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Sample records for reaction experiment enabling

  1. Energy gains from lattice-enabled nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The energy gain of a system is defined as the ratio of its output energy divided by the energy provided to operate the system. Most familiar systems have energy gains less than one due to various inefficiencies. By contrast, lattice-enabled nuclear reactions (LENR) offer high energy gains. Theoretical values in excess of 1000 are possible. Energy gains over 100 have already been reported. But, they have not yet been sustained for commercially significant durations. This article summarizes the current status of LENR energy gains. (author)

  2. Lattice-enabled nuclear reactions in the nickel and hydrogen gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of lattice-enabled nuclear reaction (LENR) experiments involving electrochemical loading of deuterium into palladium have been conducted and reported in hundreds of papers. But, it appears that the first commercial LENR power generators will employ gas loading of hydrogen onto nickel. This article reviews the scientific base for LENR in the gas-loaded Ni-H system, and some of the tests of pre-commercial prototype generators based on this combination. (author)

  3. Deep Eutectic Solvents Enable More Robust Chemoenzymatic Epoxidation Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Pengfei; Wang, Xuping; Zeng, Chaoxi; Wang, Weifei; Yang, Bo; Hollmann, F.; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    A chemoenzymatic method for the production of epoxidized vegetable oils was developed. The unique combination of the commercial lipase G from Penicillieum camembertii with certain deep eutectic solvents enabled the efficient production of epoxidized vegetable oils.

  4. Anodic Cyclization Reactions and the Mechanistic Strategies That Enable Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruozhu; Smith, Jake A; Moeller, Kevin D

    2017-09-19

    Oxidation reactions are powerful tools for synthesis because they allow us to reverse the polarity of electron-rich functional groups, generate highly reactive intermediates, and increase the functionality of molecules. For this reason, oxidation reactions have been and continue to be the subject of intense study. Central to these efforts is the development of mechanism-based strategies that allow us to think about the reactive intermediates that are frequently central to the success of the reactions and the mechanistic pathways that those intermediates trigger. For example, consider oxidative cyclization reactions that are triggered by the removal of an electron from an electron-rich olefin and lead to cyclic products that are functionalized for further elaboration. For these reactions to be successful, the radical cation intermediate must first be generated using conditions that limit its polymerization and then channeled down a productive desired pathway. Following the cyclization, a second oxidation step is necessary for product formation, after which the resulting cation must be quenched in a controlled fashion to avoid undesired elimination reactions. Problems can arise at any one or all of these steps, a fact that frequently complicates reaction optimization and can discourage the development of new transformations. Fortunately, anodic electrochemistry offers an outstanding opportunity to systematically probe the mechanism of oxidative cyclization reactions. The use of electrochemical methods allows for the generation of radical cations under neutral conditions in an environment that helps prevent polymerization of the intermediate. Once the intermediates have been generated, a series of "telltale indicators" can be used to diagnose which step in an oxidative cyclization is problematic for less successful transformation. A set of potential solutions to address each type of problem encountered has been developed. For example, problems with the initial

  5. Enabling software defined networking experiments in networked critical infrastructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Genge

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the fact that Networked Critical Infrastructures (NCI, e.g., power plants, water plants, oil and gas distribution infrastructures, and electricity grids, are targeted by significant cyber threats is well known. Nevertheless, recent research has shown that specific characteristics of NCI can be exploited in the enabling of more efficient mitigation techniques, while novel techniques from the field of IP networks can bring significant advantages. In this paper we explore the interconnection of NCI communication infrastructures with Software Defined Networking (SDN-enabled network topologies. SDN provides the means to create virtual networking services and to implement global networking decisions. It relies on OpenFlow to enable communication with remote devices and has been recently categorized as the “Next Big Technology”, which will revolutionize the way decisions are implemented in switches and routers. Therefore, the paper documents the first steps towards enabling an SDN-NCI and presents the impact of a Denial of Service experiment over traffic resulting from an XBee sensor network which is routed across an emulated SDN network.

  6. Enabling nucleophilic substitution reactions of activated alkyl fluorides through hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Pomarole, Julien; Thérien, Marie-Ève; Benhassine, Yasmine; Beaulieu, Samuel; Legault, Claude Y; Paquin, Jean-François

    2013-05-03

    It was discovered that the presence of water as a cosolvent enables the reaction of activated alkyl fluorides for bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reactions. DFT calculations show that activation proceeds through stabilization of the transition structure by a stronger F···H2O interaction and diminishing C-F bond elongation, and not simple transition state electrostatic stabilization. Overall, the findings put forward a distinct strategy for C-F bond activation through H-bonding.

  7. NavMol 3.0: enabling the representation of metabolic reactions by blind users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binev, Yuri; Peixoto, Daniela; Pereira, Florbela; Rodrigues, Ian; Cavaco, Sofia; Lobo, Ana M; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2018-01-01

    The representation of metabolic reactions strongly relies on visualization, which is a major barrier for blind users. The NavMol software renders the communication and interpretation of molecular structures and reactions accessible by integrating chemoinformatics and assistive technology. NavMol 3.0 provides a molecular editor for metabolic reactions. The user can start with templates of reactions and build from such cores. Atom-to-atom mapping enables changes in the reactants to be reflected in the products (and vice-versa) and the reaction centres to be automatically identified. Blind users can easily interact with the software using the keyboard and text-to-speech technology. NavMol 3.0 is free and open source under the GNU general public license (GPLv3), and can be downloaded at http://sourceforge.net/projects/navmol as a JAR file. joao@airesdesousa.com. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Direct nuclear reaction experiments for stellar nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, S.

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades indirect methods where proposed and used in many experiments in order to measure nuclear cross sections between charged particles at stellar energies. These are among the lowest to be measured in nuclear physics. One of these methods, the Trojan Horse method, is based on the Quasi- Free reaction mechanism and has proved to be particularly flexible and reliable. It allowed for the measurement of the cross sections of various reactions of astrophysical interest using stable beams. The use and reliability of indirect methods become even more important when reactions induced by Radioactive Ion Beams are considered, given the much lower intensity generally available for these beams. The first Trojan Horse measurement of a process involving the use of a Radioactive Ion Beam dealt with the "1"8F(p,α)"1"5O process in Nova conditions. To obtain pieces of information on this process, in particular about its cross section at Nova energies, the Trojan Horse method was applied to the "1"8F(d,α "1"5O)n three body reaction. In order to establish the reliability of the Trojan Horse method approach, the Treiman-Yang criterion is an important test and it will be addressed briefly in this paper.

  9. Murai Reaction on Furfural Derivatives Enabled by Removable N,N'-Bidentate Directing Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzetta, Cristofer; Veiros, Luis F; Oble, Julie; Poli, Giovanni

    2017-06-22

    Furfural and related compounds are industrially relevant building blocks obtained from lignocellulosic biomass. To enhance the added value of these renewable resources, a Ru-catalyzed hydrofurylation of alkenes, involving a directed C-H activation at C3 of the furan ring, was developed. A thorough experimental study revealed that a bidentate amino-imine directing group enabled the desired coupling. Removal of the directing group occurred during the purification step, directly releasing the C3-functionalized furfurals. Development of the reaction as well as optimization and scope of the method were described. A mechanism was proposed on the basis of DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Experiences That Enable One to Become an Expert Strategic Thinker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Judi; Kroth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Strategic thinking is a skill needed by leaders at all levels of the organization. In this qualitative study, 10 experienced ministers were interviewed and identified the characteristics that were most important to the development of their expertise. The eight key experiences contributing to the development of the ability to think strategically…

  11. Production Experiences with the Cray-Enabled TORQUE Resource Manager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezell, Matthew A [ORNL; Maxwell, Don E [ORNL; Beer, David [Adaptive Computing

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing resources utilize batch systems to manage the user workload. Cray systems are uniquely different from typical clusters due to Cray s Application Level Placement Scheduler (ALPS). ALPS manages binary transfer, job launch and monitoring, and error handling. Batch systems require special support to integrate with ALPS using an XML protocol called BASIL. Previous versions of Adaptive Computing s TORQUE and Moab batch suite integrated with ALPS from within Moab, using PERL scripts to interface with BASIL. This would occasionally lead to problems when all the components would become unsynchronized. Version 4.1 of the TORQUE Resource Manager introduced new features that allow it to directly integrate with ALPS using BASIL. This paper describes production experiences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the new TORQUE software versions, as well as ongoing and future work to improve TORQUE.

  12. Laboratory Experiments Enabling Electron Beam use in Tenuous Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miars, G.; Leon, O.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Delzanno, G. L.; Castello, F. L.; Borovsky, J.

    2017-12-01

    A mission concept is under development which involves firing a spacecraft-mounted electron beam from Earth's magnetosphere to connect distant magnetic field lines in real time. To prevent excessive spacecraft charging and consequent beam return, the spacecraft must be neutralized in the tenuous plasma environment of the magnetosphere. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations suggest neutralization can be accomplished by emitting a neutral plasma with the electron beam. Interpretation of these simulations also led to an ion emission model in which ion current is emitted from a quasi-neutral plasma as defined by the space charge limit [1,2]. Experiments were performed at the University of Michigan's Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory (PEPL) to help validate the ion emission model. A hollow cathode plasma contactor was used as a representative spacecraft and charged with respect to the chamber walls to examine the effect of spacecraft charging on ion emission. Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) measurements were performed to understand ion flow velocity as this parameter relates directly to the expected space charge limit. Planar probe measurements were also made to identify where ion emission primarily occurred and to determine emission current density levels. Evidence of collisions within the plasma (particularly charge exchange collisions) and a simple model predicting emitted ion velocities are presented. While a detailed validation of the ion emission model and of the simulation tools used in [1,2] is ongoing, these measurements add to the physical understanding of ion emission as it may occur in the magnetosphere. 1. G.L. Delzanno, J.E. Borovsky, M.F. Thomsen, J.D. Moulton, and E.A. MacDonald, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics 120, 3647, 2015. 2. G.L. Delzanno, J.E. Borovsky, M.F. Thomsen, and J.D. Moulton, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics 120, 3588, 2015. ________________________________ * This work is supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  13. Enabling the publication of practice based experiences and projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dewing

    2017-05-01

    to do so as it was unlikely I would ever be published. This may well have influenced my belief that there is a writer in each and all of us and my determination to support new authors. Writing is one of the mediums we use to tell stories to ourselves and to share them with others; we are storied beings through and through. So it is that this issue of IPDJ – without any significant advance planning on our part – has a focus on critical or in-depth reflective accounts. The first section has two strong original research articles and the remainder of the issue is richly populated by reflections and commentaries. Once again, it is our pleasure to publish an issue that highlights how useful reflections on practice development can be in adding to our knowledge about person-centred experience and person-centred cultures. Developing knowledge from and in practice contexts is at the heart of applied and person-based professions such as nursing and other healthcare disciplines. At IPDJ we are committed to facilitating potential authors to achieve a publication wherever possible. We will support and mentor new authors to get through the system and we will provide constructive and essentially person-centred reviews and feedback in a timely way to all authors. I trust you will see the proof of our processes in the articles in this issue. Perhaps as a result of reading this editorial and this issue, you might now consider yourself as a potential author and get in touch about something you have to share.

  14. A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggo, Simran Ds; Chua, Eng Wee; Chin, Paul; Cree, Simone; Pearson, John; Doogue, Matthew; Kennedy, Martin A

    2017-12-01

    A multitude of factors can affect drug response in individuals. It is now well established that variations in genes, especially those coding for drug metabolising enzymes, can alter the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic profile of a drug, impacting on efficacy and often resulting in drug-induced toxicity. The UDRUGS study is an initiative from the Carney Centre for Pharmacogenomics to biobank DNA and store associated clinical data from patients who have suffered rare and/or serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aim is to provide a genetic explanation of drug-induced ADRs using methods ranging from Sanger sequencing to whole exome and whole genome sequencing. Participants for the UDRUGS study are recruited from various sources, mainly via referral through clinicians working in Canterbury District Health Board, but also from district health boards across New Zealand. Participants have also self-referred to us from word-of-mouth communication between participants. We have recruited various ADRs across most drug classes. Where possible, we have conducted genetic analyses in single or a cohort of cases to identify known and novel genetic association(s) to offer an explanation to why the ADR occurred. Any genetic results relevant to the ADR are communicated back to the referring clinician and/or participant. In conclusion, we have developed a programme for studying the genetic basis of severe, rare or unusual ADR cases resulting from pharmacological treatment. Genomic analyses could eventually identify most genetic variants that predispose to ADRs, enabling a priori detection of such variants with high throughput DNA tests.

  15. Bystanders' Reactions to Witnessing Repetitive Abuse Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Gregory R.; Carney, JoLynn V.; Hazler, Richard J.; Oh, Insoo

    2009-01-01

    The Impact of Event Scale-Revised (D. S. Weiss & C. R. Marmar, 1997) was used to obtain self-reported trauma levels from 587 young adults recalling childhood or adolescence experiences as witnesses to common forms of repetitive abuse defined as bullying. Mean participant scores were in a range suggesting potential need for clinical assessment…

  16. Friedel-Crafts reaction of benzyl fluorides: selective activation of C-F bonds as enabled by hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Benhassine, Yasmine; Desroches, Justine; Paquin, Jean-François

    2014-12-08

    A Friedel-Crafts benzylation of arenes with benzyl fluorides has been developed. The reaction produces 1,1-diaryl alkanes in good yield under mild conditions without the need for a transition metal or a strong Lewis acid. A mechanism involving activation of the C-F bond through hydrogen bonding is proposed. This mode of activation enables the selective reaction of benzylic C-F bonds in the presence of other benzylic leaving groups. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A General Small-Scale Reactor To Enable Standardization and Acceleration of Photocatalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Chi Chip; Wismer, Michael K; Shi, Zhi-Cai; Zhang, Rui; Conway, Donald V; Li, Guoqing; Vachal, Petr; Davies, Ian W; MacMillan, David W C

    2017-06-28

    Photocatalysis for organic synthesis has experienced an exponential growth in the past 10 years. However, the variety of experimental procedures that have been reported to perform photon-based catalyst excitation has hampered the establishment of general protocols to convert visible light into chemical energy. To address this issue, we have designed an integrated photoreactor for enhanced photon capture and catalyst excitation. Moreover, the evaluation of this new reactor in eight photocatalytic transformations that are widely employed in medicinal chemistry settings has confirmed significant performance advantages of this optimized design while enabling a standardized protocol.

  18. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Enabling sustainable uranium production: The Inter-regional Technical Cooperation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulsidas, H.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium production cycle activities are increasing worldwide, often in countries with little or no previous experience in such activities. Initial efforts in uranium exploration and mining were limited to a few countries, which progressed through a painful learning curve often associated with high socioeconomic costs. With time, good practices for the sustainable conduct of operations became well established, but new projects in different regional contexts continue to face challenges. Moreover, there have been highs and lows in the levels of activities and operations in the uranium industry, which has disrupted the stabilizing of the experiences and lessons learned, into a coherent body of knowledge. This collective experience, assimilated over time, has to be transferred to a new generation of experts, who have to be enabled to use this knowledge effectively in their local contexts in order to increase efficiency and reduce the footprint of the operations. This makes it sustainable and socially acceptable to local communities, as well as in the global context. IAEA has implemented several projects in the last five years to address gaps in transferring a coherent body of knowledge on sustainable uranium production from a well experienced generation of experts to a new generation facing similar challenges in different geographical, technological, economic and social contexts. These projects focused on enabling the new practitioners in the uranium production industry to avoid the mistakes of the past and to apply good practices established elsewhere, adapted to local needs. The approach was intended to bring considerable cost savings while attracting elevated levels of social acceptance. These projects were effective in introducing experts from different areas of the uranium production cycle and with different levels of experience to the availability of advanced tools that can make operations more efficient and productive, reduce footprint, increase competencies in

  20. The reaction of fish to light (laboratory experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Potter, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the study on the title subject can contribute to the realization of decreasing the damage to sea trout, caused by cooling water input of thermal power plants and turbines of hydroelectric power plants. Trout can be diverted from the cooling water inlets by means of light screens. Bench-scale experiments were executed to analyze the impact of the rate of the water flow to the reaction of young sea trout (smolts) to light. Also the effectiveness of light bulbs and fluorescence lamps are compared. The smolts show a clear aversion to a small amount of light. For a high water flow and in standing water the aversion reaction to light is considerably smaller or absent

  1. Memorable Experiences with Sad Music—Reasons, Reactions and Mechanisms of Three Types of Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Henna-Riikka

    2016-01-01

    Reactions to memorable experiences of sad music were studied by means of a survey administered to a convenience (N = 1577), representative (N = 445), and quota sample (N = 414). The survey explored the reasons, mechanisms, and emotions of such experiences. Memorable experiences linked with sad music typically occurred in relation to extremely familiar music, caused intense and pleasurable experiences, which were accompanied by physiological reactions and positive mood changes in about a third of the participants. A consistent structure of reasons and emotions for these experiences was identified through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses across the samples. Three types of sadness experiences were established, one that was genuinely negative (Grief-Stricken Sorrow) and two that were positive (Comforting Sorrow and Sweet Sorrow). Each type of emotion exhibited certain individual differences and had distinct profiles in terms of the underlying reasons, mechanisms, and elicited reactions. The prevalence of these broad types of emotional experiences suggested that positive experiences are the most frequent, but negative experiences were not uncommon in any of the samples. The findings have implications for measuring emotions induced by music and fiction in general, and call attention to the non-pleasurable aspects of these experiences. PMID:27300268

  2. Enabling Field Experiences in Introductory Geoscience Classes through the Use of Immersive Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Smith, E.; Sellers, V.; Wyant, P.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Brame, S.

    2015-12-01

    Although field experiences are an important aspect of geoscience education, the opportunity to provide physical world experiences to large groups of introductory students is often limited by access, logistical, and financial constraints. Our project (NSF IUSE 1504619) is investigating the use of immersive virtual reality (VR) technologies as a surrogate for real field experiences in introductory geosciences classes. We are developing a toolbox that leverages innovations in the field of VR, including the Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard, to enable every student in an introductory geology classroom the opportunity to have a first-person virtual field experience in the Grand Canyon. We have opted to structure our VR experience as an interactive game where students must explore the Canyon to accomplish a series of tasks designed to emphasize key aspects of geoscience learning. So far we have produced two demo products for the virtual field trip. The first is a standalone "Rock Box" app developed for the iPhone, which allows students to select different rock samples, examine them in 3D, and obtain basic information about the properties of each sample. The app can act as a supplement to the traditional rock box used in physical geology labs. The second product is a fully functioning VR environment for the Grand Canyon developed using satellite-based topographic and imagery data to retain real geologic features within the experience. Players can freely navigate to explore anywhere they desire within the Canyon, but are guided to points of interest where they are able to complete exercises that will be aligned with specific learning goals. To this point we have integrated elements of the "Rock Box" app within the VR environment, allowing players to examine 3D details of rock samples they encounter within the Grand Canyon. We plan to provide demos of both products and obtain user feedback during our presentation.

  3. Enabling systematic, harmonised and large-scale biofilms data computation: the Biofilms Experiment Workbench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Gael; Glez-Peña, Daniel; Azevedo, Nuno F; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are receiving increasing attention from the biomedical community. Biofilm-like growth within human body is considered one of the key microbial strategies to augment resistance and persistence during infectious processes. The Biofilms Experiment Workbench is a novel software workbench for the operation and analysis of biofilms experimental data. The goal is to promote the interchange and comparison of data among laboratories, providing systematic, harmonised and large-scale data computation. The workbench was developed with AIBench, an open-source Java desktop application framework for scientific software development in the domain of translational biomedicine. Implementation favours free and open-source third-parties, such as the R statistical package, and reaches for the Web services of the BiofOmics database to enable public experiment deposition. First, we summarise the novel, free, open, XML-based interchange format for encoding biofilms experimental data. Then, we describe the execution of common scenarios of operation with the new workbench, such as the creation of new experiments, the importation of data from Excel spreadsheets, the computation of analytical results, the on-demand and highly customised construction of Web publishable reports, and the comparison of results between laboratories. A considerable and varied amount of biofilms data is being generated, and there is a critical need to develop bioinformatics tools that expedite the interchange and comparison of microbiological and clinical results among laboratories. We propose a simple, open-source software infrastructure which is effective, extensible and easy to understand. The workbench is freely available for non-commercial use at http://sing.ei.uvigo.es/bew under LGPL license. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The reaction of fish to light (laboratory experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Potter, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the study on the title subject can contribute to the realization of decreasing the damage to eel, caused by cooling water input of thermal power plants and turbines of hydroelectric power plants. Eel can be diverted from the cooling water inlets by means of light screens. Bench-scale experiments were executed to analyze the impact of the rate of the water flow to the reaction of eel to light. Also the effectiveness of light bulbs and fluorescence lamps are compared. Eel shows a clear aversion to a small amount of light. The diversion percentage decreases with a higher velocity of the water flow. Application of energy-efficient fluorescent lamps is considered to be a good option for diversion light systems

  5. Disability, family and technical aids: a study of how disabling/enabling experiences come about in hybrid family relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, van der H.M.; Hoogsteyns, M.

    2014-01-01

    Research regarding disabling situations generally focuses on disabling situations within a public society ‘out there’. In our research, however, the intimate family setting itself appears central to the emergence of dis/enabling experiences. Moreover, the relationships that shaped these experiences

  6. A Kinetic Study of the Diels-Alder Reaction. An Experiment Illustrating Simple Second-Order Reaction Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Michael G.; Dills, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes an organic chemistry experiment for teaching the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. Provides background information about first- and second-order reactions, experimental procedures of the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and dimethyl fumarate, and the experimental results. (YP)

  7. Verification experiment of EPR paradox by (d, 2He) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hideyuki

    2003-01-01

    FBR paradox which was brought forward by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen is expressed by Bell's inequality of spin correlation theoretically. In principle it is possible to verify the inequality by measuring spin correlation between two particles having spin 1/2 from a decay of 1 S 0 experimentally. Most of the past experiments to verify the inequality, however, have been performed by using photons. On the other hand, only one experiment by using hadron system was carried out by Lamehi and Mitting, where the [ 1 S 0 ] state was produced by proton-proton scattering at first, and then the spin orientations after the scattering were measured. Unfortunately, there exit some sources of ambiguity to reach definite conclusion from their result because the experiment was done at rather high energy of 13.5 MeV. In the experiment planned by the present author it is designed to overcome the experimental difficulties, which Lamehi and Mitting encountered, by (1) generating high purity singlet [ 1 S 0 ] state of two protons by (d, 2 He) type nuclear reaction at intermediate energy range, and by (2) developing high performance spin-correlation polarimeter which can analyze spins of two protons simultaneously to minimize the systematic errors. The excitation energy of 2 He corresponding to the proton-proton relative energy can be experimentally controlled. An idea singlet is realized by choosing the state with sufficiently small relative energy. It is planned to measure the spin correlation function by using SMART (Swinger and Magnetic Analyzer with Rotator and Twister) at RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility. Einstein POLarimeter (EPOL) to be installed on the second focal plane of SMART is under development, with which high precision measurements of spin orientations of two high energy protons simultaneously coming into limited space from 2 He decay are made selecting the subject events from very many background events. Monte Carlo simulation predicts the possibility to verify the

  8. The oxygen evolution reaction on cobalt Part I. Reaction order experiments and impedance measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobussen, A.G.C.; Willems, H.; Wit, J.H.W. de; Broers, G.H.J.

    1984-01-01

    It was found that the oxygen evolution reaction on cobalt in concentrated KOH solutions can be described differently for low and high overpotentials. In the overpotential range from 150 to 280 mV, the reaction has a Tafel slope of approximately 40 mV and a reaction order with respect to the KOH

  9. Model Experiment of Thermal Runaway Reactions Using the Aluminum-Hydrochloric Acid Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabayashi, Suguru; Nakano, Masayoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the education of students about thermal runaway reactions based on the reaction between aluminum and hydrochloric acid as a model reaction is proposed. In the introductory part of the exercise, the induction period and subsequent thermal runaway behavior are evaluated via a simple observation of hydrogen gas evolution and…

  10. Leprosy reactions in postelimination stage: the Bangladesh experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, M R; Ara, S; Mizanur Rahman, A F M; Tripura, S P; Paul, S

    2017-04-01

    Leprosy reactions are immunologically mediated conditions and a major cause of disability before, during and after multidrug therapy (MDT). Little data have been published on the epidemiology of leprosy reactions in Bangladesh. To describe the pattern and prevalence of leprosy reactions in the postelimination stage. A descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out in Chittagong Medical College Hospital using the registered records of patients in the period between 2004 and 2013. Of the 670 patients with leprosy, 488 (73.38%) were males and 182 (27.37%) were females. The prevalence of reaction was in 300 (44.78%) patients with a male:female ratio of 3.55 : 1. The age-specific cumulative reaction cases at >40 years were 115 (38.33%) among all age groups. The prevalence of reaction was found to be in 166 (55.33%) patients for the reversal reaction, 49 (16.57%) for the erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) and 85 (28.33%) for the neuritis. Borderline tuberculoid was most common (106, 35.33%)in the reversal reaction group, while lepromatous leprosy was most common (37, 12.33%) in ENL group. More than half of the patients (169, 56.33%) had reactions at the time of presentations, while 85 (28.33%) and 46 (15.33%) patients developed reaction during and after MDT, respectively. The reversal reaction group presented with ≥six skin lesions in 96 (57.83%) patients and ≥two nerve function impairments (NFIs) in 107 (64.46%) patients. The ENL was present chiefly as papulo-nodular lesions in 45 (91.84%) patients followed by pustule-necrotic lesions in four (8.16%), neuritis in 33 (67.35%), fever in 24 (48.98%), lymphadenitis in six (12.24%), arthritis in five (10.20%) and iritis in two (4.08%). Bacterial index ≥3 had been demonstrated in 34 (60.71%) patients in ENL group. The incidence of leprosy reaction seemed to be more than three times common in borderline tuberculoid (52.33%) group than in lepromatous leprosy (14%) group. Reactions with NFI and disability

  11. Enabling healthy living: Experiences of people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Marjut; Sandgren, Anna; Carlsson, Ing-Marie; Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that people with severe mental illness have a reduced life expectancy and a greater risk of being affected by preventable physical illnesses such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There are still, however, only a few published studies focusing on what enables healthy living for this group. This study thus aimed to describe what enables healthy living among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services. The data were collected in qualitative interviews (n = 16) and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The interviews resulted in an overall theme "Being regarded as a whole human being by self and others", which showed the multidimensional nature of health and the issues that enable healthy living among people with severe mental illness. Three categories emerged: (i) everyday structure (ii), motivating life events and (iii) support from significant others. The results indicate that a person with severe mental illness needs to be encountered as a whole person if healthy living is to be enabled. Attaining healthy living requires collaboration between the providers of care, help and support. Health care organizations need to work together to develop and provide interventions to enable healthy living and to reduce poor physical health among people with severe mental illness. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Experiential Learning in Rodents: Past Experience Enables Rapid Learning and Localized Encoding in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Conor D.; Palmer, Linda C.; Pham, Danielle T.; Trieu, Brian H.; Gall, Christine M.; Lynch, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Humans routinely use past experience with complexity to deal with novel, challenging circumstances. This fundamental aspect of real-world behavior has received surprisingly little attention in animal studies, and the underlying brain mechanisms are unknown. The present experiments tested for transfer from past experience in rats and then used…

  13. Multinational experience with hypersensitivity drug reactions in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jares, Edgardo José; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Cardona-Villa, Ricardo; Ensina, Luis Felipe; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Gómez, Maximiliano; Barayazarra, Susana; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Serrano, Carlos D; Cuello, Mabel Noemi; Morfin-Maciel, Blanca María; De Falco, Alicia; Cherrez-Ojeda, Iván

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic drug allergy data from Latin America are scarce, and there are no studies on specific procedures focusing on this topic in Latin America. To assess the clinical characteristics and management of hypersensitivity drug reactions in different Latin American countries. An European Network of Drug Allergy questionnaire survey was implemented in 22 allergy units in 11 Latin American countries to report on consecutive patients who presented with a suspected hypersensitivity drug reaction. Each unit used its own protocols to investigate patients. Included were 868 hypersensitivity drug reactions in 862 patients (71% of adults and elderly patients were women and 51% of children were girls, P = .0001). Children presented with less severe reactions than adults and elderly patients (P Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Jaehun; Pierce, David A.; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-01-01

    Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both sensible heat and experimental instability, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by the nth order kinetics, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model

  15. A Catalyst-Enabled Diastereodivergent Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction: Complementarity of N-Heterocyclic Carbenes and Chiral Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zi-Qiang; Wang, Min; Chow, Chi Hao Eugene; Zhao, Yu

    2016-07-04

    Highly efficient and diastereodivergent aza-Diels-Alder reactions have been developed to access either diastereomeric series of benzofuran-fused δ-lactams and dihydropyridines in nearly perfect stereoselectivity (d.r. >20:1, >99 % ee for all examples). The complementarity of N-heterocyclic carbene and chiral amine as the catalyst was demonstrated for the first time, together with an excellent level of catalytic efficiency (1 mol % loading). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Adverse reactions in voluntary whole blood donors: Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Whole blood donation, generally considered as a safe procedure, may be sometimes associated with adverse reactions and injuries of variable severity during or after the blood donation process. There are few reports of adverse events related to blood donation in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

  17. First Nuclear Reaction Experiment with Stored Radioactive 56Ni Beam and Internal Hydrogen and Helium Targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egelhof, P.; Bagchi, Soumya; Csatlós, M.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Furuno, T; Geissel, H.; Gernhauser, R.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; Kuilman, M.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Najafi, M.A.; Rigollet, C.; Streicher, B.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of light-ion induced direct reactions using stored and cooled radioactive beams, interacting with internal targets of storage rings, can lead to substantial advantages over external target experiments, in particular for direct reaction experiments in inverse kinematics at very low

  18. Distributed cognition and process management enabling individualized translational research: The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Links

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH UDP applies translational research systematically to diagnose patients with undiagnosed diseases. The challenge is to implement an information system enabling scalable translational research. The authors hypothesized that similarly complex problems are resolvable through process management and the distributed cognition of communities. The team therefore built the NIH UDP Integrated Collaboration System (UDPICS to form virtual collaborative multidisciplinary research networks or communities. UDPICS supports these communities through integrated process management, ontology-based phenotyping, biospecimen management, cloud-based genomic analysis, and an electronic laboratory notebook. UDPICS provided a mechanism for efficient, transparent, and scalable translational research and thereby addressed many of the complex and diverse research and logistical problems of the NIH UDP. Full definition of the strengths and deficiencies of UDPICS will require formal qualitative and quantitative usability and process improvement measurement.

  19. Distributed Cognition and Process Management Enabling Individualized Translational Research: The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Amanda E; Draper, David; Lee, Elizabeth; Guzman, Jessica; Valivullah, Zaheer; Maduro, Valerie; Lebedev, Vlad; Didenko, Maxim; Tomlin, Garrick; Brudno, Michael; Girdea, Marta; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Haendel, Melissa A; Mungall, Christopher J; Smedley, Damian; Hochheiser, Harry; Arnold, Andrew M; Coessens, Bert; Verhoeven, Steven; Bone, William; Adams, David; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Gahl, William A; Sincan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH UDP) applies translational research systematically to diagnose patients with undiagnosed diseases. The challenge is to implement an information system enabling scalable translational research. The authors hypothesized that similar complex problems are resolvable through process management and the distributed cognition of communities. The team, therefore, built the NIH UDP integrated collaboration system (UDPICS) to form virtual collaborative multidisciplinary research networks or communities. UDPICS supports these communities through integrated process management, ontology-based phenotyping, biospecimen management, cloud-based genomic analysis, and an electronic laboratory notebook. UDPICS provided a mechanism for efficient, transparent, and scalable translational research and thereby addressed many of the complex and diverse research and logistical problems of the NIH UDP. Full definition of the strengths and deficiencies of UDPICS will require formal qualitative and quantitative usability and process improvement measurement.

  20. Women's Experiences of Social Reactions From Informal and Formal Supports: Using a Modified Administration of the Social Reactions Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePrince, Anne P; Dmitrieva, Julia; Gagnon, Kerry L; Srinivas, Tejaswinhi

    2017-11-01

    A growing literature links social reactions to disclosures of intimate violence to posttraumatic outcomes. The Social Reactions Questionnaire (SRQ), a widely used measure developed to assess social reactions, asks about reactions received from people generally. The ability to examine the impact of social reactions from specific groups of people-such as criminal justice personnel versus community-based providers-has become increasingly more important from both research and practice perspectives. For example, as sexual assault responses nationally have relied on community-coordinated models that involve both criminal justice and community-based systems, tools are lacking to systematically assess the impact of social reactions from criminal justice personnel and community-based providers on survivors. Using the SRQ, the current study asked women to report separately on reactions received from criminal justice personnel, community-based providers, and informal supports. We recruited a diverse community sample of women ( N = 228, ages 18-63, 19% lesbian/bisexual, 44% ethnic minority) who experienced a sexual assault in the previous year and disclosed to the criminal justice system and/or a community-based provider. Multilevel analyses revealed considerable variability in the social reactions reported by women across criminal justice personnel, community-based providers, and informal supports. Analyses supported a seven-factor structure for the SRQ when the measure is yoked to particular experiences of disclosure, in this case to criminal justice personnel, community-based providers, or informal supports. The utility of this modified administration and scoring of the SRQ and the importance of considering reactions across different groups are described.

  1. Neutral current induced reactions in the Gargamelle experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doninck, W. van

    1976-07-01

    In the heavy liquid bubble chamber Gargamelle at CERN, 3 candidates are found for the pure leptonic neutral current process anti upsilonsub(μ)e - → anti upsilon sub(μ)e - . For the inclusive semileptonic reactions upsilon N → μ - X and anti upsilon N → μ + X the ratios of the neutral current to the charged current cross sections are measured to be Rsub(upsilon) = 0.25 +- 0.04 and Rsub(anti upsilon) = 0.56 +- 0.09. These inclusive results differ from the prediction of parity conserving models by more than 3 standard deviations. All three reactions are compatible with the Weinberg-Salam-model and a value of sin 2 THETAsub(ω) near 0.3. (BJ) [de

  2. Experience-dependent plasticity from eye opening enables lasting, visual cortex-dependent enhancement of motion vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusky, Glen T; Silver, Byron D; Tschetter, Wayne W; Alam, Nazia M; Douglas, Robert M

    2008-09-24

    Developmentally regulated plasticity of vision has generally been associated with "sensitive" or "critical" periods in juvenile life, wherein visual deprivation leads to loss of visual function. Here we report an enabling form of visual plasticity that commences in infant rats from eye opening, in which daily threshold testing of optokinetic tracking, amid otherwise normal visual experience, stimulates enduring, visual cortex-dependent enhancement (>60%) of the spatial frequency threshold for tracking. The perceptual ability to use spatial frequency in discriminating between moving visual stimuli is also improved by the testing experience. The capacity for inducing enhancement is transitory and effectively limited to infancy; however, enhanced responses are not consolidated and maintained unless in-kind testing experience continues uninterrupted into juvenile life. The data show that selective visual experience from infancy can alone enable visual function. They also indicate that plasticity associated with visual deprivation may not be the only cause of developmental visual dysfunction, because we found that experientially inducing enhancement in late infancy, without subsequent reinforcement of the experience in early juvenile life, can lead to enduring loss of function.

  3. Benchmark experiments at ASTRA facility on definition of space distribution of 235U fission reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, A. E.; Glushkov, E. S.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Moroz, N. P.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Nosov, V. I.; Smirnov, O. N.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Zimin, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Results of critical experiments performed at five ASTRA facility configurations modeling the high-temperature helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactors are presented. Results of experiments on definition of space distribution of 235 U fission reaction rate performed at four from these five configurations are presented more detail. Analysis of available information showed that all experiments on criticality at these five configurations are acceptable for use them as critical benchmark experiments. All experiments on definition of space distribution of 235 U fission reaction rate are acceptable for use them as physical benchmark experiments. (authors)

  4. Software-Enabled Distributed Network Governance: The PopMedNet Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Melanie; Erickson, Kyle; Wyner, Zachary; Malenfant, Jessica; Rosen, Rob; Brown, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The expanded availability of electronic health information has led to increased interest in distributed health data research networks. The distributed research network model leaves data with and under the control of the data holder. Data holders, network coordinating centers, and researchers have distinct needs and challenges within this model. The concerns of network stakeholders are addressed in the design and governance models of the PopMedNet software platform. PopMedNet features include distributed querying, customizable workflows, and auditing and search capabilities. Its flexible role-based access control system enables the enforcement of varying governance policies. Four case studies describe how PopMedNet is used to enforce network governance models. Trust is an essential component of a distributed research network and must be built before data partners may be willing to participate further. The complexity of the PopMedNet system must be managed as networks grow and new data, analytic methods, and querying approaches are developed. The PopMedNet software platform supports a variety of network structures, governance models, and research activities through customizable features designed to meet the needs of network stakeholders.

  5. Ultrafine and highly disordered Ni 2 Fe 1 nanofoams enabled highly efficient oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Shaofang; Song, Junhua; Zhu, Chengzhou; Xu, Gui-Liang; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Chengjun; Li, Xiaolin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2018-02-01

    Nickel iron hydroxides are the most promising non-noble electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline media. By in situ reduction of metal precursors, compositionally controlled three-dimensional (3D) NixFeyB nanofoams (NFs) are synthesized with high surface area and uniformly distributed bimetallic networks. The resultant ultrafine amorphous Ni2Fe1B NFs exhibit extraordinary electrocatalytic performance toward OER and overall water splitting in alkaline media. At a potential as low as 1.42 V (vs. RHE), Ni2Fe1B NFs can deliver a current density of 10 mA/cm2 and show negligible activity loss after 12 hours’ stability test. Even at large current flux of 100 mA/cm2, an ultralow overpotential of 0.27 V is achieved, which is about 0.18 V more negative than benchmark RuO2. Both ex-situ Mӧssbauer spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) reveal a phase separation and transformation for the Ni2Fe1B catalyst during OER process. The evolution of oxidation state and disordered structure of Ni2Fe1B might be a key to the high catalytic performance for OER.

  6. Enabling the Public to Experience Science from Beginning to End (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouille, L.; Chen, Y.; Lintott, C.; Lynn, S.; Simmons, B.; Smith, A.; Tremonti, C.; Whyte, L.; Willett, K.; Zevin, M.; Science Team; Moderator Team, G.

    2013-12-01

    In this talk we present the results of an experiment in collaborative research and article writing within the citizen science context. During July-September 2013, astronomers and the Zooniverse team ran Galaxy Zoo Quench (quench.galaxyzoo.org), investigating the mechanism(s) that recently and abruptly shut off star formation in a sample of post-quenched galaxies. Through this project, the public had the opportunity to experience the entire process of science, including galaxy classification, reading background literature, data analysis, discussion, debate, drawing conclusions, and writing an article to submit to a professional journal. The context was galaxy evolution, however, the lessons learned are applicable across the disciplines. The discussion will focus on how to leverage online tools to authentically engage the public in the entire process of science.

  7. Enabling nurses to lead change: the orientation experiences of nurses to boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, AnnMarie; Lake, Donna; Mullinix, Connie; Allen, Deborah; Mooney, Kathi

    2015-01-01

    Nurses need to be full partners in shaping health care and health care policy. One way to do this is to be present and active on boards at all levels. The purpose of this study is to examine the orientation experiences of nurses to boards and their preparation to influence health care and health care policy. A Web-based survey about the efficacy of board orientation was sent to members of three local boards made up exclusively of nurses. Liabilities and fiduciary duties were least likely to be addressed in board orientation for nurses. Board members requested more training in finance and a more formal/structured orientation process. Standardizing orientation elements for nurses serving on boards would best prepare them to serve on interprofessional hospital boards and work in the health policy arena. The orientation experience on local- and state-level nursing boards is fundamental to nurses beginning board service. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interface enabling the management of the magnetic gradients for a N.M.R. experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutoso, J.; Mallet, J.J.; Bonmartin, A.; Minchella, P.

    1983-01-01

    The object of this work was to realize a versatile electronic system which is able to manage the three magnetic gradients necessary to a NMR experiment. The cheapest mean used is based on a microcomputer VIC 20 Commodore, connected through an interface to three ''pilotage'' power-supplies. In this paper the interface between the VIC 20 and the three power-supplies, is particularly described [fr

  9. Forced thermal cycling of catalytic reactions: experiments and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies of catalytic reactions subjected to fast forced temperature oscillations have revealed a rate enhancement increasing with temperature oscillation frequency. We present detailed studies of the rate enhancement up to frequencies of 2.5 Hz. A maximum in the rate enhancement is observed...... at about 1 Hz. A model for the rate enhancement that includes the surface kinetics and the dynamic partial pressure variations in the reactor is introduced. The model predicts a levelling off of the rate enhancement with frequency at about 1 Hz. The experimentally observed decrease above 1 Hz is explained...

