Merle, Nicolas; Basset, Jean-Marie; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Papaioannou, Charalambos; Taoufik, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    We report a selective direct conversion of n-butane into higher molecular weight alkanes (C 5+) by alkane metathesis reaction catalysed by silica-alumina supported tungsten or tantalum hydrides at moderate temperature and pressure. The product

  13. Nanomaterials for photovoltaic conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davenas, J.; Ltaief, A.; Barlier, V.; Boiteux, G.; Bouazizi, A.

    2008-01-01

    A promising route for photovoltaic conversion has emerged from the combination of electroactive nanomaterials and small bandgap polymers. The formation of bulk heterojunctions resulting from the extended interfaces leads to efficient dissociation of the charge pairs generated under sunlight shown by the rapid extinction of the polymer photoluminescence for increasing contents of fullerenes or TiO 2 nanoparticles in MEH-PPV or PVK. Unconventional elaboration routes of the blends have been developed to increase the nanofiller dispersion and inhibit phase separation at high concentration. The size reduction of the acceptor domains led to a complete quenching of the radiative recombinations, obtained by specific solvent processing of MEH-PPV / C 60 nanocomposites or sol gel elaboration of TiO 2 nanoparticles in a PVK film. A simultaneous increase of the photocurrents could be achieved by the dispersion and size optimisation of the nanofillers. In situ generation of silver particles in MEH-PPV provides an example of enhanced charge separation induced by the plasmon resonance at the metal/polymer interface. The strong influence of the molecular morphology on the nanocomposite properties emphasizes the large improvements which can still be gained on the performances of organic solar cells

  14. Overview of fuel conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, A.E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The conversion of solid fuels to cleaner-burning and more user-friendly solid liquid or gaseous fuels spans many technologies. In this paper, the authors consider coal, residual oil, oil shale, tar sends tires, municipal oil waste and biomass as feedstocks and examine the processes which can be used in the production of synthetic fuels for the transportation sector. The products of mechanical processing to potentially usable fuels include coal slurries, micronized coal, solvent refined coal, vegetable oil and powdered biomall. The thermochemical and biochemical processes considered include high temperature carbide production, liquefaction, gasification, pyrolysis, hydrolysis-fermentation and anaerobic digestion. The products include syngas, synthetic natural gas, methanol, ethanol and other hydrocarbon oxygenates synthetic gasoline and diesel and jet engine oils. The authors discuss technical and economic aspects of synthetic fuel production giving particular attention and literature references to technologies not discussed in the five chapters which follow. Finally the authors discuss economic energy, and environmental aspects of synthetic fuels and their relationship to the price of imported oil

  15. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  16. Covalent Organic Framework Electrocatalysts for Clean Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Zhang, Detao; Zhao, Zhenghang; Xia, Zhenhai

    2018-02-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are promising for catalysis, sensing, gas storage, adsorption, optoelectricity, etc. owning to the unprecedented combination of large surface area, high crystallinity, tunable pore size, and unique molecular architecture. Although COFs are in their initial research stage, progress has been made in the design and synthesis of COF-based electrocatalysis for the oxygen reduction reaction, oxygen evolution reaction, hydrogen evolution reaction, and CO 2 reduction in energy conversion and fuel generation. Design principles are also established for some of the COF materials toward rational design and rapid screening of the best electrocatalysts for a specific application. Herein, the recent advances in the design and synthesis of COF-based catalysts for clean energy conversion and storage are presented. Future research directions and perspectives are also being discussed for the development of efficient COF-based electrocatalysts. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effect of Water on Ethanol Conversion over ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Muhammad Mahfuzur; Davidson, Stephen D.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This work focuses on understanding the role of water on ethanol conversion over zinc oxide (ZnO). It was found that a competitive adsorption between ethanol and water occurs on ZnO, which leads to the blockage of the strong Lewis acid site by water on ZnO. As a result, both dehydration and dehydrogenation reactions are inhibited. However, the extent of inhibition for dehydration is orders of magnitude higher than that for dehydrogenation, leading to the shift of reaction pathway from ethanol dehydration to dehydrogenation. In the secondary reactions for acetaldehyde conversion, water inhibits the acetaldehyde aldol-condensation to crotonaldehyde, favoring the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid, and then to acetone via ketonization at high temperature (i.e., 400 °C).

