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Sample records for reaction kinetics chemical

  1. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  2. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  3. Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics

    Houston, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    This text teaches the principles underlying modern chemical kinetics in a clear, direct fashion, using several examples to enhance basic understanding. It features solutions to selected problems, with separate sections and appendices that cover more technical applications.Each chapter is self-contained and features an introduction that identifies its basic goals, their significance, and a general plan for their achievement. This text's important aims are to demonstrate that the basic kinetic principles are essential to the solution of modern chemical problems, and to show how the underlying qu

  4. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  5. Understanding Chemical Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium with Interlocking Building Blocks

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are essential core concepts of chemistry but are challenging topics for many students, both at the high school and undergraduate university level. Visualization at the molecular level is valuable to aid understanding of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. This activity provides a discovery-based method to…

  6. Kinetics of chemical reactions initiated by hot atoms

    Firsova, L.P.

    1977-01-01

    Modern ideas about kinetics of chemical reactions of hot atoms are generalized. The main points of the phenomenological theories (''kinetic theory'' of Wolfgang-Estrup hot reactions and the theory of ''reactions integral probability'' of Porter) are given. Physico-chemical models of elastic and non-elastic collisions are considered which are used in solving Boltzmann integro-differential equations and stochastic equations in the Porter theory. The principal formulas are given describing probabilities or yields of chemical reactions, initiated with hot atoms, depending on the distribution functions of hot particles with respect to energy. Briefly described are the techniques and the results of applying the phenomenological theories for interpretation of the experimental data obtained during nuclear reactions with hot atoms, photochemical investigations, etc. 96 references are given

  7. Physical Chemistry Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Mechanism

    Trimm, Harold H

    2011-01-01

    Physical chemistry covers diverse topics, from biochemistry to materials properties to the development of quantum computers. Physical chemistry applies physics and math to problems that interest chemists, biologists, and engineers. Physical chemists use theoretical constructs and mathematical computations to understand chemical properties and describe the behavior of molecular and condensed matter. Their work involves manipulations of data as well as materials. Physical chemistry entails extensive work with sophisticated instrumentation and equipment as well as state-of-the-art computers. This

  8. Non-equilibrium reaction rates in chemical kinetic equations

    Gorbachev, Yuriy

    2018-05-01

    Within the recently proposed asymptotic method for solving the Boltzmann equation for chemically reacting gas mixture, the chemical kinetic equations has been derived. Corresponding one-temperature non-equilibrium reaction rates are expressed in terms of specific heat capacities of the species participate in the chemical reactions, bracket integrals connected with the internal energy transfer in inelastic non-reactive collisions and energy transfer coefficients. Reactions of dissociation/recombination of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules are considered. It is shown that all reaction rates are the complex functions of the species densities, similarly to the unimolecular reaction rates. For determining the rate coefficients it is recommended to tabulate corresponding bracket integrals, additionally to the equilibrium rate constants. Correlation of the obtained results with the irreversible thermodynamics is established.

  9. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  10. Bayesian inference of chemical kinetic models from proposed reactions

    Galagali, Nikhil

    2015-02-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Bayesian inference provides a natural framework for combining experimental data with prior knowledge to develop chemical kinetic models and quantify the associated uncertainties, not only in parameter values but also in model structure. Most existing applications of Bayesian model selection methods to chemical kinetics have been limited to comparisons among a small set of models, however. The significant computational cost of evaluating posterior model probabilities renders traditional Bayesian methods infeasible when the model space becomes large. We present a new framework for tractable Bayesian model inference and uncertainty quantification using a large number of systematically generated model hypotheses. The approach involves imposing point-mass mixture priors over rate constants and exploring the resulting posterior distribution using an adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The posterior samples are used to identify plausible models, to quantify rate constant uncertainties, and to extract key diagnostic information about model structure-such as the reactions and operating pathways most strongly supported by the data. We provide numerical demonstrations of the proposed framework by inferring kinetic models for catalytic steam and dry reforming of methane using available experimental data.

  11. Bayesian inference of chemical kinetic models from proposed reactions

    Galagali, Nikhil; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Bayesian inference provides a natural framework for combining experimental data with prior knowledge to develop chemical kinetic models and quantify the associated uncertainties, not only in parameter values but also in model

  12. CHEMICAL REACTIONS ON ADSORBING SURFACE: KINETIC LEVEL OF DESCRIPTION

    P.P.Kostrobii

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the effective Hubbard model we suggest a statistical description of reaction-diffusion processes for bimolecular chemical reactions of gas particles adsorbed on the metallic surface. The system of transport equations for description of particles diffusion as well as reactions is obtained. We carry out the analysis of the contributions of all physical processes to the formation of diffusion coefficients and chemical reactions constants.

  13. Iteration scheme for implicit calculations of kinetic and equilibrium chemical reactions in fluid dynamics

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    An iteration scheme for the implicit treatment of equilibrium chemical reactions in partial equilibrium flow has previously been described. Here we generalize this scheme to kinetic reactions as well as equilibrium reactions. This extends the applicability of the scheme to problems with kinetic reactions that are fast in regions of the flow field but slow in others. The resulting scheme thereby provides a single unified framework for the implicit treatment of an arbitrary number of coupled equilibrium and kinetic reactions in chemically reacting fluid flow. 10 refs., 2 figs

  14. Reaction diffusion and solid state chemical kinetics handbook

    Dybkov, V I

    2010-01-01

    This monograph deals with a physico-chemical approach to the problem of the solid-state growth of chemical compound layers and reaction-diffusion in binary heterogeneous systems formed by two solids; as well as a solid with a liquid or a gas. It is explained why the number of compound layers growing at the interface between the original phases is usually much lower than the number of chemical compounds in the phase diagram of a given binary system. For example, of the eight intermetallic compounds which exist in the aluminium-zirconium binary system, only ZrAl3 was found to grow as a separate

  15. Transport Properties of a Kinetic Model for Chemical Reactions without Barriers

    Alves, Giselle M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.; Soares, Ana Jacinta

    2011-01-01

    A kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation for chemical reactions without energy barrier is considered here with the aim of evaluating the reaction rate and characterizing the transport coefficient of shear viscosity for the reactive system. The Chapman-Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation is used to compute the chemical reaction effects, in a flow regime for which the reaction process is close to the final equilibrium state. Some numerical results are provided illustrating that the considered chemical reaction without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the reaction rate and on the transport coefficient of shear viscosity.

  16. KEMOD: A mixed chemical kinetic and equilibrium model of aqueous and solid phase geochemical reactions

    Yeh, G.T.; Iskra, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the development of a mixed chemical Kinetic and Equilibrium MODel in which every chemical species can be treated either as a equilibrium-controlled or as a kinetically controlled reaction. The reaction processes include aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, oxidation/reduction, and acid/base reactions. Further development and modification of KEMOD can be made in: (1) inclusion of species switching solution algorithms, (2) incorporation of the effect of temperature and pressure on equilibrium and rate constants, and (3) extension to high ionic strength

  17. On the Mathematical Structure of Balanced Chemical Reaction Networks Governed by Mass Action Kinetics

    Schaft, Arjan van der; Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent progress on the interplay between graph theory, dynamics, and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics. For reaction networks possessing a thermodynamic equilibrium we derive a compact formulation exhibiting at the

  18. Reactions driving conformational movements (molecular motors) in gels: conformational and structural chemical kinetics.

    Otero, Toribio F

    2017-01-18

    In this perspective the empirical kinetics of conducting polymers exchanging anions and solvent during electrochemical reactions to get dense reactive gels is reviewed. The reaction drives conformational movements of the chains (molecular motors), exchange of ions and solvent with the electrolyte and structural (relaxation, swelling, shrinking and compaction) gel changes. Reaction-driven structural changes are identified and quantified from electrochemical responses. The empirical reaction activation energy (E a ), the reaction coefficient (k) and the reaction orders (α and β) change as a function of the conformational energy variation during the reaction. This conformational energy becomes an empirical magnitude. E a , k, α and β include and provide quantitative conformational and structural information. The chemical kinetics becomes structural chemical kinetics (SCK) for reactions driving conformational movements of the reactants. The electrochemically stimulated conformational relaxation model describes empirical results and some results from the literature for biochemical reactions. In parallel the development of an emerging technological world of soft, wet, multifunctional and biomimetic tools and anthropomorphic robots driven by reactions of the constitutive material, as in biological organs, can be now envisaged being theoretically supported by the kinetic model.

  19. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly; Kim, Young Jin; Jardine, Philip M.; Watson, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M. partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M. species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions

  20. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  1. Ab initio chemical kinetics for the HCCO + OH reaction

    Mai, Tam V.-T.; Raghunath, P.; Le, Xuan T.; Huynh, Lam K.; Nam, Pham-Cam; Lin, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism for the reaction of HCCO and OH has been investigated at different high-levels of theory. The reaction was found to occur on singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces with multiple accessible paths. Rate constants predicted by variational RRKM/ME calculations show that the reaction on both surfaces occurs primarily by barrierless OH attack at both C atoms producing excited intermediates which fragment to produce predominantly CO and 1,3HCOH with kS = 3.12 × 10-8T-0.59exp[-73.0/T] and kT = 6.29 × 10-11T0.13exp[108/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at T = 300-2000 K, independent of pressure at P < 76 000 Torr.

  2. Study of kinetics and mechanism of diazo compound reactions using nuclear chemical polarization

    Gragerov, I.P.; Levit, A.F.; Kiprianova, L.A.; Buchachenko, A.L.; Sterleva, T.G.

    1975-01-01

    It has been established that at the rate-determining steps of the radical reactions in which aniline interacts with isoamyl nitrite and substituted diazo salts interact with sodium methylate, tertiary fatty amines, or phosphinic acid, no transfer of a single electron occurs. The processes of single electron transfer do not seem to play a decisive role in the kinetics of most transformations of diazo compounds. Chemical nuclear polarization is shown to be suitable for kinetic studies of fast radical processes

  3. Variable elimination in chemical reaction networks with mass-action kinetics

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, C.

    2012-01-01

    We consider chemical reaction networks taken with mass-action kinetics. The steady states of such a system are solutions to a system of polynomial equations. Even for small systems the task of finding the solutions is daunting. We develop an algebraic framework and procedure for linear elimination...

  4. On the graph and systems analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks with mass action kinetics

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Schaft, Arjan van der

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent progresses on the interplay between the graph theory and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics by reformulating it using the graph knowledge of the underlying networks. Based on this formulation, we

  5. Kinetics of heterogeneous chemical reactions: a theoretical model for the accumulation of pesticides in soil.

    Lin, S H; Sahai, R; Eyring, H

    1971-04-01

    A theoretical model for the accumulation of pesticides in soil has been proposed and discussed from the viewpoint of heterogeneous reaction kinetics with a basic aim to understand the complex nature of soil processes relating to the environmental pollution. In the bulk of soil, the pesticide disappears by diffusion and a chemical reaction; the rate processes considered on the surface of soil are diffusion, chemical reaction, vaporization, and regular pesticide application. The differential equations involved have been solved analytically by the Laplace-transform method.

  6. BGK-type models in strong reaction and kinetic chemical equilibrium regimes

    Monaco, R; Bianchi, M Pandolfi; Soares, A J

    2005-01-01

    A BGK-type procedure is applied to multi-component gases undergoing chemical reactions of bimolecular type. The relaxation process towards local Maxwellians, depending on mass and numerical densities of each species as well as common velocity and temperature, is investigated in two different cases with respect to chemical regimes. These cases are related to the strong reaction regime characterized by slow reactions, and to the kinetic chemical equilibrium regime where fast reactions take place. The consistency properties of both models are stated in detail. The trend to equilibrium is numerically tested and comparisons for the two regimes are performed within the hydrogen-air and carbon-oxygen reaction mechanism. In the spatial homogeneous case, it is also shown that the thermodynamical equilibrium of the models recovers satisfactorily the asymptotic equilibrium solutions to the reactive Euler equations

  7. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  8. Strain-induced structural changes and chemical reactions. 1: Thermomechanical and kinetic models

    Levitas, V.I.; Nesterenko, V.F.; Meyers, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Strain-induced chemical reactions were observed recently (Nesterenko et al) in experiments in the shear band in both Ti-Si and Nb-Si mixtures. Reactions can start in the solid state or after melting of at least one component. One of the aims is to find theoretically whether there are possible macroscopic mechanisms of mechanical intensification of the above and other chemical reactions due to plastic shear in the solid state. Continuum thermodynamical theory of structural changes with an athermal kinetics, which includes martensitic phase transformations, plastic strain-induced chemical reactions and polymorphic transformations, is developed at finite strains. The theory includes kinematics, criterion of structural change and extremum principle for determination of all unknown variable parameters for the case with neglected elastic strains. Thermodynamically consistent kinetic theory of thermally activated structural changes is suggested. The concept of the effective temperature is introduced which takes into account that temperature can vary significantly (on 1,000 K) during the chemical reactions under consideration. The theory will be applied in Part 2 of the paper for the description of chemical reactions in the shear band

  9. Principles of chemical kinetics

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  10. The efficiency of driving chemical reactions by a physical non-equilibrium is kinetically controlled.

    Göppel, Tobias; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-07-27

    An out-of-equilibrium physical environment can drive chemical reactions into thermodynamically unfavorable regimes. Under prebiotic conditions such a coupling between physical and chemical non-equilibria may have enabled the spontaneous emergence of primitive evolutionary processes. Here, we study the coupling efficiency within a theoretical model that is inspired by recent laboratory experiments, but focuses on generic effects arising whenever reactant and product molecules have different transport coefficients in a flow-through system. In our model, the physical non-equilibrium is represented by a drift-diffusion process, which is a valid coarse-grained description for the interplay between thermophoresis and convection, as well as for many other molecular transport processes. As a simple chemical reaction, we consider a reversible dimerization process, which is coupled to the transport process by different drift velocities for monomers and dimers. Within this minimal model, the coupling efficiency between the non-equilibrium transport process and the chemical reaction can be analyzed in all parameter regimes. The analysis shows that the efficiency depends strongly on the Damköhler number, a parameter that measures the relative timescales associated with the transport and reaction kinetics. Our model and results will be useful for a better understanding of the conditions for which non-equilibrium environments can provide a significant driving force for chemical reactions in a prebiotic setting.

  11. A kinetic model for chemical reactions without barriers: transport coefficients and eigenmodes

    Alves, Giselle M; Kremer, Gilberto M; Marques, Wilson Jr; Soares, Ana Jacinta

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation proposed in the work of Kremer and Soares 2009 for a binary mixture undergoing chemical reactions of symmetric type which occur without activation energy is revisited here, with the aim of investigating in detail the transport properties of the reactive mixture and the influence of the reaction process on the transport coefficients. Accordingly, the non-equilibrium solutions of the Boltzmann equations are determined through an expansion in Sonine polynomials up to the first order, using the Chapman–Enskog method, in a chemical regime for which the reaction process is close to its final equilibrium state. The non-equilibrium deviations are explicitly calculated for what concerns the thermal–diffusion ratio and coefficients of shear viscosity, diffusion and thermal conductivity. The theoretical and formal analysis developed in the present paper is complemented with some numerical simulations performed for different concentrations of reactants and products of the reaction as well as for both exothermic and endothermic chemical processes. The results reveal that chemical reactions without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the transport properties of the mixture. Oppositely to the case of reactions with activation energy, the coefficients of shear viscosity and thermal conductivity become larger than those of an inert mixture when the reactions are exothermic. An application of the non-barrier model and its detailed transport picture are included in this paper, in order to investigate the dynamics of the local perturbations on the constituent number densities, and velocity and temperature of the whole mixture, induced by spontaneous internal fluctuations. It is shown that for the longitudinal disturbances there exist two hydrodynamic sound modes, one purely diffusive hydrodynamic mode and one kinetic mode

  12. A kinetic model for chemical reactions without barriers: transport coefficients and eigenmodes

    Alves, Giselle M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.; Marques, Wilson, Jr.; Jacinta Soares, Ana

    2011-03-01

    The kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation proposed in the work of Kremer and Soares 2009 for a binary mixture undergoing chemical reactions of symmetric type which occur without activation energy is revisited here, with the aim of investigating in detail the transport properties of the reactive mixture and the influence of the reaction process on the transport coefficients. Accordingly, the non-equilibrium solutions of the Boltzmann equations are determined through an expansion in Sonine polynomials up to the first order, using the Chapman-Enskog method, in a chemical regime for which the reaction process is close to its final equilibrium state. The non-equilibrium deviations are explicitly calculated for what concerns the thermal-diffusion ratio and coefficients of shear viscosity, diffusion and thermal conductivity. The theoretical and formal analysis developed in the present paper is complemented with some numerical simulations performed for different concentrations of reactants and products of the reaction as well as for both exothermic and endothermic chemical processes. The results reveal that chemical reactions without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the transport properties of the mixture. Oppositely to the case of reactions with activation energy, the coefficients of shear viscosity and thermal conductivity become larger than those of an inert mixture when the reactions are exothermic. An application of the non-barrier model and its detailed transport picture are included in this paper, in order to investigate the dynamics of the local perturbations on the constituent number densities, and velocity and temperature of the whole mixture, induced by spontaneous internal fluctuations. It is shown that for the longitudinal disturbances there exist two hydrodynamic sound modes, one purely diffusive hydrodynamic mode and one kinetic mode.

  13. The redox reaction kinetics of Sinai ore for chemical looping combustion applications

    Ksepko, Ewelina; Babiński, Piotr; Nalbandian, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Redox reaction kinetics of Fe-Mn-rich Sinai ore was determined by TGA. • The most suitable model for reduction was D3, while R3 for oxidation. • Activation energies 35.3 and 16.70 kJ/mole were determined for reduction and oxidation. • Repetitive redox reactions favor the formation of spinel phases in Sinai ore. • Multiple redox cycles induce formation of extensive porosity of the particles. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to study the use of Sinai ore, a Fe–Mn-based ore from Egypt, as a low-cost oxygen carrier (OC) in Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC). The Sinai ore was selected because it possesses relatively high amounts of iron and manganese oxides. Furthermore, those oxides have low cost, very favorable environmental and thermodynamic properties for the CLC process. The performance of the Sinai ore as an OC in CLC was compared to that of ilmenite (Norway Tellnes mine), the most extensively studied naturally occurring Fe-based mineral. The kinetics of the reduction and oxidation reactions with the two minerals were studied using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Experiments were conducted under isothermal conditions, with multiple redox cycles, at temperatures between 750 and 950 °C. For the reduction and oxidation reactions, different concentrations of CH_4 (10–25 vol.%) and O_2 (5–20 vol.%) were applied, respectively. The kinetic parameters, such as the activation energy (E_a), pre-exponential factor (A_0), and reaction order (n), were determined for the redox reactions. Furthermore, models of the redox reactions were selected by means of a model-fitting method. For the Sinai ore, the D3 model (3-dimensional diffusion) was suitable for modeling reduction reaction kinetics. The calculated E_a was 35.3 kJ/mole, and the reaction order was determined to be approximately 0.76. The best fit for the oxidation reaction was obtained for the R3 model (shrinking core). The oxidation (regeneration) reaction E_a was equal to 16

  14. Kinetic calorimetry in the study of the mechanism of low-temperature chemical reactions

    Barkalov, I. M.; Kiryukhin, D. P.

    Chemical reactions are always followed by a change in the reacting system enthalpy, hence, calorimetry as a method of enthalpy and heat capacity measuring is a universal and, sometimes, even the only possible way of studying chemical reaction kinetics. Throughout its long history, the calorimeter, having preserved the positions of the main method of thermodynamic studies, has conquered a new field of application: that of kinetic study of chemical reactions. The advantages and disadvantages of the kinetic calorimeter are now obvious. First, the advantages are: (1) the possibility of measuring the rate of a chemical reaction without any special requirements being imposed on the reaction medium (solid, viscous, multicomponent systems); (2) the high efficiency: a large volume of kinetic information in one experiment and a non-destructive character of changes; (3) the possibility of measuring directly in the field of ionizing radiation (γ-radiation, accelerated electrons) and light; and (4) recording of the chemical conversion directly at the time of its occurrence. The disadvantages of this method are: (1) the high inertia of standard calorimeter systems (τC⋍102-103S), which restricts the possibilities of studying fast processes; and (2) the complexity of the correct organization of the calorimeter experiment when the parameters of the process are changed (overheating in the sample, conversion of the process to explosive and auto wave regimens). One of the oldest and most universal methods of studying the mechanism of chemical reactions, calorimetry, is now passing through a period of turbulent development due to the advances in electronics and computerization. The wide variety of types of calorimeter set-ups and the large assortment of measurement schemes in the currently described methods complicate the experimental selection of the necessary instrument rather than facilitate it. The basic principles of the method, the types of calorimeters, and the measuring

  15. A Microscale Approach to Chemical Kinetics in the General Chemistry Laboratory: The Potassium Iodide Hydrogen Peroxide Iodine-Clock Reaction

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2011-01-01

    A microscale laboratory for teaching chemical kinetics utilizing the iodine clock reaction is described. Plastic pipets, 3 mL volume, are used to store and deliver precise drops of reagents and the reaction is run in a 24 well plastic tray using a total 60 drops of reagents. With this procedure, students determine the rate of reaction and the…

  16. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  17. Cholesterol photo-oxidation: A chemical reaction network for kinetic modeling.

    Barnaba, Carlo; Rodríguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lercker, Giovanni; García, Hugo Sergio; Medina-Meza, Ilce Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    In this work we studied the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) methyl esters on cholesterol photo-induced oxidation. The oxidative routes were modeled with a chemical reaction network (CRN), which represents the first application of CRN to the oxidative degradation of a food-related lipid matrix. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, T-I), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, T-II) and a mixture of both (T-III) were added to cholesterol using hematoporphyrin as sensitizer, and were exposed to a fluorescent lamp for 48h. High amounts of Type I cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were recovered (epimers 7α- and 7β-OH, 7-keto and 25-OH), as well as 5β,6β-epoxy. Fitting the experimental data with the CRN allowed characterizing the associated kinetics. DHA and EPA exerted different effects on the oxidative process. DHA showed a protective effect to 7-hydroxy derivatives, whereas EPA enhanced side-chain oxidation and 7β-OH kinetic rates. The mixture of PUFAs increased the kinetic rates several fold, particularly for 25-OH. With respect to the control, the formation of β-epoxy was reduced, suggesting potential inhibition in the presence of PUFAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Two-scale large deviations for chemical reaction kinetics through second quantization path integral

    Li, Tiejun; Lin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the study of rare events for a typical genetic switching model in systems biology, in this paper we aim to establish the general two-scale large deviations for chemical reaction systems. We build a formal approach to explicitly obtain the large deviation rate functionals for the considered two-scale processes based upon the second quantization path integral technique. We get three important types of large deviation results when the underlying two timescales are in three different regimes. This is realized by singular perturbation analysis to the rate functionals obtained by the path integral. We find that the three regimes possess the same deterministic mean-field limit but completely different chemical Langevin approximations. The obtained results are natural extensions of the classical large volume limit for chemical reactions. We also discuss its implication on the single-molecule Michaelis–Menten kinetics. Our framework and results can be applied to understand general multi-scale systems including diffusion processes. (paper)

  19. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Ga(1-x)In(x)P Growth During Pulsed Chemical Beam Epitaxy

    Dietz, N; Beeler, S. C; Schmidt, J. W; Tran, H. T

    2000-01-01

    ... into the surface reaction kinetics during an organometallic deposition process. These insights will allow us to move the control point closer to the point where the growth occurs, which in a chemical been epitaxy process is a surface reaction layer (SRL...

  20. The chemical kinetics of the reactions of lithium with steam-air mixtures

    Barnett, D.S.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    This work involved the experimental and analytical determination of the consequences of lithium fires in the presence of steam. Experiments were performed to characterize the chemical reactions of lithium with steam-nitrogen and steam-air mixtures. Models were introduced in the LITFIRE code to describe lithium fires in the presence of steam inside the containment building and plasma chamber of a hypothetical fusion reactor. The code was also equipped with the capability to determine the effects of decay heat and lithium fire on the temperature response of the reactor first wall in the event of a coolant disturbance. Forty-two kinetics experiments were performed in which a stream of steam-nitrogen or steam-air was passed over and reacted with approximately three grams of lithium heated to a predetermined temperature. The lithium reaction rates with the constituent gases were measured and characterized for a wide range of lithium temperatures and gas compositions. Experiments were performed with steam molar concentrations of 5, 15 and 30% and lithium temperatures ranging from 400 to 1100 degree C, inclusive. The LITFIRE code was modified to enable it to model the interactions of lithium with steam-air atmospheres. Results of the reaction kinetics experiments were used in the reaction model, and the heat transfer model was expanded to allow it to handle condensible atmospheres. Three groups of accidents were investigated: a spill on the containment building floor, a spill inside the reactor plasma chamber, and a spill inside the plasma chamber with steam injection to the containment building simulating a steam line break. The results were compared to dry air cases under the same conditions. 23 refs., 66 figs., 18 tabs

  1. Understanding the reaction kinetics to optimize graphene growth on Cu by chemical vapor deposition

    Kraus, Juergen; Boebel, Lena; Zwaschka, Gregor; Guenther, Sebastian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Zentralinstitut fuer Katalyseforschung, Chemie Department, Physikalische Chemie mit Schwerpunkt Katalyse, Garching (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Understanding and controlling the growth kinetics of graphene is a prerequisite to synthesize this highly wanted material by chemical vapor deposition on Cu, e.g. for the construction of ultra-stable electron transparent membranes. It is reviewed that Cu foils contain a considerable amount of carbon in the bulk which significantly exceeds the expected amount of thermally equilibrated dissolved carbon in Cu and that this carbon must be removed before any high quality graphene may be grown. Starting with such conditioned Cu foils, systematic studies of the graphene growth kinetics in a reactive CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} atmosphere allow to extract the following meaningful data: prediction of the equilibrium constant of the graphene formation reaction within a precision of a factor of two, the confirmation that the graphene growth proceeds from a C(ad)-phase on Cu which is in thermal equilibrium with the reactive gas phase, its apparent activation barrier and finally the prediction of the achievable growth velocity of the growing graphene flakes during chemical vapor deposition. As a result of the performed study, growth parameters are identified for the synthesis of high quality monolayer graphene with single crystalline domains of 100-1000 μm in diameter within a reasonable growth time. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Programming chemical kinetics: engineering dynamic reaction networks with DNA strand displacement

    Srinivas, Niranjan

    Over the last century, the silicon revolution has enabled us to build faster, smaller and more sophisticated computers. Today, these computers control phones, cars, satellites, assembly lines, and other electromechanical devices. Just as electrical wiring controls electromechanical devices, living organisms employ "chemical wiring" to make decisions about their environment and control physical processes. Currently, the big difference between these two substrates is that while we have the abstractions, design principles, verification and fabrication techniques in place for programming with silicon, we have no comparable understanding or expertise for programming chemistry. In this thesis we take a small step towards the goal of learning how to systematically engineer prescribed non-equilibrium dynamical behaviors in chemical systems. We use the formalism of chemical reaction networks (CRNs), combined with mass-action kinetics, as our programming language for specifying dynamical behaviors. Leveraging the tools of nucleic acid nanotechnology (introduced in Chapter 1), we employ synthetic DNA molecules as our molecular architecture and toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement as our reaction primitive. Abstraction, modular design and systematic fabrication can work only with well-understood and quantitatively characterized tools. Therefore, we embark on a detailed study of the "device physics" of DNA strand displacement (Chapter 2). We present a unified view of strand displacement biophysics and kinetics by studying the process at multiple levels of detail, using an intuitive model of a random walk on a 1-dimensional energy landscape, a secondary structure kinetics model with single base-pair steps, and a coarse-grained molecular model that incorporates three-dimensional geometric and steric effects. Further, we experimentally investigate the thermodynamics of three-way branch migration. Our findings are consistent with previously measured or inferred rates for

  3. Kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of chemical reactions coupled with heat transfer.

    Castonguay, Thomas C; Wang, Feng

    2008-03-28

    In this paper, we describe two types of effective events for describing heat transfer in a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation that may involve stochastic chemical reactions. Simulations employing these events are referred to as KMC-TBT and KMC-PHE. In KMC-TBT, heat transfer is modeled as the stochastic transfer of "thermal bits" between adjacent grid points. In KMC-PHE, heat transfer is modeled by integrating the Poisson heat equation for a short time. Either approach is capable of capturing the time dependent system behavior exactly. Both KMC-PHE and KMC-TBT are validated by simulating pure heat transfer in a rod and a square and modeling a heated desorption problem where exact numerical results are available. KMC-PHE is much faster than KMC-TBT and is used to study the endothermic desorption of a lattice gas. Interesting findings from this study are reported.

  4. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    Hanson, Ronald K.; Pang, Genny A.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Ren, Wei; Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David Frank

    2013-01-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we

  5. Kinetics of the tungsten hexafluoride-silane reaction for the chemical vapor deposition of tungsten

    Gokce, Huseyin.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, the kinetics of the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tungsten by silane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride on Si(100) surfaces was studied. A single-wafer, cold-wall reactor was sued for the experiments. The SiH 4 /WF 6 ratio was 1.0. The pressure and temperature range were 1-10 torr and 137-385 degree C, respectively. Kinetic data were obtained in the absence of mass-transfer effects. The film thicknesses were measured by gravimetry. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and resistivity measurements were used to analyze the W films. For the horizontal substrate position and 4-minute reaction times, the apparent activation energies were determined to be 0.35 eV/atom for 10 torr, 0.17 eV/atom for 3 torr, and 0.08 eV/atom for 1 torr. Lower temperatures and higher pressures produced porous films, while higher temperatures and lower pressures resulted in continuous films with smoother surfaces. As the Si-W interface, a W(110) preferential orientation was observed. As the W films grew thicker, W orientation switched from (110) to (100). Apparent activation energy seems to change with thickness

  6. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Oxidation of Four Small Alkyl Esters in Laminar Premixed Flames

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Westmoreland, P R; Dryer, F L; Chaos, M; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K; Cool, T A; Wang, J; Yang, B; Hansen, N; Kasper, T

    2008-02-08

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism has been developed for a group of four small alkyl ester fuels, consisting of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate. This mechanism is validated by comparisons between computed results and recently measured intermediate species mole fractions in fuel-rich, low pressure, premixed laminar flames. The model development employs a principle of similarity of functional groups in constraining the H atom abstraction and unimolecular decomposition reactions in each of these fuels. As a result, the reaction mechanism and formalism for mechanism development are suitable for extension to larger oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, together with an improved kinetic understanding of the structure and chemical kinetics of alkyl ester fuels that can be extended to biodiesel fuels. Variations in concentrations of intermediate species levels in these flames are traced to differences in the molecular structure of the fuel molecules.

  7. Analysis of chemical reaction kinetics of depredating organic pollutants from secondary effluent of wastewater treatment plant in constructed wetlands.

    Wang, Hao; Jiang, Dengling; Yang, Yong; Cao, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Four subsurface constructed wetlands were built to treat the secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant in Tangshan, China. The chemical pollutant indexes of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were analyzed to evaluate the removal efficiency of organic pollutants from the secondary effluent of the wastewater treatment plant. In all cases, the subsurface constructed wetlands were efficient in treating organic pollutants. Under the same hydraulic loading condition, the horizontal flow wetlands exhibited better efficiency of COD removal than vertical flow wetlands: the removal rates in horizontal flow wetlands could be maintained at 68.4 ± 2.42% to 92.2 ± 1.61%, compared with 63.8 ± 1.19% to 85.0 ± 1.25% in the vertical flow wetlands. Meanwhile, the chemical reaction kinetics of organic pollutants was analyzed, and the results showed that the degradation courses of the four subsurface wetlands all corresponded with the first order reaction kinetics to a large extent.

  8. A kinetic-theory approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Gallis, Michael A; Bond, Ryan B; Torczynski, John R

    2009-09-28

    Recently proposed molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction-rate information) are investigated for chemical reactions occurring in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows. The new models are in good agreement with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions and with both measured rates and other theoretical models for far-from-equilibrium conditions. Additionally, the new models are applied to representative combustion and ionization reactions and are in good agreement with available measurements and theoretical models. Thus, molecular-level chemistry modeling provides an accurate method for predicting equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates in gases.

  9. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Selected readings in chemical kinetics

    Back, Margaret H

    2013-01-01

    Selected Readings in Chemical Kinetics covers excerpts from 12 papers in the field of general and gas-phase kinetics. The book discusses papers on the laws of connexion between the conditions of a chemical change and its amount; on the reaction velocity of the inversion of the cane sugar by acids; and the calculation in absolute measure of velocity constants and equilibrium constants in gaseous systems. The text then tackles papers on simple gas reactions; on the absolute rate of reactions in condensed phases; on the radiation theory of chemical action; and on the theory of unimolecular reacti

  11. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    Kim, Yeong Geol

    1990-10-01

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  12. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid

    Andri Cahyo Kumoro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation is one of the common methods of modifying starch properties by introducing acetil (CH3CO groups to starch molecules at low temperatures. While most acetylation is conducted using starch as anhidroglucose source and acetic anhydride or vinyl acetate as nucleophilic agents, this work employ reactants, namely flour and glacial acetic acid. The purpose of this work are to study the effect of pH reaction and GAA/GF mass ratio on the rate of acetylation reaction and to determine its rate constants. The acetylation of gadung flour with glacial acetic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide as a homogenous catalyst was studied at ambient temperature with pH ranging from 8-10 and different mass ratio of acetic acid : gadung flour (1:3; 1:4; and 1:5. It was found that increasing pH, lead to increase the degree of substitution, while increasing GAA/GF mass ratio caused such decreases in the degree of substitution, due to the hydrolysis of the acetylated starch. The desired starch acetylation reaction is accompanied by undesirable hydrolysis reaction of the acetylated starch after 40-50 minutes reaction time. Investigation of kinetics of the reaction observed that the value of mass transfer rate constant (Kcs is smaller than the surface reaction rate constant (k. Thus, it can be concluded that rate controlling step is mass transfer.  © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 7th August 2014; Revised: 8th September 2014; Accepted: 14th September 2014How to Cite: Kumoro, A.C., Amelia, R. (2015. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (1: 30-37. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37

  13. Hybrid quantum and classical methods for computing kinetic isotope effects of chemical reactions in solutions and in enzymes.

    Gao, Jiali; Major, Dan T; Fan, Yao; Lin, Yen-Lin; Ma, Shuhua; Wong, Kin-Yiu

    2008-01-01

    A method for incorporating quantum mechanics into enzyme kinetics modeling is presented. Three aspects are emphasized: 1) combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical methods are used to represent the potential energy surface for modeling bond forming and breaking processes, 2) instantaneous normal mode analyses are used to incorporate quantum vibrational free energies to the classical potential of mean force, and 3) multidimensional tunneling methods are used to estimate quantum effects on the reaction coordinate motion. Centroid path integral simulations are described to make quantum corrections to the classical potential of mean force. In this method, the nuclear quantum vibrational and tunneling contributions are not separable. An integrated centroid path integral-free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM) method along with a bisection sampling procedure was summarized, which provides an accurate, easily convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. In the ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT), these three aspects of quantum mechanical effects can be individually treated, providing useful insights into the mechanism of enzymatic reactions. These methods are illustrated by applications to a model process in the gas phase, the decarboxylation reaction of N-methyl picolinate in water, and the proton abstraction and reprotonation process catalyzed by alanine racemase. These examples show that the incorporation of quantum mechanical effects is essential for enzyme kinetics simulations.

  14. Noise-Induced Modulation of the Relaxation Kinetics around a Non-Equilibrium Steady State of Non-Linear Chemical Reaction Networks

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confi...

  15. A Non-Isothermal Chemical Lattice Boltzmann Model Incorporating Thermal Reaction Kinetics and Enthalpy Changes

    Stuart Bartlett

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The lattice Boltzmann method is an efficient computational fluid dynamics technique that can accurately model a broad range of complex systems. As well as single-phase fluids, it can simulate thermohydrodynamic systems and passive scalar advection. In recent years, it also gained attention as a means of simulating chemical phenomena, as interest in self-organization processes increased. This paper will present a widely-used and versatile lattice Boltzmann model that can simultaneously incorporate fluid dynamics, heat transfer, buoyancy-driven convection, passive scalar advection, chemical reactions and enthalpy changes. All of these effects interact in a physically accurate framework that is simple to code and readily parallelizable. As well as a complete description of the model equations, several example systems will be presented in order to demonstrate the accuracy and versatility of the method. New simulations, which analyzed the effect of a reversible reaction on the transport properties of a convecting fluid, will also be described in detail. This extra chemical degree of freedom was utilized by the system to augment its net heat flux. The numerical method outlined in this paper can be readily deployed for a vast range of complex flow problems, spanning a variety of scientific disciplines.

  16. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler

    Jun-Xia Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Because the air-staged combustion technology is one of the key technologies with low investment running costs and high emission reduction efficiency for the pulverized boiler, it is important to reveal the chemical reaction kinetics mechanism for developing various technologies of nitrogen oxide reduction emissions. At the present work, a three-dimensional mesh model of the large-scale four corner tangentially fired boiler furnace is established with the GAMBIT pre-processing of the FLUENT software. The partial turbulent premixed and diffusion flame was simulated for the air-staged combustion processing. Parameters distributions for the air-staged and no the air-staged were obtained, including in-furnace flow field, temperature field and nitrogen oxide concentration field. The results show that the air-staged has more regular velocity field, higher velocity of flue gas, higher turbulence intensity and more uniform temperature of flue gas. In addition, a lower negative pressure zone and lower O2 concentration zone is formed in the main combustion zone, which is conducive to the NO of fuel type reduced to N2, enhanced the effect of NOx reduction. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 5th November 2015; Revised: 14th January 2016; Accepted: 16th January 2016  How to Cite: Zhang, J.X., Zhang, J.F. (2016. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 100-108. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108

  17. The Study of a Simple Redox Reaction as an Experimental Approach to Chemical Kinetics.

    Elias, Horst; Zipp, Arden P.

    1988-01-01

    Recommends using iodide ions and peroxodisulfate ions for studying rate laws instead of the standard iodine clock for kinetic study. Presents the methodology and a discussion of the kinetics involved for a laboratory experiment for a high school or introductory college course. (ML)

  18. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  19. Kinetic mechanism of molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air-fuel plasmas.

    Adamovich, Igor V; Li, Ting; Lempert, Walter R

    2015-08-13

    This work describes the kinetic mechanism of coupled molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air, H2-air and hydrocarbon-air plasmas sustained by nanosecond pulse discharges (single-pulse or repetitive pulse burst). The model incorporates electron impact processes, state-specific N(2) vibrational energy transfer, reactions of excited electronic species of N(2), O(2), N and O, and 'conventional' chemical reactions (Konnov mechanism). Effects of diffusion and conduction heat transfer, energy coupled to the cathode layer and gasdynamic compression/expansion are incorporated as quasi-zero-dimensional corrections. The model is exercised using a combination of freeware (Bolsig+) and commercial software (ChemKin-Pro). The model predictions are validated using time-resolved measurements of temperature and N(2) vibrational level populations in nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane and sphere-to-sphere geometry; temperature and OH number density after nanosecond pulse burst discharges in lean H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures; and temperature after the nanosecond pulse discharge burst during plasma-assisted ignition of lean H2-mixtures, showing good agreement with the data. The model predictions for OH number density in lean C(3)H(8)-air mixtures differ from the experimental results, over-predicting its absolute value and failing to predict transient OH rise and decay after the discharge burst. The agreement with the data for C(3)H(8)-air is improved considerably if a different conventional hydrocarbon chemistry reaction set (LLNL methane-n-butane flame mechanism) is used. The results of mechanism validation demonstrate its applicability for analysis of plasma chemical oxidation and ignition of low-temperature H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures using nanosecond pulse discharges. Kinetic modelling of low-temperature plasma excited propane-air mixtures demonstrates the need for development of a more accurate

  20. Some concepts in condensed phase chemical kinetics

    Adelman, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Some concepts in condensed phase chemical kinetics which have emerged from a recent rigorous statistical mechanical treatment of condensed phase chemical reaction dynamics (S.A. Adelman, Adv. Chem. Phys.53:61 (1983)) are discussed in simple physical terms

  1. Kinetic modelling of hydro-treatment reactions by study of different chemical groups; Modelisation cinetique des reactions d`hydrotraitement par regroupement en familles chimiques

    Bonnardot, J

    1998-11-19

    Hydro-treatment of petroleum shortcuts permits elimination of unwanted components in order to increase combustion in engine and to decrease atmospheric pollution. Hydro-desulfurization (HDS), Hydro-denitrogenation (HDN) and Hydrogenation of aromatics (HDA) of a LCO (Light Cycle Oil)-Type gas oil have been studied using a new pilot at a fixed temperature with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. A hydrodynamic study showed that reactions occurring in the up-flow fixed bed reactor that has been used during the experiments, were governed exclusively by chemical reaction rates and not by diffusion. Through detailed chemical analysis, height chemical groups have been considered: three aromatics groups, one sulfided group, one nitrogenized and NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}. Two Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type kinetic models with either one or two types of sites have been established. The model with two types of site - one site of hydrogenation and one site of hydrogenolysis - showed a better fit in the modeling of the experimental results. This model enables to forecast the influence of partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and partial pressure of H{sub 2} on hydro-treatment reactions of a LCO-type gas oil. (author) 119 refs.

  2. Biocompatibility and Chemical Reaction Kinetics of Injectable, Settable Polyurethane/Allograft Bone Biocomposites

    2012-08-05

    relevant dynamic loads [7,8]. Hydroxyapatite (HA) cements have been combined with hydrogels (e.g. dextran [9] or sodium hyaluronate [10]) to form...2):144–53. [5] Friedman CD et al. BoneSource (TM) hydroxyapatite cement: a novel biomaterial for craniofacial skeletal tissue engineering and...Biomaterials 2004;25(1):85–96. [28] Parnell S, Min K, Cakmak M. Kinetic studies of polyurethane polymerization with Raman spectroscopy. Polymer

  3. Chemical kinetic studies of atmospheric reactions using tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    IR absorption using tunable diode laser spectroscopy provides a sensitive and quantitative detection method for laboratory kinetic studies of atmospheric trace gases. Improvements in multipass cell design, real time signal processing, and computer controlled data acquisition and analysis have extended the applicability of the technique. We have developed several optical systems using off-axis resonator mirror designs which maximize path length while minimizing both the sample volume and the interference fringes inherent in conventional 'White' cells. Computerized signal processing using rapid scan (300 kHz), sweep integration with 100 percent duty cycle allows substantial noise reduction while retaining the advantages of using direct absorption for absolute absorbance measurements and simultaneous detection of multiple species. Peak heights and areas are determined by curve fitting using nonlinear least square methods. We have applied these techniques to measurements of: (1) heterogeneous uptake chemistry of atmospheric trace gases (HCl, H2O2, and N2O5) on aqueous and sulfuric acid droplets; (2) vapor pressure measurements of nitric acid and water over prototypical stratospheric aerosol (nitric acid trihydrate) surfaces; and (3) discharge flow tube kinetic studies of the HO2 radical using isotopic labeling for product channel and mechanistic analysis. Results from each of these areas demonstrate the versatility of TDL absorption spectroscopy for atmospheric chemistry applications.

  4. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. II. Radical-pair reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Chia, A.; Górecka, A.; Kurzyński, P.; Paterek, T.; Kaszlikowski, D.

    2016-03-01

    We apply the quantum-walk approach proposed in the preceding paper [A. Chia et al., preceding paper, Phys. Rev. E 93, 032407 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.032407] to a radical-pair reaction where realistic estimates for the intermediate transition rates are available. The well-known average hitting time from quantum walks can be adopted as a measure of how quickly the reaction occurs and we calculate this for varying degrees of dephasing in the radical pair. The time for the radical pair to react to a product is found to be independent of the amount of dephasing introduced, even in the limit of no dephasing where the transient population dynamics exhibits strong coherent oscillations. This can be seen to arise from the existence of a rate-limiting step in the reaction and we argue that in such examples, a purely classical model based on rate equations can be used for estimating the time scale of the reaction but not necessarily its population dynamics.

  5. Chemical kinetics of multiphase reactions between ozone and human skin lipids: Implications for indoor air quality and health effects.