  10. The SMART Platform: early experience enabling substitutable applications for electronic health records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Joshua C; Murphy, Shawn N; Bernstam, Elmer Victor; Ramoni, Rachel L; Kreda, David A; McCoy, J Michael; Adida, Ben; Kohane, Isaac S

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Substitutable Medical Applications, Reusable Technologies (SMART) Platforms project seeks to develop a health information technology platform with substitutable applications (apps) constructed around core services. The authors believe this is a promising approach to driving down healthcare costs, supporting standards evolution, accommodating differences in care workflow, fostering competition in the market, and accelerating innovation. Materials and methods The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, through the Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) Program, funds the project. The SMART team has focused on enabling the property of substitutability through an app programming interface leveraging web standards, presenting predictable data payloads, and abstracting away many details of enterprise health information technology systems. Containers—health information technology systems, such as electronic health records (EHR), personally controlled health records, and health information exchanges that use the SMART app programming interface or a portion of it—marshal data sources and present data simply, reliably, and consistently to apps. Results The SMART team has completed the first phase of the project (a) defining an app programming interface, (b) developing containers, and (c) producing a set of charter apps that showcase the system capabilities. A focal point of this phase was the SMART Apps Challenge, publicized by the White House, using http://www.challenge.gov website, and generating 15 app submissions with diverse functionality. Conclusion Key strategic decisions must be made about the most effective market for further disseminating SMART: existing market-leading EHR vendors, new entrants into the EHR market, or other stakeholders such as health information exchanges. PMID:22427539

  11. A FPGA-based Network Interface Card with GPUDirect enabling realtime GPU computing in HEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lonardo, Alessandro; Ammendola, Roberto; Biagioni, Andrea; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Frezza, Ottorino; Lamanna, Gianluca; Lo Cicero, Francesca; Martinelli, Michele; Neri, Ilaria; Paolucci, Pier Stanislao; Pastorelli, Elena; Pontisso, Luca; Rossetti, Davide; Simeone, Francesco; Simula, Francesco; Sozzi, Marco; Tosoratto, Laura; Vicini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    The capability of processing high bandwidth data streams in real-time is a computational requirement common to many High Energy Physics experiments. Keeping the latency of the data transport tasks under control is essential in order to meet this requirement. We present NaNet, a FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card design featuring Remote Direct Memory Access towards CPU and GPU memories plus a transport protocol offload module characterized by cycle-accurate upper-bound handling. The combination of these two features allows to relieve almost entirely the OS and the application from data tranfer management, minimizing the unavoidable jitter effects associated to OS process scheduling. The design currently supports one GbE (1000Base-T) and three custom 34 Gbps APElink I/O channels, but four-channels 10GbE (10Base-R) and 2.5 Gbps deterministic latency KM3link versions are being implemented. Two use cases of NaNet will be discussed: the GPU-based low level trigger for the RICH detector in the NA62 experiment an...

  12. A wireless centrifuge force microscope (CFM) enables multiplexed single-molecule experiments in a commercial centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tony; Patel, Dhruv S; Halvorsen, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The centrifuge force microscope (CFM) was recently introduced as a platform for massively parallel single-molecule manipulation and analysis. Here we developed a low-cost and self-contained CFM module that works directly within a commercial centrifuge, greatly improving accessibility and ease of use. Our instrument incorporates research grade video microscopy, a power source, a computer, and wireless transmission capability to simultaneously monitor many individually tethered microspheres. We validated the instrument by performing single-molecule force shearing of short DNA duplexes. For a 7 bp duplex, we observed over 1000 dissociation events due to force dependent shearing from 2 pN to 12 pN with dissociation times in the range of 10-100 s. We extended the measurement to a 10 bp duplex, applying a 12 pN force clamp and directly observing single-molecule dissociation over an 85 min experiment. Our new CFM module facilitates simple and inexpensive experiments that dramatically improve access to single-molecule analysis.

  13. UnitedHealthcare experience illustrates how payers can enable patient engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, Lewis G; Tuckson, Reed V; Stevens, Simon L

    2013-08-01

    Patient engagement is crucial to better outcomes and a high-performing health system, but efforts to support it often focus narrowly on the role of physicians and other care providers. Such efforts miss payers' unique capabilities to help patients achieve better health. Using the experience of UnitedHealthcare, a large national payer, this article demonstrates how health plans can analyze and present information to both patients and providers to help close gaps in care; share detailed quality and cost information to inform patients' choice of providers; and offer treatment decision support and value-based benefit designs to help guide choices of diagnostic tests and therapies. As an employer, UnitedHealth Group has used these strategies along with an "earn-back" program that provides positive financial incentives through reduced premiums to employees who adopt healthful habits. UnitedHealth's experience provides lessons for other payers and for Medicare and Medicaid, which have had minimal involvement with demand-side strategies and could benefit from efforts to promote activated beneficiaries.

  14. Deiodination reactions using tributyltin hydride for potential labelling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zippi, E.M.; Plourde, G.W. II; Satyamurthy, N.

    1995-01-01

    2,6-Dinitro-1-iodobenzene and 2,4-dinitro-1-iodobenzene were deiodinated with tributylin hydride at different temperatures using various addition modes. The product ratios of 1,3-dinitrobenzene and the corresponding tributylstannyldinitrobenzene compounds were determined by NMR in order to evaluate the optimum conditions for impending tritiation experiments. (Author)

  15. Enabling the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC for High Performance Computing

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091107; Ereditato, Antonio

    In this thesis, I studied the feasibility of running computer data analysis programs from the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, in particular large-scale simulations of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC, on current general purpose High Performance Computing (HPC) systems. An approach for integrating HPC systems into the Grid is proposed, which has been implemented and tested on the „Todi” HPC machine at the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS). Over the course of the test, more than 500000 CPU-hours of processing time have been provided to ATLAS, which is roughly equivalent to the combined computing power of the two ATLAS clusters at the University of Bern. This showed that current HPC systems can be used to efficiently run large-scale simulations of the ATLAS detector and of the detected physics processes. As a first conclusion of my work, one can argue that, in perspective, running large-scale tasks on a few large machines might be more cost-effective than running on relatively small dedicated com...

  16. Enabling Data Discovery and Reuse by Improving Software Usability:Data Science Experiences, Lessons, and Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, A.; Yarmey, L.

    2014-12-01

    It is well understood that a good data scientist needs domain science, analysis, programming, and communication skills to create finished data products, visualizations, and reports. Articles and blogs tout the need for "expert" skill levels in domain knowledge, statistics, storytelling, graphic design, technology…and the list goes on. Since it seems impossible that one person would encompass all these skills, it is often suggested that data science be done by a team instead of an individual. This research into, and experience with, data product design offers an augmented definition - one that elevates relationships and engagement with the final user of a product. Essentially, no matter how fantastic or technically advanced a product appears, the intended audience of that product must be able to understand, use, and find value in the product in order for it to be considered a success. Usability is often misunderstood and seen as common sense or common knowledge, but it is actually an important and challenging piece of product development. This paper describes the National Snow and Ice Data Center's process to usability test the Arctic Data Explorer (ADE). The ADE is a federated data search tool for interdisciplinary Arctic science data that has been improved in features, appearance, functionality, and quality through a series of strategic and targeted usability testing and assessments. Based on the results, it is recommended that usability testing be incorporated into the skill set of each data science team.

  17. Solvent-Free Wittig Reaction: A Green Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sam H.; Angel, Stephen A.

    2004-01-01

    Some Wittig reactions can be carried out by grinding the reactants in a mortar with a pestle for about 20 minutes, as per investigation. A laboratory experiment involving a solvent-free Wittig reaction that can be completed in a three-hour sophomore organic chemistry laboratory class period, are developed.

  18. Conservatives Anticipate and Experience Stronger Emotional Reactions to Negative Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, Samantha; Burton, Caitlin M; Plaks, Jason E

    2014-02-01

    The present work examined whether conservatives and liberals differ in their anticipation of their own emotional reactions to negative events. In two studies, participants imagined experiencing positive or negative outcomes in domains that do not directly concern politics. In Study 1, 190 American participants recruited online (64 male, Mage  = 32 years) anticipated their emotional responses to romantic relationship outcomes. In Study 2, 97 Canadian undergraduate students (26 male, Mage  = 21 years) reported on their anticipated and experienced emotional responses to academic outcomes. In both studies, more conservative participants predicted they would feel stronger negative emotions following negative outcomes than did more liberal participants. Furthermore, a longitudinal follow-up of Study 2 participants revealed that more conservative participants actually felt worse than more liberal participants after receiving a lower-than-desired exam grade. These effects remained even when controlling for the Big Five traits, prevention focus, and attachment style (Study 1), and optimism (Study 2). We discuss how the relationship between political orientation and anticipated affect likely contributes to differences between conservatives and liberals in styles of decision and policy choices. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Sodium-concrete reactions experiments and code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, C.; Malet, J.C.; Dufresne, J.; Bolvin, M.

    1988-01-01

    Hypothesis of hot sodium leak in a fast breeder reactor implies, for the safety organism to consider spillage of sodium on concrete. This safety analysis involves the understanding of sodium-concrete reactions, the knowledge of their consequences and to test the choiced preventive solutions. In association with EDF, the nuclear safety department had carried out an extensive experimental program, the different parts of which are connected with each aspect of this problem: - firstly, interaction between sodium and bare surface of usual concrete; - secondly, the case of a sodium spillage on a concrete surface covered with a defected liner; - thirdly, special concrete tests for a comparison with usual concrete behavior, in direct contact with hot sodium; - at last, a test which concerns a new design with a layer of the selected concrete protected with a defected liner. On the same time, theoretical work leads to elaborate a physical model to describe temporal evolution of thermal and chemical decomposition of a concrete slab under hot sodium action. SORBET-REBUS system will use quoted above test results to its validation

  20. Conceptual model and economic experiments to explain nonpersistence and enable mechanism designs fostering behavioral change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djawadi, Behnud Mir; Fahr, René; Turk, Florian

    2014-12-01

    Medical nonpersistence is a worldwide problem of striking magnitude. Although many fields of studies including epidemiology, sociology, and psychology try to identify determinants for medical nonpersistence, comprehensive research to explain medical nonpersistence from an economics perspective is rather scarce. The aim of the study was to develop a conceptual framework that augments standard economic choice theory with psychological concepts of behavioral economics to understand how patients' preferences for discontinuing with therapy arise over the course of the medical treatment. The availability of such a framework allows the targeted design of mechanisms for intervention strategies. Our conceptual framework models the patient as an active economic agent who evaluates the benefits and costs for continuing with therapy. We argue that a combination of loss aversion and mental accounting operations explains why patients discontinue with therapy at a specific point in time. We designed a randomized laboratory economic experiment with a student subject pool to investigate the behavioral predictions. Subjects continue with therapy as long as experienced utility losses have to be compensated. As soon as previous losses are evened out, subjects perceive the marginal benefit of persistence lower than in the beginning of the treatment. Consequently, subjects start to discontinue with therapy. Our results highlight that concepts of behavioral economics capture the dynamic structure of medical nonpersistence better than does standard economic choice theory. We recommend that behavioral economics should be a mandatory part of the development of possible intervention strategies aimed at improving patients' compliance and persistence behavior. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. QRTEngine: An easy solution for running online reaction time experiments using Qualtrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, Jonathan Sebastiaan; Haasnoot, Erwin; Bocanegra, Bruno R.; van Steenbergen, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Performing online behavioral research is gaining increased popularity among researchers in psychological and cognitive science. However, the currently available methods for conducting online reaction time experiments are often complicated and typically require advanced technical skills. In this

  2. The Barium Hydroxide-Ammonium Thiocyanate Reaction: A Titrimetric Continuous Variations Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Arlo D.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an experiment for inorganic, organic, or physical chemistry students utilizing acid-base titrimetry to study the stoichiometric of a solid state reaction. Time involved ranges from one to three, three-hour lab periods. (Author/SA)

  3. Migrant Sexual Health Help-Seeking and Experiences of Stigmatization and Discrimination in Perth, Western Australia: Exploring Barriers and Enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agu, Josephine; Lobo, Roanna; Crawford, Gemma; Chigwada, Bethwyn

    2016-05-11

    Increasing HIV notifications amongst migrant and mobile populations to Australia is a significant public health issue. Generalizations about migrant health needs and delayed or deterred help-seeking behaviors can result from disregarding the variation between and within cultures including factors, such as drivers for migration and country of birth. This study explored barriers and enablers to accessing sexual health services, including experiences of stigma and discrimination, within a purposive sample of sub-Saharan African, Southeast Asian, and East Asian migrants. A qualitative design was employed using key informant interviews and focus group discussions. A total of 45 people with ages ranging from 18 to 50 years, participated in focus group discussions. Common barriers and enablers to help seeking behaviors were sociocultural and religious influence, financial constraints, and knowledge dissemination to reduce stigma. Additionally, common experiences of stigma and discrimination were related to employment and the social and self-isolation of people living with HIV. Overcoming barriers to accessing sexual health services, imparting sexual health knowledge, recognizing variations within cultures, and a reduction in stigma and discrimination will simultaneously accelerate help-seeking and result in better sexual health outcomes in migrant populations.

  4. Migrant Sexual Health Help-Seeking and Experiences of Stigmatization and Discrimination in Perth, Western Australia: Exploring Barriers and Enablers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Agu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing HIV notifications amongst migrant and mobile populations to Australia is a significant public health issue. Generalizations about migrant health needs and delayed or deterred help-seeking behaviors can result from disregarding the variation between and within cultures including factors, such as drivers for migration and country of birth. This study explored barriers and enablers to accessing sexual health services, including experiences of stigma and discrimination, within a purposive sample of sub-Saharan African, Southeast Asian, and East Asian migrants. A qualitative design was employed using key informant interviews and focus group discussions. A total of 45 people with ages ranging from 18 to 50 years, participated in focus group discussions. Common barriers and enablers to help seeking behaviors were sociocultural and religious influence, financial constraints, and knowledge dissemination to reduce stigma. Additionally, common experiences of stigma and discrimination were related to employment and the social and self-isolation of people living with HIV. Overcoming barriers to accessing sexual health services, imparting sexual health knowledge, recognizing variations within cultures, and a reduction in stigma and discrimination will simultaneously accelerate help-seeking and result in better sexual health outcomes in migrant populations.

  5. Note: CO₂-mineral dissolution experiments using a rocking autoclave and a novel titanium reaction cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purser, Gemma; Rochelle, Christopher A; Wallis, Humphrey C; Rosenqvist, Jörgen; Kilpatrick, Andrew D; Yardley, Bruce W D

    2014-08-01

    A novel titanium reaction cell has been constructed for the study of water-rock-CO2 reactions. The reaction cell has been used within a direct-sampling rocking autoclave and offers certain advantages over traditional "flexible gold/titanium cell" approaches. The main advantage is robustness, as flexible cells are prone to rupture on depressurisation during gas-rich experiments. The reaction cell was tested in experiments during an inter-laboratory comparison study, in which mineral kinetic data were determined. The cell performed well during experiments up to 130 °C and 300 bars pressure. The data obtained were similar to those of other laboratories participating in the study, and also to previously published data.

  6. Understanding and Improvement of an Experiment Measuring Chemical Reaction Rates by Monitoring Volume Change of a Gas: On the Reaction between HCl(aq) and Mg(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Jeong Ah; Yoon, Hee Sook; Jeong, Dae Hong; Choi, Won Ho

    2006-01-01

    In this study we analyzed and improved an experiment measuring chemical reaction rates introduced in the high school science textbooks through an understanding of the phenomena observed in carrying out the experiment. For this purpose, the contents of textbooks related to the experiment were analyzed, and the problems observed in carrying out the experiment were addressed through experimental analysis. When the experiment was carried out by the method of aquatic transposition presented in textbooks, the observed volume change of H 2 gas was delayed and chemical reaction rate was increased in the early stage of reaction period. To resolve these problems, an improved method for measuring the reaction rates was suggested. In the improved experiment the reaction rate was measured to be constant on time, which was interpreted in terms of the concentration of H + and the surface area of magnesium

  7. Nuclear bremsstrahlung in proton induced reactions at 190 MeV (first experiments at AGOR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, HW

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the first experiments with the new KVI cyclotron AGOR. First experiments have focused on nuclear bremsstrahlung in few-and many-body reactions. A classical introduction to nuclear bremsstrahlung is given. First results on coherent bremsstrahlung are discussed.

  8. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  9. Medical Students’ Experience of and Reaction to Stress: The Role of Depression and Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coumaravelou Saravanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Medical school is recognized as a stressful environment that often has a negative effect on students’ academic performance, physical health, and psychosocial well-being. Previous studies have not identified differences between depressed and nondepressed and anxious and nonanxious medical students’ experiences of stress or their reactions to stressors. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of depression and anxiety among a sample of 358 medical students attending a private university in Malaysia and to examine differences according to participants’ gender, year of study, and stage of training (preclinical and clinical. Additionally, this study examined the extent to which stress predicts depression and anxiety, differences between depressed and nondepressed medical students’ experiences of and reactions to stressors, and differences between anxious and nonanxious medical students’ experiences of and reactions to stressors. Methods. The Student Life Stress Inventory was used to measure stress and reaction to stressors and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale was used to measure depression and anxiety. Results. The results showed that 44% (n=158 of the students were anxious and 34.9% (n=125 were depressed. More female students exhibited anxiety compared to male students. Stress is a predictor for depression and anxiety. A significant difference was found between depressed and nondepressed and anxious and nonanxious students’ experience of stressors due to frustration, change, and their emotional reaction to stressors. Conclusion. Overall, depressed and anxious students were found to experience more stress and react differently to stressors compared to nondepressed and nonanxious students.

  10. Medical students' experience of and reaction to stress: the role of depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Coumaravelou; Wilks, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Medical school is recognized as a stressful environment that often has a negative effect on students' academic performance, physical health, and psychosocial well-being. Previous studies have not identified differences between depressed and nondepressed and anxious and nonanxious medical students' experiences of stress or their reactions to stressors. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of depression and anxiety among a sample of 358 medical students attending a private university in Malaysia and to examine differences according to participants' gender, year of study, and stage of training (preclinical and clinical). Additionally, this study examined the extent to which stress predicts depression and anxiety, differences between depressed and nondepressed medical students' experiences of and reactions to stressors, and differences between anxious and nonanxious medical students' experiences of and reactions to stressors. The Student Life Stress Inventory was used to measure stress and reaction to stressors and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale was used to measure depression and anxiety. The results showed that 44% (n = 158) of the students were anxious and 34.9% (n = 125) were depressed. More female students exhibited anxiety compared to male students. Stress is a predictor for depression and anxiety. A significant difference was found between depressed and nondepressed and anxious and nonanxious students' experience of stressors due to frustration, change, and their emotional reaction to stressors. Overall, depressed and anxious students were found to experience more stress and react differently to stressors compared to nondepressed and nonanxious students.

  11. Seeking help for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD): a qualitative study of the enablers and barriers conducted by a researcher with personal experience of OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Karen J; Rose, Diana; Salkovskis, Paul M

    2017-06-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) can be hugely disabling. Although very effective psychological treatments exist, many people delay years before seeking help or never seek treatment. There have been clinical observation and short questionnaire studies on why people delay, but little qualitative research exists on this complex subject. The present qualitative study aimed to identify the barriers to seeking treatment and the factors that encourage or push people to seek help for their OCD (positive and negative enablers). A qualitative, exploratory study using in-depth, individual, semi-structured interviews was conducted by a researcher with personal experience of OCD. Seventeen people with OCD, contacted through the charity OCD-UK, were interviewed about the factors that impacted on their decision to seek help or not. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Barriers identified were stigma, 'internal / cognitive' factors, not knowing what their problem was, factors relating to their GP or treatment, and fear of criminalisation. Positive enablers identified were being supported to seek help, information and personal accounts of OCD in the media, and confidence in their GP. Negative enablers were reaching a crisis point and for some participants (whose intrusive thoughts were about harming children) feeling driven to seek treatment because of the nature of the thoughts, that is, seeking help to prevent the 'harm' they feared they were capable of doing. Participants identified a range of barriers and enablers that impacted on their decision to seek help or not. These give important indicators about the likely causes for delayed help seeking in OCD and ways in which people might be encouraged to seek help earlier. People with OCD may face a wide range of barriers to seeking help, including concern about the reaction of health professionals. The level of awareness, kindness, and understanding shown by first-line practitioners can be very important to

  12. On fusion/fission chain reactions in the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.; Froelich, P.; Monkhorst, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of fusion/fission chain reactions following d-d source reactions in electrochemical cold fusion experiments have been investigated. The recycling factors for the charged particles in fusion reactions with consumable nuclei deuteron, 6 Li nd 7 Li, are estimated. It is concluded that, based on the established nuclear fusion cross sections and electronic stopping power, the recycling factor is four to five orders of magnitude less than required for close to critical conditions. It is argued that the cross generation of charged particles by neutrons does not play a significant role in this process, even if increased densities at the surface of electrodes do occur

  13. Real Time Control of CO2 Enrichment Experiments on the Sea Floor Enabled by the MARS Cabled Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, P. G.; Mbari Foce Team

    2010-12-01

    We report on progress on FOCE (Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment) techniques designed to accomplish realistic (that is not contained within land-based aquaria) experiments on the response of deep-sea animals and biogeochemical cycles to ocean acidification. Such experiments have long been carried out on ecosystems on land, and the outcome has differed significantly from CO2 enrichment in enclosed greenhouse systems, thereby undoing much of the hope for an increase in the large-scale biosphere draw down of atmospheric CO2. It is a far bigger step if deep-sea animals and systems are removed from their cold, dark, high pressure and low oxygen native habitat. The equivalent problem in the ocean is far more difficult because of (1) the very different physical forcing; (2) the complex reaction rates between CO2 and water require delay times between addition and entry to the experimental space; (3) the lack of supporting infrastructure and of adequate sensors; and (4) the need for sophisticated and robust control techniques in both hardware and software. We have overcome almost all of these challenges, and related working systems have already been successfully deployed on the Great Barrier Reef coralline flats with Australian colleagues. We have used the MBARI MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System) cabled observatory to carry out deep-ocean (880m depth) experiments. The basic experimental unit is a 1m x 1m x 50cm chamber with side arms of ~ 3m length to provide the required chemical delay times for the reaction between admixed CO2 enriched sea water and emergence of the flow into the main chamber. Controllable thrusters, operated by user commands, help maintain a steady flow of seawater through the experiment. The site is slightly below the depth of the O2 minimum where small changes in either O2 from ocean warming, or CO2 from ocean acidification can lead to the formation of dead zones. Shallow (near shore) experiments are now also in the late planning stages. We have

  14. Improved measurements of scant hydrogen peroxide enable experiments that define its threshold of toxicity for Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Imlay, James A

    2018-03-14

    Escherichia coli is a model organism that has been exploited to reveal key details of hydrogen peroxide stress: the biomolecules that H 2 O 2 most rapidly damages and the defensive tactics that organisms use to fend it off. Much less clear is the amount of exogenous H 2 O 2 that is sufficient to injure the bacterium and/or to trigger its stress response. To fill this gap, we need to study the behavior of cells when they are exposed to defined amounts of H 2 O 2 on an hours-long time scale. Such experiments are difficult because bacteria rapidly consume H 2 O 2 that is added to test cultures. Further, lab media itself can generate H 2 O 2 , and media components interfere with the quantification of H 2 O 2 levels. In this study we describe mechanisms by which media components interfere with H 2 O 2 determinations, and we identify simple ways to minimize and correct for this interference. Using these techniques, it was shown that standard media generate so much H 2 O 2 that most intracellular H 2 O 2 derives from the medium rather than from endogenous metabolism. Indeed, bacteria spread on plates must induce their stress response or else perish. Finally, two straightforward methods were used to sustain low-micromolar steady-state concentrations of H 2 O 2 . In this way we determined that > 2 μM extracellular H 2 O 2 is sufficient to trigger the intracellular OxyR stress response, and > 5 μM begins to impair cell growth in a minimal medium. These concentrations are orders of magnitude lower than the doses that have typically been used in lab experiments. The new approaches should enable workers to study how various organisms cope with natural levels of H 2 O 2 stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Simple Experiment for Teaching Process Intensification by Static Mixing in Chemical Reaction Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baz-Rodríguez, Sergio; Herrera-Soberanis, Natali; Rodríguez-Novelo, Miguel; Guillén-Francisc, Juana; Rocha-Uribe, José

    2016-01-01

    An experiment for teaching mixing intensification in reaction engineering is described. For this, a simple tubular reactor was constructed; helical static mixer elements were fabricated from stainless steel strips and inserted into the reactor. With and without the internals, the equipment operates as a static mixer reactor or a laminar flow…

  16. A Laboratory Experiment, Based on the Maillard Reaction, Conducted as a Project in Introductory Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Olena; Elliott, Antony; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2005-01-01

    A simple laboratory experiment, based on the Maillard reaction, served as a project in Introductory Statistics for undergraduates in Food Science and Technology. By using the principles of randomization and replication and reflecting on the sources of variation in the experimental data, students reinforced the statistical concepts and techniques…

  17. Differences in male and female subjective experience and physiological reactions to emotional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poláčková Šolcová, Iva; Lačev, Alek

    2017-07-01

    Research based on self-reported data often indicates that women are the more emotional sex. The present study examined differences in emotion between the sexes across two components of the emotional process: subjective experience and physiological reactions to emotional stimuli. During the experimental study, participants (N=124; 22.5±2.88; 51 males) subjectively rated their emotional experience (valence and intensity) towards presented positive and negative affective stimuli, while physiological reactions (facial electromyography, heart rate, skin conductance, and finger skin temperature) were measured during expositions. Results from self-reports suggest that women declared more intensive emotional experiences for positive and negative stimuli and rated negative stimuli as more negative in comparison to men. Physiological measurements showed differences between the sexes in the physiological baseline measurements (facial electromyography, skin conductance and finger skin temperature). However, physiological responses towards positive or negative emotional stimuli did not prove to be different between men and women, except for finger skin temperature. Relations between self-reported subjective experiences and physiological changes were weak and insignificant. Collectively, our findings suggest certain emotional differences experienced between men and women. These differences can be found specifically in self-reported subjective experiences, while significant differences were not predominantly present in recorded physiological reactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Francine [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Agblevor, Foster [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Klein, Michael [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Sheikhi, Reza [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    A collaborative effort involving experiments, kinetic modeling, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to understand co-gasification of coal-biomass mixtures. The overall goal of the work was to determine the key reactive properties for coal-biomass mixed fuels. Sub-bituminous coal was mixed with biomass feedstocks to determine the fluidization and gasification characteristics of hybrid poplar wood, switchgrass and corn stover. It was found that corn stover and poplar wood were the best feedstocks to use with coal. The novel approach of this project was the use of a red mud catalyst to improve gasification and lower gasification temperatures. An important results was the reduction of agglomeration of the biomass using the catalyst. An outcome of this work was the characterization of the chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms of the co-gasification fuels, and the development of a set of models that can be integrated into other modeling environments. The multiphase flow code, MFIX, was used to simulate and predict the hydrodynamics and co-gasification, and results were validated with the experiments. The reaction kinetics modeling was used to develop a smaller set of reactions for tractable CFD calculations that represented the experiments. Finally, an efficient tool was developed, MCHARS, and coupled with MFIX to efficiently simulate the complex reaction kinetics.

  19. Can Culture Act as an Enabler to Innovation? Exploring the Germany-Ontario Experience Regarding the Introduction of Green Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Irwin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the role that societal culture may play in terms of acting as an inhibitor or enabler when creating conditions conducive to innovative enterprise. To further understanding of this concept, the paper's authors explore different cultural influences and traditions of the country of Germany and the Canadian province of Ontario against the backdrop of the introduction of a government green energy policy and how local business reacts to new opportunities forthcoming from this shift in policy direction. The authors contend that the current Ontario psyche has contributed to an overall cultural drag on innovative activities. They demonstrate that in no place is this cultural impact more evident than the apparent lack of home-grown innovative activity surrounding green energy entrepreneurship; where, in spite of progressive and favourable provincial government policy, continued manufacturing growth is led by offshore companies The Ontario experience is in sharp contrast to current and historical German activity, when it comes to local innovation and advances in green energy. While Germany officially enacted their green energy act at the turn of the last century, experts agree that the German tenure with going green is in fact 35 to 40 years in the making. Although it has been contended that unique historical conditions such as postwar reconstruction and the reunification of the former East and West Germany have been significant contributing factors to Germany's embracing of sustainable energy, the authors of this paper contend that cultural factors such as the German sense of naturfreund; an overwhelming sense of being a nature-lover, may also play a significant role. In their exploration the authors build upon Hofstede's cultural dimension theory unpacking specific cultural components, as they compare actions and responses made by German and Ontarian policy-makers and business decision-makers.

  20. Do Victimization Experiences Accentuate Reactions to Ostracism? An Experiment Using Cyberball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, Sabrina; Bendixen, Mons; Gabriel, Ute; Alsaker, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Based on the notion that the history of victimization has an impact on the sensitivity to current victimization situations this study investigated whether victims of bullying show more pronounced responses to single episodes of social exclusion. We examined whether victimization experiences in school are associated with responses to ostracism in a…

  1. Directional Track Selection Technique in CR39 SSNTD for lowyield reaction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, Francesco; Andreoli, Pierluigi; Batani, Dimitri; Bonasera, Aldo; Boutoux, Guillaume; Burgy, Frederic; Cipriani, Mattia; Consoli, Fabrizio; Cristofari, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Riccardo; Di Giorgio, Giorgio; Ducret, Jean Eric; Giulietti, Danilo; Jakubowska, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    There is a great interest in the study of p-11B aneutronic nuclear fusion reactions, both for energy production and for determination of fusion cross-sections at low energies. In this context we performed experiments at CELIA in which energetic protons, accelerated by the laser ECLIPSE, were directed toward a solid Boron target. Because of the small cross-sections at these energies the number of expected reactions is low. CR39 Solid-State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) were used to detect the alpha particles produced. Because of the low expected yield, it is difficult to discriminate the tracks due to true fusion products from those due to natural background in the CR39. To this purpose we developed a methodology of particle recognition according to their direction with respect to the detector normal, able to determine the position of their source. We applied this to the specific experiment geometry, so to select from all the tracks those due to particles coming from the region of interaction between accelerated protons and solid boron target. This technique can be of great help on the analysis of SSNTD in experiments with low yield reactions, but can be also generally applied to any experiment where particles reach the track detector with known directions, and for example to improve the detection limit of particle spectrometers using CR39.

  2. QRTEngine: An easy solution for running online reaction time experiments using Qualtrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhoorn, Jonathan S; Haasnoot, Erwin; Bocanegra, Bruno R; van Steenbergen, Henk

    2015-12-01

    Performing online behavioral research is gaining increased popularity among researchers in psychological and cognitive science. However, the currently available methods for conducting online reaction time experiments are often complicated and typically require advanced technical skills. In this article, we introduce the Qualtrics Reaction Time Engine (QRTEngine), an open-source JavaScript engine that can be embedded in the online survey development environment Qualtrics. The QRTEngine can be used to easily develop browser-based online reaction time experiments with accurate timing within current browser capabilities, and it requires only minimal programming skills. After introducing the QRTEngine, we briefly discuss how to create and distribute a Stroop task. Next, we describe a study in which we investigated the timing accuracy of the engine under different processor loads using external chronometry. Finally, we show that the QRTEngine can be used to reproduce classic behavioral effects in three reaction time paradigms: a Stroop task, an attentional blink task, and a masked-priming task. These findings demonstrate that QRTEngine can be used as a tool for conducting online behavioral research even when this requires accurate stimulus presentation times.

  3. Background studies of high energy γ rays from (n,γ) reactions in the CANDLES experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, K.; Iida, T.; Akutagawa, K.; Batpurev, T.; Chan, W. M.; Dokaku, F.; Fushimi, K.; Kakubata, H.; Kanagawa, K.; Katagiri, S.; Kawasaki, K.; Khai, B. T.; Kino, H.; Kinoshita, E.; Kishimoto, T.; Hazama, R.; Hiraoka, H.; Hiyama, T.; Ishikawa, M.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Moser, M.; Nomachi, M.; Ogawa, I.; Ohata, T.; Sato, H.; Shamoto, K.; Shimada, M.; Shokati, M.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Takihira, Y.; Tamagawa, Y.; Tozawa, M.; Teranishi, K.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Tsuzuki, M.; Umehara, S.; Wang, W.; Yoshida, S.; Yotsunaga, N.

    2018-07-01

    High energy γ rays with several MeV produced by (n,γ) reactions can be a trouble for low background measurements in the underground laboratories such as double beta decay experiments. In the CANDLES project, which aimed to observe the neutrino-less double beta decay from 48Ca, γ rays caused by (n,γ) reactions were found to be the most significant background. The profile of the background was studied by measurements with a neutron source and a simulation with a validity check of neutron processes in Geant4. The observed spectrum of γ rays from (n,γ) reactions was well reproduced by the simulated spectra, which were originated from the surrounding rock and a detector tank made of stainless steel. The environmental neutron flux was derived by the observed event rate of γ rays from (n,γ) reactions using the simulation. The thermal and non-thermal neutron flux were found to be (1.3 ± 0.6) ×10-6 cm-2s-1 and (1.1 ± 0.5) ×10-5 cm-2s-1 , respectively. It is necessary to install an additional shield to reduce the background from (n,γ) reaction to the required level.

  4. Adverse allergic reactions to linear ionic gadolinium-based contrast agents: experience with 194, 400 injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aran, S.; Shaqdan, K.W.; Abujudeh, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To report the authors' experience with the administration of four gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA; gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadofosveset trisodium, gadoxetate disodium and gadobenate dimeglumine) in a large study population at a single, large academic medical centre. Materials and methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study in which data in the electronic incident reporting system were searched. A total of 194, 400 intravenous administrations of linear ionic GBCAs were assessed for the incidence of adverse reactions and risk factors from 1 January 2007 to 14 January 2014. The severity of reactions (mild, moderate, and severe), patient type (outpatients, inpatients, and emergency), examination type, and treatment options were also investigated. Results: In total, 204/194400 (0.1%) patients (mean age 45.7 ± 14.9) showed adverse reactions, consisting of 6/746 (0.80%), 10/3200 (0.31%), 14/6236 (0.22%) and 174/184218 (0.09%), for gadofosveset trisodium, gadoxetate disodium, gadobenate dimeglumine, and gadopentetate dimeglumine, respectively. An overall significant difference was found between different GBCAs regarding the total number of reactions (p < 0.0001). When comparing the GBCAs together, significant differences were found between gadofosveset trisodium versus gadopentetate dimeglumine (p < 0.0001), gadofosveset trisodium versus gadobenate dimeglumine (p = 0.0051), gadoxetate disodium versus gadopentetate dimeglumine (p < 0.0001) and gadopentetate dimeglumine versus gadobenate dimeglumine (p = 0.0013). Rate of reaction was higher in females (F: 146/113187, 0.13%/M: 58/81213, 0.07%; p < 0.0001). Rate of reactions was higher in outpatient (180/158885, 0.11%), emergency (10/10413, 0.10%), and inpatients (14/25102, 0.05%), respectively (p < 0.0001). Most of the patients had mild symptoms 171/204 (83.8%). Abdomen–pelvis, liver, and thoracic examinations had highest rates of reactions (0.17 versus 0

  5. Experiences on removal of sodium-water reaction products in SWAT-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, H.; Hiroi, H.; Sato, M.; Otaka, J.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes experiences and information concerning the removal of sodium water reaction products (SMRP) obtained through large leak tests of the Steam Generator Safety Test Facility (SWAT-3) at PNC/OEC, which were conducted to validate the safety design of steam generators of a prototype LMFBR Monju. The following three problems are discussed here: (1) drainability of SWRP, (2) removal of SWRP by using a cold trap, and (3) steam cleaning of SWRP. (author)

  6. Community health workers' experiences of mobile device-enabled clinical decision support systems for maternal, newborn and child health in developing countries: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzabeng, Francis; Enuameh, Yeetey; Adjei, George; Manu, Grace; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this review is to synthesize evidence on the experiences of community health workers (CHWs) of mobile device-enabled clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) interventions designed to support maternal newborn and child health (MNCH) in low-and middle-income countries.Specific objectives.

  7. Review of the sodium fire experiments including sodium-concrete-reactions and summary of the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherdron, W.

    1996-01-01

    In the technical and design concept of containment systems of sodium cooled breeder reactors it has to be considered, that leakages in sodium pipes lead to sodium fires. The temperature and pressure rise caused by sodium fires makes it indispensable to analyse these accidents to be able to assess the safety of the whole system. Generally sodium leakages may lead to three different types of fires with different consequences. The main influences are the geometry of the leakage, shape, size, location, and the sodium conditions, such as temperature, flow rate and velocity. It must be also considered the reaction of sodium with surfaces like concrete. The paper gives an overview over all the sodium fire experiments performed in the FAUNA-facility (220 m 3 ) of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in the years 1979 to 1993. The experimental program started with the investigation of pool fires on burning areas between 2 and 12 m 2 with up to 500 kg of Sodium. The experiments had been continued with 3 combined fires and 40 experiments on spray fires. 7 experiments on sodium-concrete reactions completed the program. (author)

  8. Neutron-induced reactions relevant for Inertial-Cofinement Fusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Melissa; Devlin, Mathew; Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Merrill, Frank; Nelson, Ronald; Tonchev, Anton

    2014-09-01

    The typical ignition experiment at the National Ignition Facility ablatively implodes a plastic capsule filled with DT fuel, generating a high flux of 14-MeV neutrons from the d(t,n) α reaction. There is some spread in the energy of these primary 14-MeV neutrons, which is mainly attributable to Doppler shifting from the relative thermal motion of the burning DT fuel. Neutrons created during this reaction have 5--10% chance of scattering before escaping the fuel assembly, losing some fraction of their energy in the scattering process. Neutrons emerging with an energy greater than the reaction energy are generated by a two-step process where neutrons first transfer momentum to a deuteron or tritium ion, these enhanced energy ions then fuse in flight to produce higher energy neutrons; some of these neutrons have energies in excess of 30 MeV. Measuring the fluencies of both the low- and high-energy neutrons is a powerful mechanism for studying the properties of the fuel assembly, and the various parameters important to inertial confinement fusion. We have developed a number of tools to measure the spectral characteristics of the NIF neutron spectrum. Most of these methods rely on exploiting the energy dependence of (n, γ), (n,2n), (n,3n) and (n,p) reactions on a variety o.

  9. Modeling Studies of Inhomogeneity Effects during Laser Flash Photolysis Experiments: A Reaction-Diffusion Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóka, Éva; Lente, Gábor

    2017-04-13

    This work presents a rigorous mathematical study of the effect of unavoidable inhomogeneities in laser flash photolysis experiments. There are two different kinds of inhomegenities: the first arises from diffusion, whereas the second one has geometric origins (the shapes of the excitation and detection light beams). Both of these are taken into account in our reported model, which gives rise to a set of reaction-diffusion type partial differential equations. These equations are solved by a specially developed finite volume method. As an example, the aqueous reaction between the sulfate ion radical and iodide ion is used, for which sufficiently detailed experimental data are available from an earlier publication. The results showed that diffusion itself is in general too slow to influence the kinetic curves on the usual time scales of laser flash photolysis experiments. However, the use of the absorbances measured (e.g., to calculate the molar absorption coefficients of transient species) requires very detailed mathematical consideration and full knowledge of the geometrical shapes of the excitation laser beam and the separate detection light beam. It is also noted that the usual pseudo-first-order approach to evaluating the kinetic traces can be used successfully even if the usual large excess condition is not rigorously met in the reaction cell locally.

  10. Performance study of the anisotropic flow and reaction plane reconstruction in the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaylov, V; Kugler, A; Kushpil, V; Tlustý, P; Selyuzhenkov, I

    2016-01-01

    The Projectile Spectator Detector (PSD) is a subsystem of the CBM experiment at the future FAIR facility designed to determine centrality and reaction plane orientation in the heavy-ion collisions. It will be done by measurement of the energy distribution of the heavy nucleons and nuclei fragments emitted close to the beam rapidity in forward direction. For the anticipated beam energies of FAIR SIS100 and SIS300 accelerators, different event generators (iQMD, UrQMD, DCM-QGSM, LA-QGSM and HSD) were used for the study of directed and elliptic proton flow in Au+Au collisions. Produced particles were transported with the GEANT4 Monte-Carlo using the CBM detector geometry. Performance of the reaction plane determination is shown for different PSD setups to demonstrate effects of the detector granularity and magnetic field. Simulation results are compared with the FOPI, AGS E877, E895 and STAR experimental data. (paper)

  11. Can Culture Act as an Enabler to Innovation? Exploring the Germany-Ontario Experience Regarding the Introduction of Green Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Bill Irwin; Jan A.C. Klakurka

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the role that societal culture may play in terms of acting as an inhibitor or enabler when creating conditions conducive to innovative enterprise. To further understanding of this concept, the paper's authors explore different cultural influences and traditions of the country of Germany and the Canadian province of Ontario against the backdrop of the introduction of a government green energy policy and how local business reacts to new opportunities forthcoming from this sh...