  18. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  19. The Conversion of Carboxylic Acids to Ketones: A Repeated Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, John W.; Wilson, Alan

    2004-09-01

    This article describes the history of the reaction converting carboxylic acids to ketones. The reaction has been rediscovered several times, yet has actually been known for centuries. The best known version of the process is the Dakin West reaction (1928), which applies to α-amino acids and also involves the simultaneous conversion of the amine group to amido functionality. Unlike other examples, this particular reaction has attracted a reasonable amount of attention and it appears to be better known than the conversion of simple carboxylic acids to ketones. However, this reaction was described as long ago as 1612, when Beguin published an account of it in his book, Tyrocinium Chymicum . Since then, many chemists have rediscovered the reaction, apparently independently. One of the earliest modern accounts was by W. H. Perkin, Sr., in 1886, who made various simple ketones by refluxing the appropriate carboxylic acids with base. However, this work has been largely ignored, including by his son, W. H. Perkin, Jr., who used a more complicated base-catalyzed ketonization to prepare small ring compounds in the early years of the 20th century. Other articles detailing the application of ketonization to organic acids are discussed, including our own work, which employed the process to crosslink carboxylated polymers for possible technical application in coatings. Despite its relative obscurity, the reaction was used by Woodward et al. in the total synthesis of strychnine, reported in 1963, and this is discussed in detail at the end of the article. See Featured Molecules .

  20. Analytical solutions for non-linear conversion of a porous solid particle in a gas–II. Non-isothermal conversion and numerical verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brem, Gerrit; Brouwers, J.J.H.

    1990-01-01

    In Part I, analytical solutions were given for the non-linear isothermal heterogeneous conversion of a porous solid particle. Account was taken of a reaction rate of general order with respect to the gas reactant, intrinsic reaction surface area and effective pore diffusion, which change with solid

  1. Analytical solutions for non-linear conversion of a porous solid particle in a gas : II. non-isothermal conversion and numerical verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brem, G.; Brouwers, J.J.H.

    1990-01-01

    In Part I, analytical solutions were given for the non-linear isothermal heterogeneous conversion of a porous solid particle. Account was taken of a reaction rate of general order with respect to the gas reactant, intrinsic reaction surface area and effective pore diffusion, which change with solid

  2. NMR Isotope Tracking Reveals Cascade Steps in Carbohydrate Conversion by Sn-Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliot, Samuel Gilbert; Taarning, Esben; Madsen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative isotope tracking studies were used to investigate the reaction pathways occurring for Sn-Beta catalyzed carbohydrate conversion to various alpha-hydroxy esters. Experimental insight into the conversion of pentoses was sought (i) by identifying pathways based on isotope patterns in th...

  3. Tree value conversion standards revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul S. DeBald; Martin E. Dale; Martin E. Dale

    1991-01-01

    Updated tree value conversion standards (TVCS) are presented for 12 important hardwood species of the oak-hickory forest. These updated standards-developed for each species by butt-log grade, merchantable height, and diameter at breast height-reflect the changes in lumber prices and in conversion costs which have occurred since 1976 when the original TVCS were...

  4. Optimization theory for ballistic conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Yanbo; Versluis, Michel; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2016-01-01

    The growing demand of renewable energy stimulates the exploration of new materials and methods for clean energy. We recently demonstrated a high efficiency and power density energy conversion mechanism by using jetted charged microdroplets, termed as ballistic energy conversion. Hereby, we model and

  5. Career conversations in vocational schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittendorff, K.M.; Brok, den P.J.; Beijaard, D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine career conversations between teachers and students in competence-based vocational education in the Netherlands. A total of 32 career conversations were observed and analysed with respect to four elements: content, teacher activities, student activities and

  6. [Neuropsychological assessment in conversion disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demır, Süleyman; Çelıkel, Feryal Çam; Taycan, Serap Erdoğan; Etıkan, İlker