    Lakey, P S J; Wisthaler, A; Berkemeier, T; Mikoviny, T; Pöschl, U; Shiraiwa, M

    2017-07-01

    Ozone reacts with skin lipids such as squalene, generating an array of organic compounds, some of which can act as respiratory or skin irritants. Thus, it is important to quantify and predict the formation of these products under different conditions in indoor environments. We developed the kinetic multilayer model that explicitly resolves mass transport and chemical reactions at the skin and in the gas phase (KM-SUB-Skin). It can reproduce the concentrations of ozone and organic compounds in previous measurements and new experiments. This enabled the spatial and temporal concentration profiles in the skin oil and underlying skin layers to be resolved. Upon exposure to ~30 ppb ozone, the concentrations of squalene ozonolysis products in the gas phase and in the skin reach up to several ppb and on the order of ~10 mmol m -3 . Depending on various factors including the number of people, room size, and air exchange rates, concentrations of ozone can decrease substantially due to reactions with skin lipids. Ozone and dicarbonyls quickly react away in the upper layers of the skin, preventing them from penetrating deeply into the skin and hence reaching the blood. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of Chemical Kinetic for Mathematics Model Reduction of Cadmium Reaction Rate, Constant and Reaction Orde in to Electrochemical Process

    Prayitno

    2007-01-01

    The experiment was reduction of cadmium rate with electrochemical influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. The aim of the experiment was to know the influence, mathematic model reduction of cadmium the reaction rate, reaction rate constant and reaction orde influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. Result of research indicate the time processing if using plate of copper electrode is during 30 minutes and using plate of aluminium electrode is during 20 minutes. Condition of strong current that used in process of electrochemical is only 0.8 ampere and concentration effective is 5.23 mg/l. The most effective type Al of electrode plate for reduction from waste and the efficiency of reduction is 98 %. (author)

  7. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  8. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  9. Modeling chemical kinetics graphically

    Heck, A.

    2012-01-01

    In literature on chemistry education it has often been suggested that students, at high school level and beyond, can benefit in their studies of chemical kinetics from computer supported activities. Use of system dynamics modeling software is one of the suggested quantitative approaches that could

  10. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions. The mo...

  11. Cobalt sulfide thin films: Chemical growth, reaction kinetics and microstructural analysis

    Kamble, S.S. [Thin Film and Solar Studies Research Laboratory, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India); Sikora, Andrzej [Electrotechnical Institute, Division of Electrotechnology and Materials Science, ul. M Skłodowskiej-Curie 55/61, 50-369 Wroclaw (Poland); Pawar, S.T. [Thin Film and Solar Studies Research Laboratory, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India); Maldar, N.N. [Polymer Chemistry Department, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India); Deshmukh, L.P., E-mail: laldeshmukh@gmail.com [Thin Film and Solar Studies Research Laboratory, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India)

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • CoS thin films were deposited from an aqueous alkaline bath. • The CoS thin films are polycrystalline with hexagonal crystal structure. • Microstructure consists of multifaceted webbed network of elongated CoS crystallites. • MFM images revealed presence of magnetic regions mimicking surface topography. • Influence of the complexing agents is also stressed by the bandgap measurements. - Abstract: CoS thin films were successfully deposited from an aqueous alkaline bath containing ammonia and TEA as the complexing agents. Under the pre-optimized conditions (temperature = 80 ± 0.5 °C, speed of the substrate rotation = 65 ± 2 rpm and deposition period = 90 min), ammonia and TEA quantities in the reaction bath were found to play a decisive role in the final product yield. Highly uniform, dark sea-green colored and tightly adherent deposits were obtained at our experimental conditions. As-obtained CoS thin films were polycrystalline in nature with hexagonal class of crystal system as derived from the X-ray diffraction analysis. Complex multifaceted webbed network of as-grown CoS crystals elongated and threaded into each other were observed through a scanning electron microscope. Atomic force micrographs revealed collapsing of the hillocks and filling of the valleys triggering decrease in the RMS roughness for increased TEA and NH{sub 3} quantities. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was employed to study surface topography in terms of magnetic mapping. MFM images highlighted the existence of the magnetic clusters imitating topography. Broad absorption edge with high absorption coefficient (α ≈ 10{sup 4} cm{sup −1}) was observed for as-grown CoS thin films. Determined values of the optical bandgaps revealed influence of complexing environment on the final product.

  12. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  13. Ionic Diffusion and Kinetic Homogeneous Chemical Reactions in the Pore Solution of Porous Materials with Moisture Transport

    Johannesson, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Results from a systematic continuum mixture theory will be used to establish the governing equations for ionic diffusion and chemical reactions in the pore solution of a porous material subjected to moisture transport. The theory in use is the hybrid mixture theory (HMT), which in its general form......’s law of diffusion and the generalized Darcy’s law will be used together with derived constitutive equations for chemical reactions within phases. The mass balance equations for the constituents and the phases together with the constitutive equations gives the coupled set of non-linear differential...... general description of chemical reactions among constituents is described. The Petrov – Galerkin approach are used in favour of the standard Galerkin weighting in order to improve the solution when the convective part of the problem is dominant. A modified type of Newton – Raphson scheme is derived...

  14. Kinetic modeling of reactions in Foods

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2008-01-01

    The level of quality that food maintains as it travels down the production-to-consumption path is largely determined by the chemical, biochemical, physical, and microbiological changes that take place during its processing and storage. Kinetic Modeling of Reactions in Foods demonstrates how to

  15. Reaction kinetics of polybutylene terephthalate polycondensation reaction

    Darda, P. J.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.; Souren, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the forward polycondensation reaction of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PBT - prepolymer with an initial degree of polymerization of 5.5 was used as starting material. The PBT prepolymer was prepared from dimethyl

  16. LSENS: A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. Part 1: Theory and numerical solution procedures

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 1 of a series of three reference publications that describe LENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 1 derives the governing equations and describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved. The accuracy and efficiency of LSENS are examined by means of various test problems, and comparisons with other methods and codes are presented. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  17. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Rajesh Ramaswamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  18. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-28

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF) of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  19. Investigation of Spark Ignition and Autoignition in Methane and Air Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Chemical Reaction Kinetics. A numerical Study of Ignition Processes in Internal Combustion Engines

    Nordrik, R.

    1993-12-01

    The processes in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines have received increased attention in recent years because their efficiencies are important both economically and environmentally. This doctoral thesis studies the ignition phenomena by means of numerical simulation methods. The fundamental physical relations include flow field conservation equations, thermodynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, transport properties and spark modelling. Special attention is given to the inclusion of chemical kinetics in the flow field equations. Using his No Transport of Radicals Concept method, the author reduces the computational efforts by neglecting the transport of selected intermediate species. The method is validated by comparison with flame propagation data. A computational method is described and used to simulate spark ignition in laminar premixed methane-air mixtures and the autoignition process of a methane bubble surrounded by hot air. The spark ignition simulation agrees well with experimental results from the literature. The autoignition simulation identifies the importance of diffusive and chemical processes acting together. The ignition delay times exceed the experimental values found in the literature for premixed ignition delay, presumably because of the mixing process and lack of information on low temperature reactions in the skeletal kinetic mechanism. Transient turbulent methane jet autoignition is simulated by means of the KIVA-II code. Turbulent combustion is modelled by the Eddy Dissipation Concept. 90 refs., 81 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Chemical burn or reaction

    Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ... leave the person alone and watch carefully for reactions affecting the entire body. Note: If a chemical gets into the eyes, the eyes should be ...

  1. Chemical Conversion Pathways and Kinetic Modeling for the OH-Initiated Reaction of Triclosan in Gas-Phase

    Xue Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As a widely used antimicrobial additive in daily consumption, attention has been paid to the degradation and conversion of triclosan for a long time. The quantum chemistry calculation and the canonical variational transition state theory are employed to investigate the mechanism and kinetic property. Besides addition and abstraction, oxidation pathways and further conversion pathways are also considered. The OH radicals could degrade triclosan to phenols, aldehydes, and other easily degradable substances. The conversion mechanisms of triclosan to the polychlorinated dibenzopdioxin and furan (PCDD/Fs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are clearly illustrated and the toxicity would be strengthened in such pathways. Single radical and diradical pathways are compared to study the conversion mechanism of dichlorodibenzo dioxin (DCDD. Furthermore, thermochemistry is discussed in detail. Kinetic property is calculated and the consequent ratio of kadd/ktotal and kabs/ktotal at 298.15 K are 0.955 and 0.045, respectively. Thus, the OH radical addition reactions are predominant, the substitute position of OH radical on triclosan is very important to generate PCDD and furan, and biradical is also a vital intermediate to produce dioxin.

  2. Chemical conversion pathways and kinetic modeling for the OH-initiated reaction of triclosan in gas-phase.

    Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Xiaomin; Kang, Lingyan; Zhao, Yan

    2015-04-10

    As a widely used antimicrobial additive in daily consumption, attention has been paid to the degradation and conversion of triclosan for a long time. The quantum chemistry calculation and the canonical variational transition state theory are employed to investigate the mechanism and kinetic property. Besides addition and abstraction, oxidation pathways and further conversion pathways are also considered. The OH radicals could degrade triclosan to phenols, aldehydes, and other easily degradable substances. The conversion mechanisms of triclosan to the polychlorinated dibenzopdioxin and furan (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are clearly illustrated and the toxicity would be strengthened in such pathways. Single radical and diradical pathways are compared to study the conversion mechanism of dichlorodibenzo dioxin (DCDD). Furthermore, thermochemistry is discussed in detail. Kinetic property is calculated and the consequent ratio of k add/k total and k abs/k total at 298.15 K are 0.955 and 0.045, respectively. Thus, the OH radical addition reactions are predominant, the substitute position of OH radical on triclosan is very important to generate PCDD and furan, and biradical is also a vital intermediate to produce dioxin.

  3. Chemical transport reactions

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  4. Ab initio chemical kinetics for the ClOO + NO reaction: Effects of temperature and pressure on product branching formation

    Raghunath, P.; Lin, M. C.

    2012-07-01

    The kinetics and mechanism for the reaction of ClOO with NO have been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital theory calculations based on the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df)//PW91PW91/6-311+G(3df) method, employed to evaluate the energetics for the construction of potential energy surfaces and prediction of reaction rate constants. The results show that the reaction can produce two key low energy products ClNO + 3O2 via the direct triplet abstraction path and ClO + NO2 via the association and decomposition mechanism through long-lived singlet pc-ClOONO and ClONO2 intermediates. The yield of ClNO + O2 (1△) from any of the singlet intermediates was found to be negligible because of their high barriers and tight transition states. As both key reactions initially occur barrierlessly, their rate constants were evaluated with a canonical variational approach in our transition state theory and Rice-Ramspergen-Kassel-Marcus/master equation calculations. The rate constants for ClNO + 3O2 and ClO + NO2 production from ClOO + NO can be given by 2.66 × 10-16 T1.91 exp(341/T) (200-700 K) and 1.48 × 10-24 T3.99 exp(1711/T) (200-600 K), respectively, independent of pressure below atmospheric pressure. The predicted total rate constant and the yields of ClNO and NO2 in the temperature range of 200-700 K at 10-760 Torr pressure are in close agreement with available experimental results.

  5. A Chemical-Adsorption Strategy to Enhance the Reaction Kinetics of Lithium-Rich Layered Cathodes via Double-Shell Surface Modification.

    Guo, Lichao; Li, Jiajun; Cao, Tingting; Wang, Huayu; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2016-09-21

    Sluggish surface reaction kinetics hinders the power density of Li-ion battery. Thus, various surface modification techniques have been applied to enhance the electronic/ionic transfer kinetics. However, it is challenging to obtain a continuous and uniform surface modification layer on the prime particles with structure integration at the interface. Instead of classic physical-adsorption/deposition techniques, we propose a novel chemical-adsorption strategy to synthesize double-shell modified lithium-rich layered cathodes with enhanced mass transfer kinetics. On the basis of experimental measurement and first-principles calculation, MoO2S2 ions are proved to joint the layered phase via chemical bonding. Specifically, the Mo-O or Mo-S bonds can flexibly rotate to bond with the cations in the layered phase, leading to the good compatibility between the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and layered cathode. Followed by annealing treatment, the lithium-excess-spinel inner shell forms under the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and functions as favorable pathways for lithium and electron. Meanwhile, the nanothick MoO3-x(SO4)x outer shell protects the transition metal from dissolution and restrains electrolyte decomposition. The double-shell modified sample delivers an enhanced discharge capacity almost twice as much as that of the unmodified one at 1 A g(-1) after 100 cycles, demonstrating the superiority of the surface modification based on chemical adsorption.

  6. Reaction kinetics of bond rotations in graphene

    Skowron, Stephen T.; Koroteev, Victor O.; Baldoni, Matteo; Lopatin, Sergei; Zurutuza, Amaia; Chuvilin, Andrey; Besley, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The formation and healing processes of the fundamental topological defect in graphitic materials, the Stone-Wales (SW) defect, are brought into a chemical context by considering the rotation of a carbon-carbon bond as chemical reaction. We investigate the rates and mechanisms of these SW transformations in graphene at the atomic scale using transmission electron microscopy. We develop a statistical atomic kinetics formalism, using direct observations obtained under different conditions to determine key kinetic parameters of the reactions. Based on the obtained statistics we quantify thermally and irradiation induced routes, identifying a thermal process of healing with an activation energy consistent with predicted adatom catalysed mechanisms. We discover exceptionally high rates for irradiation induced SW healing, incompatible with the previously assumed mechanism of direct knock-on damage and indicating the presence of an efficient nonadiabatic coupling healing mechanism involving beam induced electronic excitations of the SW defect.

  7. Reaction kinetics of bond rotations in graphene

    Skowron, Stephen T.

    2016-04-12

    The formation and healing processes of the fundamental topological defect in graphitic materials, the Stone-Wales (SW) defect, are brought into a chemical context by considering the rotation of a carbon-carbon bond as chemical reaction. We investigate the rates and mechanisms of these SW transformations in graphene at the atomic scale using transmission electron microscopy. We develop a statistical atomic kinetics formalism, using direct observations obtained under different conditions to determine key kinetic parameters of the reactions. Based on the obtained statistics we quantify thermally and irradiation induced routes, identifying a thermal process of healing with an activation energy consistent with predicted adatom catalysed mechanisms. We discover exceptionally high rates for irradiation induced SW healing, incompatible with the previously assumed mechanism of direct knock-on damage and indicating the presence of an efficient nonadiabatic coupling healing mechanism involving beam induced electronic excitations of the SW defect.

  8. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  9. CHEMSIMUL: A simulator for chemical kinetics

    Kirkegaard, P.; Bjergbakke, E.

    1999-01-01

    CHEMSIMUL is a computer program system for numerical simulation of chemical reaction systems. It can be used for modeling complex kinetics in many contexts, in particular radiolytic processes. It contains a translator module and a module for solving theresulting coupled nonlinear ordinary...

  10. Reaction kinetics of chemical pollutants as a basis of risk estimates in terms of rad-equivalence

    Ehrenberg, L.; Osterman-Golkar, S.

    1977-01-01

    Most mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals are electrophilic agents or are converted to electrophilic agents in vivo. A majority of the effective genotoxic compounds are alkylating or arylating. The dose-response curve for mutation induced by alkylating agents is indicated to contain a linear component in the region of low doses. In this region the mutagenic effectiveness per unit dose was found for several alkylating agents to be approximately proportional to the calculated rate of reaction at a certain low nucleophilic strength. This proportionality appears, by and large, to be independent on the nature of the alkyl group introduced. Hence it is possible to ascribe a genetic risk to the degree of alkylation of these centers. This risk may be expressed in rad-equivalents

  11. Kinetics of isotope exchange reactions involving intra- and intermolecular reactions: 1. Rate law for a system with two chemical compounds and three exchangeable atoms

    Xuelei Chu; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    For an isotopic exchange reaction between two compounds (X and AB) in a homogeneous system, such as a gaseous or aqueous system, where one (AB) of them possesses two exchangeable atoms in non-equivalent positions and where one intramolecular isotope exchange (A ↔ B) and two intermolecular isotope exchange reactions (X ↔ A and X ↔ B) may occur, its rate law no longer obeys a pseudo-first order rate equation described for simple two-component systems by many previous investigators. The change with time of the δ value of each of the three components (X, A, and B) in a closed and homogeneous system is a complicated function of the initial δ values of the three components, the chemical concentrations of the two compounds, and the overall rate constants of the forward and reverse reactions involving the two intermolecular and one intramolecular reactions of isotope exchanges. Also, for some one of the three components, the change of its δ value with time may not be monotonic, and the relationship of 1n (1 - F) with time may be non-linear in a plot of 1n (1 - F) vs. t. In addition, the rate law of the isotope exchange reaction in this system also provides a quantitative method to estimate the overall rate constants for the one-intra-and two intermolecular isotope exchanges and the equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors among the three components

  12. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  13. Chemical kinetics: on the heterogeneous catalysis processes leading to an exchange between two phases. Example: isotopic exchange reactions; Cinetique chimique: sur les processus de catalyse 'heterogene' conduisant a un echange entre deux phases. Exemple: reactions d'echange isotopique

    Dirian, G; Grandcollot, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    For an exchange reaction between a gaseous and a liquid phase proceeding by 'heterogeneous' catalysis in the liquid phase, diffusion in the liquid and the chemical reaction are two simultaneous and indivisible processes. We have nevertheless been able to establish criteria making it possible to distinguish between a really homogeneous kinetic process and a pseudo-homogeneous one. (author) [French] Pour une reaction d'echange entre une phase gazeuse et une phase liquide procedant par catalyse 'heterogene' en phase liquide, la diffusion dans le liquide et la reaction chimique sont deux etapes simultanees et indissociables. Nous avons pu neanmoins etablir des criteres permettant de distinguer entre une cinetique homogene vraie et une cinetique pseudo-homogene. (auteur)

  14. Extension of a Kinetic Approach to Chemical Reactions to Electronic Energy Levels and Reactions Involving Charged Species with Application to DSMC Simulations

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties are extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. These extensions are shown to agree favorably with reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near-equilibrium conditions. Also, the extensions are applied to the second flight of the Project FIRE flight experiment at 1634 seconds with a Knudsen number of 0.001 at an altitude of 76.4 km. In order to accomplish this, NASA's direct simulation Monte Carlo code DAC was rewritten to include the ability to simulate charge-neutral ionized flows, take advantage of the recently introduced chemistry model, and to include the extensions presented in this work. The 1634 second data point was chosen for comparisons to be made in order to include a CFD solution. The Knudsen number at this point in time is such that the DSMC simulations are still tractable and the CFD computations are at the edge of what is considered valid because, although near-transitional, the flow is still considered to be continuum. It is shown that the inclusion of electronic energy levels in the DSMC simulation is necessary for flows of this nature and is required for comparison to the CFD solution. The flow field solutions are also post-processed by the nonequilibrium radiation code HARA to compute the radiative portion.

  15. Extension of a Kinetic Approach to Chemical Reactions to Electronic Energy Levels and Reactions Involving Charged Species With Application to DSMC Simulations

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties are extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. These extensions are shown to agree favorably with reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for nearequilibrium conditions. Also, the extensions are applied to the second flight of the Project FIRE flight experiment at 1634 seconds with a Knudsen number of 0.001 at an altitude of 76.4 km. In order to accomplish this, NASA's direct simulation Monte Carlo code DAC was rewritten to include the ability to simulate charge-neutral ionized flows, take advantage of the recently introduced chemistry model, and to include the extensions presented in this work. The 1634 second data point was chosen for comparisons to be made in order to include a CFD solution. The Knudsen number at this point in time is such that the DSMC simulations are still tractable and the CFD computations are at the edge of what is considered valid because, although near-transitional, the flow is still considered to be continuum. It is shown that the inclusion of electronic energy levels in the DSMC simulation is necessary for flows of this nature and is required for comparison to the CFD solution. The flow field solutions are also post-processed by the nonequilibrium radiation code HARA to compute the radiative portion of the heating and is then compared to the total heating measured in flight.

  16. Global Controllability of Chemical Reactions

    Drexler, Dániel András; Tóth, János

    2015-01-01

    Controllability of chemical reactions is an important problem in chemical engineering science. In control theory, analysis of the controllability of linear systems is well-founded, however the dynamics of chemical reactions is usually nonlinear. Global controllability properties of chemical reactions are analyzed here based on the Lie-algebra of the vector fields associated to elementary reactions. A chemical reaction is controllable almost everywhere if all the reaction rate coefficients can...

  17. Entropy Generation in a Chemical Reaction

    Miranda, E. N.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy generation in a chemical reaction is analysed without using the general formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics at a level adequate for advanced undergraduates. In a first approach to the problem, the phenomenological kinetic equation of an elementary first-order reaction is used to show that entropy production is always positive. A…

  18. Chemistry and reaction kinetics of biowaste torrefaction

    Stelt, van der M.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses the question of how the chemistry and reaction kinetics of torrefaction are influenced by reaction conditions and the effects occuring during the reaction. This research question can be specified by questions such as, what controls their kinetics during torrefaction and what

  19. Enhancing chemical reactions

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  20. Ab initio chemical kinetics for SiH3 reactions with Si(x)H2x+2 (x = 1-4).

    Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2010-12-30

    Gas-phase kinetics and mechanisms of SiH(3) reactions with SiH(4), Si(2)H(6), Si(3)H(8), and Si(4)H(10), processes of relevance to a-Si thin-film deposition, have been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital and transition-state theory (TST) calculations. Geometric parameters of all the species involved in the title reactions were optimized by density functional theory at the B3LYP and BH&HLYP levels with the 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set. The potential energy surface of each reaction was refined at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. The results show that the most favorable low energy pathways in the SiH(3) reactions with these silanes occur by H abstraction, leading to the formation of SiH(4) + Si(x)H(2x+1) (silanyl) radicals. For both Si(3)H(8) and n-Si(4)H(10) reactions, the lowest energy barrier channels take place by secondary Si-H abstraction, yielding SiH(4) + s-Si(3)H(7) and SiH(4) + s-Si(4)H(9), respectively. In the i-Si(4)H(10) reaction, tertiary Si-H abstraction has the lowest barrier producing SiH(4) + t-Si(4)H(9). In addition, direct SiH(3)-for-X substitution reactions forming Si(2)H(6) + X (X = H or silanyls) can also occur, but with significantly higher reaction barriers. A comparison of the SiH(3) reactions with the analogous CH(3) reactions with alkanes has been made. The rate constants for low-energy product channels have been calculated for the temperature range 300-2500 K by TST with Eckart tunneling corrections. These results, together with predicted heats of formation of various silanyl radicals and Si(4)H(10) isomers, have been tabulated for modeling of a-Si:H film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

  1. Investigation of Chemical Equilibrium Kinetics by the Electromigration Method

    Bozhikov, G A; Bontchev, G D; Maslov, O D; Milanov, M V; Dmitriev, S N

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of the chemical reaction rates for complex formation as well as hydrolysis type reactions by the method of horizontal zone electrophoresis is outlined. The correlation between chemical equilibrium kinetics and electrodiffusion processes in a constant d.c. electric field is described. In model electromigration experiments the reaction rate constant of the complex formation of Hf(IV) and DTPA is determined.

  2. Controlled formation of Ni(DMG)2 microrods/tubes by manipulating the kinetics of chemical reactions and their application in naked-eye sensors.

    Qin, Jianli; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2012-08-01

    We have demonstrated controlled preparation of Ni(DMG)2 microrods/tubes via chemical reaction method. By manipulating the reaction kinetics via the concentration of reactants, shapes of the resulting microstructures can be easily tuned from microrods to microtubes. Size of the resulting products can also be controlled through changing the reaction temperatures. It was proposed that under high reactants' concentrations, molecules will prefer to grow at corners or edges of nuclei with high free energies, to reduce the total energy in the system, which would lead to partial or complete hollow interiors and eventually resulted in mircotubes. The fact that DMG show high selectivity with Ni2+ and accompanied with obvious color change enable us to fabricate test strip for naked-eye detection of Ni2+. Benefit from the large surface areas of DMG nanoparticles on the test strip, the detection limit is improved by two orders over that of conventional solution method. This strategy is sensitive, simple and easy to handle, thus expected to possess potentials for the practical Ni2+ detection applications.

  3. Online quench-flow electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for elucidating kinetic and chemical enzymatic reaction mechanisms.

    Clarke, David J; Stokes, Adam A; Langridge-Smith, Pat; Mackay, C Logan

    2010-03-01

    We have developed an automated quench-flow microreactor which interfaces directly to an electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometer. We have used this device in conjunction with ESI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) to demonstrate the potential of this approach for studying the mechanistic details of enzyme reactions. For the model system chosen to test this device, namely, the pre-steady-state hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate by the enzyme chymotrypsin, the kinetic parameters obtained are in good agreement with those in the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of online quench-flow coupled with FTICR MS. Furthermore, we have exploited the power of FTICR MS to interrogate the quenched covalently bound enzyme intermediate using top-down fragmentation. The accurate mass capabilities of FTICR MS permitted the nature of the intermediate to be assigned with high confidence. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) fragmentation allowed us to locate the intermediate to a five amino acid section of the protein--which includes the known catalytic residue, Ser(195). This experimental approach, which uniquely can provide both kinetic and chemical details of enzyme mechanisms, is a potentially powerful tool for studies of enzyme catalysis.

  4. Chemical kinetics and modeling of planetary atmospheres

    Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    A unified overview is presented for chemical kinetics and chemical modeling in planetary atmospheres. The recent major advances in the understanding of the chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere make the study of planets more interesting and relevant. A deeper understanding suggests that the important chemical cycles have a universal character that connects the different planets and ultimately link together the origin and evolution of the solar system. The completeness (or incompleteness) of the data base for chemical kinetics in planetary atmospheres will always be judged by comparison with that for the terrestrial atmosphere. In the latter case, the chemistry of H, O, N, and Cl species is well understood. S chemistry is poorly understood. In the atmospheres of Jovian planets and Titan, the C-H chemistry of simple species (containing 2 or less C atoms) is fairly well understood. The chemistry of higher hydrocarbons and the C-N, P-N chemistry is much less understood. In the atmosphere of Venus, the dominant chemistry is that of chlorine and sulfur, and very little is known about C1-S coupled chemistry. A new frontier for chemical kinetics both in the Earth and planetary atmospheres is the study of heterogeneous reactions. The formation of the ozone hole on Earth, the ubiquitous photochemical haze on Venus and in the Jovian planets and Titan all testify to the importance of heterogeneous reactions. It remains a challenge to connect the gas phase chemistry to the production of aerosols.

  5. Satl model lesson in chemical kinetics | Nazir | African Journal of ...

    Studies in order to pursue kinetics and mechanism of chemical reactions are a vital component of chemical literature. SATL literature is still not available for promoting this vital aspect of chemistry teaching. A lesson pertaining to this important issue has been developed and various parameters of kinetic studies are ...

  6. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  7. Comparing chemical reaction networks

    Cardelli, Luca; Tribastone, Mirco; Tschaikowski, Max

    2017-01-01

    We study chemical reaction networks (CRNs) as a kernel model of concurrency provided with semantics based on ordinary differential equations. We investigate the problem of comparing two CRNs, i.e., to decide whether the solutions of a source and of a target CRN can be matched for an appropriate...... choice of initial conditions. Using a categorical framework, we extend and unify model-comparison approaches based on dynamical (semantic) and structural (syntactic) properties of CRNs. Then, we provide an algorithm to compare CRNs, running linearly in time with respect to the cardinality of all possible...... comparisons. Finally, using a prototype implementation, CAGE, we apply our results to biological models from the literature....

  8. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    2016-03-25

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/23/15 - 04/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction...Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith

  9. A Kinetic Study of the Diels-Alder Reaction. An Experiment Illustrating Simple Second-Order Reaction Kinetics.

    Silvestri, Michael G.; Dills, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes an organic chemistry experiment for teaching the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. Provides background information about first- and second-order reactions, experimental procedures of the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and dimethyl fumarate, and the experimental results. (YP)

  10. Silver Nanowire Embedded Colorless Polyimide Heater for Wearable Chemical Sensors: Improved Reversible Reaction Kinetics of Optically Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    Choi, Seon-Jin; Kim, Sang-Joon; Jang, Ji-Soo; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Il-Doo

    2016-09-14

    Optically reduced graphene oxide (ORGO) sheets are successfully integrated on silver nanowire (Ag NW)-embedded transparent and flexible substrate. As a heating element, Ag NWs are embedded in a colorless polyimide (CPI) film by covering Ag NW networks using polyamic acid and subsequent imidization. Graphene oxide dispersed aqueous solution is drop-coated on the Ag NW-embedded CPI (Ag NW-CPI) film and directly irradiated by intense pulsed light to obtain ORGO sheets. The heat generation property of Ag NW-CPI film is investigated by applying DC voltage, which demonstrates unprecedentedly reliable and stable characteristics even in dynamic bending condition. To demonstrate the potential application in wearable chemical sensors, NO 2 sensing characteristic of ORGO is investigated with respect to the different heating temperature (22.7-71.7 °C) of Ag NW-CPI film. The result reveals that the ORGO sheets exhibit high sensitivity of 2.69% with reversible response/recovery sensing properties and minimal deviation of baseline resistance of around 1% toward NO 2 molecules when the temperature of Ag NW-CPI film is 71.7 °C. This work first demonstrates the improved reversible NO 2 sensing properties of ORGO sheets on flexible and transparent Ag NW-CPI film assisted by Ag NW heating networks. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hydrogen electrode reaction: A complete kinetic description

    Quaino, P.M.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R.; Chialvo, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic description of the hydrogen electrode reaction (HER) in the whole range of overpotentials (-0.2 < η (V) < 0.40) is presented. The Volmer-Heyrovsky-Tafel mechanism was solved considering simultaneously the following items: (i) the diffusional contribution of the molecular hydrogen from and towards the electrode surface, (ii) the forward and backward reaction rates of each elementary step and (iii) a Frumkin type adsorption for the reaction intermediate. In order to verify the descriptive capability of the kinetic expressions derived, an experimental study of the HER was carried out on a rotating platinum disc electrode in acid solution. From the correlation of these results the elementary kinetic parameters were evaluated and several aspects related to the kinetic mechanism were discussed. Finally, the use of these kinetic expressions to interpret results obtained on microelectrodes is also analysed

  12. Prediction of Combustion Instability with Detailed Chemical Kinetics

    2014-12-01

    of combustion instability. The mechanisms used for methane oxidation are the GRI 1.2 set that comprises of 32 chemical species and 177 reactions. All...with a single step global reaction and the GRI -1.2 kinetics mechanism which contains 177 reactions. The paper is organized as follows, Section II...flame speeds10. GRI -1.2 is a more complete set of hydrocarbon reactions consisting of 177 reactions involving 32 species and was optimized for natural

  13. Mass transfer with complex chemical reactions in gas–liquid systems : two-step reversible reactions with unit stoichiometric and kinetic orders

    Vas Bhat, R.D.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    An absorption model to study gas–liquid mass transfer accompanied by reversible two-step reactions in the liquid phase has been presented. This model has been used to determine mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and concentration profiles over a wide range of process conditions. Although

  14. Mass transfer with complex chemical reactions in gas-liquid systems: two-step reversible reactions with unit stoichiometric and kinetic orders

    Vas bhat, R.D.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, Geert

    2000-01-01

    An absorption model to study gas¿liquid mass transfer accompanied by reversible two-step reactions in the liquid phase has been presented. This model has been used to determine mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and concentration profiles over a wide range of process conditions. Although

  15. Paterno`-Bu¨chi Reaction as a Demonstration of Chemical Kinetics and Synthetic Photochemistry Using a Light Emitting Diode Apparatus

    Thompson, Matthew P.; Agger, Jonathan; Wong, Lu Shin

    2015-01-01

    The Paterno`-Bu¨chi photocycloaddition reaction is used as the basis for physical-organic final-year undergraduate laboratory experiments designed to emphasize the multidisciplinary approach to modern-day chemical practice. These reactions are performed using commercially available LED-based light sources, which offer a convenient and safe tool…

  16. CHEMSIMUL: A simulator for chemical kinetics

    Kirkegaard, P.; Bjergbakke, E.

    1999-01-01

    CHEMSIMUL is a computer program system for numerical simulation of chemical reaction systems. It can be used for modeling complex kinetics in many contexts, in particular radiolytic processes. It contains a translator module and a module for solving the resulting coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. An overview of the program system is given, and its use is illustrated by examples. A number of special features are described, in particular a method for verifying the mass balance. Moreover, the document contains a complete User's Guide for running CHEMSIMUL on a PC or another computer. Finally, the mathematical implementation is discussed. (au)

  17. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  18. Transesterification of canola, palm, peanut, soybean and sunflower oil with methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, butanol and tert-butanol to biodiesel: Modelling of chemical equilibrium, reaction kinetics and mass transfer based on fatty acid composition

    Likozar, Blaž; Levec, Janez

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Modelling of chemical equilibrium, reaction kinetics and mass transfer for triglyceride transesterification with different alcohols based on fatty acid composition. - Highlights: • Catalysed transesterification to biodiesel with various oils, alcohols and catalysts. • Analysis of components and reactivity based on fatty acid composition of all species. • Simultaneous modelling of mass transfer, reaction kinetics and chemical equilibrium. • Diffusivities, distribution and mass transfer coefficients for individual components. • Correlation of kinetic parameters with molecular structure of reactants and products. - Abstract: Mechanism of alcoholysis (e.g. methanolysis) using different oils, alcohols and homogeneous base catalysts was utilized to devise chemical kinetics and thermodynamics based on fatty acid composition, differentiating among triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides and fatty acid alkyl esters (e.g. fatty acid alkyl esters, FAME) with bonded gadoleic, linoleic, linolenic, oleic, palmitic and stearic acid-originating substituents. Their concentrations were measured using an optimized high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Hydrodynamics and diffusion limitations in emulsion were considered in overall model by determining diffusivities, distribution coefficients, molar volumes, boiling points and viscosities of individual components. Pre-exponential factors and activation energies were related with structure of reactants, intermediates and products acknowledging number of carbons, double bonds and alkyl branches by linear and mixed response surface methodology. Developed model may be used with batch and continuous flow reactors, e.g. for novel micro-structured or industrial-scale process intensification, different vegetable or non-edible oils (waste cooking Jatropha or microalgae lipids)

  19. Insights into the mechanisms on chemical reactions: reaction paths for chemical reactions

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Rosen, E.; Eades, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report reaction paths for two prototypical chemical reactions: Li + HF, an electron transfer reaction, and OH + H 2 , an abstraction reaction. In the first reaction we consider the connection between the energetic terms in the reaction path Hamiltonian and the electronic changes which occur upon reaction. In the second reaction we consider the treatment of vibrational effects in chemical reactions in the reaction path formalism. 30 refs., 9 figs

  20. Slow manifolds in chemical kinetics

    Shahzad, M.; Haq, I. U.; Sultan, F.; Wahab, A.; Faizullah, F.; Rahman, G. U.

    2016-01-01

    Modelling the chemical system, especially for complex and higher dimensional problems, gives an easy way to handle the ongoing reaction process with respect to time. Here, we will consider some of the newly developed computational methods commonly used for model reductions in a chemical reaction. An effective (simple) method is planned to measure the low dimensional manifold, which reduces the higher dimensional system in such a way that it may not affect the precision of the whole mechanism. The phase flow of the solution trajectories near the equilibrium point is observed while the initial approximation is measured with the spectral quasi equilibrium manifold, which starts from the equilibrium point. To make it an invariant curve, the approximated curve is first refined a certain number of times using the method of invariant grids. The other way of getting the reduced data in the low dimensional manifold is possible through the intrinsic low dimensional manifold. Then, we compare these two invariant curves given by both the methods. Finally, the idea is extended to the higher dimensional manifold, where more number of progress variables will be added. (author)

  1. Empiricism or self-consistent theory in chemical kinetics?

    Gutman, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    To give theoretical background for mechanochemical kinetics, we need first of all to find a possibility to predict the kinetic parameters for real chemical processes by determining rate constants and reaction orders without developing strictly specialized and, to a great extent, artificial models, i.e. to derive the kinetic law of mass action from 'first principles'. However, the kinetic law of mass action has had only an empirical basis from the first experiments of Gulberg and Waage until now, in contrast to the classical law of mass action for chemical equilibrium rigorously derived in chemical thermodynamics from equilibrium condition. Nevertheless, in this paper, an attempt to derive the kinetic law of mass action from 'first principles' is made in macroscopic formulation. It has turned out to be possible owing to the methods of thermodynamics of irreversible processes that were unknown in Gulberg and Waage's time

  2. Evidence for Dynamic Chemical Kinetics at Individual Molecular Ruthenium Catalysts.

    Easter, Quinn T; Blum, Suzanne A

    2018-02-05

    Catalytic cycles are typically depicted as possessing time-invariant steps with fixed rates. Yet the true behavior of individual catalysts with respect to time is unknown, hidden by the ensemble averaging inherent to bulk measurements. Evidence is presented for variable chemical kinetics at individual catalysts, with a focus on ring-opening metathesis polymerization catalyzed by the second-generation Grubbs' ruthenium catalyst. Fluorescence microscopy is used to probe the chemical kinetics of the reaction because the technique possesses sufficient sensitivity for the detection of single chemical reactions. Insertion reactions in submicron regions likely occur at groups of many (not single) catalysts, yet not so many that their unique kinetic behavior is ensemble averaged. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. untangling chemical kinetics through tangible and visual

    Temechegn

    elementary chemical reactions as part of the learning process. Despite employing ... relation between reaction rates of reactants and their products involves the use .... Experiment Journal of Chemical Education, 77, 1013– 1014. 19. Niaz, M. A ...

  4. Inflation Rates, Car Devaluation, and Chemical Kinetics.

    Pogliani, Lionello; Berberan-Santos, Mario N.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the inflation rate problem and offers an interesting analogy with chemical kinetics. Presents and solves the car devaluation problem as a normal chemical kinetic problem where the order of the rate law and the value of the rate constant are derived. (JRH)

  5. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  6. Ametryn degradation by aqueous chlorine: Kinetics and reaction influences

    Xu Bin; Gao Naiyun; Cheng Hefa; Hu Chenyan; Xia Shengji; Sun Xiaofeng; Wang Xuejiao; Yang Shaogui

    2009-01-01

    The chemical oxidation of the herbicide ametryn was investigated by aqueous chlorination between pH 4 and 10 at a temperature of 25 deg. C. Ametryn was found to react very rapidly with aqueous chlorine. The reaction kinetics can be well described by a second-order kinetic model. The apparent second-order rate constants are greater than 5 x 10 2 M -1 s -1 under acidic and neutral conditions. The reaction proceeds much more slowly under alkaline conditions. The predominant reactions were found to be the reactions of HOCl with neutral ametryn and the charged ametryn, with rate constants equal to 7.22 x 10 2 and 1.58 x 10 3 M -1 s -1 , respectively. The ametryn degradation rate increases with addition of bromide and decreases with addition of ammonia during the chlorination process. Based on elementary chemical reactions, a kinetic model of ametryn degradation by chlorination in the presence of bromide or ammonia ion was also developed. By employing this model, we estimate that the rate constants for the reactions of HOBr with neutral ametryn and charged ametryn were 9.07 x 10 3 and 3.54 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 , respectively. These values are 10- to 10 3 -fold higher than those of HOCl, suggesting that the presence of bromine species during chlorination could significantly accelerate ametryn degradation.

  7. A green approach towards adoption of chemical reaction model on 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-di-(tert-butylperoxy)hexane decomposition by differential isoconversional kinetic analysis

    Das, Mitali; Shu, Chi-Min, E-mail: shucm@yuntech.edu.tw

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Thermally degraded DBPH products are identified. • An appropriate mathematical model was selected for decomposition study. • Differential isoconversional analysis was performed to obtain kinetic parameters. • Simulation on thermal analysis model was conducted for the best storage conditions. - Abstract: This study investigated the thermal degradation products of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-di-(tert-butylperoxy) hexane (DBPH), by TG/GC/MS to identify runaway reaction and thermal safety parameters. It also included the determination of time to maximum rate under adiabatic conditions (TMR{sub ad}) and self-accelerating decomposition temperature obtained through Advanced Kinetics and Technology Solutions. The apparent activation energy (E{sub a}) was calculated from differential isoconversional kinetic analysis method using differential scanning calorimetry experiments. The E{sub a} value obtained by Friedman analysis is in the range of 118.0–149.0 kJ mol{sup −1}. The TMR{sub ad} was 24.0 h with an apparent onset temperature of 82.4 °C. This study has also established an efficient benchmark for a thermal hazard assessment of DBPH that can be applied to assure safer storage conditions.

  8. Chemical kinetics of detonation in some liquid mixtures

    Raikova, Vlada M.; Likholatov, Evgeny A. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to study the chemical kinetics of detonation reactions in some nitroester mixtures and solutions of nitrocompounds in concentrated nitric acid. The main source of information on chemical kinetics in the detonation wave was the experimental dependence of failure diameter on composition of mixtures. Calculations were carried out in terms of classic theory of Dremin using the SGKR computer code. Effective values for the activation energies and pre-exponential factors for detonation reactions in the mixtures under investigation have been defined. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Kinetic mechanism for modeling of electrochemical reactions.

    Cervenka, Petr; Hrdlička, Jiří; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2012-04-01

    We propose a kinetic mechanism of electrochemical interactions. We assume fast formation and recombination of electron donors D- and acceptors A+ on electrode surfaces. These mediators are continuously formed in the electrode matter by thermal fluctuations. The mediators D- and A+, chemically equivalent to the electrode metal, enter electrochemical interactions on the electrode surfaces. Electrochemical dynamics and current-voltage characteristics of a selected electrochemical system are studied. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with those given by the classical Butler-Volmer kinetics. The proposed model can be used to study fast electrochemical processes in microsystems and nanosystems that are often out of the thermal equilibrium. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism operates only with the surface concentrations of chemical reactants and local electric potentials, which facilitates the study of electrochemical systems with indefinable bulk.

  10. Air corona discharge chemical kinetics

    Kline, L.E.; Kanter, I.E.

    1984-01-01

    We have theoretically studied the initial chemical processing steps which occur in pulseless, negative, dc corona discharges in flowing air. A rate equation model is used because these discharges consist of a very small ionization zone near the pin with most of the pin-plane gap filled by a drift zone where both the electric field and the electron density are relatively uniform. The primary activated species are N 2 (A),O and O 2 (a 1 Δ). The predicted activated species density due to one discharge is 100 ppm per ms . mA cm 2 assuming E/n=60 Td. In pure, dry air the final product due to these activated species is primarily O 3 . The NO /sub x/ production is about 0.5 ppm per mA. In moist air there is an additional production of about 1.5 ppm per mA of HO /sub x/ species. The predicted ozone formation reactions will be ''intercepted'' when impurities are present in the air. Impurities present at densities below about 0.1% will react primarily with the activated species rather than with electrons. Hence the predicted activated species density provides an estimate of the potential chemical processing performance of the discharge

  11. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  12. Ab Initio Chemical Kinetics for the CH3 + O((3)P) Reaction and Related Isomerization-Decomposition of CH3O and CH2OH Radicals.

    Xu, Z F; Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics and mechanism of the CH3 + O reaction and related isomerization-decomposition of CH3O and CH2OH radicals have been studied by ab initio molecular orbital theory based on the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ, CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ, and G2M//B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p) levels of theory. The predicted potential energy surface of the CH3 + O reaction shows that the CHO + H2 products can be directly generated from CH3O by the TS3 → LM1 → TS7 → LM2 → TS4 path, in which both LM1 and LM2 are very loose and TS7 is roaming-like. The result for the CH2O + H reaction shows that there are three low-energy barrier processes including CH2O + H → CHO + H2 via H-abstraction and CH2O + H → CH2OH and CH2O + H → CH3O by addition reactions. The predicted enthalpies of formation of the CH2OH and CH3O radicals at 0 K are in good agreement with available experimental data. Furthermore, the rate constants for the forward and some key reverse reactions have been predicted at 200-3000 K under various pressures. Based on the new reaction pathway for CH3 + O, the rate constants for the CH2O + H and CHO + H2 reactions were predicted with the microcanonical variational transition-state/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (VTST/RRKM) theory. The predicted total and individual product branching ratios (i.e., CO versus CH2O) are in good agreement with experimental data. The rate constant for the hydrogen abstraction reaction of CH2O + H has been calculated by the canonical variational transition-state theory with quantum tunneling and small-curvature corrections to be k(CH2O + H → CHO + H2) = 2.28 × 10(-19) T(2.65) exp(-766.5/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the 200-3000 K temperature range. The rate constants for the addition giving CH3O and CH2OH and the decomposition of the two radicals have been calculated by the microcanonical RRKM theory with the time-dependent master equation solution of the multiple quantum well system in the 200-3000 K temperature range at 1 Torr to

  13. Effects of reaction-kinetic parameters on modeling reaction pathways in GaN MOVPE growth

    Zhang, Hong; Zuo, Ran; Zhang, Guoyi

    2017-11-01

    In the modeling of the reaction-transport process in GaN MOVPE growth, the selections of kinetic parameters (activation energy Ea and pre-exponential factor A) for gas reactions are quite uncertain, which cause uncertainties in both gas reaction path and growth rate. In this study, numerical modeling of the reaction-transport process for GaN MOVPE growth in a vertical rotating disk reactor is conducted with varying kinetic parameters for main reaction paths. By comparisons of the molar concentrations of major Ga-containing species and the growth rates, the effects of kinetic parameters on gas reaction paths are determined. The results show that, depending on the values of the kinetic parameters, the gas reaction path may be dominated either by adduct/amide formation path, or by TMG pyrolysis path, or by both. Although the reaction path varies with different kinetic parameters, the predicted growth rates change only slightly because the total transport rate of Ga-containing species to the substrate changes slightly with reaction paths. This explains why previous authors using different chemical models predicted growth rates close to the experiment values. By varying the pre-exponential factor for the amide trimerization, it is found that the more trimers are formed, the lower the growth rates are than the experimental value, which indicates that trimers are poor growth precursors, because of thermal diffusion effect caused by high temperature gradient. The effective order for the contribution of major species to growth rate is found as: pyrolysis species > amides > trimers. The study also shows that radical reactions have little effect on gas reaction path because of the generation and depletion of H radicals in the chain reactions when NH2 is considered as the end species.