  12. 1H-detected MAS solid-state NMR experiments enable the simultaneous mapping of rigid and dynamic domains of membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T.; Nelson, Sarah E. D.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2017-12-01

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a unique method for the atomic resolution structure determination of native membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Although 13C-detected ssNMR experiments continue to play a major role, recent technological developments have made it possible to carry out 1H-detected experiments, boosting both sensitivity and resolution. Here, we describe a new set of 1H-detected hybrid pulse sequences that combine through-bond and through-space correlation elements into single experiments, enabling the simultaneous detection of rigid and dynamic domains of membrane proteins. As proof-of-principle, we applied these new pulse sequences to the membrane protein phospholamban (PLN) reconstituted in lipid bilayers under moderate MAS conditions. The cross-polarization (CP) based elements enabled the detection of the relatively immobile residues of PLN in the transmembrane domain using through-space correlations; whereas the most dynamic region, which is in equilibrium between folded and unfolded states, was mapped by through-bond INEPT-based elements. These new 1H-detected experiments will enable one to detect not only the most populated (ground) states of biomacromolecules, but also sparsely populated high-energy (excited) states for a complete characterization of protein free energy landscapes.

  13. Interfacial reactions in the Sb–Sn/(Cu, Ni) systems: Wetting experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, R.; Lanata, T.; Delsante, S.; Borzone, G.

    2012-01-01

    Interfacial reactions in the Sb–Sn/Cu and Sb–Sn/Ni systems have been investigated by means of wetting experiments. The wetting behaviour of two lead-free alloys, namely, Sb 2.5 Sn 97.5 and Sb 14.5 Sn 85.5 (at.%), in contact with Cu and Ni-substrates has been studied in view of possible applications as high-temperature solders in the electronics industry. The contact angle measurements on Cu and Ni plates were performed by using a sessile drop apparatus. The solder/substrate interface was characterised by the SEM-EDS analyses. -- Highlights: ► Sb–Sn alloys are used as high temperature lead-free solders. ► Sb–Sn alloys have good wetting properties on Cu and Ni substrates. ► Interfacial reactions and products are important for joint properties. ► Interfacial reactions/products data can be used to study the phase diagrams.

  14. A reaction time experiment on adult attachment: The development of a measure for neurophysiological settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia Wichmann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, there has been an increase of experimental research on automatic unconscious processes concerning the evaluation of the self and others. Previous research investigated implicit aspects of romantic attachment using self-report measures as explicit instruments for assessing attachment style. There is a lack of experimental procedures feasible for neurobiological settings. We developed a reaction time experiment (RT using a narrative attachment measure with an implicit nature and were interested to capture automatic processes, when the individuals’ attachment system is activated. We aimed to combine attachment methodology with knowledge from implicit measures by using a decision reaction time paradigm. This should serve as a means to capture implicit aspects of attachment. This experiment evaluated participants’ response to prototypic attachment sentences in association with their own attachment classification, measured with the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP.First the AAP was administered as the standardized interview procedure to 30 healthy participants, which were classified into a secure or insecure group. In the following experimental session, both experimenter and participants were blind with respect to classifications. 128 prototypically secure or insecure sentences related to the 8 pictures of the AAP were presented to the participants. Their response and reaction times were recorded. Based on the response (accept, reject a continuous security scale was defined. Both the AAP classification and security scale were related to the reaction times. Differentiated study hypotheses were confirmed for insecure sentences, which were accepted faster by participants from the insecure attachment group (or with lower security scale, and rejected faster by participants form secure attachment group (or with higher security scale. The elaborating unconscious processes were more activated by insecure sentences with

  15. Impact of transamination reactions and protein turnover on labeling dynamics in C-13-labeling experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grotkjær, Thomas; Åkesson, M.; Christensen, Bjarke

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic model describing carbon atom transitions in the central metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used to investigate the influence of transamination reactions and protein turnover on the transient behavior of C-13-labeling chemostat experiments. The simulations performed suggest...... that carbon exchange due to transamination and protein turnover can significantly increase the required time needed for metabolites in the TCA cycle to reach isotopic steady state, which is in agreement with published experimental observations. On the other hand, transamination and protein turnover will speed...... behavior until after three residence times. These observations suggest that greater caution should be used while also pointing to new opportunities in the design and interpretation of C-13-labeling experiments....

  16. Analyses for experiment on sodium-water reaction temperature by the CHAMPAGNE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Naoki; Kishida, Masako; Yamada, Yumi

    2000-03-01

    In this work, analyses on sodium-water reaction temperature in the new SWAT-1(SWAT-1R) test were completed by the CHAMPAGNE code in order to understand void and velocity distribution in sodium system, which was difficult to be measured in experiments. The application method of the RELAP5/Mod2 code was investigated to LMFBR steam generator (SG) blow down analysis, too. The following results were obtained. (1) Analyses on sodium-water reaction temperature in the SWAT-1R test. 1) Analyses were carried out for the SWAT-1R test under the condition water leak rate 600 g/s by treating the pressure loss coefficient, the interface friction coefficient and the coefficient related to reaction rate as parameters. The effect and mechanism of each parameter on the shape of reaction zone were well understood by these analyses. 2) The void and velocity distribution in sodium system were estimated by use of the most suitable parameters. These analytical results are expected to be useful for planning of the SWAT-1R test and evaluation of test result. (2) Investigation of the RELAP5/Mod2 code. 1) The items to be improved in the RELAP5/Mod2 code were clarified to apply this code to the FBR SG blow down analysis. 2) One of these items was an addition of the shell-side (sodium-side) model. A sodium-side model was designed and added to the RELAP5/Mod2 code. Test calculations were carried out by this improved code and the basic function of this code was confirmed. (author)

  17. Standard and Nonstandard Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions Cross Sections and Event Rates to Neutrino Detection Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Papoulias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we explore ν-nucleus processes from a nuclear theory point of view and obtain results with high confidence level based on accurate nuclear structure cross sections calculations. Besides cross sections, the present study includes simulated signals expected to be recorded by nuclear detectors and differential event rates as well as total number of events predicted to be measured. Our original cross sections calculations are focused on measurable rates for the standard model process, but we also perform calculations for various channels of the nonstandard neutrino-nucleus reactions and come out with promising results within the current upper limits of the corresponding exotic parameters. We concentrate on the possibility of detecting (i supernova neutrinos by using massive detectors like those of the GERDA and SuperCDMS dark matter experiments and (ii laboratory neutrinos produced near the spallation neutron source facilities (at Oak Ridge National Lab by the COHERENT experiment. Our nuclear calculations take advantage of the relevant experimental sensitivity and employ the severe bounds extracted for the exotic parameters entering the Lagrangians of various particle physics models and specifically those resulting from the charged lepton flavour violating μ-→e- experiments (Mu2e and COMET experiments.

  18. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  19. Enabling Voice: Aboriginal Parents, Experiences and Perceptions of Sending a Child to Boarding School in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the experience of having a child educated away from home at boarding school for Aboriginal parents living in regional and remote communities in Western Australia (WA). In-depth interviews were conducted with 11 participants and thematic analysis found the following major themes emerged from the data: (1) Access, Standards and…

  20. Microservices Architecture Enables DevOps: an Experience Report on Migration to a Cloud-Native Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Balalaie, A; Heydarnoori, A; Jamshidi Dermani, P

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on experiences and lessons learned during incremental migration and architectural refactoring of a commercial mobile back end as a service to microservices architecture. It explains how the researchers adopted DevOps and how this facilitated a smooth migration.

  1. Self-supervised learning as an enabling technology for future space exploration robots: ISS experiments on monocular distance learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hecke, Kevin; de Croon, Guido C. H. E.; Hennes, Daniel; Setterfield, Timothy P.; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Izzo, Dario

    2017-11-01

    Although machine learning holds an enormous promise for autonomous space robots, it is currently not employed because of the inherent uncertain outcome of learning processes. In this article we investigate a learning mechanism, Self-Supervised Learning (SSL), which is very reliable and hence an important candidate for real-world deployment even on safety-critical systems such as space robots. To demonstrate this reliability, we introduce a novel SSL setup that allows a stereo vision equipped robot to cope with the failure of one of its cameras. The setup learns to estimate average depth using a monocular image, by using the stereo vision depths from the past as trusted ground truth. We present preliminary results from an experiment on the International Space Station (ISS) performed with the MIT/NASA SPHERES VERTIGO satellite. The presented experiments were performed on October 8th, 2015 on board the ISS. The main goals were (1) data gathering, and (2) navigation based on stereo vision. First the astronaut Kimiya Yui moved the satellite around the Japanese Experiment Module to gather stereo vision data for learning. Subsequently, the satellite freely explored the space in the module based on its (trusted) stereo vision system and a pre-programmed exploration behavior, while simultaneously performing the self-supervised learning of monocular depth estimation on board. The two main goals were successfully achieved, representing the first online learning robotic experiments in space. These results lay the groundwork for a follow-up experiment in which the satellite will use the learned single-camera depth estimation for autonomous exploration in the ISS, and are an advancement towards future space robots that continuously improve their navigation capabilities over time, even in harsh and completely unknown space environments.

  2. Five years' experience of classical swine fever polymerase chain reaction ring trials in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po, F; Le Dimna, M; Le Potier, M F

    2011-12-01

    Since 2004, the French National Reference Laboratory for classical swine fever (CSF) has conducted an annual proficiency test (PT) to evaluate the ability of local veterinary laboratories to perform real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for CSF virus. The results of five years of testing (2004-2008) are described here. The PT was conducted under blind conditions on 20 samples. The same batch of samples was used for all five years. The number of laboratories that analysed the samples increased from four in 2004 to 13 in 2008. The results of the PT showed the following: cross-contamination between samples and deficiencies in RNA preparation can occur even in experienced laboratories; sample homogeneity should be checked carefully before selection; samples stored at-80 degrees C for several years remain stable; and poor shipment conditions do not damage the samples with regard to detection of CSF virus genome. These results will enable redesign of the panel to improve the overall quality of the PT, which will encourage laboratories to check and improve their PCR procedures and expertise. This is an excellent way to determine laboratory performance.

  3. Photonuclear reactions in astrophysical p-process: Theoretical calculations and experiment simulation based on ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Luo, Wen; Balabanski, Dimiter; Goriely, Stephane; Matei, Catalin; Tesileanu, Ovidiu

    2017-09-01

    The astrophysical p-process is an important way of nucleosynthesis to produce the stable and proton-rich nuclei beyond Fe which can not be reached by the s- and r-processes. In the present study, the astrophysical reaction rates of (γ,n), (γ,p), and (γ,α) reactions are computed within the modern reaction code TALYS for about 3000 stable and proton-rich nuclei with 12 Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility is being developed, which will provide the great opportunity to experimentally study the photonuclear reactions in p-process. Simulations of the experimental setup for the measurements of the photonuclear reactions 96Ru(γ,p) and 96Ru(γ,α) are performed. It is shown that the experiments of photonuclear reactions in p-process based on ELI-NP are quite promising.

  4. Physical activity in culturally and linguistically diverse migrant groups to Western society: a review of barriers, enablers and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Kolt, Gregory S; Mummery, W Kerry

    2009-01-01

    A close examination of epidemiological data reveals burdens of disease particular to culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) migrants, as these individuals adjust to both culture and modernization gaps. Despite the increased risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, overweight/obesity and cardiovascular disease, individuals from CALD groups are less likely to be proactive in accessing healthcare or undertaking preventative measures to ensure optimal health outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to review literature that outlines the barriers, challenges and enablers of physical activity in CALD groups who have recently migrated to Western society, and to identify key strategies to increase physical activity participation for these individuals. Electronic and manual literature searches were used to identify 57 publications that met the inclusion criteria. Findings from the review indicate that migration to Western societies has a detrimental effect on the health status and health behaviours of CALD groups as they assimilate to their new surroundings, explore different cultures and customs, and embrace a new way of life. In particular, there is evidence that physical inactivity is common in migrant CALD groups, and is a key contributing risk factor to chronic disease for these individuals. Challenges and barriers that limit physical activity participation in CALD groups include: cultural and religious beliefs, issues with social relationships, socioeconomic challenges, environmental barriers, and perceptions of health and injury. Strategies that may assist with overcoming these challenges and barriers consist of the need for cultural sensitivity, the provision of education sessions addressing health behaviours, encouraging participation of individuals from the same culture, exploration of employment situational variables, and the implementation of 'Health Action Zones' in CALD communities. This information will inform and support the development of culturally

  5. Base voltammetric characterization of phenylazide modified deoxycytidine - the potential DNA redox label enabling its post-synthetic modifications by "click-reactions"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daňhel, Aleš; Trošanová, Zuzana; Balintová, Jana; Havran, Luděk; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2013), s. 140-141 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /65./. 09.09.2013-13.09.2013, Tatranské Matliare] R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Grant - others:MŠMT(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0019 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA redox label * click-reaction Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  6. Facile and efficient room temperature solid state reaction enabled synthesis of antimony nanoparticles embedded within reduced graphene oxide for enhanced sodium-ion storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiukui; Wu, Ping; Jiang, Li; Zhang, Xiaofang; Shi, Hongxia; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Wei, Shaohua; Zhou, Yiming

    2018-06-01

    Herein, a very simple and cost-effective solid state reaction method is employed to obtain, for the first time, the antimony nanoparticles embedded within reduced graphene oxide matrices (designated as Sb/rGO). By directly grinding antimony chloride and sodium hydroxide together at room temperature in the presence of graphene oxide (GO), Sb4O5Cl2 precursor was quickly obtained, which is evenly incorporated in the graphene oxide matrices. After subsequent chemical reduction by NaBH4, the Sb/rGO composite was successfully synthesized. The as-prepared Sb/rGO composite consists of uniform Sb nanoparticles of sub-20 nm, all of which have been wrapped in and protected by the rGO matrices. The Sb nanoparticles serve as a sufficient sodium ion reservoir while the rGO matrices provide highly efficient pathways for transport of sodium ions and electrons. Moreover, the volume expansion of Sb during sodiation can be buffered in the rGO matrices. As a result, the Sb/rGO composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance in sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), including an enhanced cycling stability with a highly reversible charge capacity of 455 mA h g-1 after 45 cycles at 100 mA g-1, and a coulombic efficiency exceeding 98% during cycling. The findings in the present work pave the way to not only synthesize the designated promising electrode materials for high performance SIBs, but also thoroughly understand the solid-state reaction.

  7. Rate Coefficient for the (4)Heμ + CH4 Reaction at 500 K: Comparison between Theory and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseneau, Donald J; Fleming, Donald G; Li, Yongle; Li, Jun; Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-03

    The rate constant for the H atom abstraction reaction from methane by the muonic helium atom, Heμ + CH4 → HeμH + CH3, is reported at 500 K and compared with theory, providing an important test of both the potential energy surface (PES) and reaction rate theory for the prototypical polyatomic CH5 reaction system. The theory used to characterize this reaction includes both variational transition-state (CVT/μOMT) theory (VTST) and ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations on a recently developed PES, which are compared as well with earlier calculations on different PESs for the H, D, and Mu + CH4 reactions, the latter, in particular, providing for a variation in atomic mass by a factor of 36. Though rigorous quantum calculations have been carried out for the H + CH4 reaction, these have not yet been extended to the isotopologues of this reaction (in contrast to H3), so it is important to provide tests of less rigorous theories in comparison with kinetic isotope effects measured by experiment. In this regard, the agreement between the VTST and RPMD calculations and experiment for the rate constant of the Heμ + CH4 reaction at 500 K is excellent, within 10% in both cases, which overlaps with experimental error.

  8. Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions on Actinide Targets Extracted from Surrogate Experiments: A Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Lesher, S R; Scielzo, N D; Thompson, I J; Younes, W

    2009-10-01

    The Surrogate nuclear reactions method, an indirect approach for determining cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions involving difficult-to-measure targets, is reviewed. Focusing on cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on actinides, we review the successes of past and present applications of the method and assess its uncertainties and limitations. The approximations used in the analyses of most experiments work reasonably well for (n,f) cross sections for neutron energies above 1-2 MeV, but lead to discrepancies for low-energy (n,f) reactions, as well as for (n,{gamma}) applications. Correcting for some of the effects neglected in the approximate analyses leads to improved (n,f) results. We outline steps that will further improve the accuracy and reliability of the Surrogate method and extend its applicability to reactions that cannot be approached with the present implementation of the method.

  9. Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions on Actinide Targets Extracted from Surrogate Experiments: A Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escher, J.E.; Burke, J.T.; Dietrich, F.S.; Lesher, S.R.; Scielzo, N.D.; Thompson, I.J.; Younes, W.

    2009-01-01

    The Surrogate nuclear reactions method, an indirect approach for determining cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions involving difficult-to-measure targets, is reviewed. Focusing on cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on actinides, we review the successes of past and present applications of the method and assess its uncertainties and limitations. The approximations used in the analyses of most experiments work reasonably well for (n,f) cross sections for neutron energies above 1-2 MeV, but lead to discrepancies for low-energy (n,f) reactions, as well as for (n,γ) applications. Correcting for some of the effects neglected in the approximate analyses leads to improved (n,f) results. We outline steps that will further improve the accuracy and reliability of the Surrogate method and extend its applicability to reactions that cannot be approached with the present implementation of the method.

  10. Reaction Rate Benchmark Experiments with Miniature Fission Chambers at the Slovenian TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štancar, Žiga; Kaiba, Tanja; Snoj, Luka; Barbot, Loïc; Destouches, Christophe; Fourmentel, Damien; Villard, Jean-François AD(; )

    2018-01-01

    A series of fission rate profile measurements with miniature fission chambers, developed by the Commisariat á l'énergie atomique et auxénergies alternatives, were performed at the Jožef Stefan Institute's TRIGA research reactor. Two types of fission chambers with different fissionable coating (235U and 238U) were used to perform axial fission rate profile measurements at various radial positions and several control rod configurations. The experimental campaign was supported by an extensive set of computations, based on a validated Monte Carlo computational model of the TRIGA reactor. The computing effort included neutron transport calculations to support the planning and design of the experiments as well as calculations to aid the evaluation of experimental and computational uncertainties and major biases. The evaluation of uncertainties was performed by employing various types of sensitivity analyses such as experimental parameter perturbation and core reaction rate gradient calculations. It has been found that the experimental uncertainty of the measurements is sufficiently low, i.e. the total relative fission rate uncertainty being approximately 5 %, in order for the experiments to serve as benchmark experiments for validation of fission rate profiles. The effect of the neutron flux redistribution due to the control rod movement was studied by performing measurements and calculations of fission rates and fission chamber responses in different axial and radial positions at different control rod configurations. It was confirmed that the control rod movement affects the position of the maximum in the axial fission rate distribution, as well as the height of the local maxima. The optimal detector position, in which the redistributions would have minimum effect on its signal, was determined.

  11. Self-propagating exothermic reaction analysis in Ti/Al reactive films using experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Seema, E-mail: seema.sen@tu-ilmenau.de [Technical University of Ilmenau, Department of Materials for Electronics, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Niederrhein University of Applied Science, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Reinarzstraße 49, 47805 Krefeld (Germany); Lake, Markus; Kroppen, Norman; Farber, Peter; Wilden, Johannes [Niederrhein University of Applied Science, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Reinarzstraße 49, 47805 Krefeld (Germany); Schaaf, Peter [Technical University of Ilmenau, Department of Materials for Electronics, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Development of nanoscale Ti/Al multilayer films with 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 molar ratios. • Characterization of exothermic reaction propagation by experiments and simulation. • The reaction velocity depends on the ignition potentials and molar ratios of the films. • Only 1Ti/3Al films exhibit the unsteady reaction propagation with ripple formation. • CFD simulation shows the time dependent atom mixing and temperature flow during exothermic reaction. - Abstract: This study describes the self-propagating exothermic reaction in Ti/Al reactive multilayer foils by using experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulation. The Ti/Al foils with different molar ratios of 1Ti/1Al, 1Ti/2Al and 1Ti/3Al were fabricated by magnetron sputtering method. Microstructural characteristics of the unreacted and reacted foils were analyzed by using electronic and atomic force microscopes. After an electrical ignition, the influence of ignition potentials on reaction propagation has been experimentally investigated. The reaction front propagates with a velocity of minimum 0.68 ± 0.4 m/s and maximum 2.57 ± 0.6 m/s depending on the input ignition potentials and the chemical compositions. Here, the 1Ti/3Al reactive foil exhibits both steady state and unsteady wavelike reaction propagation. Moreover, the numerical computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation shows the time dependent temperature flow and atomic mixing in a nanoscale reaction zone. The CFD simulation also indicates the potentiality for simulating exothermic reaction in the nanoscale Ti/Al foil.

  12. Verification experiment of EPR paradox by (d, {sup 2}He) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Hideyuki [Tokyo Univ., Graudate School of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    FBR paradox which was brought forward by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen is expressed by Bell's inequality of spin correlation theoretically. In principle it is possible to verify the inequality by measuring spin correlation between two particles having spin 1/2 from a decay of {sup 1}S{sub 0} experimentally. Most of the past experiments to verify the inequality, however, have been performed by using photons. On the other hand, only one experiment by using hadron system was carried out by Lamehi and Mitting, where the [{sup 1}S{sub 0}] state was produced by proton-proton scattering at first, and then the spin orientations after the scattering were measured. Unfortunately, there exit some sources of ambiguity to reach definite conclusion from their result because the experiment was done at rather high energy of 13.5 MeV. In the experiment planned by the present author it is designed to overcome the experimental difficulties, which Lamehi and Mitting encountered, by (1) generating high purity singlet [{sup 1}S{sub 0}] state of two protons by (d, {sup 2}He) type nuclear reaction at intermediate energy range, and by (2) developing high performance spin-correlation polarimeter which can analyze spins of two protons simultaneously to minimize the systematic errors. The excitation energy of {sup 2}He corresponding to the proton-proton relative energy can be experimentally controlled. An idea singlet is realized by choosing the state with sufficiently small relative energy. It is planned to measure the spin correlation function by using SMART (Swinger and Magnetic Analyzer with Rotator and Twister) at RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility. Einstein POLarimeter (EPOL) to be installed on the second focal plane of SMART is under development, with which high precision measurements of spin orientations of two high energy protons simultaneously coming into limited space from {sup 2}He decay are made selecting the subject events from very many background events. Monte Carlo

  13. Understanding the electron-stimulated surface reactions of organometallic complexes to enable design of precursors for electron beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Julie A.; Rosenberg, Samantha G.; Barclay, Michael; Fairbrother, D. Howard [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wu, Yung-Chien; McElwee-White, Lisa [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Standard practice in electron beam-induced deposition (EBID) is to use precursors designed for thermal processes, such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD). However, organometallic precursors that yield pure metal deposits in CVD often create EBID deposits with high levels of organic contamination. This contamination negatively impacts the deposit's properties (e.g., by increasing resistivity or decreasing catalytic activity) and severely limits the range of potential applications for metal-containing EBID nanostructures. To provide the information needed for the rational design of precursors specifically for EBID, we have employed an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) surface science approach to identify the elementary reactions of organometallic precursors during EBID. These UHV studies have demonstrated that the initial electron-induced deposition of the surface-bound organometallic precursors proceeds through desorption of one or more of the ligands present in the parent compound. In specific cases, this deposition step has been shown to proceed via dissociative electron attachment, involving low-energy secondary electrons generated by the interaction of the primary beam with the substrate. Electron beam processing of the surface-bound species produced in the initial deposition event usually causes decomposition of the residual ligands, creating nonvolatile fragments. This process is believed to be responsible for a significant fraction of the organic contaminants typically observed in EBID nanostructures. A few ligands (e.g., halogens) can, however, desorb during electron beam processing while other ligands (e.g., PF{sub 3}, CO) can thermally desorb if elevated substrate temperatures are used during deposition. Using these general guidelines for reactivity, we propose some design strategies for EBID precursors. The ultimate goal is to minimize organic contamination and thus overcome the key bottleneck for fabrication of relatively pure EBID nanostructures. (orig.)

  14. Shock tube experiments on nitromethane and Promotion of chemical reactions by non-thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seljeskog, Morten

    2002-06-01

    This dissertation was undertaken to study two different subjects both related to molecular decomposition by applying a shock tube and non-thermal plasma to decompose selected hydrocarbons. The first approach to molecular decomposition concerned thermal decomposition and oxidation of highly diluted nitromethane (NM) in a shock tube. Reflected shock tube experiments on NM decomposition, using mixtures of 0.2 to 1.5 vol% NM in nitrogen or argon were performed over the temperature range 850-1550 K and pressure range 190-900 kPa, with 46 experiments diluted in nitrogen and 44 diluted in argon. By residual error analysis of the measured decomposition profiles it was found that NM decomposition (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} + M {yields} CH{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} + M, where M = N{sub 2} /Ar) corresponds well to a law of first order. Arrhenius expressions corresponding to NM diluted either in N{sub 2} or in Ar were found as k{sub N2} = 10{sup 17.011} * exp(- 182.6 kJ/mole / R*T) and k{sub Ar} = 10{sup 17.574}*exp(-207 kJ/mole / R*T ) , respectively. A new reaction mechanism was then proposed, based on new experimental data for NM decomposition both in Ar and N{sub 2} and on three previously developed mechanisms. The new mechanism predicts well the decomposition of NM diluted in both N{sub 2} and Ar within the pressure and temperature range covered by the experiments. In parallel to, and following the decomposition experiments, oxidative experiments on the ignition delay times of NM/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures were investigated over high temperature and low to high pressure ranges. These experiments were carried out with eight different mixtures of gaseous NM and oxygen diluted in argon, with pressures ranging between 44.3-600 kPa, and temperatures ranging between 842-1378 K. The oxidation experiments were divided into different categories according to the type of decomposition signals achieved. For signals with and without emission, the apparent quasi

  15. Clinical experience of adverse drug reaction in gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Hyae; Hong, Ju Hee; Lee, Yeon Su; Cha, Kyung Soo; Chang, Suk Il; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Yeong Soo

    1992-01-01

    Gadopentetate dimenglumine(Gd-DTPA) has low toxicity and good tolerance and it is said that the observed adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is compatible to those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. The overall incidence of adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is even lower than those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. Then, the possibility of potential adverse drug reaction of these contrast media is not fully known and recently, many authors have a growing interest in this point. We have taken 2501 cases of MRI and executed 1467 case of Gd-DTPA enhancement scanning(58.7%) and experienced 12 cases of adverse drug reaction(11 cases: mild reaction, 1 case: severs anaphylactic shock) and the overall incidence of our adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA was 0.8%. In conclusion, the adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is not rare and the severe adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA may occur. So, the possibility of adverse drug reaction after Gd-DTPA injection should always be kept in mind, especially when the patient has a history of reaction to contrast material, allergy(particularly asthma) and cardiac disease. For the safe use of Gd-DTPA, well trained personnel and nearby emergent care facilities should be available

  16. Enhancing communication about paediatric medicines: lessons from a qualitative study of parents' experiences of their child's suspected adverse drug reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Janine; Hesselgreaves, Hannah; Nunn, Anthony J; Peak, Matthew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Smyth, Rosalind L; Turner, Mark A; Young, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    There is little research on parents' experiences of suspected adverse drug reactions in their children and hence little evidence to guide clinicians when communicating with families about problems associated with medicines. To identify any unmet information and communication needs described by parents whose child had a suspected adverse drug reaction. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with parents of 44 children who had a suspected adverse drug reaction identified on hospital admission, during in-patient treatment or reported by parents using the Yellow Card Scheme (the UK system for collecting spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions). Interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone; most interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Analysis was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method. Many parents described being dissatisfied with how clinicians communicated about adverse drug reactions and unclear about the implications for their child's future use of medicines. A few parents felt that clinicians had abandoned their child and reported refusing the use of further medicines because they feared a repeated adverse drug reaction. The accounts of parents of children with cancer were different. They emphasised their confidence in clinicians' management of adverse drug reactions and described how clinicians prospectively explained the risks associated with medicines. Parents linked symptoms to medicines in ways that resembled the established reasoning that clinicians use to evaluate the possibility that a medicine has caused an adverse drug reaction. Clinicians' communication about adverse drug reactions was poor from the perspective of parents, indicating that improvements are needed. The accounts of parents of children with cancer indicate that prospective explanation about adverse drug reactions at the time of prescription can be effective. Convergence between parents and clinicians in their reasoning for linking children

  17. Enhancing communication about paediatric medicines: lessons from a qualitative study of parents' experiences of their child's suspected adverse drug reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Arnott

    Full Text Available There is little research on parents' experiences of suspected adverse drug reactions in their children and hence little evidence to guide clinicians when communicating with families about problems associated with medicines.To identify any unmet information and communication needs described by parents whose child had a suspected adverse drug reaction.Semi-structured qualitative interviews with parents of 44 children who had a suspected adverse drug reaction identified on hospital admission, during in-patient treatment or reported by parents using the Yellow Card Scheme (the UK system for collecting spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions. Interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone; most interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Analysis was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method.Many parents described being dissatisfied with how clinicians communicated about adverse drug reactions and unclear about the implications for their child's future use of medicines. A few parents felt that clinicians had abandoned their child and reported refusing the use of further medicines because they feared a repeated adverse drug reaction. The accounts of parents of children with cancer were different. They emphasised their confidence in clinicians' management of adverse drug reactions and described how clinicians prospectively explained the risks associated with medicines. Parents linked symptoms to medicines in ways that resembled the established reasoning that clinicians use to evaluate the possibility that a medicine has caused an adverse drug reaction.Clinicians' communication about adverse drug reactions was poor from the perspective of parents, indicating that improvements are needed. The accounts of parents of children with cancer indicate that prospective explanation about adverse drug reactions at the time of prescription can be effective. Convergence between parents and clinicians in their reasoning for

  18. Enhancing Communication about Paediatric Medicines: Lessons from a Qualitative Study of Parents' Experiences of Their Child's Suspected Adverse Drug Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Janine; Hesselgreaves, Hannah; Nunn, Anthony J.; Peak, Matthew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Smyth, Rosalind L.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is little research on parents' experiences of suspected adverse drug reactions in their children and hence little evidence to guide clinicians when communicating with families about problems associated with medicines. Objective To identify any unmet information and communication needs described by parents whose child had a suspected adverse drug reaction. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews with parents of 44 children who had a suspected adverse drug reaction identified on hospital admission, during in-patient treatment or reported by parents using the Yellow Card Scheme (the UK system for collecting spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions). Interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone; most interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Analysis was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method. Results Many parents described being dissatisfied with how clinicians communicated about adverse drug reactions and unclear about the implications for their child's future use of medicines. A few parents felt that clinicians had abandoned their child and reported refusing the use of further medicines because they feared a repeated adverse drug reaction. The accounts of parents of children with cancer were different. They emphasised their confidence in clinicians' management of adverse drug reactions and described how clinicians prospectively explained the risks associated with medicines. Parents linked symptoms to medicines in ways that resembled the established reasoning that clinicians use to evaluate the possibility that a medicine has caused an adverse drug reaction. Conclusion Clinicians' communication about adverse drug reactions was poor from the perspective of parents, indicating that improvements are needed. The accounts of parents of children with cancer indicate that prospective explanation about adverse drug reactions at the time of prescription can be effective. Convergence between parents and

  19. Reaction to the Special Issue on Centralizing the Experiences of LGB People of Color in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea, Maria Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    This reaction article comments on the Major Contribution "Centralizing the Experiences of LGB People of Color in Counseling Psychology." The content analysis of the published literature on lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people of color from 1998 to 2007 provides much-needed information that will help psychologists set future research agendas and…

  20. Prehospital treatment of burns: a qualitative study of experiences, perceptions and reactions of victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Bazargani, H; Fouladi, N; Alimohammadi, H; Sadeghieh Ahari, S; Agamohammadi, M; Mohamadi, R

    2013-08-01

    The manner in which burns are initially managed, at an incident scene, can affect the extent and depth of burn wounds and their final prognosis. The aim of this study was to understand people's experiences, perceptions and reactions towards the initial management of burns and fire accidents in Ardabil Province, Iran. In a qualitative study, 48 burn victims accompanied by their caregivers were enrolled. Focus group discussion (FGD) was used to collect data. All the interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using content analysis method. Four categories of information were retrieved in this study, including fire control, scald and burn wound management, seeking medical consultation and severity indicators. Uncertainty regarding what to do when someone catches fire was an evident finding that was explored through the discussions. The results revealed that transferring the patient to the hospital most often takes place after initial treatments administered at home. People believed that cooling a burn wound for a time longer than a few seconds may harm the wound. A strong belief in the efficacy of traditional remedies was disclosed when the statements of participants revealed that traditional or home-made remedies were widely used either to control pain immediately after burn and later during the wound repair process to accelerate the repair or to control the infection and prevent oedema and scar. Among these remedies, pennyroyal and grated potatoes seemed to be the most popular ones. Pennyroyal was thought to prevent infection and potatoes were used to relieve pain. People doubted the capability of health-care workers who work in rural health houses. People considered electrical burns and burns on the chest to be the most severe types of burns. Inappropriate perceptions regarding initial management of burns existed among the participants that should be addressed in future quantitative research or through developing programmes on secondary prevention of burns

  1. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  2. Proton-gamma coincidence experiment on medium mass nuclei at 400MeV and study of reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldit, Alain.

    1981-01-01

    Previous γ ray production experiments produced by proton on nuclei show important cross sections for residual nuclei corresponding to a four nucleon (2p + 2n) removal. With our (p - γ) coincidence experiment the forward emitted proton reflects the primary interaction and the γ spectra characterizes the final state of the reaction. Protons are detected with a magnetic spectrometer and γ rays are selected with a Ge(Li) diode. Angular and momentum analysis of scattered protons demonstrate a primary quasi free process on nucleons. No indication of knock out reactions on clusters has been seen. The residual nuclei are mainly produced by evaporation processes. A theoretical calculation involving intranuclear cascades and evaporation processes has been performed. The nucleus model is based upon a Fermi gas and nuclear density agrees with diffusion electron experiments. Residual nuclei far from target are well described with a such model. Residual nuclei near the target are sensitive to the nuclear structure [fr

  3. The H2 + + He proton transfer reaction: quantum reactive differential cross sections to be linked with future velocity mapping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Vera, Mario; Wester, Roland; Gianturco, Francesco Antonio

    2018-01-01

    We construct the velocity map images of the proton transfer reaction between helium and molecular hydrogen ion {{{H}}}2+. We perform simulations of imaging experiments at one representative total collision energy taking into account the inherent aberrations of the velocity mapping in order to explore the feasibility of direct comparisons between theory and future experiments planned in our laboratory. The asymptotic angular distributions of the fragments in a 3D velocity space is determined from the quantum state-to-state differential reactive cross sections and reaction probabilities which are computed by using the time-independent coupled channel hyperspherical coordinate method. The calculations employ an earlier ab initio potential energy surface computed at the FCI/cc-pVQZ level of theory. The present simulations indicate that the planned experiments would be selective enough to differentiate between product distributions resulting from different initial internal states of the reactants.

  4. Preparation of a Strong Thin Polonium Source And Preliminary Experiments on the Yield of (α,n) Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1945-01-01

    This report was written by E. Broda and P. K. Wright at the Cavendish Laboratory (Cambridge) in July 1945 and is about the preparation of a strong thin polonium source and preliminary experiments on the yield of (alpha,n) reactions. This report includes the experiment description, the discussion of the results and consist of 4 parts: (1) the electrode position of polonium under different conditions (2) a standard procedure for preparation of strong thin Po sources (3) a simple method for the recovery of RaD from complex mixtures (4) some preliminary experiments with a Po source. (nowak)

  5. Preparation of a Strong Thin Polonium Source And Preliminary Experiments on the Yield of (α,n) Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1945-07-01

    This report was written by E. Broda and P. K. Wright at the Cavendish Laboratory (Cambridge) in July 1945 and is about the preparation of a strong thin polonium source and preliminary experiments on the yield of (alpha,n) reactions. This report includes the experiment description, the discussion of the results and consist of 4 parts: (1) the electrode position of polonium under different conditions (2) a standard procedure for preparation of strong thin Po sources (3) a simple method for the recovery of RaD from complex mixtures (4) some preliminary experiments with a Po source. (nowak)

  6. Dynamics of ion–molecule reactions from beam experiments: A historical survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk; Futrell, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 377, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 84-92 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ion–molecule reactions * Dynamics * Beam scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  7. Computational organic chemistry: bridging theory and experiment in establishing the mechanisms of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gui-Juan; Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Xu, Liping; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2015-02-11

    Understanding the mechanisms of chemical reactions, especially catalysis, has been an important and active area of computational organic chemistry, and close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists represent a growing trend. This Perspective provides examples of such productive collaborations. The understanding of various reaction mechanisms and the insight gained from these studies are emphasized. The applications of various experimental techniques in elucidation of reaction details as well as the development of various computational techniques to meet the demand of emerging synthetic methods, e.g., C-H activation, organocatalysis, and single electron transfer, are presented along with some conventional developments of mechanistic aspects. Examples of applications are selected to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of these techniques. Some challenges in the mechanistic studies and predictions of reactions are also analyzed.

  8. Some experiments on the primary electron acceptor in reaction centres from Rhodopseudomanas sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wraight, C A; Cogdell, R J; Clayton, R K

    1975-01-01

    The bacterial reaction center absorbance change at 450 nm (A-450), assigned to an anionic semiquinone, has been suggested as a candidate for the reduced form of the primary electron acceptor in bacterial photosynthesis. In reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides we have found kinetic discrepancies between the decay of A-450 and the recovery of photochemical competence. In addition, no proton uptake is measurable on the first turnover, although subsequent ones elicit one proton bound per electron. These results are taken to indicate that the acceptor reaction after a long dark period may be different for the first turnover than for subsequent ones. It is suggested that A-450 is still a likely candidate for the acceptor function but that in reaction centers, additional quinone may act as an adventitious primary acceptor when the ''true'' primary acceptor is reduced. Alternatively, the primary acceptor may act in a ''ping-pong'' fashion with respect to subsequent photoelectrons.

  9. Adverse Reactions in Allogeneic Blood Donors: A Tertiary Care Experience from a Developing Country

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan, Sadia; Baig, Mohammad Amjad; Irfan, Syed Mohammed; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Hasan, Syeda Faiza

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Fragmented blood transfusion services along with an unmotivated blood donation culture often leads to blood shortage. Donor retention is crucial to meet the increasing blood demand, and adverse donor reactions have a negative impact on donor return. The aim of this study was to estimate adverse donor reactions and identify any demographic association.   Methods: We conducted a prospective study between January 2011 and December 2013. A total of 41,759 healthy donors were enrol...