    2013-01-01

    Conversion disorder is characterized by functional impairment in motor, sensory, or neurovegetative systems that cannot be explained by a general medical condition. Diagnostic systems emphasize the absence of an organic basis for the dysfunction observed in conversion disorder. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of data on the specific functional brain correlates of conversion symptoms, particularly those obtained via neuroimaging and neurophysiological assessment. The present study aimed to determine if there are differences in measures of cognitive functioning between patients with conversion disorder and healthy controls. The hypothesis of the study was that the patients with conversion disorder would have poorer neurocognitive performance than the controls. The patient group included 43 patients diagnosed as conversion disorder and other psychiatric comorbidities according to DSM-IV-TR. Control group 1 included 44 patients diagnosed with similar psychiatric comorbidities, but not conversion diosorder, and control group 2 included 43 healthy individuals. All participants completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and were administered the SCID-I and a neuropsychological test battery of 6 tests, including the Serial Digit Learning Test (SDLT), Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT), Wechsler Memory Scale, Stroop Color Word Interference Test, Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test (BJLOT), and Cancellation Test. The patient group had significantly poorer performance on the SDLT, AVLT, Stroop Color Word Interference Test, and BJLOT than both control groups. The present findings highlight the differences between the groups in learning and memory, executive and visuospatial functions, and attention, which seemed to be specific to conversion disorder.

  7. Efficient electrochemical CO2 conversion powered by renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Thakkar, Jay; Siva, Rajan; Matranga, Christopher; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Zeng, Chenjie; Jin, Rongchao

    2015-07-22

    The catalytic conversion of CO2 into industrially relevant chemicals is one strategy for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Along these lines, electrochemical CO2 conversion technologies are attractive because they can operate with high reaction rates at ambient conditions. However, electrochemical systems require electricity, and CO2 conversion processes must integrate with carbon-free, renewable-energy sources to be viable on larger scales. We utilize Au25 nanoclusters as renewably powered CO2 conversion electrocatalysts with CO2 → CO reaction rates between 400 and 800 L of CO2 per gram of catalytic metal per hour and product selectivities between 80 and 95%. These performance metrics correspond to conversion rates approaching 0.8-1.6 kg of CO2 per gram of catalytic metal per hour. We also present data showing CO2 conversion rates and product selectivity strongly depend on catalyst loading. Optimized systems demonstrate stable operation and reaction turnover numbers (TONs) approaching 6 × 10(6) molCO2 molcatalyst(-1) during a multiday (36 h total hours) CO2 electrolysis experiment containing multiple start/stop cycles. TONs between 1 × 10(6) and 4 × 10(6) molCO2 molcatalyst(-1) were obtained when our system was powered by consumer-grade renewable-energy sources. Daytime photovoltaic-powered CO2 conversion was demonstrated for 12 h and we mimicked low-light or nighttime operation for 24 h with a solar-rechargeable battery. This proof-of-principle study provides some of the initial performance data necessary for assessing the scalability and technical viability of electrochemical CO2 conversion technologies. Specifically, we show the following: (1) all electrochemical CO2 conversion systems will produce a net increase in CO2 emissions if they do not integrate with renewable-energy sources, (2) catalyst loading vs activity trends can be used to tune process rates and product distributions, and (3) state-of-the-art renewable-energy technologies are sufficient

  8. Effects of different reaction mediums on ring opening polymerization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work examined the effects of reaction conditions on ring opening ... of this study was to observe molecular weight distribution, conversion rates, and thermal ... M monomer and 0.56 M solvent), 10 mg lipase were used in the experiments.

  9. Tandem Wittig-ene reaction approach to kainic acid

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Majik, M.S.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Tilve, S.G.

    The first example of a tandem Wittig-intramolecular ene reaction approach and its application toward the synthesis of kainic acid is reported. The synthetic pathway involves conversion of prenyl bromide into phosphorane 3, followed by one-pot Wittig...

  10. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the experimental and theoretical situation regarding transfer reactions and inelastic scattering. In the first category there is little (very little) precision data for heavy projectiles and consequently almost no experience with quantitative theoretical analysis. For the inelastic scattering the rather extensive data strongly supports the coupled channels models with collective formfactors. At the most back angles, at intensities about 10 -5 of Rutherford scattering, a second, compound-like mechanism becomes dominant. The description of the interplay of these two opposite mechanisms provides a new challenge for our understanding

  11. Improvement of skeleton conversion in ICRP reference phantom conversion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhao Jun; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Thang, Nguyen Tat; Kim, Han Sung; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    In the previous skeleton conversion, most bones were directly converted from the ICRP voxel phantoms by using the 3D rendering method whereas several complex-shape bones (cranium, ribs, spines, feet, and hands) were not able to be directly converted. We alternatively employed the corresponding well-defined polygonal models and attempted to adjust them to match the voxel models. However, this approach was unsatisfactory. The shapes of the alternative models were significantly different from those of the voxel models, making it virtually impossible to exactly match the voxel models as shown in Fig. 3 (left). In order to overcome the difficulty in the complex bone conversion, the present study developed a new conversion method and converted these complex bones voxel models of the ICRP male phantom to polygonal models. The present study developed the new conversion method and successfully improved polygonal models for cranium, ribs, and spines for the ICRP male phantom. The new conversion method will be also applied to the complex bone conversion for the ICRP female phantom as well as other complex organ conversion in the future.