  14. The applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research during the past four decades is presented with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium models and thermochemical kinetics. Several current problems in planetary atmospheres research such as the origin of the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, atmosphere-surface interactions on Venus and Mars, deep mixing in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets, and the origin of the atmospheres of outer planet satellites all require laboratory data on the kinetics of thermochemical reactions for their solution.

  15. Computational Chemical Kinetics for the Reaction of Criegee Intermediate CH2OO with HNO3 and Its Catalytic Conversion to OH and HCO.

    Raghunath, P; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lin, M C

    2017-05-25

    The kinetics and mechanisms for the reaction of the Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with HNO 3 and the unimolecular decomposition of its reaction product CH 2 (O)NO 3 are important in atmospheric chemistry. The potential-energy profile of the reactions predicted with the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method shows that the initial association yields a prereaction complex that isomerizes by H migration to yield excited intermediate nitrooxymethyl hydroperoxide NO 3 CH 2 OOH* with internal energy ∼44 kcal mol -1 . A fragmentation of this excited intermediate produces CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH with its transition state located 5.0 kcal mol -1 below that of the reactants. Further decomposition of CH 2 (O)NO 3 produces HCO + HNO 3 , forming a catalytic cycle for destruction of CH 2 OO by HNO 3 . The rate coefficients and product-branching ratios were calculated in the temperature range 250-700 K at pressure 20-760 Torr (N 2 ) using the variational-transition-state and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theories. The predicted total rate coefficient for reaction CH 2 OO + HNO 3 at 295 K, 5.1 × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , agrees satisfactorily with the experimental value, (5.4 ± 1.0) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . The predicted branching ratios at 295 K are 0.21 for the formation of NO 3 CH 2 OOH and 0.79 for CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH at a pressure of 40 Torr (N 2 ), and 0.79 for the formation of NO 3 CH 2 OOH and 0.21 for CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH at 760 Torr (N 2 ). This new catalytic conversion of CH 2 OO to HCO + OH by HNO 3 might have significant impact on atmospheric chemistry.

  16. Kinetics of catalytic reactions solutions manual

    Vannice, M Albert

    2005-01-01

    Including countless exercises and worked examples, this advanced reference work and textbook will be extremely useful for the work of many industrial scientists. It teaches readers to design kinetic experiments involving heterogeneous catalysts, to characterize these catalysts, to acquire rate data, to find heat and mass transfer limitations in these data, to select reaction models, to derive rate expressions based on these models, and to assess the consistency of these rate equations.

  17. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems

    Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another

  18. Kinetic modelling of the Maillard reaction between proteins and sugars

    Brands, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: Maillard reaction, sugar isomerisation, kinetics, multiresponse modelling, brown colour formation, lysine damage, mutagenicity, casein, monosaccharides, disaccharides, aldoses, ketoses

    The aim of this thesis was to determine the kinetics of the Maillard reaction between

  19. CSP-based chemical kinetics mechanisms simplification strategy for non-premixed combustion: An application to hybrid rocket propulsion

    Ciottoli, Pietro P.; Malpica Galassi, Riccardo; Lapenna, Pasquale E.; Leccese, G.; Bianchi, D.; Nasuti, F.; Creta, F.; Valorani, M.

    2017-01-01

    A set of simplified chemical kinetics mechanisms for hybrid rocket applications using gaseous oxygen (GOX) and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) is proposed. The starting point is a 561-species, 2538-reactions, detailed chemical kinetics

  20. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-02

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure.

  1. Research in chemical kinetics, v.2

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume in a new series, which aims to publish authoritative review articles on a wide range of exciting and contemporary topics in gas and condensed phase kinetics. Research in Chemical Kinetics complements the acclaimed series Comprehensive Chemical Kinetics, and is edited by the same team of professionals. The reviews contained in this volume are concise, topical accounts of specific research written by acknowledged experts. The authors summarize their latest work and place it in a general context. Particular strengths of the volume are the quality of the c

  2. Research in Chemical Kinetics, v.3

    2012-01-01

    This series of volumes aims to publish authoritative review articles on a wide range of exciting and contemporary topics in gas and condensed phase kinetics. Research in Chemical Kinetics complements the acclaimed series Comprehensive Chemical Kinetics, and is edited by the same team of professionals. The reviews contained in this volume are concise, topical accounts of specific research written by acknowledged experts. The authors summarize their latest work and place it in a general context. Particular strengths of the volume are the quality of the contributions and their top

  3. Spectroscopy and reaction kinetics of HCO

    Guo, Yili.

    1989-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared spectrum of the C-H stretching fundamental of HCO has been studied by means of infrared flash kinetic spectroscopy. HCO was generated by flash photolysis of acetaldehyde or formaldehyde using a 308 nm (XeCl) excimer laser. The transient absorption was probed with an infrared difference frequency laser system. The high resolution spectra obtained were assigned and fitted with rotational, spin-rotational, and centrifugal distortion constants. The ν 1 band origin is 2434.48 cm/sup /minus/1/. New ground state constants have been derived from a least-squares fit combining the ν 1 data with previous microwave and FIR LMR measurements. A new set of spectroscopic constants for the (1, 0, 0) state, the equilibrium rotational constants, and the orientation of the transition dipole moment are also reported. The kinetics and product branching ratios of the HCO + NO 2 reaction have been studied using visible and infrared laser flash kinetic spectroscopy. The rate constant for the disappearance of HCO radical at 296 K is (5.7 +- 0.9) /times/ 10/sup /minus/11/ cm 3 molec/sup /minus/1/ sec/sup /minus/1/, and it is independent of the pressure of SF 6 buffer gas up to 700 torr. Less than 10% of the reaction goes through the most exothermic product channel, HNO + CO 2 . The product channel, H + CO 2 + NO, is responsible for 52% of the reaction. HONO has been observed, though not quantitatively, as a reaction product corresponding to the HONO + CO channel. 51 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Scattering theory and chemical reactions

    Kuppermann, A.

    1988-01-01

    In this course, scattering theory and chemical reactions are presented including scattering of one particle by a potential, n-particle systems, colinear triatomic molecules and the study of reactive scattering for 3-dimensional triatomic systems. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  5. Isothermal reaction calorimetry as a tool for kinetic analysis

    Zogg, Andreas; Stoessel, Francis; Fischer, Ulrich; Hungerbuehler, Konrad

    2004-01-01

    Reaction calorimetry has found widespread application for thermal and kinetic analysis of chemical reactions in the context of thermal process safety as well as process development. This paper reviews the most important reaction calorimetric principles (heat-flow, heat-balance, power-compensation, and Peltier principle) and their applications in commercial or scientific devices. The discussion focuses on the different dynamic behavior of the main calorimetric principles during an isothermal reaction measurement. Examples of available reaction calorimeters are further compared considering their detection limit, time constant as well as temperature range. In a second part, different evaluation methods for the isothermally measured calorimetric data are reviewed and discussed. The methods will be compared, focusing especially on the fact that reaction calorimetric data always contains additional informations not directly related to the actual chemical reaction such as heat of mixing, heat of phase-transfer/change processes or simple measurement errors. Depending on the evaluation method applied such disturbances have a significant influence on the calculated reaction enthalpies or rate constants

  6. QUIC: a chemical kinetics code for use with the chemical equilibrium code QUIL

    Lunsford, J.L.

    1977-10-01

    A chemical rate kinetics code QUIC is described, along with a support code RATE. QUIC is designed to allow chemical kinetics calculations on a wide variety of chemical environments while operating in the overlay environment of the chemical equilibrium code QUIL. QUIC depends upon a rate-data library called LIBR. This library is maintained by RATE. RATE enters into the library all reactions in a standardized format. The code QUIC, operating in conjunction with QUIL, is interactive and written to be used from a remote terminal, with paging control provided. Plotted output is also available

  7. Chemical kinetic modeling of H{sub 2} applications

    Marinov, N.M.; Westbrook, C.K.; Cloutman, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Work being carried out at LLNL has concentrated on studies of the role of chemical kinetics in a variety of problems related to hydrogen combustion in practical combustion systems, with an emphasis on vehicle propulsion. Use of hydrogen offers significant advantages over fossil fuels, and computer modeling provides advantages when used in concert with experimental studies. Many numerical {open_quotes}experiments{close_quotes} can be carried out quickly and efficiently, reducing the cost and time of system development, and many new and speculative concepts can be screened to identify those with sufficient promise to pursue experimentally. This project uses chemical kinetic and fluid dynamic computational modeling to examine the combustion characteristics of systems burning hydrogen, either as the only fuel or mixed with natural gas. Oxidation kinetics are combined with pollutant formation kinetics, including formation of oxides of nitrogen but also including air toxics in natural gas combustion. We have refined many of the elementary kinetic reaction steps in the detailed reaction mechanism for hydrogen oxidation. To extend the model to pressures characteristic of internal combustion engines, it was necessary to apply theoretical pressure falloff formalisms for several key steps in the reaction mechanism. We have continued development of simplified reaction mechanisms for hydrogen oxidation, we have implemented those mechanisms into multidimensional computational fluid dynamics models, and we have used models of chemistry and fluid dynamics to address selected application problems. At the present time, we are using computed high pressure flame, and auto-ignition data to further refine the simplified kinetics models that are then to be used in multidimensional fluid mechanics models. Detailed kinetics studies have investigated hydrogen flames and ignition of hydrogen behind shock waves, intended to refine the detailed reactions mechanisms.

  8. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions

    Gordon, R.J.

    1990-06-01

    During the past three years we have been working on four problems in the general area of gas phase kinetics and energy transfer of small molecules. These are: (1) measurements of the fine structure populations of ground state oxygen atoms produced in photodissociation reactions; (2) quenching of the Rydberg B ( 1 Σ + ) state of CO; (3) vibrational relaxation of highly excited molecules; and (4) kinetics of hydrogen molecules. The first two topics, which involve transitions between different electronic states of the parent molecule, are a departure from our previous research interests. In the accompanying renewal proposal we discuss plans to pursue these new topics vigorously during the coming year. The third topic is a continuation of our long interest in the energy dependence of the rates laws governing vibrational-to-translational energy transfer of molecules having large initial amounts of vibrational excitation. The final topic is a continuation of our studies of the reaction of O( 3 P) + H 2 . In this work we measured the rate constant for the reaction O( 3 P) with deuterium and also analyzed spectroscopically different sources of vibrationally excited hydrogen for possible future work. We discuss each of these four studies in the following sections

  9. A network dynamics approach to chemical reaction networks

    van der Schaft, Abraham; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    2016-01-01

    A treatment of chemical reaction network theory is given from the perspective of nonlinear network dynamics, in particular of consensus dynamics. By starting from the complex-balanced assumption the reaction dynamics governed by mass action kinetics can be rewritten into a form which allows for a

  10. Open complex-balanced mass action chemical reaction networks

    Rao, Shodhan; van der Schaft, Arjan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    We consider open chemical reaction networks, i.e. ones with inflows and outflows. We assume that all the inflows to the network are constant and all outflows obey the mass action kinetics rate law. We define a complex-balanced open reaction network as one that admits a complex-balanced steady state.

  11. Reaction kinetic analysis of reactor surveillance data

    Yoshiie, T., E-mail: yoshiie@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Kinomura, A. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    In the reactor pressure vessel surveillance data of a European-type pressurized water reactor (low-Cu steel), it was found that the concentration of matrix defects was very high, and a large number of precipitates existed. In this study, defect structure evolution obtained from surveillance data was simulated by reaction kinetic analysis using 15 rate equations. The saturation of precipitation and the growth of loops were simulated, but it was not possible to explain the increase in DBTT on the basis of the defect structures. The sub-grain boundary segregation of solutes was discussed for the origin of the DBTT increase.

  12. Conservation-dissipation structure of chemical reaction systems.

    Yong, Wen-An

    2012-12-01

    In this Brief Report, we show that balanced chemical reaction systems governed by the law of mass action have an elegant conservation-dissipation structure. From this structure a number of important conclusions can be easily deduced. In particular, with the help of this structure we can rigorously justify the classical partial equilibrium approximation in chemical kinetics.

  13. Chemical kinetics in the coma

    Huebner, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    Physical and chemical conditions in the coma of a bright new comet are related to the composition of the nucleus. Chemical and photolytic processes are described and related to distance in the coma above the nucleus and to heliocentric distance of the comet. Comparison of the model with coma observations leads to some restrictions about the nucleus composition. It is expected that these restrictions become more stringent as coma models are developed further and as observations become more detailed

  14. On the theory of time dilation in chemical kinetics

    Baig, Mirza Wasif

    2017-10-01

    The rates of chemical reactions are not absolute but their magnitude depends upon the relative speeds of the moving observers. This has been proved by unifying basic theories of chemical kinetics, which are transition state theory, collision theory, RRKM and Marcus theory, with the special theory of relativity. Boltzmann constant and energy spacing between permitted quantum levels of molecules are quantum mechanically proved to be Lorentz variant. The relativistic statistical thermodynamics has been developed to explain quasi-equilibrium existing between reactants and activated complex. The newly formulated Lorentz transformation of the rate constant from Arrhenius equation, of the collision frequency and of the Eyring and Marcus equations renders the rate of reaction to be Lorentz variant. For a moving observer moving at fractions of the speed of light along the reaction coordinate, the transition state possess less kinetic energy to sweep translation over it. This results in the slower transformation of reactants into products and in a stretched time frame for the chemical reaction to complete. Lorentz transformation of the half-life equation explains time dilation of the half-life period of chemical reactions and proves special theory of relativity and presents theory in accord with each other. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the present theory, the enzymatic reaction of methylamine dehydrogenase and radioactive disintegration of Astatine into Bismuth are considered as numerical examples.

  15. Reaction kinetics of dolomite rim growth

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Abart, R.; Morales, L. F. G.; Rhede, D.; Jeřábek, P.; Dresen, G.

    2014-04-01

    Reaction rims of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) were produced by solid-state reactions at the contacts of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals at 400 MPa pressure, 750-850 °C temperature, and 3-146 h annealing time to determine the reaction kinetics. The dolomite reaction rims show two different microstructural domains. Elongated palisades of dolomite grew perpendicular into the MgCO3 interface with length ranging from about 6 to 41 µm. At the same time, a 5-71 µm wide rim of equiaxed granular dolomite grew at the contact with CaCO3. Platinum markers showed that the original interface is located at the boundary between the granular and palisade-forming dolomite. In addition to dolomite, a 12-80 µm thick magnesio-calcite layer formed between the dolomite reaction rims and the calcite single crystals. All reaction products show at least an axiotactic crystallographic relationship with respect to calcite reactant, while full topotaxy to calcite prevails within the granular dolomite and magnesio-calcite. Dolomite grains frequently exhibit growth twins characterized by a rotation of 180° around one of the equivalent axis. From mass balance considerations, it is inferred that the reaction rim of dolomite grew by counter diffusion of MgO and CaO. Assuming an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, activation energies for diffusion of CaO and MgO are E a (CaO) = 192 ± 54 kJ/mol and E a (MgO) = 198 ± 44 kJ/mol, respectively.

  16. Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms and kinetics relevant to the CVD of semiconductor materials

    Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the state of the art in experimental and theoretical techniques for determining reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of semiconductor materials. It summarizes the most common ultra-high vacuum experimental techniques that are used and the types of rate information available from each. Several case studies of specific chemical systems relevant to the microelectronics industry are described. Theoretical methods for calculating heterogeneous reaction rate constants are also summarized.

  17. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of 2-Methylhexane Combustion

    Mohamed, Samah Y.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important for investigating the combustion behavior of diesel, gasoline, and aviation fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracy in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and kinetic model for a gasoline surrogate fuel, 2-methylhexane, with recently published group values and rate rules. These update provides a better agreement with rapid compression machine measurements of ignition delay time, while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  18. Kinetic aspects of the Maillard reaction: a critical review

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The literature concerning the kinetics of the Maillard reaction was critically discussed according to the initial, intermediate and advanced stages, as this is the way the Maillard reaction is traditionally analysed. For each stage, a division is made between simple kinetics and complex kinetics.

  19. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  20. Chemical Kinetics of Progesterone Radioimmunoassay System

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.; Moustsfs, K.A.; El-Kolally, M.T.

    2004-01-01

    Progesterone is one of the steroids secreted by the corpus Iuteum in females during the menstrual cycle, and in a much higher amount by the placenta during pregnancy. It is also secreted in a minor quantities by the adrenal cortex in both males and females. Measurement of serum progesterone represents one of diagnostic values in menstrual disorders and infertility. The progesterone radioimmunoassay is based on the competition between unlabelled progesterone and a fixed quantity of 125 I-labeled progesterone for a limited number of binding sites on progesterone specific antibody. Allowing for a fixed amount of magnetizable immunosorbent to react, the antigen-antibody complex is bound on solid particles which are then separated by magnetic rack, and the radioactivity of the solid phase was counted using gamma counter. In this work, the chemical kinetics of the assay was followed, where the specific rate constant (K) was calculated at 4 degree and 37 degree and the activation energy (E act ) were calculated and the reaction rate was deduced

  1. Enzyme-catalyzed and binding reaction kinetics determined by titration calorimetry.

    Hansen, Lee D; Transtrum, Mark K; Quinn, Colette; Demarse, Neil

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal calorimetry allows monitoring of reaction rates via direct measurement of the rate of heat produced by the reaction. Calorimetry is one of very few techniques that can be used to measure rates without taking a derivative of the primary data. Because heat is a universal indicator of chemical reactions, calorimetry can be used to measure kinetics in opaque solutions, suspensions, and multiple phase systems and does not require chemical labeling. The only significant limitation of calorimetry for kinetic measurements is that the time constant of the reaction must be greater than the time constant of the calorimeter which can range from a few seconds to a few minutes. Calorimetry has the unique ability to provide both kinetic and thermodynamic data. This article describes the calorimetric methodology for determining reaction kinetics and reviews examples from recent literature that demonstrate applications of titration calorimetry to determine kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed and ligand binding reactions. A complete model for the temperature dependence of enzyme activity is presented. A previous method commonly used for blank corrections in determinations of equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for binding reactions is shown to be subject to significant systematic error. Methods for determination of the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and for simultaneous determination of thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding reactions are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of kinetic parameters of heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction

    Huang, Ting-Chia; Tsai, Fuan-Nan

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model has been proposed for a heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction which involves film diffusion, surface chemical reaction and intraparticle diffusion. The exchange equation to predict the exchange fraction as a function of time for the spherical particles immersed in a solution of finite volume has been derived. The relations between the exchange fraction and dimensionless time are plotted with xi(=ak sub(f)/KD sub(e)), xi 1 (=K 1 a 2 /D sub(e)) and final fractional uptake as parameters. From the values of the kinetic parameters xi and xi 1 , the relative importance of each limiting step is discussed. Experimental results of the isotopic exchange reaction of calcium ion in both system CaCO 3 (s)/Ca 2+ (aq) and system calcium type resin Dowex 50W-X8/Ca 2+ (aq) are coincident with the theoretical equation proposed in this study. (auth.)

  3. Versatile Dual Photoresponsive System for Precise Control of Chemical Reactions.

    Xu, Can; Bing, Wei; Wang, Faming; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-08-22

    A versatile method for photoregulation of chemical reactions was developed through a combination of near-infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) light sensitive materials. This regulatory effect was achieved through photoresponsive modulation of reaction temperature and pH values, two prominent factors influencing reaction kinetics. Photothermal nanomaterial graphene oxide (GO) and photobase reagent malachite green carbinol base (MGCB) were selected for temperature and pH regulation, respectively. Using nanocatalyst- and enzyme-mediated chemical reactions as model systems, we demonstrated the feasibility and high efficiency of this method. In addition, a photoresponsive, multifunctional "Band-aid"-like hydrogel platform was presented for programmable wound healing. Overall, this simple, efficient, and reversible system was found to be effective for controlling a wide variety of chemical reactions. Our work may provide a method for remote and sustainable control over chemical reactions for industrial and biomedical applications.

  4. pyJac: Analytical Jacobian generator for chemical kinetics

    Niemeyer, Kyle E.; Curtis, Nicholas J.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2017-06-01

    Accurate simulations of combustion phenomena require the use of detailed chemical kinetics in order to capture limit phenomena such as ignition and extinction as well as predict pollutant formation. However, the chemical kinetic models for hydrocarbon fuels of practical interest typically have large numbers of species and reactions and exhibit high levels of mathematical stiffness in the governing differential equations, particularly for larger fuel molecules. In order to integrate the stiff equations governing chemical kinetics, generally reactive-flow simulations rely on implicit algorithms that require frequent Jacobian matrix evaluations. Some in situ and a posteriori computational diagnostics methods also require accurate Jacobian matrices, including computational singular perturbation and chemical explosive mode analysis. Typically, finite differences numerically approximate these, but for larger chemical kinetic models this poses significant computational demands since the number of chemical source term evaluations scales with the square of species count. Furthermore, existing analytical Jacobian tools do not optimize evaluations or support emerging SIMD processors such as GPUs. Here we introduce pyJac, a Python-based open-source program that generates analytical Jacobian matrices for use in chemical kinetics modeling and analysis. In addition to producing the necessary customized source code for evaluating reaction rates (including all modern reaction rate formulations), the chemical source terms, and the Jacobian matrix, pyJac uses an optimized evaluation order to minimize computational and memory operations. As a demonstration, we first establish the correctness of the Jacobian matrices for kinetic models of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, and isopentanol oxidation (number of species ranging 13-360) by showing agreement within 0.001% of matrices obtained via automatic differentiation. We then demonstrate the performance achievable on CPUs and GPUs using py

  5. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions

    Gold, V.; McAdam, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    Under the influence of tritium β-radiation, 1,4-dioxan undergoes hydrogen exchange with the solvent water. The inhibition of the reaction by known electron scavengers (Ag + , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Zn 2+ , H 3 + O) and also by species with high reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals but negligible reactivity towards solvated electrons (N 3 - , Br - , SCN - ) has been examined in detail. γ-irradiation similarly induces hydrogen exchange. The action of scavengers is interpreted as requiring the involvement of two separately scavengeable primary radiolysis products in the sequence of reactions leading to exchange. The presence of electron scavengers, even at high concentration, does not totally inhibit the exchange, and a secondary exchange route, involving a low vacancy state of inhibitor cations, is considered responsible for the 'unscavengeable' portion of the reaction, by providing an alternative exchange route. Analogies are drawn between the exchange reaction and other radiation-induced reactions that are thought to involve spur processes. Some implication of radiation-chemical studies in water-alcohol mixtures are indicated. (author)

  6. Non-equilibrium effects in high temperature chemical reactions

    Johnson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction rate data were collected for chemical reactions occurring at high temperatures during reentry of space vehicles. The principle of detailed balancing is used in modeling kinetics of chemical reactions at high temperatures. Although this principle does not hold for certain transient or incubation times in the initial phase of the reaction, it does seem to be valid for the rates of internal energy transitions that occur within molecules and atoms. That is, for every rate of transition within the internal energy states of atoms or molecules, there is an inverse rate that is related through an equilibrium expression involving the energy difference of the transition.

  7. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics and a fluctuation theorem for individual reaction steps in a chemical reaction network

    Pal, Krishnendu; Das, Biswajit; Banerjee, Kinshuk; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    We have introduced an approach to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an open chemical reaction network in terms of the propensities of the individual elementary reactions and the corresponding reverse reactions. The method is a microscopic formulation of the dissipation function in terms of the relative entropy or Kullback-Leibler distance which is based on the analogy of phase space trajectory with the path of elementary reactions in a network of chemical process. We have introduced here a fluctuation theorem valid for each opposite pair of elementary reactions which is useful in determining the contribution of each sub-reaction on the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of overall reaction. The methodology is applied to an oligomeric enzyme kinetics at a chemiostatic condition that leads the reaction to a nonequilibrium steady state for which we have estimated how each step of the reaction is energy driven or entropy driven to contribute to the overall reaction. (paper)

  9. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  10. Amazing variational approach to chemical reactions

    Fernández, Francisco M.

    2009-01-01

    In this letter we analyse an amazing variational approach to chemical reactions. Our results clearly show that the variational expressions are unsuitable for the analysis of empirical data obtained from chemical reactions.

  11. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however......, not a sufficient condition in order to establish genuine tunneling as a result of quantum dynamics. This proposition is illustrated for a two-dimensional model potential describing dissociative sticking of N-2 on Ru(s). It is suggested that the remarkable heavy atom tunneling, found in this system, is related...

  12. Quantum indistinguishability in chemical reactions.

    Fisher, Matthew P A; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2018-05-15

    Quantum indistinguishability plays a crucial role in many low-energy physical phenomena, from quantum fluids to molecular spectroscopy. It is, however, typically ignored in most high-temperature processes, particularly for ionic coordinates, implicitly assumed to be distinguishable, incoherent, and thus well approximated classically. We explore enzymatic chemical reactions involving small symmetric molecules and argue that in many situations a full quantum treatment of collective nuclear degrees of freedom is essential. Supported by several physical arguments, we conjecture a "quantum dynamical selection" (QDS) rule for small symmetric molecules that precludes chemical processes that involve direct transitions from orbitally nonsymmetric molecular states. As we propose and discuss, the implications of the QDS rule include ( i ) a differential chemical reactivity of para- and orthohydrogen, ( ii ) a mechanism for inducing intermolecular quantum entanglement of nuclear spins, ( iii ) a mass-independent isotope fractionation mechanism, ( iv ) an explanation of the enhanced chemical activity of "reactive oxygen species", ( v ) illuminating the importance of ortho-water molecules in modulating the quantum dynamics of liquid water, and ( vi ) providing the critical quantum-to-biochemical linkage in the nuclear spin model of the (putative) quantum brain, among others.

  13. Learning to Predict Chemical Reactions

    Kayala, Matthew A.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles respectively are not high-throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, or lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry dataset consisting of 1630 full multi-step reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval, problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of non-productive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  14. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  15. Rate kernel theory for pseudo-first-order kinetics of diffusion-influenced reactions and application to fluorescence quenching kinetics.

    Yang, Mino

    2007-06-07

    Theoretical foundation of rate kernel equation approaches for diffusion-influenced chemical reactions is presented and applied to explain the kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions. A many-body master equation is constructed by introducing stochastic terms, which characterize the rates of chemical reactions, into the many-body Smoluchowski equation. A Langevin-type of memory equation for the density fields of reactants evolving under the influence of time-independent perturbation is derived. This equation should be useful in predicting the time evolution of reactant concentrations approaching the steady state attained by the perturbation as well as the steady-state concentrations. The dynamics of fluctuation occurring in equilibrium state can be predicted by the memory equation by turning the perturbation off and consequently may be useful in obtaining the linear response to a time-dependent perturbation. It is found that unimolecular decay processes including the time-independent perturbation can be incorporated into bimolecular reaction kinetics as a Laplace transform variable. As a result, a theory for bimolecular reactions along with the unimolecular process turned off is sufficient to predict overall reaction kinetics including the effects of unimolecular reactions and perturbation. As the present formulation is applied to steady-state kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions, the exact relation between fluorophore concentrations and the intensity of excitation light is derived.

  16. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  17. Chain chemical reactions during matrix devitrification

    Barkalov, I.M.

    1980-01-01

    Investigation results of chain reaction mechanisms, proceeding at devitrification of glass-like matrices under the effect of γ-irradiation are summarized. Peculiarities of kinetics and mechanism of chain reactions proceeding at devitrification are considered: hydrocarbon chlorination, polymerization of vinyl monomers, copolymerization and graft polymerization. Possible application aspects of the chain reaction conducting during matrix devitrification are also considered

  18. Accounting for chemical kinetics in field scale transport calculations

    Bryan, N.D.

    2005-01-01

    The modelling of column experiments has shown that the humic acid mediated transport of metal ions is dominated by the non-exchangeable fraction. Metal ions enter this fraction via the exchangeable fraction, and may transfer back again. However, in both directions these chemical reactions are slow. Whether or not a kinetic description of these processes is required during transport calculations, or an assumption of local equilibrium will suffice, will depend upon the ratio of the reaction half-time to the residence time of species within the groundwater column. If the flow rate is sufficiently slow or the reaction sufficiently fast then the assumption of local equilibrium is acceptable. Alternatively, if the reaction is sufficiently slow (or the flow rate fast), then the reaction may be 'decoupled', i.e. removed from the calculation. These distinctions are important, because calculations involving chemical kinetics are computationally very expensive, and should be avoided wherever possible. In addition, column experiments have shown that the sorption of humic substances and metal-humate complexes may be significant, and that these reactions may also be slow. In this work, a set of rules is presented that dictate when the local equilibrium and decoupled assumptions may be used. In addition, it is shown that in all cases to a first approximation, the behaviour of a kinetically controlled species, and in particular its final distribution against distance at the end of a calculation, depends only upon the ratio of the reaction first order rate to the residence time, and hence, even in the region where the simplifications may not be used, the behaviour is predictable. In this way, it is possible to obtain an estimate of the migration of these species, without the need for a complex transport calculation. (orig.)

  19. Kinetics of liquid lithium reaction with oxygen-nitrogen mixtures

    Gil, T.K.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in order to characterize the kinetics of lithium chemical reaction with a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. Three mixed gas compositions were used; 80% N 2 and 20% O 2 , 90% N 2 and 10% O 2 , and 95% N 2 and 5% O 2 . The reaction rate was obtained as a function of lithium temperature and the oxygen fraction. Liquid lithium temperature varied from 400 to 1100 0 C. By varying the composition, the degree of inhibition of the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate due to the presence of oxygen was observed. The results indicate that the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate depended on both the fraction of oxygen present and lithium temperature. The lithium nitride layer formed from the reaction also had a significant inhibition effect on the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate while the lithium-oxygen reaction rate was not as greatly hindered. LITFIRE, a computer code which simulates temperature and pressure history in a containment building following lithium spills, was modified by including (1) an improved model for the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate and (2) a model for the lithium-CO 2 reaction. LITFIRE was used to simulate HEDL's LC-2 and LA-5 experiments, and the predicted temperatures and pressures were in a reasonable agreement. Furthermore, LITFIRE was applied to a prototypical fusion reactor containment in order to simulate the consequences of a lithium spill accident. The result indicated that if nitrogen was used as containment building gas during the accident, the consequences of the accident would be less severe than those with air. The pressure rise in the building was found to be reduced by 50% and the maximum temperature of the combustion zone was limited to 900 0 C instead of 1200 0 C in the case of air

  20. CH4/air homogeneous autoignition: A comparison of two chemical kinetics mechanisms

    Tingas, Efstathios Al.; Manias, Dimitris M.; Sarathy, Mani; Goussis, Dimitris A.

    2018-01-01

    Reactions contributing to the generation of the explosive time scale that characterise autoignition of homogeneous stoichiometric CH4/air mixture are identified using two different chemical kinetics models; the well known GRI-3.0 mechanism (53

  1. Chemical Reaction Engineering: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Dudukovic, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Chemical Reaction Engineering (CRE) as the discipline that quantifies the interplay of transport phenomena and kinetics in relating reactor performance to operating conditions and input variables. Addresses the current status of CRE in both academic and industrial settings and outlines future trends. (TW)

  2. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D.; Tsori, Yoav, E-mail: tsori@bgu.ac.il [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  3. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients.

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D; Tsori, Yoav

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  4. Nonlinear magnetoacoustic wave propagation with chemical reactions

    Margulies, Timothy Scott

    2002-11-01

    The magnetoacoustic problem with an application to sound wave propagation through electrically conducting fluids such as the ocean in the Earth's magnetic field, liquid metals, or plasmas has been addressed taking into account several simultaneous chemical reactions. Using continuum balance equations for the total mass, linear momentum, energy; as well as Maxwell's electrodynamic equations, a nonlinear beam equation has been developed to generalize the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation for a fluid with linear viscosity but nonlinear and diffraction effects. Thermodynamic parameters are used and not tailored to only an adiabatic fluid case. The chemical kinetic equations build on a relaxing media approach presented, for example, by K. Naugolnukh and L. Ostrovsky [Nonlinear Wave Processes in Acoustics (Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, 1998)] for a linearized single reaction and thermodynamic pressure equation of state. Approximations for large and small relaxation times and for magnetohydrodynamic parameters [Korsunskii, Sov. Phys. Acoust. 36 (1990)] are examined. Additionally, Cattaneo's equation for heat conduction and its generalization for a memory process rather than a Fourier's law are taken into account. It was introduced for the heat flux depends on the temperature gradient at an earlier time to generate heat pulses of finite speed.

  5. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  6. Adsorption and catalysis: The effect of confinement on chemical reactions

    Santiso, Erik E.; George, Aaron M.; Turner, C. Heath; Kostov, Milen K.; Gubbins, Keith E.; Buongiorno-Nardelli, Marco; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, MaIgorzata

    2005-01-01

    Confinement within porous materials can affect chemical reactions through a host of different effects, including changes in the thermodynamic state of the system due to interactions with the pore walls, selective adsorption, geometrical constraints that affect the reaction mechanism, electronic perturbation due to the substrate, etc. In this work, we present an overview of some of our recent research on some of these effects, on chemical equilibrium, kinetic rates and reaction mechanisms. We also discuss our current and future directions for research in this area

  7. Investigation of chemical equilibrium kinetics by the electromigration method

    Bozhikov, G.A.; Ivanov, P.I.; Maslov, O.D.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Bontchev, G.D.; Milanov, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of the chemical reaction rates for complex formation as well as hydrolysis type reactions by the method of horizontal zone electrophoresis is outlined. The correlation between chemical equilibrium kinetics and electrodiffusion processes in a constant d.c. electric field is described. In model electromigration experiments the reaction rate constant of the formation a complex by Hf(IV) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is determined. The electrophoretic mobility, diffusion coefficient and stability constant of the [HfDTPA] - complex are calculated, taking into account experimental electrophoretic data obtained at 298.15±0.05 K and constant ionic strength. No-carrier-added 175 Hf radionuclide was used in electromigration experiments at concentrations of 10 -10 -10 -11 M. (orig.)

  8. Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-22

    The objectives for this project are as follows: Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for compression ignition (CI), homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engines; and Combine component models into surrogate fuel models to represent real transportation fuels. Use them to model low-temperature combustion strategies in HCCI, RCCI, and CI engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency.

  9. Kinetics of the gas-phase tritium oxidation reaction

    Failor, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Homogeneous gas-phase kinetics of tritium oxidation (2T 2 + O 2 →2T 2 O) have been studied with a model that accounts explicitly for radiolysis of the major species and the kinetics of the subsequent reactions of ionic, excited-state, and neutral species. Results from model calculations are given for 10 -4 -1.0 mol% T 2 in O 2 (298 K, 1 atm). As the reaction evolves three different mechanisms control T 2 O production, each with a different overall rate expression and a different order with respect to the T 2 concentration. The effects of self-radiolysis of pure T 2 on the tritium oxidation reaction were calculated. Tritium atoms, the primary product of T 2 self-radiolysis, altered the oxidation mechanism only during the first few seconds following the initiation of the T 2 -O 2 reaction. Ozone, an important intermediate in T 2 oxidation, was monitored in-situ by U.V. absorption spectroscopy for 0.01-1.0 mol% T 2 an 1 atm O 2 . The shape of the experimental ozone time profile agreed with the model predictions. As predicted, the measured initial rate of ozone production varied linearly with initial T 2 concentration ([T 2 ] 0.6 o ), but at an initial rate one-third the predicted value. The steady-state ozone concentration ([O 3 ]ss) was predicted to be dependent on [T 2 ] 0.3 o , but the measured value was [T 2 ] 0.6 o , resulting in four times higher [O 3 ]ss than predicted for a 1.0% T 2 -O 2 mixture. Adding H 2 to the T 2 -O 2 mixture, to provide insight into the differences between the radiolytic and chemical behavior of the tritium, produced a greater decrease in [O 3 ]ss than predicted. Adjusting the reaction cell surface-to-volume ratio showed implications of minor surface removal of ozone

  10. A network dynamics approach to chemical reaction networks

    van der Schaft, A. J.; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    2016-04-01

    A treatment of a chemical reaction network theory is given from the perspective of nonlinear network dynamics, in particular of consensus dynamics. By starting from the complex-balanced assumption, the reaction dynamics governed by mass action kinetics can be rewritten into a form which allows for a very simple derivation of a number of key results in the chemical reaction network theory, and which directly relates to the thermodynamics and port-Hamiltonian formulation of the system. Central in this formulation is the definition of a balanced Laplacian matrix on the graph of chemical complexes together with a resulting fundamental inequality. This immediately leads to the characterisation of the set of equilibria and their stability. Furthermore, the assumption of complex balancedness is revisited from the point of view of Kirchhoff's matrix tree theorem. Both the form of the dynamics and the deduced behaviour are very similar to consensus dynamics, and provide additional perspectives to the latter. Finally, using the classical idea of extending the graph of chemical complexes by a 'zero' complex, a complete steady-state stability analysis of mass action kinetics reaction networks with constant inflows and mass action kinetics outflows is given, and a unified framework is provided for structure-preserving model reduction of this important class of open reaction networks.

  11. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals

    Curl, Robert F; Glass, Graham

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  12. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions.

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W; Holliday, Gemma L; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-07-01

    Extracting chemical features like Atom-Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder : asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Thermodynamically consistent model calibration in chemical kinetics

    Goutsias John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of biochemical reaction systems are constrained by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, which impose well-defined relationships among the reaction rate constants characterizing these systems. Constructing biochemical reaction systems from experimental observations often leads to parameter values that do not satisfy the necessary thermodynamic constraints. This can result in models that are not physically realizable and may lead to inaccurate, or even erroneous, descriptions of cellular function. Results We introduce a thermodynamically consistent model calibration (TCMC method that can be effectively used to provide thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of an open biochemical reaction system. The proposed method formulates the model calibration problem as a constrained optimization problem that takes thermodynamic constraints (and, if desired, additional non-thermodynamic constraints into account. By calculating thermodynamically feasible values for the kinetic parameters of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling cascade, we demonstrate the qualitative and quantitative significance of imposing thermodynamic constraints on these parameters and the effectiveness of our method for accomplishing this important task. MATLAB software, using the Systems Biology Toolbox 2.1, can be accessed from http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS lab/software.html. An SBML file containing the thermodynamically feasible EGF/ERK signaling cascade model can be found in the BioModels database. Conclusions TCMC is a simple and flexible method for obtaining physically plausible values for the kinetic parameters of open biochemical reaction systems. It can be effectively used to recalculate a thermodynamically consistent set of parameter values for existing thermodynamically infeasible biochemical reaction models of cellular function as well as to estimate thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of new

  14. Importance of spinel reaction kinetics in packed-bed chemical looping combustion using a CuO/Al2O3 oxygen carrier

    San Pio, M.A.; Sabatino, F.; Gallucci, F.; van Sint Annaland, M.

    2018-01-01

    Chemical looping combustion is especially competitive for electrical power generation with integrated CO2 capture when it is operated at high temperatures (1000–1200 °C) and high pressures (15 bar or higher). For these demanding conditions, dynamically operated packed bed reactors have been

  15. Computer-Aided Construction of Chemical Kinetic Models

    Green, William H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    The combustion chemistry of even simple fuels can be extremely complex, involving hundreds or thousands of kinetically significant species. The most reasonable way to deal with this complexity is to use a computer not only to numerically solve the kinetic model, but also to construct the kinetic model in the first place. Because these large models contain so many numerical parameters (e.g. rate coefficients, thermochemistry) one never has sufficient data to uniquely determine them all experimentally. Instead one must work in “predictive” mode, using theoretical rather than experimental values for many of the numbers in the model, and as appropriate refining the most sensitive numbers through experiments. Predictive chemical kinetics is exactly what is needed for computer-aided design of combustion systems based on proposed alternative fuels, particularly for early assessment of the value and viability of proposed new fuels before those fuels are commercially available. This project was aimed at making accurate predictive chemical kinetics practical; this is a challenging goal which requires a range of science advances. The project spanned a wide range from quantum chemical calculations on individual molecules and elementary-step reactions, through the development of improved rate/thermo calculation procedures, the creation of algorithms and software for constructing and solving kinetic simulations, the invention of methods for model-reduction while maintaining error control, and finally comparisons with experiment. Many of the parameters in the models were derived from quantum chemistry calculations, and the models were compared with experimental data measured in our lab or in collaboration with others.

  16. Approximate method for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales by chemical Langevin equations

    Wu, Fuke; Tian, Tianhai; Rawlings, James B.; Yin, George

    2016-01-01

    The frequently used reduction technique is based on the chemical master equation for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales, which yields the modified stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). For the chemical reaction processes involving a large number of molecular species and reactions, the collection of slow reactions may still include a large number of molecular species and reactions. Consequently, the SSA is still computationally expensive. Because the chemical Langevin equations (CLEs) can effectively work for a large number of molecular species and reactions, this paper develops a reduction method based on the CLE by the stochastic averaging principle developed in the work of Khasminskii and Yin [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 56, 1766–1793 (1996); ibid. 56, 1794–1819 (1996)] to average out the fast-reacting variables. This reduction method leads to a limit averaging system, which is an approximation of the slow reactions. Because in the stochastic chemical kinetics, the CLE is seen as the approximation of the SSA, the limit averaging system can be treated as the approximation of the slow reactions. As an application, we examine the reduction of computation complexity for the gene regulatory networks with two-time scales driven by intrinsic noise. For linear and nonlinear protein production functions, the simulations show that the sample average (expectation) of the limit averaging system is close to that of the slow-reaction process based on the SSA. It demonstrates that the limit averaging system is an efficient approximation of the slow-reaction process in the sense of the weak convergence.

  17. Infrared laser-induced chemical reactions

    Katayama, Mikio

    1978-01-01

    The experimental means which clearly distinguishes between infrared ray-induced reactions and thermal reactions has been furnished for the first time when an intense monochromatic light source has been obtained by the development of infrared laser. Consequently, infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have started to develop as one field of chemical reaction researches. Researches of laser-induced chemical reactions have become new means for the researches of chemical reactions since they were highlighted as a new promising technique for isotope separation. Specifically, since the success has been reported in 235 U separation using laser in 1974, comparison of this method with conventional separation techniques from the economic point of view has been conducted, and it was estimated by some people that the laser isotope separation is cheaper. This report briefly describes on the excitation of oscillation and reaction rate, and introduces the chemical reactions induced by CW laser and TEA CO 2 laser. Dependence of reaction yield on laser power, measurement of the absorbed quantity of infrared ray and excitation mechanism are explained. Next, isomerizing reactions are reported, and finally, isotope separation is explained. It was found that infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have the selectivity for isotopes. Since it is evident that there are many examples different from thermal and photo-chemical reactions, future collection of the data is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Symmetry Relations in Chemical Kinetics Arising from Microscopic Reversibility

    Adib, Artur B.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the kinetics of time-reversible chemical reactions having the same equilibrium constant but different initial conditions are closely related to one another by a directly measurable symmetry relation analogous to chemical detailed balance. In contrast to detailed balance, however, this relation does not require knowledge of the elementary steps that underlie the reaction, and remains valid in regimes where the concept of rate constants is ill defined, such as at very short times and in the presence of low activation barriers. Numerical simulations of a model of isomerization in solution are provided to illustrate the symmetry under such conditions, and potential applications in protein folding or unfolding are pointed out.

  19. Optimizing Chemical Reactions with Deep Reinforcement Learning.

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Li, Xiaocheng; Zare, Richard N

    2017-12-27

    Deep reinforcement learning was employed to optimize chemical reactions. Our model iteratively records the results of a chemical reaction and chooses new experimental conditions to improve the reaction outcome. This model outperformed a state-of-the-art blackbox optimization algorithm by using 71% fewer steps on both simulations and real reactions. Furthermore, we introduced an efficient exploration strategy by drawing the reaction conditions from certain probability distributions, which resulted in an improvement on regret from 0.062 to 0.039 compared with a deterministic policy. Combining the efficient exploration policy with accelerated microdroplet reactions, optimal reaction conditions were determined in 30 min for the four reactions considered, and a better understanding of the factors that control microdroplet reactions was reached. Moreover, our model showed a better performance after training on reactions with similar or even dissimilar underlying mechanisms, which demonstrates its learning ability.