  10. Intersystem crossing and dynamics in O(3P) + C2H4 multichannel reaction: Experiment validates theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bina; Han, Yong-Chang; Bowman, Joel M.; Angelucci, Luca; Balucani, Nadia; Leonori, Francesca; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2012-01-01

    The O(3P) + C2H4 reaction, of importance in combustion and atmospheric chemistry, stands out as a paradigm reaction involving triplet- and singlet-state potential energy surfaces (PESs) interconnected by intersystem crossing (ISC). This reaction poses challenges for theory and experiments owing to the ruggedness and high dimensionality of these potentials, as well as the long lifetimes of the collision complexes. Primary products from five competing channels (H + CH2CHO, H + CH3CO, H2 + CH2CO, CH3 + HCO, CH2 + CH2O) and branching ratios (BRs) are determined in crossed molecular beam experiments with soft electron-ionization mass-spectrometric detection at a collision energy of 8.4 kcal/mol. As some of the observed products can only be formed via ISC from triplet to singlet PESs, from the product BRs the extent of ISC is inferred. A new full-dimensional PES for the triplet state as well as spin-orbit coupling to the singlet PES are reported, and roughly half a million surface hopping trajectories are run on the coupled singlet-triplet PESs to compare with the experimental BRs and differential cross-sections. Both theory and experiment find almost equal contributions from the two PESs to the reaction, posing the question of how important is it to consider the ISC as one of the nonadiabatic effects for this and similar systems involved in combustion chemistry. Detailed comparisons at the level of angular and translational energy distributions between theory and experiment are presented for the two primary channel products, CH3 + HCO and H + CH2CHO. The agreement between experimental and theoretical functions is excellent, implying that theory has reached the capability of describing complex multichannel nonadiabatic reactions. PMID:22665777

  11. Oxidative C-H/C-H Cross-Coupling Reactions between N-Acylanilines and Benzamides Enabled by a Cp*-Free RhCl3/TFA Catalytic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jingsong; Shi, Yang; Zhang, Luoqiang; Lan, Jingbo; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Fulin; Wei, Wenlong

    2018-06-03

    Using the dual chelation-assisted strategy, a completely regiocontrolled oxidative C-H/C-H cross-coupling reaction between an N-acylaniline and a benzamide has been accomplished for the first time, which enables a step-economical and highly efficient pathway to 2-amino-2'-carboxybiaryl scaffolds from readily available substrates. A Cp*-free RhCl3/TFA catalytic system has been developed to replace the generally used [Cp*RhCl2]2/AgSbF6 (Cp* = pentamethyl cyclopentadienyl) in oxidative C-H/C-H cross-coupling reactions between two (hetero)arenes. The RhCl3/TFA system avoids the use of expensive Cp* ligand and AgSbF6. As an illustrative example, the protocol developed herein greatly streamlines access to naturally occurring benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid oxynitidine in an excellent overall yield. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Determination of transport and reaction swarm coefficients from the analysis of complex transient pulses from the pulsed Townsend experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekstein, A; De Urquijo, J; Rodríguez-Luna, J C; Juárez, A M; Ducasse, O

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper the interpretation and analysis of transient pulses from a pulsed Townsend experiment by solving the continuity equations of the charged carriers (electrons and ions) involved in the avalanche. The set of second order partial differential equations is solved by SIMAV, a simulator designed specifically for the pulsed Townsend avalanche. Complex situations involving processes such as electron detachment, ion-molecule reactions, Penning ionization and secondary electron emission from ion impact at the cathode, virtually impossible to solve analytically, are discussed here to illustrate the capability of the simulator to help explain the various reaction processes involved in the avalanche, and also to derive some of the transport and reaction coefficients.

  13. Diagnostic technique for measuring fusion reaction rate for inertial confinement fusion experiments at Shen Guang-III prototype laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Feng; Peng Xiao-Shi; Liu Shen-Ye; Xu Tao; Kang Dong-Guo

    2013-01-01

    A study is conducted using a two-dimensional simulation program (Lared-s) with the goal of developing a technique to evaluate the effect of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in a neutron fusion reaction region. Two peaks of fusion reaction rate are simulated by using a two-dimensional simulation program (Lared-s) and confirmed by the experimental results. A neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) system is developed with a high temporal resolution of ∼ 30 ps at the Shen Guang-III (SG-III) prototype laser facility in China, to measure the fusion reaction rate history. With the shape of neutron reaction rate curve and the spherical harmonic function in this paper, the degree of Rayleigh-Taylor growth and the main source of the neutron yield in our experiment can be estimated qualitatively. This technique, including the diagnostic system and the simulation program, may provide important information for obtaining a higher neutron yield in implosion experiments of inertial confinement fusion

  14. Adverse Reactions in Allogeneic Blood Donors: A Tertiary Care Experience from a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Sultan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fragmented blood transfusion services along with an unmotivated blood donation culture often leads to blood shortage. Donor retention is crucial to meet the increasing blood demand, and adverse donor reactions have a negative impact on donor return. The aim of this study was to estimate adverse donor reactions and identify any demographic association.   Methods: We conducted a prospective study between January 2011 and December 2013. A total of 41,759 healthy donors were enrolled. Professionally trained donor attendants drew blood and all donors were observed during and following donation for possible adverse events for 20 minutes. Blood donors were asked to report if they suffered from any delayed adverse consequences.   Results: Out of 41,759 blood donors, 537 (1.3% experienced adverse reactions. The incidence was one in every 78 donations. The mean age of donors who experienced adverse events was 26.0±6.8 years, and all were male. Out of 537 donors, 429 (80% developed vasovagal reaction (VVR, 133 (25% had nausea, 63 (12% fainted, 35 (6% developed hyperventilation, 9 (2% had delayed syncope, and 9 (2% developed hematoma. Arterial prick, nerve injury, cardiac arrest, and seizures were not observed. Donors aged less than < 30 years and weighing < 70 kg were significantly associated with VVR, hyperventilation, and nausea (p < 0.005. Undergraduates and Urdu speaking donors also had a significant association with fainting and nausea, respectively (p < 0.05.   Conclusion: The prevalence of adverse events was low at our tertiary center. A VVR was the predominant adverse reaction and was associated with age and weight. Our study highlights the importance of these parameters in the donation process. A well-trained and experienced phlebotomist and pre-evaluation counseling of blood donors could further minimize the adverse reactions.

  15. Adverse Reactions in Allogeneic Blood Donors: A Tertiary Care Experience from a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sadia; Baig, Mohammad Amjad; Irfan, Syed Mohammed; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Hasan, Syeda Faiza

    2016-03-01

    Fragmented blood transfusion services along with an unmotivated blood donation culture often leads to blood shortage. Donor retention is crucial to meet the increasing blood demand, and adverse donor reactions have a negative impact on donor return. The aim of this study was to estimate adverse donor reactions and identify any demographic association.  . We conducted a prospective study between January 2011 and December 2013. A total of 41,759 healthy donors were enrolled. Professionally trained donor attendants drew blood and all donors were observed during and following donation for possible adverse events for 20 minutes. Blood donors were asked to report if they suffered from any delayed adverse consequences.  . Out of 41,759 blood donors, 537 (1.3%) experienced adverse reactions. The incidence was one in every 78 donations. The mean age of donors who experienced adverse events was 26.0±6.8 years, and all were male. Out of 537 donors, 429 (80%) developed vasovagal reaction (VVR), 133 (25%) had nausea, 63 (12%) fainted, 35 (6%) developed hyperventilation, 9 (2%) had delayed syncope, and 9 (2%) developed hematoma. Arterial prick, nerve injury, cardiac arrest, and seizures were not observed. Donors aged less than donors also had a significant association with fainting and nausea, respectively (p adverse events was low at our tertiary center. A VVR was the predominant adverse reaction and was associated with age and weight. Our study highlights the importance of these parameters in the donation process. A well-trained and experienced phlebotomist and pre-evaluation counseling of blood donors could further minimize the adverse reactions.

  16. Basic visualization experiments on eutectic reaction of boron carbide and stainless steel under sodium-cooled fast reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamano, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Tohru; Kamiyama, Kenji; Kudo, Isamu

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes basic visualization experiments on eutectic reaction and relocation of boron carbide (B 4 C) and stainless steel (SS) under a high temperature condition exceeding 1500degC as well as the importance of such behaviors in molten core during a core disruptive accident in a Generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (750 MWe class) designed in Japan. At first, a reactivity history was calculated using an exact perturbation calculation tool taking into account expected behaviors. This calculation indicated the importance of a relocation behavior of the B 4 C-SS eutectic because its behavior has a large uncertainty in the reactivity history. To clarify this behavior, basic experiments were carried out by visualizing the reaction of a B 4 C pellet contacted with molten SS in a high temperature-heating furnace. The experiments have shown the eutectic reaction visualization as well as freezing and relocation of the B 4 C-SS eutectic in upper part of the solidified test piece due to the density separation. (author)

  17. Optimization of reaction parameters for the electrochemical oxidation of lidocaine with a Design of Experiments approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gul, Turan; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar

    2015-01-01

    Identification of potentially toxic oxidative drug metabolites is a crucial step in the development of new drugs. Electrochemical methods are useful to study oxidative drug metabolism, but are not widely used to synthesize metabolites for follow-up studies. Careful optimization of reaction

  18. Dynamics of chemical reactions of multiply-charged cations: Information from beam scattering experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 378, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 113-126 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Multiply-charged ions * Dynamics of chemical reactions * Beam scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  19. Two Experiments to Approach the Boltzmann Factor: Chemical Reaction and Viscous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Claudio; Battaglia, Onofrio R.; Guastella, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a pedagogical approach aimed at pointing out the role played by the Boltzmann factor in describing phenomena usually perceived as regulated by different mechanisms of functioning. Experimental results regarding some aspects of a chemical reaction and of the viscous flow of some liquids are analysed and described in terms…

  20. A Smart Cage With Uniform Wireless Power Distribution in 3D for Enabling Long-Term Experiments With Freely Moving Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Bahrami, Hadi; Sawan, Mohamad; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel experimental chamber with uniform wireless power distribution in 3D for enabling long-term biomedical experiments with small freely moving animal subjects. The implemented power transmission chamber prototype is based on arrays of parallel resonators and multicoil inductive links, to form a novel and highly efficient wireless power transmission system. The power transmitter unit includes several identical resonators enclosed in a scalable array of overlapping square coils which are connected in parallel to provide uniform power distribution along x and y. Moreover, the proposed chamber uses two arrays of primary resonators, facing each other, and connected in parallel to achieve uniform power distribution along the z axis. Each surface includes 9 overlapped coils connected in parallel and implemented into two layers of FR4 printed circuit board. The chamber features a natural power localization mechanism, which simplifies its implementation and ease its operation by avoiding the need for active detection and control mechanisms. A single power surface based on the proposed approach can provide a power transfer efficiency (PTE) of 69% and a power delivered to the load (PDL) of 120 mW, for a separation distance of 4 cm, whereas the complete chamber prototype provides a uniform PTE of 59% and a PDL of 100 mW in 3D, everywhere inside the chamber with a size of 27×27×16 cm(3).

  1. First contact: acute stress reactions and experiences of emergency department consultations following an incident of intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Philippa

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this research was to explore women's emotional and affective responses following an incident of intimate partner violence experienced during emergency department attendances. A growing body of research has explored women's experiences of emergency departments following intimate partner violence still little remains known about the experience and impact of emotional and affective responses during these attendances. A descriptive qualitative design was used, underpinned theoretically by critical realism and postmodern complexity theory to attend to multiple, intersecting mechanisms that lie behind events and experiences. Semistructured interviews with six women who had attended an emergency department directly following an incident of intimate partner violence. Interview data were transcribed and thematically analysed in nvivo9 using a coding framework. There were three interconnected key findings. First, was the commonality of acute stress experiences among women attending an emergency department following partner violence, second was that these acute stress reactions negatively impacted women's consultations, and third was the need for specialist domestic violence services at the point of first contact to assist service users navigate an effective consultation. Acute stress reactions were an important feature of women's experiences of emergency department consultations following intimate partner violence. Attending to psychological first aid; providing a safe and quiet space; and affording access to specialist violence advocacy services at the point of first contact will limit harm and improve health consultation outcomes for this population. This research provides an account of emotional and affective responses experienced by women attending emergency departments following intimate partner violence and explicates how these acute stress reactions impacted their consultation. This research has relevance for practitioners in many first contact health

  2. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose Zayas, Michael Derby, Patrick Gilman and Shreyas Ananthan,

    2015-05-01

    Leveraging this experience, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office has evaluated the potential for wind power to generate electricity in all 50 states. This report analyzes and quantifies the geographic expansion that could be enabled by accessing higher above ground heights for wind turbines and considers the means by which this new potential could be responsibly developed.

  3. Communication: The Al + CO2 → AlO + CO reaction: Experiment vs. theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi; Moore, Kevin B.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    2017-11-01

    Based on their highly sophisticated crossed-beam experimental studies of the Al + CO2 → AlO + CO reaction, Honma and Hirata have directly challenged the results of earlier theoretical studies of this system. We report high level theoretical studies of this system. It is shown that, consistent with Honma-Hirata experimental conclusions, the previous theoretical prediction of a substantial barrier height for this reaction was incorrect. However, for the structures of the possible intermediates, in agreement with the 1992 theoretical study of Sakai, we find striking disagreement with the experimental conclusion that the O-C-O moiety is nearly linear. The energies of the three entrance channel intermediates lie 14.4, 15.2, and 16.4 kcal mol-1 below separated Al + CO2.

  4. Application of SSNTDs for measurements of fusion reaction products in high-temperature plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowska, A., E-mail: a.malinowska@ipj.gov.p [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Szydlowski, A.; Malinowski, K. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Sadowski, M.J. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM), 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Zebrowski, J. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Scholz, M.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM), 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Jaskola, M.; Korman, A. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    The paper describes the application of SSNTDs of the PM-355 type to diagnostics of reaction products emitted from high-temperature deuterium plasmas produced in Plasma Focus (PF) facilities. Acceleration processes occurring in plasma lead often to the generation of high-energy ion beams. Such beams induce nuclear reactions and contribute to the emission of fast neutrons, fusion protons and alpha particles from PF discharges with a deuterium gas. Ion measurements are of primary importance for understanding the mechanisms of the physical processes which drive the charged-particle acceleration. The main aim of the present studies was to perform measurements of spatial- and energy-distributions of fusion-reaction protons (about 3 MeV) within a PF facility. Results obtained from energy measurements were compared with the proton-energy spectra computed theoretically. The protons were measured by means of a set of ion pinhole cameras equipped with PM-355 detectors, which were placed at different angles relative to the electrode axis of the PF facility.

  5. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3 He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3 He(d,p) 4 He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  6. First-Principles Computed Rate Constant for the O + O2 Isotopic Exchange Reaction Now Matches Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Grégoire; Honvault, Pascal; Kochanov, Roman; Tyuterev, Vladimir

    2018-04-19

    We show, by performing exact time-independent quantum molecular scattering calculations, that the quality of the ground electronic state global potential energy surface appears to be of utmost importance in accurately obtaining even as strongly averaged quantities as kinetic rate constants. The oxygen isotope exchange reaction, 18 O + 32 O 2 , motivated by the understanding of a complex long-standing problem of isotopic ozone anomalies in the stratosphere and laboratory experiments, is explored in this context. The thermal rate constant for this key reaction is now in quantitative agreement with all experimental data available to date. A significant recent progress at the frontier of three research domains, advanced electronic structure calculations, ultrasensitive spectroscopy, and quantum scattering calculations, has therefore permitted a breakthrough in the theoretical modeling of this crucial collision process from first principles.

  7. Capture reactions at astrophysically relevant energies: extended gas target experiments and GEANT simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kölle, V; Braitmayer, S E; Mohr, P J; Wilmes, S; Staudt, G; Hammer, J W; Jäger, M; Knee, H; Kunz, R; Mayer, A

    1999-01-01

    Several resonances of the capture reaction sup 2 sup 0 Ne(alpha, gamma) sup 2 sup 4 Mg were measured using an extended windowless gas target system. Detailed GEANT simulations were performed to derive the strength and the total width of the resonances from the measured yield curve. The crucial experimental parameters, which are mainly the density profile in the gas target and the efficiency of the gamma-ray detector, were analyzed by a comparison between the measured data and the corresponding simulation calculations. The excellent agreement between the experimental data and the simulations gives detailed insight into these parameters. (author)

  8. Evaluation of the 152Eu migration experiments using a combined reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloszewski, P.; Klotz, D.

    2001-01-01

    A transport and interaction model is applied to 152 Eu migration experiments which takes account simultaneously of fast (so-called local equilibrium) and slow (kinetic) exchange processes of the migrant between the aqueous and the solid phase [de

  9. Implementation of BIRADSTM together with an organization of percutaneous breast biopsies: experiences, reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hergan, K.; Oser, W.; Laengle, I.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To record the acceptance and reactions of radiologist und physicians who recommend patients for mammography after simultaneous establishment of BIRADS TM and a registration of the results of percutaneous breast biopsies. Materials and methods: To improve clarity of mammographic reports and to provide guidance concerning any necessary percutaneous breast biopsies the Breast Imaging Data And Reporting System (BIRADS TM ) has been introduced regionally together with a registration of percutaneous breast biopsies. Using a questionnaire, 25 radiologists and 230 referring physicians were asked on acceptance and reactions concerning the established system. Results: Of the 15 answering radiologists, 93% considered BIRADS TM a worthwhile effort and 87% found the biopsy guidelines to be useful. They regarded the acceptance of the referring physicians and patients as high (80%). Up to 69% of the 52 participating physicians stated a better understanding of the mammographic reports, an easier comprehension of the dignity classification of a mammographic lesion and the feeling of an improvement in their work. Preoperative assessment of histology was found to be valuable by 94% of the referring physicians. They believe that more than half of the patients benefit from the biopsy guidelines and that the majority of patients accept this approach. Conclusion: BIRADS TM is useful to standardize and improve mammographic reports. It is advantageous to link BIRADS TM with guidelines for percutaneous breast biopsies. (orig.) [de

  10. Numerical study of chemical reactions in a surface microdischarge tube with mist flow based on experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, T; Nishiyama, H

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a water treatment method of spraying solution into a discharge region has been developed and shows high energy efficiency. In this study, a simulation model of a water treatment method using a surface microdischarge (SMD) tube with mist flow is proposed for further understanding the detailed chemical reactions. Our model has three phases (plasma, gas and liquid) and three simulation steps. The carrier gas is humid air including 2% or 3% water vapour. The chemical species diffusion characteristics in the SMD tube and the concentrations in a droplet are clarified in a wide pH interval. The simulation results show that the chemical species generated on the SMD tube inner wall are diffused to the central axis and dissolved into fine droplets. Especially, OH radicals dissolve into droplets a few mm away from the SMD tube wall because of acidification of the droplets. Furthermore, the hydrogen peroxide density, which is the most important indicator of a radical reaction in water, is influenced by the initial solution pH. This pH dependence results from ozone self-decomposition in water. (paper)

  11. Numerical study of chemical reactions in a surface microdischarge tube with mist flow based on experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, T.; Nishiyama, H.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a water treatment method of spraying solution into a discharge region has been developed and shows high energy efficiency. In this study, a simulation model of a water treatment method using a surface microdischarge (SMD) tube with mist flow is proposed for further understanding the detailed chemical reactions. Our model has three phases (plasma, gas and liquid) and three simulation steps. The carrier gas is humid air including 2% or 3% water vapour. The chemical species diffusion characteristics in the SMD tube and the concentrations in a droplet are clarified in a wide pH interval. The simulation results show that the chemical species generated on the SMD tube inner wall are diffused to the central axis and dissolved into fine droplets. Especially, OH radicals dissolve into droplets a few mm away from the SMD tube wall because of acidification of the droplets. Furthermore, the hydrogen peroxide density, which is the most important indicator of a radical reaction in water, is influenced by the initial solution pH. This pH dependence results from ozone self-decomposition in water.

  12. Effects of positive electrical feedback in the oscillating Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction: Experiments and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes both the experimental and numerical investigations on the effect of positive electrical feedback in the oscillating Belovsou-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction under batch conditions. Positive electrical feedback causes an increase in the amplitude and period of the oscillations with the corresponding increase of the feedback strength. Oregonator model with a positive feedback term suitably incorporated in one of the dynamical variables is used to account for these experimental observations. Further, the effect of positive feedback on the Hopf points are investigated numerically by constructing the bifurcation diagrams. In the absence of feedback, for a particular stoichiometric parameter, the model exhibits both supercritical and subcritical Hopf bifurcations with canard existing near the former Hopf point. In the presence of positive feedback it is observed that (i) both the Hopf points advances, (ii) the distance between the two Hopf points decreases linearly, while the period increases exponentially with the increase of feedback strength near the Hopf points, (iii) only supercritical Hopf point without canard survives for a very strong positive feedback strength and (iv) moderate feedback strength takes the system away from limit cycle to the canard regime. These observations are explained in terms of Field-Koeroes-Noyes mechanism of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. This may be the first instance where the advancement of Hopf points due to positive feedback is clearly shown

  13. Looking for the GAP effect in manual responses and the role of contextual influences in reaction time experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria Jr. A.J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available When the offset of a visual stimulus (GAP condition precedes the onset of a target, saccadic reaction times are reduced in relation to the condition with no offset (overlap condition - the GAP effect. However, the existence of the GAP effect for manual responses is still controversial. In two experiments using both simple (Experiment 1, N = 18 and choice key-press procedures (Experiment 2, N = 12, we looked for the GAP effect in manual responses and investigated possible contextual influences on it. Participants were asked to respond to the imperative stimulus that would occur under different experimental contexts, created by varying the array of warning-stimulus intervals (0, 300 and 1000 ms and conditions (GAP and overlap: i intervals and conditions were randomized throughout the experiment; ii conditions were run in different blocks and intervals were randomized; iii intervals were run in different blocks and conditions were randomized. Our data showed that no GAP effect was obtained for any manipulation. The predictability of stimulus occurrence produced the strongest influence on response latencies. In Experiment 1, simple manual responses were shorter when the intervals were blocked (247 ms, P < 0.001 in relation to the other two contexts (274 and 279 ms. Despite the use of choice key-press procedures, Experiment 2 produced a similar pattern of results. A discussion addressing the critical conditions to obtain the GAP effect for distinct motor responses is presented. In short, our data stress the relevance of the temporal allocation of attention for behavioral performance.

  14. Nuclear science experiments with a bright neutron source from fusion reactions on the OMEGA Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, C. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Schroeder, W. U.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Sickles, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Szczepanski, J.

    2018-04-01

    Subnanosecond impulses of 1013 to 1014 neutrons, produced in direct-drive laser inertial confinement fusion implosions, have been used to irradiate deuterated targets at the OMEGA Laser System (Boehly et al., 1997). The target compounds include heavy water (D2O) and deuterated benzene (C6D6). Yields and energy spectra of neutrons from D(n,2n)p to study the breakup reaction have been measured at a forward angle of θlab = 3 .5∘ ± 3.5° with a sensitive, high-dynamic-range neutron time-of-flight spectrometer to infer the double-differential breakup cross section d2 σ/dE d Ω for 14-MeV D-T fusion neutrons.

  15. Relationship power and betrayal experience as predictors of reactions to infidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Margit I; Frazier, Patricia A

    2005-12-01

    Explanations for sexual infidelity have been dominated by an evolutionary psychological theory of jealousy that finds its strongest support in research that employs a forced-choice hypothetical infidelity paradigm wherein participants imagine experiencing infidelity and choose whether sexual or emotional infidelity would be more distressing. Robust gender differences that support evolutionary psychological perspectives are consistently found using this paradigm, but recent work suggests that gender differences may be attenuated among actual infidelity victims. However, no research has used the forced-choice paradigm to compare real and hypothetical infidelity. This study uses this paradigm to compare reactions to imagined dating infidelity to those of infidelity victims. No gender differences are observed in response to the forced-choice question among victims of infidelity. Gender differences among participants who imagined infidelity are partially mediated by level of relationship power. Difficulties with the hypothetical forced-choice paradigm and implications for the evolutionary psychological theory of jealousy are discussed.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of the thermal dehydration reaction in a TGA experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lan, S.; Gaeini, M.; Zondag, H.A.; van Steenhoven, A.A.; Rindt, C.C.M.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents a detailed mathematical model of the coupled mass and heat transfer processes in salt hydrate grains in a TGA experiment. The purpose of developing this numerical model is to get a more fundamental understanding of the influence of parameters like particle size, nucleation rate

  17. On the Use of Interactive Texts in Undergraduate Chemical Reaction Engineering Courses: A Pedagogical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Daniela A.; Barassi, Francisca J.; Zambon, Mariana T.; Mazza, Germán D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a pedagogical experience carried out at the University of Comahue, Argentina, with an interactive text (IT) concerning Homogeneous Chemical Reactors Analysis. The IT was built on the frame of the "Mathematica" software with the aim of providing students with a robust computational tool. Students'…

  18. Behavioral reactions to advanced cruise control: results of a driving simulator experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaeker, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes an experimental study that is conducted in the driving simulator at the Centre for Environmental and Traffic Psychology (COV) of the University of Groningen. In the experiment, two groups of drivers, who differed with respect to reported driving style in terms of speed, drove

  19. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  20. MRMer, an interactive open source and cross-platform system for data extraction and visualization of multiple reaction monitoring experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel B; Holzman, Ted; May, Damon; Peterson, Amelia; Eastham, Ashley; Eng, Jimmy; McIntosh, Martin

    2008-11-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry identifies and quantifies specific peptides in a complex mixture with very high sensitivity and speed and thus has promise for the high throughput screening of clinical samples for candidate biomarkers. We have developed an interactive software platform, called MRMer, for managing highly complex MRM-MS experiments, including quantitative analyses using heavy/light isotopic peptide pairs. MRMer parses and extracts information from MS files encoded in the platform-independent mzXML data format. It extracts and infers precursor-product ion transition pairings, computes integrated ion intensities, and permits rapid visual curation for analyses exceeding 1000 precursor-product pairs. Results can be easily output for quantitative comparison of consecutive runs. Additionally MRMer incorporates features that permit the quantitative analysis experiments including heavy and light isotopic peptide pairs. MRMer is open source and provided under the Apache 2.0 license.

  1. Experiments on the nuclear fragmentation and on the production of radioactive beams for direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.

    1993-06-01

    In April 1992 at the GSI a prototype experiment on the production and study of the double-magic radioactive nucleus 56 Ni was successfully performed with proton scattering in inverse kinematics. A 350 MeV/u 56 Ni primary beam from the heavy ion synchrotron SIS was fragmented in a 4/g/cm 2 thick beryllium target. The separation of the formed isotopes ensued in the fragment separator FRS, which was operated in the achromatic mode with a degrader. Production cross sections for a whole series of fragments in the range 29≥Z≥19 and 57≥A≥41 were obtained. It succeeded to detect proton-rich isotopes at the boundary of the stability as for instance 52 Co, 51 Co, 50 Co, or 52 Ni and to determine for the first time their production cross sections. A further part of this thesis with regard to experiments with radioactive beams were first test experiments at the experimental storage ring ESR. The spotlight held luminosity measurements at the internal gas target with cooled, stable proton beam. For this the elastic scattering was stuided in inverse kinematics in the Rutherford range. Studied were different projectile beams (Ne, Xe) at energies of 150 MeV/u respectively 250 MeV/u and gas jets of nitrogen, argon, and hydrogen. The measured energy spectra of the recoils are in agreement with simulation calculations

  2. Better and more efficient care through ICT-enabled integration of social care and healthcare services: experiences from two European projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sonja; Meyer, Ingo; Kubitschke, Lutz; Delaney, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Unsynchronised social and health care service delivery leads to inefficiencies, duplication of resources and reduced levels of quality of care. Older people are particularly affected by this situation. They often need both types of services, such as support with daily living activities and chronic disease management. ICT has the potential to support integrated service delivery to achieve high quality independent living and wellbeing for older people across Europe and elsewhere. Against this background, the presentation will demonstrate experiences and results derived from the development and piloting of ICT-supported integrated care services in eight sites across Europe, namely Dublin, Hull, Milton Keynes, Malaga, Veldhoven, Geldrop, Eindhoven and Bielefeld. Through innovative usage of ICT, current ‘silos’ in service delivery are broken up to allow for cooperation across relevant care sectors and participation of family members. The integrated services are to support the effective management of chronic diseases, and to address issues which affect independence, such as reduced agility, vision or hearing, in order to significantly improve the quality of life for older people and their carers. A dedicated programme of service process innovation complemented by adaptation of technology is being pursued in order to develop an integrated digital support infrastructure and related services: using appropriate existing technology to provide as many older people as possible with digital access to support services they needaugmenting and opening sectoral care platforms to enable coordinated cross-sector support deliveryadopting a clearly demand-driven inclusive approach and avoiding a technology ‘push’. Wider deployment of the services is supported by a dedicated programme of socio-economic service evaluation. The evaluation framework utilises a multi-method and multi-perspective approach, involving end users, family carers, service provider staff and key informants

  3. Coupled enzyme reactions performed in heterogeneous reaction media: experiments and modeling for glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase in a PEG/citrate aqueous two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumiller, William M; Davis, Bradley W; Hashemian, Negar; Maranas, Costas; Armaou, Antonios; Keating, Christine D

    2014-03-06

    The intracellular environment in which biological reactions occur is crowded with macromolecules and subdivided into microenvironments that differ in both physical properties and chemical composition. The work described here combines experimental and computational model systems to help understand the consequences of this heterogeneous reaction media on the outcome of coupled enzyme reactions. Our experimental model system for solution heterogeneity is a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/sodium citrate aqueous mixture that provides coexisting PEG-rich and citrate-rich phases. Reaction kinetics for the coupled enzyme reaction between glucose oxidase (GOX) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were measured in the PEG/citrate aqueous two-phase system (ATPS). Enzyme kinetics differed between the two phases, particularly for the HRP. Both enzymes, as well as the substrates glucose and H2O2, partitioned to the citrate-rich phase; however, the Amplex Red substrate necessary to complete the sequential reaction partitioned strongly to the PEG-rich phase. Reactions in ATPS were quantitatively described by a mathematical model that incorporated measured partitioning and kinetic parameters. The model was then extended to new reaction conditions, i.e., higher enzyme concentration. Both experimental and computational results suggest mass transfer across the interface is vital to maintain the observed rate of product formation, which may be a means of metabolic regulation in vivo. Although outcomes for a specific system will depend on the particulars of the enzyme reactions and the microenvironments, this work demonstrates how coupled enzymatic reactions in complex, heterogeneous media can be understood in terms of a mathematical model.

  4. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  5. Characterization of Aerodynamic Interactions with the Mars Science Laboratory Reaction Control System Using Computation and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; VanNorman, John; Rhode, Matthew; Paulson, John

    2013-01-01

    On August 5 , 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule successfully entered Mars' atmosphere and landed the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater. The capsule used a reaction control system (RCS) consisting of four pairs of hydrazine thrusters to fly a guided entry. The RCS provided bank control to fly along a flight path commanded by an onboard computer and also damped unwanted rates due to atmospheric disturbances and any dynamic instabilities of the capsule. A preliminary assessment of the MSL's flight data from entry showed that the capsule flew much as predicted. This paper will describe how the MSL aerodynamics team used engineering analyses, computational codes and wind tunnel testing in concert to develop the RCS system and certify it for flight. Over the course of MSL's development, the RCS configuration underwent a number of design iterations to accommodate mechanical constraints, aeroheating concerns and excessive aero/RCS interactions. A brief overview of the MSL RCS configuration design evolution is provided. Then, a brief description is presented of how the computational predictions of RCS jet interactions were validated. The primary work to certify that the RCS interactions were acceptable for flight was centered on validating computational predictions at hypersonic speeds. A comparison of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions to wind tunnel force and moment data gathered in the NASA Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel was the lynch pin to validating the CFD codes used to predict aero/RCS interactions. Using the CFD predictions and experimental data, an interaction model was developed for Monte Carlo analyses using 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation. The interaction model used in the flight simulation is presented.

  6. Applications of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) for fast ion and fusion reaction product measurements in TEXTOR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydlowski, A.; Malinowski, K.; Malinowska, A. [Association EURTOM-IPPLM Warsaw, The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Wassenhove, G. Van [EURATOM-Belgium State Association, LPP, ERM/KMS, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Schweer, B. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Institutte of Plasma Physicx, Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The paper reports on measurements of fusion reaction protons which were performed on TEXTOR facility in January 2009. The basic experimental scheme was similar to that applied in the previous measurements [1, 2]. The main experimental tool equipment was a small ion pinhole camera which was equipped with a PM-355 detector sample and was attached to a water cooled manipulator. The camera was placed below the plasma ring in the direction of ion drifts, at a distance of 4.4 cm from LCFS. However, in the described experiment it was aligned at an angle to the mayor TEXTOR radius (contrary to previous experiments), so that the input pinhole was oriented first at {gamma} = 45 degrees (shots 108799 - 108818) and then {gamma} = 600 (shots 108832 - 108847). The discharges were executed with one neutral beam of the total power 0.6 - 1.0 MW. In the first series (Nos 108799 - 108818) the plasma was additionally heated by ICRH of frequency 38 MHz. The irradiated detector samples were subjected to the same interrupted etching procedure as the samples used in the CR-39/PM-355 detector calibration measurements [1, 2]. After that, track density distributions and track diameter histograms were measured under an optical microscope. By the use of the calibration curves, it was possible to distinguish craters produced by protons from other craters and to convert the obtained histograms into proton energy spectra. The craters induced by lower energy ions appeared to be concentrated in narrower areas, whereas higher energy ions were registered in a more diffused detector fields. The paper shows again that the CR-39/PM-355 detector is an useful diagnostic tool for tokamak experiments, for measurement of charged ions. References: [1] A. Szydlowski, A. Malinowska, M. Jaskola, A. Korman, M.J. Sadowski, G. Van Wassenhove, B. Schweer and the TEXTOR team, A. Galkowski, 'Application of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors in TEXTOR Experiment for Measurements

  7. Validation of Cross Sections with Criticality Experiment and Reaction Rates: the Neptunium Case

    CERN Document Server

    Leong, L S; Audouin, L; Berthier, B; Le Naour, C; Stéphan, C; Paradela, C; Tarrío, D; Duran, I

    2014-01-01

    The Np-237 neutron-induced fission cross section has been recently measured in a large energy range (from eV to GeV) at the n\\_TOF facility at CERN. When compared to previous measurements the n\\_TOF fission cross section appears to be higher by 5-7\\% beyond the fission threshold. To check the relevance of the n\\_TOF data, we considered a criticality experiment performed at Los Alamos with a 6 kg sphere of Np-237, surrounded by uranium highly enriched in U-235 so as to approach criticality with fast neutrons. The multiplication factor k(eff) of the calculation is in better agreement with the experiment when we replace the ENDF/B-VII. 0 evaluation of the Np-237 fission cross section by the n\\_TOF data. We also explored the hypothesis of deficiencies of the inelastic cross section in U-235 which has been invoked by some authors to explain the deviation of 750 pcm. The large modification needed to reduce the deviation seems to be incompatible with existing inelastic cross section measurements. Also we show that t...

  8. Radioactive beam EXperiments at ISOLDE : Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer reactions of exotic nuclei.

    CERN Multimedia

    Kugler, E; Ratzinger, U; Wenander, F J C

    2002-01-01

    % IS347 \\\\ \\\\We propose to perform a pilot experiment to study very neutron rich (A<32) Na-Mg and (A<52) K-Ca isotopes in the region around the neutron shell closures of N=20 and N=28 after Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer, and to demonstrate highly efficient and cost-effective ways to bunch, charge-state breed and accelerate already existing mass-separated singly-charged radioactive ion beams. \\\\ \\\\To do this we plan to accelerate the ISOLDE beams up to 2~MeV/u by means of a novel acceleration scheme and to install an efficient $\\gamma$-ray array for low-multiplicity events around the target position.

  9. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations into hydrogen oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures has been conducted. The experiments were carried out in a high pressure laminar flow reactor at 50 bar pressure and a temperature range of 600–900 K. The equivalence ratio......, the mechanism is used to simulate published data on ignition delay time and laminar burning velocity of hydrogen. The flow reactor results show that at reducing, stoichiometric, and oxidizing conditions, conversion starts at temperatures of 750–775 K, 800–825 K, and 800–825 K, respectively. In oxygen atmosphere......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time....

  10. Giant resonance spectroscopy of 40Ca with the (e,e'x) reaction (I): Experiments and overview of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diesener, H.; Helm, U.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Stascheck, A.; Stiller, A.; Carter, J.

    2001-01-01

    The 40 Ca(e,e'x; x=p,α) reaction has been measured in the giant resonance excitation region for E x ≅8-26 MeV. The present article is the first out of three describing the experiments and giving an overview of the results. Data were taken at four momentum transfers in the range q=0.26-0.66 fm -1 . Angular correlations for decay to the ground state and low-lying states of 39 K and 36 Ar could be extracted as a function of excitation energy in 40 Ca. Excitation energy spectra integrated over the particle emission angle were generated for the various resolved decay channels. Comparisons of the giant resonance cross-section distributions with results using other electromagnetic or hadronic probes have been made and good agreement is found in most cases

  11. Measuring Heterogeneous Reaction Rates with ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Evaluate Chemical Fates in an Atmospheric Environment: A Physical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Maron, Marta K.; Mach, Mindy; Dwebi, Iman; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an undergraduate laboratory experiment to measure heterogeneous liquid/gas reaction kinetics (ozone-oleic acid and ozone-phenothrin) using a flow reactor coupled to an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometer. The experiment is specially designed for an upper-level undergraduate Physical…

  12. Displays enabling mobile multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Jyrki

    2007-02-01

    With the rapid advances in telecommunications networks, mobile multimedia delivery to handsets is now a reality. While a truly immersive multimedia experience is still far ahead in the mobile world, significant advances have been made in the constituent audio-visual technologies to make this become possible. One of the critical components in multimedia delivery is the mobile handset display. While such alternatives as headset-style near-to-eye displays, autostereoscopic displays, mini-projectors, and roll-out flexible displays can deliver either a larger virtual screen size than the pocketable dimensions of the mobile device can offer, or an added degree of immersion by adding the illusion of the third dimension in the viewing experience, there are still challenges in the full deployment of such displays in real-life mobile communication terminals. Meanwhile, direct-view display technologies have developed steadily, and can provide a development platform for an even better viewing experience for multimedia in the near future. The paper presents an overview of the mobile display technology space with an emphasis on the advances and potential in developing direct-view displays further to meet the goal of enabling multimedia in the mobile domain.

  13. Being Bullied in Virtual Environments: Experiences and Reactions of Male and Female Students to a Male or Female Oppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Krämer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bullying is a pressing societal problem. As such, it is important to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in bullying and of resilience factors which might protect victims. Moreover, it is necessary to provide tools that can train potential victims to strengthen their resilience. To facilitate both of these goals, the current study tests a recently developed virtual environment that puts participants in the role of a victim who is being oppressed by a superior. In a 2 × 2 between-subjects experiment (N = 81, we measured the effects of gender of the oppressor and gender of the participant on psychophysiological reactions, subjective experiences and willingness to report the event. The results reveal that even when a male and a female bully show the exact same behavior, the male bully is perceived as more threatening. In terms of gender of the victim, the only difference that emerged was a more pronounced increase in heart rate in males. The results were moderated by the personality factors social gender, neuroticism, and need to belong, while self-esteem did not show any moderating influence.

  14. Barriers and enablers to implementing scalp cooling in Australia: a qualitative study of health professionals' attitudes to and experience with scalp cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joanne M; O'Brien, Jane; Chua, Susan; De Boer, Richard; Dear, Rachel; Murray, Nicholas; Boyle, Fran

    2018-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a common and distressing adverse event for patients. Scalp cooling to reduce this alopecia has been available in Europe for more than a decade, but only recently introduced in Australia. The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore health professionals' perceptions of the barriers and enablers to the implementation of scalp cooling in Australian cancer centres. Using a qualitative methodology, telephone interviews were conducted with 21 health professionals working in a tumour stream where chemotherapy-induced alopecia is an adverse event of treatment. Participants were recruited from five centres in Australia where scalp cooling is currently available and one centre without access to the technology. Four interrelated themes were identified: (1) health professional attitudes, (2) concerns for patient equity, (3) logistical considerations and (4) organisational support. This qualitative study provides the first methodological exploration of Australian health professionals' perceptions of barriers and enablers to scalp cooling uptake. The results highlighted health professional support drives the introduction of scalp cooling. Integration of the technology requires adjustments to nursing practice to manage the increased time, workload and change in patient flow. Strategies to manage the change in practice and organisational support for change in work flow are essential for successful implementation into routine care.

  15. Experiment E89-044 on the Quasielastic 3He(e,e'p) Reaction at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penel-Nottaris, Emilie [Univ. Joseph Fourier Grenoble (France)

    2004-07-07

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A E89-044 experiment has measured the 3He(e,e'p) reaction cross-sections. The extraction of the longitudinal and transverse response functions for the two-body break-up 3He(e,e'p)d reaction in parallel kinematics allows the study of the bound proton electromagnetic properties inside the 3He nucleus and the involved nuclear mechanisms beyond plane wave approximations.

  16. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Gopinath, T.; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Kitchen, Jason; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring 1 H- 15 N dipolar couplings (DC) and 15 N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles’ heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([ 1 H, 15 N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D 15 N/ 15 N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the 15 N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers.

  17. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Gopinath, T; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Kitchen, Jason; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-11-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings (DC) and (15)N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles' heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([(1)H,(15)N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D (15)N/(15)N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the (15)N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  18. Catalysis in the Service of Green Chemistry: Nobel Prize-Winning Palladium-Catalysed Cross-Couplings, Run in Water at Room Temperature: Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura and Negishi reactions carried out in the absence of organic solvents, enabled by micellar catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipshutz, Bruce H; Taft, Benjamin R; Abela, Alexander R; Ghorai, Subir; Krasovskiy, Arkady; Duplais, Christophe

    2012-04-01

    Palladium-catalysed cross-couplings, in particular Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura and Negishi reactions developed over three decades ago, are routinely carried out in organic solvents. However, alternative media are currently of considerable interest given an increasing emphasis on making organic processes 'greener'; for example, by minimising organic waste in the form of organic solvents. Water is the obvious leading candidate in this regard. Hence, this review focuses on the application of micellar catalysis, in which a 'designer' surfactant enables these award-winning coupling reactions to be run in water at room temperature.