  12. Improvement of skeleton conversion in ICRP reference phantom conversion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhao Jun; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Thang, Nguyen Tat; Kim, Han Sung; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    In the previous skeleton conversion, most bones were directly converted from the ICRP voxel phantoms by using the 3D rendering method whereas several complex-shape bones (cranium, ribs, spines, feet, and hands) were not able to be directly converted. We alternatively employed the corresponding well-defined polygonal models and attempted to adjust them to match the voxel models. However, this approach was unsatisfactory. The shapes of the alternative models were significantly different from those of the voxel models, making it virtually impossible to exactly match the voxel models as shown in Fig. 3 (left). In order to overcome the difficulty in the complex bone conversion, the present study developed a new conversion method and converted these complex bones voxel models of the ICRP male phantom to polygonal models. The present study developed the new conversion method and successfully improved polygonal models for cranium, ribs, and spines for the ICRP male phantom. The new conversion method will be also applied to the complex bone conversion for the ICRP female phantom as well as other complex organ conversion in the future

  13. Body talk among undergraduate women: why conversations about exercise and weight loss differentially predict body appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylkiw, Louise; Butler, Nicole A

    2014-08-01

    Undergraduate women (N = 143) completed self-reports on exercise behavior, body orientation, body appreciation, and body-related talk. Results showed that conversations about weight loss/dieting and conversations about exercise differentially predicted body appreciation. Importantly, multiple regression analyses showed that the relationship between talk type and body appreciation was explained by the object-process dichotomy: Conversations about exercise oriented women to consider what their bodies can do which, in turn, predicted appreciation of one's body. In contrast, the relationship between conversations about weight loss/dieting and body appreciation was mediated by negative attitudes about one's body but not by an object orientation. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corner, J.; Richardson, K.; Fenton, N.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactions' marks a new development in the study of television as an agency of public policy debate. During the Eighties, nuclear energy became a major international issue. The disasters at Three-mile Island and Chernobyl created a global anxiety about its risks and a new sensitivity to it among politicians and journalists. This book is a case-study into documentary depictions of nuclear energy in television and video programmes and into the interpretations and responses of viewers drawn from many different occupational groupings. How are the complex and specialist arguments about benefit, risk and proof conveyed through the different conventions of commentary, interview and film sequence? What symbolic associations does the visual language of television bring to portrayals of the issue? And how do viewers make sense of various and conflicting accounts, connecting what they see and hear on the screen with their pre-existing knowledge, experience and 'civic' expectations. The authors examine some of the contrasting forms and themes which have been used by programme makers to explain and persuade, and then give a sustained analysis of the nature and sources of viewers' own accounts. 'Nuclear Reactions' inquires into the public meanings surrounding energy and the environment, spelling out in its conclusion some of the implications for future media treatments of this issue. It is also a key contribution to the international literature on 'television knowledge' and the processes of active viewing. (author)

  15. Catalytic conversion of ethanol on H-Y zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čegar Nedeljko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of the H-form of synthetic zeolite NaY was examined in this study. The catalytic activity was determined according to the rate of ethanol conversion in a gas phase in the static system. In the conversion of ethanol on synthetic NaY zeolite at 585, 595, and 610 K, on which the reaction develops at an optimal rate, ethene and diethyl ether are evolved in approximately the same quantity. After transforming the NaY zeolite into the H-form, its catalytic activity was extremely increases so, the reaction develops at a significantly lower temperature with a very large increase in the reaction rate. The distribution of the products also changes, so that at lower temperatures diethyl ether is elvolved in most cases, and the development of ethene is favored at higher ones, and after a certain period of time there is almost complete conversion of ethanol into ethene. The increase in catalytic activity, as well as the change of selectivity of conversion of ethanol on the H-form of zeolite, is the result of removing Na+ cations in the NaY zeolite, so that more acidic catalyst is obtained which contains a number of acidic catalytically active centers, as well as a more powerful one compared to the original NaY zeolite.