  20. Development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/water interaction

    Biney, P.O.

    1993-04-01

    An experimental set-up for accurate measurement of hydrogen generation rate in Lithium-Lead (Li 17 Pb 83 ) Steam or water interactions has been designed. The most important features of the design include a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature all stainless steel valve used to control the reaction time and the placement of most measuring devices below a water line to minimize leakage of the hydrogen collected. A PC based data acquisition and control system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all major components of the set-up. Initial tests indicate that the first design objective of maintaining leakproof gas collection chamber has been achieved. Initial pressure tests indicated that the pressure drop over a time span of 30 minutes was within the tolerance of the pressure transducer used to measure the pressure (within 0.690 kPa) at a nominal system pressure of 685 kPa. The experimental system hardware, data acquisition and control programs and data analysis program have been completed, tested and are currently functional

  1. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-03-01

    , they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

  2. Exploring the chemical kinetics of partially oxidized intermediates by combining experiments, theory, and kinetic modeling.

    Hoyermann, Karlheinz; Mauß, Fabian; Olzmann, Matthias; Welz, Oliver; Zeuch, Thomas

    2017-07-19

    Partially oxidized intermediates play a central role in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. In this perspective, we focus on the chemical kinetics of alkoxy radicals, peroxy radicals, and Criegee intermediates, which are key species in both combustion and atmospheric environments. These reactive intermediates feature a broad spectrum of chemical diversity. Their reactivity is central to our understanding of how volatile organic compounds are degraded in the atmosphere and converted into secondary organic aerosol. Moreover, they sensitively determine ignition timing in internal combustion engines. The intention of this perspective article is to provide the reader with information about the general mechanisms of reactions initiated by addition of atomic and molecular oxygen to alkyl radicals and ozone to alkenes. We will focus on critical branching points in the subsequent reaction mechanisms and discuss them from a consistent point of view. As a first example of our integrated approach, we will show how experiment, theory, and kinetic modeling have been successfully combined in the first infrared detection of Criegee intermediates during the gas phase ozonolysis. As a second example, we will examine the ignition timing of n-heptane/air mixtures at low and intermediate temperatures. Here, we present a reduced, fuel size independent kinetic model of the complex chemistry initiated by peroxy radicals that has been successfully applied to simulate standard n-heptane combustion experiments.

  3. A kinetic model for chemical neurotransmission

    Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Martinez-Valencia, Alejandro; Fernandez de Miguel, Francisco

    Recent experimental observations in presynaptic terminals at the neuromuscular junction indicate that there are stereotyped patterns of cooperativeness in the fusion of adjacent vesicles. That is, a vesicle in hemifusion process appears on the side of a fused vesicle and which is followed by another vesicle in a priming state while the next one is in a docking state. In this talk we present a kinetic model for this morphological pattern in which each vesicle state previous to the exocytosis is represented by a kinetic state. This chain states kinetic model can be analyzed by means of a Master equation whose solution is simulated with the stochastic Gillespie algorithm. With this approach we have reproduced the responses to the basal release in the absence of stimulation evoked by the electrical activity and the phenomena of facilitation and depression of neuromuscular synapses. This model offers new perspectives to understand the underlying phenomena in chemical neurotransmission based on molecular interactions that result in the cooperativity between vesicles during neurotransmitter release. DGAPA Grants IN118410 and IN200914 and Conacyt Grant 130031.

  4. Progress in Chemical Kinetic Modeling for Surrogate Fuels

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J

    2008-06-06

    Gasoline, diesel, and other alternative transportation fuels contain hundreds to thousands of compounds. It is currently not possible to represent all these compounds in detailed chemical kinetic models. Instead, these fuels are represented by surrogate fuel models which contain a limited number of representative compounds. We have been extending the list of compounds for detailed chemical models that are available for use in fuel surrogate models. Detailed models for components with larger and more complicated fuel molecular structures are now available. These advancements are allowing a more accurate representation of practical and alternative fuels. We have developed detailed chemical kinetic models for fuels with higher molecular weight fuel molecules such as n-hexadecane (C16). Also, we can consider more complicated fuel molecular structures like cyclic alkanes and aromatics that are found in practical fuels. For alternative fuels, the capability to model large biodiesel fuels that have ester structures is becoming available. These newly addressed cyclic and ester structures in fuels profoundly affect the reaction rate of the fuel predicted by the model. Finally, these surrogate fuel models contain large numbers of species and reactions and must be reduced for use in multi-dimensional models for spark-ignition, HCCI and diesel engines.

  5. Chemical reaction due to stronger Ramachandran interaction

    actions between two polarized atoms are responsible for initiating a chemical reaction, either before or after ... Chemical reaction; Ramachandran interaction; anisotropic and asymmetric polarization; ionization ..... man sequence exactly, including the generalized mech- ..... We now move on and rearrange Eq. (8) to arrive at.

  6. Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions is made possible through the use of pulse-shaping techniques coupled to a learning algorithm feedback loop – teaching the laser pulse to control the chemical reaction. This can result in controllable...

  7. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrazine Decomposition

    Meagher, Nancy E.; Bates, Kami R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to develop and validate a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. Hydrazine is used extensively in aerospace propulsion, and although liquid hydrazine is not considered detonable, many fuel handling systems create multiphase mixtures of fuels and fuel vapors during their operation. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the decomposition chemistry of hydrazine under a variety of conditions can be of value in assessing potential operational hazards in hydrazine fuel systems. To gain such knowledge, a reasonable starting point is the development and validation of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. A reasonably complete mechanism was published in 1996, however, many of the elementary steps included had outdated rate expressions and a thorough investigation of the behavior of the mechanism under a variety of conditions was not presented. The current work has included substantial revision of the previously published mechanism, along with a more extensive examination of the decomposition behavior of hydrazine. An attempt to validate the mechanism against the limited experimental data available has been made and was moderately successful. Further computational and experimental research into the chemistry of this fuel needs to be completed.

  8. Kinetics of gaseous uranium hexafluoride reaction with hydrogen chloride

    Ezubchenko, A.N.; Ilyukhin, A.I.; Merzlyakov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Kinetics of decrease of concentration of gaseous uranium hexafluoride in reaction with hydrogen chloride at temperatures close to room ones, was investigated by the method of IR spectroscopy. It was established that the process represented the first order reaction by both UF 6 and HCl. Activation energy of the reaction was determined: 7.6 ± 0.7 kcal/mol. Specific feature of reaction kinetics was noted: inversely proportional dependence of effective constant on UF 6 initial pressure. 5 refs., 3 figs

  9. Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold for Chemical Kinetics.

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V

    2016-05-26

    The Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold (SQEM) method is a model reduction technique for chemical kinetics based on entropy maximization under constraints built by the slowest eigenvectors at equilibrium. The method is revisited here and discussed and validated through the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, and the quality of the reduction is related to the temporal evolution and the gap between eigenvalues. SQEM is then applied to detailed reaction mechanisms for the homogeneous combustion of hydrogen, syngas, and methane mixtures with air in adiabatic constant pressure reactors. The system states computed using SQEM are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the detailed mechanism, and good agreement between the reduced and the detailed descriptions is demonstrated. The SQEM reduced model of hydrogen/air combustion is also compared with another similar technique, the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE). For the same number of representative variables, SQEM is found to provide a more accurate description.

  10. Modelling Students' Visualisation of Chemical Reaction

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Gilbert, John K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a model-based notion of "submicro representations of chemical reactions". Based on three structural models of matter (the simple particle model, the atomic model and the free electron model of metals), we suggest there are two major models of reaction in school chemistry curricula: (a) reactions that are simple…

  11. Investigation of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation, nitration, and hydrogenation of uranium

    Adda, Y.

    1955-06-01

    Various physico-chemical methods have been used to investigate the kinetics of the oxidation hydridation and nitridation of uranium. The experimental results show that the kinetics of these reactions are influenced by many factors also the Pilling and Bedworth rule is valid only under very limited conditions. The disagreement between this rule and the experimental results could be explained by the existence of numerous mechanical faults in the compounds obtained by the dry corrosion of the metal. (author) [fr

  12. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF REACTION OF ACIDIC ...

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of two phenoxazine dyes namely Nile blue (7-amino-3-diethylamino-8,9-benzo phenoxazine chloride, NB+) and Meldola\\'s blue (3- dimethylamino-8,9-benzo phenoxazine chloride, MB+) with acidic chlorite and hypochlorous acid have been investigated using a UV-visible and a ...

  13. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Chemical memory reactions induced bursting dynamics in gene expression.

    Tian, Tianhai

    2013-01-01

    Memory is a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems in which the present system state is not entirely determined by the current conditions but also depends on the time evolutionary path of the system. Specifically, many memorial phenomena are characterized by chemical memory reactions that may fire under particular system conditions. These conditional chemical reactions contradict to the extant stochastic approaches for modeling chemical kinetics and have increasingly posed significant challenges to mathematical modeling and computer simulation. To tackle the challenge, I proposed a novel theory consisting of the memory chemical master equations and memory stochastic simulation algorithm. A stochastic model for single-gene expression was proposed to illustrate the key function of memory reactions in inducing bursting dynamics of gene expression that has been observed in experiments recently. The importance of memory reactions has been further validated by the stochastic model of the p53-MDM2 core module. Simulations showed that memory reactions is a major mechanism for realizing both sustained oscillations of p53 protein numbers in single cells and damped oscillations over a population of cells. These successful applications of the memory modeling framework suggested that this innovative theory is an effective and powerful tool to study memory process and conditional chemical reactions in a wide range of complex biological systems.

  15. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  16. Photocatalytic Water-Splitting Reaction from Catalytic and Kinetic Perspectives

    Hisatomi, Takashi

    2014-10-16

    Abstract: Some particulate semiconductors loaded with nanoparticulate catalysts exhibit photocatalytic activity for the water-splitting reaction. The photocatalysis is distinct from the thermal catalysis because photocatalysis involves photophysical processes in particulate semiconductors. This review article presents a brief introduction to photocatalysis, followed by kinetic aspects of the photocatalytic water-splitting reaction.Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions: Progress report

    Gordon, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Our research program is concerned with the kinetics of elementary gas phase reactions and energy transfer involving polyatomic molecules. We report here on three ongoing projects: The reaction of oxygen atoms with hydrogen molecules, the electronic relaxation of NH radicals, and the vibrational relaxation of highly excited SF 6 molecules. 10 refs., 5 figs

  18. Deuterium secondary isotope kinetic effects in imine formation reactions

    Amaral, L. do; Rossi, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects, K D /K H , for reaction mechanisms is studied. The reaction of pH function to m-bromobenzaldehyde, semicarbazide nucleophile, methoxy-amine and hydroxylamine are analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  19. Unravelling the Maillard reaction network by multiresponse kinetic modelling

    Martins, S.I.F.S.

    2003-01-01

    The Maillard reaction is an important reaction in food industry. It is responsible for the formation of colour and aroma, as well as toxic compounds as the recent discovered acrylamide. The knowledge of kinetic parameters, such as rate constants and activation energy, is necessary to predict its

  20. The reaction kinetics of lithium salt with water vapor

    Balooch, M.; Dinh, L.N.; Calef, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of lithium salt (LiH and/or LiD) with water vapor in the partial pressure range of 10 -5 -2657 Pa has been investigated. The reaction probability of water with LiH cleaved in an ultra high vacuum environment was obtained using the modulated molecular beam technique. This probability was 0.11 and independent of LiH surface temperature, suggesting a negligible activation energy for the reaction in agreement with quantum chemical calculations. The value gradually reduced, however, to 0.007 as the surface concentration of oxygen containing product approached full coverage. As the film grew beyond a monolayer, the phase lag of hydrogen product increased from 0 deg. C to 20 deg. C and the reaction probability reduced further until it approached our detection limit (∼10 -4 ). This phase lag was attributed to a diffusion-limited process in this regime. For micrometer thick hydroxide films grown in high moisture concentration environment on LiD and LiH, the reaction probability reduced to ∼4x10 -7 and was independent of exposure time. In this regime of thick hydroxide films (LiOH and/or LiOD), microcracks generated in the films to release stress provided easier pathways for moisture to reach the interface. A modified microscope, capable of both atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation, was also employed to investigate the surface morphology of hydroxide monohydrate (LiOH · H 2 O and/or LiOD · H 2 O) grown on hydroxide at high water vapor partial pressures and the kinetics of this growth

  1. Flows and chemical reactions in heterogeneous mixtures

    Prud'homme, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This book - a sequel of previous publications 'Flows and Chemical Reactions' and 'Chemical Reactions in Flows and Homogeneous Mixtures' - is devoted to flows with chemical reactions in heterogeneous environments.  Heterogeneous media in this volume include interfaces and lines. They may be the site of radiation. Each type of flow is the subject of a chapter in this volume. We consider first, in Chapter 1, the question of the generation of environments biphasic individuals: dusty gas, mist, bubble flow.  Chapter 2 is devoted to the study at the mesoscopic scale: particle-fluid exchange of mom

  2. Reduced Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for JP-8 Combustion

    Montgomery, Christopher J; Cannon, S. M; Mawid, M. A; Sekar, B

    2002-01-01

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, six different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for JP-8 combustion have been generated...

  3. Discussion of the Investigation Method on the Reaction Kinetics of Metallurgical Reaction Engineering

    Du, Ruiling; Wu, Keng; Zhang, Jiazhi; Zhao, Yong

    Reaction kinetics of metallurgical physical chemistry which was successfully applied in metallurgy (as ferrous metallurgy, non-ferrous metallurgy) became an important theoretical foundation for subject system of traditional metallurgy. Not only the research methods were very perfect, but also the independent structures and systems of it had been formed. One of the important tasks of metallurgical reaction engineering was the simulation of metallurgical process. And then, the mechanism of reaction process and the conversion time points of different control links should be obtained accurately. Therefore, the research methods and results of reaction kinetics in metallurgical physical chemistry were not very suitable for metallurgical reaction engineering. In order to provide the definite conditions of transmission, reaction kinetics parameters and the conversion time points of different control links for solving the transmission and reaction equations in metallurgical reaction engineering, a new method for researching kinetics mechanisms in metallurgical reaction engineering was proposed, which was named stepwise attempt method. Then the comparison of results between the two methods and the further development of stepwise attempt method were discussed in this paper. As a new research method for reaction kinetics in metallurgical reaction engineering, stepwise attempt method could not only satisfy the development of metallurgical reaction engineering, but also provide necessary guarantees for establishing its independent subject system.

  4. Microfabricated sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    Northrup, M. Allen

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  5. The renneting of milk : a kinetic study of the enzymic and aggregation reactions

    Hooydonk, van A.C.M.

    1987-01-01

    The rennet-induced clotting of milk was studied under various conditions. The kinetics of the enzymic and aggregation reactions was analysed separately and, where possible, related to the physico-chemical properties of the casein micelle and its environment.

    The effects of important

  6. Incorporation of chemical kinetic models into process control

    Herget, C.J.; Frazer, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    An important consideration in chemical process control is to determine the precise rationing of reactant streams, particularly when a large time delay exists between the mixing of the reactants and the measurement of the product. In this paper, a method is described for incorporating chemical kinetic models into the control strategy in order to achieve optimum operating conditions. The system is first characterized by determining a reaction rate surface as a function of all input reactant concentrations over a feasible range. A nonlinear constrained optimization program is then used to determine the combination of reactants which produces the specified yield at minimum cost. This operating condition is then used to establish the nominal concentrations of the reactants. The actual operation is determined through a feedback control system employing a Smith predictor. The method is demonstrated on a laboratory bench scale enzyme reactor

  7. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  8. Kinetics of transuranium element oxidation-reduction reactions in solution

    Gourisse, D.

    1966-09-01

    A review of the kinetics of U, Np, Pu, Am oxidation-reduction reactions is proposed. The relations between the different activation thermodynamic functions (compensatory effect, formal entropy of the activated complex, magnitude of reactions velocities) are considered. The effects of acidity, ionic strength deuterium and mixed solvents polarity on reactions rates are described. The effect of different anions on reactions rates are explained by variations of the reaction standard free energy and variations of the activation free energy (coulombic interactions) resulting from the complexation of dissolved species by these anions. (author) [fr

  9. Reaction wheels for kinetic energy storage

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-11-01

    In contrast to all existing reaction wheel implementations, an order of magnitude increase in speed can be obtained efficiently if power to the actuators can be recovered. This allows a combined attitude control-energy storage system to be developed with structure mounted reaction wheels. The feasibility of combining reaction wheels with energy storage wwheels is demonstrated. The power required for control torques is a function of wheel speed but this energy is not dissipated; it is stored in the wheel. The I(2)R loss resulting from a given torque is shown to be constant, independent of the design speed of the motor. What remains, in order to efficiently use high speed wheels (essential for energy storage) for control purposes, is to reduce rotational losses to acceptable levels. Progress was made in permanent magnet motor design for high speed operation. Variable field motors offer more control flexibility and efficiency over a broader speed range.

  10. Deviation from the kinetic law of mass action for reactions induced by binary encounters in liquid solutions

    Doktorov, Alexander B; Kipriyanov, Alexey A

    2007-01-01

    In considering the irreversible chemical reaction A+B→ C+B in liquid solutions two many-particle approaches to the derivation of binary non-Markovian kinetic equations are compared: simple superposition decoupling and a method of extracting 'pair' channels from three-particle correlation evolution. It is shown that both methods provide an almost identical description of this reaction. However, in studies of reversible reactions in liquid solutions only the channel extraction method gives a correct physically clear description of the reaction though it consists of a sequence of steps: the development of integral encounter theory (IET), effective pairs approximation (EPA), modified encounter theory (MET), and the final regular form (RF) of kinetic equations. It is shown that the rate equations often encountered in the literature correspond to the independence of transient channels of 'scattering' in the bimolecular reversible reaction (A+B -B), while the independent transient channel of 'decay' in the reversible reactionA+B -C is defined solely by time integral convolution. In the general case transient channels in non-Markovian theory are not independent, and their interference manifests itself as a non-Markovian inhomogeneous source in binary non-Markovian kinetic equations in regular form. Based on the derived equations new universal kinetics (independent of models) of chemical equilibrium attainment have been obtained. It is shown that these kinetics can differ essentially from the kinetics corresponding to the kinetic law of mass action of formal chemical kinetics

  11. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    Freud, Hans-Joachim [Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany). Fritz-Haber-Inst.

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  12. Explorations into Chemical Reactions and Biochemical Pathways.

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-12-01

    A brief overview of the work in the research group of the present author on extracting knowledge from chemical reaction data is presented. Methods have been developed to calculate physicochemical effects at the reaction site. It is shown that these physicochemical effects can quite favourably be used to derive equations for the calculation of data on gas phase reactions and on reactions in solution such as aqueous acidity of alcohols or carboxylic acids or the hydrolysis of amides. Furthermore, it is shown that these physicochemical effects are quite effective for assigning reactions into reaction classes that correspond to chemical knowledge. Biochemical reactions constitute a particularly interesting and challenging task for increasing our understanding of living species. The BioPath.Database is a rich source of information on biochemical reactions and has been used for a variety of applications of chemical, biological, or medicinal interests. Thus, it was shown that biochemical reactions can be assigned by the physicochemical effects into classes that correspond to the classification of enzymes by the EC numbers. Furthermore, 3D models of reaction intermediates can be used for searching for novel enzyme inhibitors. It was shown in a combined application of chemoinformatics and bioinformatics that essential pathways of diseases can be uncovered. Furthermore, a study showed that bacterial flavor-forming pathways can be discovered. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Complex Reaction Kinetics in Chemistry: A Unified Picture Suggested by Mechanics in Physics

    Elena Agliari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex biochemical pathways can be reduced to chains of elementary reactions, which can be described in terms of chemical kinetics. Among the elementary reactions so far extensively investigated, we recall the Michaelis-Menten and the Hill positive-cooperative kinetics, which apply to molecular binding and are characterized by the absence and the presence, respectively, of cooperative interactions between binding sites. However, there is evidence of reactions displaying a more complex pattern: these follow the positive-cooperative scenario at small substrate concentration, yet negative-cooperative effects emerge as the substrate concentration is increased. Here, we analyze the formal analogy between the mathematical backbone of (classical reaction kinetics in Chemistry and that of (classical mechanics in Physics. We first show that standard cooperative kinetics can be framed in terms of classical mechanics, where the emerging phenomenology can be obtained by applying the principle of least action of classical mechanics. Further, since the saturation function plays in Chemistry the same role played by velocity in Physics, we show that a relativistic scaffold naturally accounts for the kinetics of the above-mentioned complex reactions. The proposed formalism yields to a unique, consistent picture for cooperative-like reactions and to a stronger mathematical control.

  14. Elimination kinetic model for organic chemicals in earthworms.

    Dimitrova, N.; Dimitrov, S.; Georgieva, D.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Hankard, P.; Spurgeon, D.J.; Li, H.; Mekenyan, O.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanistic understanding of bioaccumulation in different organisms and environments should take into account the influence of organism and chemical depending factors on the uptake and elimination kinetics of chemicals. Lipophilicity, metabolism, sorption (bioavailability) and biodegradation of

  15. The modelling of direct chemical kinetic effects in turbulent flames

    Lindstet, R.P. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-06-01

    Combustion chemistry-related effects have traditionally been of secondary importance in the design of gas turbine combustors. However, the need to deal with issues such as flame stability, relight and pollutant emissions has served to bring chemical kinetics and the coupling of finite rate chemistry with turbulent flow fields to the centre of combustor design. Indeed, improved cycle efficiency and more stringent environmental legislation, as defined by the ICAO, are current key motivators in combustor design. Furthermore, lean premixed prevaporized (LPP) combustion systems, increasingly used for power generation, often operate close to the lean blow-off limit and are prone to extinction/reignition type phenomena. Thus, current key design issues require that direct chemical kinetic effects be accounted for accurately in any simulation procedure. The transported probability density function (PDF) approach uniquely offers the potential of facilitating the accurate modelling of such effects. The present paper thus assesses the ability of this technique to model kinetically controlled phenomena, such as carbon monoxide emissions and flame blow-off, through the application of a transported PDF method closed at the joint scalar level. The closure for the velocity field is at the second moment level, and a key feature of the present work is the use of comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms. The latter are derived from recent work by Lindstedt and co-workers that has resulted in a compact 141 reactions and 28 species mechanism for LNG combustion. The systematically reduced form used here features 14 independent C/H/O scalars, with the remaining species incorporated via steady state approximations. Computations have been performed for hydrogen/carbon dioxide and methane flames. The former (high Reynolds number) flames permit an assessment of the modelling of flame blow-off, and the methane flame has been selected to obtain an indication of the influence of differential

  16. Modeling chemical reactions for drug design.

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2007-01-01

    Chemical reactions are involved at many stages of the drug design process. This starts with the analysis of biochemical pathways that are controlled by enzymes that might be downregulated in certain diseases. In the lead discovery and lead optimization process compounds have to be synthesized in order to test them for their biological activity. And finally, the metabolism of a drug has to be established. A better understanding of chemical reactions could strongly help in making the drug design process more efficient. We have developed methods for quantifying the concepts an organic chemist is using in rationalizing reaction mechanisms. These methods allow a comprehensive modeling of chemical reactivity and thus are applicable to a wide variety of chemical reactions, from gas phase reactions to biochemical pathways. They are empirical in nature and therefore allow the rapid processing of large sets of structures and reactions. We will show here how methods have been developed for the prediction of acidity values and of the regioselectivity in organic reactions, for designing the synthesis of organic molecules and of combinatorial libraries, and for furthering our understanding of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and of the metabolism of drugs.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of a chemical reaction

    Gorecki, J.; Gryko, J.

    1988-06-01

    Molecular dynamics is used to study the chemical reaction A+A→B+B. It is shown that the reaction rate constant follows the Arrhenius law both for Lennard-Jones and hard sphere interaction potentials between substrate particles. A. For the denser systems the reaction rate is proportional to the value of the radial distribution function at the contact point of two hard spheres. 10 refs, 4 figs

  18. Kinetic concepts of thermally stimulated reactions in solids

    Vyazovkin, Sergey

    Historical analysis suggests that the basic kinetic concepts of reactions in solids were inherited from homogeneous kinetics. These concepts rest upon the assumption of a single-step reaction that disagrees with the multiple-step nature of solid-state processes. The inadequate concepts inspire such unjustified anticipations of kinetic analysis as evaluating constant activation energy and/or deriving a single-step reaction mechanism for the overall process. A more adequate concept is that of the effective activation energy, which may vary with temperature and extent of conversion. The adequacy of this concept is illustrated by literature data as well as by experimental data on the thermal dehydration of calcium oxalate monohydrate and thermal decomposition of calcium carbonate, ammonium nitrate and 1,3,5,7- tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine.

  19. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  20. Decomposition theory of chemical reactions

    Rabitz, S.; Rabitz, H.

    1977-01-01

    The coupled channel formulation is utilized to variationally derive approximate closed-form expressions for reactive transition matrices. In conjunction with this effort it is shown that the effect of differing choices of possible channel coupling arrays becomes important when incomplete channel basis sets are used. Generalized techniques are employed to derive the necessary variational principles. The inherent coupling of the Green's functions in the resulting expression for the transition matrix makes inclusion of continuum states in the basis sets less crucial. The practical viability of this formulation as a computational scheme for chemical systems is discussed

  1. Kinetic investigation of heterogeneous catalytic reactions by means of the kinetic isotope method

    Bauer, F; Dermietzel, J [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung

    1978-09-01

    The application of the kinetic isotope method to heterogeneous catalytic processes is possible for surface compounds by using the steady-state relation. However, the characterization of intermediate products becomes ambiguous if sorption rates are of the same order of magnitude as surface reactions rates. The isotopic exchange reaction renders possible the estimation of sorption rates.

  2. Flow-Injection Responses of Diffusion Processes and Chemical Reactions

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2000-01-01

    tool of automated analytical chemistry. The need for an even lower consumption of chemicals and for computer analysis has motivated a study of the FIA peak itself, that is, a theoretical model was developed, that provides detailed knowledge of the FIA profile. It was shown that the flow in a FIA...... manifold may be characterised by a diffusion coefficient that depends on flow rate, denoted as the kinematic diffusion coefficient. The description was applied to systems involving species of chromium, both in the case of simple diffusion and in the case of chemical reactions. It is suggested that it may...... be used in the resolution of FIA profiles to obtain information about the content of interference’s, in the study of chemical reaction kinetics and to measure absolute concentrations within the FIA-detector cell....

  3. for simulating kinetic profiles of multi-step chemical systems

    Preferred Customer

    waves and Belousov-Zhabotinsky type reactions have complex reaction mechanisms ... A pre-processor code for a sequence of chemical reactions is .... mechanism only as the text file using any editor that support text format, (iv) the reactant.

  4. Vicher: A Virtual Reality Based Educational Module for Chemical Reaction Engineering.

    Bell, John T.; Fogler, H. Scott

    1996-01-01

    A virtual reality application for undergraduate chemical kinetics and reactor design education, Vicher (Virtual Chemical Reaction Model) was originally designed to simulate a portion of a modern chemical plant. Vicher now consists of two programs: Vicher I that models catalyst deactivation and Vicher II that models nonisothermal effects in…

  5. Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon fuels

    Montgomery, C.J.; Cremer, M.A.; Heap, M.P.; Chen, J-Y.; Westbrook, C.K.; Maurice, L.Q.

    1999-01-01

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, a variety of different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for ethylene and n-heptane have been generated. The reduced mechanisms have been compared to detailed chemistry calculations in simple homogeneous reactors and experiments. Reduced mechanisms for combustion of ethylene having as few as 10 species were found to give reasonable agreement with detailed chemistry over a range of stoichiometries and showed significant improvement over currently used global mechanisms. The performance of reduced mechanisms derived from a large detailed mechanism for n-heptane was compared to results from a reduced mechanism derived from a smaller semi-empirical mechanism. The semi-empirical mechanism was advantageous as a starting point for reduction for ignition delay, but not for PSR calculations. Reduced mechanisms with as few as 12 species gave excellent results for n-heptane/air PSR calculations but 16-25 or more species are needed to simulate n-heptane ignition delay

  6. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  7. Study of kinetics of reaction of lithium deuteride powder with O2, CO2 and water vapor

    Li Gan; Lu Guangda; Jing Wenyong; Qin Cheng

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of reaction of lithium deuteride powder with O 2 , CO 2 and water vapor is studied. The experimental results show that lithium deuteride reacts with O 2 and CO 2 at very small reaction rate but with water vapor at comparatively larger rate at room temperature (≅28 degree C). The reaction process with water vapor could be described using the unreacted shrinking core model. The second-order kinetics is appropriate for the chemical reaction on the surface of lithium deuteride and reaction rate constant is 0.281 kPa -1 ·min -1

  8. Formation kinetics of gemfibrozil chlorination reaction products: analysis and application.

    Krkosek, Wendy H; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-07-01

    Aqueous chlorination kinetics of the lipid regulator gemfibrozil and the formation of reaction products were investigated in deionized water over the pH range 3 to 9, and in two wastewater matrices. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil was found to be highly dependent on pH. No statistically significant degradation of gemfibrozil was observed at pH values greater than 7. Gemfibrozil oxidation between pH 4 and 7 was best represented by first order kinetics. At pH 3, formation of three reaction products was observed. 4'-C1Gem was the only reaction product formed from pH 4-7 and was modeled with zero order kinetics. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil in two wastewater matrices followed second order kinetics. 4'-C1Gem was only formed in wastewater with pH below 7. Deionized water rate kinetic models were applied to two wastewater effluents with gemfibrozil concentrations reported in literature in order to calculate potential mass loading rates of 4'C1Gem to the receiving water.

  9. An investigation of the general regularity of size dependence of reaction kinetics of nanoparticles

    Cui, Zixiang; Duan, Huijuan; Xue, Yongqiang; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    In the processes of preparation and application of nanomaterials, the chemical reactions of nanoparticles are often involved, and the size of nanoparticles has dramatic influence on the reaction kinetics. Nevertheless, there are many conflicts on regularities of size dependence of reaction kinetic parameters, and these conflicts have not been explained so far. In this paper, taking the reaction of nano-ZnO (average diameter is from 20.96 to 53.31 nm) with acrylic acid solution as a system, the influence regularities of the particle size on the kinetic parameters were researched. The regularities were consistent with that in most literatures, but inconsistent with that in a few of literatures, the reasons for the conflicts were interpreted. The reasons can be attributed to two factors: one is improper data processing for fewer data points, and the other is the difference between solid particles and porous particles. A general regularity of the size dependence of reaction kinetics for solid particles was obtained. The regularity shows that with the size of nanoparticles decreasing, the rate constant and the reaction order increase, while the apparent activation energy and the pre-exponential factor decrease; and the relationships of the logarithm of rate constant, the logarithm of pre-exponential factor, and the apparent activation energy to the reciprocal of the particle size are linear, respectively

  10. Analysis of mechanism of complex chemical reaction taking radiation chemical purification of gases from impurities as an example

    Gerasimov, G.Ya.; Makarov, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    Algorithm of selecting optimal mechanism of complex chemical reaction, enabling to reduce the number of its stages, is suggested. Main steps of constructing the kinetic model of the medium are considered, taking the radiation chemical purification (using fast electron radiation) of gases (N 2 , CO 2 , O 2 and others) from impurities as an example. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Internal Diffusion-Controlled Enzyme Reaction: The Acetylcholinesterase Kinetics.

    Lee, Sangyun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyoub

    2012-02-14

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme with a very high turnover rate; it quenches the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at the synapse. We have investigated the kinetics of the enzyme reaction by calculating the diffusion rate of the substrate molecule along an active site channel inside the enzyme from atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast to the previous works, we have found that the internal substrate diffusion is the determinant of the acetylcholinesterase kinetics in the low substrate concentration limit. Our estimate of the overall bimolecular reaction rate constant for the enzyme is in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the present calculation provides a reasonable explanation for the effects of the ionic strength of solution and the mutation of surface residues of the enzyme. The study suggests that internal diffusion of the substrate could be a key factor in understanding the kinetics of enzymes of similar characteristics.

  12. Kinetics of the hydrogen production reaction in a copper-chlorine water splitting plant

    Zamfirescu, C.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2009-01-01

    The exothermic reaction of HCl with particulate Cu occurs during hydrogen production step in the thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) water splitting cycle. In this paper, this chemical reaction is modeled kinetically, and a parametric study is performed to determine the influences of particle size, temperature and molar ratios on the reaction kinetics. It is determined that the residence time of copper particles varies between 10 and 100 s, depending on the operating conditions. The hydrogen conversion at equilibrium varies between 55 and 85%, depending on the reaction temperature. The heat flux at the particle surface, caused by the exothermic enthalpy of reaction, reaches about 3,000 W/m 2 when the particle shrinks to 0.1% from its initial size. A numerical algorithm is developed to solve the moving boundary Stefan problem with a chemical reaction. It predicts the shrinking of copper particles based on the hypothesis that the chemical reaction and heat transfer are decoupled. The model allows for estimation of the temperature of the copper particle, assumed spherical, in the radial direction. The maximum temperature at the interface is higher than the melting point of CuCl by 10-50 o C, depending on the assumed operating conditions. (author)

  13. Diagnostic Appraisal of Grade 12 Students' Understanding of Reaction Kinetics

    Yan, Yaw Kai; Subramaniam, R.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored grade 12 students' understanding of reaction kinetics, a topic which has not been extensively explored in the chemistry education literature at this level. A 3-tier diagnostic instrument with 11 questions was developed--this format is of very recent origin and has been the subject of only a handful of studies. The findings…

  14. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  15. Kinetics Analysis of Synthesis Reaction of Struvite With Air-Flow Continous Vertical Reactors

    Edahwati, L.; Sutiyono, S.; Muryanto, S.; Jamari, J.; Bayuseno, dan A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Kinetics reaction is a knowledge about a rate of chemical reaction. The differential of the reaction rate can be determined from the reactant material or the formed material. The reaction mechanism of a reactor may include a stage of reaction occurring sequentially during the process of converting the reactants into products. In the determination of reaction kinetics, the order of reaction and the rate constant reaction must be recognized. This study was carried out using air as a stirrer as a medium in the vertical reactor for crystallization of struvite. Stirring is one of the important aspects in struvite crystallization process. Struvite crystals or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrates (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) is commonly formed in reversible reactions and can be generated as an orthorhombic crystal. Air is selected as a stirrer on the existing flow pattern in the reactor determining the reaction kinetics of the crystal from the solution. The experimental study was conducted by mixing an equimolar solution of 0.03 M NH4OH, MgCl2 and H3PO4 with a ratio of 1: 1: 1. The crystallization process of the mixed solution was observed in an inside reactor at the flow rate ranges of 16-38 ml/min and the temperature of 30°C was selected in the study. The air inlet rate was kept constant at 0.25 liters/min. The pH solution was adjusted to be 8, 9 and 10 by dropping wisely of 1 N KOH solution. The crystallization kinetics was examined until the steady state of the reaction was reached. The precipitates were filtered and dried at a temperature for subsequent material characterization, including Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and XRD (X-Ray diffraction) method. The results show that higher flow rate leads to less mass of struvite.

  16. Energetics and kinetics of ferrocyanide and nitrate/nitrite reactions

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    During the 1950's, radiocesium scavenging at the Hanford site resulted in radioactive waste sludges containing ferrocyanide, nitrate, and nitrite. These waters are a concern since certain mixtures of ferrocyanide and nitrate and/or nitrite are known to explode when heated. The authors have used differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, isothermal calorimetry and gravimetry, and accelerating rate calorimetry to measure the thermal behavior, the reaction enthalpies, and selected kinetic parameters for reactions between sodium nickel ferrocyanide, the suspected ferrocyanide form in Hanford wastes, and nitrate and/or nitrite. These studies indicate that the oxidation proceeds via multiple steps, the initial reaction begins near 200 degrees C, the initial step has a high activation energy (>200 kJ/mole-K), succeeding reaction steps have activation energies ranging from 90 to 160 kJ/mole-K, and that the oxidation yields about 50% of the theoretical heat of reaction for the most energetic reaction

  17. Hybrid framework for the simulation of stochastic chemical kinetics

    Duncan, Andrew; Erban, Radek; Zygalakis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Stochasticity plays a fundamental role in various biochemical processes, such as cell regulatory networks and enzyme cascades. Isothermal, well-mixed systems can be modelled as Markov processes, typically simulated using the Gillespie Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) [25]. While easy to implement and exact, the computational cost of using the Gillespie SSA to simulate such systems can become prohibitive as the frequency of reaction events increases. This has motivated numerous coarse-grained schemes, where the “fast” reactions are approximated either using Langevin dynamics or deterministically. While such approaches provide a good approximation when all reactants are abundant, the approximation breaks down when one or more species exist only in small concentrations and the fluctuations arising from the discrete nature of the reactions become significant. This is particularly problematic when using such methods to compute statistics of extinction times for chemical species, as well as simulating non-equilibrium systems such as cell-cycle models in which a single species can cycle between abundance and scarcity. In this paper, a hybrid jump-diffusion model for simulating well-mixed stochastic kinetics is derived. It acts as a bridge between the Gillespie SSA and the chemical Langevin equation. For low reactant reactions the underlying behaviour is purely discrete, while purely diffusive when the concentrations of all species are large, with the two different behaviours coexisting in the intermediate region. A bound on the weak error in the classical large volume scaling limit is obtained, and three different numerical discretisations of the jump-diffusion model are described. The benefits of such a formalism are illustrated using computational examples.

  18. Hybrid framework for the simulation of stochastic chemical kinetics

    Duncan, Andrew; Erban, Radek; Zygalakis, Konstantinos

    2016-12-01

    Stochasticity plays a fundamental role in various biochemical processes, such as cell regulatory networks and enzyme cascades. Isothermal, well-mixed systems can be modelled as Markov processes, typically simulated using the Gillespie Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) [25]. While easy to implement and exact, the computational cost of using the Gillespie SSA to simulate such systems can become prohibitive as the frequency of reaction events increases. This has motivated numerous coarse-grained schemes, where the "fast" reactions are approximated either using Langevin dynamics or deterministically. While such approaches provide a good approximation when all reactants are abundant, the approximation breaks down when one or more species exist only in small concentrations and the fluctuations arising from the discrete nature of the reactions become significant. This is particularly problematic when using such methods to compute statistics of extinction times for chemical species, as well as simulating non-equilibrium systems such as cell-cycle models in which a single species can cycle between abundance and scarcity. In this paper, a hybrid jump-diffusion model for simulating well-mixed stochastic kinetics is derived. It acts as a bridge between the Gillespie SSA and the chemical Langevin equation. For low reactant reactions the underlying behaviour is purely discrete, while purely diffusive when the concentrations of all species are large, with the two different behaviours coexisting in the intermediate region. A bound on the weak error in the classical large volume scaling limit is obtained, and three different numerical discretisations of the jump-diffusion model are described. The benefits of such a formalism are illustrated using computational examples.

  19. Hybrid framework for the simulation of stochastic chemical kinetics

    Duncan, Andrew, E-mail: a.duncan@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Erban, Radek, E-mail: erban@maths.ox.ac.uk [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Zygalakis, Konstantinos, E-mail: k.zygalakis@ed.ac.uk [School of Mathematics, University of Edinburgh, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FD (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-01

    Stochasticity plays a fundamental role in various biochemical processes, such as cell regulatory networks and enzyme cascades. Isothermal, well-mixed systems can be modelled as Markov processes, typically simulated using the Gillespie Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) [25]. While easy to implement and exact, the computational cost of using the Gillespie SSA to simulate such systems can become prohibitive as the frequency of reaction events increases. This has motivated numerous coarse-grained schemes, where the “fast” reactions are approximated either using Langevin dynamics or deterministically. While such approaches provide a good approximation when all reactants are abundant, the approximation breaks down when one or more species exist only in small concentrations and the fluctuations arising from the discrete nature of the reactions become significant. This is particularly problematic when using such methods to compute statistics of extinction times for chemical species, as well as simulating non-equilibrium systems such as cell-cycle models in which a single species can cycle between abundance and scarcity. In this paper, a hybrid jump-diffusion model for simulating well-mixed stochastic kinetics is derived. It acts as a bridge between the Gillespie SSA and the chemical Langevin equation. For low reactant reactions the underlying behaviour is purely discrete, while purely diffusive when the concentrations of all species are large, with the two different behaviours coexisting in the intermediate region. A bound on the weak error in the classical large volume scaling limit is obtained, and three different numerical discretisations of the jump-diffusion model are described. The benefits of such a formalism are illustrated using computational examples.

  20. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs

  1. Reaction kinetics, reaction products and compressive strength of ternary activators activated slag designed by Taguchi method

    Yuan, B.; Yu, Q.L.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the reaction kinetics, the reaction products and the compressive strength of slag activated by ternary activators, namely waterglass, sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate. Nine mixtures are designed by the Taguchi method considering the factors of sodium carbonate content

  2. Coupling between solute transport and chemical reactions models

    Samper, J.; Ajora, C.

    1993-01-01

    During subsurface transport, reactive solutes are subject to a variety of hydrodynamic and chemical processes. The major hydrodynamic processes include advection and convection, dispersion and diffusion. The key chemical processes are complexation including hydrolysis and acid-base reactions, dissolution-precipitation, reduction-oxidation, adsorption and ion exchange. The combined effects of all these processes on solute transport must satisfy the principle of conservation of mass. The statement of conservation of mass for N mobile species leads to N partial differential equations. Traditional solute transport models often incorporate the effects of hydrodynamic processes rigorously but oversimplify chemical interactions among aqueous species. Sophisticated chemical equilibrium models, on the other hand, incorporate a variety of chemical processes but generally assume no-flow systems. In the past decade, coupled models accounting for complex hydrological and chemical processes, with varying degrees of sophistication, have been developed. The existing models of reactive transport employ two basic sets of equations. The transport of solutes is described by a set of partial differential equations, and the chemical processes, under the assumption of equilibrium, are described by a set of nonlinear algebraic equations. An important consideration in any approach is the choice of primary dependent variables. Most existing models cannot account for the complete set of chemical processes, cannot be easily extended to include mixed chemical equilibria and kinetics, and cannot handle practical two and three dimensional problems. The difficulties arise mainly from improper selection of the primary variables in the transport equations. (Author) 38 refs

  3. Chemical Demonstrations with Consumer Chemicals: The Black and White Reaction

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    A color-change reaction is described in which two colorless solutions are combined to afford a black mixture. Two more colorless solutions are combined to afford a white mixture. The black and white mixtures are then combined to afford a clear, colorless solution. The reaction uses chemicals that are readily available on the retail market: vitamin C, tincture of iodine, vinegar, ammonia, bleach, Epsom salt, and laundry starch.

  4. Reaction kinetics for preparation of silica film with Stoeber method

    Shang Mengying; Jiang Xiaodong; Liu Miao; Luo Xuan; Tang Yongjian; Cao Linhong

    2013-01-01

    A new formula was proposed to investigate the relationship between reaction time and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) conversion rate for preparation of silica sol with Stöber method, by studying the reaction kinetics of TEOS hydrolytic process. An appropriate conversion rate was then determined and used to calculate the theoretical optimal reaction time. Meanwhile, silica sols were prepared by sol-gel process using TEOS as precursor and ammonia as catalyst. It was found that the reaction time decreases with an increasing amount of ammonia and water. The values of experimental optimal reaction time were obtained, and agree with the theoretical results (the errors are within 5%), which shows good applicability of our formula. (authors)

  5. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of 2-Methylhexane Combustion

    Mohamed, Samah Y.; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracy in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and kinetic model for a gasoline surrogate fuel, 2-methylhexane, with recently published group values

  6. Runaway chemical reaction exposes community to highly toxic chemicals

    Kaszniak, Mark; Vorderbrueggen, John

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) conducted a comprehensive investigation of a runaway chemical reaction at MFG Chemical (MFG) in Dalton, Georgia on April 12, 2004 that resulted in the uncontrolled release of a large quantity of highly toxic and flammable allyl alcohol and allyl chloride into the community. Five people were hospitalized and 154 people required decontamination and treatment for exposure to the chemicals. This included police officers attempting to evacuate the community and ambulance personnel who responded to 911 calls from residents exposed to the chemicals. This paper presents the findings of the CSB report (U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB), Investigation Report: Toxic Chemical Vapor Cloud Release, Report No. 2004-09-I-GA, Washington DC, April 2006) including a discussion on tolling practices; scale-up of batch reaction processes; Process Safety Management (PSM) and Risk Management Plan (RMP) implementation; emergency planning by the company, county and the city; and emergency response and mitigation actions taken during the incident. The reactive chemical testing and atmospheric dispersion modeling conducted by CSB after the incident and recommendations adopted by the Board are also discussed

  7. Chemical reaction due to stronger Ramachandran interaction

    The origin of a chemical reaction between two reactant atoms is associated with the activation energy, on the assumption that, high-energy collisions between these atoms, are the ones that overcome the activation energy. Here, we show that a stronger attractive van der Waals (vdW) and electron-ion Coulomb interactions ...