  19. An integral experiment on thorium oxide/depleted uranium cylinders with D-T neutrons for 232Th(n, 2n) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, S.; Yang, Y.W.; Lu, X.X.; Liu, R.; Jiang, L.; Zhu, T.H.; Wang, M.; Qin, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An integral experiment for 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction was carried out on the newly-established ThO 2 /depleted uranium cylinders. • 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction rate distribution was obtained in the assemblies with an uncertainty of about 7%. • Experiments were analyzed by MCNP code with ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. • Experimental results could be used to re-evaluate the cross sections of 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction. - Abstract: In order to verify the evaluated cross sections of 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction for the conceptual design of the thorium based subcritical blanket in the fusion–fission hybrid reactor, an integral experiment on thorium oxide/depleted uranium cylinders was carried out with D-T neutrons using the activation technique. 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction rate distribution was obtained at the central axis direction in the assemblies with an uncertainty of about 7%. Experiments were analyzed by using MCNP code with ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries to validate the nuclear data libraries of 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction, the calculated results with JENDL-4.0 agree with the measurements the best with discrepancies within the experimental uncertainty. The average values of C/E for the three benchmark assemblies are 1.058, 1.044 and 0.980. Calculations with different evaluated libraries in the benchmark assemblies show a large discrepancy. The experimental results can be used to re-evaluate the cross sections of the 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction

  20. Emotional Reactions to the Outcomes of Decisions: The Role of Counterfactual Thought in the Experience of Regret and Disappointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelenberg; van Dijk WW; van der Pligt J; Manstead; van Empelen P; Reinderman

    1998-08-01

    Regret and disappointment are emotions that can be experienced in response to an unfavorable outcome of a decision. Previous research suggests that both emotions are related to the process of counterfactual thinking. The present research extends this idea by combining it with ideas from regret and disappointment theory. The results show that regret is related to behavior-focused counterfactual thought in which the decision-maker's own actions are changed, whereas disappointment is related to situation-focused counterfactual thought in which aspects of the situation are changed. In Study 1 participants (N = 130) were asked to recall an autobiographical episode of either a regretful or a disappointing event. When asked to undo this event, regret participants predominantly changed their own actions, whereas disappointment participants predominantly changed aspects of the situation. In Study 2 all participants (N = 50) read a scenario in which a person experiences a negative event. Participants who were instructed to undo the event by changing the person's actions reported more regret than disappointment, while participants who were instructed to undo the event by changing aspects of the situation reported more disappointment than regret. Study 3 (N = 140) replicated the findings from Study 2 with a different scenario, and a design in which regret and disappointment were measured between rather than within subjects. In the discussion we address the relation among counterfactual thinking, attributions and affective reactions to decision outcomes, and the implications for decision research. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  1. Study of the (e,e'p) quasi-elastic reaction in complex nuclei: theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, Joaquin Lopez [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain)

    2010-03-01

    Experimental coincidence cross section and transverse-longitudinal asymmetry ATL have been obtained for the quasielastic (e,e'p) reaction in 16O, 12C, and {sup 208}Pb in constant q-ω kinematics in the missing momentum range -350 < pmiss < 350 MeV/c. In these experiments, performed in experimental Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB), the beam energy and the momentum and angle of the scattered electrons were kept fixed, while the angle between the proton momentum and the momentum transfer q was varied in order to map out the missing momentum distribution. The experimental cross section and ATL asymmetry have been compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA) calculations with both relativistic and non-relativistic spinor structure. The spectroscopic factors obtained for both models are in agreement with previous experimental values, while ATL measurements favor the relativistic DWIA calculation. This thesis describes the details of the experimental setup, the calibration of the spectrometers, the techniques used in the data analysis to derive the final cross sections and the ATL, the ingredients of the theoretical calculations employed and the comparison of the results with the simulations based on these theoretical models.

  2. CHICSi - a compact ultra-high vacuum compatible detector system for nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. II. Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, P.; Avdeichikov, V.; Carlen, L.; Jakobsson, B. E-mail: bo.jakobsson@kosufy.lu.se; Siwek, A.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van; Westerberg, L.; Whitlow, H.J

    2003-03-11

    We describe the detectors for identification of charged particles and fragments in CHICSi, a large solid angle multi-telescope system mounted inside an ultra-high vacuum (UHV), cluster-jet target chamber. CHICSi performs nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. The telescopes consist of a first very thin, 10-14 {mu}m Si detector, a second 300 {mu}m (or possibly 500 {mu}m) ion implanted Si detector supplemented by a 6 mm GSO(Ce) scintillator read out by a photodiode (PD) or by a third 300 {mu}m Si detector. The telescopes provide full charge separation up to Z=17 and mass resolution up to A=9 in the energy range 0.7-60A MeV. The thin p-i-n diode detector, etched out from a 280 {mu}m Si wafer, and the GSO/PD detector, both exclusively developed for CHICSi, provide an energy resolution {<=}8%, while the standard 300 {mu}m detectors have {<=}2% energy resolution. Radiation stability of the Si detectors is confirmed up to an integrated flux of 10{sup 10} alpha particles. The GSO detector has 70% light collection efficiency with the optical coupling to the PD a simple open, 0.2 mm, gap. A new method, developed to perform absolute energy calibration for the GSO/PD detector is presented.

  3. CHICSi - a compact ultra-high vacuum compatible detector system for nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. II. Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubev, P.; Avdeichikov, V.; Carlen, L.; Jakobsson, B.; Siwek, A.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van; Westerberg, L.; Whitlow, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the detectors for identification of charged particles and fragments in CHICSi, a large solid angle multi-telescope system mounted inside an ultra-high vacuum (UHV), cluster-jet target chamber. CHICSi performs nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. The telescopes consist of a first very thin, 10-14 μm Si detector, a second 300 μm (or possibly 500 μm) ion implanted Si detector supplemented by a 6 mm GSO(Ce) scintillator read out by a photodiode (PD) or by a third 300 μm Si detector. The telescopes provide full charge separation up to Z=17 and mass resolution up to A=9 in the energy range 0.7-60A MeV. The thin p-i-n diode detector, etched out from a 280 μm Si wafer, and the GSO/PD detector, both exclusively developed for CHICSi, provide an energy resolution ≤8%, while the standard 300 μm detectors have ≤2% energy resolution. Radiation stability of the Si detectors is confirmed up to an integrated flux of 10 10 alpha particles. The GSO detector has 70% light collection efficiency with the optical coupling to the PD a simple open, 0.2 mm, gap. A new method, developed to perform absolute energy calibration for the GSO/PD detector is presented

  4. Experiments on the Synthesis of Element 115 in the Reaction ^{243}Am (^{48}Ca, xn)^{291-x}115

    CERN Document Server

    Oganessian, Yu T; Lobanov, Yu V; Abdullin, F S; Polyakov, A N; Shirokovsky, I V; Tsyganov, Yu S; Gulbekyan, G G; Bogomolov, S L; Mezentsev, A N; Iliev, S; Subbotin, V G; Sukhov, A M; Voinov, A A; Buklanov, G V; Subotic, K M; Zagrebaev, V I; Itkis, M G; Patin, J B; Moody, K J; Wild, J F; Stoyer, M A; Stoyer, N J; Shaughnessy, D A; Kenneally, J M; Lougheed, R W

    2003-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to synthesize element 115 isotopes in the ^{243}Am(^{48}Ca,xn)^{291-x}115 reaction are presented. With a beam dose of 4.3\\cdot 10^{18} 248-Mev ^{48}Ca projectiles, we observed three similar decay chains consisting of five consecutive alpha-decays, all detected in time intervals of about 20 s and terminated at a later time by a spontaneous fission with a high energy release (TKE \\sim 220 MeV). At a higher bombarding energy of 253 MeV, with an equal ^{48}Ca beam dose, we registered a different decay chain of four consecutive alpha-decays detected in a time interval of about 0.5 s, also terminated by spontaneous fission. The alpha-decay energies and half-lives for nine new alpha-decaying nuclei were determined. The decay properties of these synthesized nuclei are consistent with consecutive alpha-decays originating from the parent isotopes of the new element 115, ^{288}115 and ^{287}115, produced in the 3n- and 4n-evaporation channels with cross sections of about 3 and 1 pb, r...

  5. Incidence and management of infusion reactions to infliximab in 186 italian patient’s with rheumatoid arthritis: the Padua experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Todesco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We report the incidence and treatment of infusion reactions to infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal IgG1 antibody against tumor necrosis factor a, in a large cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients and methods: One hundred eighty six patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with infliximab for a total of 216.6 patient years were retrospectively evaluated. Patients received 2160 infliximab infusions at the Division of Rheumatology at the University Hospital of Padua from May, 2000 to April, 2004. Specific treatment protocols for initial and subsequent acute infusion reactions were followed and the outcomes documented. Results: The overall incidence of infusion reactions to infliximab was 0.8% (19 out of 2160 of infusions, affecting 10.2% of patients (19 out of 186. Mild, moderate, or severe acute reactions occurred in 0.1% (3 of 2160, 0.6% (13 of 2160, and 0.04% (1 of 2160 of infliximab infusions, respectively. Delayed infusion reactions occurred in 0.09% (2 of 2160 of infusions. Use of specific treatment protocols resulted in rapid resolution of all acute reactions to infliximab. With a prophylaxis protocol, all patients who experienced an initial mild acute reaction were able to receive additional infusions. Conclusions: Using appropriate treatment protocols, infliximab infusion reactions were effectively treated and prevented in patients with mild acute reactions upon retreatment. In the case of moderate to severe infusion reactions, the risks and the benefits of the continuation of infliximab therapy need to be carefully considered.

  6. The Small Payload Access to Space Experiment (SPASE): Using Non-Traditional Aerospace Technology to Enable a New Generation of Low-Cost Missions

    OpenAIRE

    McDermott, Scott; Aamot, L. Eric

    2001-01-01

    Launching on STS-108 Endeavour in late 2001, the Small Payload Access to Space Experiment (SPASE) demonstrates a number of new technologies, efficient ways to conduct a nanospacecraft development program, and how to take such a spacecraft through the Shuttle Hitchhiker safety and integration process. This paper describes the essential “lessons learned” in each of these areas. Commercial solar panels, batteries, imagers, photocells, integrated circuits, and manufacturing techniques are used th...

  7. Large-scale, high-performance and cloud-enabled multi-model analytics experiments in the context of the Earth System Grid Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, S.; Płóciennik, M.; Doutriaux, C.; Blanquer, I.; Barbera, R.; Williams, D. N.; Anantharaj, V. G.; Evans, B. J. K.; Salomoni, D.; Aloisio, G.

    2017-12-01

    The increased models resolution in the development of comprehensive Earth System Models is rapidly leading to very large climate simulations output that pose significant scientific data management challenges in terms of data sharing, processing, analysis, visualization, preservation, curation, and archiving.Large scale global experiments for Climate Model Intercomparison Projects (CMIP) have led to the development of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), a federated data infrastructure which has been serving the CMIP5 experiment, providing access to 2PB of data for the IPCC Assessment Reports. In such a context, running a multi-model data analysis experiment is very challenging, as it requires the availability of a large amount of data related to multiple climate models simulations and scientific data management tools for large-scale data analytics. To address these challenges, a case study on climate models intercomparison data analysis has been defined and implemented in the context of the EU H2020 INDIGO-DataCloud project. The case study has been tested and validated on CMIP5 datasets, in the context of a large scale, international testbed involving several ESGF sites (LLNL, ORNL and CMCC), one orchestrator site (PSNC) and one more hosting INDIGO PaaS services (UPV). Additional ESGF sites, such as NCI (Australia) and a couple more in Europe, are also joining the testbed. The added value of the proposed solution is summarized in the following: it implements a server-side paradigm which limits data movement; it relies on a High-Performance Data Analytics (HPDA) stack to address performance; it exploits the INDIGO PaaS layer to support flexible, dynamic and automated deployment of software components; it provides user-friendly web access based on the INDIGO Future Gateway; and finally it integrates, complements and extends the support currently available through ESGF. Overall it provides a new "tool" for climate scientists to run multi-model experiments. At the

  8. Thermal analysis experiment for elucidating sodium-water chemical reaction mechanism in steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the mechanism of the sodium-water surface reaction in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors, kinetic study of the sodium (Na)-sodium hydroxide (NaOH) reaction has been carried out by using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) technique. The parameters, including melting points of Na and NaOH, phase transition temperature of NaOH, Na-NaOH reaction temperature, and decomposition temperature of sodium hydride (NaH) have been identified from DTA curves. Based on the measured reaction temperature, rate constant of sodium monoxide (Na 2 O) generation was obtained. Thermal analysis results indicated that Na 2 O generation at the secondary overall reaction should be considered during the sodium-water reaction. (author)

  9. Three years experience with forward-site mass casualty triage-, evacuation-, operating room-, ICU-, and radiography-enabled disaster vehicles: development of usage strategies from drills and deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Jane L; Kirby, Neil R; Waterson, James A

    2014-01-01

    Delineation of the advantages and problems related to the use of forward-site operating room-, Intensive Care Unit (ICU)-, radiography-, and mass casualty-enabled disaster vehicles for site evacuation, patient stabilization, and triage. The vehicles discussed have six ventilated ICU spaces, two ORs, on-site radiography, 21 intermediate acuity spaces with stretchers, and 54 seated minor acuity spaces. Each space has piped oxygen with an independent vehicle-loaded supply. The vehicles are operated by the Dubai Corporate Ambulance Services. Their support hospital is the main trauma center for the Emirate of Dubai and provides the vehicles' surgical, intensivist, anesthesia, and nursing staff. The disaster vehicles have been deployed 264 times in the last 5 years (these figures do not include deployments for drills). Introducing this new service required extensive initial planning and ongoing analysis of the performance of the disaster vehicles that offer ambulance services and receiving hospitals a large array of possibilities in terms of triage, stabilization of priority I and II patients, and management of priority III patients. In both drills and in disasters, the vehicles were valuable in forward triage and stabilization and in the transport of large numbers of priority III patients. This has avoided the depletion of emergency transport available for priority I and II patients. The successful utilization of disaster vehicles requires seamless cooperation between the hospital staffing the vehicles and the ambulance service deploying them. They are particularly effective during preplanned deployments to high-risk situations. These vehicles also potentially provide self-sufficient refuges for forward teams in hostile environments.

  10. Moeller polarimetry for the BGO-OD experiment and cross section measurement of the reaction γp→K+Λ at the extreme forward angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The BGO-OD experiment, located at the electron accelerator ELSA at the University of Bonn, is designed to study nucleon and hyperon excitations via meson photoproduction using an energy tagged bremsstrahlung photon beam, with the emphasis on understanding the reaction dynamics. It consists of a central BGO calorimeter with a magnetic spectrometer in forward directions. The physics program includes the measurement of polarization observables, some of which can be accessed using polarized photon beams. Circularly polarized photon beams can be produced via bremsstrahlung from an amorphous radiator using longitudinally polarized electrons. The degree of polarization of the photon beam depends on the transferred momentum from the beam electron to the beam photon, and the degree of polarization of the electron beam. The polarization of the electron beam is measured by a Moeller polarimeter. The setup and commissioning of this polarimeter is described in this thesis. Using a circularly polarized photon beam, several double polarization observables can be measured. For associated strangeness photoproduction, such as γp→K + Λ the self analyzing weak hyperon decay, allows the determination of the recoil polarization without requiring an additional recoil polarimeter. γp→K + Λ is therefore one of the photoproduction final states with the most polarization observable data available. Large contributions from t-channel exchange mechanisms however still leave it difficult to determine resonance, s-channel contributions in this channel. To understand the t-channel contribution, the forward angles are essential, but even in the most simplest observable, the cross section, the angular coverage is not complete. In addition the available data disagrees with each other. The BGO-OD experiment is ideally suited to resolve these issues. The magnetic forward spectrometer covers the forward angular range and the BGO calorimeter enabled significant background reduction. The

  11. Moeller polarimetry for the BGO-OD experiment and cross section measurement of the reaction γp→K{sup +}Λ at the extreme forward angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment, located at the electron accelerator ELSA at the University of Bonn, is designed to study nucleon and hyperon excitations via meson photoproduction using an energy tagged bremsstrahlung photon beam, with the emphasis on understanding the reaction dynamics. It consists of a central BGO calorimeter with a magnetic spectrometer in forward directions. The physics program includes the measurement of polarization observables, some of which can be accessed using polarized photon beams. Circularly polarized photon beams can be produced via bremsstrahlung from an amorphous radiator using longitudinally polarized electrons. The degree of polarization of the photon beam depends on the transferred momentum from the beam electron to the beam photon, and the degree of polarization of the electron beam. The polarization of the electron beam is measured by a Moeller polarimeter. The setup and commissioning of this polarimeter is described in this thesis. Using a circularly polarized photon beam, several double polarization observables can be measured. For associated strangeness photoproduction, such as γp→K{sup +}Λ the self analyzing weak hyperon decay, allows the determination of the recoil polarization without requiring an additional recoil polarimeter. γp→K{sup +}Λ is therefore one of the photoproduction final states with the most polarization observable data available. Large contributions from t-channel exchange mechanisms however still leave it difficult to determine resonance, s-channel contributions in this channel. To understand the t-channel contribution, the forward angles are essential, but even in the most simplest observable, the cross section, the angular coverage is not complete. In addition the available data disagrees with each other. The BGO-OD experiment is ideally suited to resolve these issues. The magnetic forward spectrometer covers the forward angular range and the BGO calorimeter enabled significant background reduction. The

  12. Risk Evaluation of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography-Related Contrast Media Allergic-Like Reaction: A Single Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Trottier-Tellier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Few cases of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography- (ERCP- related contrast media (CM adverse reactions have been reported in the current literature. There is a lack of standardisation in practice regarding premedication prophylaxis for at-risk patients undergoing ERCP and there are few data to guide the practitioners. Our goal is to evaluate the risk of CM adverse reaction in a group of patients with a past history of allergic-like reaction to iodine product undergoing ERCP. Methods. A retrospective chart review study was performed of patients who underwent ERCP at our single centre from January 2010 to December 2015. Results. 2295 ERCPs were performed among 1766 patients. No anaphylactoid or severe adverse reaction occurred. One (0.04% ERCP-related CM benign reaction was reported in a patient known for penicillin allergy. Among 127 ERCPs performed on patients with a prior adverse reaction to iodine, 121 procedures were done without and 6 with a premedication prophylaxis. In both groups, no ERCP-related CM reaction occurred. Conclusions. To our knowledge, we report the largest cohort of iodine allergic patients undergoing ERCP ever published. These results suggest that ERCP-related CM adverse reactions are very rare even among patients at risk for CM reaction.

  13. Enabling distributed petascale science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovski, Andrew; Bharathi, Shishir; Bresnahan, John

    2007-01-01

    Petascale science is an end-to-end endeavour, involving not only the creation of massive datasets at supercomputers or experimental facilities, but the subsequent analysis of that data by a user community that may be distributed across many laboratories and universities. The new SciDAC Center for Enabling Distributed Petascale Science (CEDPS) is developing tools to support this end-to-end process. These tools include data placement services for the reliable, high-performance, secure, and policy-driven placement of data within a distributed science environment; tools and techniques for the construction, operation, and provisioning of scalable science services; and tools for the detection and diagnosis of failures in end-to-end data placement and distributed application hosting configurations. In each area, we build on a strong base of existing technology and have made useful progress in the first year of the project. For example, we have recently achieved order-of-magnitude improvements in transfer times (for lots of small files) and implemented asynchronous data staging capabilities; demonstrated dynamic deployment of complex application stacks for the STAR experiment; and designed and deployed end-to-end troubleshooting services. We look forward to working with SciDAC application and technology projects to realize the promise of petascale science

  14. Synthesis of 1,1-Diphenylethylene (DPE): The Marriage of a Grignard Reaction and a Column Chromatography Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alty, Lisa T.; France, Marcia B.; Alty, Isaac G.; Saber, Christine A.; Smith, Donna M.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of 1,1-diphenylethylene (DPE) via a Grignard reaction, followed by an acid-catalyzed dehydration reaction, yields a mixture of compounds. DPE is a high boiling liquid that cannot be purified using simple distillation. However, it is easily separated from the more polar starting material and intermediate alcohol using both thin layer…

  15. Benchmark experiment for the cross section of the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,pn)99Mo reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Aikawa, M.; Haba, H.; Otuka, N.

    2016-05-01

    As nuclear medicine community has shown an increasing interest in accelerator produced 99mTc radionuclide, the possible alternative direct production routes for producing 99mTc were investigated intensively. One of these accelerator production routes is based on the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. The cross section of this nuclear reaction was studied by several laboratories earlier but the available data-sets are not in good agreement. For large scale accelerator production of 99mTc based on the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction, a well-defined excitation function is required to optimise the production process effectively. One of our recent publications pointed out that most of the available experimental excitation functions for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction have the same general shape while their amplitudes are different. To confirm the proper amplitude of the excitation function, results of three independent experiments were presented (Takács et al., 2015). In this work we present results of a thick target count rate measurement of the Eγ = 140.5 keV gamma-line from molybdenum irradiated by Ep = 17.9 MeV proton beam, as an integral benchmark experiment, to prove the cross section data reported for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,pn)99Mo reactions in Takács et al. (2015).

  16. Establishment of the BOSPOR-80 machine library of evaluated threshold reaction cross-sections and its testing by means of integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.M.; Zolotarev, K.I.; Pashchenko, A.B.; Plyaskin, V.I.

    1982-08-01

    A paper was published in 1979 containing a compilation of experimental data on the cross-sections of (n,p), (n,α) and (n,2n) threshold reactions and recommended excitation functions. A further paper considered the development of evaluation methods based on the use of theoretical model calculations, an increase in the number of recommended excitation functions, correction of the recommended cross-sections on the basis of integral experiments and allowance for recent experimental data. To satisfy the wide circle of users, BOSPOR-80 - a machine library of evaluated threshold reaction cross-sections - was set up

  17. Unifying theory of low-energy nuclear reaction and transmutation processes in deuterated/hydrogenated metals, acoustic cavitation, glow discharge, and deuteron beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    2006-01-01

    The most basic theoretical challenge for understanding low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) and transmutation reaction (LETR) in condensed matters is to find mechanisms by which the large Coulomb barrier between fusing nuclei can be overcome. A unifying theory of LENR and LETR has been developed to provide possible mechanisms for the LENR and LETR processes in matters based on high-density nano-scale and micro-scale quantum plasmas. It is shown that recently developed theoretical models based on Bose-Einstein Fusion (BEF) mechanism and Quantum Plasma Nuclear Fusion (QPNF) mechanism are applicable to the results of many different types of LENR and LETR experiments. (author)

  18. Unifying Theory of Low-Energy Nuclear Reaction and Transmutation Processes in Deuterated/hydrogenated Metals, Acoustic Cavitation, Glow Discharge, and Deuteron Beam Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    The most basic theoretical challenge for understanding low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) and transmutation reaction (LETR) in condensed matters is to find mechanisms by which the large Coulomb barrier between fusing nuclei can be overcome. A unifying theory of LENR and LETR has been developed to provide possible mechanisms for the LENR and LETR processes in matters based on high-density nano-scale and micro-scale quantum plasmas. It is shown that recently developed theoretical models based on Bose-Einstein Fusion (BEF) mechanism and Quantum Plasma Nuclear Fusion (QPNF) mechanism are applicable to the results of many different types of LENR and LETR experiments.

  19. Experiments on the reaction π-p → π0π0n and their contributions to the knowledge of ππ-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1977-12-01

    The status of our experimental knowledge of ππ-interaction is presented. Special attention is given to the contributions from experiments which measured the reaction π - p → π 0 π 0 n. The publication contains also an introduction to the basic theoretical aspects of ππ-scattering and describes the extraction of ππ-scattering from the reaction πN → ππN. The origin of the ambiguities in the phase shifts is discussed. In the last part a description of the experimental set ups and techniques is given. (orig.) [de

  20. Investigation of the reaction 6Li + 40Ca at 156 MeV in a coincidence experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freindl, L.; Grotowski, K.; Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Krakow; Planeta, R.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Neumann, B.; Buschmann, J.; Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.; Zagromski, S.

    1983-12-01

    The cross sections for inelastic break up have been studied for the 6 Li + 40 Ca reaction at Esub(Li) = 156 MeV. For this, gamma ray spectra from the heavy residual nuclei were measured in coincidence with beam velocity projectile fragments. The cross sections were found to be: 34 +- 9 14 mb for protons, 30 +- 7 12 mb for deuterons, and 78 +- 41 142 mb for α-particles, respectively. These values are small when compared to total break up cross sections. A comparison of the cross section sum of all known reaction paths induced by 6 Li + 40 Ca at 156 MeV with total reaction cross section indicates a missing cross section of the order of a few hundred millibarns. It is discussed whether this cross section may be attributed to pick up reactions. (orig.) [de

  1. Enabling cleanup technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditmars, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Technology transfer in the environmental restoration, or cleanup, area has been challenging. While there is little doubt that innovative technologies are needed to reduce the times, risks, and costs associated with the cleanup of federal sites, particularly those of the Departments of Energy (DOE) and Defense, the use of such technologies in actual cleanups has been relatively limited. There are, of course, many reasons why technologies do not reach the implementation phase or do not get transferred from developing entities to the user community. For example, many past cleanup contracts provided few incentives for performance that would compel a contractor to seek improvement via technology applications. While performance-based contracts are becoming more common, they alone will not drive increased technology applications. This paper focuses on some applications of cleanup methodologies and technologies that have been successful and are illustrative of a more general principle. The principle is at once obvious and not widely practiced. It is that, with few exceptions, innovative cleanup technologies are rarely implemented successfully alone but rather are implemented in the context of enabling processes and methodologies. And, since cleanup is conducted in a regulatory environment, the stage is better set for technology transfer when the context includes substantive interactions with the relevant stakeholders. Examples of this principle are drawn from Argonne National Laboratory's experiences in Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Programs (ASAPs), Precise Excavation, and the DOE Technology Connection (TechCon) Program. The lessons learned may be applicable to the continuing challenges posed by the cleanup and long-term stewardship of radioactive contaminants and unexploded ordnance (UXO) at federal sites

  2. Organising to Enable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual paper is to reveal how organising can enable innovation across organisational layers and organisational units. This approach calls for a cross-disciplinary literature review. The aim is to provide an integrated understanding of innovation in an organisational approach....... The findings reveal a continous organising process between individual/ team creativity and organisational structures/control to enable innovation at firm level. Organising provides a dynamic approach and contains the integrated reconstruction of creativity, structures and boundaries for enhanced balance...... of explorative and exploitative learning in uncertain environments. Shedding light on the cross-disciplinary theories to organise innovation provides a contribution at the firm level to enable innovation....

  3. A beam detector for pion experiments and analysis of the inclusive Λ production in proton-proton reactions with HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalik, Rafal Tomasz

    2016-06-02

    This thesis presents the work focused on two topics related to the physics performed at the HADES detector. In the first part, the development of the tracking detector playing an important role of online beam monitoring and the momentum reconstruction device in the secondary pion beam experiment is presented. Such a detector must fulfill various requirements regarding the operation in the vacuum, with accelerator beams and high count rates. Two detection stations employing double sided silicons strip sensors with an active area of 10 cm x 10 cm and position resolution of 780 μm, providing momentum resolution below 0.5 % and capable for operating with beams up to 32 x 10{sup 6} particles/s total and 2 x 10{sup 6} particles/s in a single channel have been constructed, tested and used in the pion beam experiments. In the first chapter, general information about the production of the secondary, in particular, pion beams is presented. Further, description how the momentum is reconstructed using the information obtained from the tracking detector, and description of most important components of the system, namely the silicon sensor and front end electronics used for its readout is presented. In the second chapter, development of the detector, including all the components used or constructed for this particular purpose is presented. This section also includes description of the laboratory tests and calibrations performed to characterize the detector. In the end of the section, results from two of the beam runs employed for the tests of the detector are presented and discussed. The last third chapter presents results from the commissioning of the tracking detector in the final configuration. Momentum reconstruction feasibility is presented. The second part of the thesis focuses on the analysis of inclusive production of the Λ hyperons in the nuclear reactions at the HADES energies. The aims of the analysis are to extract the differential cross-section of Λ production in

  4. Measurement of the differential cross section of the reaction γp→π+n at the energy-tagged photon beam of the PHOENICS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, K.

    1991-10-01

    At the Bonn Electron Strecherring ELSA the differential cross section for the reaction γp → π + n was measured. The measurement was performed with the PHOENICS detector, which consists of a bremsstrahlung tagging system and a hadron detector with large angular acceptance. The experiment covered a kinematic region of 210 MeV ≤ E γ ≤ 960 MeV and 35deg π , CMS ≤ 135deg. The data are in good agreement with other experiments. They are also compared with the results of a recent partial wave analysis and with the predictions of a constituent quark model in the first resonance region. (orig.) [de

  5. Growth of multilayered polycrystalline reaction rims in the MgO-SiO2 system, part I: experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardés, E.; Wunder, B.; Wirth, R.; Heinrich, W.

    2011-01-01

    Growth of transport-controlled reaction layers between single crystals of periclase and quartz, and forsterite and quartz was investigated experimentally at 1.5 GPa, 1100°C to 1400°C, 5 min to 72 h under dry and melt-free conditions using a piston-cylinder apparatus. Starting assemblies consisting of Per | Qtz | Fo sandwiches produced polycrystalline double layers of forsterite and enstatite between periclase and quartz, and enstatite single layers between forsterite and quartz. The position of inert Pt-markers initially deposited at the interface of the reactants and inspection of mass balance confirmed that both layer-producing reactions are controlled by MgO diffusion, while SiO2 is relatively immobile. BSE and TEM imaging revealed thicknesses from 0.6 μm to 14 μm for double layers and from 0 to 6.8 μm for single layers. Both single and double layers displayed non-parabolic growth together with pronounced grain coarsening. Textural evolution and growth rates for each reaction are directly comparable. Forsterite-enstatite double layers are always wider than enstatite single layers, and the growth of enstatite in the double layer is slower than that in the single layer. In double layers, the enstatite/forsterite layer thickness ratio significantly increases with temperature, reflecting different MgO mobilities as temperature varies. Thus, thickness ratios in multilayered reaction zones may contain a record of temperature, but also that of any physico-chemical parameter that modifies the mobilities of the chemical components between the various layers. This potential is largely unexplored in geologically relevant systems, which calls for further experimental studies of multilayered reaction zones.

  6. The enabling approach for housing supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Farouk Hassan

    2011-12-01

    The paper attempts to highlight prerequisites needed to improve the success of the enabling approach in achieving adequate housing provision. Then the paper revisits the Egyptian experiences in the application of the enabling approach from 2005 till 2010. Finally, the paper highlights the main drops and lessons must be considered as promising approach after the revolution.

  7. The Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Slaug, Bjørn; Brandt, Åse

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses development of a content valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients and their home environments. The instrument was translated...... from the original Swedish version of the Housing Enabler, and adapted according to accessibility norms and guidelines for housing design in Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. This iterative process involved occupational therapists, architects, building engineers and professional translators......, resulting in the Nordic Housing Enabler. For reliability testing, the sampling strategy and data collection procedures used were the same in all countries. Twenty voluntary occupational therapists, pair-wise but independently from each other, collected data from 106 cases by means of the Nordic Housing...

  8. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow

    This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using...... pilot projects as enabler of transition. Aspects of how to create trust and deal with distrust during a transition are addressed. The transition in focus is the concept of New Public Management and how it is applied in the management of the Employment Service in Denmark. The transition regards...

  9. High-flux white neutron source based on p(35)-Be reactions for activation experiments at NPI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefánik, Milan; Bém, Pavel; Götz, Miloslav; Katovsky, K.; Majerle, Mitja; Novák, Jan; Šimečková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 104, NOV (2014), s. 306-309 ISSN 0969-806X. [1st International Conference on Dosimetry and its Applications (ICDA). Prague, 23.6.2013-28.6.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : neutron generator * accelerator * dosimetry foils activation method * neutron spectrometry * Gamma-spectrometry * reaction rate Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.380, year: 2014

  10. Study of proton-deuteron break-up reaction in exclusive experiment at 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, N.P.; Belostotskij, S.L.; Dotsenko, Yu.V.

    1987-07-01

    The exclusive proton-deuteron break-up reaction pD yields ppn was studied at 1 GeV. Differential cross sections and polarizations of the final protons were measured in the range of neutron-spectator momenta 0 3 3 <0.2 GeV/c, respectively. The data obtained are well described within the framework of impulse approximation with the Paris wave function of the deuteron. (author)

  11. [Reaction time tests in Leipzig, Paris and Würzburg. The Franco-German history of a psychological experiment, 1890-1910].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroy, Jacqueline; Schmidgen, Henning

    2004-01-01

    This article diiscusses from a comparative perspective the complex history of the reaction experiment with the Hipp chronoscope, one of the central experiments of late 19th-century psychology. It focuses on Wilhelm Wundt's (1832-1920) Institute for Experimental Psychology in Leipzig and on the Paris Laboratory for Physiological Psychology at the Sorbonne, which was initially directed by Henry Beaunis (1830-1921), but soon came to be dominated by the research activities of Alfred Binet (1857-1911). When the Paris psychologists founded their Laboratory in 1889, they took the Leipzig Institute as their model. In the early 1890s they adopted the reaction time experiment that had been central to Wundt's psychology. Shortly after, they modified this experiment according to their own specific interests. For Binet, it no longer served as a method for identifying the elementary components of "general" consciousness (as in Wundt), but for classifying "individual" personalities. The methodological and technological changes that Binet introduced into the experimental practice of psychology had no immediate impact on the research work in Leipzig. However, they influenced the "Wurzburg School" of psychology under Wundt's former assistant, Oswald Külpe (1862-1915). This illustrates that the comparative history of transfers of "experimental systems" (Rheinberger) across national borders is not simply a history of mere transports. Rather, it is a history of transferences that sometimes includes surprising "re-transferences".

  12. Enabling distributed collaborative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maglaughlin, K.

    2000-01-01

    To enable collaboration over distance, a collaborative environment that uses a specialized scientific instrument called a nanoManipulator is evaluated. The nanoManipulator incorporates visualization and force feedback technology to allow scientists to see, feel, and modify biological samples bein...

  13. The Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, T.; Nygren, C.; Slaug, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses development of a content-valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients, and their home environments. The instrument was transla......This study addresses development of a content-valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients, and their home environments. The instrument...... was translated from the original Swedish version of the Housing Enabler, and adapted according to accessibility norms and guidelines for housing design in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland. This iterative process involved occupational therapists, architects, building engineers, and professional translators......, resulting in the Nordic Housing Enabler. For reliability testing, the sampling strategy and data collection procedures used were the same in all countries. Twenty voluntary occupational therapists, pair-wise but independently of each other, collected data from 106 cases by means of the Nordic Housing...

  14. Experimental technique for study on three-particle reactions in kinematically total experiments with usage of the two-processor complex on the M-400 computer basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezin, F.N.; Kisurin, V.A.; Nemets, O.F.; Ofengenden, R.G.; Pugach, V.M.; Pavlenko, Yu.N.; Patlan', Yu.V.; Savrasov, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental technique for investigation of three-particle nuclear reactions in kinematically total experiments is described. The technique provides the storage of one-dimensional and two- dimensional energy spectra from several detectors. A block diagram of the measuring system, using this technique, is presented. The measuring system consists of analog equipment for rapid-slow coincidences and of a two-processor complex on the base of the M-400 computer with a general bus. Application of a two-processor complex, each computer of which has a possibility of direct access to memory of another computer, permits to separate functions of data collection and data operational presentation and to perform necessary physical calculations. Software of the measuring complex which includes programs written using the ASSEMBLER language for the first computer and functional programs written using the BASIC language for the second computer, is considered. Software of the first computer includes the DISPETCHER dialog control program, driver package for control of external devices, of applied program package and system modules. The technique, described, is tested in experiment on investigation of d+ 10 B→α+α+α three- particle reaction at deutron energy of 13.6 MeV. The two-dimensional energy spectrum reaction obtained with the help of the technique described is presented [ru

  15. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr. (.,; .)

    2005-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological

  16. Cooperation on impingement wastage experiment of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel using SWAT-1R sodium-water reaction test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauchamp, F.; Allou, A.; Nishimura, M.; Umeda, R.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: • 6 experiments were carried out in the SWAT-1R facility of JAEA Oarai R&D Center to study the wastage resistance of the Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel (T91) straight tubes. • These experiments were performed under the cooperation between CEA and JAEA. • The experiments were conducted successfully: - all the tubes were punctured by the reaction jet, - wastage and steam/water leak rates were obtained, - experimental results brought some new determining sets of wastage data on T91. • This fruitful cooperation has contributed to: - expanding the wastage database on T91, - upgrading wastage rates prediction from modelling, - the safety demonstration of future steam generators units

  17. Enzymatic Spectrophotometric Reaction Rate Determination of Glucose in Fruit Drinks and Carbonated Beverages. An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Food Science-Oriented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilarou, Argyro-Maria G.; Georgiou, Constantinos A.

    2000-10-01

    The glucose oxidase-horseradish peroxidase coupled reaction using phenol and 4-aminoantipyrine is used for the kinetic determination of glucose in drinks and beverages. This laboratory experiment demonstrates the implementation of reaction rate kinetic methods of analysis, the use of enzymes as selective analytical reagents for the determination of substrates, the kinetic masking of ascorbic acid interference, and the analysis of glucose in drinks and beverages. The method is optimized for student use in the temperature range of 18-28 °C and can be used in low-budget laboratories equipped with an inexpensive visible photometer. The mixed enzyme-chromogen solution that is used is stable for two months. Precision ranged from 5.1 to 12% RSD for analyses conducted during a period of two months by 48 students.

  18. Simulation experiments for a large leak sodium-water reaction analysis. Volume 4. IHTS/relief system simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploeger, D.W.

    1978-09-01

    Tests were performed in which a simplified 1/8-scale model of the intermediate heat transfer system and relief system of a LMFBR was subjected to a simulated sodium-water reaction in a steam generator. Pressures in the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and in the pipe were measured. The flow of water through the relief system was photographed and its velocity was measured. The forces on the relief system elbows resulting from the fluid flow were also measured. The tests were performed primarily to validate pulse propagation codes used for design and for direct use as design data

  19. Racial Fault-lines in “Baseball’s Great Experiment:” Black Perceptions, White Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry D. Fetter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines three facets of the breaking of major league baseball’s color line by Jackie Robinson of the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947: the perception of blacks, the response of white players (whether teammates or opponents, and the reaction of baseball fans. By so doing, the paper will illuminate the fault-lines that characterized race relations within both the sport of baseball and the larger society as each was confronted with new challenges to long established policies and practices in the years after the Second World War.

  20. Reactive scattering of H2 from Cu(100): comparison of dynamics calculations based on the specific reaction parameter approach to density functional theory with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sementa, L; Wijzenbroek, M; van Kolck, B J; Somers, M F; Al-Halabi, A; Busnengo, H F; Olsen, R A; Kroes, G J; Rutkowski, M; Thewes, C; Kleimeier, N F; Zacharias, H

    2013-01-28

    We present new experimental and theoretical results for reactive scattering of dihydrogen from Cu(100). In the new experiments, the associative desorption of H(2) is studied in a velocity resolved and final rovibrational state selected manner, using time-of-flight techniques in combination with resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization laser detection. Average desorption energies and rotational quadrupole alignment parameters were obtained in this way for a number of (v = 0, 1) rotational states, v being the vibrational quantum number. Results of quantum dynamics calculations based on a potential energy surface computed with a specific reaction parameter (SRP) density functional, which was derived earlier for dihydrogen interacting with Cu(111), are compared with the results of the new experiments and with the results of previous molecular beam experiments on sticking of H(2) and on rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of H(2) and D(2) from Cu(100). The calculations use the Born-Oppenheimer and static surface approximations. With the functional derived semi-empirically for dihydrogen + Cu(111), a chemically accurate description is obtained of the molecular beam experiments on sticking of H(2) on Cu(100), and a highly accurate description is obtained of rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of D(2) from Cu(100) and of the orientational dependence of the reaction of (v = 1, j = 2 - 4) H(2) on Cu(100). This suggests that a SRP density functional derived for H(2) interacting with a specific low index face of a metal will yield accurate results for H(2) reactively scattering from another low index face of the same metal, and that it may also yield accurate results for H(2) interacting with a defected (e.g., stepped) surface of that same metal, in a system of catalytic interest. However, the description that was obtained of the average desorption energies, of rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of H(2) from Cu(100), and of the

  1. Feasibility study of experiments to measure inclusive reactions at large x/sub F/ in ISABELLE's small-angle hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, S.; Danby, G.; Foley, K.; Paige, F.; Thorndike, A.; Engelmann, R.; McCarthy, R.; Pope, B.