  16. Spallation reactions; Reactions de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugon, J.

    1996-12-31

    Spallation reactions dominate the interactions of hadrons with nuclei in the GeV range (from {approx} 0.1 to {approx} 10 GeV). They correspond to a sometimes important ejection of light particles leaving most of the time a residue of mass commensurate with the target mass. The main features of the experimental data are briefly reviewed. The most successful theoretical model, namely the intranuclear cascade + evaporation model, is presented. Its physical content, results and possible improvements are critically discussed. Alternative approaches are shortly reviewed. (author). 84 refs.

  17. Nanogold plasmonic photocatalysis for organic synthesis and clean energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changlong; Astruc, Didier

    2014-01-01

    This review provides the basic concepts, an overall survey and the state-of-the art of plasmon-based nanogold photocatalysis using visible light including fundamental understanding and major applications to organic reactions and clean energy-conversion systems. First, the basic concepts of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) are recalled, then the major preparation methods of AuNP-based plasmonic photocatalysts are reviewed. The major part of the review is dedicated to the latest progress in the application of nanogold plasmonic photocatalysis to organic transformations and energy conversions, and the proposed mechanisms are discussed. In conclusion, new challenges and perspectives are proposed and analyzed.

  18. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C [Idaho Falls, ID; Nelson, Lee O [Idaho Falls, ID; Detering, Brent A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-02-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  19. Process for complete conversion of coal oils, shale oils, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, P

    1911-07-08

    A process is described for complete conversion of mineral coal oil, shale oil, and other similar oils in pitch, characterized by these oils being mixed with a nonvolatile substance with a boiling point on the average higher than the boiling point of the oil to be treated, and then being heated under pressure with the introduction of air, whereby the heating is interrupted if necessary on account of the known exothermic reaction and the conversion of the oil in the pitch or its distillation can be carried out without further heating.

  20. Gas turbine with two circuits and intermediate fuel conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachl, H.

    1978-01-01

    The combination of a fuel conversion process with a thermal process saves coolant and subsequent separation plant, in order to achieve the greatest possible use of the mechanical or electrical energy. The waste heat of a thermal circuit is taken to an endothermal chemical fuel conversion process arranged before a second circuit. The heat remaining after removal of the heat required for the chemical process is taken to a second thermal circuit. The reaction products of the chemical process which condense out during expansion in the second thermal process are selectively separated from the remaining gas mixture in the individual turbine stages. (HGOE) [de

  1. Conversion of Abbandoned Military Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Marcinkevičiūtė

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the situation of abandoned military sites, their value and significance of their conservation. It also reviews their impact on their environment and their potential in tourism, environmental, economic and social spheres. Further the positive experiences in military sites' conversion are studied. The importance of society's involvement in the conversions is discussed. The situation of XIX-XX age's military object's, the significance of their conservation and their potential in tourism market is separately analysed. The results of two researches are introduced, one of which inquires about the Lithuanian military objects' potential in tourism sphere, another one explores the possibilities of conversion. Article in Lithuanian

  2. Motor and somatosensory conversion disorder: a functional unawareness syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L; Barsky, Arthur J; Daffner, Kirk; Silbersweig, David A

    2012-01-01

    Although conversion disorder is closely connected to the origins of neurology and psychiatry, it remains poorly understood. In this article, the authors discuss neural and clinical parallels between lesional unawareness disorders and unilateral motor and somatosensory conversion disorder, emphasizing functional neuroimaging/disease correlates. Authors suggest that a functional-unawareness neurobiological framework, mediated by right hemisphere-lateralized, large-scale brain network dysfunction, may play a significant role in the neurobiology of conversion disorder. The perigenual anterior cingulate and the posterior parietal cortices are detailed as important in disease pathophysiology. Further investigations will refine the functional-unawareness concept, clarify the role of affective circuits, and delineate the process through which functional neurologic symptoms emerge.

  3. Destruction of liver haem by norethindrone. Conversion into green pigments

    OpenAIRE

    White, Ian N. H.