  8. SurfKin: an ab initio kinetic code for modeling surface reactions.

    Le, Thong Nguyen-Minh; Liu, Bin; Huynh, Lam K

    2014-10-05

    In this article, we describe a C/C++ program called SurfKin (Surface Kinetics) to construct microkinetic mechanisms for modeling gas-surface reactions. Thermodynamic properties of reaction species are estimated based on density functional theory calculations and statistical mechanics. Rate constants for elementary steps (including adsorption, desorption, and chemical reactions on surfaces) are calculated using the classical collision theory and transition state theory. Methane decomposition and water-gas shift reaction on Ni(111) surface were chosen as test cases to validate the code implementations. The good agreement with literature data suggests this is a powerful tool to facilitate the analysis of complex reactions on surfaces, and thus it helps to effectively construct detailed microkinetic mechanisms for such surface reactions. SurfKin also opens a possibility for designing nanoscale model catalysts. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Operational High Resolution Chemical Kinetics Simulation, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerical simulations of chemical kinetics are critical to addressing urgent issues in both the developed and developing world. Ongoing demand for higher resolution...

  10. Heterogeneous chemical kinetics by modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry: limitations of technique

    Olander, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of modulated molecular beam, mass spectrometry as applied to the study of heterogeneous chemical kinetics are reviewed. The process of deducing a model of the surface reaction from experimental data is illustrated by analysis of the hydrogen reduction of uranium dioxide

  11. Calculation of the energetics of chemical reactions

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Harding, L.B.; Shepard, R.L.; Harrison, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    To calculate the energetics of chemical reactions we must solve the electronic Schroedinger equation for the molecular conformations of importance for the reactive encounter. Substantial changes occur in the electronic structure of a molecular system as the reaction progresses from reactants through the transition state to products. To describe these changes, our approach includes the following three elements: the use of multiconfiguration self-consistent field wave functions to provide a consistent zero-order description of the electronic structure of the reactants, transition state, and products; the use of configuration interaction techniques to describe electron correlation effects needed to provide quantitative predictions of the reaction energetics; and the use of large, optimized basis sets to provide the flexibility needed to describe the variations in the electronic distributions. With this approach we are able to study reactions involving as many as 5--6 atoms with errors of just a few kcal/mol in the predicted reaction energetics. Predictions to chemical accuracy, i.e., to 1 kcal/mol or less, are not yet feasible, although continuing improvements in both the theoretical methodology and computer technology suggest that this will soon be possible, at least for reactions involving small polyatomic species. 4 figs.

  12. Lagrangian descriptors of driven chemical reaction manifolds.

    Craven, Galen T; Junginger, Andrej; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2017-08-01

    The persistence of a transition state structure in systems driven by time-dependent environments allows the application of modern reaction rate theories to solution-phase and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. However, identifying this structure is problematic in driven systems and has been limited by theories built on series expansion about a saddle point. Recently, it has been shown that to obtain formally exact rates for reactions in thermal environments, a transition state trajectory must be constructed. Here, using optimized Lagrangian descriptors [G. T. Craven and R. Hernandez, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 148301 (2015)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.148301], we obtain this so-called distinguished trajectory and the associated moving reaction manifolds on model energy surfaces subject to various driving and dissipative conditions. In particular, we demonstrate that this is exact for harmonic barriers in one dimension and this verification gives impetus to the application of Lagrangian descriptor-based methods in diverse classes of chemical reactions. The development of these objects is paramount in the theory of reaction dynamics as the transition state structure and its underlying network of manifolds directly dictate reactivity and selectivity.

  13. Development of Green and Sustainable Chemical Reactions

    Taarning, Esben

    Abstract This thesis entitled Development of Green and Sustainable Chemical Reactions is divided into six chapters involving topics and projects related to green and sustainable chemistry. The chapters can be read independently, however a few concepts and some background information is introduced...... as well as the possibility for establishing a renewable chemical industry is discussed. The development of a procedure for using unsaturated aldehydes as olefin synthons in the Diels- Alder reaction is described in chapter three. This procedure affords good yields of the desired Diels- Alder adducts...... in chapter one and two which can be helpful to know when reading the subsequent chapters. The first chapter is an introduction into the fundamentals of green and sustainable chemistry. The second chapter gives an overview of some of the most promising methods to produce value added chemicals from biomass...

  14. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  15. Kinetic aspects of the embedded clusters: Reaction - Rate Theory

    Despa, F.; Apostol, M.

    1995-07-01

    The main stages of the cluster growth process are reviewed using Reaction - Rate Theory. The precipitation stage is shown as a relaxation of the solute towards a cluster state characterized by a higher stability. The kinetic of the late stage of phase separation, the coarsening process, is analyzed by an off-centre diffusion mechanism. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental ones. (author). 37 refs, 6 figs

  16. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media

    Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

  17. Neutral theory of chemical reaction networks

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Holme, Petter; Minnhagen, Petter; Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Kim, Beom Jun

    2012-01-01

    To what extent do the characteristic features of a chemical reaction network reflect its purpose and function? In general, one argues that correlations between specific features and specific functions are key to understanding a complex structure. However, specific features may sometimes be neutral and uncorrelated with any system-specific purpose, function or causal chain. Such neutral features are caused by chance and randomness. Here we compare two classes of chemical networks: one that has been subjected to biological evolution (the chemical reaction network of metabolism in living cells) and one that has not (the atmospheric planetary chemical reaction networks). Their degree distributions are shown to share the very same neutral system-independent features. The shape of the broad distributions is to a large extent controlled by a single parameter, the network size. From this perspective, there is little difference between atmospheric and metabolic networks; they are just different sizes of the same random assembling network. In other words, the shape of the degree distribution is a neutral characteristic feature and has no functional or evolutionary implications in itself; it is not a matter of life and death. (paper)

  18. Kinetics of the high temperature oxygen exchange reaction on 238PuO2 powder

    Whiting, Christofer E.; Du, Miting; Felker, L. Kevin; Wham, Robert M.; Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen exchange reactions performed on PuO 2 suggest the reaction is influenced by at least three mechanisms: an internal chemical reaction, surface mobility of active species/defects, and surface exchange of gaseous oxygen with lattice oxygen. Activation energies for the surface mobility and internal chemical reaction are presented. Determining which mechanism is dominant appears to be a complex function including at least specific surface area and temperature. Thermal exposure may also impact the oxygen exchange reaction by causing reductions in the specific surface area of PuO 2 . Previous CeO 2 surrogate studies exhibit similar behavior, confirming that CeO 2 is a good qualitative surrogate for PuO 2 , in regards to the oxygen exchange reaction. Comparison of results presented here with previous work on the PuO 2 oxygen exchange reaction allows complexities in the previous work to be explained. These explanations allowed new conclusions to be drawn, many of which confirm the conclusions presented here. - Highlights: • PuO 2 Oxygen exchange kinetics can be influenced by at least 3 different mechanisms. • An internal chemical reaction controls the rate at high temperature and large SSA. • Surface mobility and surface exchange influence rate at lower temperatures and SSA. • Exchange temperatures may alter SSA and make data difficult to interpret.

  19. Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Battaglia, Francine [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Agblevor, Foster [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Klein, Michael [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Sheikhi, Reza [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    A collaborative effort involving experiments, kinetic modeling, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to understand co-gasification of coal-biomass mixtures. The overall goal of the work was to determine the key reactive properties for coal-biomass mixed fuels. Sub-bituminous coal was mixed with biomass feedstocks to determine the fluidization and gasification characteristics of hybrid poplar wood, switchgrass and corn stover. It was found that corn stover and poplar wood were the best feedstocks to use with coal. The novel approach of this project was the use of a red mud catalyst to improve gasification and lower gasification temperatures. An important results was the reduction of agglomeration of the biomass using the catalyst. An outcome of this work was the characterization of the chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms of the co-gasification fuels, and the development of a set of models that can be integrated into other modeling environments. The multiphase flow code, MFIX, was used to simulate and predict the hydrodynamics and co-gasification, and results were validated with the experiments. The reaction kinetics modeling was used to develop a smaller set of reactions for tractable CFD calculations that represented the experiments. Finally, an efficient tool was developed, MCHARS, and coupled with MFIX to efficiently simulate the complex reaction kinetics.

  20. Bayesian experts in exploring reaction kinetics of transcription circuits.

    Yoshida, Ryo; Saito, Masaya M; Nagao, Hiromichi; Higuchi, Tomoyuki

    2010-09-15

    Biochemical reactions in cells are made of several types of biological circuits. In current systems biology, making differential equation (DE) models simulatable in silico has been an appealing, general approach to uncover a complex world of biochemical reaction dynamics. Despite of a need for simulation-aided studies, our research field has yet provided no clear answers: how to specify kinetic values in models that are difficult to measure from experimental/theoretical analyses on biochemical kinetics. We present a novel non-parametric Bayesian approach to this problem. The key idea lies in the development of a Dirichlet process (DP) prior distribution, called Bayesian experts, which reflects substantive knowledge on reaction mechanisms inherent in given models and experimentally observable kinetic evidences to the subsequent parameter search. The DP prior identifies significant local regions of unknown parameter space before proceeding to the posterior analyses. This article reports that a Bayesian expert-inducing stochastic search can effectively explore unknown parameters of in silico transcription circuits such that solutions of DEs reproduce transcriptomic time course profiles. A sample source code is available at the URL http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/~yoshidar/lisdas/.

  1. Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Walch, S. P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications to reactions leading to NOx and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  2. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    Schatz, G.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  3. MRI of chemical reactions and processes.

    Britton, Melanie M

    2017-08-01

    As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can spatially resolve a wealth of molecular information available from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), it is able to non-invasively visualise the composition, properties and reactions of a broad range of spatially-heterogeneous molecular systems. Hence, MRI is increasingly finding applications in the study of chemical reactions and processes in a diverse range of environments and technologies. This article will explain the basic principles of MRI and how it can be used to visualise chemical composition and molecular properties, providing an overview of the variety of information available. Examples are drawn from the disciplines of chemistry, chemical engineering, environmental science, physics, electrochemistry and materials science. The review introduces a range of techniques used to produce image contrast, along with the chemical and molecular insight accessible through them. Methods for mapping the distribution of chemical species, using chemical shift imaging or spatially-resolved spectroscopy, are reviewed, as well as methods for visualising physical state, temperature, current density, flow velocities and molecular diffusion. Strategies for imaging materials with low signal intensity, such as those containing gases or low sensitivity nuclei, using compressed sensing, para-hydrogen or polarisation transfer, are discussed. Systems are presented which encapsulate the diversity of chemical and physical parameters observable by MRI, including one- and two-phase flow in porous media, chemical pattern formation, phase transformations and hydrodynamic (fingering) instabilities. Lastly, the emerging area of electrochemical MRI is discussed, with studies presented on the visualisation of electrochemical deposition and dissolution processes during corrosion and the operation of batteries, supercapacitors and fuel cells. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Kinetics of electrically and chemically induced swelling in polyelectrolyte gels

    Grimshaw, P. E.; Nussbaum, J. H.; Grodzinsky, A. J.; Yarmush, M. L.

    1990-09-01

    Controlled swelling and shrinking of polyelectrolyte gels is useful for regulating the transport of solutes into, out of, and through these materials. A macroscopic continuum model is presented to predict the kinetics of swelling in polyelectrolyte gel membranes induced by augmentation of electrostatic swelling forces arising from membrane fixed charge groups. The model accounts for ionic transport within the membrane, electrodiffusion phenomena, dissociation of membrane charge groups, intramembrane fluid flow, and mechanical deformation of the membrane matrix. Model predictions are compared with measurements of chemically and electrically induced swelling and shrinking in crosslinked polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) membranes. Large, reversible changes in PMAA membrane hydration were observed after changing the bath pH or by applying an electric field to modify the intramembrane ionic environment and fixed charge density. A relatively slow swelling process and more rapid shrinking for both chemical and electrical modulation of the intramembrane pH are observed. The model indicates that retardation of membrane swelling is dominated by diffusion-limited reaction of H+ ions with membrane charge groups, and that the more rapid shrinking is limited primarily by mechanical processes.

  5. Flows and chemical reactions in homogeneous mixtures

    Prud'homme, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Flows with chemical reactions can occur in various fields such as combustion, process engineering, aeronautics, the atmospheric environment and aquatics. The examples of application chosen in this book mainly concern homogeneous reactive mixtures that can occur in propellers within the fields of process engineering and combustion: - propagation of sound and monodimensional flows in nozzles, which may include disequilibria of the internal modes of the energy of molecules; - ideal chemical reactors, stabilization of their steady operation points in the homogeneous case of a perfect mixture and c

  6. Accurate and approximate thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions

    Nyman, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    In favourable cases it is possible to calculate thermal rate constants for polyatomic reactions to high accuracy from first principles. Here, we discuss the use of flux correlation functions combined with the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach to efficiently calculate cumulative reaction probabilities and thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions. Three isotopic variants of the H 2 + CH 3 → CH 4 + H reaction are used to illustrate the theory. There is good agreement with experimental results although the experimental rates generally are larger than the calculated ones, which are believed to be at least as accurate as the experimental rates. Approximations allowing evaluation of the thermal rate constant above 400 K are treated. It is also noted that for the treated reactions, transition state theory (TST) gives accurate rate constants above 500 K. TST theory also gives accurate results for kinetic isotope effects in cases where the mass of the transfered atom is unchanged. Due to neglect of tunnelling, TST however fails below 400 K if the mass of the transferred atom changes between the isotopic reactions

  7. Laser-induced chemical vapor deposition reactions

    Teslenko, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of investigation of chemical reactions of deposition of different substances from the gas phase when using the energy of pulse quasicontinuous and continuous radiation of lasers in the wave length interval from 0.193 to 10.6 μm are generalized. Main attetion is paid to deposition of inorganic substances including nonmetals (C, Si, Ge and others), metals (Cu, Au, Zn, Cd, Al, Cr, Mo, W, Ni) and some simple compounds. Experimental data on the effect of laser radiation parameters and reagent nature (hydrides, halogenides, carbonyls, alkyl organometallic compounds and others) on the deposition rate and deposit composition are described in detail. Specific features of laser-chemical reactions of deposition and prospects of their application are considered

  8. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  9. Optimization of a Chemical Reaction Train

    Bahar Sansar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This project consists of the optimization of a chemical reactor train. The reactor considered here is the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR, one of the reactor models used in engineering. Given the design equation for the CSTR and the cost function for a reactor, the following values are determined; the optimum number of reactors in the reaction train, the volume of each reactor and the total cost.

  10. Chemical kinetic functional sensitivity analysis: Elementary sensitivities

    Demiralp, M.; Rabitz, H.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is considered for kinetics problems defined in the space--time domain. This extends an earlier temporal Green's function method to handle calculations of elementary functional sensitivities deltau/sub i//deltaα/sub j/ where u/sub i/ is the ith species concentration and α/sub j/ is the jth system parameter. The system parameters include rate constants, diffusion coefficients, initial conditions, boundary conditions, or any other well-defined variables in the kinetic equations. These parameters are generally considered to be functions of position and/or time. Derivation of the governing equations for the sensitivities and the Green's funciton are presented. The physical interpretation of the Green's function and sensitivities is given along with a discussion of the relation of this work to earlier research

  11. Hungarian University Students' Misunderstandings in Thermodynamics and Chemical Kinetics

    Turanyi, Tamas; Toth, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    The misunderstandings related to thermodynamics (including chemical equilibrium) and chemical kinetics of first and second year Hungarian students of chemistry, environmental science, biology and pharmacy were investigated. We demonstrated that Hungarian university students have similar misunderstandings in physical chemistry to those reported in…

  12. Reaction kinetics of resveratrol with thiyl and alkoxyl radicals

    Dzeba, I.; Mihaljevic, B.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Plant derived resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) possesses a broad spectrum of biological activities, one of them are very well known its antioxidative properties. Our work aims to provide kinetic data with regard to the reactivity of resveratrol with uninvestigated short-lived bioradicals, identified as mediators in oxidative lipid degradation processes. Radicals of our interest are alkoxyl radicals, well known propagators of the chain free radical reactions in lipids, and thiyl radicals which protect lipids from their degradation pathway, but at the same time cause the isomerization of the double bonds. In order to investigate these reactions of resveratrol laser flash photolysis was used. On the basis of competitive kinetics the rate constants were determined under pseudo-first order conditions in acetonitrile solutions at room temperature. Thiyl radicals were generated indirectly in solution containing 1-octadecanthiol and photosensitive benzophenone in acetonitrile using the light pulses at 347 nm from ruby laser. Tert-butoxyl radicals were generated directly by peroxide bond cleavage from di-tert-butyl peroxide in acetonitrile by light pulses of Nd:YAG at 355 nm, and ruby at 347 nm. Obtained rate constants for the reactions of resveratrol and radicals generated by laser flash photolysis will be summarized and compared with rare literature data for the rate constants of investigated reactions of resveratrol and other radicals generated by pulse radiolysis.

  13. Proton conduction based on intracrystalline chemical reaction

    Schuck, G.; Lechner, R.E.; Langer, K.

    2002-01-01

    Proton conductivity in M 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 crystals (M=K, Rb, Cs) is shown to be due to a dynamic disorder in the form of an intracrystalline chemical equilibrium reaction: alternation between the association of the monomers [HSeO 4 ] 1- and [SeO 4 ] 2- resulting in the dimer [H(SeO 4 ) 2 ] 3- (H-bond formation) and the dissociation of the latter into the two monomers (H-bond breaking). By a combination of quasielastic neutron scattering and FTIR spectroscopy, reaction rates were obtained, as well as rates of proton exchange between selenate ions, leading to diffusion. The results demonstrate that this reaction plays a central role in the mechanism of proton transport in these solid-state protonic conductors. (orig.)

  14. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  15. Automated chemical kinetic modeling via hybrid reactive molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations.

    Döntgen, Malte; Schmalz, Felix; Kopp, Wassja A; Kröger, Leif C; Leonhard, Kai

    2018-06-13

    An automated scheme for obtaining chemical kinetic models from scratch using reactive molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations is presented. This methodology combines the phase space sampling of reactive molecular dynamics with the thermochemistry and kinetics prediction capabilities of quantum mechanics. This scheme provides the NASA polynomial and modified Arrhenius equation parameters for all species and reactions that are observed during the simulation and supplies them in the ChemKin format. The ab initio level of theory for predictions is easily exchangeable and the presently used G3MP2 level of theory is found to reliably reproduce hydrogen and methane oxidation thermochemistry and kinetics data. Chemical kinetic models obtained with this approach are ready-to-use for, e.g., ignition delay time simulations, as shown for hydrogen combustion. The presented extension of the ChemTraYzer approach can be used as a basis for methodologically advancing chemical kinetic modeling schemes and as a black-box approach to generate chemical kinetic models.

  16. Chemical modifications and reactions in DNA nanostructures

    Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-01-01

    such as hydrocarbons or steroids have been introduced to change the surface properties of DNA origami structures, either to protect the DNA nanostructure or to dock it into membranes and other hydrophobic surfaces. DNA nanostructures have also been used to control covalent chemical reactions. This article provides......DNA nanotechnology has the power to form self-assembled and well-defined nanostructures, such as DNA origami, where the relative positions of each atom are known with subnanometer precision. Our ability to synthesize oligonucleotides with chemical modifications in almost any desired position...... provides rich opportunity to incorporate molecules, biomolecules, and a variety of nanomaterials in specific positions on DNA nanostructures. Several standard modifications for oligonucleotides are available commercially, such as dyes, biotin, and chemical handles, and such modified oligonucleotides can...

  17. Chemical kinetic model uncertainty minimization through laminar flame speed measurements

    Park, Okjoo; Veloo, Peter S.; Sheen, David A.; Tao, Yujie; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Wang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Laminar flame speed measurements were carried for mixture of air with eight C3-4 hydrocarbons (propene, propane, 1,3-butadiene, 1-butene, 2-butene, iso-butene, n-butane, and iso-butane) at the room temperature and ambient pressure. Along with C1-2 hydrocarbon data reported in a recent study, the entire dataset was used to demonstrate how laminar flame speed data can be utilized to explore and minimize the uncertainties in a reaction model for foundation fuels. The USC Mech II kinetic model was chosen as a case study. The method of uncertainty minimization using polynomial chaos expansions (MUM-PCE) (D.A. Sheen and H. Wang, Combust. Flame 2011, 158, 2358–2374) was employed to constrain the model uncertainty for laminar flame speed predictions. Results demonstrate that a reaction model constrained only by the laminar flame speed values of methane/air flames notably reduces the uncertainty in the predictions of the laminar flame speeds of C3 and C4 alkanes, because the key chemical pathways of all of these flames are similar to each other. The uncertainty in model predictions for flames of unsaturated C3-4 hydrocarbons remain significant without considering fuel specific laminar flames speeds in the constraining target data set, because the secondary rate controlling reaction steps are different from those in the saturated alkanes. It is shown that the constraints provided by the laminar flame speeds of the foundation fuels could reduce notably the uncertainties in the predictions of laminar flame speeds of C4 alcohol/air mixtures. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that an accurate prediction of the laminar flame speed of a particular C4 alcohol/air mixture is better achieved through measurements for key molecular intermediates formed during the pyrolysis and oxidation of the parent fuel. PMID:27890938

  18. [Recent results in research on oscillatory chemical reactions].

    Poros, Eszter; Kurin-Csörgei, Krisztina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of the complicated periodical phenomenas in the nature (e.g. hearth beat, sleep cycle, circadian rhythms, etc) could be understood with using the laws of nonlinear chemical systems. In this article the newest result in the research of the subfield of nonlinear chemical dynamics aimed at constructing oscillatory chemical reactions, which are novel either in composition or in configuration, are presented. In the introductory part the concept of chemical periodicity is defined, then the forms as it can appear in time and space and the methods of their study are discussed. Detailed description of the experimental work that has resulted in two significant discoveries is provided. A method was developed to design pH-oscillators which are capable of operating under close conditions. The batch pH-oscillators are more convenient to use in some proposed applications than the equivalent CSTR variant. A redox oscillator that is new in composition was found. The permanganate oxidation of some amino acids was shown to take place according to oscillatory kinetics in a narrow range of the experimental parameters. The KMnO4 - glycine - Na2HPO4 system represents the first example in the family of manganese based oscillators where amino acids is involved. In the conclusion formal analogies between the simple chemical and some more complicated biological oscillatory phenomena are mentioned and the possibility of modeling periodic processes with the use of information gained from the studies of chemical oscillations is pointed out.

  19. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Magnussen, B F [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  20. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  1. Purification of free hydrogen or hydrogen combined in a gaseous mixture by chemical reactions with uranium

    Caron-Charles, M.; Gilot, B.

    1989-01-01

    Within the framework of the European fusion program, the authors are dealing with the tritium technology aspect. Hydrogen, free or under a combined form within a H 2 , N 2 , NH 3 , O 2 , gaseous mixture, can be purified by chemical reactions with uranium metal. The resulting reactions consist in absorbing the impurities without holding back H 2 . Working conditions have been defined according to two main goals: the formation of stable solid products, especially under hydrogenated atmosphere and the optimization of the material quantities to be used. Thermodynamical considerations have shown that the 950-1300 K temperature range should be suitable for this chemical process. Experiments performed with massive uranium set in a closed reactor at 973 K, have produced hydrogen according to the predicted reactions rates. But they have also pointed out the importance of interferences that might occur in the uranium-gas system, on the gases conversion rates. The comparison between the chemical kinetic ratings of the reactions of pure gases and the chemical kinetic ratings of the reactions of the same gases in mixture, has been set up. It proves that simultaneous reactions can modify the working conditions of the solid products formation, and particularly modify their structure. In this case, chemical kinetic ratings are increased up to their maximal value; that means surface phenomena are favoured as with uranium powder gases reactions. (orig.)

  2. MULTICOMPONENT DETERMINATION OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS USING A REACTION-BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR .2. CHEMICAL SPECIATION USING MULTIVARIATE CURVE RESOLUTION

    Tauler, R.; Smilde, A. K.; HENSHAW, J. M.; BURGESS, L. W.; KOWALSKI, B. R.

    1994-01-01

    A new multivariate curve resolution method that can extract analytical information from UV/visible spectroscopic data collected from a reaction-based chemical sensor is proposed. The method is demonstrated with the determination of mixtures of chlorinated hydrocarbons by estimating the kinetic and

  3. Thermodynamic criteria for estimating the kinetic parameters of catalytic reactions

    Mitrichev, I. I.; Zhensa, A. V.; Kol'tsova, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic parameters are estimated using two criteria in addition to the traditional criterion that considers the consistency between experimental and modeled conversion data: thermodynamic consistency and the consistency with entropy production (i.e., the absolute rate of the change in entropy due to exchange with the environment is consistent with the rate of entropy production in the steady state). A special procedure is developed and executed on a computer to achieve the thermodynamic consistency of a set of kinetic parameters with respect to both the standard entropy of a reaction and the standard enthalpy of a reaction. A problem of multi-criterion optimization, reduced to a single-criterion problem by summing weighted values of the three criteria listed above, is solved. Using the reaction of NO reduction with CO on a platinum catalyst as an example, it is shown that the set of parameters proposed by D.B. Mantri and P. Aghalayam gives much worse agreement with experimental values than the set obtained on the basis of three criteria: the sum of the squares of deviations for conversion, the thermodynamic consistency, and the consistency with entropy production.

  4. Kinetic and mechanism formation reaction of complex compound Cu with di-n-buthildithiocarbamate (dbdtc) ligand

    Haryani, S.; Kurniawan, C.; Kasmui

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis of complex compound is one field of research which intensively studied. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes find wide-ranging applications in nanomaterial and metal separation science, and have potential use as chemotherapeutic, pesticides, and as additives to lubricants. However, the information about is reaction kinetic and mechanism are very much lacking. The research and analyzes results show that reaction synthesis ligand DBDTC and complex compounds Cu-DBDTC. Optimum reaction condition of formation of complex compounds Cu with DBDTC at pH=3, [DBDTC] = 4.10-3 M, and the time of reaction 5 minutes. Based the analysis varian reaction of complex compounds at pH 3 and 4, diffrence significance at the other pH: 5; 5,5; 6; 6,5 ; 7; and 8. The various of mole with reactants comosition difference sigbificance, those the time reaction for 5 and 6 minutes diffrence by significance with the other time, it is 3,4,8, and 10 minutes. The great product to at condition pH 6, the time optimum at 5 minutes and molar ratio of logam: ligand = 1:2. The reaction kinetic equation of complex compound Cu with chelathing ligand DBDTC is V=0.917106 [Cu2+]0.87921 [DBDTC]2.03021. Based on the kinetic data, and formed complex compounds estimation, the mechanism explaining by 2 stages. In the first stage formation of [Cu(DBDTC)], and then [Cu(DBDTC)2] with the last structure geomethry planar rectangle. The result of this research will be more useful if an effort is being done in reaction mechanism by chemical computation method for obtain intermediate, and for constant “k” in same stage, k1.k2. and compound complex constanta (β).

  5. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  6. Tunneling and reflection in unimolecular reaction kinetic energy release distributions

    Hansen, K.

    2018-02-01

    The kinetic energy release distributions in unimolecular reactions is calculated with detailed balance theory, taking into account the tunneling and the reflection coefficient in three different types of transition states; (i) a saddle point corresponding to a standard RRKM-type theory, (ii) an attachment Langevin cross section, and (iii) an absorbing sphere potential at short range, without long range interactions. Corrections are significant in the one dimensional saddle point states. Very light and lightly bound absorbing systems will show measurable effects in decays from the absorbing sphere, whereas the Langevin cross section is essentially unchanged.

  7. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... be readily produced. Products of chemical adsorption and/or chemical reactions induced within adsorbates are aggregated on the surface and observed by light scattering. We will demonstrate how pressure and spectral dependencies of the chemical outcomes, polarization of the light and interference of two laser...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis....

  8. KINETIC MODELS STUDY OF HYDRODESULPHURIZATION VACUUM DISTILLATE REACTION

    AbdulMunem A. Karim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available    This study deals with  kinetics of hydrodesulphurization (HDS reaction of vacuum gas oil (611-833 K which was distillated from Kirkuk crude oil and which was obtained by blending the fractions, light vacuum gas oil (611 - 650 K, medium vacuum gas oil (650-690 K, heavy vacuum gas oil (690-727 K and very heavy vacuum gas oil (727-833 K.   The vacuum gas oil was hydrotreated on a commercial cobalt-molybdenum alumina catalyst presulfied at specified conditions in a laboratory trickle bed reactor. The reaction temperature range (583-643 K,liquid hourly space velocity range (1.5-3.75 h-1 and hydrogen pressure was kept constant at 3.5 MPa with hydrogen to oil ratio about 250 lt/lt.           The conversion results for desulphurization reaction appeared to obey the second order reaction. According to this model, the rate constants for desulphurization reaction were determined. Finally, the apparent activation energy (Ea, enthalpy of activation ( H* and entropy ( S* were calculated based on the values of rate constant (k2 and were equal 80.3792 KJ/mole, 75.2974 KJ/mole and 197.493 J/mole, respectively.

  9. Chemical reactions induced by fast neutron irradiation

    Katsumura, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Here, several studies on fast neutron irradiation effects carried out at the reactor 'YAYOI' are presented. Some indicate a significant difference in the effect from those by γ-ray irradiation but others do not, and the difference changes from subject to subject which we observed. In general, chemical reactions induced by fast neutron irradiation expand in space and time, and there are many aspects. In the time region just after the deposition of neutron energy in the system, intermediates are formed densely and locally reflecting high LET of fast neutrons and, with time, successive reactions proceed parallel to dissipation of localized energy and to diffusion of the intermediates. Finally the reactions are completed in longer time region. If we pick up the effects which reserve the locality of the initial processes, a significant different effect between in fast neutron radiolysis and in γ-ray radiolysis would be derived. If we observe the products generated after dissipation and diffusion in longer time region, a clear difference would not be observed. Therefore, in order to understand the fast neutron irradiation effects, it is necessary to know the fundamental processes of the reactions induced by radiations. (author)

  10. Quantum dynamics of fast chemical reactions

    Light, J.C. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The aims of this research are to explore, develop, and apply theoretical methods for the evaluation of the dynamics of gas phase collision processes, primarily chemical reactions. The primary theoretical tools developed for this work have been quantum scattering theory, both in time dependent and time independent forms. Over the past several years, the authors have developed and applied methods for the direct quantum evaluation of thermal rate constants, applying these to the evaluation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions, applied wave packet propagation techniques to the dissociation of Rydberg H{sub 3}, incorporated optical potentials into the evaluation of thermal rate constants, evaluated the use of optical potentials for state-to-state reaction probability evaluations, and, most recently, have developed quantum approaches for electronically non-adiabatic reactions which may be applied to simplify calculations of reactive, but electronically adiabatic systems. Evaluation of the thermal rate constants and the dissociation of H{sub 3} were reported last year, and have now been published.

  11. Experimental and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of Dimethylcyclohexane Oxidation and Pyrolysis

    Eldeeb, Mazen A.

    2016-08-30

    A combined experimental and chemical kinetic modeling study of the high-temperature ignition and pyrolysis of 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane (13DMCH) is presented. Ignition delay times are measured behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1049–1544 K and pressures of 3.0–12 atm. Pyrolysis is investigated at average pressures of 4.0 atm at temperatures of 1238, 1302, and 1406 K. By means of mid-infrared direct laser absorption at 3.39 μm, fuel concentration time histories are measured under ignition and pyrolytic conditions. A detailed chemical kinetic model for 13DMCH combustion is developed. Ignition measurements show that the ignition delay times of 13DMCH are longer than those of its isomer, ethylcyclohexane. The proposed chemical kinetic model predicts reasonably well the effects of equivalence ratio and pressure, with overall good agreement between predicted and measured ignition delay times, except at low dilution levels and high pressures. Simulated fuel concentration profiles agree reasonably well with the measured profiles, and both highlight the influence of pyrolysis on the overall ignition kinetics at high temperatures. Sensitivity and reaction pathway analyses provide further insight into the kinetic processes controlling ignition and pyrolysis. The work contributes toward improved understanding and modeling of the oxidation and pyrolysis kinetics of cycloalkanes.

  12. Thermally activated reaction–diffusion-controlled chemical bulk reactions of gases and solids

    S. Möller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical kinetics of the reaction of thin films with reactive gases is investigated. The removal of thin films using thermally activated solid–gas to gas reactions is a method to in-situ control deposition inventory in vacuum and plasma vessels. Significant scatter of experimental deposit removal rates at apparently similar conditions was observed in the past, highlighting the need for understanding the underlying processes. A model based on the presence of reactive gas in the films bulk and chemical kinetics is presented. The model describes the diffusion of reactive gas into the film and its chemical interaction with film constituents in the bulk using a stationary reaction–diffusion equation. This yields the reactive gas concentration and reaction rates. Diffusion and reaction rate limitations are depicted in parameter studies. Comparison with literature data on tokamak co-deposit removal results in good agreement of removal rates as a function of pressure, film thickness and temperature.

  13. Chemical and kinetic equilibrations via radiative parton transport

    Zhang Bin; Wortman, Warner A

    2011-01-01

    A hot and dense partonic system can be produced in the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. How it equilibrates is important for the extraction of Quark-Gluon Plasma properties. We study the chemical and kinetic equilibrations of the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a radiative transport model. Thermal and Color-Glass-Condensate motivated initial conditions are used. We observe that screened parton interactions always lead to partial pressure isotropization. Different initial pressure anisotropies result in the same asymptotic evolution. Comparison of evolutions with and without radiative processes shows that chemical equilibration interacts with kinetic equilibration and radiative processes can contribute significantly to pressure isotropization.

  14. A study of butyl acetate synthesis. 4-reaction kinetics

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at studying liquid-phase acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (P atm =0.76 Bar,using an ion exchange resin (Lewatit K-2431 as catalyst. The effect of the absence of internal and external mass transport on catalyst particles was established in the research conditions used here. A set of assays to determine the effect of catalyst load (0.5%, 1%, 2% w/w temperature (73°C, 80°C, 87°C and molar ratio (1:2, 1:1, 2:1 acid/alcohol on reaction rate was carried out and both LHHW and pseudo-homogeneous kinetic expressions were obtained, these being in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Kinetics of the reactions of hydrated electrons with metal complexes

    Korsse, J.

    1983-01-01

    The reactivity of the hydrated electron towards metal complexes is considered. Experiments are described involving metal EDTA and similar complexes. The metal ions studied are mainly Ni 2+ , Co 2+ and Cu 2+ . Rates of the reactions of the complexes with e - (aq) were measured using the pulse radiolysis technique. It is shown that the reactions of e - (aq) with the copper complexes display unusually small kinetic salt effects. The results suggest long-range electron transfer by tunneling. A tunneling model is presented and the experimental results are discussed in terms of this model. Results of approximate molecular orbital calculations of some redox potentials are given, for EDTA chelates as well as for series of hexacyano and hexaquo complexes. Finally, equilibrium constants for the formation of ternary complexes are reported. (Auth./G.J.P.)

  16. Solutions of the chemical kinetic equations for initially inhomogeneous mixtures.

    Hilst, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Following the recent discussions by O'Brien (1971) and Donaldson and Hilst (1972) of the effects of inhomogeneous mixing and turbulent diffusion on simple chemical reaction rates, the present report provides a more extensive analysis of when inhomogeneous mixing has a significant effect on chemical reaction rates. The analysis is then extended to the development of an approximate chemical sub-model which provides much improved predictions of chemical reaction rates over a wide range of inhomogeneities and pathological distributions of the concentrations of the reacting chemical species. In particular, the development of an approximate representation of the third-order correlations of the joint concentration fluctuations permits closure of the chemical sub-model at the level of the second-order moments of these fluctuations and the mean concentrations.

  17. The Nanoconfined Free Radical Polymerization: Reaction Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    Zhao, Haoyu; Simon, Sindee

    The reaction kinetics and thermodynamics of nanoconfined free radical polymerizations are investigated for methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethyl methacrylate (EMA) monomers using differential scanning calorimetry. Controlled pore glass is used as the confinement medium with pore diameters as small as 7.5 nm; the influence of both hydrophobic (silanized such that trimethylsilyl groups cover the surface) and hydrophilic (native silanol) surfaces is investigated. Propagation rates increase when monomers are reacted in the hydrophilic pores presumably due to the specific interactions between the carbonyl and silanol groups; however, the more flexible EMA monomer shows weaker effects. On the other hand, initial rates of polymerization in hydrophobic pores are unchanged from the bulk. In both pores, the onset of autoacceleration occurs earlier due to the reduced diffusivity of confined chains, which may be compensated at high temperatures. In addition to changes in kinetics, the reaction thermodynamics can be affected under nanoconfinement. Specifically, the ceiling temperature (Tc) is shifted to lower temperatures in nanopores, with pore surface chemistry showing no significant effects; the equilibrium conversion is also reduced at high temperatures below Tc. These observations are attributed to a larger negative change in entropy on propagation for the confined system, with the MMA system again showing greater effects. Funding from ACS PRF is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    Gol'danskij, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerisation, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerisation reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau 0 ) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerisation by radiation and during postpolymerisation and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau 0 slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau 0 reaches a plateau (tau 0 approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life)

  19. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    Gol' danskii, V I [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Khimicheskoj Fiziki

    1975-12-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius Law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerization, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerization reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau/sub 0/) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerization by radiation and during postpolymerization and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau/sub 0/ slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau/sub 0/ reaches a plateau (tau/sub 0/ approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life).

  20. Depressurization accident analysis of MPBR by PBRSIM with chemical reaction model

    No, Hee Cheon; Kadak, A. C.

    2002-01-01

    The simple model for natural circulation is implemented into PBR S IM to provide air inlet velocity from the containment air space. For the friction and form loss only the pebble region is considered conservatively modeling laminar flow through a packed bed. For the chemical reaction model of PBR S IM the oxidation rate is determined as the minimum value of three mechanisms estimated at each time step: oxygen mass flow rate entering the bottom of the reflector, oxidation rate by kinetics, and oxygen mass flow rate arriving at the graphite surface by diffusion. Oxygen mass flux arriving at the graphite surface by diffusion is estimated based on energy-mass analogy. Two types of exothermic chemical reaction are considered: (C + zO 2 → xCO + yCO 2 ) and (2CO + O 2 2CO 2 ). The heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reaction rates by kinetics are determined by INEEL and Bruno correlations, respectively. The instantaneous depressurization accident of MPBR is simulated using PBR S IM with chemical model. The air inlet velocity is initially rapidly dropped within 10 hr and reaches a saturation value of about 1.5cm/s. The oxidation rate by the diffusion process becomes lower than that by the chemical kinetics above 600K. The maximum pebble bed temperatures without and with chemical reaction reach the peak values of 1560 and 1617 .deg. C at 80 hr and 92 hr, respectively. As the averaged temperatures in the bottom reflector and the pebble bed regions increase with time, (C+1/2O2 ->CO) reaction becomes dominant over (C+O 2 →CO 2 ) reaction. Also, the CO generated by (C+1/2O 2 →CO) reaction will be consumed by (2CO+O 2 →2CO 2 ) reaction and the energy homogeneously generated by this CO depletion reaction becomes dominant over the heterogeneous reaction

  1. In situ synchrotron powder diffraction study of the setting reaction kinetics of magnesium-potassium phosphate cements

    Viani, Alberto; Pérez-Estébanez, Marta; Pollastri, S.; Gualtieri, A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 79, January (2016), s. 344-352 ISSN 0008-8846 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : kinetics * reaction * X-ray diffraction * MgO * chemically bonded ceramics Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 4.762, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0008884615002690

  2. Simplified mathematical model for heat supply and removal with allowance for chemical reaction kinetics in the N2O4 reversible 2NO2 reversible 2NO + O2 system

    Shiryaeva, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    The processes of heat supply and removal with chemical reactions proceeding in the circuit are usually described by a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Considering a non-equilibrium state of a chemically reacting gas relative to equilibrium, to which the nonequilibrium system approaches according to a certain process and applying the Tailor series expansion near this equilibrium point, a set of differential equations can be reduced to one differential and some algebraic equations. The analysis shows that of the differential equation obtained can be quasilinearized, and then the linear differential equation can be solved. On the basis of the analytical solutions obtained the calculations of flow parameters have been performed for the cases of cooling and heating the dissociating coolant in channels of a constant cross-section at various pressures. The calculation results are in a satisfactory agreement with the numerical solution of a set of differential equations performed on the ''Minsk-22'' computer. The solution may be applied to calculate isobaric processes in thermodynamic cycles, where the N 2 O 4 coolant is used

  3. The role of high temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics in the rate of radionuclide vaporisation during core-concrete interactions

    Raymond, D.P.; Clough, P.N.

    1989-09-01

    Heterogeneous reactions may cause enhanced release of radionuclides during the core-concrete interaction (CCl) stage of a PWR severe accident. The VANESA computer code models these CCI releases using chemical equilibrium assumptions; however, the possibility that chemical kinetics could prevent equilibrium from being achieved is considered in this report. Direct experimental evidence is lacking on these reactions. Therefore, some analogues studies are reviewed, including examples of Eyring's surface reaction rate theory; sequential vaporisation-oxidation processes; iron and steelmaking chemistry; radionuclide evaporation from solid UO 2 . This circumstantial evidence appeared to agree with the current assumptions, in VANESA and some UK modelling studies, that mass transfer, rather than chemical kinetics will limit the rate at which equilibrium is attained. (author)

  4. Struvite Precipitation and Phosphorous Removal from Urine Synthetic Solution: Reaction Kinetic Study

    Marwa Saied Shalaby

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus, like oil, is a non-renewable resource that must be harvested from finite resources in the earth’s crust. An essential element for life, phosphorus is becoming increasingly scarce, contaminated, and difficult to extract. Struvite or magnesium ammonium phosphate (MgNH4PO4.6H2O is a white, crystalline phosphate mineral that can be used as a bio-available fertilizer. The main objective of this research is to indicate the most important operating parameters affecting struvite precipitation by means of chemical reaction kinetics. The present study explores struvite precipitation by chemical method under different starting molar ratios, pH and SSR. It is shown that an increase of starting Mg: PO4: NH4 with respect to magnesium (1.6:1:1 strongly influences the growth rate of struvite and so the efficiency of the phosphate removal. This was attributed to the effect of magnesium on the struvite solubility product and on the reached supersaturation Super Saturation Ratio at optimum starting molar ratio and pH. It was also shown, by using chemical precipitation method that the determined Super Saturation Ratio (SSR values of struvite, at 8, 8.5, 9, 9.5 and 10 are 1.314, 4.29, 8.89, 9.87 and 14.89 respectively are close to those presented in the literature for different origins of wastewater streams. The results show that SSR , pH, and starting molar ratio strongly influences the kinetics of precipitation and so phosphorous removal to reach 93% removal percent , 5.95 mg/lit as a minimum PO4 remained in solution, and 7.9 gm precipitated struvite from feed synthetic solution of 750 ml . The product was subjected to chemical analysis by means of EDIX-FTIR, SEM and XRD showing conformity with published literature. First-order kinetics was found to be sufficient to describe the rate data. The rates increased with increasing pH and so SSR and the apparent rate constants for the reaction were determined. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved

  5. Surface chemical reactions probed with scanning force microscopy

    Werts, M.P L; van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we report the study of surface chemical reactions with scanning force microscopy (SFM) with chemical specificity. Using chemically modified SFM probes, we can determine the local surface reaction conversion during a chemical surface modification. The adhesion forces between a

  6. Students' conceptions and misconceptions in chemical kinetics in ...

    The purpose of the study was to probe the conception and misconception of senior secondary (SS3) and University (US) chemistry students in chemical kinetics in Rivers State, Nigeria. The study sample was made up of 107 SS3 and 93 US students. Two main instruments were used to collect data for the study. They are the ...

  7. Simulation; an everyday tool for research in chemical kinetics

    Nakhle, M.; Roux, P.; Thomas de Montpreville, C.