    1979-01-01

    As a way of testing current ideas on the construction of experimental halls at ISABELLE, a particular class of experiments suggested for the small-angle (or 2 o'clock) hall are examined: p + p → p + X, and p + p → c + X, c is not = p. Somewhat more detail has been incorporated than in previous summer study and summer workshop treatments of these experiments. Briefly, the result of this examination is that inclusive single-particle experiments are feasible over a suitable kinematic range without the use of previously proposed special insertion quadrupoles. The forward single-arm spectrometer is housed in a separate tunnel of modest transverse dimension. The extraction of scattered particles (theta > approx. 1 mrad) into the spectrometer is accomplished with Lambertson septa and current sheet septa. Provision is made for overlap with the kinematic region covered by ISR and Fermilab experiments. Section II is a review of the physics objectives of such experiments. Section III describes the general layout of the apparatus, with the extraction system and the spectrometer discussed in more detail in Sections IV and V respectively. A guess at how this experiment would fit into the overall small-angle physics program is presented in Section VI

  2. Spatially enabled land administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    enabling of land administration systems managing tenure, valuation, planning, and development will allow the information generated by these activities to be much more useful. Also, the services available to private and public sectors and to community organisations should commensurably improve. Knowledge....... In other words: Good governance and sustainable development is not attainable without sound land administration or - more broadly – sound land management. The paper presents a land management vision that incorporates the benefits of ICT enabled land administration functions. The idea is that spatial...... the communication between administrative systems and also establish more reliable data due to the use the original data instead of copies. In Denmark, such governmental guidelines for a service-oriented ITarchitecture in support of e-government are recently adopted. Finally, the paper presents the role of FIG...

  3. Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Brandt, Åse

    Development and reliability testing of the Nordic Housing Enabler – an instrument for accessibility assessment of the physical housing. Tina Helle & Åse Brandt University of Lund, Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine (SE) and University College Northern Jutland, Occupational Therapy department (DK......). Danish Centre for Assistive Technology. Abstract. For decades, accessibility to the physical housing environment for people with functional limitations has been of interest politically, professionally and for the users. Guidelines and norms on accessible housing design have gradually been developed......, however, the built environment shows serious deficits when it comes to accessibility. This study addresses development of a content valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of inter-rater reliability, when used in occupational therapy practice. The instrument was translated from...

  4. Feasibility study of experiments to measure inclusive reactions at large x/sub F/ in ISABELLE's small-angle hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, S.; Danby, G.; Foley, K.; Paige, F.; Thorndike, A.; Engelmann, R.; McCarthy, R.; Pope, B.

    1978-01-01

    As a way of testing current ideas on the construction of experimental halls at ISABELLE, a particular class of experiments suggested for the small-angle (or 2 o' clock) hall, p + p → p + X and p + p → c + X, c not equal to p is examined. The result of this examination is that inclusive single-particle experiments are feasible over a suitable kinematic range without the use of previously proposed special insertion quadrupoles. The forward single-arm spectrometer is housed in a separate tunnel of modest transverse dimension. The extraction of scattered particles (theta greater than or equal to 1 mrad) into the spectrometer is accomplished with Lambertson septa and current sheet septa. Provision is made for overlap with the kinematic region covered by ISR and Fermilab experiments. The physics objectives of such experiments are reviewed first. Then the general layout of the apparatus is described, with special emphasis on the extraction system and the spectrometer. A guess at how this experiment would fit into the overall small-angle physics program is presented. 5 figures

  5. Combining water-rock interaction experiments with reaction path and reactive transport modelling to predict reservoir rock evolution in an enhanced geothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuesters, Tim; Mueller, Thomas; Renner, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Reliably predicting the evolution of mechanical and chemical properties of reservoir rocks is crucial for efficient exploitation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, dissolution and precipitation of individual rock forming minerals often result in significant volume changes, affecting the hydraulic rock properties and chemical composition of fluid and solid phases. Reactive transport models are typically used to evaluate and predict the effect of the internal feedback of these processes. However, a quantitative evaluation of chemo-mechanical interaction in polycrystalline environments is elusive due to poorly constrained kinetic data of complex mineral reactions. In addition, experimentally derived reaction rates are generally faster than reaction rates determined from natural systems, likely a consequence of the experimental design: a) determining the rate of a single process only, e.g. the dissolution of a mineral, and b) using powdered sample materials and thus providing an unrealistically high reaction surface and at the same time eliminating the restrictions on element transport faced in-situ for fairly dense rocks. In reality, multiple reactions are coupled during the alteration of a polymineralic rocks in the presence of a fluid and the rate determining process of the overall reactions is often difficult to identify. We present results of bulk rock-water interaction experiments quantifying alteration reactions between pure water and a granodiorite sample. The rock sample was chosen for its homogenous texture, small and uniform grain size (˜0.5 mm in diameter), and absence of pre-existing alteration features. The primary minerals are plagioclase (plg - 58 vol.%), quartz (qtz - 21 vol.%), K-feldspar (Kfs - 17 vol.%), biotite (bio - 3 vol.%) and white mica (wm - 1 vol.%). Three sets of batch experiments were conducted at 200 ° C to evaluate the effect of reactive surface area and different fluid path ways using (I) powders of the bulk rock with

  6. Cyber-Enabled Scientific Discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Tony; Jameson, Leland

    2007-01-01

    It is often said that numerical simulation is third in the group of three ways to explore modern science: theory, experiment and simulation. Carefully executed modern numerical simulations can, however, be considered at least as relevant as experiment and theory. In comparison to physical experimentation, with numerical simulation one has the numerically simulated values of every field variable at every grid point in space and time. In comparison to theory, with numerical simulation one can explore sets of very complex non-linear equations such as the Einstein equations that are very difficult to investigate theoretically. Cyber-enabled scientific discovery is not just about numerical simulation but about every possible issue related to scientific discovery by utilizing cyberinfrastructure such as the analysis and storage of large data sets, the creation of tools that can be used by broad classes of researchers and, above all, the education and training of a cyber-literate workforce

  7. Quasi-Classical Trajectory Dynamics Study of the Cl(2P) + C2H6 → HCl(v,j) + C2H5 Reaction. Comparison with Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Garcia, Joaquin; Martinez-Nuñez, Emilio; Rangel, Cipriano

    2018-03-15

    To understand and simulate the dynamics behavior of the title reaction, QCT calculations were performed on a recently developed global analytical potential energy surface, PES-2017. These calculations combine the classical description of the dynamics with pseudoquantization in the reactants and products to perform a theoretical/experimental comparison on the same footing. Thus, in the products a series of constraints are included to analyze the HCl(v = 0,j) product, which is experimentally detected. At collision energies of 5.5 and 6.7 kcal mol -1 the largest fraction of available energy is deposited as translation, 67%, while the ethyl radical shows significant internal energy, 27%, and so it does not act as a spectator of the reaction, thus reproducing recent experimental evidence. The HCl(v=0, j) rotational distribution is cold, peaking at j = 2, only one unit hotter than experiment, which represents an error of 0.12 kcal mol -1 . At a collision energy of 5.5 kcal mol -1 product translational distribution is slightly hotter than experiment, but at 6.7 kcal mol -1 agreement with recent experiments is practically quantitative, suggesting that the first experiments should be revised. In addition, we observe that the HCl(v=0, j) scattering distribution shifts from isotropic at low values of j to backward at high values of j, which is in agreement with experimental data. Finally, no evidence was found for the "chattering" mechanism suggested to explain the low translational energy of the HCl product in the backward scattering region. In sum, agreement with experiments of a series of sensible dynamic properties permits us to be optimistic on the quality and accuracy of the theoretical tools used in the present work, QCT and PES-2017.

  8. Analysis of self-wastage phenomena of micro leak caused by sodium-water reaction in sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor through simulant experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sunghyon; Takata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Self-wastage phenomena are an enlargement of a leak on the heat transfer tube caused by a corrosive sodium-water reaction (SWR) in a steam generator (SG) of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor (SFR). If the steam generator operates for sometimes under this condition, the self-wastage phenomena start from the sodium side and advance through the tube thickness. The leak rate stays almost constant level until the wastage reaches the sodium side, however, when the thin diaphragm of the tube wall is removed, the leak rate sharply increase, and it may bring a secondary failure of the surrounding heat transfer tubes. The design and safety concern is a possibility of the secondary failure of nearby SG tubes that could cause undesirable development of the accidents. One needs to evaluate the increased resultant leak rate due to the self-wastage phenomenon. Therefore, a quantification of the diameter of enlarged leak is needed to estimate the resultant leak rate. For this purpose, a simulant self-wastage experiment was proposed to investigate the self-enlargement of the leak so that evaluate the mechanism of the Self-wastage. In the experiment, high concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl) is injected to the reaction tank that is filled sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution through a nozzle made by paraffin wax. The self-enlargement of the leak was evaluated by considering the melted nozzle due to the reaction heat released from the Neutralization reaction. Also, a numerical investigation has been carried out to evaluate the enlarged nozzle and validate the results of experimental methodology. Based on the experimental and computational results, it is found that despite initial leak rate, there is an upper limit in the enlarged nozzle. These results show a similar tendency with the experimental result of SWAT-4 experiment carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), Japan. Furthermore, the increased resultant leak rate is evaluated using the enlarged

  9. Strange baryonic resonances below the anti KN threshold. Results from p+p reactions at the HADES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebenson, Johannes Stephan

    2013-04-18

    The present work investigates the vacuum properties of the hyperon resonances {Sigma}(1385){sup +} and {Lambda}(1405). For this purpose, p+p reactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy were analyzed. By using simulations and a special background method, the Breit-Wigner mass and width of the {Sigma}(1385){sup +} could be determined. Furthermore, its production dynamics were studied in different angular distributions. In this context indications were found that the {Sigma}(1385){sup +} partially stems from the decay of a heavy {Delta}-resonance. The investigation of the {Lambda}(1405) was based on similar analysis methods. After acceptance and efficiency corrections, the spectral shape of the {Lambda}(1405) could be extracted. Here a mass shift of this particle to masses below 1400 MeV/c{sup 2} was found. This might reveal important information about the two pole structure of the {Lambda}(1405) and its influence on the low energy anti KN interaction.

  10. Prediction and validation of burnout curves for Goettelborn char using reaction kinetics determined in shock tube experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moors, J.H.J.; Banin, V.E.; Haas, J.H.P.; Weber, R.; Veefkind, A. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics

    1999-01-01

    Using a shock tube facility the combustion characteristics of pulverised char ({lt} 10 {mu}m) were measured. A prediction was made for the burnout behaviour of a commercial sized char particle (75-90 {mu}m) in different ambient conditions using a `pseudo kinetic` approach. In this approach the kinetic rate of a surface containing micro pores is determined and these `pseudo kinetics` are then applied to the larger particle not taking into account the micro pores. Comparison of the predictions with measurements done with an isothermal plug flow reactor showed this approach to be valid within experimental error for low burnout. A linear decrease of the kinetic reaction rate with burnout is shown to predict the burnout behaviour in the complete range of burnout. A possible explanation for this linear decrease could be a growing fraction of non-combustible material in the char particles during burnout. 11 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Teaching Experiment to Elucidate a Cation-Pi Effect in an Alkyne Cycloaddition Reaction and Illustrate Hypothesis-Driven Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.Germain, Elijah J.; Horowitz, Andrew S.; Rucco, Dominic; Rezler, Evonne M.; Lepore, Salvatore D.

    2017-01-01

    An organic chemistry experiment is described that is based on recent research to elucidate a novel cation-pi interaction between tetraalkammonium cations and propargyl hydrazines. This nonbonded interaction is a key component of the mechanism of ammonium-catalyzed intramolecular cycloaddition of nitrogen to the terminal carbon of a C-C triple bond…

  12. More Ideas for Monitoring Biological Experiments with the BBC Computer: Absorption Spectra, Yeast Growth, Enzyme Reactions and Animal Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presented are five ideas for A-level biology experiments using a laboratory computer interface. Topics investigated include photosynthesis, yeast growth, animal movements, pulse rates, and oxygen consumption and production by organisms. Includes instructions specific to the BBC computer system. (CW)

  13. Untangling reaction pathways through modern approaches to high-throughput single-molecule force-spectroscopy experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulin, D.; Berghuis, B.A.; Depken, S.M.; Dekker, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule experiments provide a unique means for real-time observation of the activity of individual biomolecular machines. Through such techniques, insights into the mechanics of for example, polymerases, helicases, and packaging motors have been gleaned. Here we describe the recent advances

  14. Utilization of a Microcomputer for the Study of an Iodine Oxidation and Equilibrium Reaction: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which incorporates the use of a microcomputer to enhance understanding of combined kinetic and equilibrium phenomena, to increase experimental capabilities when working with large numbers of students and limited equipment, and for the student to develop a better understanding of experimental design. (JN)

  15. The redox-Mannich reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Seidel, Daniel

    2014-06-06

    A complement to the classic three-component Mannich reaction, the redox-Mannich reaction, utilizes the same starting materials but incorporates an isomerization step that enables the facile preparation of ring-substituted β-amino ketones. Reactions occur under relatively mild conditions and are facilitated by benzoic acid.

  16. EnableATIS strategy assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Enabling Advanced Traveler Information Systems (EnableATIS) is the traveler information component of the Dynamic Mobility Application (DMA) program. The objective of : the EnableATIS effort is to foster transformative traveler information application...

  17. Enabling Digital Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Georgsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    There are some tensions between high-level policy definitions of “digital literacy” and actual teaching practice. We need to find workable definitions of digital literacy; obtain a better understanding of what digital literacy might look like in practice; and identify pedagogical approaches, which...... support teachers in designing digital literacy learning. We suggest that frameworks such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are approaches that enable digital literacy learning because they provide good settings for engaging with digital literacy. We illustrate this through analysis of a case. Furthermore......, these operate on a meso-level mediating between high-level concepts of digital literacy and classroom practice....

  18. CtOS Enabler

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo Cepeda, Rodrigo; El Yamri El Khatibi, Meriem; Carrera García, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Las Smart Cities son, indudablemente, el futuro próximo de la tecnología al que nos acercamos cada día, lo que se puede observar en la abundancia de dispositivos móviles entre la población, que informatizan la vida cotidiana mediante el uso de la geolocalización y la información. Pretendemos unir estos dos ámbitos con CtOS Enabler para crear un estándar de uso que englobe todos los sistemas de Smart Cities y facilite a los desarrolladores de dicho software la creación de nuevas herramientas. ...

  19. Experiences from consumer reports on psychiatric adverse drug reactions with antidepressant medication: a qualitative study of reports to a consumer association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas; Svensson, Tommy; Meeuwisse, Anna; Carlsten, Anders

    2012-12-23

    The new European pharmacovigilance legislation has been suggested as marking the beginning of a new chapter in drug safety, making patients an important part of pharmacovigilance. In Sweden since 2008 it has been possible for consumers to report adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to the Medical Products Agency (MPA), and these reports are now understood as an increasingly valuable contribution in the monitoring of safety aspects in medicines. Already in 2002 it was possible to report experiences with medicines to the non-profit and independent organization Consumer Association for Medicines and Health (KILEN) through a web-based report form with an opportunity to describe ADR experiences in free text comments. The aim of this study was to qualitatively analyze the free text comments appended to consumer reports on antidepressant medication. All reports of suspected adverse reactions regarding antidepressant medications submitted from January 2002 to April 2009 to KILEN's Internet-based reporting system in Sweden were analyzed according to reported narrative experience(s). Content analysis was used to interpret the content of 181 reports with free text comments. Three main categories emerged from the analyzed data material: (1) Experiences of drug treatment with subcategories (a) Severe psychiatric adverse reactions, and (b) Discontinuation symptoms; (2) Lack of communication and (3) Trust and distrust. A majority of the reports to KILEN were from patients experiencing symptoms of mental disturbances (sometimes severe) affecting them in many different ways, especially during discontinuation. Several report included narratives of patients not receiving information of potential ADRs from their doctor, but also that there were no follow-ups of the treatment. Trust was highlighted as especially important and some patients reported losing confidence in their doctor when they were not believed about the suspected ADRs they experienced, making them attempt to discontinue their

  20. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-01-12

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  1. Molecular beam scattering experiments on the abstraction and exchange reactions of deuterium atoms with the hydrogen halides HCl, HBr, and HI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.; Rusin, L.Y.; Toennies, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Molecular beam scattering experiments have been carried out on the abstraction and exchange reactions of deuterium atoms (T=2600 K) with the hydrogen halides HX(T=300 K) in the range of scattering angles: 0 0 0 (theta/sub cm/=0 0 is the direction of the incident D-atom beam). The apparatus employed a very sensitive electron bombardment detector with a sufficiently low H 2 background to make possible the measurement of differential cross sections of about 0.1 A 2 /sr for reactively scattered HD and H and nonreactively scattered D-atoms. The measured HD signal can be largely attributed to various background sources and only serves to establish a rough upper limit on the abstraction cross section in the angular range investigated. The H-atom signal was more intense. The observed angular distribution was forward peaked, and is attributed to the exchange reaction. The nonreactively scattered D-atom signal was used in conjunction with a recently reported effective spherically symmetric potential to provide an absolute calibration of the detector sensitivity. The measured integral cross sections for the exchange reactions are 2.3 A 2 (D+HCl), 1.3 A 2 (D+HBr) and 1.6 A 2 (D+HI) with an estimated error of about +- 30%. The absolute cross sections and the H-atom angular distributions are consistent with the DX distributions measured by McDonald and Herschbach. Both experimental angular distributions are considerably narrower than those predicted by the recent classical trajectory calculations of Raff, Suzukawa, and Thompson. The implications of the new data for the activation energies for the exchange reactions are discussed

  2. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G. [Observatoire de Paris/Université de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, F-95000 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Mutschke, H. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Astrophysical Institute and University Observatory, Friedrich Schiller University Jena Schillergässchen 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Henning, T., E-mail: tolou.sabri@uni-jena.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  3. Parental expectations, experiences and reactions, sense of coherence and grade of anxiety related to routine ultrasound examination with normal findings during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelin, M; Crang Svalenius, E; Larsson, A-K; Nyberg, P; Marsál, K; Dykes, A-K

    2009-10-01

    To investigate parents' expectations, experiences and reactions, sense of coherence and anxiety before and after a second-trimester routine ultrasound examination, with normal findings. Before and after ultrasound questionnaires including the scales parents' expectations, experiences and reactions to routine ultrasound examination (PEER-U state of mind index), sense of coherence (SOC) and state and trait anxiety inventory (STAI), were sent to a 1-year cohort of women and their partners. Replies received were 2183. Both parents had significantly less worried state of mind (PEER-U) after the examination than before. Women had a lower grade of state anxiety after than before, but for men there was no significant change. Before the ultrasound, women had a higher degree of worried state of mind, as well as a higher grade of state and trait anxiety and a lower sense of coherence, than men. The women showed a greater reduction in worried state of mind than the men after the ultrasound examination. There were no significant differences in sense of coherence before and after ultrasound. Women and men are affected in their psychological well-being in relation to a routine ultrasound examination, but their sense of coherence remains stable.

  4. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the experimental and theoretical situation regarding transfer reactions and inelastic scattering. In the first category there is little (very little) precision data for heavy projectiles and consequently almost no experience with quantitative theoretical analysis. For the inelastic scattering the rather extensive data strongly supports the coupled channels models with collective formfactors. At the most back angles, at intensities about 10 -5 of Rutherford scattering, a second, compound-like mechanism becomes dominant. The description of the interplay of these two opposite mechanisms provides a new challenge for our understanding

  5. Field expansion of DNA polymerase chain reaction for early infant diagnosis of HIV-1: The Ethiopian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fonjungo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early diagnosis of infants infected with HIV (EID and early initiation of treatment significantly reduces the rate of disease progression and mortality. One of the challengesto identification of HIV-1-infected infants is availability and/or access to quality molecular laboratory facilities which perform molecular virologic assays suitable for accurate identificationof the HIV status of infants. Method: We conducted a joint site assessment and designed laboratories for the expansion of DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR testing based on dried blood spot (DBS for EID insix regions of Ethiopia. Training of appropriate laboratory technologists and development of required documentation including standard operating procedures (SOPs was carried out. The impact of the expansion of EID laboratories was assessed by the number of tests performed as well as the turn-around time. Results: DNA PCR for EID was introduced in 2008 in six regions. From April 2006 to April 2008, a total of 2848 infants had been tested centrally at the Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute (EHNRI in Addis Ababa, and which was then the only laboratory with the capability to perform EID; 546 (19.2% of the samples were positive. By November 2010, EHNRI and the six laboratories had tested an additional 16 985 HIV-exposed infants, of which 1915 (11.3% were positive. The median turn-around time for test results was 14 days (range 14−21 days. Conclusion: Expansion of HIV DNA PCR testing facilities that can provide quality and reliable results is feasible in resource-limited settings. Regular supervision and monitoring for quality assurance of these laboratories is essential to maintain accuracy of testing.

  6. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei; Ohta, Taisuke; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Gutierrez, Carlos; Nolen, C. M.; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; McCarty, Kevin F.; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D electronic material amenable to the planar semiconductor fabrication processing, possesses tunable electronic material properties potentially far superior to metals and other standard semiconductors. Despite its phenomenal electronic properties, focused research is still required to develop techniques for depositing and synthesizing graphene over large areas, thereby enabling the reproducible mass-fabrication of graphene-based devices. To address these issues, we combined an array of growth approaches and characterization resources to investigate several innovative and synergistic approaches for the synthesis of high quality graphene films on technologically relevant substrate (SiC and metals). Our work focused on developing the fundamental scientific understanding necessary to generate large-area graphene films that exhibit highly uniform electronic properties and record carrier mobility, as well as developing techniques to transfer graphene onto other substrates.

  7. The quality of colostrum and vitality of calves, born from cows with different reaction to stress experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Chernenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studying cortisol concentration and creatine phosphokinase activity in the blood serum of 40 half-sib Ukrainian black and white dairy cows an hour after planned blood extraction, which was a stress experience. We divided the cows into three groups according to the distribution of cortisol concentration in the animals: I – high, II – average and III – low stress resistance. During the research, the cows from these groups were in their fourth month of lactation after their first calving. They were kept untethered in their summer quarters, natural pastures. The aim of the research was to identify the differences in the quality of colostrum, the vitality of the calves up to the age of 6 months, the vitality of the mother-cows, and also the influence of their different adaptation potentials in cases of abortion and stillborn calves among the cows from different groups. At the dairy complex where the research was conducted, the quality of the cows’ colostrum is not monitored. This is typical for most dairy plants of Ukraine. We found that the classes of A and M immunoglobulins did not depend upon which particular groups the animals belonged to, whereas the content of immunoglobulins of class G is 6.7 g/l higher, and the content of total protein is 8.9 g/l higher in the yield of colostrum of the cows from group 1. The influence of cows’ different levels of resistance to stress experiences on their incidence of abortions and stillborn calves was not determined. Gastroenteritis occurred among calves of cows from group 3 three times more often than with those of group 1. Vitality of calves from cows of groups 1 and 2 was significantly higher. Therefore, technological stress experiences of mother-cows have a negative effect upon the quality of colostrum and upon the vitality of calves. This factor ought to be taken into consideration in the exploitation of animals, especially during pregnancy in order to

  8. Nernst-Planck Based Description of Transport, Coulombic Interactions and Geochemical Reactions in Porous Media: Modeling Approach and Benchmark Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Massimo; Sprocati, Riccardo; Masi, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    ‐ but also under advection‐dominated flow regimes. To accurately describe charge effects in flow‐through systems, we propose a multidimensional modeling approach based on the Nernst‐Planck formulation of diffusive/dispersive fluxes. The approach is implemented with a COMSOL‐PhreeqcRM coupling allowing us......, and high‐resolution experimental datasets. The latter include flow‐through experiments that have been carried out in this study to explore the effects of electrostatic interactions in fully three‐dimensional setups. The results of the simulations show excellent agreement for all the benchmarks problems...... the quantification and visualization of the specific contributions to the diffusive/dispersive Nernst‐Planck fluxes, including the Fickian component, the term arising from the activity coefficient gradients, and the contribution due to electromigration....

  9. Context-Enabled Business Intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-04-01

    To truly understand context and apply it in business intelligence, it is vital to understand what context is and how it can be applied in addressing organizational needs. Context describes the facets of the environment that impact the way that end users interact with the system. Context includes aspects of location, chronology, access method, demographics, social influence/ relationships, end-user attitude/ emotional state, behavior/ past behavior, and presence. To be successful in making Business Intelligence content enabled, it is important to be able to capture the context of use user. With advances in technology, there are a number of ways in which this user based information can be gathered and exposed to enhance the overall end user experience.

  10. Grid-Enabled Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Richard P.; Hesse, Bradford W.; Shaikh, Abdul R.; Courtney, Paul; Morgan, Glen; Augustson, Erik; Kobrin, Sarah; Levin, Kerry; Helba, Cynthia; Garner, David; Dunn, Marsha; Coa, Kisha

    2011-01-01

    Scientists are taking advantage of the Internet and collaborative web technology to accelerate discovery in a massively connected, participative environment —a phenomenon referred to by some as Science 2.0. As a new way of doing science, this phenomenon has the potential to push science forward in a more efficient manner than was previously possible. The Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database has been conceptualized as an instantiation of Science 2.0 principles by the National Cancer Institute with two overarching goals: (1) Promote the use of standardized measures, which are tied to theoretically based constructs; and (2) Facilitate the ability to share harmonized data resulting from the use of standardized measures. This is done by creating an online venue connected to the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) where a virtual community of researchers can collaborate together and come to consensus on measures by rating, commenting and viewing meta-data about the measures and associated constructs. This paper will describe the web 2.0 principles on which the GEM database is based, describe its functionality, and discuss some of the important issues involved with creating the GEM database, such as the role of mutually agreed-on ontologies (i.e., knowledge categories and the relationships among these categories— for data sharing). PMID:21521586

  11. Enabling immersive simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Josh (University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA); Mateas, Michael (University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA); Hart, Derek H.; Whetzel, Jonathan; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Glickman, Matthew R.; Abbott, Robert G.

    2009-02-01

    The object of the 'Enabling Immersive Simulation for Complex Systems Analysis and Training' LDRD has been to research, design, and engineer a capability to develop simulations which (1) provide a rich, immersive interface for participation by real humans (exploiting existing high-performance game-engine technology wherever possible), and (2) can leverage Sandia's substantial investment in high-fidelity physical and cognitive models implemented in the Umbra simulation framework. We report here on these efforts. First, we describe the integration of Sandia's Umbra modular simulation framework with the open-source Delta3D game engine. Next, we report on Umbra's integration with Sandia's Cognitive Foundry, specifically to provide for learning behaviors for 'virtual teammates' directly from observed human behavior. Finally, we describe the integration of Delta3D with the ABL behavior engine, and report on research into establishing the theoretical framework that will be required to make use of tools like ABL to scale up to increasingly rich and realistic virtual characters.

  12. Measurement of the neutral current reaction at high Q{sup 2} in the H1 experiment at HERA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shushkevich, Stanislav

    2012-12-15

    This thesis presents inclusive e{sup {+-}}p double and single differential cross section measurements for neutral current deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized leptons on protons as a function of the negative four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} and the Bjorken variable x. The data were collected in the years 2003-2007 in the H1 experiment at HERA with positively and negatively longitudinally polarized lepton beams of 27 GeV and a proton beam of 920 GeV corresponding to the centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=319 GeV. The integrated luminosity is about 330 pb{sup -1}. An overview of the phenomenology of the deep inelastic scattering is given and the experimental apparatus is described. The NC cross section measurement procedure is presented and discussed in details. The measured cross sections are used to investigate electroweak effects at high Q{sup 2}. The proton structure function xF{sub 3}, sensitive to the valence quarks in the proton, is measured. The polarization effects sensitive to the chiral structure of neutral currents are investigated. The Standard Model predictions are found to be in a good agreement with the measurement.

  13. Transport and reaction kinetics at the glass:solution interface region: results of repository-oriented leaching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Bates, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Repository-oriented leaching experiments involving Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) 165 type glass under a γ-radiation field (1 +/- 0.2 x 10 4 R/h) have been performed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project. In this communication, they discuss glass surface analyses obtained by SEM, nuclear resonance profiling, and SIMS together with leachate solution data in relation to a mechanism that couples diffusion, hydrolysis (etching and gelation), and precipitation to qualitatively describe the release of different glass components to the leachant solutions. The release of mobile (e.g., Li) and partly mobile (e.g., B) species is controlled primarily by interdiffusion with water species across the interdiffusion zone. Glass components that are immobile in the interdiffusion zone are released to the solution by etching. For prediction of long-term steady-state concentrations of glass components with low solubility, the relative rates of release from the glass and secondary mineral precipitation must be taken into account. 20 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  14. Feasibility studies for the open-charm production in proton-antiproton reactions for the PANDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vejdani, Solmaz [KVI-CART, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The PANDA experiment is one of the pillars of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. The PANDA physics program is focused on answering fundamental questions related to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), mostly in the non-perturbative energy regime. Spectroscopy exploiting Λc-baryons that are composed of a heavy charm valence quark and two light valence quarks is an integral part of the PANDA physics program. Such systems can systematically provide information on various key features of QCD, such as heavy-quark symmetry, chiral symmetry breaking, and the nature of exotic states. In this work, the experimental feasibility of studying the production mechanisms of associative open-charm baryons in antiproton-proton annihilations is investigated by using Monte Carlo simulations. I present results obtained for the channel p anti p → Λ{sup -}{sub c}Λ{sub c}, highlighting the detector performances (efficiencies and resolutions) and the statistical significance that can be achieved with the foreseen luminosities.

  15. Defence reactions of mature Norway spruce (Picea abies before and after inoculation of the blue-stain fungus Endoconidiophora polonica in a drought stress experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netherer Sigrid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed an inoculation experiment using the blue-stain fungus Endoconidiophora polonica at the Rosalia Roof study site, which was set up to study drought effects on Norway spruce susceptibility to attacks by the European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. Tree resistance parameters such as resin flow rate and extent of hypersensitive wound reaction in the phloem were investigated prior to and after fungal infection. Sample trees with different drought treatments (trees fully covered or semi-covered by roofs, control trees were inoculated with E. polonica in July 2014. In order to check for areas of phloem necrosis, the outer bark around the inoculation holes was scratched off 6 weeks later. We recorded the amount of resin exudation within 12 hours overnight in August and September 2013 and 2014. Although wound reaction zones did not differ in size between tree collectives of the various treatments, fully covered trees tended to exhibit larger necrotic areas compared to control trees. The least water supplied trees showed lowest resin flow rates prior to fungal inoculation, but were the only group to show significantly enhanced resin flow five weeks after the evaluation of defence reactions. Our results agree with earlier findings that wounding and few fungal inoculations can increase tree resistance in the medium term given not too severe water stress. Further investigations will clarify how water stress affects the availability of non-structural carbohydrates for secondary metabolism, when depletion of resources eventually occurs, and at which point trees are most susceptible to bark beetle attack.

  16. The reaction of glass during gamma irradiation in a saturated tuff environment: Part 3, long-term experiments at 1 x 10{sup 4}rad/hour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Ebert, W.L.

    1988-02-01

    Savannah River Laboratory 165 type glass was leached with equilibrated J-13 groundwater at 90{degree}C for times up to 182 days. These experiments were performed as part of an effort by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project to assess the importance of radiation effects on repository performance and waste glass corrosion. The gamma radiation field used in this work was 1. 0 +- 0.2 x 10{sup 4} rad/h. Glass dissolution is notably incongruent throughout the entire experimental periods and normalized releases follow the sequence Li {ge} Na {ge} B {approx_equal} U {ge} Si. The normalized leach rates of these elements, as well as the measured growth rates of the reaction layers, decreased with time. The only significant variation observed in the abundance of anions is the systematic decrease in NO{sub 3}/sup {minus}//NO{sub 2}/sup {minus}/ ratio from the starting EJ-13 groundwater to the EJ-13 blank experiments to the tuff- and glass-containing experiments. A leaching model that is consistent with the observed solution data and depth profiles is presented. The applicability and limitation of the present results in predicting the actual interactions that may occur in the NNWSI repository are discussed. 35 refs., 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Determination of the double-polarization observable E for the reaction γp→pπ0 in the CBELSA/TAPS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschall, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the double-polarization observable E for the reaction γp→pπ 0 was determined in the energy range of E γ =600-2400 MeV. For this in the CBELSA/TAPS experiment ar the ELSA electron-stretcher facility a circularly polarized photon beam and a longitudinally polarized butanol target were available. Additionally for the determination of the dilution factor, which specifies the contribution of reactions on the hydrogen of the butanol, data were taken on a hydrogen target and a carbon target. In order to determine the double-polarization observable E two different methods were developed. in the first method exclusively the data on the butanol target were applied and the double-polarization observable E determined by means of the dilution factor. In the second method the sum from the cross sections at antiparallel and parallel spin orientation σ 1/2 and σ 3/2 was expressed by the unpolarized cross section 2σ, which was determined by means of the data on the unpolarized hydrogen target. The results of the double-polarization observable E were compared with the predictions of the three presently most usual partial-wave analyses. While the unpolarized cross section can be well described by all three predictions, already at lowest energies differences occur between the predictions and the data, so that by the extraction of this observable new informations for the partial-wave analyses can be made available.

  18. Jefferson Lab E89-044 experiment: study of the quasi-elastic He3(e,e'p)d reaction in parallel kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penel-Nottaris, E.

    2004-07-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A E89-044 experiment has measured the He 3 (e,e'p) reaction cross-sections. The extraction of the longitudinal and transverse response functions for the two-body break-up He 3 (e,e'p)d reaction in parallel kinematics allows the study of the bound proton electromagnetic properties inside the He 3 nucleus and the involved nuclear mechanisms beyond plane waves approximations, for missing momenta of 0 and +- 300 MeV/c and transferred momenta from 0.8 to 4.1 GeV 2 . Preliminary cross-sections have been obtained after calibration of the experimental setup by fitting theoretical models averaged over the experimental phase-space using a Monte-Carlo simulation. The 8% systematic error on cross-sections is linked mainly to the absolute normalization of the target density: the elastic scattering data analysis will allow to reduce this error. The preliminary results show some disagreement with theoretical predictions for the forward angles kinematics around 0 MeV/c missing momenta and sensitivity to final state interactions and He 3 waves functions for missing momenta of 300 MeV/c. The longitudinal and transverse separation should constraint theoretical models more strongly. (author)

  19. Reactions at surfaces in the atmosphere: integration of experiments and theory as necessary (but not necessarily sufficient) for predicting the physical chemistry of aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-09-28

    While particles have significant deleterious impacts on human health, visibility and climate, quantitative understanding of their formation, composition and fates remains problematic. Indeed, in many cases, even qualitative understanding is lacking. One area of particular uncertainty is the nature of particle surfaces and how this determines interactions with gases in the atmosphere, including water, which is important for cloud formation and properties. The focus in this Perspective article is on some chemistry relevant to airborne particles and especially to reactions occurring on their surfaces. The intent is not to provide a comprehensive review, but rather to highlight a few selected examples of interface chemistry involving inorganic and organic species that may be important in the lower atmosphere. This includes sea salt chemistry, nitrate and nitrite ion photochemistry, organics on surfaces and heterogeneous reactions of oxides of nitrogen on proxies for airborne mineral dust and boundary layer surfaces. Emphasis is on the molecular level understanding that can only be gained by fully integrating experiment and theory to elucidate these complex systems.

  20. Carbon isotope exchange between gaseous CO2 and thin solution films: Artificial cave experiments and a complete diffusion-reaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maximilian; Scholz, Denis; Froeschmann, Marie-Louise; Schöne, Bernd R.; Spötl, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Speleothem stable carbon isotope (δ13C) records provide important paleoclimate and paleo-environmental information. However, the interpretation of these records in terms of past climate or environmental change remains challenging because of various processes affecting the δ13C signals. A process that has only been sparsely discussed so far is carbon isotope exchange between the gaseous CO2 of the cave atmosphere and the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) contained in the thin solution film on the speleothem, which may be particularly important for strongly ventilated caves. Here we present a novel, complete reaction diffusion model describing carbon isotope exchange between gaseous CO2 and the DIC in thin solution films. The model considers all parameters affecting carbon isotope exchange, such as diffusion into, out of and within the film, the chemical reactions occurring within the film as well as the dependence of diffusion and the reaction rates on isotopic mass and temperature. To verify the model, we conducted laboratory experiments under completely controlled, cave-analogue conditions at three different temperatures (10, 20, 30 °C). We exposed thin (≈0.1 mm) films of a NaHCO3 solution with four different concentrations (1, 2, 5 and 10 mmol/l, respectively) to a nitrogen atmosphere containing a specific amount of CO2 (1000 and 3000 ppmV). The experimentally observed temporal evolution of the pH and δ13C values of the DIC is in good agreement with the model predictions. The carbon isotope exchange times in our experiments range from ca. 200 to ca. 16,000 s and strongly depend on temperature, film thickness, atmospheric pCO2 and the concentration of DIC. For low pCO2 (between 500 and 1000 ppmV, as for strongly ventilated caves), our time constants are substantially lower than those derived in a previous study, suggesting a potentially stronger influence of carbon isotope exchange on speleothem δ13C values. However, this process should only have an

  1. Enabling scientific teamwork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereld, Mark; Uram, Thomas; Hudson, Randy; Norris, John; Papka, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    The Computer Supported Collaborative Work research community has identified that the technology used to support distributed teams of researchers, such as email, instant messaging, and conferencing environments, are not enough. Building from a list of areas where it is believed technology can help support distributed teams, we have divided our efforts into support of asynchronous and synchronous activities. This paper will describe two of our recent efforts to improve the productivity of distributed science teams. One effort focused on supporting the management and tracking of milestones and results, with the hope of helping manage information overload. The second effort focused on providing an environment that supports real-time analysis of data. Both of these efforts are seen as add-ons to the existing collaborative infrastructure, developed to enhance the experience of teams working at a distance by removing barriers to effective communication.

  2. Enabling scientific teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereld, Mark; Hudson, Randy; Norris, John; Papka, Michael E.; Uram, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The Computer Supported Collaborative Work research community has identified that the technology used to support distributed teams of researchers, such as email, instant messaging, and conferencing environments, are not enough. Building from a list of areas where it is believed technology can help support distributed teams, we have divided our efforts into support of asynchronous and synchronous activities. This paper will describe two of our recent efforts to improve the productivity of distributed science teams. One effort focused on supporting the management and tracking of milestones and results, with the hope of helping manage information overload. The second effort focused on providing an environment that supports real-time analysis of data. Both of these efforts are seen as add-ons to the existing collaborative infrastructure, developed to enhance the experience of teams working at a distance by removing barriers to effective communication.