    1981-01-01

    1. Factors affecting the norethindrone-mediated conversion of hepatic haem into green pigments have been studied in the rat. Concentrations of haem and green pigments were estimated spectrophotometrically after esterification and separation by silica gel high-pressure liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). 2. Accumulation of green pigments in the liver was dependent on the dose of steroid and the time after dosing, maximum values being reached after 4–8h. Phenobarbitone pretreatment of rats result...

  4. Plasmon-induced selective carbon dioxide conversion on earth-abundant aluminum-cuprous oxide antenna-reactor nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robatjazi, Hossein; Zhao, Hangqi; Swearer, Dayne F; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Zhou, Linan; Alabastri, Alessandro; McClain, Michael J; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2017-06-21

    The rational combination of plasmonic nanoantennas with active transition metal-based catalysts, known as 'antenna-reactor' nanostructures, holds promise to expand the scope of chemical reactions possible with plasmonic photocatalysis. Here, we report earth-abundant embedded aluminum in cuprous oxide antenna-reactor heterostructures that operate more effectively and selectively for the reverse water-gas shift reaction under milder illumination than in conventional thermal conditions. Through rigorous comparison of the spatial temperature profile, optical absorption, and integrated electric field enhancement of the catalyst, we have been able to distinguish between competing photothermal and hot-carrier driven mechanistic pathways. The antenna-reactor geometry efficiently harnesses the plasmon resonance of aluminum to supply energetic hot-carriers and increases optical absorption in cuprous oxide for selective carbon dioxide conversion to carbon monoxide with visible light. The transition from noble metals to aluminum based antenna-reactor heterostructures in plasmonic photocatalysis provides a sustainable route to high-value chemicals and reaffirms the practical potential of plasmon-mediated chemical transformations.Plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis holds promise for the control of chemical reactions. Here the authors report an Al@Cu 2 O heterostructure based on earth abundant materials to transform CO 2 into CO at significantly milder conditions.

  5. 5 CFR 317.302 - Conversion procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... conversion. (2) Pay. Upon conversion to the Senior Executive Service, an employee's SES rate will be... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conversion procedures. 317.302 Section... IN THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE Conversion to the Senior Executive Service § 317.302 Conversion...

  6. Efficient quantum computing using coherent photon conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, N K; Ramelow, S; Prevedel, R; Munro, W J; Milburn, G J; Zeilinger, A

    2011-10-12

    Single photons are excellent quantum information carriers: they were used in the earliest demonstrations of entanglement and in the production of the highest-quality entanglement reported so far. However, current schemes for preparing, processing and measuring them are inefficient. For example, down-conversion provides heralded, but randomly timed, single photons, and linear optics gates are inherently probabilistic. Here we introduce a deterministic process--coherent photon conversion (CPC)--that provides a new way to generate and process complex, multiquanta states for photonic quantum information applications. The technique uses classically pumped nonlinearities to induce coherent oscillations between orthogonal states of multiple quantum excitations. One example of CPC, based on a pumped four-wave-mixing interaction, is shown to yield a single, versatile process that provides a full set of photonic quantum processing tools. This set satisfies the DiVincenzo criteria for a scalable quantum computing architecture, including deterministic multiqubit entanglement gates (based on a novel form of photon-photon interaction), high-quality heralded single- and multiphoton states free from higher-order imperfections, and robust, high-efficiency detection. It can also be used to produce heralded multiphoton entanglement, create optically switchable quantum circuits and implement an improved form of down-conversion with reduced higher-order effects. Such tools are valuable building blocks for many quantum-enabled technologies. Finally, using photonic crystal fibres we experimentally demonstrate quantum correlations arising from a four-colour nonlinear process suitable for CPC and use these measurements to study the feasibility of reaching the deterministic regime with current technology. Our scheme, which is based on interacting bosonic fields, is not restricted to optical systems but could also be implemented in optomechanical, electromechanical and superconducting

  7. Bimolecular reactions of carbenes: Proton transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saleh, Abd Al-Aziz A.; Almatarneh, Mansour H.; Poirier, Raymond A.

    2018-04-01

    Here we report the bimolecular reaction of trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene conformers and the water-mediated mechanism of the 1,2-proton shift for the unimolecular trans-conformer by using quantum chemical calculations. The CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVDZ potential-energy profile of the bimolecular reaction of cis- and trans-trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene, shows the lowest gas-phase barrier height of 13 kJ mol-1 compared to the recently reported value of 128 kJ mol-1 for the unimolecular reaction. We expect bimolecular reactions of carbene's stereoisomers will open a valuable field for new and useful synthetic strategies.