    1985-08-01

    In order to make apparent the facilities offered by the NEPTUNIX package in solving some complex problems in chemical kinetics, the paper deals with its application to a particular example taken from material science: assistance to the validation of mechanisms governing colloids growth in a fluorite crystal when it is irradiated by an electron beam

  8. Revealing chemical processes and kinetics of drug action within single living cells via plasmonic Raman probes.

    Li, Shan-Shan; Guan, Qi-Yuan; Meng, Gang; Chang, Xiao-Feng; Wei, Ji-Wu; Wang, Peng; Kang, Bin; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-05-23

    Better understanding the drug action within cells may extend our knowledge on drug action mechanisms and promote new drugs discovery. Herein, we studied the processes of drug induced chemical changes on proteins and nucleic acids in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells via time-resolved plasmonic-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (PERS) in combination with principal component analysis (PCA). Using three popular chemotherapy drugs (fluorouracil, cisplatin and camptothecin) as models, chemical changes during drug action process were clearly discriminated. Reaction kinetics related to protein denaturation, conformational modification, DNA damage and their associated biomolecular events were calculated. Through rate constants and reaction delay times, the different action modes of these drugs could be distinguished. These results may provide vital insights into understanding the chemical reactions associated with drug-cell interactions.

  9. Kinetic parameters of hydroprocessing reactions in a flow reactor

    Raychaudhuri, U.; Banerjee, T.S.; Ghar, R.N. (Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India))

    1994-01-01

    The change in distillation properties of a blend of light and heavy distillates over a commercial hydrotreating catalyst was studied using a small packed bed reactor. The results were interpreted assuming a pseudo-component model that took into account the physical and chemical complexity of the system. A first order series-parallel reaction mechanism was found to be valid for the operating conditions involved. Pore diffusion effects were also taken into consideration. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions. II: Parallel reversible chemical reactions

    Versteeg, Geert; van Beckum, F.P.H.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and

  11. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions. II: parallel reversible chemical reactions

    Versteeg, G.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Beckum, van F.P.H.; van Swaaij, W.P.M.

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and

  12. Comparison of different chemical kinetic mechanisms of methane combustion in an internal combustion engine configuration

    Ennetta Ridha; Hamdi Mohamed; Said Rachid

    2008-01-01

    Three chemical kinetic mechanisms of methane combustion were tested and compared using the internal combustion engine model of Chemkin 4.02 [1]: one-step global reaction mechanism, four-step mechanism, and the standard detailed scheme GRIMECH 3.0. This study shows good concordances, especially between the four-step and the detailed mechanisms in the prediction of temperature and main species profiles. But reduced schemes were incapables to predict pollutant emissions in an internal combustion...

  13. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  14. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  15. Non-equilibrium reactive flux: A unified framework for slow and fast reaction kinetics.

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2017-10-21

    The flux formulation of reaction rate theory is recast in terms of the expectation value of the reactive flux with an initial condition that corresponds to a non-equilibrium, factorized reactant density. In the common case of slow reactive processes, the non-equilibrium expression reaches the plateau regime only slightly slower than the equilibrium flux form. When the reactants are described by a single quantum state, as in the case of electron transfer reactions, the factorized reactant density describes the true initial condition of the reactive process. In such cases, the time integral of the non-equilibrium flux expression yields the reactant population as a function of time, allowing characterization of the dynamics in cases where there is no clear separation of time scales and thus a plateau regime cannot be identified. The non-equilibrium flux offers a unified approach to the kinetics of slow and fast chemical reactions and is ideally suited to mixed quantum-classical methods.

  16. Spectator Ions ARE Important! A Kinetic Study of the Copper-Aluminum Displacement Reaction

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Cohen, Skyler

    2010-01-01

    Surprisingly, spectator ions are responsible for unexpected kinetics in the biphasic copper(II)-aluminum displacement reaction, with the rate of reaction dependent on the identity of the otherwise ignored spectator ions. Application of a published kinetic analysis developed for a reaction between a rotating Al disk and a Cu(II) ion solution to the…

  17. Kinetics of reactions of aquacobalamin with aspartic and glutamic acids and their amides in water solutions

    Bui, T. T. T.; Sal'nikov, D. S.; Dereven'kov, I. A.; Makarov, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    The kinetics of aquacobalamin reaction with aspartic and glutamic acids, and with their amides in water solutions, is studied via spectrophotometry. The kinetic and activation parameters of the process are determined. It is shown that the reaction product is cobalamin-amino acid complex. The data are compared to results on the reaction between aquacobalamin and primary amines.

  18. A detailed chemical kinetic model for pyrolysis of the lignin model compound chroman

    James Bland

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolysis of woody biomass, including the lignin component, is emerging as a potential technology for the production of renewable fuels and commodity chemicals. Here we describe the construction and implementation of an elementary chemical kinetic model for pyrolysis of the lignin model compound chroman and its reaction intermediate ortho-quinone methide (o-QM. The model is developed using both experimental and theoretical data, and represents a hybrid approach to kinetic modeling that has the potential to provide molecular level insight into reaction pathways and intermediates while accurately describing reaction rates and product formation. The kinetic model developed here can replicate all known aspects of chroman pyrolysis, and provides new information on elementary reaction steps. Chroman pyrolysis is found to proceed via an initial retro-Diels–Alder reaction to form o-QM + ethene (C2H4, followed by dissociation of o-QM to the C6H6 isomers benzene and fulvene (+ CO. At temperatures of around 1000–1200 K and above fulvene rapidly isomerizes to benzene, where an activation energy of around 270 kJ mol-1 is required to reproduce experimental observations. A new G3SX level energy surface for the isomerization of fulvene to benzene supports this result. Our modeling also suggests that thermal decomposition of fulvene may be important at around 950 K and above. This study demonstrates that theoretical protocols can provide a significant contribution to the development of kinetic models for biomass pyrolysis by elucidating reaction mechanisms, intermediates, and products, and also by supplying realistic rate coefficients and thermochemical properties.

  19. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Cobbs Gary

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Results Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the

  20. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-08-16

    Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the literature. They also give better estimates of

  1. Inventory Control: A Small Electronic Device for Studying Chemical Kinetics.

    Perez-Rodriguez, A. L.; Calvo-Aguilar, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Shows how the rate of reaction can be studied using a simple electronic device that overcomes the difficulty students encounter in solving the differential equations describing chemical equilibrium. The device, used in conjunction with an oscilloscope, supplies the voltages that represent the chemical variables that take part in the equilibrium.…

  2. From simple to complex and backwards. Chemical reactions under very high pressure

    Bini, Roberto; Ceppatelli, Matteo; Citroni, Margherita; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► High pressure reactivity of several molecular systems. ► Reaction kinetics and dynamics in high density conditions. ► Key role of optical pumping and electronic excitation. ► Perspectives for the synthesis of hydrogen. - Abstract: High pressure chemical reactions of molecular systems are discussed considering the various factors that can affect the reactivity. These include steric hindrance and geometrical constraints in the confined environment of crystals at high pressure, changes of the free energy landscape with pressure, photoactivation by two-photon absorption, local and collective effects. A classification of the chemical reactions at high pressure is attempted on the basis of the prevailing factors.

  3. Kinetic and reaction pathways of methanol oxidation on platinum

    McCabe, R.W.; McCready, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol oxidation kinetics were measured on Pt wires in a flow reactor at pressures between 30 and 130 Pa. The kinetics were measured as a function of oxygen-to-methanol equivalence ratio phi and wire temperature. In methanol-lean feeds (phi 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were the only products; in methanol-rich feeds (phi > 1), CO, H 2 , H 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were observed. Experiments with 18 O 2 showed that the principal methanol oxidation pathway does not involve C-O bond dissociation. However, the 18 O 2 experiments, together with other features of the methanol oxidation data, also provided evidence for a minor oxidation pathway (accounting for less than 1% of the product CO 2 ) which proceeds through a carbon intermediate. A mathematical model is presented which describes the principal CH 3 OH oxidation pathway as a series reaction involving adsorbed H 2 CO and CO intermediates. Consistent with experimental results, the model predicts that inhibition by adsorbed CO should be weaker for CH 3 OH and H 2 CO oxidation than for CO oxidation. 34 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  4. Chemical kinetics and combustion modelling with CFX 4

    Stopford, P [AEA Technology, Computational Fluid Dynamics Services Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    The presentation describes some recent developments in combustion and kinetics models used in the CFX software of AEA Technology. Three topics are highlighted: the development of coupled solvers in a traditional `SIMPLE`-based CFD code, the use of detailed chemical kinetics mechanism via `look-up` tables and the application of CFD to large-scale multi-burner combustion plant. The aim is identify those physical approximations and numerical methods that are likely to be most useful in the future and those areas where further developments are required. (author) 6 refs.

  5. Chemical kinetics and combustion modelling with CFX 4

    Stopford, P. [AEA Technology, Computational Fluid Dynamics Services Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The presentation describes some recent developments in combustion and kinetics models used in the CFX software of AEA Technology. Three topics are highlighted: the development of coupled solvers in a traditional `SIMPLE`-based CFD code, the use of detailed chemical kinetics mechanism via `look-up` tables and the application of CFD to large-scale multi-burner combustion plant. The aim is identify those physical approximations and numerical methods that are likely to be most useful in the future and those areas where further developments are required. (author) 6 refs.

  6. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water reaction phenomena in support of chemical reaction model development

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2011-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule to the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. The results are used as the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by JAEA toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  7. Chemical kinetics on thermal decompositions of cumene hydroperoxide in cumene studied by calorimetry: An overview

    Duh, Yih-Shing, E-mail: yihshingduh@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Occupation Safety and Health, Jen-Teh Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, Miaoli, 35664, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National United University, No. 1 Lien-Da, Miaoli, 36052, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-08-10

    Highlights: • Chemical kinetics on thermal decompositions of CHP are conducted and summarized. • Kinetics agrees well between data from DSC and adiabatic calorimetry. • Ea is determined to be about 120 kJ mol{sup −1} by various calorimetry. • LogA (A in s{sup −1}) is determined to be about 11.8 by various calorimetry. - Abstract: Study on chemical kinetics related to the thermal decomposition of cumene hydoperoxide (CHP) in cumene is summarized in this work. It is of great importance to gather and compare the differences between these kinetic parameters for further substantial applications in the chemical industry and process safety. CHP has been verified to possess an autocatalytic behavior by using microcalorimetry (such as TAM and C-80) operated at isothermal mode in the temperature range from 70 °C to 120 °C. However, it exhibits a reaction of n-th order detected by non-isothermal DSC scanning and adiabatic calorimeter. By the isothermal aging tests, activation energy and frequency factor in logA(s{sup −1}) were averaged to be (117.3 ± 5.9) kJ mol{sup −1}and (11.4 ± 0.3), respectively. Kinetic parameters acquired from data of interlaboratories by using heat-flow calorimetry, the averaged activation energy and frequency factor in logA(s{sup −1}) were (119.3 ± 11.3) kJ mol{sup −1}and (12.0 ± 0.2), respectively. On the analogy of results from adiabatic calorimetry, the activation energy and frequency factor in logA(s{sup −1}) were respectively averaged to be (122.4 ± 9.2) kJ mol{sup −1}and (11.8 ± 0.8). Five sets of kinetic models in relation to autocatalytic reactions are collected and discussed as well.

  8. Silicon-based sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    Northrup, M. Allen; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  9. On mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of chemical kinetics in turbulent lean premixed combustion

    Lilleberg, Bjorn

    2011-07-01

    This thesis investigates turbulent reacting lean premixed flows with detailed treatment of the chemistry. First, the fundamental equations which govern laminar and turbulent reacting flows are presented. A perfectly stirred reactor numerical code is developed to investigate the role of unmixedness and chemical kinetics in driving combustion instabilities. This includes both global single-step and detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. The single-step mechanisms predict to some degree a similar behavior as the detailed mechanisms. However, it is shown that simple mechanisms can by themselves introduce instabilities. Magnussens Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) for turbulent combustion is implemented in the open source CFD toolbox OpenFOAM R for treatment of both fast and detailed chemistry. RANS turbulence models account for the turbulent compressible flow. A database of pre-calculated chemical time scales, which contains the influence of chemical kinetics, is coupled to EDC with fast chemistry to account for local extinction in both diffusion and premixed flames. Results are compared to fast and detailed chemistry calculations. The inclusion of the database shows significantly better results than the fast chemistry calculations while having a comparably small computational cost. Numerical simulations of four piloted lean premixed jet flames falling into the 'well stirred reactor/broken reaction zones' regime, with strong finite-rate chemistry effects, are performed. Measured and predicted scalars compare well for the two jets with the lowest velocities. The two jets with the highest velocities experience extinction and reignition, and the simulations are able to capture the decrease and increase of the OH mass fractions, but the peak values are higher than in the experiments. Also numerical simulations of a lean premixed lifted jet flame with high sensitivity to turbulence modeling and chemical kinetics are performed. Limitations of the applied turbulence and

  10. Scramjet Combustor Simulations Using Reduced Chemical Kinetics for Practical Fuels

    2003-12-01

    JP-8 kinetics and soot models into the UNICORN CFD code (Montgomery et al., 2003a) NSF Phase I and II SBIRs for development of a computer-assisted...the consequent large relative ratio of communication to computation, which increases as the number of processors increases. Table 6. CPU Times for 2-D...divided by diameter QSS quasi-steady state REI Reaction Engineering International UNICORN UNsteady Ignition and COmbustion with ReactioNs VULCAN Viscous Upwind aLgorithm for Complex flow ANalysis

  11. Application of Detailed Chemical Kinetics to Combustion Instability Modeling

    2016-01-04

    Clearance Number 15692 Clearance Date 12/3/2015 14. ABSTRACT A comparison of a single step global reaction and the detailed GRI -Mech 1.2 for combustion...comparison of a single step global reaction and the detailed GRI -Mech 1.2 for com- bustion instability modeling in a methane-fueled longitudinal-mode...methane as the fuel. We use the GRI -Mech 1.2 kinetics mechanism for methane oxidation.11 The GRI -Mech 1.2 was chosen over 2.11 because the only

  12. Chemical kinetics studies at high temperatures using shock tubes

    Rajakumar, B; Anandraj, D; Reddy, KPJ; Arunan, E

    2002-01-01

    Shock tube is an unique facility to create temperature gradients exceeding million degrees Kelvin per second. We have established two shock tubes for measuring the kinetic reaction rates at high temperatures with two different but complementary detection techniques. The first one is a single pulse shock tube, in which the reflected shock is used to heat the molecules. The equilibrated products are analyzed by gas chromatograph and infrared spectrometer. The second one uses laser-schlieren sys...

  13. Chemical and physical reactions under thermal plasmas conditions

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, A.; Vardelle, M.; Coudert, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Basic understanding of the involved phenomena lags far behind industrial development that requires now a better knowledge of the phenomena to achieve a better control of the process allowing to improve the quality of the products. Thus the authors try to precise what is their actual knowledge in the fields of: plasma generators design; plasma flow models with the following key points: laminar or turbulent flow, heat transfer to walls, 2D or 3D models, non equilibrium effects, mixing problems when chemical reactions are to be taken into account with very fast kinetics, electrode regions, data for transport properties and kinetic rates; nucleation problems; plasma flow characteristics measurements: temperature or temperatures and population of excited states (automatized emission spectroscopy, LIF, CARS) as well as flow velocity (LDA with small particles, Doppler effects...); plasma and particles momentum and heat transfer either with models taking into account particles size and injection velocity distributions, heat propagation, vaporization, Kundsen effect, turbulences ... or with measurements: particles velocity and flux distributions (Laser Anemometry) as well as surface temperature distributions (two colour pyrometry in flight statistical or not)

  14. Driving Chemical Reactions in Plasmonic Nanogaps with Electrohydrodynamic Flow.

    Thrift, William J; Nguyen, Cuong Q; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, Mahsa; Zare, Siavash; Sharac, Nicholas; Sanderson, Robert N; Dupper, Torin J; Hochbaum, Allon I; Capolino, Filippo; Abdolhosseini Qomi, Mohammad Javad; Ragan, Regina

    2017-11-28

    Nanoparticles from colloidal solution-with controlled composition, size, and shape-serve as excellent building blocks for plasmonic devices and metasurfaces. However, understanding hierarchical driving forces affecting the geometry of oligomers and interparticle gap spacings is still needed to fabricate high-density architectures over large areas. Here, electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow is used as a long-range driving force to enable carbodiimide cross-linking between nanospheres and produces oligomers exhibiting sub-nanometer gap spacing over mm 2 areas. Anhydride linkers between nanospheres are observed via surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The anhydride linkers are cleavable via nucleophilic substitution and enable placement of nucleophilic molecules in electromagnetic hotspots. Atomistic simulations elucidate that the transient attractive force provided by EHD flow is needed to provide a sufficient residence time for anhydride cross-linking to overcome slow reaction kinetics. This synergistic analysis shows assembly involves an interplay between long-range driving forces increasing nanoparticle-nanoparticle interactions and probability that ligands are in proximity to overcome activation energy barriers associated with short-range chemical reactions. Absorption spectroscopy and electromagnetic full-wave simulations show that variations in nanogap spacing have a greater influence on optical response than variations in close-packed oligomer geometry. The EHD flow-anhydride cross-linking assembly method enables close-packed oligomers with uniform gap spacings that produce uniform SERS enhancement factors. These results demonstrate the efficacy of colloidal driving forces to selectively enable chemical reactions leading to future assembly platforms for large-area nanodevices.

  15. Kinetic study of the reaction of chlorine atoms with hydroxyacetone in gas-phase

    Stoeffler, Clara; Joly, Lilian; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Bruyant, Aurélien; Roth, Estelle; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-12-01

    In this letter the kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyacetone CH3C(O)CH2OH with Cl atoms is investigated using the relative rate technique. Experiments are carried out in a 65 L multipass photoreactor in the temperature range of 281-350 K. A mid-infrared spectrometer based on a quantum cascade laser in external cavity emitting at 9.5 μm is used to analyze the reactants. The determined rate coefficient for the investigated reaction is (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10-11exp(381.5 ± 57.3/T). The results are presented and discussed in terms of precision and compared with those obtained previously. The impact of Cl atoms on the atmospheric life time of hydroxyacetone is also discussed. Developing analytical techniques to quantify this compound in the atmosphere. Several methods of measurement have been used including the technique of proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) [2] and derivatization with a chemical agent such as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) [3,4] followed by GC/MS or HPLC analyses. The HA amount in the troposphere was found to be in the order of a few hundred parts per trillion by volume [4], Performing laboratory experiments in order to study the HA reactivity with atmospheric oxidants. The first study on the kinetic of the reaction between OH radicals and HA was made by Dagault et al. [5] whose work was performed at room temperature by flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. The determined rate constant implies a lifetime of a few days for HA relative to oxidation by OH radicals. Orlando et al. performed mechanistic and kinetics studies of the reaction of HA with OH radicals and Cl atoms at room temperature using a relative method [6]. Products detection was performed using FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, these authors studied the photolysis of HA to determine its quantum yield and UV absorption spectrum. These studies showed that HA is principally removed from the atmosphere by reaction with OH radicals. Kinetic studies of the reaction of OH radicals with HA as a

  16. Chemical kinetics in H2O and D2O under hydrothermal conditions

    Ghandi, K.; Alcorn, C.D.; Legate, G.; Percival, P.W.; Brodovitch, J.-C.

    2010-01-01

    Muonium (Mu = μ + e - ) is a light analogue of the H-atom. Studies of Mu chemical kinetics have been extended to supercritical water, a medium in some designs of future generation nuclear reactors. The Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) would operate at higher temperatures than current pressurized water-cooled reactors, and the lack of knowledge of water radiolysis under supercritical conditions constitutes a technology gap for SCWR development. Accurate modeling of chemistry in a SCWR requires data on kinetics of reactions involved in the radiolysis of water. In this paper, we first review our measurements of kinetics in H 2 O and then describe new data for D 2 O under sub- and supercritical conditions. (author)

  17. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  18. Plasmon-driven sequential chemical reactions in an aqueous environment.

    Zhang, Xin; Wang, Peijie; Zhang, Zhenglong; Fang, Yurui; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-06-24

    Plasmon-driven sequential chemical reactions were successfully realized in an aqueous environment. In an electrochemical environment, sequential chemical reactions were driven by an applied potential and laser irradiation. Furthermore, the rate of the chemical reaction was controlled via pH, which provides indirect evidence that the hot electrons generated from plasmon decay play an important role in plasmon-driven chemical reactions. In acidic conditions, the hot electrons were captured by the abundant H(+) in the aqueous environment, which prevented the chemical reaction. The developed plasmon-driven chemical reactions in an aqueous environment will significantly expand the applications of plasmon chemistry and may provide a promising avenue for green chemistry using plasmon catalysis in aqueous environments under irradiation by sunlight.

  19. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry.

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J; Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-03-11

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reactive potential energy surfaces and are combined here with quantum chemical structure optimizations, which yield the structures and energies of the reaction intermediates and products. Application of heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology to the formose reaction reproduces the experimentally observed reaction products, major reaction pathways, and autocatalytic cycles.

  20. Effect of strain on bond-specific reaction kinetics during the oxidation of H-terminated (111) Si

    Gokce, Bilal; Aspnes, David E.; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2011-01-01

    Although strain is used in semiconductor technology for manipulating optical, electronic, and chemical properties of semiconductors, the understanding of the microscopic phenomena that are affected or influenced by strain is still incomplete. Second-harmonic generation data obtained during the air oxidation of H-terminated (111) Si reveal the effect of compressive strain on this chemical reaction. Even small amounts of strain manipulate the reaction kinetics of surface bonds significantly, with tensile strain enhancing oxidation and compressive strain retarding it. This dramatic change suggests a strain-driven charge transfer mechanism between Si-H up bonds and Si-Si back bonds in the outer layer of Si atoms.

  1. MAKSIMA-CHEMIST: a program for Mass Action Kinetics Simulation by Automatic Chemical Equation Manipulation and Integration using Stiff Techniques

    Carver, M.B.; Hanley, D.V.; Chaplin, K.R.

    1979-02-01

    MAKSIMA-CHEMIST was written to compute the kinetics of simultaneous chemical reactions. The ordinary differential equations, which are automatically derived from the stated chemical equations, are difficult to integrate, as they are coupled in a highly nonlinear manner and frequently involve a large range in the magnitude of the reaction rates. They form a classic 'stiff' differential equaton set which can be integrated efficiently only by recently developed advanced techniques. The new program also contains provision for higher order chemical reactions, and has a dynamic storage and decision feature. This permits it to accept any number of chemical reactions and species, and choose an integraton scheme which will perform most efficiently within the available memory. Sparse matrix techniques are used when the size and structure of the equation set is suitable. Finally, a number of post-analysis options are available, including printer and Calcomp plots of transient response of selected species, and graphical representation of the reaction matrix. (auth)

  2. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Response of Microbial Reactions to High CO2.

    Jin, Qusheng; Kirk, Matthew F

    2016-01-01

    Geological carbon sequestration captures CO 2 from industrial sources and stores the CO 2 in subsurface reservoirs, a viable strategy for mitigating global climate change. In assessing the environmental impact of the strategy, a key question is how microbial reactions respond to the elevated CO 2 concentration. This study uses biogeochemical modeling to explore the influence of CO 2 on the thermodynamics and kinetics of common microbial reactions in subsurface environments, including syntrophic oxidation, iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. The results show that increasing CO 2 levels decreases groundwater pH and modulates chemical speciation of weak acids in groundwater, which in turn affect microbial reactions in different ways and to different extents. Specifically, a thermodynamic analysis shows that increasing CO 2 partial pressure lowers the energy available from syntrophic oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis, but raises the available energy of microbial iron reduction, hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Kinetic modeling suggests that high CO 2 has the potential of inhibiting microbial sulfate reduction while promoting iron reduction. These results are consistent with the observations of previous laboratory and field studies, and highlight the complexity in microbiological responses to elevated CO 2 abundance, and the potential power of biogeochemical modeling in evaluating and quantifying these responses.

  3. Thermodynamic and kinetic response of microbial reactions to high CO2

    Qusheng Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Geological carbon sequestration captures CO2 from industrial sources and stores the CO2 in subsurface reservoirs, a viable strategy for mitigating global climate change. In assessing the environmental impact of the strategy, a key question is how microbial reactions respond to the elevated CO2 concentration. This study uses biogeochemical modeling to explore the influence of CO2 on the thermodynamics and kinetics of common microbial reactions in subsurface environments, including syntrophic oxidation, iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. The results show that increasing CO2 levels decreases groundwater pH and modulates chemical speciation of weak acids in groundwater, which in turn affect microbial reactions in different ways and to different extents. Specifically, a thermodynamic analysis shows that increasing CO2 partial pressure lowers the energy available from syntrophic oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis, but raises the available energy of microbial iron reduction, hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Kinetic modeling suggests that high CO2 has the potential of inhibiting microbial sulfate reduction while promoting iron reduction. These results are consistent with the observations of previous laboratory and field studies, and highlight the complexity in microbiological responses to elevated CO2 abundance, and the potential power of biogeochemical modeling in evaluating and quantifying these responses.

  4. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals, Final Technical Report

    Curl, Robert F.; Glass, Graham P.

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  5. Substrate-Directed Catalytic Selective Chemical Reactions.

    Sawano, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2018-05-04

    The development of highly efficient reactions at only the desired position is one of the most important subjects in organic chemistry. Most of the reactions in current organic chemistry are reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions, and the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reactions are determined by the inherent nature of the reagent or catalyst. In sharp contrast, substrate-directed reaction determines the selectivity of the reactions by the functional group on the substrate and can strictly distinguish sterically and electronically similar multiple reaction sites in the substrate. In this Perspective, three topics of substrate-directed reaction are mainly reviewed: (1) directing group-assisted epoxidation of alkenes, (2) ring-opening reactions of epoxides by various nucleophiles, and (3) catalytic peptide synthesis. Our newly developed synthetic methods with new ligands including hydroxamic acid derived ligands realized not only highly efficient reactions but also pinpointed reactions at the expected position, demonstrating the substrate-directed reaction as a powerful method to achieve the desired regio- and stereoselective functionalization of molecules from different viewpoints of reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions.

  6. Compactness and robustness: Applications in the solution of integral equations for chemical kinetics and electromagnetic scattering

    Zhou, Yajun

    This thesis employs the topological concept of compactness to deduce robust solutions to two integral equations arising from chemistry and physics: the inverse Laplace problem in chemical kinetics and the vector wave scattering problem in dielectric optics. The inverse Laplace problem occurs in the quantitative understanding of biological processes that exhibit complex kinetic behavior: different subpopulations of transition events from the "reactant" state to the "product" state follow distinct reaction rate constants, which results in a weighted superposition of exponential decay modes. Reconstruction of the rate constant distribution from kinetic data is often critical for mechanistic understandings of chemical reactions related to biological macromolecules. We devise a "phase function approach" to recover the probability distribution of rate constants from decay data in the time domain. The robustness (numerical stability) of this reconstruction algorithm builds upon the continuity of the transformations connecting the relevant function spaces that are compact metric spaces. The robust "phase function approach" not only is useful for the analysis of heterogeneous subpopulations of exponential decays within a single transition step, but also is generalizable to the kinetic analysis of complex chemical reactions that involve multiple intermediate steps. A quantitative characterization of the light scattering is central to many meteoro-logical, optical, and medical applications. We give a rigorous treatment to electromagnetic scattering on arbitrarily shaped dielectric media via the Born equation: an integral equation with a strongly singular convolution kernel that corresponds to a non-compact Green operator. By constructing a quadratic polynomial of the Green operator that cancels out the kernel singularity and satisfies the compactness criterion, we reveal the universality of a real resonance mode in dielectric optics. Meanwhile, exploiting the properties of

  7. Chemical Kinetics for Bridging Molecular Mechanisms and Macroscopic Measurements of Amyloid Fibril Formation.

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Šarić, Anđela; Habchi, Johnny; Chia, Sean; Meisl, Georg; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2018-04-20

    Understanding how normally soluble peptides and proteins aggregate to form amyloid fibrils is central to many areas of modern biomolecular science, ranging from the development of functional biomaterials to the design of rational therapeutic strategies against increasingly prevalent medical conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. As such, there is a great need to develop models to mechanistically describe how amyloid fibrils are formed from precursor peptides and proteins. Here we review and discuss how ideas and concepts from chemical reaction kinetics can help to achieve this objective. In particular, we show how a combination of theory, experiments, and computer simulations, based on chemical kinetics, provides a general formalism for uncovering, at the molecular level, the mechanistic steps that underlie the phenomenon of amyloid fibril formation.

  8. Chemical Kinetics for Bridging Molecular Mechanisms and Macroscopic Measurements of Amyloid Fibril Formation

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Šarić, Anđela; Habchi, Johnny; Chia, Sean; Meisl, Georg; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding how normally soluble peptides and proteins aggregate to form amyloid fibrils is central to many areas of modern biomolecular science, ranging from the development of functional biomaterials to the design of rational therapeutic strategies against increasingly prevalent medical conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. As such, there is a great need to develop models to mechanistically describe how amyloid fibrils are formed from precursor peptides and proteins. Here we review and discuss how ideas and concepts from chemical reaction kinetics can help to achieve this objective. In particular, we show how a combination of theory, experiments, and computer simulations, based on chemical kinetics, provides a general formalism for uncovering, at the molecular level, the mechanistic steps that underlie the phenomenon of amyloid fibril formation.

  9. Kinetics of the Reaction of CO2 with Aqueous Potassium Salt of Taurine and Glycine

    Kumar, P.S.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Versteeg, G.F.; Feron, P.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between CO2 and aqueous potassium salts of taurine and glycine was measured at 295 K in a stirred-cell reactor with a flat gas–liquid interface. For aqueous potassium taurate solutions, the temperature effect on the reaction kinetics was measured at 285 and 305 K. Unlike

  10. Kinetics of the reaction of CO2 with aqueous potassium salt of taurine and glycine

    Kumar Paramasivam Senthil, P.S.; Hogendoorn, Kees; Versteeg, Geert; Feron, P.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between CO2 and aqueous potassium salts of taurine and glycine was measured at 295 K in a stirred-cell reactor with a flat gas-liquid interface. For aqueous potassium taurate solutions, the temperature effect on the reaction kinetics was measured at 285 and 305 K. Unlike

  11. Simulation of square wave voltammetry of three electrode reactions coupled by two reversible chemical reactions

    Lovrić, Milivoj

    2017-01-01

    Three fast and reversible electrode reactions that are connected by two reversible chemical reactions that are permanently in the equilibrium are analysed theoretically for square wave voltammetry. The dependence of peak potentials on the dimensionless equilibrium constants of chemical reactions is calculated. The influence of the basic thermodynamic parameters on the square wave voltammetric responses is analysed.

  12. Simulating Chemical Kinetics Without Differential Equations: A Quantitative Theory Based on Chemical Pathways.

    Bai, Shirong; Skodje, Rex T

    2017-08-17

    A new approach is presented for simulating the time-evolution of chemically reactive systems. This method provides an alternative to conventional modeling of mass-action kinetics that involves solving differential equations for the species concentrations. The method presented here avoids the need to solve the rate equations by switching to a representation based on chemical pathways. In the Sum Over Histories Representation (or SOHR) method, any time-dependent kinetic observable, such as concentration, is written as a linear combination of probabilities for chemical pathways leading to a desired outcome. In this work, an iterative method is introduced that allows the time-dependent pathway probabilities to be generated from a knowledge of the elementary rate coefficients, thus avoiding the pitfalls involved in solving the differential equations of kinetics. The method is successfully applied to the model Lotka-Volterra system and to a realistic H 2 combustion model.

  13. The reaction kinetics of amino radicals with sulfur dioxide

    Gao, Yide; Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Application of the laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence method to the reaction NH2+SO2 in argon bath gas yields pressure-dependent, third-order kinetics which may be summarized as k = (1.49 ± 0.15) × 10-31 (T/298 K)-0.83cm6 molecule-2 s-1 over 292-555K, where the uncertainty is the 95......% confidence interval and includes possible systematic errors. The quenching of vibrationally excited NH2 is consistent with a high-pressure limit for NH2+SO2 of (1.62 ± 0.25) × 10-11cm3 molecule-1 s-1 over the temperature range 295-505K, where again the 95% confidence interval is shown. Ab initio analysis...... yields a H2N-SO2 dissociation enthalpy of 73.5 kJ mol-1, and comparison with RRKM theory and the exponential down model for energy transfer yields down = 350 cm-1 for Ar at room temperature....

  14. Mechanistic rationalization of unusual sigmoidal kinetic profiles in the Machetti-De Sarlo cycloaddition reaction.

    Mower, Matthew P; Blackmond, Donna G

    2015-02-18

    Unusual sigmoidal kinetic profiles in the Machetti-De Sarlo base-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of acrylamide to N-methylnitroacetamide are rationalized by detailed in situ kinetic analysis. A dual role is uncovered in which a substrate acts as a precursor to catalyze its own reaction. Such kinetic studies provide a general protocol for distinguishing among different mechanistic origins of induction periods in complex organic reactions.

  15. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  16. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    Keshavamurthy, S.

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems

  17. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    Keshavamurthy, Srihari [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems.

  18. CH4/air homogeneous autoignition: A comparison of two chemical kinetics mechanisms

    Tingas, Efstathios Al.

    2018-03-11

    Reactions contributing to the generation of the explosive time scale that characterise autoignition of homogeneous stoichiometric CH4/air mixture are identified using two different chemical kinetics models; the well known GRI-3.0 mechanism (53/325 species/reactions with N-chemistry) and the AramcoMech mechanism from NUI Galway (113/710 species/reactions without N-chemistry; Combustion and Flame 162:315-330, 2015). Although the two mechanisms provide qualitatively similar results (regarding ignition delay and profiles of temperature, of mass fractions and of explosive time scale), the 113/710 mechanism was shown to reproduce the experimental data with higher accuracy than the 53/325 mechanism. The present analysis explores the origin of the improved accuracy provided by the more complex kinetics mechanism. It is shown that the reactions responsible for the generation of the explosive time scale differ significantly. This is reflected to differences in the length of the chemical and thermal runaways and in the set of the most influential species.

  19. Some Considerations on the Fundamentals of Chemical Kinetics: Steady State, Quasi-Equilibrium, and Transition State Theory

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F.

    2017-01-01

    The elementary reaction sequence A ? I ? Products is the simplest mechanism for which the steady-state and quasi-equilibrium kinetic approximations can be applied. The exact integrated solutions for this chemical system allow inferring the conditions that must fulfill the rate constants for the different approximations to hold. A graphical…

  20. Investigation of the kinetics and mechanism of the glycerol chlorination reaction using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    JUN WANG

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As a primary by-product in biodiesel production, glycerol can be used to prepare an important fine chemical, epichlorohydrin, by the glycerol chlorination reaction. Although this process has been applied in industrial production, unfortunately, less attention has been paid to the analysis and separation of the compounds in the glycerol chlorination products. In this study, a convenient and accurate method to determine the products in glycerol chlorination reaction was established and based on the results the kinetic mechanism of the reaction was investigated. The structure of main products, including 1,3--dichloropropan-2-ol, 2,3-dichloropropan-1-ol, 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol, 2-chloro-1,3-propanediol and glycerol was ascertained by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and the isomers of the products were distinguished. Apidic acid was considered as the best catalyst because of its excellent catalytic effect and high boiling point. The mechanism of the glycerol chlorination reaction was proposed and a new kinetic model was developed. Kinetic equations of the process in the experimental range were obtained by data fitting and the activation energies of each tandem reaction were 30.7, 41.8, 29.4 and 49.5 kJ mol-1, respectively. This study revealed the process and mechanism of the kinetics and provides the theoretical basis for engineering problems.

  1. Parameter Estimates in Differential Equation Models for Chemical Kinetics

    Winkel, Brian

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the need for devoting time in differential equations courses to modelling and the completion of the modelling process with efforts to estimate the parameters in the models using data. We estimate the parameters present in several differential equation models of chemical reactions of order n, where n = 0, 1, 2, and apply more general…

  2. The influence of the “cage effect” on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions in solutions

    Doktorov, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    Manifestations of the “cage effect” at the encounters of reactants are theoretically treated by the example of multistage reactions in liquid solutions including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages. It is shown that consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of multistage reactions (possible only in the framework of the encounter theory) for reactions proceeding near reactants contact can be made on the basis of the concepts of a “cage complex.” Though mathematically such a consideration is more complicated, it is more clear from the standpoint of chemical notions. It is established that the presence of the “cage effect” leads to some important effects not inherent in reactions in gases or those in solutions proceeding in the kinetic regime, such as the appearance of new transition channels of reactant transformation that cannot be caused by elementary event of chemical conversion for the given mechanism of reaction. This results in that, for example, rate constant values of multistage reaction defined by standard kinetic equations of formal chemical kinetics from experimentally measured kinetics can differ essentially from real values of these constants

  3. The influence of the "cage effect" on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions in solutions.

    Doktorov, Alexander B

    2015-08-21

    Manifestations of the "cage effect" at the encounters of reactants are theoretically treated by the example of multistage reactions in liquid solutions including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages. It is shown that consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of multistage reactions (possible only in the framework of the encounter theory) for reactions proceeding near reactants contact can be made on the basis of the concepts of a "cage complex." Though mathematically such a consideration is more complicated, it is more clear from the standpoint of chemical notions. It is established that the presence of the "cage effect" leads to some important effects not inherent in reactions in gases or those in solutions proceeding in the kinetic regime, such as the appearance of new transition channels of reactant transformation that cannot be caused by elementary event of chemical conversion for the given mechanism of reaction. This results in that, for example, rate constant values of multistage reaction defined by standard kinetic equations of formal chemical kinetics from experimentally measured kinetics can differ essentially from real values of these constants.

  4. The influence of the “cage effect” on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions in solutions

    Doktorov, Alexander B., E-mail: doktorov@kinetics.nsc.ru [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics & Combustion, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-21

    Manifestations of the “cage effect” at the encounters of reactants are theoretically treated by the example of multistage reactions in liquid solutions including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages. It is shown that consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of multistage reactions (possible only in the framework of the encounter theory) for reactions proceeding near reactants contact can be made on the basis of the concepts of a “cage complex.” Though mathematically such a consideration is more complicated, it is more clear from the standpoint of chemical notions. It is established that the presence of the “cage effect” leads to some important effects not inherent in reactions in gases or those in solutions proceeding in the kinetic regime, such as the appearance of new transition channels of reactant transformation that cannot be caused by elementary event of chemical conversion for the given mechanism of reaction. This results in that, for example, rate constant values of multistage reaction defined by standard kinetic equations of formal chemical kinetics from experimentally measured kinetics can differ essentially from real values of these constants.

  5. Pressure-dependent kinetics of initial reactions in iso-octane pyrolysis.

    Ning, HongBo; Gong, ChunMing; Li, ZeRong; Li, XiangYuan

    2015-05-07

    This study focuses on the studies of the main pressure-dependent reaction types of iso-octane (iso-C8H18) pyrolysis, including initial C-C bond fission of iso-octane, isomerization, and β-scission reactions of the alkyl radicals produced by the C-C bond fission of iso-octane. For the C-C bond fission of iso-octane, the minimum energy potentials are calculated at the CASPT2(2e,2o)/6-31+G(d,p)//CAS(2e,2o)/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. For the isomerization and the β-scission reactions of the alkyl radicals, the optimization of the geometries and the vibrational frequencies of the reactants, transition states, and products are performed at the B3LYP/CBSB7 level, and their single point energies are calculated by using the composite CBS-QB3 method. Variable reaction coordinate transition state theory (VRC-TST) is used for the high-pressure limit rate constant calculation and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/master equation (RRKM/ME) is used to calculate the pressure-dependent rate constants of these channels with pressure varying from 0.01-100 atm. The rate constants obtained in this work are in good agreement with those available from literatures. We have updated the rate constants and thermodynamic parameters for species involved in these reactions into a current chemical kinetic mechanism and also have improved the concentration profiles of main products such as C3H6 and C4H6 in the shock tube pyrolysis of iso-octane. The results of this study provide insight into the pyrolysis of iso-octane and will be helpful in the future development of branched paraffin kinetic mechanisms.

  6. Effect of chemical reaction on unsteady MHD free convective two ...

    The effect of flow parameters on the coefficient of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are also tabulated and discussed appropriately. It was observed that the increase in chemical reaction coefficient/parameter suppresses both velocity and concentration profiles. Keywords: Chemical Reaction, MHD, ...

  7. Stereodynamics: From elementary processes to macroscopic chemical reactions

    Kasai, Toshio [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Che, Dock-Chil [Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Tsai, Po-Yu [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, King-Chuen [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Palazzetti, Federico [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Chimica Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Roma (Italy); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2015-12-31

    This paper aims at discussing new facets on stereodynamical behaviors in chemical reactions, i.e. the effects of molecular orientation and alignment on reactive processes. Further topics on macroscopic processes involving deviations from Arrhenius behavior in the temperature dependence of chemical reactions and chirality effects in collisions are also discussed.

  8. Mesoscale simulations of shockwave energy dissipation via chemical reactions.

    Antillon, Edwin; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-02-28

    We use a particle-based mesoscale model that incorporates chemical reactions at a coarse-grained level to study the response of materials that undergo volume-reducing chemical reactions under shockwave-loading conditions. We find that such chemical reactions can attenuate the shockwave and characterize how the parameters of the chemical model affect this behavior. The simulations show that the magnitude of the volume collapse and velocity at which the chemistry propagates are critical to weaken the shock, whereas the energetics in the reactions play only a minor role. Shock loading results in transient states where the material is away from local equilibrium and, interestingly, chemical reactions can nucleate under such non-equilibrium states. Thus, the timescales for equilibration between the various degrees of freedom in the material affect the shock-induced chemistry and its ability to attenuate the propagating shock.

  9. Shock tube and chemical kinetic modeling study of the oxidation of 2,5-dimethylfuran.

    Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Wang, Weijing; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A

    2013-02-21

    A detailed kinetic model describing the oxidation of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), a potential second-generation biofuel, is proposed. The kinetic model is based upon quantum chemical calculations for the initial DMF consumption reactions and important reactions of intermediates. The model is validated by comparison to new DMF shock tube ignition delay time measurements (over the temperature range 1300-1831 K and at nominal pressures of 1 and 4 bar) and the DMF pyrolysis speciation measurements of Lifshitz et al. [ J. Phys. Chem. A 1998 , 102 ( 52 ), 10655 - 10670 ]. Globally, modeling predictions are in good agreement with the considered experimental targets. In particular, ignition delay times are predicted well by the new model, with model-experiment deviations of at most a factor of 2, and DMF pyrolysis conversion is predicted well, to within experimental scatter of the Lifshitz et al. data. Additionally, comparisons of measured and model predicted pyrolysis speciation provides validation of theoretically calculated channels for the oxidation of DMF. Sensitivity and reaction flux analyses highlight important reactions as well as the primary reaction pathways responsible for the decomposition of DMF and formation and destruction of key intermediate and product species.