  3. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corner, J.; Richardson, K.; Fenton, N.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactions' marks a new development in the study of television as an agency of public policy debate. During the Eighties, nuclear energy became a major international issue. The disasters at Three-mile Island and Chernobyl created a global anxiety about its risks and a new sensitivity to it among politicians and journalists. This book is a case-study into documentary depictions of nuclear energy in television and video programmes and into the interpretations and responses of viewers drawn from many different occupational groupings. How are the complex and specialist arguments about benefit, risk and proof conveyed through the different conventions of commentary, interview and film sequence? What symbolic associations does the visual language of television bring to portrayals of the issue? And how do viewers make sense of various and conflicting accounts, connecting what they see and hear on the screen with their pre-existing knowledge, experience and 'civic' expectations. The authors examine some of the contrasting forms and themes which have been used by programme makers to explain and persuade, and then give a sustained analysis of the nature and sources of viewers' own accounts. 'Nuclear Reactions' inquires into the public meanings surrounding energy and the environment, spelling out in its conclusion some of the implications for future media treatments of this issue. It is also a key contribution to the international literature on 'television knowledge' and the processes of active viewing. (author)

  4. Enabling Global Observations of Clouds and Precipitation on Fine Spatio-Temporal Scales from CubeSat Constellations: Temporal Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems Technology Demonstration (TEMPEST-D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reising, S. C.; Todd, G.; Padmanabhan, S.; Lim, B.; Heneghan, C.; Kummerow, C.; Chandra, C. V.; Berg, W. K.; Brown, S. T.; Pallas, M.; Radhakrishnan, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Temporal Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems (TEMPEST) mission concept consists of a constellation of 5 identical 6U-Class satellites observing storms at 5 millimeter-wave frequencies with 5-10 minute temporal sampling to observe the time evolution of clouds and their transition to precipitation. Such a small satellite mission would enable the first global measurements of clouds and precipitation on the time scale of tens of minutes and the corresponding spatial scale of a few km. TEMPEST is designed to improve the understanding of cloud processes by providing critical information on temporal signatures of precipitation and helping to constrain one of the largest sources of uncertainty in cloud models. TEMPEST millimeter-wave radiometers are able to perform remote observations of the cloud interior to observe microphysical changes as the cloud begins to precipitate or ice accumulates inside the storm. The TEMPEST technology demonstration (TEMPEST-D) mission is in progress to raise the TRL of the instrument and spacecraft systems from 6 to 9 as well as to demonstrate radiometer measurement and differential drag capabilities required to deploy a constellation of 6U-Class satellites in a single orbital plane. The TEMPEST-D millimeter-wave radiometer instrument provides observations at 89, 165, 176, 180 and 182 GHz using a single compact instrument designed for 6U-Class satellites. The direct-detection topology of the radiometer receiver substantially reduces both its power consumption and design complexity compared to heterodyne receivers. The TEMPEST-D instrument performs precise, end-to-end calibration using a cross-track scanning reflector to view an ambient blackbody calibration target and cosmic microwave background every scan period. The TEMPEST-D radiometer instrument has been fabricated and successfully tested under environmental conditions (vibration, thermal cycling and vacuum) expected in low-Earth orbit. TEMPEST-D began in Aug. 2015, with a

  5. Study on solar chemical heat pump system. Basic experiment on falling film reaction for dehydrogenation of 2-propanol; Solar chemical heat pump no kenkyu. 2-propanol bunkai hanno ni okeru ryuka ekimakushiki hanno jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, T; Ando, Y; Tanaka, T; Takashima, T [Electrochemical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan); Nomura, T; Kamoshida, J [Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    An experiment and the examination were carried out in order to elucidate the optimum conditions in the falling liquid film reaction method, in the conversion of solar energy using the decomposition reaction of 2-propanol. The device for the experiment was constituted of a reaction container, tubular pump, cooling pipe, sampling container for effluent from the upper and lower part of the reaction container, and gas burette. Examined in the experiment were various factors such as a fibrous activated carbon (catalyst support), ratio for carrying catalyst, catalytic composition and heating temperature. In the experiment, with the temperature inside the reaction container fully stabilized under prescribed conditions, measurement was done for the hydrogen generation by the gas burette for 10 minutes as well as for the sampling of effluent. The experiment revealed that the heat utilization ratio reached the maximum of about 27% when the heating temperature was 90{degree}C using a catalyst with the ratio of RU and Pt 1 to 1 and the ratio for carrying catalyst 10wt%, so that a great improvement was obtained in the heat utilization ratio at a low temperature. Also obtained was a large inversion ratio of about 15%. 4 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Lessons from a “Failed” Experiment: Zinc Silicates with Complex Morphology by Reaction of Zinc Acetate, the Ionic Liquid Precursor (ILP Tetrabutylammonium Hydroxide (TBAH, and Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Taubert

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available At elevated temperatures, the ionic liquid precursor (ILP tetrabutylammonium hydroxide reacts with zinc acetate and the glass wall of the reaction vessel. While the reaction of OH- with the glass wall is not surprising as such and could be considered a failed experiment, the resulting materials are interesting for a variety of applications. If done on purpose and under controlled conditions, the reaction with the glass wall results in uniform, well-defined hemimorphite Zn4Si2O7(OH2·nH2O and willemite Zn2SiO4 microcrystals and films. Their morphology can be adjusted by variation of the reaction time and reaction temperature. The hemimorphite can be transformed to Zn2SiO4 via calcination. The process is therefore a viable approach for the fabrication of porous films on glass surfaces with potential applications as catalyst support, among others.

  7. Radiation chemical effects in experiments to study the reaction of glass in an environment of gamma-irradiated air, groundwater, and tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of experiments performed by John K. Bates et al. on the reaction of nuclear waste glass with a gamma-irradiated 90 0 C aqueous solution were analyzed using theory developed from past research in radiation chemistry. The aqueous solution they used is similar to what would be expected in a water-saturated environment in a nuclear waste repository in tuff. The purpose of our study was to develop an understanding of the radiation-chemical processes that occurred in the Bates et al. experiments so the results could be applied to the design and performance analysis of a proposed repository in unsaturated tuff in Nevada. For the Bates et al. experiments at the highest dose (269 Mrad), which originally contained about 16 ml of ''equilibrated'' water taken from Nevada Test Site Well J-13 and 5.4 ml of air, we predicted that water decomposition to H 2 and O 2 would produce a pressure increase of at least 1.0 MPa at 20 0 C. We also predicted that nitrogen fixation from the air would occur, producing an increase of 1.6 x 10 -4 M in total fixed nitrogen concentration in solution. In addition, an equimolar production of H + would occur, which would be buffered by the HCO 3 - in the water. The fixed nitrogen in solution was predicted to be present as NO 2 - and NO 3 - with the ratio influenced by the presence of materials catalytic to the decomposition of H 2 O 2 . We found reasonable agreement between our predictions and the observations of Bates et al., where comparisons were possible. We apply the results to the proposed Nevada repository to the degree possible, given the different expected conditions

  8. Photon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1982-04-01

    Various aspects of medium energy nuclear reactions induced by real photons are reviewed. Special emphasis is put on high accuracy experiments that will become possible with the next generation of electron accelerators. (orig.)

  9. Measurement of polarization observables in the reaction γp→ pπ0π0 using linearly polarized photons with the CBELSA/TAPS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokhoyan, Vahe

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum and the properties of baryon resonances can be studied using photons with energies appropriate to excite baryonic states. Double meson photoproduction allows access to cascading resonance decays via other excited states. Also, at higher energies the importance of the double meson photoproduction increases due to higher cross-sections in comparison to single meson photoproduction. To study baryon resonances, the measurement of polarization observables as well as the measurement of differential cross-sections plays a very important role. In this work the three-body polarization observables I s , I c and the respective twobody asymmetry Σ were measured for the reaction γp → pπ 0 π 0 in an incoming photon energy range of E γ = 970 - 1650 MeV. The data were acquired with the CBELSA/TAPS experiment located at the ELSA accelerator in Bonn, using a linearly polarized photon beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. The observables I s and I c which occur in two-meson final states are measured for the first time in the reaction γp → pπ 0 π 0 . The corresponding two-body asymmetry Σ is measured in an extended energy range in comparison to already existing data. A comparison with theoretical models shows that the polarization observables provide valuable input to study resonance contributions and their decay modes. The D 33 (1700) → Δπ decay is studied based on the comparison of the Bonn-Gatchina Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) predictions with the data. Furthermore, a comparison of the data with the Bonn-Gatchina PWA and the Fix isobar model predictions allows to distinguish between these two models. Additionally, band-like structures and peaks are observed in the mass ranges of Δ(1232), D 13 (1520), F 15 (1680), f 0 (980) and f 2 (1270) in the according Dalitz plots and invariant mass distributions. The contributions of these states are confirmed by the Bonn-Gatchina PWA. An excellent compatibility with the existing data from the previous CBELSA

  10. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong [Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Dr., Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing, E-mail: hanqing.jiang@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Yu, Hongyu, E-mail: hongyu.yu@asu.edu [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics.

  11. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing; Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong; Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing; Yu, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics

  12. Investigation of the tensor analysing power T{sub 20} in the vector d+p→{sup 3}He+η reaction with the COSY-ANKE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papenbrock, Michael Paul

    2016-07-01

    The work presented here is a contribution to the ongoing search for quasi-bound states between mesons and nuclei. Early theoretical predictions estimated that an η-meson may form a quasi-bound state with nuclei with a mass number of A≥12. Many measurements in this field have revealed evidence that such a state may indeed exist. More interestingly, it may already form at much lower mass numbers, e.g. between an η-meson and {sup 3}He nucleus. Of special note is an unpolarised measurement of the d+p→{sup 3}He+η reaction, which has been studied in unprecedented detail in the excess energy range -5 MeVexperiment. Evidence for a quasi-bound η{sup 3}He state was found by parametrising total and differential cross sections and extracting the final state interaction between the two ejectiles, which was found to be surprisingly strong. However, with both beam and target being unpolarised, possible contributions of the initial state to the cross section could not be investigated. In the d+p→{sup 3}He+η reaction the final state can be produced from two different initial spin states with S=1/2 and S=3/2. If the production amplitudes of these respective states inhibit a different energy dependence, it could manifest in the shape of the total cross section in an unpolarised measurement, thereby affecting the determination of the final state interaction. A new measurement with a vector and tensor polarised deuteron beam on the vector d+p→{sup 3}He+η reaction was performed with COSY-ANKE in the same excess energy range, i.e. -5 MeV

  13. What can we learn from consumer reports on psychiatric adverse drug reactions with antidepressant medication? Experiences from reports to a consumer association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas; Svensson, Tommy; Meeuwisse, Anna; Carlsten, Anders

    2011-10-25

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) the cost of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the general population is high and under-reporting by health professionals is a well-recognized problem. Another way to increase ADR reporting is to let the consumers themselves report directly to the authorities. In Sweden it is mandatory for prescribers to report serious ADRs to the Medical Products Agency (MPA), but there are no such regulations for consumers. The non-profit and independent organization Consumer Association for Medicines and Health, KILEN has launched the possibility for consumers to report their perceptions and experiences from their use of medicines in order to strengthen consumer rights within the health care sector. This study aimed to analyze these consumer reports. All reports submitted from January 2002 to April 2009 to an open web site in Sweden where anyone could report their experience with the use of pharmaceuticals were analyzed with focus on common psychiatric side effects related to antidepressant usage. More than one ADR for a specific drug could be reported. In total 665 reports were made during the period. 442 reports concerned antidepressant medications and the individual antidepressant reports represented 2392 ADRs and 878 (37%) of these were psychiatric ADRs. 75% of the individual reports concerned serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and the rest serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). Women reported more antidepressant psychiatric ADRs (71%) compared to men (24%). More potentially serious psychiatric ADRs were frequently reported to KILEN and withdrawal symptoms during discontinuation were also reported as a common issue. The present study indicates that consumer reports may contribute with important information regarding more serious psychiatric ADRs following antidepressant treatment. Consumer reporting may be considered a complement to traditional ADR reporting.

  14. Disagreement between theory and experiment grows with increasing rotational excitation of HD(v', j') product for the H + D2 reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankunas, Justin; Sneha, Mahima; Zare, Richard N; Bouakline, Foudhil; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2013-03-07

    The Photoloc technique has been employed to measure the state-resolved differential cross sections of the HD(v', j(')) product in the reaction H + D2 over a wide range of collision energies and internal states. The experimental results were compared with fully dimensional, time-dependent quantum mechanical calculations on the refined Boothroyd-Keogh-Martin-Peterson potential energy surface. We find nearly perfect agreement between theory and experiment for HD(v', j(')) product states with low to medium rotational excitation, e.g., HD(v' = 1, j(') = 3) at a collision energy, Ecoll, of 1.72 eV, HD(v' = 1, j(') = 3, 5) at Ecoll = 1.97 eV, and HD(v' = 3, j(') = 3) at Ecoll = 1.97 eV. As the rotational angular momentum, j('), of HD(v', j(')) increases, the agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental measurements worsens but not in a simple fashion. A moderate disagreement between theory and experiment has been found for HD(v' = 0, j(') = 12) at Ecoll = 1.76 eV and increased monotonically for HD(v' = 0, j(') = 13) at Ecoll = 1.74 eV, HD(v' = 0, j(') = 14) at Ecoll = 1.72 eV, and HD(v' = 0, j(') = 15) at Ecoll = 1.70 eV. Disagreement was not limited to vibrationless HD(v', j(')) product states: HD(v' = 1, j(') = 12) at Ecoll = 1.60 eV and HD(v' = 3, j(') = 8, 10) at Ecoll = 1.97 eV followed a similar trend. Theoretical calculations suggest more sideways∕forward scattering than has been observed experimentally for high j(') HD(v', j(')) states. The source of this discrepancy is presently unknown but might be the result of inaccuracy in the potential energy surface.

  15. Primary care patients' views and decisions about, experience of and reactions to direct-to-consumer genetic testing: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Katherine; Sanders, Tonya Nashay; Hogan, Nancy S; Cherny, Sara; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the decisions and perspectives of participants undergoing direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTCGT). The aims of this study were to examine the views, attitudes and decision-making factors of primary care patients regarding DTCGT. Their experience of and reactions to testing also emerged during the study. In this longitudinal, qualitative study, 20 primary care patients participated in DTCGT and individual interviews: (1) prior to testing after the informed consent session, (2) after receiving results, (3) 3 months post-test, and (4) 12 months post-test. Interviews included open-ended questions and all transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory, constant comparison methods. Five key themes emerged from data analysis as participants underwent DTCGT and reflected on their decision over time: (1) limited concerns about DTCGT, (2) motivations for testing, (3) expectations of testing, (4) understanding of results, and (5) impact of testing and results. While a few participants expressed concerns before testing, participants were motivated to test by curiosity, gaining actionable knowledge, and altruism. Most were uncertain of what to expect from DTCGT and needed assistance in understanding results. While many reported testing had no significant impact on them, being relieved or pleased after testing was the most common emotional effect. Notably, a few participants made positive health changes in response to testing. Given the paucity of information about primary care patients and DTCGT, this study adds more in-depth information to the emerging research on how such participants' view, make decisions about, experience and react to DTCGT over time. Because uncertainty remains about the accuracy of DTCGT, the response of primary care patients to this testing requires further investigation.

  16. Breakthrough of two pesticides into tile drain and shallow groundwater: comparison of tile drain reaction and soil profiles within a field scale irrigation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Julian; Zehe, Erwin; Elsner, Martin; Palm, Juliane; Schneider, Dorothee; Schröder, Boris; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; West, Stephanie

    2010-05-01

    and bromide. The tile drain water showed traces of bromide and both pesticides within a few minutes. IPU showed highest concentration before the hydrograph started to increase, while bromide and FLU are strongly correlated to the hydrograph. Although IPU is less sorptive than FLU the concentrations and total transported mass of FLU were significantly higher then for IPU. The hydrograph reacted with two peaks on the three block irrigation; the two peaks can be attributed to the second and third irrigation block. Analysis of the water isotopes showed that during the experiment the event water mainly consisted of soil water. While the tile drain showed significant reaction in pesticides transport the picture deriving from soil profiles were different. Especially FLU was found mainly in the upper soil parts, so the bypassing might occurred so fast that it was only marginally absorbed in deeper soil party, but transported to the drain or shallow groundwater. As preferential flow paths earthworm burrows of different species could be identified, although the area density and species number of anecic earthworms was quite low compared to other field sites.

  17. Geo-Enabled, Mobile Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    We are witnessing the emergence of a global infrastructure that enables the widespread deployment of geo-enabled, mobile services in practice. At the same time, the research community has also paid increasing attention to data management aspects of mobile services. This paper offers me...

  18. SOLVENTLESS MIGRATORY-INSERTION REACTIONS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The product formed by reaction of an alkyl or aryl cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyl .... (as also observed from the NMR tube experiments) that the solventless reaction between ... As can be seen from Figure 3, the reaction rate in the melt.

  19. Toward genome-enabled mycology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbett, David S; Stajich, Jason E; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-enabled mycology is a rapidly expanding field that is characterized by the pervasive use of genome-scale data and associated computational tools in all aspects of fungal biology. Genome-enabled mycology is integrative and often requires teams of researchers with diverse skills in organismal mycology, bioinformatics and molecular biology. This issue of Mycologia presents the first complete fungal genomes in the history of the journal, reflecting the ongoing transformation of mycology into a genome-enabled science. Here, we consider the prospects for genome-enabled mycology and the technical and social challenges that will need to be overcome to grow the database of complete fungal genomes and enable all fungal biologists to make use of the new data.

  20. Conclusions from the sodium-water reaction experiments performed with a straight tube bundle model for a steam generator with respect to the calculation method of the accident design pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, P.W.P.; Ruijterman, C.

    1975-01-01

    This paper will give some conclusions, drawn from the big-leakages sodium-water reaction experiments, on the calculation methods to be used in determining the sodium blow down, the water supply and the bubble pressure. The necessity of taking into account the compressibility of sodium is demonstrated. (author)

  1. Conclusions from the sodium-water reaction experiments performed with a straight tube bundle model for a steam generator with respect to the calculation method of the accident design pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, P W.P.; Ruijterman, C

    1975-07-01

    This paper will give some conclusions, drawn from the big-leakages sodium-water reaction experiments, on the calculation methods to be used in determining the sodium blow down, the water supply and the bubble pressure. The necessity of taking into account the compressibility of sodium is demonstrated. (author)

  2. IT Enabled Agility in Organizational Ambidexterity

    OpenAIRE

    Röder, Nina; Schermann, Michael; Krcmar, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The aim of ambidextrous organizations is to balance exploratory and exploitative learning concepts. They innovate through experiments and research, and capture the value of innovations through refinement and continuous improvement. In this paper, we study the relationship of organizational ambidexterity and IT enabled agility. Based on a case study with a German car manufacturer we find that (1) entrepreneurial agility impedes exploitative concepts, (2) adaptive agility impedes exploratory co...

  3. Scientists as communicators: A randomized experiment to assess public reactions to scientists' social media communication along the science-advocacy continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotcher, J.; Vraga, E.; Myers, T.; Stenhouse, N.; Roser-Renouf, C.; Maibach, E.

    2014-12-01

    The question of what type of role scientists, or experts more generally, should play in policy debates is a perennial point of discussion within the scientific community. It is often thought that communication containing some form of policy advocacy is likely to compromise the perceived credibility of the individual scientist engaged in such behavior, with the possibility that it may also harm the credibility of the scientific community more broadly. Rather than evaluating statements in a binary fashion as representing either pure objectivity or pure advocacy, one recent model proposes that public communication by scientists should instead be thought of as falling along a continuum based upon the extent of normative judgment implicit in a statement. This approach predicts that as the extent of normative judgment increases, it poses a relatively greater risk to a scientist's perceived credibility. Though such a model is conceptually useful, little empirical social science research has systematically explored how individuals form judgments about different types of advocacy to examine common assumptions about the relative risks associated with such behaviors. In this presentation, we will report results from a national online experiment (N=1200) that examines audience responses to fictional social media posts written by either a climate scientist or a television weathercaster. Following the above model, the posts represent differing degrees of advocacy defined by the extent of normative judgment implicit in each statement. In instances where a specific policy is advocated, we examine whether participants' reactions are shaped by the extent to which the policy mentioned is congruent with one's political ideology. We hope this study will serve as an exemplar of applied science communication research that can begin to help inform scientists and other experts about the potential implications of different communication options they may choose from in deciding how to engage

  4. Measurement of beam asymmetries in the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup 0}{eta} with the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment at ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutz, Eric Paul-Maria

    2011-07-01

    The photoproduction of mesons off the nucleon provides an excellent tool to gain further insight into the structure of baryons and their excitation spectrum. A large number of final states yielding various resonance contributions are accessible in photoproduction experiments. Especially in the regime of high-lying resonances, the photoproduction of multi-meson final states is of increasing importance, giving access to sequential decays of such resonances via e.g. {delta}(1232)P{sub 33} or N(1535)S{sub 11} in the intermediate state. For a complete understanding of the processes involved, however, it is insufficient to measure only unpolarized total and differential cross sections. The extraction of polarization observables from data obtained using polarized beams and targets is mandatory to constrain theoretical models and analyses and to uniquely determine the amplitudes participating in a given process. This work presents the analysis of data taken with the Crystal-Barrel/TAPS experiment at the accelerator facility ELSA in Bonn, using a linearly polarized photon beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. The detector system is optimized for the detection of multi-photon final states. The data has been selected for the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup 0}{eta} {yields} p4{gamma} for an incoming photon energy range of 970 MeV to 1650 MeV. In this range, photon polarizations of up to 50% have been achieved. From this data, all polarization observables accessible with a linearly polarized photon beam and an unpolarized target have been extracted. This includes the beam asymmetry sum, determined as a function of various invariant masses and angles using a quasi two-body approach, along with the three-body asymmetries I{sup c} and I{sup s}. The latter two observables are unique to the acoplanar kinematics of multi-meson final states and have been measured for the first time within this work. The comparison of the results to solutions derived from various theoretical

  5. Measurement of beam asymmetries in the reaction γp → pπ0η with the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment at ELSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutz, Eric Paul-Maria

    2011-01-01

    The photoproduction of mesons off the nucleon provides an excellent tool to gain further insight into the structure of baryons and their excitation spectrum. A large number of final states yielding various resonance contributions are accessible in photoproduction experiments. Especially in the regime of high-lying resonances, the photoproduction of multi-meson final states is of increasing importance, giving access to sequential decays of such resonances via e.g. Δ(1232)P 33 or N(1535)S 11 in the intermediate state. For a complete understanding of the processes involved, however, it is insufficient to measure only unpolarized total and differential cross sections. The extraction of polarization observables from data obtained using polarized beams and targets is mandatory to constrain theoretical models and analyses and to uniquely determine the amplitudes participating in a given process. This work presents the analysis of data taken with the Crystal-Barrel/TAPS experiment at the accelerator facility ELSA in Bonn, using a linearly polarized photon beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. The detector system is optimized for the detection of multi-photon final states. The data has been selected for the reaction γp → pπ 0 η → p4γ for an incoming photon energy range of 970 MeV to 1650 MeV. In this range, photon polarizations of up to 50% have been achieved. From this data, all polarization observables accessible with a linearly polarized photon beam and an unpolarized target have been extracted. This includes the beam asymmetry sum, determined as a function of various invariant masses and angles using a quasi two-body approach, along with the three-body asymmetries I c and I s . The latter two observables are unique to the acoplanar kinematics of multi-meson final states and have been measured for the first time within this work. The comparison of the results to solutions derived from various theoretical frameworks demonstrates the sensitivity of the

  6. Computer Security Systems Enable Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggen, Gary

    1989-01-01

    A good security system enables access and protects information from damage or tampering, but the most important aspects of a security system aren't technical. A security procedures manual addresses the human element of computer security. (MLW)

  7. How GNSS Enables Precision Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Precision farming: Feeding a Growing Population Enables Those Who Feed the World. Immediate and Ongoing Needs - population growth (more to feed) - urbanization (decrease in arable land) Double food production by 2050 to meet world demand. To meet thi...

  8. Selective C(sp3)−H aerobic oxidation enabled by decatungstate photocatalysis in flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laudadio, G.; Govaerts, S.; Wang, Y.; Ravelli, D.; Koolman, H.; Fagnoni, M.; Djuric, S.; Noel, T.

    2018-01-01

    A mild and selective C(sp3)−H aerobic oxidation enabled by decatungstate photocatalysis has been developed. The reaction can be significantly improved in a microflow reactor enabling the safe use of oxygen and enhanced irradiation of the reaction mixture. Our method allows for the oxidation of both

  9. Factors associated with acute oral mucosal reaction induced by radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A retrospective single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhenchao; Gao, Jin; Qian, Liting; Huang, Yifan; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Liping; He, Jian; Yang, Jing; Wang, Ru; Zhang, Yangyang

    2017-12-01

    To investigate risk factors for acute oral mucosal reaction during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma radiotherapy.A retrospective study of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who underwent radiotherapy from November 2013 to May 2016 in Anhui Provincial Cancer Hospital was conducted. Data on the occurrence and severity of acute oral mucositis were extracted from clinical records. Based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading of acute radiation mucosal injury, the patients were assigned into acute reaction (grades 2-4) and minimum reaction (grades 0-1) groups. Preradiotherapy characteristics and treatment factors were compared between the 2 groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to detect the independent factors associated with acute oral mucosal reactions.Eighty patients completed radiotherapy during the study period. Oral mucosal reactions were recorded as 25, 31, and 24 cases of grades 1, 2, and 3 injuries, respectively. Significant differences between acute reaction and minimum reaction groups were detected in cancer lymph node (N) staging, smoking and diabetes history, pretreatment platelet count and T-Helper/T-Suppressor lymphocyte (Th/Ts) ratio, concurrent chemotherapy, and total and single irradiation doses.Multivariate analysis showed that N stage, smoking history, single dose parapharyngeal irradiation, and pretreatment platelet count were independent risk factors for acute radiation induced oral mucosal reaction. Smoking history, higher grading of N stage, higher single dose irradiation, and lower preirradiation platelet count may increase the risk and severity of acute radiation oral mucosal reaction in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cross sections of the O++H2→OH++H ion-molecule reaction and isotopic variants (D2, HD): Quasiclassical trajectory study and comparison with experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Rodrigo; Sierra, Jose Daniel; Gonzalez, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    A dynamics study [cross section and microscopic mechanism versus collision energy (E T )] of the reaction O + +H 2 →OH + +H, which plays an important role in Earth's ionosphere and interstellar chemistry, was conducted using the quasiclassical trajectory method, employing an analytical potential energy surface (PES) recently derived by our group [R. Martinez et al., J. Chem. Phys. 120, 4705 (2004)]. Experimental excitation functions for the title reaction, as well as its isotopic variants with D 2 and HD, were near-quantitatively reproduced in the calculations in the very broad collision energy range explored (E T =0.01-6.0 eV). Intramolecular and intermolecular isotopic effects were also examined, yielding data in good agreement with experimental results. The reaction occurs via two microscopic mechanisms (direct and nondirect abstraction). The results were satisfactorily interpreted based on the reaction probability and the maximum impact parameter dependences with E T , and considering the influence of the collinear [OHH] + absolute minimum of the PES on the evolution from reactants to products. The agreement between theory and experiment suggests that the reaction mainly occurs through the lowest energy PES and nonadiabatic processes are not very important in the wide collision energy range analyzed. Hence, the PES used to describe this reaction is suitable for both kinetics and dynamics studies

  11. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  12. Analysis of the reaction γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} in the neutral decay channel at the BGO-OD experiment using kinematic fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alef, Stefan [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA facility in Bonn is built to investigate nucleon excitations via meson photoproduction. One research objective is associated strangeness production, which includes the reaction channel γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +}. Results of the analysis for the neutral decay channel K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} → π{sup 0}π{sup 0}π{sup 0}p will be presented. Due to the small production cross section and branching ratio kinematic fitting is used to discriminate the reaction against background.

  13. OGC® Sensor Web Enablement Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Percivall

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a high-level overview of and architecture for the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standards activities that focus on sensors, sensor networks, and a concept called the “Sensor Web”. This OGC work area is known as Sensor Web Enablement (SWE. This article has been condensed from "OGC® Sensor Web Enablement: Overview And High Level Architecture," an OGC White Paper by Mike Botts, PhD, George Percivall, Carl Reed, PhD, and John Davidson which can be downloaded from http://www.opengeospatial.org/pt/15540. Readers interested in greater technical and architecture detail can download and read the OGC SWE Architecture Discussion Paper titled “The OGC Sensor Web Enablement Architecture” (OGC document 06-021r1, http://www.opengeospatial.org/pt/14140.

  14. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic reaction studies, because of their capability to microscopically probe nuclear structure, are still of considerable interest in heavy-ion reactions. The recent progress in understanding various aspects of the reaction mechanism make this aim appear closer. The relation between microscopic and macroscopic behavior, as suggested, for example, by the single proton transfer data to individual final states or averaged excitation energy intervals, needs to be explored. It seems particularly useful to extend measurements to higher incident energies, to explore and understand nuclear structure aspects up to the limit of the energy range where they are important

  15. Enabling Routes as Context in Mobile Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brilingaite, Agne; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Zokaite, Nora

    With the continuing advances in wireless communications, geo-positioning, and portable electronics, an infrastructure is emerging that enables the delivery of on-line, location-enabled services to very large numbers of mobile users. A typical usage situation for mobile services is one characteriz...... and accumulates the routes of a user along with their usage patterns and that makes the routes available to services. Experiences from using the component on logs of GPS positions acquired from vehicles traveling within a real road network are reported....... by a small screen and no keyboard, and by the service being only a secondary focus of the user. Under such circumstances, it is particularly important to deliver the "right" information and service at the right time, with as little user interaction as possible. This may be achieved by making services context...

  16. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Molecular Modeling Group, Organic Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology,. Hyderabad ... thus obtained are helpful to model the regioselectivity ... compromise to model Diels–Alder reactions involving ...... acceptance.

  17. Resonance phase and sings of P-odd and P-even effects, observable in the reactions with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smotritskij, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that introduction of the resonance phase for two quasistationary states with a similar spin and counter parity makes it possible to correlate the sing dependence of both the P-odd and P-even effects, experimentally observed in the reactions with neutrons. The common description of such effects enables determination of the theory unknown (free) parameters from the experiment [ru

  18. Electronically stimulated deep-center reactions in electron-irradiated InP: Comparison between experiment and recombination-enhancement theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.

    1987-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the recombination enhancement of several defect reactions involving the main deep centers in low-temperature electron-irradiated InP. A fairly good agreement is obtained with the Weeks-Tully-Kimerling theory for the activation energies of the enhanced process. On the other hand, a thorough investigation of a thermally and electronically stimulated defect transformation shows evidence that one major approximation (local vibrational equilibrium) fails, and that the recently proposed [H. Sumi, Phys. Rev. B 29, 4616 (1984)] mechanism of coherent recombination on deep centers is responsible for altered reaction rates at high injection levels

  19. Realization of two light particle correlation experiments: behaviour to very low relative momenta (measurement with a magnetic spectrometer) and influence of the violence of reaction on the emission sources (measured by the neutron detector ORION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sezac, L.

    1993-01-01

    The correlation measurements between light particles emitted during heavy ion collisions allow to estimate the time-space extension of the emitting sources. This report about the preliminaries of two correlation experiments is split into two parts. The first one describes a test experiment, performed to study the feasibility of a correlation experiment at very low relative momenta with the help of a magnetic spectrometer. The results will allow to determine the still unknown relative effects from the final state interaction and the combination of both Coulomb interaction and quantum statistics. A correlation study without experimental selection of the impact parameter gives unclear answers about the sizes and the temporal characteristics of the emitting systems. The second part analyses the sources of the alpha particles detected in the reaction chamber of the multidetector ORION used as a violence of the reaction filter. The results show that it is possible to consider as a good filter a fast information called 'prompt peak' (correlated to the neutron multiplicity detected with ORION). Under such conditions a study of two particle correlations from equilibrated systems with a reasonable statistics becomes thinkable. The results obtained allow to characterize the emitting sources (speed, intensity, temperature) as a function of the violence of the reaction for the system 208 Pb + 93 Nb at 29 MeV/u. (author)

  20. Experimenting with a Visible Copper-Aluminum Displacement Reaction in Agar Gel and Observing Copper Crystal Growth Patterns to Engage Student Interest and Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinhua; Wu, Meifen; Wang, Xiaogang; Yang, Yangyiwei; Shi, Xiang; Wang, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    The reaction process of copper-aluminum displacement in agar gel was observed at the microscopic level with a stereomicroscope; pine-like branches of copper crystals growing from aluminum surface into gel at a constant rate were observed. Students were asked to make hypotheses on the pattern formation and design new research approaches to prove…

  1. Direct Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, N. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1963-01-15

    In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions and the kinds of final states in which DI effects dominate and in which CN effects may almost be forgotten. The DI cross-sections which are studied are often extremely large, comparable to elastic scattering cross-sections. (author)

  2. Organizational Enablers for Project Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Ralf; Shao, Jingting; Pemsel, Sofia

    and their relationships to organizational success. Based on these results, the authors discovered that organizational enablers (including key factors such as leadership, governance, and influence of project managers) have a critical impact on how organizations operate, adapt to market fluctuations and forces, and make......While corporate culture plays a significant role in the success of any corporation, governance and “governmentality” not only determine how business should be conducted, but also define the policies and procedures organizations follow to achieve business functions and goals. In their book......, Organizational Enablers for Project Governance, Ralf Müller, Jingting Shao, and Sofia Pemsel examine the interaction of governance and governmentality in various types of companies and demonstrate how these factors drive business success and influence project work, efficiency, and profitability. The data...

  3. 'Ethos' Enabling Organisational Knowledge Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudaira, Yoshito

    This paper examines knowledge creation in relation to improvements on the production line in the manufacturing department of Nissan Motor Company and aims to clarify embodied knowledge observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation will be clarified. For that purpose, this study adopts an approach that adds a first, second, and third-person's viewpoint to the theory of knowledge creation. Embodied knowledge, observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation, is the continued practice of 'ethos' (in Greek) founded in Nissan Production Way as an ethical basis. Ethos is knowledge (intangible) assets for knowledge creating companies. Substantiated analysis classifies ethos into three categories: the individual, team and organisation. This indicates the precise actions of the organisational members in each category during the knowledge creation process. This research will be successful in its role of showing the indispensability of ethos - the new concept of knowledge assets, which enables knowledge creation -for future knowledge-based management in the knowledge society.

  4. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  5. Realization of two light particle correlation experiments: behaviour to very low relative momenta (measurement with a magnetic spectrometer) and influence of the violence of reaction on the emission sources (measured by the neutron detector ORION); Mise en oeuvre de deux experiences de correlations de particules legeres: comportement a tres faibles impulsions relatives (mesure avec un spectrometre magnetique) et influence de la violence de reaction sur les sources d`emission (mesuree avec le detecteur de neutrons ORION)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sezac, L. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1993-01-20

    The correlation measurements between light particles emitted during heavy ion collisions allow to estimate the time-space extension of the emitting sources. This report about the preliminaries of two correlation experiments is split into two parts. The first one describes a test experiment, performed to study the feasibility of a correlation experiment at very low relative momenta with the help of a magnetic spectrometer. The results will allow to determine the still unknown relative effects from the final state interaction and the combination of both Coulomb interaction and quantum statistics. A correlation study without experimental selection of the impact parameter gives unclear answers about the sizes and the temporal characteristics of the emitting systems. The second part analyses the sources of the alpha particles detected in the reaction chamber of the multidetector ORION used as a violence of the reaction filter. The results show that it is possible to consider as a good filter a fast information called `prompt peak` (correlated to the neutron multiplicity detected with ORION). Under such conditions a study of two particle correlations from equilibrated systems with a reasonable statistics becomes thinkable. The results obtained allow to characterize the emitting sources (speed, intensity, temperature) as a function of the violence of the reaction for the system {sup 208} Pb + {sup 93} Nb at 29 MeV/u. (author) 85 refs.

  6. Experiments on iron shield transmission of quasi-monoenergetic neutrons generated by 43- and 68-MeV protons via the 7Li(p,n) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Nakao, Noriaki

    1996-03-01

    In order to provide benchmark data of neutrons transmitted through iron shields in the intermediate-energy region, spatial distributions of neutron energy spectra and reaction rates behind and inside the iron shields of thickness up to 130 cm were measured for 43- and 68-MeVp- 7 Li neutrons using a quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam source at the 90-MV AVF cyclotron facility of the TLARA facility in JAERI. The measured data by five kinds of detectors: the BC501A detector, the Bonner ball counter, 238 U and 232 Th fission counters, 7 LiF and nat LiF TLDs and solid state nuclear track detector, are numerically provided in this report in the energy region between 10 -4 eV and the energy of peak neutrons generated by the 7 Li(p,n) reaction. (author)

  7. Experiments on iron shield transmission of quasi-monoenergetic neutrons generated by 43- and 68-MeV protons via the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Nakao, Noriaki [and others

    1996-03-01

    In order to provide benchmark data of neutrons transmitted through iron shields in the intermediate-energy region, spatial distributions of neutron energy spectra and reaction rates behind and inside the iron shields of thickness up to 130 cm were measured for 43- and 68-MeVp-{sup 7}Li neutrons using a quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam source at the 90-MV AVF cyclotron facility of the TLARA facility in JAERI. The measured data by five kinds of detectors: the BC501A detector, the Bonner ball counter, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th fission counters, {sup 7}LiF and {sup nat}LiF TLDs and solid state nuclear track detector, are numerically provided in this report in the energy region between 10{sup -4} eV and the energy of peak neutrons generated by the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction. (author).

  8. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  9. Exploring the dynamics of reaction N((2)D)+C2H4 with crossed molecular-beam experiments and quantum-chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shih-Huang; Chin, Chih-Hao; Chen, Wei-Kan; Huang, Wen-Jian; Hsieh, Chu-Chun

    2011-05-14

    We conducted the title reaction using a crossed molecular-beam apparatus, quantum-chemical calculations, and RRKM calculations. Synchrotron radiation from an undulator served to ionize selectively reaction products by advantage of negligibly small dissociative ionization. We observed two products with gross formula C(2)H(3)N and C(2)H(2)N associated with loss of one and two hydrogen atoms, respectively. Measurements of kinetic-energy distributions, angular distributions, low-resolution photoionization spectra, and branching ratios of the two products were carried out. Furthermore, we evaluated total branching ratios of various exit channels using RRKM calculations based on the potential-energy surface of reaction N((2)D)+C(2)H(4) established with the method CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)+ZPE[B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)]. The combination of experimental and computational results allows us to reveal the reaction dynamics. The N((2)D) atom adds to the C=C π-bond of ethene (C(2)H(4)) to form a cyclic complex c-CH(2)(N)CH(2) that directly ejects a hydrogen atom or rearranges to other intermediates followed by elimination of a hydrogen atom to produce C(2)H(3)N; c-CH(2)(N)CH+H is the dominant product channel. Subsequently, most C(2)H(3)N radicals, notably c-CH(2)(N)CH, further decompose to CH(2)CN+H. This work provides results and explanations different from the previous work of Balucani et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A, 2000, 104, 5655], indicating that selective photoionization with synchrotron radiation as an ionization source is a good choice in chemical dynamics research.

  10. Experience in using the covariances of some ENDF/B-V dosimetry cross sections: proposed improvements and addition of cross-reaction covariances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, C.Y.; Hetrick, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recent ratio data, with carefully evaluated covariances, were combined with eleven of the ENDF/B-V dosimetry cross sections using the generalized least-squares method. The purpose was to improve these evaluated cross sections and covariances, as well as to generate values for the cross-reaction covariances. The results represent improved cross sections as well as realistic and usable covariances. The latter are necessary for meaningful intergral-differential comparisons and for spectrum unfolding

  11. Separation of uranium isotopes by accelerated isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seko, M.; Miyake, T.; Inada, K.; Ochi, K.; Sakamoto, T.

    1977-01-01

    A novel catalyst for isotope exchange reaction between uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) compounds enables acceleration of the reaction rate as much as 3000 times to make industrial separation of uranium isotopes economically possible

  12. Allergic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that don't bother most people (such as venom from bee stings and certain foods, medicines, and pollens) can ... person. If the allergic reaction is from a bee sting, scrape the ... more venom. If the person has emergency allergy medicine on ...

  13. Correction of effects due to reactions on complex nuclei in a sample of hydrogen-like antiproton annihilations from a heavy liquid bubble chamber experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fett, E.; Haatuft, A.; Olsen, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented, which has been used to determine the pion multiplicity distributions for antiproton annihilations on free protons from a sample of events obtained in a heavy liquid bubble chamber experiment. The method uses data obtained in the experiment in question together with the usual invariance principles satisfied by strong interactions. Furthermore no particular nuclear model is assumed

  14. "Greening" a Familiar General Chemistry Experiment: Coffee Cup Calorimetry to Determine the Enthalpy of Neutralization of an Acid-Base Reaction and the Specific Heat Capacity of Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.; Perera, K. Nishanthi R.

    2017-01-01

    Coffee cup calorimetry, performed with calorimeters made with styrofoam coffee cups, is a familiar experiment in the general chemistry laboratory. These calorimeters are inexpensive, easy to use, and provide good insulation for most thermodynamics experiments. This paper presents the successful substitution of paper coffee cups for styrofoam cups…

  15. Smart Grid enabled heat pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmo, Carolina; Detlefsen, Nina; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2014-01-01

    The transition towards a 100 % fossil-free energy system, while achieving extreme penetration levels of intermittent wind and solar power in electricity generation, requires demand-side technologies that are smart (intermittency-friendly) and efficient. The integration of Smart Grid enabling...... with an empirical study in order to achieve a number of recommendations with respect to technology concepts and control strategies that would allow residential vapor-compression heat pumps to support large-scale integration of intermittent renewables. The analysis is based on data gathered over a period of up to 3...

  16. Organic chemistry experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Seok Sik

    2005-02-01

    This book deals with organic chemistry experiments, it is divided five chapters, which have introduction, the way to write the experiment report and safety in the laboratory, basic experiment technic like recrystallization and extraction, a lot of organic chemistry experiments such as fischer esterification, ester hydrolysis, electrophilic aromatic substitution, aldol reaction, benzoin condensation, wittig reaction grignard reaction, epoxidation reaction and selective reduction. The last chapter introduces chemistry site on the internet and way to find out reference on chemistry.