  8. Leprosy type 1 reactions and erythema nodosum leprosum

    OpenAIRE

    Kahawita,Indira P.; Walker,Stephen L.; Lockwood,Diana N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Leprosy reactions are a major cause of nerve damage and morbidity in a significant proportion of leprosy patients. Reactions are immunologically mediated and can occur even after successful completion of multi-drug therapy. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathology and treatment of leprosy type 1 reactions, erythema nodosum leprosum and silent neuropathy.

  9. Conversational evidence in therapeutic dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Tom; Busch, Robbie; Couture, Shari

    2008-07-01

    Family therapists' participation in therapeutic dialogue with clients is typically informed by evidence of how such dialogue is developing. In this article, we propose that conversational evidence, the kind that can be empirically analyzed using discourse analyses, be considered a contribution to widening psychotherapy's evidence base. After some preliminaries about what we mean by conversational evidence, we provide a genealogy of evaluative practice in psychotherapy, and examine qualitative evaluation methods for their theoretical compatibilities with social constructionist approaches to family therapy. We then move on to examine the notion of accomplishment in therapeutic dialogue given how such accomplishments can be evaluated using conversation analysis. We conclude by considering a number of research and pedagogical implications we associate with conversational evidence.

  10. HYDROKINETIC ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS: PROSPECTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Hydrokinetic energy conversion systems utilize the kinetic energy of flowing water bodies with little or no head to generate ... generator. ... Its principle of operation is analogous to that of wind ..... Crisis-solar and wind power systems, 2009,.

  11. Conversion electrons in the SDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicklund, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    We summarize a preliminary analysis of the rates for conversion electrons in the SDC detector, relative to other interesting sources of prompt electrons. We have used Papageno V3.30, and other available NLO calculations to estimate inclusive rates in the central region (η less than 2.0), and we have cross checked these using CDF data at 1.8 TeV. We have considered three sources of ''isolated'' electrons, namely inclusive W/Z production; top quark (Mt=140); and QCD prompt photon production, followed by conversion in 10% XO. This value approximates the inner silicon detector at SDC. Additional conversions will occur in the outer tracking chamber, but the trigger and track reconstruction efficiency will be lower. We have also considered ''nonisolated'' leptons coming from inclusive bottom production, photon conversions resulting from π 0 ,η production in jets, and high pt hadrons faking electrons

  12. Energy conversion at dipolarization fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Divin, A.; Vaivads, A.; André, M.; Markidis, S.

    2017-02-01

    We use multispacecraft observations by Cluster in the Earth's magnetotail and 3-D particle-in-cell simulations to investigate conversion of electromagnetic energy at the front of a fast plasma jet. We find that the major energy conversion is happening in the Earth (laboratory) frame, where the electromagnetic energy is being transferred from the electromagnetic field to particles. This process operates in a region with size of the order several ion inertial lengths across the jet front, and the primary contribution to E·j is coming from the motional electric field and the ion current. In the frame of the front we find fluctuating energy conversion with localized loads and generators at sub-ion scales which are primarily related to the lower hybrid drift instability excited at the front; however, these provide relatively small net energy conversion.

  13. Ocean energy conversion - A reality

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    -depth analysis of application and achievements of OTEC, tidal energy, impact of astronomical forces on tide, prospects of tidal power plants, wave energy conversion and its mathematical approach for both linear and non-linear waves, economic viability, problems...

  14. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  15. Effective communication during difficult conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Jacquelyn M

    2013-06-01

    A strong interest and need exist in the workplace today to master the skills of conducting difficult conversations. Theories and strategies abound, yet none seem to have found the magic formula with universal appeal and success. If it is such an uncomfortable skill to master is it better to avoid or initiate such conversations with employees? Best practices and evidence-based management guide us to the decision that quality improvement dictates effective communication, even when difficult. This brief paper will offer some suggestions for strategies to manage difficult conversations with employees. Mastering the skills of conducting difficult conversations is clearly important to keeping lines of communication open and productive. Successful communication skills may actually help to avert confrontation through employee engagement, commitment and appropriate corresponding behavior

  16. Electron spectrometers with internal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suita, J.C.; Lemos Junior, O.F.; Auler, L.T.; Silva, A.G. da

    1981-01-01

    The efforts that the Department of Physics (DEFI) of Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN) are being made aiming at adjusting the electron spectrometers with internal conversion to its necessity, are shown. (E.G.) [pt

  17. A Conversation Well Worth Remembering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolven-Allen, John

    2009-01-01

    To mark the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth, a special event was held at Oxford, which included a "Conversation" between Professor Richard Dawkins and Bishop Richard Harries. Here we present a personal reminiscence of the event.