  10. Material Balance And Reaction Kinetics Modeling For Penex Isomerization Process In Daura Refinery

    Hamadi Adel Sharif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penex Deisohexanizer isomerization of light straight run naphtha is a significant process for petroleum refining and proved to be effective technology to produce gasoline components with a high octane number. Modeling of the chemical kinetic reactions is an important tool because it is a better tool for optimization of the experimental data into parameters used for industrial reactors. The present study deals on the isomerization process in Daura refinery. Material balance calculations were done mathematically on the unit for the kinetics prediction purpose. A kinetic mathematical model was derived for the prediction rate constants K1 and K2 and activation energy Ea at operating temperatures range 120-180°C. According to the model, the results show that with increasing of temperature leads to increased K1 directly, where the K2 values proportional inversely. The activation energy results show that Ea1(nC6

  11. The development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/steam interaction. Final report 9-21-90--3-31-95

    Biney, P.O.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this research to experimentally determine the hydrogen generation rate during the beginning and subsequent stages of liquid metal (Li 17 Pb 83 ) and water reaction. The experimental set-up has been built. It includes a metal sample preparation apparatus, a reaction system, a measurement system and a PC based data acquisition and control system. The most important feature of the reaction system is a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature, all stainless steel valve used the system for reaction time control. The PC system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all the systems except the metal preparation apparatus. Due to the reactivity of the lithium, all the metal sampling, preparation and loading procedures are executed in a glove box under argon protection. The metal temperature was varied between 350 degrees C-650 degrees C and water temperature fixed at 60 degrees C during the experiments. A set of experimental procedures and two analyses methods: (1) thermodynamics method and (2) heat transfer method are discussed. All the measurements and data collections are executed under the PC system control. A data analysis program is used to calculate both the partial pressure of hydrogen and the hydrogen generation rate. The experiment results indicate that the amount of hydrogen generated is relate to the initial liquid metal temperature when the reaction surface is fixed. The mass of hydrogen generated as a function of initial liquid metal temperature and time of reaction is presented, The hydrogen generation over a time period of 240 seconds and the calculated errors are summarized in Table 1

  12. Droplet heat transfer and chemical reactions during direct containment heating

    Baker, L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified model of heat transfer and chemical reaction has been adapted to evaluate the expected behavior of droplets containing unreacted Zircaloy and stainless steel moving through the containment atmosphere during postulated accidents involving direct containment heating. The model includes internal and external diffusive resistances to reaction. The results indicate that reactions will be incomplete for many conditions characteristic of direct containment heating sequences

  13. Chemical boundary layers in CVD II. Reversible reactions

    Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Giling, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    In addition to irreversible reactions, which were treated in part I, reversible reactions in the gas phase have beenstudied using the concept of the chemical boundary layer. The analysis is given for the situations in which either the forwardor the back reaction is dominant. Two conceptual models

  14. Chemical changes in groundwater and their reaction rates

    Talma, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of the major ion concentrations of groundwater (Na, K, Ca, Mg, HCO 3 , SO 4 , Cl and NO 3 ) can be described as the consequence of a number of competing chemical reactions. With the aid of the naturally occuring radioactive and stable isotopes some of these reactions can be separated, identified and followed in space and time. In some field studies, especialy of artesian water, the rates of reactions can be estimated. A number of processes observed in South African sandstones aquifers are discussed and the variable reaction rates demonstrated. Reactions that can be identified include carbonate solution, chemical weathering, salt leaching, cation exchange and redox processes

  15. Evaluating the effect of potassium on cellulose pyrolysis reaction kinetics

    Trendewicz, Anna; Evans, Robert; Dutta, Abhijit; Sykes, Robert; Carpenter, Daniel; Braun, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes modifications to an existing cellulose pyrolysis mechanism in order to include the effect of potassium on product yields and composition. The changes in activation energies and pre-exponential factors due to potassium were evaluated based on the experimental data collected from pyrolysis of cellulose samples treated with different levels of potassium (0–1% mass fraction). The experiments were performed in a pyrolysis reactor coupled to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) performed on the collected data revealed that cellulose pyrolysis products could be divided into two groups: anhydrosugars and other fragmentation products (hydroxyacetaldehyde, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, acetyl compounds). Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) was used to extract the time resolved concentration score profiles of principal components. Kinetic tests revealed that potassium apparently inhibits the formation of anhydrosugars and catalyzes char formation. Therefore, the oil yield predicted at 500 ° C decreased from 87.9% from cellulose to 54.0% from cellulose with 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment. The decrease in oil yield was accompanied by increased yield of char and gases produced via a catalyzed dehydration reaction. The predicted char and gas yield from cellulose were 3.7% and 8.4%, respectively. Introducing 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment resulted in an increase of char yield to 12.1% and gas yield to 33.9%. The validation of the cellulose pyrolysis mechanism with experimental data from a fluidized-bed reactor, after this correction for potassium, showed good agreement with our results, with differences in product yields of up to 5%

  16. Surrogate models and optimal design of experiments for chemical kinetics applications

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-07

    Kinetic models for reactive flow applications comprise hundreds of reactions describing the complex interaction among many chemical species. The detailed knowledge of the reaction parameters is a key component of the design cycle of next-generation combustion devices, which aim at improving conversion efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. Shock tubes are a laboratory scale experimental configuration, which is widely used for the study of reaction rate parameters. Important uncertainties exist in the values of the thousands of parameters included in the most advanced kinetic models. This talk discusses the application of uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods to the analysis of shock tube data as well as the design of shock tube experiments. Attention is focused on a spectral framework in which uncertain inputs are parameterized in terms of canonical random variables, and quantities of interest (QoIs) are expressed in terms of a mean-square convergent series of orthogonal polynomials acting on these variables. We outline the implementation of a recent spectral collocation approach for determining the unknown coefficients of the expansion, namely using a sparse, adaptive pseudo-spectral construction that enables us to obtain surrogates for the QoIs accurately and efficiently. We first discuss the utility of the resulting expressions in quantifying the sensitivity of QoIs to uncertain inputs, and in the Bayesian inference key physical parameters from experimental measurements. We then discuss the application of these techniques to the analysis of shock-tube data and the optimal design of shock-tube experiments for two key reactions in combustion kinetics: the chain-brancing reaction H + O2 ←→ OH + O and the reaction of Furans with the hydroxyl radical OH.

  17. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  18. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Fedorenko, S. G. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Burshtein, A. I. [Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  19. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics

  20. Formal modeling of a system of chemical reactions under uncertainty.

    Ghosh, Krishnendu; Schlipf, John

    2014-10-01

    We describe a novel formalism representing a system of chemical reactions, with imprecise rates of reactions and concentrations of chemicals, and describe a model reduction method, pruning, based on the chemical properties. We present two algorithms, midpoint approximation and interval approximation, for construction of efficient model abstractions with uncertainty in data. We evaluate computational feasibility by posing queries in computation tree logic (CTL) on a prototype of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway.

  1. Quantitative modeling of the reaction/diffusion kinetics of two-chemistry photopolymers

    Kowalski, Benjamin Andrew

    Optically driven diffusion in photopolymers is an appealing material platform for a broad range of applications, in which the recorded refractive index patterns serve either as images (e.g. data storage, display holography) or as optical elements (e.g. custom GRIN components, integrated optical devices). A quantitative understanding of the reaction/diffusion kinetics is difficult to obtain directly, but is nevertheless necessary in order to fully exploit the wide array of design freedoms in these materials. A general strategy for characterizing these kinetics is proposed, in which key processes are decoupled and independently measured. This strategy enables prediction of a material's potential refractive index change, solely on the basis of its chemical components. The degree to which a material does not reach this potential reveals the fraction of monomer that has participated in unwanted reactions, reducing spatial resolution and dynamic range. This approach is demonstrated for a model material similar to commercial media, achieving quantitative predictions of index response over three orders of exposure dose (~1 to ~103 mJ cm-2) and three orders of feature size (0.35 to 500 microns). The resulting insights enable guided, rational design of new material formulations with demonstrated performance improvement.

  2. Reaction kinetics and transformation of carbadox and structurally related compounds with aqueous chlorine.

    Shah, Amisha D; Kim, Jae-Hong; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2006-12-01

    The potential release of carbadox (CDX), a commonly used antibacterial agent in swine husbandry, into water systems is of a concern due to its carcinogenic and genotoxic effects. Until this study, the reactivity of carbadox (possessing quinoxaline N,N'-dioxide and hydrazone moieties) toward aqueous chlorine has yetto be investigated in depth. Chemical reactivity, reaction kinetics, and transformation pathways of carbadox and structurally related compounds with free chlorine under typical water treatment conditions were determined. This study found that only CDX and desoxycarbadox (DCDX), a main metabolite of CDX with no ring N-oxide groups, react rapidly with free chlorine while other structurally related compounds including olaquindox, quindoxin, quinoxaline N-oxide, quinoxaline, and quinoline N-oxide do not. The reaction kinetics of CDX and DCDX with chlorine are highly pH dependent (e.g., the apparent second-order rate constant, kapp, for CDX ranges from 51.8 to 3.15 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1) at pH 4-11). The high reactivity of CDX and DCDX to chlorine involves deprotonation of their hydrazone N-H moieties where initial chlorine attack results in a reactive intermediate that is further attacked by nucleophiles in the matrix to yield non-chlorinated, hydroxylated, and larger molecular weight byproducts. All of the CDX's byproducts retain their biologically active N-oxide groups, suggesting that they may remain as active antibacterial agents.

  3. Chemical Kinetics in Support of Syngas Turbine Combustion

    Dryer, Frederick

    2007-07-31

    This document is the final report on an overall program formulated to extend our prior work in developing and validating kinetic models for the CO/hydrogen/oxygen reaction by carefully analyzing the individual and interactive behavior of specific elementary and subsets of elementary reactions at conditions of interest to syngas combustion in gas turbines. A summary of the tasks performed under this work are: 1. Determine experimentally the third body efficiencies in H+O{sub 2}+M = HO{sub 2}+M (R1) for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. 2. Using published literature data and the results in this program, further develop the present H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent and CO/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mechanisms for dilution with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} through comparisons with new experimental validation targets for H{sub 2}-CO-O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} reaction kinetics in the presence of significant diluent fractions of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}O, at high pressures. (task amplified to especially address ignition delay issues, see below). 3. Analyze and demonstrate issues related to NOx interactions with syngas combustion chemistry (task amplified to include interactions of iron pentacarbonyl with syngas combustion chemistry, see below). 4. Publish results, including updated syngas kinetic model. Results are summarized in this document and its appendices. Three archival papers which contain a majority of the research results have appeared. Those results not published elsewhere are highlighted here, and will appear as part of future publications. Portions of the work appearing in the above publications were also supported in part by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER-13503. As a result of and during the research under the present contract, we became aware of other reported results that revealed substantial differences between experimental characterizations of ignition delays for syngas mixtures and ignition delay predictions based upon homogenous kinetic modeling. We

  4. REACTION KINETICS SELF-PROPOGATION REGIME DURING PRE-IGNITION PERIOD

    D. D. Polishchuk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Self-propagation high temperature synthesis (SHS technological regulations application is mainly limited by transformation processes taking place in the pre-ignition period. Zn-S, Zn-Se, Ti-C and 3Ni-Al small sample systems ignition experimental study was carried out under heating conditions in inert atmosphere with temperature values T = 1200K.It was shown that at this temperature level a chemical reaction can be initiated, turning into a self-sustaining mode. Wherein the reaction limiting factors can be mass transfer processes. Ignition temperatures were determined and plotted via the samples size. A physical ignition model was developed assuming the pre-ignition period limiting reaction Arrhenius law.The inverse combustion problem solution made it possible to calculate the low-temperature (T = 800 ÷ 1200K reaction kinetic constant values. Comparison thus obtained values  with the known data of other researchers showed their good agreement.Activation energy values for the Zn-S system were used to calculate the heat wave propagation speed. This value appeared to coincide with experimental values.Obtained results analysis leads to the conclusion about the availability and justification for the proposed method of express-analysis of presupposed, but previously not studied SHS systems. The results thus obtained allow us to estimate conditions for the SHS technology implementation, the reactor characteristic sizes and the thermal wave’s propagation speed.

  5. Kinetics of the reaction between H· and superheated water probed with muonium

    Alcorn, Chris D.; Brodovitch, Jean-Claude; Percival, Paul W.; Smith, Marisa; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Rate constants for reactions of H with water resolve a controversy. • H reacts with superheated water via two channels. • The findings have important implications for the safety of some nuclear power reactors. - Abstract: Safe operation of supercritical water-cooled reactors requires knowledge of the kinetics of transient species formed by the radiolysis of water in the range 300–650 °C. Using muonium, it is possible to study aqueous H · atom chemistry over this temperature range. An important reaction to study is that of the H · atom with water itself, because it is a potential source of molecular H 2 . The concentration of H 2 is important to plant coolant chemistry, as H 2 is currently added to suppress oxidative corrosion in CANDU reactors. The reaction of muonium with H 2 O and D 2 O was studied experimentally up to 450 °C, and also via quantum chemical computations to investigate possible isotope effects. Our results suggest that although the H · atom abstraction from H 2 O is important at temperatures above 300 °C, the electron-producing channel (H · + H 2 O ⇌ H 3 O + + e aq - ) is significant at temperatures up to 300 °C, and becomes the dominant reaction channel at lower temperatures

  6. Kinetics of the reaction between H{sup ·} and superheated water probed with muonium

    Alcorn, Chris D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick E4L 1G8 (Canada); Brodovitch, Jean-Claude [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Percival, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Smith, Marisa [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick E4L 1G8 (Canada); Ghandi, Khashayar, E-mail: kghandi@mta.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick E4L 1G8 (Canada)

    2014-05-19

    Highlights: • Rate constants for reactions of H with water resolve a controversy. • H reacts with superheated water via two channels. • The findings have important implications for the safety of some nuclear power reactors. - Abstract: Safe operation of supercritical water-cooled reactors requires knowledge of the kinetics of transient species formed by the radiolysis of water in the range 300–650 °C. Using muonium, it is possible to study aqueous H{sup ·} atom chemistry over this temperature range. An important reaction to study is that of the H{sup ·} atom with water itself, because it is a potential source of molecular H{sub 2}. The concentration of H{sub 2} is important to plant coolant chemistry, as H{sub 2} is currently added to suppress oxidative corrosion in CANDU reactors. The reaction of muonium with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O was studied experimentally up to 450 °C, and also via quantum chemical computations to investigate possible isotope effects. Our results suggest that although the H{sup ·} atom abstraction from H{sub 2}O is important at temperatures above 300 °C, the electron-producing channel (H{sup ·} + H{sub 2}O ⇌ H{sub 3}O{sup +} + e{sub aq}{sup -}) is significant at temperatures up to 300 °C, and becomes the dominant reaction channel at lower temperatures.

  7. Kinetics of the high temperature oxygen exchange reaction on {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} powder

    Whiting, Christofer E., E-mail: chris.whiting@udri.udayton.edu [University of Dayton – Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0172 (United States); Du, Miting; Felker, L. Kevin; Wham, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P. [University of Dayton – Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0172 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen exchange reactions performed on PuO{sub 2} suggest the reaction is influenced by at least three mechanisms: an internal chemical reaction, surface mobility of active species/defects, and surface exchange of gaseous oxygen with lattice oxygen. Activation energies for the surface mobility and internal chemical reaction are presented. Determining which mechanism is dominant appears to be a complex function including at least specific surface area and temperature. Thermal exposure may also impact the oxygen exchange reaction by causing reductions in the specific surface area of PuO{sub 2}. Previous CeO{sub 2} surrogate studies exhibit similar behavior, confirming that CeO{sub 2} is a good qualitative surrogate for PuO{sub 2}, in regards to the oxygen exchange reaction. Comparison of results presented here with previous work on the PuO{sub 2} oxygen exchange reaction allows complexities in the previous work to be explained. These explanations allowed new conclusions to be drawn, many of which confirm the conclusions presented here. - Highlights: • PuO{sub 2} Oxygen exchange kinetics can be influenced by at least 3 different mechanisms. • An internal chemical reaction controls the rate at high temperature and large SSA. • Surface mobility and surface exchange influence rate at lower temperatures and SSA. • Exchange temperatures may alter SSA and make data difficult to interpret.

  8. Kinetics of chemical vapor deposition of boron on molybdenum

    Tanaka, W.; Nakaanishi, N.; Kato, E.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental rate data of chemical vapor deposition of boron by reduction of boron trichloride with hydrogen are analyzed to determine the reaction mechanism. The reaction orders with respect to the partial pressures of hydrogen and boron trichloride are one half and one third, respectively. It has been found that the outer layer of a deposited film is Mo/sub 2/B/sub 5/ and the inner layer is MoB by the use of X-ray diffraction and EPMA line analysis

  9. Chemical kinetics of flue gas cleaning by electron beam

    Maetzing, H.

    1989-02-01

    By electron beam treatment of flue gases, NO x and SO 2 are converted to nitric and sulfuric acids simultaneously. Upon ammonia addition, the corresponding salts are collected in solid state and can be sold as fertilizer. Both homogeneous gas phase reactions and physico-chemical aerosol dynamics are involved in product formation. These processes have been analyzed by model calculations. In part 1, the present report summarizes the model results and gives an account of the theoretical understanding of the EBDS process and its performance characteristics. Part 2 of this report gives a complete listing of the reactions used in the AGATE code. (orig.) [de

  10. Acetalised Galactarate Polyesters: Interplay between Chemical Structure and Polymerisation Kinetics

    Ionela Gavrila

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the progress that has made so far in the recent years regarding the synthesis of bio-based polymers and in particular polyesters, only few references address the optimisation of these new reactions with respect to conversion and reaction time. Related to this aspect, we here describe the transesterification reaction of two different acetalised galactarate esters with a model aliphatic diol, 1,6-hexanediol. The kinetics of these two apparently similar reactions is compared, with a focus on the conversion while varying the concentration of a di-butyltin oxide catalyst (DBTO, respectively, the used N2 flow-rate. During the first stage of polymerisation, the molecular weight of the end-products is more than doubled when using a 250 mL/min flow as opposed to an almost static N2 pressure. Additionally, the resulted pre-polymers are subjected to further polycondensation and the comparison between the obtained polyesters is extended to their thermal, mechanical and dielectrical characterisation. The influence of the acetal groups on the stability of the polyesters in acidic conditions concludes the study.

  11. Fixation and reduction of uranium by natural organic matter: reaction mechanisms and kinetics

    Nakashima, S.; Perruchot, A.; Trichet, J.; Disnar, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The reactivity of lignite towards soluble uranyl species in an aqueous medium is experimentally investigated as a function of temperature (between 20 0 C and 400 0 C). The fixation process starts near 45 0 C, with reduction beginning around 120 0 C. The fixation process leads to the formation of chemically and thermally stable organo-uranyl species. The reduction of free uranyl species is accompanied by a stoichiometric (2:1) liberation of protons into the medium. These protons originate from the organic matter which thus undergoes dehydrogenation. The general evolution of the carbonaceous residue in the course of this reaction shows that alcoholic and aliphatic hydrocarbon groups are responsible for the reduction. This chemical dehydrogenation could explain the low hydrogen content of natural organic materials associated with uraniferous deposits. The kinetics of the reduction step have been studied at 180 0 C, 190 0 C and 200 0 C. The kinetic parameters determined over this temperature range, and the extrapolation made to 20 0 C, show that reduction can be a crucial process in the geochemical behaviour of uranium especially in the thermal conditions in which sedimentary basins evolve [fr

  12. FACILITATED CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS UNDER ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    The chemical research in the late 1990's witnessed a paradigm shift towards "environmentally-friendly chemistry" more popularly known as "green chemistry" due to the increasing environmental concerns and legislative requirements to curb the release of chemical waste into the atmo...

  13. Kinetic study on bonding reaction of gelatin with CdS nanopaticles by UV-visible spectroscopy.

    Tang, Shihua; Wang, Baiyang; Li, Youqun

    2015-04-15

    The chemical kinetics on gelatin-CdS direct conjugates has been systematically investigated as a function of different temperature and reactant concentration (i.e. Cd(2+), S(2-) and gelatin) by UV-visible spectroscopy, for the first time. The nonlinear fitting and the differential method were used to calculate the initial rate based on the absorbance-time data. A double logarithmic linear equation for calculating the rate constant (k) and the reaction order (n) was introduced. The reaction kinetic parameters (n, k, Ea, and Z) and activation thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(≠), ΔH(≠), and ΔS(≠)) were obtained from variable temperature kinetic studies. The overall rate equation allowing evaluation of conditions that provide required reaction rate could be expressed as: r = 1.11 × 10(8) exp(-4971/T)[Cd(2+)][gelatin](0.6)[S(2-)](0.6) (M/S) The calculated values of the reaction rate are well coincide with the experimental results. A suitable kinetic model is also proposed. This work will provide guidance for the rational design of gelatin-directed syntheses of metal sulfide materials, and help to understand the biological effects of nanoparticles at the molecular level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Gas phase chemical kinetics at high temperature of carbonaceous molecules: application to circumstellar envelopes

    Biennier, L.; Gardez, A.; Saidani, G.; Georges, R.; Rowe, B.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar shells of evolved stars are a theater of extremely rich physical and chemical processes. More than seventy molecules of varied nature have been identified in the envelopes through their spectral fingerprints in the microwave or far infrared regions. Many of them are carbon chain molecules and radicals and a significant number are unique to the circumstellar medium. However, observational data remain scarce and more than half of the detected species have been observed in only one object, the nearby carbon star IRC + 10216. Chemical kinetic models are needed to describe the formation of molecules in evolved circumstellar outflows. Upcoming terrestrial telescopes such as ALMA will increase the spatial resolution by several orders of magnitude and provide a wealth of data. The determination of relevant laboratory kinetics data is critical to keep up with the development of the observations and of the refinement of chemical models. Today, the majority of reactions studied in the laboratory are the ones involved in combustion and concerning light hydrocarbons. Our objective is to provide the scientific community with rate coefficients of reactions between abundant species in these warm environments. Cyanopolyynes from HC_2N to HC_9N have all been detected in carbon rich circumstellar envelopes in up to 10 sources for HC_3N. Neutral-neutral reactions of the CN radical with unsaturated hydrocarbons could be a dominant route in the formation of cyanopolyynes, even at low temperatures. Our approach aims to bridge the temperature gap between resistively heated flow tubes and shock tubes. The present kinetic measurements are obtained using a new reactor combining a high enthalpy source (Moudens et al. 2011) with a flow tube and a pulsed laser photolysis and laser induced fluorescence system to probe the undergoing chemical reactions. The high enthalpy flow tube has been used to measure the rate constant of the reaction of the CN radical with propane, propene

  15. Thermo effect of chemical reaction in irreversible electrochemical systems

    Tran Vinh Quy; Nguyen Tang

    1989-01-01

    From first law of thermodynamics the expressions of statistical calculation of 'Fundamental' and 'Thermo-chemical' thermal effects are obtained. Besides, method of calculation of thermal effect of chemical reactions in non-equilibrium electro-chemical systems is accurately discussed. (author). 7 refs

  16. The Dynamics of Chemical Reactions: Atomistic Visualizations of Organic Reactions, and Homage to van 't Hoff.

    Yang, Zhongyue; Houk, K N

    2018-03-15

    Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff was the first Nobel Laureate in Chemistry. He pioneered in the study of chemical dynamics, which referred at that time to chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. The term has evolved in modern times to refer to the exploration of chemical transformations in a time-resolved fashion. Chemical dynamics has been driven by the development of molecular dynamics trajectory simulations, which provide atomic visualization of chemical processes and illuminate how dynamic effects influence chemical reactivity and selectivity. In homage to the legend of van 't Hoff, we review the development of the chemical dynamics of organic reactions, our area of research. We then discuss our trajectory simulations of pericyclic reactions, and our development of dynamic criteria for concerted and stepwise reaction mechanisms. We also describe a method that we call environment-perturbed transition state sampling, which enables trajectory simulations in condensed-media using quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM). We apply the method to reactions in solvent and in enzyme. Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff (1852, Rotterdam-1911, Berlin) received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1901 "in recognition of the extraordinary services he has rendered by the discovery of the laws of chemical dynamics and osmotic pressure in solutions". van 't Hoff was born the Netherlands, and earned his doctorate in Utrecht in 1874. In 1896 he moved to Berlin, where he was offered a position with more research and less teaching. van 't Hoff is considered one of the founders of physical chemistry. A key step in establishing this new field was the start of Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie in 1887. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Using Equation-Free Computation to Accelerate Network-Free Stochastic Simulation of Chemical Kinetics.

    Lin, Yen Ting; Chylek, Lily A; Lemons, Nathan W; Hlavacek, William S

    2018-06-21

    The chemical kinetics of many complex systems can be concisely represented by reaction rules, which can be used to generate reaction events via a kinetic Monte Carlo method that has been termed network-free simulation. Here, we demonstrate accelerated network-free simulation through a novel approach to equation-free computation. In this process, variables are introduced that approximately capture system state. Derivatives of these variables are estimated using short bursts of exact stochastic simulation and finite differencing. The variables are then projected forward in time via a numerical integration scheme, after which a new exact stochastic simulation is initialized and the whole process repeats. The projection step increases efficiency by bypassing the firing of numerous individual reaction events. As we show, the projected variables may be defined as populations of building blocks of chemical species. The maximal number of connected molecules included in these building blocks determines the degree of approximation. Equation-free acceleration of network-free simulation is found to be both accurate and efficient.

  18. Invariant boxes and stability of some systems from biomathematics and chemical reactions

    Pavel, N.H.

    1984-08-01

    A general theorem on the flow-invariance of a time-dependent rectangular box with respect to a differential system is first recalled [''Analysis of some non-linear problems'' in Banach Spaces and Applications, Univ. of Iasi (Romania) (1982)]. Then a theorem applicable to the study of some differential systems from biomathematics and chemical reactions is given and proved. The theorem can be applied to enzymatic reactions, the chemical mechanism in the Belousov reaction, and the kinetic system for the chemical scheme of Hanusse of two processes with three intermediate species [in Pavel, N.H., Differential Equations, Flow-invariance and Applications, Pitman Publishing, Ltd., London (to appear)]. Next, the matrices A for which the corresponding linear system x'=Ax is component-wise positive asymptotically stable are characterized. In the Appendix a partial answer to an open problem regarding the preservation of both continuity and dissipativity in the extension of functions to a Banach space is given

  19. Reaction kinetics of oxygen on single-phase alloys, oxidation of nickel and niobium alloys

    Lalauze, Rene

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis first addresses the reaction kinetics of oxygen on alloys. It presents some generalities on heterogeneous reactions (conventional theory, theory of jumps), discusses the core reaction (with the influence of pressure), discusses the influence of metal self-diffusion on metal oxidation kinetics (equilibrium conditions at the interface, hybrid diffusion regime), reports the application of the hybrid diffusion model to the study of selective oxidation of alloys (Wagner model, hybrid diffusion model) and the study of the oxidation kinetics of an alloy forming a solid solution of two oxides. The second part reports the investigation of the oxidation of single phase nickel and niobium alloys (phase α, β and γ)

  20. An autonomous organic reaction search engine for chemical reactivity

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Henson, Alon B.; Granda, Jaroslaw M.; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-06-01

    The exploration of chemical space for new reactivity, reactions and molecules is limited by the need for separate work-up-separation steps searching for molecules rather than reactivity. Herein we present a system that can autonomously evaluate chemical reactivity within a network of 64 possible reaction combinations and aims for new reactivity, rather than a predefined set of targets. The robotic system combines chemical handling, in-line spectroscopy and real-time feedback and analysis with an algorithm that is able to distinguish and select the most reactive pathways, generating a reaction selection index (RSI) without need for separate work-up or purification steps. This allows the automatic navigation of a chemical network, leading to previously unreported molecules while needing only to do a fraction of the total possible reactions without any prior knowledge of the chemistry. We show the RSI correlates with reactivity and is able to search chemical space using the most reactive pathways.

  1. Chemical tailoring of teicoplanin with site-selective reactions.

    Pathak, Tejas P; Miller, Scott J

    2013-06-05

    Semisynthesis of natural product derivatives combines the power of fermentation with orthogonal chemical reactions. Yet, chemical modification of complex structures represents an unmet challenge, as poor selectivity often undermines efficiency. The complex antibiotic teicoplanin eradicates bacterial infections. However, as resistance emerges, the demand for improved analogues grows. We have discovered chemical reactions that achieve site-selective alteration of teicoplanin. Utilizing peptide-based additives that alter reaction selectivities, certain bromo-teicoplanins are accessible. These new compounds are also scaffolds for selective cross-coupling reactions, enabling further molecular diversification. These studies enable two-step access to glycopeptide analogues not available through either biosynthesis or rapid total chemical synthesis alone. The new compounds exhibit a spectrum of activities, revealing that selective chemical alteration of teicoplanin may lead to analogues with attenuated or enhanced antibacterial properties, in particular against vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant strains.

  2. Modular verification of chemical reaction network encodings via serializability analysis

    Lakin, Matthew R.; Stefanovic, Darko; Phillips, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reaction networks are a powerful means of specifying the intended behaviour of synthetic biochemical systems. A high-level formal specification, expressed as a chemical reaction network, may be compiled into a lower-level encoding, which can be directly implemented in wet chemistry and may itself be expressed as a chemical reaction network. Here we present conditions under which a lower-level encoding correctly emulates the sequential dynamics of a high-level chemical reaction network. We require that encodings are transactional, such that their execution is divided by a “commit reaction” that irreversibly separates the reactant-consuming phase of the encoding from the product-generating phase. We also impose restrictions on the sharing of species between reaction encodings, based on a notion of “extra tolerance”, which defines species that may be shared between encodings without enabling unwanted reactions. Our notion of correctness is serializability of interleaved reaction encodings, and if all reaction encodings satisfy our correctness properties then we can infer that the global dynamics of the system are correct. This allows us to infer correctness of any system constructed using verified encodings. As an example, we show how this approach may be used to verify two- and four-domain DNA strand displacement encodings of chemical reaction networks, and we generalize our result to the limit where the populations of helper species are unlimited. PMID:27325906

  3. Kinetics of reactions of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide

    Maksakov, V.A.; Ershova, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism of M(CO) 6 (M = Cr, Mo, W) reaction with hydroxylamine was studied. On the basis of kinetic data it was ascertained that as a result of the reaction CO oxidation to CO 2 and intramolecular transfer of amine formed to the central atom of metal occur. Mechanisms of M(CO) 6 reactions with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide are compared

  4. Acoustic wave propagation in fluids with coupled chemical reactions

    Margulies, T.S.; Schwarz, W.H.

    1984-08-01

    This investigation presents a hydroacoustic theory which accounts for sound absorption and dispersion in a multicomponent mixture of reacting fluids (assuming a set of first-order acoustic equations without diffusion) such that several coupled reactions can occur simultaneously. General results are obtained in the form of a biquadratic characteristic equation (called the Kirchhoff-Langevin equation) for the complex propagation variable chi = - (α + iω/c) in which α is the attenuation coefficient, c is the phase speed of the progressive wave and ω is the angular frequency. Computer simulations of sound absorption spectra have been made for three different chemical systems, each comprised of two-step chemical reactions using physico-chemical data available in the literature. The chemical systems studied include: (1) water-dioxane, (2) aqueous solutions of glycine and (3) cobalt polyphosphate mixtures. Explicit comparisons are made between the exact biquadratic characteristic solution and the approximate equation (sometimes referred to as a Debye equation) previously applied to interpret the experimental data for the chemical reaction contribution to the absorption versus frequency. The relative chemical reaction and classical viscothermal contributions to the sound absorption are also presented. Several discrepancies that can arise when estimating thermodynamic data (chemical reaction heats or volume changes) for multistep chemical reaction systems when making dilute solution or constant density assumptions are discussed

  5. Kinetics of chemical vapor deposition of boron on molybdenum

    Tanaka, H.; Nakanishi, N.; Kato, E.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental rate data of chemical vapor deposition of boron by reduction of boron trichloride with hydrogen are analyzed to determine the reaction mechanism. The experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure. The weight change of the sample was noted by means of a thermobalance. Molybdenum was used as the substrate. It has been found that the outer layer of the deposited film is Mo/sub 2/B/sub 5/ and the inner layer is MoB, and in the stational state of the reaction, the diffusion in the solid state is considered not to be rate controlling. When mass transport limitation was absent, the reaction orders with respect to boron trichloride and hydrogen were one third and one half, respectively. By comparing these orders with those obtained from Langmuir-Hinshelwood type equations, the rate controlling mechanism is identified to be the desorption of hydrogen chloride from the substrate

  6. Some current problems in atmospheric ozone chemistry; role of chemical kinetics

    Cox, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    A review is given on selected aspects of the reaction mechanisms of current interest in the chemistry of atmospheric ozone. Atmospheric ozone is produced and removed by a complex series of elementary gas-phase photochemical reactions involving O/sub x/, HO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, CIO/sub x/ and hydrocarbon species. At the present time there is a good knowledge of the basic processes involved in ozone chemistry in the stratosphere and the troposphere and the kinetics of most of the key reactions are well defined. There are a number of difficulties in the theoretical descriptions of observed ozone behaviour which may be due to uncertainties in the chemistry. Examples are the failure to predict present day ozone in the photochemically controlled region above 35 Km altitude and the large reductions in the ozone column in the Antartic Spring which has been observed in recent years. In the troposphere there is growing evidence that ozone and other trace gases have changed appreciably from pre-industrial concentrations, due to chemical reactions involving man-made pollutants. Quantitative investigation of the mechanisms by which these changes may occur requires a sound laboratory kinetics data base.

  7. The kinetics of dolomite reaction rim growth under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. G.; Abart, R.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    During burial and exhumation, rocks are simultaneously exposed to metamorphic reactions and tectonic stresses. Therefore, the reaction rate of newly formed minerals may depend on chemical and mechanical driving forces. Here, we investigate the reaction kinetics of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) rim growth by solid-state reactions experiments on oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions. Cylindrical samples of 3-5 mm length and 7 mm diameter were drilled and polished perpendicular to the rhombohedral cleavage planes of natural clear crystals. The tests were performed using a Paterson-type deformation apparatus at P = 400 MPa confining pressure, temperatures, T, between 750 and 850°C, and reaction durations, t, of 2 - 146 h to calculate the kinetic parameters of dolomite rim growth under isostatic stress conditions. For non-isostatic reaction experiments we applied in addition differential stresses, σ, up to 40 MPa perpendicular to the contact interface at T = 750°C for 4 - 171 h duration, initiating minor inelastic deformation of calcite. The thickness of the resulting dolomite reaction rims increases linearly with the square root of time, indicating a diffusion-controlled reaction. The rims consist of two different textural domains. Granular dolomite grains (≈ 2 -5 μm grain size) form next to calcite and elongated palisade-shaped grains (1-6 μm diameter) grow perpendicular to the magnesite interface. Texture measurements with the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicate that the orientations of dolomite grains are mainly influenced by the orientation of the calcite educt crystal, in particular in the granular rim. To some extent, the texture of dolomite palisades is also influenced by the orientation of magnesite. The thickness of the two individual layers increases with temperature. At 400 MPa isostatic pressure, T = 750°C and t = 29 hours, a 5 μm thick granular dolomite layer

  8. Coupling Effect between Mechanical Loading and Chemical Reactions

    Klika, Václav; Maršík, František

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 44 (2009), s. 14689-14697 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/08/0557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : coupling * dynamic loading * reaction kinetics Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 3.471, year: 2009

  9. Investigation of Evaluation method of chemical runaway reaction

    Sato, Yoshihiko; Sasaya, Shinji; Kurakata, Koichiro; Nojiri, Ichiro

    2002-02-01

    Safety study 'Study of evaluation of abnormal occurrence for chemical substances in the nuclear fuel facilities' will be carried out from 2001 to 2005. In this study, the prediction of thermal hazards of chemical substances will be investigated and prepared. The hazard prediction method of chemical substances will be constructed from these results. Therefore, the hazard prediction methods applied in the chemical engineering in which the chemical substances with the hazard of fire and explosion were often treated were investigated. CHETAH (The ASTM Computer Program for Chemical Thermodynamic and Energy Release Evaluation) developed by ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) and TSS (Thermal Safety Software) developed by CISP (ChemInform St. Petersburg) were introduced and the fire and explosion hazards of chemical substances and reactions in the reprocessing process were evaluated. From these evaluated results, CHETAH could almost estimate the heat of reaction at 10% accuracy. It was supposed that CHETAH was useful as a screening for the hazards of fire and explosion of the new chemical substances and so on. TSS could calculate the reaction rate and the reaction behavior from the data measured by the various calorimeters rapidly. It was supposed that TSS was useful as an evaluation method for the hazards of fire and explosion of the new chemical reactions and so on. (author)

  10. Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Nanocarbon: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics via in Situ Experimental Methods.

    Qi, Wei; Yan, Pengqiang; Su, Dang Sheng

    2018-03-20

    Sustainable and environmentally benign catalytic processes are vital for the future to supply the world population with clean energy and industrial products. The replacement of conventional metal or metal oxide catalysts with earth abundant and renewable nonmetallic materials has attracted considerable research interests in the field of catalysis and material science. The stable and efficient catalytic performance of nanocarbon materials was discovered at the end of last century, and these materials are considered as potential alternatives for conventional metal-based catalysts. With its rapid development in the past 20 years, the research field of carbon catalysis has been experiencing a smooth transition from the discovery of novel nanocarbon materials or related new reaction systems to the atomistic-level mechanistic understanding on the catalytic process and the subsequent rational design of the practical catalytic reaction systems. In this Account, we summarize the recent progress in the kinetic and mechanistic studies on nanocarbon catalyzed alkane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions. The paper attempts to extract general concepts and basic regularities for carbon catalytic process directing us on the way for rational design of novel efficient metal-free catalysts. The nature of the active sites for ODH reactions has been revealed through microcalorimetric analysis, ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement, and in situ chemical titration strategies. The detailed kinetic analysis and in situ catalyst structure characterization suggests that carbon catalyzed ODH reactions involve the redox cycles of the ketonic carbonyl-hydroxyl pairs, and the key physicochemical parameters (activation energy, reaction order, and rate/equilibrium constants, etc.) of the carbon catalytic systems are proposed and compared with conventional transition metal oxide catalysts. The proposal of the intrinsic catalytic activity (TOF) provides the

  11. The influence of gas–solid reaction kinetics in models of thermochemical heat storage under monotonic and cyclic loading

    Nagel, T.; Shao, H.; Roßkopf, C.; Linder, M.; Wörner, A.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Detailed analysis of cyclic and monotonic loading of thermochemical heat stores. • Fully coupled reactive heat and mass transport. • Reaction kinetics can be simplified in systems limited by heat transport. • Operating lines valid during monotonic and cyclic loading. • Local integral degree of conversion to capture heterogeneous material usage. - Abstract: Thermochemical reactions can be employed in heat storage devices. The choice of suitable reactive material pairs involves a thorough kinetic characterisation by, e.g., extensive thermogravimetric measurements. Before testing a material on a reactor level, simulations with models based on the Theory of Porous Media can be used to establish its suitability. The extent to which the accuracy of the kinetic model influences the results of such simulations is unknown yet fundamental to the validity of simulations based on chemical models of differing complexity. In this article we therefore compared simulation results on the reactor level based on an advanced kinetic characterisation of a calcium oxide/hydroxide system to those obtained by a simplified kinetic model. Since energy storage is often used for short term load buffering, the internal reactor behaviour is analysed under cyclic partial loading and unloading in addition to full monotonic charge/discharge operation. It was found that the predictions by both models were very similar qualitatively and quantitatively in terms of thermal power characteristics, conversion profiles, temperature output, reaction duration and pumping powers. Major differences were, however, observed for the reaction rate profiles themselves. We conclude that for systems not limited by kinetics the simplified model seems sufficient to estimate the reactor behaviour. The degree of material usage within the reactor was further shown to strongly vary under cyclic loading conditions and should be considered when designing systems for certain operating regimes

  12. Computational Analyses of Complex Flows with Chemical Reactions

    Bae, Kang-Sik

    The heat and mass transfer phenomena in micro-scale for the mass transfer phenomena on drug in cylindrical matrix system, the simulation of oxygen/drug diffusion in a three dimensional capillary network, and a reduced chemical kinetic modeling of gas turbine combustion for Jet propellant-10 have been studied numerically. For the numerical analysis of the mass transfer phenomena on drug in cylindrical matrix system, the governing equations are derived from the cylindrical matrix systems, Krogh cylinder model, which modeling system is comprised of a capillary to a surrounding cylinder tissue along with the arterial distance to veins. ADI (Alternative Direction Implicit) scheme and Thomas algorithm are applied to solve the nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). This study shows that the important factors which have an effect on the drug penetration depth to the tissue are the mass diffusivity and the consumption of relevant species during the time allowed for diffusion to the brain tissue. Also, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed to simulate the blood flow and oxygen/drug diffusion in a three dimensional capillary network, which are satisfied in the physiological range of a typical capillary. A three dimensional geometry has been constructed to replicate the one studied by Secomb et al. (2000), and the computational framework features a non-Newtonian viscosity model for blood, the oxygen transport model including in oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation and wall flux due to tissue absorption, as well as an ability to study the diffusion of drugs and other materials in the capillary streams. Finally, a chemical kinetic mechanism of JP-10 has been compiled and validated for a wide range of combustion regimes, covering pressures of 1atm to 40atm with temperature ranges of 1,200 K--1,700 K, which is being studied as a possible Jet propellant for the Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) and other high-speed flight applications such as hypersonic

  13. Chemical Reaction and Flow Modeling in Fullerene and Nanotube Production

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Greendyke, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of processes to produce fullerenes and carbon nanotubes has largely been empirical. Fullerenes were first discovered in the soot produced by laser ablation of graphite [1]and then in the soot of electric arc evaporated carbon. Techniques and conditions for producing larger and larger quantities of fullerenes depended mainly on trial and error empirical variations of these processes, with attempts to scale them up by using larger electrodes and targets and higher power. Various concepts of how fullerenes and carbon nanotubes were formed were put forth, but very little was done based on chemical kinetics of the reactions. This was mainly due to the complex mixture of species and complex nature of conditions in the reactors. Temperatures in the reactors varied from several thousand degrees Kelvin down to near room temperature. There are hundreds of species possible, ranging from atomic carbon to large clusters of carbonaceous soot, and metallic catalyst atoms to metal clusters, to complexes of metals and carbon. Most of the chemical kinetics of the reactions and the thermodynamic properties of clusters and complexes have only been approximated. In addition, flow conditions in the reactors are transient or unsteady, and three dimensional, with steep spatial gradients of temperature and species concentrations. All these factors make computational simulations of reactors very complex and challenging. This article addresses the development of the chemical reaction involved in fullerene production and extends this to production of carbon nanotubes by the laser ablation/oven process and by the electric arc evaporation process. In addition, the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process is discussed. The article is in several parts. The first one addresses the thermochemical aspects of modeling; and considers the development of chemical rate equations, estimates of reaction rates, and thermodynamic properties where they are available. The second part

  14. Formal balancing of chemical reaction networks

    van der Schaft, Abraham; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we recall and extend the main results of Van der Schaft, Rao, Jayawardhana (2015) concerning the use of Kirchhoff’s Matrix Tree theorem in the explicit characterization of complex-balanced reaction networks and the notion of formal balancing. The notion of formal balancing corresponds

  15. Simulation of chemical reactions using fractional derivatives

    Zabadal, J.; Vilhena, M.; Livotto, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this work a new approach to solve time-dependant Schroedinger equation for molecular systems is proposed. The method employs functional derivatives to describe the time evolution of the wave functions in reactive systems, in order to establish the mechanisms and products of the reaction. A numerical simulation is reported

  16. VULCAN: An Open-source, Validated Chemical Kinetics Python Code for Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Grosheintz, Luc; Kitzmann, Daniel; Heng, Kevin [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland); Lyons, James R. [Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Bateman Physical Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Rimmer, Paul B., E-mail: shang-min.tsai@space.unibe.ch, E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch, E-mail: jimlyons@asu.edu [University of St. Andrews, School of Physics and Astronomy, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-01

    We present an open-source and validated chemical kinetics code for studying hot exoplanetary atmospheres, which we name VULCAN. It is constructed for gaseous chemistry from 500 to 2500 K, using a reduced C–H–O chemical network with about 300 reactions. It uses eddy diffusion to mimic atmospheric dynamics and excludes photochemistry. We have provided a full description of the rate coefficients and thermodynamic data used. We validate VULCAN by reproducing chemical equilibrium and by comparing its output versus the disequilibrium-chemistry calculations of Moses et al. and Rimmer and Helling. It reproduces the models of HD 189733b and HD 209458b by Moses et al., which employ a network with nearly 1600 reactions. We also use VULCAN to examine the theoretical trends produced when the temperature–pressure profile and carbon-to-oxygen ratio are varied. Assisted by a sensitivity test designed to identify the key reactions responsible for producing a specific molecule, we revisit the quenching approximation and find that it is accurate for methane but breaks down for acetylene, because the disequilibrium abundance of acetylene is not directly determined by transport-induced quenching, but is rather indirectly controlled by the disequilibrium abundance of methane. Therefore we suggest that the quenching approximation should be used with caution and must always be checked against a chemical kinetics calculation. A one-dimensional model atmosphere with 100 layers, computed using VULCAN, typically takes several minutes to complete. VULCAN is part of the Exoclimes Simulation Platform (ESP; exoclime.net) and publicly available at https://github.com/exoclime/VULCAN.

  17. Student Research in Rocket and Plume-Reaction Kinetics

    Fontijn, Arthur

    1998-01-01

    Semi-empirical configuration interaction (SECI) theory has been extended to predict activation barriers for combustion reactions of boron group halide oxidation reactions, Good agreement with experiments has been obtained...

  18. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer in Chemical Reactions: A Mechanistic Tool for NMR Detection and Characterization of Transient Intermediates.

    Lokesh, N; Seegerer, Andreas; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2018-02-07

    The low sensitivity of NMR and transient key intermediates below detection limit are the central problems studying reaction mechanisms by NMR. Sensitivity can be enhanced by hyperpolarization techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization or the incorporation/interaction of special hyperpolarized molecules. However, all of these techniques require special equipment, are restricted to selective reactions, or undesirably influence the reaction pathways. Here, we apply the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) technique for the first time to NMR detect and characterize previously unobserved transient reaction intermediates in organocatalysis. The higher sensitivity of CEST and chemical equilibria present in the reaction pathway are exploited to access population and kinetics information on low populated intermediates. The potential of the method is demonstrated on the proline-catalyzed enamine formation for unprecedented in situ detection of a DPU stabilized zwitterionic iminium species, the elusive key intermediate between enamine and oxazolidinones. The quantitative analysis of CEST data at 250 K revealed the population ratio of [Z-iminium]/[exo-oxazolidinone] 0.02, relative free energy +8.1 kJ/mol (calculated +7.3 kJ/mol), and free energy barrier of +45.9 kJ/mol (ΔG ⧧ calc. (268 K) = +42.2 kJ/mol) for Z-iminium → exo-oxazolidinone. The findings underpin the iminium ion participation in enamine formation pathway corroborating our earlier theoretical prediction and help in better understanding. The reliability of CEST is validated using 1D EXSY-build-up techniques at low temperature (213 K). The CEST method thus serves as a new tool for mechanistic investigations in organocatalysis to access key information, such as chemical shifts, populations, and reaction kinetics of intermediates below the standard NMR detection limit.