  18. TEMPO/viologen electrochemical heterojunction for diffusion-controlled redox mediation: a highly rectifying bilayer-sandwiched device based on cross-reaction at the interface between dissimilar redox polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokue, Hiroshi; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Sukegawa, Takashi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-26

    A couple of totally reversible redox-active molecules, which are different in redox potentials, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and viologen (V(2+)), were employed to give rise to a rectified redox conduction effect. Single-layer and bilayer devices were fabricated using polymers containing these sites as pendant groups per repeating unit. The devices were obtained by sandwiching the redox polymer layer(s) with indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass and Pt foil electrodes. Electrochemical measurements of the single-layer device composed of polynorbornene-bearing TEMPO (PTNB) exhibited a diffusion-limited current-voltage response based on the TEMPO(+)/TEMPO exchange reaction, which was almost equivalent to a redox gradient through the PTNB layer depending upon the thickness. The bilayer device gave rise to the current rectification because of the thermodynamically favored cross-reaction between TEMPO(+) and V(+) at the polymer/polymer interface. A current-voltage response obtained for the bilayer device demonstrated a two-step diffusion-limited current behavior as a result of the concurrent V(2+)/V(+) and V(+)/V(0) exchange reactions according to the voltage and suggested that the charge transport process through the device was most likely to be rate-determined by a redox gradient in the polymer layer. Current collection experiments revealed a charge transport balance throughout the device, as a result of the electrochemical stability and robustness of the polymers in both redox states.

  19. Effect of temperature on photochemical smog reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufalini, J J; Altshuller, A P

    1963-01-01

    In the present investigation the photo-oxidation reactions to trans-2-butene-nitric oxide and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (mesitylene)-nitric oxide in air have been followed. The rates of formation and disappearance of nitrogen dioxide and the rate of reaction of the hydrocarbons have been measured at 20 and 40/sup 0/. The results obtained indicate about a twofold decrease in conversion times over the 20/sup 0/ interval and a corresponding increase in rates of reactions. 5 references.

  20. Heterogeneous kinetic modeling of the catalytic conversion of cycloparaffins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabawi, Mustafa N.

    The limited availability of high value light hydrocarbon feedstocks along with the rise in crude prices has resulted in the international recognition of the vast potential of Canada's oil sands. With the recent expansion of Canadian bitumen production come, however, many technical challenges, one of which is the significant presence of aromatics and cycloparaffins in bitumen-derived feedstocks. In addition to their negative environmental impact, aromatics limit fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstock conversion, decrease the yield and quality of valuable products such as gasoline and middle distillates, increase levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons prone to form coke on the catalyst, and ultimately compromise the FCC unit performance. Although cycloparaffins do not have such negative impacts, they are precursors of aromatics as they frequently undergo hydrogen transfer reactions. However, cycloparaffin cracking chemistry involves other competing reactions that are complex and need much investigation. This dissertation provides insights and understanding of the fundamentals of the catalytic cracking of cycloparaffins using carefully selected model compounds such as methylcyclohexane (MCH) and decalin. Thermal and catalytic cracking of these cycloparaffins on FCC-type catalysts are carried out using the CREC Riser Simulator under operating conditions similar to those of the industrial FCC units in terms of temperature, reaction time, reactant partial pressure and catalyst-to-hydrocarbon ratio. The crystallite size of the supported zeolites is varied between 0.4 and 0.9 microns, with both activity and selectivity being monitored. Catalytic conversions ranged between 4 to 16 wt% for MCH and between 8 to 27 wt% for decalin. Reaction pathways of cycloparaffins are determined, and these include ring-opening, protolytic cracking, isomerization, hydrogen transfer and transalkylation. The yields and selectivities of over 60 and 140 products, formed during MCH and decalin