  19. Kinetic Monte Carlo studies of the reaction kinetics of crystal defects that diffuse one-dimensionally with occasional transverse migration

    Heinisch, H.L.; Trinkaus, H.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    2007-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of the various species of mobile defects in irradiated materials are crucially dependent on the dimensionality of their migration. Sink strengths for one-dimensionally (1D) gliding interstitial loops undergoing occasional direction changes have been described analytically...

  20. A comprehensive iso-octane combustion model with improved thermochemistry and chemical kinetics

    Atef, Nour

    2017-02-05

    Iso-Octane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane) is a primary reference fuel and an important component of gasoline fuels. Moreover, it is a key component used in surrogates to study the ignition and burning characteristics of gasoline fuels. This paper presents an updated chemical kinetic model for iso-octane combustion. Specifically, the thermodynamic data and reaction kinetics of iso-octane have been re-assessed based on new thermodynamic group values and recently evaluated rate coefficients from the literature. The adopted rate coefficients were either experimentally measured or determined by analogy to theoretically calculated values. Furthermore, new alternative isomerization pathways for peroxy-alkyl hydroperoxide (ȮOQOOH) radicals were added to the reaction mechanism. The updated kinetic model was compared against new ignition delay data measured in rapid compression machines (RCM) and a high-pressure shock tube. These experiments were conducted at pressures of 20 and 40 atm, at equivalence ratios of 0.4 and 1.0, and at temperatures in the range of 632–1060 K. The updated model was further compared against shock tube ignition delay times, jet-stirred reactor oxidation speciation data, premixed laminar flame speeds, counterflow diffusion flame ignition, and shock tube pyrolysis speciation data available in the literature. Finally, the updated model was used to investigate the importance of alternative isomerization pathways in the low temperature oxidation of highly branched alkanes. When compared to available models in the literature, the present model represents the current state-of-the-art in fundamental thermochemistry and reaction kinetics of iso-octane; and thus provides the best prediction of wide ranging experimental data and fundamental insights into iso-octane combustion chemistry.

  1. Theory of First Order Chemical Kinetics at the Critical Point of Solution.

    Baird, James K; Lang, Joshua R

    2017-10-26

    Liquid mixtures, which have a phase diagram exhibiting a miscibility gap ending in a critical point of solution, have been used as solvents for chemical reactions. The reaction rate in the forward direction has often been observed to slow down as a function of temperature in the critical region. Theories based upon the Gibbs free energy of reaction as the driving force for chemical change have been invoked to explain this behavior. With the assumption that the reaction is proceeding under relaxation conditions, these theories expand the free energy in a Taylor series about the position of equilibrium. Since the free energy is zero at equilibrium, the leading term in the Taylor series is proportional to the first derivative of the free energy with respect to the extent of reaction. To analyze the critical behavior of this derivative, the theories exploit the principle of critical point isomorphism, which is thought to govern all critical phenomena. They find that the derivative goes to zero in the critical region, which accounts for the slowing down observed in the reaction rate. As has been pointed out, however, most experimental rate investigations have been carried out under irreversible conditions as opposed to relaxation conditions [Shen et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 8784-8791]. Below, we consider a reaction governed by first order kinetics and invoke transition state theory to take into account the irreversible conditions. We express the apparent activation energy in terms of thermodynamic derivatives evaluated under standard conditions as well as the pseudoequilibrium conditions associated with the reactant and the activated complex. We show that these derivatives approach infinity in the critical region. The apparent activation energy follows this behavior, and its divergence accounts for the slowing down of the reaction rate.

  2. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-01-01

    the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized

  3. Vibrationally Excited Carbon Monoxide Produced via a Chemical Reaction Between Carbon Vapor and Oxygen

    Jans, Elijah R.; Eckert, Zakari; Frederickson, Kraig; Rich, Bill; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of the vibrational distribution function of carbon monoxide produced via a reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen has shown a total population inversion on vibrational levels 4-7. Carbon vapor, produced using an arc discharge to sublimate graphite, is mixed with an argon oxygen flow. The excited carbon monoxide is vibrationally populated up to level v=14, at low temperatures, T=400-450 K, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr, with total population inversions between v=4-7. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of the reaction enthalpy. Kinetic modeling of the flow reactor, including state specific vibrational processes, was performed to infer the vibrational distribution of the products of the reaction. The results show viability of developing of a new chemical CO laser from the reaction of carbon vapor and oxygen.

  4. Modeling Ignition of a Heptane Isomer: Improved Thermodynamics, Reaction Pathways, Kinetic, and Rate Rule Optimizations for 2-Methylhexane

    Mohamed, Samah; Cai, Liming; Khaled, Fathi; Banyon, Colin; Wang, Zhandong; Rachidi, Mariam El; Pitsch, Heinz; Curran, Henry J.; Farooq, Aamir; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important to investigate the combustion behavior of real fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracies in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and the kinetic reaction mechanism for a gasoline surrogate component, 2-methylhexane, based on recently published thermodynamic group values and rate rules derived from quantum calculations and experiments. Alternative pathways for the isomerization of peroxy-alkylhydroperoxide (OOQOOH) radicals are also investigated. The effects of these updates are compared against new high-pressure shock tube and rapid compression machine ignition delay measurements. It is shown that rate constant modifications are required to improve agreement between kinetic modeling simulations and experimental data. We further demonstrate the ability to optimize the kinetic model using both manual and automated techniques for rate parameter tunings to improve agreement with the measured ignition delay time data. Finally, additional low temperature chain branching reaction pathways are shown to improve the model’s performance. The present approach to model development provides better performance across extended operating conditions while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  5. Modeling Ignition of a Heptane Isomer: Improved Thermodynamics, Reaction Pathways, Kinetic, and Rate Rule Optimizations for 2-Methylhexane

    Mohamed, Samah

    2016-03-21

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important to investigate the combustion behavior of real fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracies in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and the kinetic reaction mechanism for a gasoline surrogate component, 2-methylhexane, based on recently published thermodynamic group values and rate rules derived from quantum calculations and experiments. Alternative pathways for the isomerization of peroxy-alkylhydroperoxide (OOQOOH) radicals are also investigated. The effects of these updates are compared against new high-pressure shock tube and rapid compression machine ignition delay measurements. It is shown that rate constant modifications are required to improve agreement between kinetic modeling simulations and experimental data. We further demonstrate the ability to optimize the kinetic model using both manual and automated techniques for rate parameter tunings to improve agreement with the measured ignition delay time data. Finally, additional low temperature chain branching reaction pathways are shown to improve the model’s performance. The present approach to model development provides better performance across extended operating conditions while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  6. A kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction is proposed based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. Special attention was paid to reactants, intermediates and end products: -fructose, N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG), 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose and

  7. Indistinguishability and identifiability of kinetic models for the MurC reaction in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    Hattersley, J G; Pérez-Velázquez, J; Chappell, M J; Bearup, D; Roper, D; Dowson, C; Bugg, T; Evans, N D

    2011-11-01

    An important question in Systems Biology is the design of experiments that enable discrimination between two (or more) competing chemical pathway models or biological mechanisms. In this paper analysis is performed between two different models describing the kinetic mechanism of a three-substrate three-product reaction, namely the MurC reaction in the cytoplasmic phase of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. One model involves ordered substrate binding and ordered release of the three products; the competing model also assumes ordered substrate binding, but with fast release of the three products. The two versions are shown to be distinguishable; however, if standard quasi-steady-state assumptions are made distinguishability cannot be determined. Once model structure uniqueness is ensured the experimenter must determine if it is possible to successfully recover rate constant values given the experiment observations, a process known as structural identifiability. Structural identifiability analysis is carried out for both models to determine which of the unknown reaction parameters can be determined uniquely, or otherwise, from the ideal system outputs. This structural analysis forms an integrated step towards the modelling of the full pathway of the cytoplasmic phase of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nucleic Acid Templated Reactions for Chemical Biology.

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Seitz, Oliver

    2017-06-21

    Nucleic acid directed bioorthogonal reactions offer the fascinating opportunity to unveil and redirect a plethora of intracellular mechanisms. Nano- to picomolar amounts of specific RNA molecules serve as templates and catalyze the selective formation of molecules that 1) exert biological effects, or 2) provide measurable signals for RNA detection. Turnover of reactants on the template is a valuable asset when concentrations of RNA templates are low. The idea is to use RNA-templated reactions to fully control the biodistribution of drugs and to push the detection limits of DNA or RNA analytes to extraordinary sensitivities. Herein we review recent and instructive examples of conditional synthesis or release of compounds for in cellulo protein interference and intracellular nucleic acid imaging. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  9. Sintering with a chemical reaction as applied to uranium monocarbide

    Accary, A.; Caillat, R.

    1960-01-01

    The present paper provides a survey of different investigations whose aim was the preparation and fabrication of uranium monocarbide for nuclear use. If a chemical reaction takes place in the sample during the sintering operation, it may be expected that the atom rearrangements involved in this reaction should favour the sintering process and thereby lower the temperature needed to yield a body of a given density. With this hypothesis in mind, the following methods have been studied: - Sintering of U-C mixtures; - Sintering of UO 2 -C mixtures; - Hot pressing of U-C mixtures; - Extrusion of U-C mixtures. To generalize our result, it could be said that a chemical reaction does not lead to high densification, if one depends on a simple contact between discrete particles. On the contrary, a chemical reaction can help sintering if, as our hot pressing experiments shows, the densification can be achieved prior to the reaction. (author) [fr

  10. A kinetic study on non-catalytic reactions in hydroprocessing Boscan crude oil

    A. Marafi; E. Kam; A. Stanislaus [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait). Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center

    2008-08-15

    Non-catalytic hydrothermal cracking reactions are known to associate with catalytic hydrocracking reactions. In a recent study on hydroprocessing of Boscan crude over a specific catalyst system containing three distinct catalysts, it was found that hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallation (HDM) reactions continued even when the catalyst is severely deactivated. Since the reactor was packed with considerable amount of inert material besides the three catalysts, it will be advantage to determine if the inert materials can also facilitate hydroprocessing reactions. A series of kinetic experiments for the inert particles was undertaken under different space velocity and temperature conditions. The extent of catalytic and non-catalytic hydroprocessing reactions was assessed. Through statistical analysis, the initial reaction rate constant, reaction order and activation energy for various hydroprocessing reactions were then determined. The absolute average deviations (AAD) of the kinetics values obtained for inert materials are less than 10%. 25 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. A chemical reaction in the movie The Ten Commandments

    López Pérez, José Pedro;

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of natural sciences in the second year of Secondary Education must be complemented with a visit to the laboratory, where experiments should be permormed. The curriculum emphasizes the initial basis of Chemistry and the study of reactions. In this paper we describe a laboratory experience, useful for understanding the concept of chemical change. Also, we present the hypothesis that a chemical reaction was used in the classic movie The Ten Commandments.

  12. Quantum chemical approach to estimating the thermodynamics of metabolic reactions.

    Jinich, Adrian; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Dunn, Ian; Sanchez-Lengeling, Benjamin; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Noor, Elad; Even, Arren Bar; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-11-12

    Thermodynamics plays an increasingly important role in modeling and engineering metabolism. We present the first nonempirical computational method for estimating standard Gibbs reaction energies of metabolic reactions based on quantum chemistry, which can help fill in the gaps in the existing thermodynamic data. When applied to a test set of reactions from core metabolism, the quantum chemical approach is comparable in accuracy to group contribution methods for isomerization and group transfer reactions and for reactions not including multiply charged anions. The errors in standard Gibbs reaction energy estimates are correlated with the charges of the participating molecules. The quantum chemical approach is amenable to systematic improvements and holds potential for providing thermodynamic data for all of metabolism.

  13. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  14. Chemical Reactions in Turbulent Mixing Flows

    1992-07-01

    Chemically-Reacting, Gas-Phase Turbulent Jets (Gilbrech 1991), that explored Reynolds number effects on turbulent flame length and the influence of...and asymptotes to a constant value beyond the flame tip. The main result of the work is that the flame length , as estimated from the temperature...8217. Specifically, the normalized flame length Lf/d* displays a linear dependence on the stoichiometric mixture ratio 0, with a slope that decreases from Re "• 1.0

  15. A Study of Interactions between Mixing and Chemical Reaction Using the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Method

    Hadi, Fatemeh; Janbozorgi, Mohammad; Sheikhi, M. Reza H.; Metghalchi, Hameed

    2016-10-01

    The rate-controlled constrained-equilibrium (RCCE) method is employed to study the interactions between mixing and chemical reaction. Considering that mixing can influence the RCCE state, the key objective is to assess the accuracy and numerical performance of the method in simulations involving both reaction and mixing. The RCCE formulation includes rate equations for constraint potentials, density and temperature, which allows taking account of mixing alongside chemical reaction without splitting. The RCCE is a dimension reduction method for chemical kinetics based on thermodynamics laws. It describes the time evolution of reacting systems using a series of constrained-equilibrium states determined by RCCE constraints. The full chemical composition at each state is obtained by maximizing the entropy subject to the instantaneous values of the constraints. The RCCE is applied to a spatially homogeneous constant pressure partially stirred reactor (PaSR) involving methane combustion in oxygen. Simulations are carried out over a wide range of initial temperatures and equivalence ratios. The chemical kinetics, comprised of 29 species and 133 reaction steps, is represented by 12 RCCE constraints. The RCCE predictions are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the same kinetics, termed detailed kinetics model (DKM). The RCCE shows accurate prediction of combustion in PaSR with different mixing intensities. The method also demonstrates reduced numerical stiffness and overall computational cost compared to DKM.

  16. Kinetic study of the dehydration reaction of lithium sulfate monohydrate crystals using microscopy and modeling

    Lan, Shuiquan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Zondag, Herbert [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Energy research Center of the Netherlands – ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Steenhoven, Anton van [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rindt, Camilo, E-mail: c.c.m.rindt@tue.nl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-12-10

    Highlights: • Kinetics of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O single crystals were modeled based on elementary processes. • Kinetics of nucleation and nuclei growth were studied by using optical microscopy. • A novel experiment was designed to visualize the reaction front into crystal bulk. • Fractional conversion was calculated and compared with TGA-experiments. - Abstract: Simulation of gas–solid reactions occurring in industrial processes requires a robust kinetic model to be applicable in a wide range of complicated reaction conditions. However, in literature it is often seen that even the same reaction under specific controlled conditions is interpreted with different kinetic models. In the present work, a phenomenological model based on nucleation and nuclei growth processes is presented to study the kinetics of the dehydration reaction of lithium sulfate monohydrate single crystals. The two elementary processes of the reaction, nucleation and nuclei growth, are characterized and quantified as a function of temperature by using optical microscopy experiments. The in-situ measured characteristics of the dehydration reaction provided confirmatory evidence that the rate of nucleation obeys an exponential law and the rate of nuclei growth is approximately constant. With knowledge acquired from the optical observations as inputs of the kinetic model, the fractional conversion of the dehydration reaction was calculated and compared with experimental results from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). A satisfactory comparison was found both in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. It is demonstrated that this knowledge-based model has a great potential to represent the gas–solid reaction kinetics in a wide range of process conditions regarding temperature, pressure and particle geometry.

  17. Mass transfer with chemical reaction in multiphase systems

    Alper, E.

    1983-01-01

    These volumes deal with the phenomenon of 'mass transfer with chemical reaction' which is of industrial, biological and physiological importance. In process engineering, it is encountered both in separation processes and in reaction engineering and both aspects are covered here in four sections: introduction; gas-liquid system; liquid-liquid system; and gas-liquid-solid system

  18. The Heck reaction in the production of fine chemicals

    Vries, Johannes G. de

    2001-01-01

    An overview is given of the use of the Heck reaction for the production of fine chemicals. Five commercial products have been identified that are produced on a scale in excess of 1 ton/year. The herbicide Prosulfuron™ is produced via a Matsuda reaction of 2-sulfonatobenzenediazonium on

  19. Raman Spectral Determination of Chemical Reaction Rate Characteristics

    Balakhnina, I. A.; Brandt, N. N.; Mankova, A. A.; Chikishev, A. Yu.; Shpachenko, I. G.

    2017-09-01

    The feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy to determine chemical reaction rates and activation energies has been demonstrated for the saponification of ethyl acetate. The temperature dependence of the reaction rate was found in the range from 15 to 45°C.

  20. An optimized chemical kinetic mechanism for HCCI combustion of PRFs using multi-zone model and genetic algorithm

    Neshat, Elaheh; Saray, Rahim Khoshbakhti

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new chemical kinetic mechanism for PRFs HCCI combustion is developed. • New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. • Engine-related combustion and performance parameters are predicted accurately. • Engine unburned HC and CO emissions are predicted by the model properly. - Abstract: Development of comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms is required for HCCI combustion and emissions prediction to be used in engine development. The main purpose of this study is development of a new chemical kinetic mechanism for primary reference fuels (PRFs) HCCI combustion, which can be applied to combustion models to predict in-cylinder pressure and exhaust CO and UHC emissions, accurately. Hence, a multi-zone model is developed for HCCI engine simulation. Two semi-detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms those are suitable for premixed combustion are used for n-heptane and iso-octane HCCI combustion simulation. The iso-octane mechanism contains 84 species and 484 reactions and the n-heptane mechanism contains 57 species and 296 reactions. A simple interaction between iso-octane and n-heptane is considered in new mechanism. The multi-zone model is validated using experimental data for pure n-heptane and iso-octane. A new mechanism is prepared by combination of these two mechanisms for n-heptane and iso-octane blended fuel, which includes 101 species and 594 reactions. New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. Mechanism contains low temperature heat release region, which decreases with increasing octane number. The results showed that the optimized chemical kinetic mechanism is capable of predicting engine-related combustion and performance parameters. Also after implementing the optimized mechanism, engine unburned HC and CO emissions predicted by the model are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data

  1. Modelling of chemical reactions in metallurgical processes

    Kinaci, M. Efe; Lichtenegger, Thomas; Schneiderbauer, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Iron-ore reduction has attracted much interest in the last three decades since it can be considered as a core process in steel industry. The iron-ore is reduced to iron with the use of blast furnace and fluidized bed technologies. To investigate the harsh conditions inside fluidized bed reactors, computational tools can be utilized. One such tool is the CFD-DEM method, in which the gas phase reactions and governing equations are calculated in the Eulerian (CFD) side, whereas the particle reac...

  2. Process and kinetics of the fundamental radiation-electrochemical reactions in the primary coolant loop of nuclear reactors

    Kozomara-Maic, S.

    1987-06-01

    In spite of the rather broad title of this report, its major part is devoted to the corrosion problems at the RA reactor, i.e. causes and consequences of the reactor shutdown in 1979 and 1982. Some problems of reactor chemistry are pointed out because they are significant for future reactor operation. The final conclusion of this report is that corrosion processes in the primary coolant circuit of the nuclear reactor are specific and that radiation effects cannot be excluded when processes and reaction kinetics are investigated. Knowledge about the kinetics of all the chemical reactions occurring in the primary coolant loop are of crucial significance for safe and economical reactor operation [sr

  3. Quantum Chemical Approach to Estimating the Thermodynamics of Metabolic Reactions

    Adrian Jinich; Dmitrij Rappoport; Ian Dunn; Benjamin Sanchez-Lengeling; Roberto Olivares-Amaya; Elad Noor; Arren Bar Even; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics plays an increasingly important role in modeling and engineering metabolism. We present the first nonempirical computational method for estimating standard Gibbs reaction energies of metabolic reactions based on quantum chemistry, which can help fill in the gaps in the existing thermodynamic data. When applied to a test set of reactions from core metabolism, the quantum chemical approach is comparable in accuracy to group contribution methods for isomerization and group transfe...

  4. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict and Invent Reactions.

    Segler, Marwin H S; Waller, Mark P

    2017-05-02

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows organic chemists to solve synthetic problems and invent novel transformations. Herein, we propose a model that mimics chemical reasoning, and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outperforms a rule-based expert system in the reaction prediction task for 180 000 randomly selected binary reactions. The data-driven model generalises even beyond known reaction types, and is thus capable of effectively (re-)discovering novel transformations (even including transition metal-catalysed reactions). Our model enables computers to infer hypotheses about reactivity and reactions by only considering the intrinsic local structure of the graph and because each single reaction prediction is typically achieved in a sub-second time frame, the model can be used as a high-throughput generator of reaction hypotheses for reaction discovery. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. General theory of the multistage geminate reactions of the isolated pairs of reactants. II. Detailed balance and universal asymptotes of kinetics.

    Kipriyanov, Alexey A; Doktorov, Alexander B

    2014-10-14

    The analysis of general (matrix) kinetic equations for the mean survival probabilities of any of the species in a sample (or mean concentrations) has been made for a wide class of the multistage geminate reactions of the isolated pairs. These kinetic equations (obtained in the frame of the kinetic approach based on the concept of "effective" particles in Paper I) take into account various possible elementary reactions (stages of a multistage reaction) excluding monomolecular, but including physical and chemical processes of the change in internal quantum states carried out with the isolated pairs of reactants (or isolated reactants). The general basic principles of total and detailed balance have been established. The behavior of the reacting system has been considered on macroscopic time scales, and the universal long-term kinetics has been determined.

  6. The importance of variables and parameters in radiolytic chemical kinetics modeling

    Piepho, M.G.; Turner, P.J.; Reimus, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    Many of the pertinent radiochemical reactions are not completely understood, and most of the associated rate constants are poorly characterized. To help identify the important radiochemical reactions, rate constants, species, and environmental conditions, an importance theory code, SWATS (Sensitivitiy With Adjoint Theory-Sparse version)-LOOPCHEM, has been developed for the radiolytic chemical kinetics model in the radiolysis code LOOPCHEM. The LOOPCHEM code calculates the concentrations of various species in a radiolytic field over time. The SWATS-LOOPCHEM code efficiently calculates: the importance (relative to a defined response of interest) of each species concentration over time, the sensitivity of each parameter of interest, and the importance of each equation in the radiolysis model. The calculated results will be used to guide future experimental and modeling work for determining the importance of radiolysis on waste package performance. A demonstration (the importance of selected concentrations and the sensitivities of selected parameters) of the SWATS-LOOPCHEM code is provided for illustrative purposes

  7. Microsecond reaction kinetics and catalytic mechanism of bacterial cytochrome oxidases

    Paulus, A.

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental biochemical research is of crucial importance for a complete and detailed
    understanding of what drives enzyme activity and how enzyme kinetic properties are
    optimized towards survival of the host organism. When cells fail to produce a fully functional
    enzyme, the organism’s

  8. Use of Competition Kinetics with Fast Reactions of Grignard Reagents

    Holm, Torkil

    2000-01-01

    small.This is concluded from experiments in which results obtained by competition kinetics are compared with results obtained directly by flow stream procedures. A clearer picture of the reactivity ratios is obtained when the highly reactive reagent is highly diluted with its competitor. A fast reagent...

  9. The effects of one-dimensional glide on the reaction kinetics of interstitial clusters

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.; Golubov, S.I.

    2000-01-01

    is therefore 'mixed 1D/3D migration' along a 3D path consisting of 1D segments, The defect reaction kinetics under mixed 1D/3D diffusion are different from pure 1D diffusion and pure 3D diffusion, both of which can be formulated within analytical rate theory models of microstructure evolution under irradiation....... Atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) defect migration simulations are used to investigate the effects of mixed 1D/3D migration on defect reaction kinetics as a guide for implementing mixed 1D/3D migration into the analytical rate theory. The functional dependence of the sink strength on the size...

  10. Kinetic isotope effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of tritium-labelled D-galactosamine

    Akulov, G.P.; Korsakova, N.A.

    1992-01-01

    Primary, secondary and intramolecular kinetic isotopic effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of D-galactosamine labelled by tritium in position 6, were measured. When comparing values of the effects with previously obtained results for similar reaction D-[6- 3 H]galactose, it was ascertained that the presence of aminogroup in galactopyranosyl mainly affects kinetics of substrate-ferment complex formation stage. The possibility to use kinetic isotope effects for increase in molar activity of D-galactosamine, labelled by tritium in position 6, is shown

  11. Results of the 2010 Survey on Teaching Chemical Reaction Engineering

    Silverstein, David L.; Vigeant, Margot A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of faculty teaching the chemical reaction engineering course or sequence during the 2009-2010 academic year at chemical engineering programs in the United States and Canada reveals change in terms of content, timing, and approaches to teaching. The report consists of two parts: first, a statistical and demographic characterization of the…

  12. On the network thermodynamics of mass action chemical reaction networks

    Schaft, A.J. van der; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    In this paper we elaborate on the mathematical formulation of mass action chemical reaction networks as recently given in van der Schaft, Rao, Jayawardhana (2012). We show how the reference chemical potentials define a specific thermodynamical equilibrium, and we discuss the port-Hamiltonian

  13. Mass transfer rate through liquid membranes: interfacial chemical reactions and diffusion as simultaneous permeability controlling factors

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Chiarizia, R.

    1981-01-01

    Equations describing the permeability of a liquid membrane to metal cations have been derived taking into account aqueous diffusion, membrane diffusion, and interfacial chemical reactions as simultaneous permeability controlling factors. Diffusion and chemical reactions have been coupled by a simple model analogous to the one previously described by us to represent liquid-liquid extraction kinetics. The derived equations, which make use of experimentally determined interfacial reaction mechanisms, qualitatively fit unexplained literature data regarding Cu 2+ transfer through liquid membranes. Their use to predict and optimize membrane permeability in practical separation processes by setting the appropriate concentration of the membrane carrier [LIX 64 (General Mills), a commercial β-hydroxy-oxime] and the pH of the aqueous copper feed solution is briefly discussed. 4 figures

  14. Computational prediction of chemical reactions: current status and outlook.

    Engkvist, Ola; Norrby, Per-Ola; Selmi, Nidhal; Lam, Yu-Hong; Peng, Zhengwei; Sherer, Edward C; Amberg, Willi; Erhard, Thomas; Smyth, Lynette A

    2018-06-01

    Over the past few decades, various computational methods have become increasingly important for discovering and developing novel drugs. Computational prediction of chemical reactions is a key part of an efficient drug discovery process. In this review, we discuss important parts of this field, with a focus on utilizing reaction data to build predictive models, the existing programs for synthesis prediction, and usage of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) to explore chemical reactions. We also outline potential future developments with an emphasis on pre-competitive collaboration opportunities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. On the Complexity of Reconstructing Chemical Reaction Networks

    Fagerberg, Rolf; Flamm, Christoph; Merkle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the structure of chemical reaction networks is crucial for a better understanding of chemical processes. Such networks are well described as hypergraphs. However, due to the available methods, analyses regarding network properties are typically made on standard graphs derived from...... the full hypergraph description, e.g. on the so-called species and reaction graphs. However, a reconstruction of the underlying hypergraph from these graphs is not necessarily unique. In this paper, we address the problem of reconstructing a hypergraph from its species and reaction graph and show NP...

  16. An effective rate equation approach to reaction kinetics in small volumes: theory and application to biochemical reactions in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions.

    Grima, R

    2010-07-21

    Chemical master equations provide a mathematical description of stochastic reaction kinetics in well-mixed conditions. They are a valid description over length scales that are larger than the reactive mean free path and thus describe kinetics in compartments of mesoscopic and macroscopic dimensions. The trajectories of the stochastic chemical processes described by the master equation can be ensemble-averaged to obtain the average number density of chemical species, i.e., the true concentration, at any spatial scale of interest. For macroscopic volumes, the true concentration is very well approximated by the solution of the corresponding deterministic and macroscopic rate equations, i.e., the macroscopic concentration. However, this equivalence breaks down for mesoscopic volumes. These deviations are particularly significant for open systems and cannot be calculated via the Fokker-Planck or linear-noise approximations of the master equation. We utilize the system-size expansion including terms of the order of Omega(-1/2) to derive a set of differential equations whose solution approximates the true concentration as given by the master equation. These equations are valid in any open or closed chemical reaction network and at both the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. In the limit of large volumes, the effective mesoscopic rate equations become precisely equal to the conventional macroscopic rate equations. We compare the three formalisms of effective mesoscopic rate equations, conventional rate equations, and chemical master equations by applying them to several biochemical reaction systems (homodimeric and heterodimeric protein-protein interactions, series of sequential enzyme reactions, and positive feedback loops) in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions. In all cases, we find that the effective mesoscopic rate equations can predict very well the true concentration of a chemical species. This provides a useful method by which one can quickly determine the

  17. Kinetic modelling of reactions in heated disaccharide-casein systems

    Brands, C.M.J.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    The reactions occurring in disaccharide-casein reaction mixtures during heating at 120 degreesC and pH 6.8 were studied. The existence of two main degradation routes were established: (1) Isomerisation of the aldose sugars lactose and maltose in their ketose isomers lactulose and maltulose,

  18. Use of radioactive tracers in chemical reactions

    Paci, B.; Saiki, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the determination of small quantities of nickel by using radioactive tracers is presented. An analytical application of the displacement reaction between and zinc-ethylenediaminetetraacetate, (Zn-EDTA), labelled with 65 Zn is investigated. This method is based on the extraction of radioactive zinc, displaced by nickel from the zinc chelate, into a dithizone-carbon tetrachloride solution and the subsequent measurement of the activity of an aliquot of the extract. It is shown that the method is very sentitive and nickel can be measured in concentrations as small as 0,1μg/ml or even less, depending on the specific activity of the radioreagent used. The precision and accuracy of the method are determined. An attempt to eliminate the problem of interference by using masking agents or by means of a previous separation of nickel and other interfereing metals, is also made. (Author) [pt

  19. Imaging chemical reactions - 3D velocity mapping

    Chichinin, A. I.; Gericke, K.-H.; Kauczok, S.; Maul, C.

    Visualising a collision between an atom or a molecule or a photodissociation (half-collision) of a molecule on a single particle and single quantum level is like watching the collision of billiard balls on a pool table: Molecular beams or monoenergetic photodissociation products provide the colliding reactants at controlled velocity before the reaction products velocity is imaged directly with an elaborate camera system, where one should keep in mind that velocity is, in general, a three-dimensional (3D) vectorial property which combines scattering angles and speed. If the processes under study have no cylindrical symmetry, then only this 3D product velocity vector contains the full information of the elementary process under study.

  20. Use of radioactive tracers in chemical reactions

    Paci, B.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the determination of small quantities of nickel using radioactive tracers is presented. An analytical application of the displacement reaction between nickel and zinc ethylenediaminetetraacetate labeled with zinc-65 is pursued. This method is based on the extraction of radioactive zinc displaced by nickel from the zinc chelate into a dithizone-carbon tetracloride solution and the subsequent measurement of the activity of an aliquot of the extract. The method is very sensitive and nickel can be measured in concentrations as small as 0.1μg/ml or even less, depending on the specific activity of the radioreagent used. The precision and the accuracy of the method are determined. The problem of interferences, trying to eliminate them by using masking agents or by means of a previous separation between nickel and other interfering metals, is also investigated [pt

  1. Heterogeneously Catalysed Chemical Reactions in Carbon Dioxide Medium

    Musko, Nikolai E.

    In this PhD-study the different areas of chemical engineering, heterogeneous catalysis, supercritical fluids, and phase equilibrium thermodynamics have been brought together for selected reactions. To exploit the beneficial properties of supercritical fluids in heterogeneous catalysis, experimental...... studies of catalytic chemical reactions in dense and supercritical carbon dioxide have been complemented by the theoretical calculations of phase equilibria using advanced thermodynamic models. In the recent years, the use of compressed carbon dioxide as innovative, non-toxic and non-flammable, cheap......, and widely available reaction medium for many practical and industrial applications has drastically increased. Particularly attractive are heterogeneously catalysed chemical reactions. The beneficial use of CO2 is attributed to its unique properties at dense and supercritical states (at temperatures...

  2. SABIO-RK: A data warehouse for biochemical reactions and their kinetics

    Krebs Olga

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology is an emerging field that aims at obtaining a system-level understanding of biological processes. The modelling and simulation of networks of biochemical reactions have great and promising application potential but require reliable kinetic data. In order to support the systems biology community with such data we have developed SABIO-RK (System for the Analysis of Biochemical Pathways - Reaction Kinetics, a curated database with information about biochemical reactions and their kinetic properties, which allows researchers to obtain and compare kinetic data and to integrate them into models of biochemical networks. SABIO-RK is freely available for academic use at http://sabio.villa-bosch.de/SABIORK/.

  3. Kinetics of subdiffusion-assisted reactions: non-Markovian stochastic Liouville equation approach

    Shushin, A I

    2005-01-01

    Anomalous specific features of the kinetics of subdiffusion-assisted bimolecular reactions (time-dependence, dependence on parameters of systems, etc) are analysed in detail with the use of the non-Markovian stochastic Liouville equation (SLE), which has been recently derived within the continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) approach. In the CTRW approach, subdiffusive motion of particles is modelled by jumps whose onset probability distribution function is of a long-tailed form. The non-Markovian SLE allows for rigorous describing of some peculiarities of these reactions; for example, very slow long-time behaviour of the kinetics, non-analytical dependence of the reaction rate on the reactivity of particles, strong manifestation of fluctuation kinetics showing itself in very slowly decreasing behaviour of the kinetics at very long times, etc

  4. ReactionMap: an efficient atom-mapping algorithm for chemical reactions.

    Fooshee, David; Andronico, Alessio; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-11-25

    Large databases of chemical reactions provide new data-mining opportunities and challenges. Key challenges result from the imperfect quality of the data and the fact that many of these reactions are not properly balanced or atom-mapped. Here, we describe ReactionMap, an efficient atom-mapping algorithm. Our approach uses a combination of maximum common chemical subgraph search and minimization of an assignment cost function derived empirically from training data. We use a set of over 259,000 balanced atom-mapped reactions from the SPRESI commercial database to train the system, and we validate it on random sets of 1000 and 17,996 reactions sampled from this pool. These large test sets represent a broad range of chemical reaction types, and ReactionMap correctly maps about 99% of the atoms and about 96% of the reactions, with a mean time per mapping of 2 s. Most correctly mapped reactions are mapped with high confidence. Mapping accuracy compares favorably with ChemAxon's AutoMapper, versions 5 and 6.1, and the DREAM Web tool. These approaches correctly map 60.7%, 86.5%, and 90.3% of the reactions, respectively, on the same data set. A ReactionMap server is available on the ChemDB Web portal at http://cdb.ics.uci.edu .

  5. Integration of large chemical kinetic mechanisms via exponential methods with Krylov approximations to Jacobian matrix functions

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2012-06-01

    Recent trends in hydrocarbon fuel research indicate that the number of species and reactions in chemical kinetic mechanisms is rapidly increasing in an effort to provide predictive capabilities for fuels of practical interest. In order to cope with the computational cost associated with the time integration of stiff, large chemical systems, a novel approach is proposed. The approach combines an exponential integrator and Krylov subspace approximations to the exponential function of the Jacobian matrix. The components of the approach are described in detail and applied to the ignition of stoichiometric methane-air and iso-octane-air mixtures, here described by two widely adopted chemical kinetic mechanisms. The approach is found to be robust even at relatively large time steps and the global error displays a nominal third-order convergence. The performance of the approach is improved by utilising an adaptive algorithm for the selection of the Krylov subspace size, which guarantees an approximation to the matrix exponential within user-defined error tolerance. The Krylov projection of the Jacobian matrix onto a low-dimensional space is interpreted as a local model reduction with a well-defined error control strategy. Finally, the performance of the approach is discussed with regard to the optimal selection of the parameters governing the accuracy of its individual components. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  6. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K_C_A_T and K_C_A_T/K_M values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H_2O_2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H_2O_2 concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL"−"1 SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL"−"1 was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K_C_A_T) and catalytic efficiency (K_C_A_T/K_M) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment.

  7. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, Ya [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People’s Republic of China, Nanjing 210042 (China); Ji, Yuefei [College of Resources and Environmental Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gao, Shixiang, E-mail: ecsxg@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-06-05

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K{sub CAT} and K{sub CAT}/K{sub M} values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, while the optimal pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL{sup −1} SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL{sup −1} was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K{sub CAT}) and catalytic efficiency (K{sub CAT}/K{sub M}) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water

  8. Chemical reaction between single hydrogen atom and graphene

    Ito, Atsushi; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Arimichi

    2007-04-01

    We study chemical reaction between a single hydrogen atom and a graphene, which is the elemental reaction between hydrogen and graphitic carbon materials. In the present work, classical molecular dynamics simulation is used with modified Brenner's empirical bond order potential. The three reactions, that is, absorption reaction, reflection reaction and penetration reaction, are observed in our simulation. Reaction rates depend on the incident energy of the hydrogen atom and the graphene temperature. The dependence can be explained by the following mechanisms: (1) The hydrogen atom receives repulsive force by π-electrons in addition to nuclear repulsion. (2) Absorbing the hydrogen atom, the graphene transforms its structure to the 'overhand' configuration such as sp 3 state. (3) The hexagonal hole of the graphene is expanded during the penetration of the hydrogen atom. (author)

  9. A path flux analysis method for the reduction of detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Sun, Wenting; Ju, Yiguang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Chen, Zheng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gou, Xiaolong [School of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2010-07-15

    A direct path flux analysis (PFA) method for kinetic mechanism reduction is proposed and validated by using high temperature ignition, perfect stirred reactors, and steady and unsteady flame propagations of n-heptane and n-decane/air mixtures. The formation and consumption fluxes of each species at multiple reaction path generations are analyzed and used to identify the important reaction pathways and the associated species. The formation and consumption path fluxes used in this method retain flux conservation information and are used to define the path indexes for the first and the second generation reaction paths related to a targeted species. Based on the indexes of each reaction path for the first and second generations, different sized reduced chemical mechanisms which contain different number of species are generated. The reduced mechanisms of n-heptane and n-decane obtained by using the present method are compared to those generated by the direct relation graph (DRG) method. The reaction path analysis for n-decane is conducted to demonstrate the validity of the present method. The comparisons of the ignition delay times, flame propagation speeds, flame structures, and unsteady spherical flame propagation processes showed that with either the same or significantly less number of species, the reduced mechanisms generated by the present PFA are more accurate than that of DRG in a broad range of initial pressures and temperatures. The method is also integrated with the dynamic multi-timescale method and a further increase of computation efficiency is achieved. (author)

  10. Kinetics of diffusion-controlled and ballistically-controlled reactions

    Redner, S.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of diffusion-controlled two-species annihilation, A+B → O and single-species ballistically-controlled annihilation, A+A → O are investigated. For two-species annihilation, we describe the basic mechanism that leads to the formation of a coarsening mosaic of A- and B-domains. The implications of this picture on the distribution of reactants is discussed. For ballistic annihilation, dimensional analysis shows that the concentration and rms velocity decay as c∼t -α and v∼t -β , respectively, with α+β = 1 in any spatial dimension. Analysis of the Boltzmann equation for the evolution of the velocity distribution yields accurate predictions for the kinetics. New phenomena associated with discrete initial velocity distributions and with mixed ballistic and diffusive reactant motion are also discussed. (author)

  11. Kinetics of the Coupled Gas-Iron Reactions Involving Silicon and ...

    The kinetic study of coupled gas-iron reactions at 15600 has been carried out for the system involving liquid iron containing carbon and silicon and a gas phase consisting carbon monoxide, silicon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The coupled reactions are: (1) 200(g) = CO2 + C. (2) SiO (g) + CO (g) = Si ¸ CO (g). (3) SiO (g) + ...

  12. Microsecond time-scale kinetics of transient biochemical reactions

    Mitic, S.; Strampraad, M.J.F.; Hagen, W.R.; de Vries, S.

    2017-01-01

    To afford mechanistic studies in enzyme kinetics and protein folding in the microsecond time domain we have developed a continuous-flow microsecond time-scale mixing instrument with an unprecedented dead-time of 3.8 ± 0.3 μs. The instrument employs a micro-mixer with a mixing time of 2.7 μs

  13. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    Diogo A R S Latino

    Full Text Available The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF, the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure

  14. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    Latino, Diogo A R S; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1)H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1)H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of

  15. Using ground reaction force to predict knee kinetic asymmetry following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Dai, B; Butler, R J; Garrett, W E; Queen, R M

    2014-12-01

    Asymmetries in sagittal plane knee kinetics have been identified as a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury. Clinical tools are needed to identify the asymmetries. This study examined the relationships between knee kinetic asymmetries and ground reaction force (GRF) asymmetries during athletic tasks in adolescent patients following ACL reconstruction (ACL-R). Kinematic and GRF data were collected during a stop-jump task and a side-cutting task for 23 patients. Asymmetry indices between the surgical and non-surgical limbs were calculated for GRF and knee kinetic variables. For the stop-jump task, knee kinetics asymmetry indices were correlated with all GRF asymmetry indices (P kinetic asymmetry indices were correlated with the peak propulsion vertical GRF and vertical GRF impulse asymmetry indices (P kinetic asymmetries and therefore may assist in optimizing rehabilitation outcomes and minimizing re-injury rates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  17. Analysis of exergy loss of gasoline surrogate combustion process based on detailed chemical kinetics

    Sun, Hongjie; Yan, Feng; Yu, Hao; Su, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We explored the exergy loss sources of gasoline engine like combustion process. • The model combined non-equilibrium thermodynamics with detailed chemical kinetics. • We explored effects of initial conditions on exergy loss of combustion process. • Exergy loss decreases 15% of fuel chemical exergy by design of initial conditions. • Correspondingly, the second law efficiency increases from 38.9% to 68.9%. - Abstract: Chemical reaction is the most important source of combustion irreversibility in premixed conditions, but details of the exergy loss mechanisms have not been explored yet. In this study numerical analysis based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics combined with detailed chemical kinetics is conducted to explore the exergy loss mechanism of gasoline engine like combustion process which is simplified as constant volume combustion. The fuel is represented by the common accepted gasoline surrogates which consist of four components: iso-octane (57%), n-heptane (16%), toluene (23%), and 2-pentene (4%). We find that overall exergy loss is mainly composed of three peaks along combustion generated from chemical reactions in three stages, the conversion from large fuel molecules into small molecules (as Stage 1), the H 2 O 2 loop-related reactions (as Stage 2), and the violent oxidation reactions of CO, H, and O (as Stage 3). The effects of individual combustion boundaries, including temperature, pressure, equivalence ratio, oxygen concentration, on combustion exergy loss have been widely investigated. The combined effects of combustion boundaries on the total loss of gasoline surrogates are also investigated. We find that in a gasoline engine with a compression ratio of 10, the total loss can be reduced from 31.3% to 24.3% using lean combustion. The total loss can be further reduced to 22.4% by introducing exhaust gas recirculation and boosting the inlet charge. If the compression ratio is increased to 17, the total loss can be decreased to

  18. Mechanistic interpretation of glass reaction: Input to kinetic model development

    Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Bradley, J.P.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-05-01

    Actinide-doped SRL 165 type glass was reacted in J-13 groundwater at 90 degree C for times up to 278 days. The reaction was characterized by both solution and solid analyses. The glass was seen to react nonstoichiometrically with preferred leaching of alkali metals and boron. High resolution electron microscopy revealed the formation of a complex layer structure which became separated from the underlying glass as the reaction progressed. The formation of the layer and its effect on continued glass reaction are discussed with respect to the current model for glass reaction used in the EQ3/6 computer simulation. It is concluded that the layer formed after 278 days is not protective and may eventually become fractured and generate particulates that may be transported by liquid water. 5 refs., 5 figs. , 3 tabs

  19. Photocatalytic Water-Splitting Reaction from Catalytic and Kinetic Perspectives

    Hisatomi, Takashi; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Domen, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Some particulate semiconductors loaded with nanoparticulate catalysts exhibit photocatalytic activity for the water-splitting reaction. The photocatalysis is distinct from the thermal catalysis because photocatalysis involves photophysical

  20. Isotope effects of sulfur in chemical reactions

    Mikolajczuk, A.

    1999-01-01

    Sulfur is an important component of organic matter because it forms compounds with many elements. Due to high chemical activity of sulfur, it takes part in biological and geological processes in which isotope effects are occurring. It has been shown during last years research of isotope effects that we have take into account not only mass difference but also many other physical properties of nuclides e.g. even or odd number of neutrons in nuclei, shape and distribution of charge, turn of nuclear spin etc. The factor remains that new theoretical ideas have been formed on the base of data, being obtained in fractionation processes of heavy element isotope, particularly uranium. Now it is being well known that effects unconnected with vibration energy have also caused an effect on fractionation of considerably lighter elements like iron and magnesium. The important question is, if these effects would come to light during the separation of sulfur isotopes. Sulfur have three even isotopes M = (32, 34, 36) and one odd M 33). This problem is still open. (author)