  17. Experiments on multi-nucleon transfer reactions with the systems {sup 58,64}Ni+{sup 207}Pb at SHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandovich Comas Lijachev, Victor

    2012-07-01

    This work presents experimental results on multi-nucleon transfer reactions in the collision systems {sup 58}Ni+{sup 207}Pb and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 207}Pb which were measured at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI. The reactions were performed at beam energies below and up to 10% above the Coulomb barrier. The work was motivated by theoretical predictions to apply multi-nucleon transfer reactions in heavy systems to synthesize new neutron-rich isotopes in the region of superheavy nuclei with Z>100 and in the region of the closed neutron shell N=126. The expected cross-sections for the production of these nuclei in transfer reactions are small and reach typically nanobarn and below. Therefore, efficient separation techniques have to be applied and the detection system must allow for the identification of single nuclei. A dedicated experimental setup to study such rare transfer products does not exist presently. But already existing facilities which are used for the synthesis of superheavy fusion products meet the requirements for the detection of rare reaction products. In this context, the velocity filter SHIP offers the possibility to separate heavy target-like transfer products from projectiles and projectile-like reaction products before they reach the detection system where the particles are identified by their alpha-decay properties. At SHIP, a cross-section limit of 10 pb can be reached at usual beam intensities. In the present work on collisions of {sup 58,64}Ni+{sup 207}Pb the influence of the projectile neutron number on the cross-sections, isotopic distributions and excitation energies of the transfer products was studied. Especially with the more neutron-rich {sup 64}Ni projectiles a transfer of up to seven protons and eight neutrons to the target nucleus was observed. The largest cross-sections for the most neutron-rich isotopes were reached at the beam energies around the Coulomb barrier. The transfer was accompanied by the full dissipation of the available

  18. Analysis of the reaction γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} by the identification of the charged K* decay channel at the BGO-OD experiment using kinematic fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Bjoern-Eric [Physikalisches Institut Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA facility in Bonn is built to investigate nucleon excitations via meson photoproduction. A program of measurements of reactions of associated strangeness in the final state has begun, one of which is γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +}. One research objective is associated production of strange particles. An interesting reaction channel is γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +}. This talk shows the preliminary results of the analysis for the charged decay channel K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} → π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup 0}p. Due to the small production cross section kinematic fitting has been used to discriminate the wanted channel against background.

  19. What can we learn from consumer reports on psychiatric adverse drug reactions with antidepressant medication? Experiences from reports to a consumer association

    OpenAIRE

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas; Svensson, Tommy; Meeuwisse, Anna; Carlsten, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Background According to the World Health Organization (WHO) the cost of adverse drug reactions   (ADRs) in the general population is high and under-reporting by health professionals   is a well-recognized problem. Another way to increase ADR reporting is to let the   consumers themselves report directly to the authorities. In Sweden it is mandatory   for prescribers to report serious ADRs to the Medical Products Agency (MPA), but there   are no such regulations for consumers. The non-profit a...

  20. Laboratory batch experiments and geochemical modelling of water-rock-supercritical CO2 reactions in Southern San Joaquin Valley, California oil field sediments: Implications for future carbon capture and sequestration projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickler, P. J.; Rivas, C.; Freeman, S.; Tan, T. W.; Baron, D.; Horton, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Storage of CO2 as supercritical liquid in oil reservoirs has been proposed for enhanced oil recovery and a way to lower atmospheric CO2 levels. The fate of CO2 after injection requires an understanding of mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions occurring between the formation minerals and the existing formation brines at formation temperatures and pressures in the presence of supercritical CO2. In this study, core samples from three potential storage formations, the Vedder Fm. (Rio Bravo oil field), Stevens Fm. (Elk Hills oil field) and Temblor Fm. (McKittrick oil field) were reacted with a synthetic brine and CO2(sc) at reservoir temperature (110°C) and pressure (245-250 bar). A combination of petrographic, SEM-EDS and XRD analyses, brine chemistry, and PHREEQ-C modelling were used to identify geochemical reactions altering aquifer mineralogy. XRD and petrographic analyses identified potentially reactive minerals including calcite and dolomite (~2%), pyrite (~1%), and feldspars (~25-60%). Despite the low abundance, calcite dissolution and pyrite oxidation were dominant geochemical reactions. Feldspar weathering produced release rates ~1-2 orders of magnitude slower than calcite dissolution. Calcite dissolution increased the aqueous concentrations of Ca, HCO3, Mg, Mn and Sr. Silicate weathering increased the aqueous concentrations of Si and K. Plagioclase weathering likely increased aqueous Ca concentrations. Pyrite oxidation, despite attempts to remove O2 from the experiment, increased the aqueous concentration of Fe and SO4. SEM-EDS analysis of post-reaction samples identified mixed-layered illite-smectites associated with feldspar grains suggesting clay mineral precipitation in addition to calcite, pyrite and feldspar dissolution. The Vedder Fm. sample underwent complete disaggregation during the reaction due to cement dissolution. This may adversely affect Vedder Formation CCS projects by impacting injection well integrity.

  1. CHICSi - a compact ultra-high vacuum compatible detector system for nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. I. General structure, mechanics and UHV compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerberg, L.; Avdeichikov, V.; Carlen, L.; Golubev, P.; Jakobsson, B.; Rouki, C.; Siwek, A.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van; Whitlow, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    CELSIUS Heavy-Ion Collision Silicon detector system (CHICSi) is a large solid angle, barrel-shaped detector system, housing up to 600 detector telescopes arranged in rotational symmetry around the beam axis. CHICSi measures charged particles and fragments from nuclear reactions. It operates at internal targets of storage rings. In order to optimize space and momentum-space coverage and minimize the low-energy detection limits, CHICSi is designed for use in ultra-high vacuum (UHV, ∼10 -8 Pa) inside a cluster-jet target chamber. This calls for materials in mechanical support, detectors, Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) electronics, connectors, cables and other signal transport devices with very low outgassing. Two auxiliary detector systems, which will operate in coincidence with CHICSi, a heavy-recoil, time-of-flight system (HR-TOF) also placed inside the target chamber and a projectile fragmentation wall (PF-WALL) located outside the chamber, have also been constructed. In total, this combined system registers more than 80% of all charged particles and fragments from typical heavy-ion reactions at energies of a few hundreds of MeV per nucleon

  2. CHICSi - a compact ultra-high vacuum compatible detector system for nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. I. General structure, mechanics and UHV compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerberg, L.; Avdeichikov, V.; Carlen, L.; Golubev, P.; Jakobsson, B. E-mail: bo.jakobsson@kosufy.lu.se; Rouki, C.; Siwek, A.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van; Whitlow, H.J

    2003-03-11

    CELSIUS Heavy-Ion Collision Silicon detector system (CHICSi) is a large solid angle, barrel-shaped detector system, housing up to 600 detector telescopes arranged in rotational symmetry around the beam axis. CHICSi measures charged particles and fragments from nuclear reactions. It operates at internal targets of storage rings. In order to optimize space and momentum-space coverage and minimize the low-energy detection limits, CHICSi is designed for use in ultra-high vacuum (UHV, {approx}10{sup -8} Pa) inside a cluster-jet target chamber. This calls for materials in mechanical support, detectors, Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) electronics, connectors, cables and other signal transport devices with very low outgassing. Two auxiliary detector systems, which will operate in coincidence with CHICSi, a heavy-recoil, time-of-flight system (HR-TOF) also placed inside the target chamber and a projectile fragmentation wall (PF-WALL) located outside the chamber, have also been constructed. In total, this combined system registers more than 80% of all charged particles and fragments from typical heavy-ion reactions at energies of a few hundreds of MeV per nucleon.

  3. Simulation enabled safeguards assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, Robert; Bjornard, Trond; Larson, Tom

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that nuclear energy will be a significant component of future supplies. New facilities, operating under a strengthened international nonproliferation regime will be needed. There is good reason to believe virtual engineering applied to the facility design, as well as to the safeguards system design will reduce total project cost and improve efficiency in the design cycle. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment MEthodology has been developed as a software package to provide this capability for nuclear reprocessing facilities. The software architecture is specifically designed for distributed computing, collaborative design efforts, and modular construction to allow step improvements in functionality. Drag and drop wire-frame construction allows the user to select the desired components from a component warehouse, render the system for 3D visualization, and, linked to a set of physics libraries and/or computational codes, conduct process evaluations of the system they have designed. (authors)

  4. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert Bean; Trond Bjornard; Thomas Larson

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that nuclear energy will be a significant component of future supplies. New facilities, operating under a strengthened international nonproliferation regime will be needed. There is good reason to believe virtual engineering applied to the facility design, as well as to the safeguards system design will reduce total project cost and improve efficiency in the design cycle. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment Methodology (SESAME) has been developed as a software package to provide this capability for nuclear reprocessing facilities. The software architecture is specifically designed for distributed computing, collaborative design efforts, and modular construction to allow step improvements in functionality. Drag and drop wireframe construction allows the user to select the desired components from a component warehouse, render the system for 3D visualization, and, linked to a set of physics libraries and/or computational codes, conduct process evaluations of the system they have designed

  5. Informatics enables public health surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. N McNabb

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the world has radically changed. New advances in information and communication technologies (ICT connect the world in ways never imagined. Public health informatics (PHI leveraged for public health surveillance (PHS, can enable, enhance, and empower essential PHS functions (i.e., detection, reporting, confirmation, analyses, feedback, response. However, the tail doesn't wag the dog; as such, ICT cannot (should not drive public health surveillance strengthening. Rather, ICT can serve PHS to more effectively empower core functions. In this review, we explore promising ICT trends for prevention, detection, and response, laboratory reporting, push notification, analytics, predictive surveillance, and using new data sources, while recognizing that it is the people, politics, and policies that most challenge progress for implementation of solutions.

  6. Uncertainty enabled Sensor Observation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornford, Dan; Williams, Matthew; Bastin, Lucy

    2010-05-01

    Almost all observations of reality are contaminated with errors, which introduce uncertainties into the actual observation result. Such uncertainty is often held to be a data quality issue, and quantification of this uncertainty is essential for the principled exploitation of the observations. Many existing systems treat data quality in a relatively ad-hoc manner, however if the observation uncertainty is a reliable estimate of the error on the observation with respect to reality then knowledge of this uncertainty enables optimal exploitation of the observations in further processes, or decision making. We would argue that the most natural formalism for expressing uncertainty is Bayesian probability theory. In this work we show how the Open Geospatial Consortium Sensor Observation Service can be implemented to enable the support of explicit uncertainty about observations. We show how the UncertML candidate standard is used to provide a rich and flexible representation of uncertainty in this context. We illustrate this on a data set of user contributed weather data where the INTAMAP interpolation Web Processing Service is used to help estimate the uncertainty on the observations of unknown quality, using observations with known uncertainty properties. We then go on to discuss the implications of uncertainty for a range of existing Open Geospatial Consortium standards including SWE common and Observations and Measurements. We discuss the difficult decisions in the design of the UncertML schema and its relation and usage within existing standards and show various options. We conclude with some indications of the likely future directions for UncertML in the context of Open Geospatial Consortium services.

  7. Enabling the First Interstellar Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, P.

    2017-12-01

    All propulsion systems that leave the Earth are based on chemical reactions. Chemical reactions, at best, have an efficiency compared to rest mass of 10-10 (or about 1eV per bond). All the mass in the universe converted to chemical reactions would not propel even a single proton to relativistic speeds. While chemistry will get us to Mars it will not allow interstellar capability in any reasonable mission time. Barring new physics we are left with few realistic solutions. None of our current propulsion systems, including nuclear, are capable of the relativistic speeds needed for exploring the many nearby stellar systems and exo-planets. However recent advances in photonics and directed energy systems now allow us to realize what was only a decade ago, simply science fiction, namely the ability to seriously conceive of and plan for relativistic flight. From fully-functional gram-level wafer-scale spacecraft capable of speeds greater than c/4 that could reach the nearest star in 20 years to spacecraft for large missions capable of supporting human life with masses more than 105 kg (100 tons) for rapid interplanetary transit that could reach speeds of greater than 1000 km/s can be realized. With this technology spacecraft can be propelled to speeds currently unimaginable. Photonics, like electronics, and unlike chemical propulsion is an exponential technology with a current double time of about 20 months. This is the key. The cost of such a system is amortized over the essentially unlimited number of launches. In addition, the same photon driver can be used for many other purposes including beamed energy to power high Isp ion engines, remote asteroid composition analysis and planetary defense. This would be a profound change in human capability with enormous implications. Known as Starlight we are now in a NASA Phase II study. The FY 2017 congressional appropriations request directs NASA to study the feasibility of an interstellar mission to coincide with the 100th

  8. Coprecipitation experiment with Sm hydroxide using a multitracer produced by nuclear spallation reaction: A tool for chemical studies with superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasamatsu, Yoshitaka; Yokokita, Takuya; Toyomura, Keigo; Shigekawa, Yudai; Haba, Hiromitsu; Kanaya, Jumpei; Huang, Minghui; Ezaki, Yutaka; Yoshimura, Takashi; Morita, Kosuke; Shinohara, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    To establish a new methodology for superheavy element chemistry, the coprecipitation behaviors of 34 elements with samarium hydroxide were investigated using multitracer produced by a spallation of Ta. The chemical reactions were rapidly equilibrated within 10 s for many elements. In addition, these elements exhibited individual coprecipitation behaviors, and the behaviors were qualitatively related to their hydroxide precipitation behaviors. It was demonstrated that the ammine and hydroxide complex formations of superheavy elements could be investigated using the established method. - Highlights: • We established a new methodology for superheavy element (SHE) chemistry. • Coprecipitation behaviors of 34 elements with Sm hydroxide could be simultaneously investigated by using multitracer. • The complex formations were investigated from the coprecipitation behaviors. • The established method will lead to the study on various precipitates of SHEs.

  9. 26kDa endochitinase from barley seeds: real-time monitoring of the enzymatic reaction and substrate binding experiments using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dennhart, Nicole; Weigang, Linda M M; Fujiwara, Maho

    2009-01-01

    A 26 kDa endochitinase from barley seeds was enzymatically characterized exclusively by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). At first, oligosaccharide hydrolysis catalyzed by the barley chitinase was monitored in real-time by ESI-MS. The reaction time-course obtained by ESI......-MS monitoring was found to be consistent with the data obtained earlier by HPLC, and the quantitative profile was successfully simulated by kinetic modeling of the enzymatic hydrolysis. It is obvious that the real-time monitoring method by ESI-MS allows a faster and cheaper determination of the chitinase...... of the enzymatic activity in E67Q is definitely caused by a point mutation of Glu67 but not due to partial unfolding of the mutated enzyme. Finally, association constants of enzyme-oligosaccharide complexes were calculated from Scatchard plots obtained by mass spectra. The binding free energy values obtained for E...

  10. Study of fission barriers in neutron-rich nuclei using the (p,2p) reaction. Status of SAMURAI-experiment NP1306 SAMURAI14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, Sebastian [TU Munich (Germany); Collaboration: NP1306-SAMURAI14-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Violent stellar processes are currently assumed to be a major origin of the elements beyond iron and their abundances. The conditions during stellar explosions lead to the so called r-process in which the rapid capture of neutrons and subsequent β decays form heavier elements. This extension of the nuclei stops at the point when the repulsive Coulomb energy induces fission. Its recycling is one key aspect to describe the macroscopic structure of the r-process and the well known elemental abundance pattern. The RIBF at RIKEN is able to provide such neutron rich heavy element beams and a first test with the primary beam {sup 238}U was performed to understand the response of the SAMURAI spectrometer and detectors for heavy beams. The final goal is the definition of the fission barrier height with a resolution of 1 MeV (in σ) using the missing mass method using (p,2p) reactions in inverse kinematics.

  11. Practical experiences with the synthesis of [11C]CH3I through gas phase iodination reaction using a TRACERlabFXC synthesis module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, Torsten; Rode, Katrin; Wuest, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The results of [ 11 C]CH 3 I synthesis through hydrogen gas reduction of [ 11 C]CO 2 on different nickel catalysts (HARSHAW-nickel, SHIMALITE-nickel, nickel on silica/alumina, nickel nanosize 99.99%) followed by gas phase iodination using a TRACERlab FX C synthesis unit are reported. Further reaction parameters such as furnace temperatures, flow rate of hydrogen gas and reduction time were optimized. It was found that reduction of [ 11 C]CO 2 proceeded in 28-83% yield depending on the nickel catalyst and temperature. The gas phase iodination (methane conversion) gave 31-62% of [ 11 C]CH 3 I depending on temperature and amount of iodine in the iodine furnace. [ 11 C]CH 3 I was used for heteroatom methylation reactions exemplified by a piperazine and a phenol (1 and 3). The specific activity of the 11 C-labelled products 2 and 4 was determined after HPLC purification and solid-phase extraction. Compounds 2 and 4 were obtained in 8-14% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected, based upon trapped [ 11 C]CH 4 ) within 30 min. The specific activity was determined to be in the range of 20-30 GBq/μmol at the end-of-synthesis. Nickel catalyst nanosize was found to be superior compared with other Ni catalysts tested. The relatively low specific activity may be mainly due to carbon contaminations originating from the long copper tubing (500 m) between the cyclotron and the radiochemistry facility

  12. Enablers of and barriers to abortion training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiahi, Maryam; Lim, Sahnah; Westover, Corey; Gold, Marji; Westhoff, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    Since the legalization of abortion services in the United States, provision of abortions has remained a controversial issue of high political interest. Routine abortion training is not offered at all obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn) training programs, despite a specific training requirement by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Previous studies that described Ob-Gyn programs with routine abortion training either examined associations by using national surveys of program directors or described the experience of a single program. We set out to identify enablers of and barriers to Ob-Gyn abortion training in the context of a New York City political initiative, in order to better understand how to improve abortion training at other sites. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 22 stakeholders from 7 New York City public hospitals and focus group interviews with 62 current residents at 6 sites. Enablers of abortion training included program location, high-capacity services, faculty commitment to abortion training, external programmatic support, and resident interest. Barriers to abortion training included lack of leadership continuity, leadership conflict, lack of second-trimester abortion services, difficulty obtaining mifepristone, optional rather than routine training, and antiabortion values of hospital personnel. Supportive leadership, faculty commitment, and external programmatic support appear to be key elements for establishing routine abortion training at Ob-Gyn residency training programs.

  13. Blue space geographies: Enabling health in place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Ronan; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Drawing from research on therapeutic landscapes and relationships between environment, health and wellbeing, we propose the idea of 'healthy blue space' as an important new development Complementing research on healthy green space, blue space is defined as; 'health-enabling places and spaces, where water is at the centre of a range of environments with identifiable potential for the promotion of human wellbeing'. Using theoretical ideas from emotional and relational geographies and critical understandings of salutogenesis, the value of blue space to health and wellbeing is recognised and evaluated. Six individual papers from five different countries consider how health can be enabled in mixed blue space settings. Four sub-themes; embodiment, inter-subjectivity, activity and meaning, document multiple experiences within a range of healthy blue spaces. Finally, we suggest a considerable research agenda - theoretical, methodological and applied - for future work within different forms of blue space. All are suggested as having public health policy relevance in social and public space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  15. Attitude change in a realistic experiment: the effect of party membership and audience reaction during an interview with a Dutch politician

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this realistic experiment, an interview with the leader of the Liberals in the Dutch Parliament was recorded in the presence of a live audience, which reacted in a positive, negative, or neutral way. It was shown to subjects of two opposing political parties, whose attitudes were to be changed by

  16. Enabling multi-tenancy : An industrial experience report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, C.P.; Zaidman, A.; Platzbeecker, B.; Hurkmans, T.; 't Hart, A.

    2010-01-01

    Multi-tenancy is a relatively new software architecture principle in the realm of the Software as a Service (SaaS) business model. It allows to make full use of the economy of scale, as multiple customers – “tenants” – share the same application and database instance. All the while, the tenants

  17. Measuring Officer Knowledge and Experience to Enable Tailored Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ample evidence to suggest that learning-related individual differences exist (Jensen, 1998; Thorndike , 1985) and that these individual differences...Gottfredson, 1998; Jensen, 1998; Thorndike , 1985). However, general mental ability would seem to affect performance through the acquisition of prior...Psychologist, 27 (1), 5-32. Thorndike , R. L. (1985). The central role of general ability in prediction. Multivariate Behavioral research, 20, 241

  18. Measuring Noncommissioned Officer Knowledge and Experience to Enable Tailored Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    both that learning related individual differences exist (Jensen, 1998; Thorndike , 1985) and that these individual differences interact with learning...robustly predictive of broad psychological constructs (Goska & Ackerman, 1996; Gottfredson, 1998; Jensen, 1998; Thorndike , 1985). However, general...Aptitude theory: yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Educational Psychologist, 27 (1), 5-32. Thorndike , R. L. (1985). The central role of general

  19. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufnagel, Dick [Fermilab

    2015-11-19

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize “opportunistic” resources — resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS — to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Here we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  20. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]: Annual progress report, October 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1987-10-01

    The experiments which this group has been working on seek to define the reaction mechanisms responsible for complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions. The reactions studied are La + La, La + Al, and La + Cu at 46.8 MeV/u; and Ne + Ag and Ne + Au reactions at 250 MeV/u. Another experimental program at the Oak Ridge Hollifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) is designed to measure the excitation energy division between reaction products in asymmetric deep inelastic reactions. A brief description is given of progress to date, the scientific goals of this experiment and the plastic phoswich detectors developed for this experiment

  1. Nuclear reactions as structure probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Bernard; Cugnon, Joseph; Roussel-Chomaz, Patricia; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Oliveira Santos, Francois de; Bauge, Eric; Poves, Alfredo; Keeley, Nicholas; Simenel, Cedric; Avez, Benoit; Lacroix, Denis; Baye, Daniel; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Pons, Alexandre

    2007-09-01

    This publication gathers courses which aim at giving a view on new experiments which are performed by using radioactive beams, notably low intensity beams, in different accelerators, and allow the structure of very exotic nuclei to be characterized. Experimental as well as theoretical aspects are thus addressed. The contributions propose: a brief history of nuclear reactions and of instruments used to study them from the discovery of nucleus to the DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation); an overview of nuclear reactions; experimental techniques; the theory of collisions at low energy; resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; to probe nuclear structure with nucleons; shell model and spectroscopic factors; analysis of transfer reactions and determination of spectroscopic factors; microscopic approaches of nuclear dynamics; theoretical aspects of dissociation reactions; experimental aspects of knockout reactions; research in oenology with the chemical characterisation of defective ageing of dry white wines

  2. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  3. First superheavy element experiments at the GSI recoil separator TASCA: The production and decay of element 114 in the 244Pu(48Ca,3-4n) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, J. M.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Schaedel, M.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Bruechle, W.; Essel, H. G.; Hartmann, W.; Hessberger, F. P.; Huebner, A.; Jaeger, E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Steiner, J.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments with the new recoil separator, Transactinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA), at the GSI were performed by using beams of 48 Ca to irradiate targets of 206-208 Pb, which led to the production of 252-254 No isotopes. These studies allowed for evaluation of the performance of TASCA when coupled to a new detector and electronics system. By following these studies, the isotopes of element 114 ( 288-291 114) were produced in irradiations of 244 Pu targets with 48 Ca beams at compound nucleus excitation energies around 41.7 and 37.5 MeV, demonstrating TASCA's ability to perform experiments with picobarn-level cross sections. A total of 15 decay chains were observed and were assigned to the decay of 288-291 114. A new α-decay branch in 281 Ds was observed, leading to the new nucleus 277 Hs.

  4. Attitude change in a realistic experiment: the effect of party membership and audience reaction during an interview with a Dutch politician

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegman, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this realistic experiment, an interview with the leader of the Liberals in the Dutch Parliament was recorded in the presence of a live audience, which reacted in a positive, negative, or neutral way. It was shown to subjects of two opposing political parties, whose attitudes were to be changed by the experimental interview. The main hypothesis, which predicted more attitude change in the positive than in the negative audience condition, could not in general be supported. The alternative au...

  5. Part 3. Assessment of adaptation reactions in the participants of the long-term medical & ecological investigations during the experiment Mars-500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman M. Baevsky

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the long-term medical & ecological investigations conducted during the experiment Mars-500. Methodology of conducting the long-term medical & ecological investigations and the applied methods are considered. The results are presented in the materials of the research conducted in Russian Federation and Republic of Belarus (Moscow, Syktyvkar, Yekaterinburg, Izhevsk, Magadan and Minsk. For comparative evaluation of the functional state of different reference groups the notion of “ecological stress” was introduced. It depends upon the degree of dominance of the activity of the sympathetic member of the regulatory system over the parasympathetic member. Application of probabilistic approach to the assessment of the functional state and adaptation level with the FR (functional reserve and the DT (the degree of tension of the regulatory mechanisms proved the detected peculiarities of the heart rhythm vegetative regulation. Clear dependency of the functional state of the volunteers on geographic location of regions and climatic parameters is observed. Almost every HRV indicator is characterized by seasonal dynamics. Seasonal dynamics data is exemplified by the research conducted in Yekaterinburg and Syktyvkar. During the earth-bound experiment Mars-500 flight conditions to Mars were simulated. Results of the long-term medical & ecological investigations conducted simultaneously with the experiment Mars-500 showed that health changes in practically healthy people do not usually exceed the limits of the prenosological state.

  6. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T L; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2014-05-01

    This review presents a broad overview of the research that enabled the structure determination of the bacterial reaction centers from Blastochloris viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, with a focus on the contributions from Duysens, Clayton, and Feher. Early experiments performed in the laboratory of Duysens and others demonstrated the utility of spectroscopic techniques and the presence of photosynthetic complexes in both oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The laboratories of Clayton and Feher led efforts to isolate and characterize the bacterial reaction centers. The availability of well-characterized preparations of pure and stable reaction centers allowed the crystallization and subsequent determination of the structures using X-ray diffraction. The three-dimensional structures of reaction centers revealed an overall arrangement of two symmetrical branches of cofactors surrounded by transmembrane helices from the L and M subunits, which also are related by the same twofold symmetry axis. The structure has served as a framework to address several issues concerning bacterial photosynthesis, including the directionality of electron transfer, the properties of the reaction center-cytochrome c 2 complex, and the coupling of proton and electron transfer. Together, these research efforts laid the foundation for ongoing efforts to address an outstanding question in oxygenic photosynthesis, namely the molecular mechanism of water oxidation.

  7. Visuomotor mental rotation: the reaction time advantage for anti-pointing is not influenced by perceptual experience with the cardinal axes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Kristina A; Heath, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    In the visuomotor mental rotation (VMR) paradigm, participants execute a center-out reaching movement to a location that deviates from a visual cue by a predetermined instruction angle. Previous work has demonstrated a linear increase in reaction time (RT) as a function of the amplitude of the instruction angle (Georgopoulos and Massey in Exp Brain Res 65:361-370, 1987). In contrast, we recently reported a RT advantage for an instruction angle of 180 degrees relative to a 90 degrees angle (Neely and Heath in Neurosci Lett 463:194-198, 2009). It is possible, however, that perceptual expertise with the cardinal axes, which are perceptually familiar reference frames, influenced the results of our previous investigation. To address this issue, we employed a VMR paradigm identical to that of our previous work, with the exception that the stimulus array was shifted 45 degrees from the horizontal and vertical meridians. Our results demonstrated that RTs were fastest and least variable when the instruction angle was 0 degrees, followed by 180 degrees, which in turn, was faster than 90 degrees. Such findings establish that the RT advantage for the 180 degrees instruction angle is not influenced by perceptual expertise with the cardinal axes. Moreover, the present results provide convergent evidence that RT is not determined by the angle of rotation; instead, they indicate that response latencies reflect computational differences in the complexity of response remapping.

  8. Key pharmacovigilance stakeholders' experiences of direct patient reporting of adverse drug reactions and their prospects of future development in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, P; Cavaco, A; Allan, E; Airaksinen, M

    2018-02-01

    In the European Union (EU), legislation allows patients to directly report adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to competent authorities. Five years after its implementation, patient reporting is not equal in all countries. This study aimed to explore key stakeholders' perceptions of patient reporting in four EU countries. Qualitative study design. Twelve representatives from national pharmacovigilance centres and/or authorities as well as national pharmaceutical industry bodies in four EU countries participated in the study. Supranational organizations were also included. Data collection was via face-semi-structured interviews. Inductive content analysis was performed thereafter, applying principles of risk management as a theoretical framework. Four themes (attitudes and beliefs, system maturation factors, regulatory improvements, and cultural shifts) emerged, conceptually interconnected. Participants from countries introducing patient reporting recently expressed a negative attitude. Participants highlighted the need for additional resources, both human and financial, to address patient reporting and associated advantages. The findings identified perceived barriers and facilitators of patient reporting. The involvement of patients, use of information, and dissemination of patient reporting are far from optimal. A better integration of the work by EU regulatory authorities is recommended. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Roads leading to roam. Role of triple fragmentation and of conical intersections in photochemical reactions: experiments and theory on methyl formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Po-Yu; Chao, Meng-Hsuan; Kasai, Toshio; Lin, King-Chuen; Lombardi, Andrea; Palazzetti, Federico; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2014-02-21

    The exploration of alternative roads that open to molecules with sufficient energy to yield different products permits prediction and eventually control of the outcomes of chemical reactions. Advanced imaging techniques for monitoring laser-induced photodissociation are here combined with dynamical simulations, involving ample sets of classical trajectories generated on a quantum chemical potential energy surface. Methyl formate, HCOOCH3, is photodissociated at energies near the triple fragmentation threshold into H, CO and OCH3. Images of velocity and rotational distributions of CO exhibit signatures of alternative routes, such as those recently designated as transition-state vs. roaming-mediated. Furthermore, a demonstration of the triple fragmentation route is given, and also confirmed by H-atom product imaging and FTIR time-resolved spectra of the intermediate HCO radical. In addition, the relevance of nonadiabatic transitions promoted by a conical intersection is clarified by simulations as the privileged "reactivity funnel" of organic photochemistry, whereby the outcomes of molecular photoexcitation are delivered to electronic ground states.

  10. Spallation reactions; Reactions de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugon, J.

    1996-12-31

    Spallation reactions dominate the interactions of hadrons with nuclei in the GeV range (from {approx} 0.1 to {approx} 10 GeV). They correspond to a sometimes important ejection of light particles leaving most of the time a residue of mass commensurate with the target mass. The main features of the experimental data are briefly reviewed. The most successful theoretical model, namely the intranuclear cascade + evaporation model, is presented. Its physical content, results and possible improvements are critically discussed. Alternative approaches are shortly reviewed. (author). 84 refs.

  11. Neutron-induced capture cross sections via the surrogate reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutoux, G.; Jurado, B.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Capellan, N.; Companis, I.; Czajkowski, S.; Dassie, D.; Haas, B.; Mathieu, L.; Meot, V.; Bail, A.; Bauge, E.; Daugas, J. M.; Faul, T.; Gaudefroy, L.; Morel, P.; Pillet, N.; Roig, O.; Romain, P.; Taieb, J.; Theroine, C.; Burke, J.T.; Companis, I.; Derkx, X.; Gunsing, F.; Matea, I.; Tassan-Got, L.; Porquet, M.G.; Serot, O.

    2011-01-01

    The surrogate reaction method is an indirect way of determining cross sections for nuclear reactions that proceed through a compound nucleus. This technique enables neutron-induced cross sections to be extracted for nuclear reactions on short-lived unstable nuclei that otherwise can not be measured. This technique has been successfully applied to determine the neutron-induced fission cross sections of several short-lived nuclei. In this work, we investigate whether this powerful technique can also be used to determine of neutron-induced capture cross sections. For this purpose we use the surrogate reaction 174 Yb( 3 He, pγ) 176 Lu to infer the well known 175 Lu(n, γ) cross section and compare the results with the directly measured neutron-induced data. This surrogate experiment has been performed in March 2010. The experimental technique used and the first preliminary results will be presented. (authors)

  12. Enabling individualized therapy through nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Jason H; van de Ven, Anne L; Godin, Biana; Blanco, Elvin; Serda, Rita E; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ziemys, Arturas; Bouamrani, Ali; Hu, Tony; Ranganathan, Shivakumar I; De Rosa, Enrica; Martinez, Jonathan O; Smid, Christine A; Buchanan, Rachel M; Lee, Sei-Young; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Landry, Matthew; Meyn, Anne; Tasciotti, Ennio; Liu, Xuewu; Decuzzi, Paolo; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-08-01

    Individualized medicine is the healthcare strategy that rebukes the idiomatic dogma of 'losing sight of the forest for the trees'. We are entering a new era of healthcare where it is no longer acceptable to develop and market a drug that is effective for only 80% of the patient population. The emergence of "-omic" technologies (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and advances in systems biology are magnifying the deficiencies of standardized therapy, which often provide little treatment latitude for accommodating patient physiologic idiosyncrasies. A personalized approach to medicine is not a novel concept. Ever since the scientific community began unraveling the mysteries of the genome, the promise of discarding generic treatment regimens in favor of patient-specific therapies became more feasible and realistic. One of the major scientific impediments of this movement towards personalized medicine has been the need for technological enablement. Nanotechnology is projected to play a critical role in patient-specific therapy; however, this transition will depend heavily upon the evolutionary development of a systems biology approach to clinical medicine based upon "-omic" technology analysis and integration. This manuscript provides a forward looking assessment of the promise of nanomedicine as it pertains to individualized medicine and establishes a technology "snapshot" of the current state of nano-based products over a vast array of clinical indications and range of patient specificity. Other issues such as market driven hurdles and regulatory compliance reform are anticipated to "self-correct" in accordance to scientific advancement and healthcare demand. These peripheral, non-scientific concerns are not addressed at length in this manuscript; however they do exist, and their impact to the paradigm shifting healthcare transformation towards individualized medicine will be critical for its success. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  13. Enabling individualized therapy through nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Jason H.; van de Ven, Anne L.; Godin, Biana; Blanco, Elvin; Serda, Rita E.; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ziemys, Arturas; Bouamrani, Ali; Hu, Tony; Ranganathan, Shivakumar I.; De Rosa, Enrica; Martinez, Jonathan O.; Smid, Christine A.; Buchanan, Rachel M.; Lee, Sei-Young; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Landry, Matthew; Meyn, Anne; Tasciotti, Ennio; Liu, Xuewu; Decuzzi, Paolo; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Individualized medicine is the healthcare strategy that rebukes the idiomatic dogma of ‘losing sight of the forest for the trees’. We are entering a new era of healthcare where it is no longer acceptable to develop and market a drug that is effective for only 80% of the patient population. The emergence of “-omic” technologies (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and advances in systems biology are magnifying the deficiencies of standardized therapy, which often provide little treatment latitude for accommodating patient physiologic idiosyncrasies. A personalized approach to medicine is not a novel concept. Ever since the scientific community began unraveling the mysteries of the genome, the promise of discarding generic treatment regimens in favor of patient-specific therapies became more feasible and realistic. One of the major scientific impediments of this movement towards personalized medicine has been the need for technological enablement. Nanotechnology is projected to play a critical role in patient-specific therapy; however, this transition will depend heavily upon the evolutionary development of a systems biology approach to clinical medicine based upon “-omic” technology analysis and integration. This manuscript provides a forward looking assessment of the promise of nanomedicine as it pertains to individualized medicine and establishes a technology “snapshot” of the current state of nano-based products over a vast array of clinical indications and range of patient specificity. Other issues such as market driven hurdles and regulatory compliance reform are anticipated to “self-correct” in accordance to scientific advancement and healthcare demand. These peripheral, non-scientific concerns are not addressed at length in this manuscript; however they do exist, and their impact to the paradigm shifting healthcare transformation towards individualized medicine will be critical for its success. PMID:20045055

  14. Interplay of demographic variables, birth experience, and initial reactions in the prediction of symptoms of posttraumatic stress one year after giving birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia König

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been increasing research on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD following childbirth in the last two decades. The literature on predictors of who develops posttraumatic stress symptoms (PSS suggests that both vulnerability and birth factors have an influence, but many studies measure predictors and outcomes simultaneously. Objective: In this context, we aimed to examine indirect and direct effects of predictors of PSS, which were measured longitudinally. Method: We assessed women within the first days (n=353, 6 weeks, and 12 months (n=183 after having given birth to a healthy infant. The first assessment included questions on demographics, pregnancy, and birth experience. The second and third assessments contained screenings for postpartum depression, PTSD, and general mental health problems, as well as assessing social support and physical well-being. We analysed our data using structural equation modelling techniques (n=277. Results: Our final model showed good fit and was consistent with a diathesis-stress model of PSS. Women who had used antidepressant medication in the 10 years before childbirth had higher PSS at 6 weeks, independent of birth experiences. Subjective birth experience was the early predictor with the highest total effect on later PSS. Interestingly, a probable migration background also had a small but significant effect on PSS via more episiotomies. The null results for social support may have been caused by a ceiling effect. Conclusions: Given that we measured predictors at different time points, our results lend important support to the etiological model, namely, that there is a vulnerability pathway and a stress pathway leading to PSS. PSS and other psychological measures stayed very stable between 6 weeks and 1 year postpartum, indicating that it is possible to identify women developing problems early.

  15. Peripheral reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    Peripheral collisions, that is, collisions involving a small amount of overlap of nuclear matter, are discussed including inclusive interactions, the magnitude of the peripheral cross section, fragmentation, a compilation of experiments and available data, limiting fragmentation, factorization, some models, fragment momentum distributions, and future research directions

  16. Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Section in p+p reactions measured by the LHC Experiment TOTEM at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    OpenAIRE

    Collaboration, T. Csörgő for the TOTEM; :; Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bozzo, M.; Brogi, P.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured by the TOTEM experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at $\\sqrt{s} = 7 $ TeV in special runs with the Roman Pot detectors placed as close to the outgoing beam as seven times the transverse beam size. The differential cross-section measurements are reported in the |t|-range of 0.36 to 2.5 GeV^2. Extending the range of data to low t values from 0.02 to 0.33 GeV^2,and utilizing the luminosity measurements of CMS, the total proton-proton cros...

  17. Pathways to diagnosis: a qualitative study of the experiences and emotional reactions of parents of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, David; Harden, Jeni; Waugh, Norman; Noyes, Kathryn; Barnard, Katharine D; Stephen, John; Robertson, Kenneth J; Bath, Louise; Robertson, Linda; Lawton, Julia

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore from parents' perspectives the circumstances and events which led to their child being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The objective was to understand reasons for delays in seeking treatment and parents' emotional reactions to diagnosis so others can be better informed and supported in future. In-depth interviews with 54 parents of children (aged ≤12 yr) with T1D were conducted. Data analysis used an inductive, thematic approach. Parents described a 'prompt' and a 'delayed' pathway to their child being diagnosed. Parents who considered the diagnosis to be 'prompt' reported how they, or other people, had recognized their child had developed symptoms of T1D which resulted in a rapid presentation to health care professionals. In contrast, parents who perceived their child's diagnosis to be 'delayed' did not recognize signs of T1D and attributed their child's deteriorating health to other conditions, being out of routines and/or their stage of development. These parents often only sought medical help when symptoms became extreme. All parents were distressed by their child's diagnosis; however, parents in the 'delayed' pathway expressed unresolved feelings of guilt, particularly when their child was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. Parents' and other people's knowledge about T1D can affect the duration between onset of their child's symptoms and diagnosis. Campaigns to raise awareness should ensure that parents are made aware of symptoms and that T1D can develop during childhood. Health care professionals could discuss with parents the events preceding their child's diagnosis to better determine their emotional support needs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Section in p+p reactions as measured by the LHC Experiment TOTEM at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Csörgö, Tamás; Aspell, P; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bozzo, M; Brogi, P; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Deile, M; Dimovasili, E; Doubek, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferretti, R; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Giani, S; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Intonti, M R; Janda, M; Kaspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Magaletti, L; Magazzù, G; Mercadante, A; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Noschis, E; Novák, T; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Perrot, A-L; Pedreschi, E; Petäjäjärvi, J; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Spinella, F; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Vítek, M; Welti, J; Whitmore, J

    2012-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured by the TOTEM experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at $\\sqrt{s} = 7 $ TeV in special runs with the Roman Pot detectors placed as close to the outgoing beam as seven times the transverse beam size. The differential cross-section measurements are reported in the |t|-range of 0.36 to 2.5 GeV$^2$. Extending the range of data to low t values from 0.02 to 0.33 GeV$^2$,and utilizing the luminosity measurements of CMS, the total proton-proton cross section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV is measured to be $(98.3 \\pm 0.2^{stat} \\pm 2.8^{syst})$ mb.

  19. 2011 Joplin, Missouri Tornado Experience, Mental Health Reactions, and Service Utilization: Cross-Sectional Assessments at Approximately 6 Months and 2.5 Years Post-Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, J Brian; Spialek, Matthew L; Stevens, Jordan; First, Jennifer; Mieseler, Vicky L; Pfefferbaum, Betty

    2015-10-26

    Introduction. On May 22, 2011 the deadliest tornado in the United States since 1947 struck Joplin, Missouri killing 161 people, injuring approximately 1,150 individuals, and causing approximately $2.8 billion in economic losses. Methods. This study examined the mental health effects of this event through a random digit dialing sample (N = 380) of Joplin adults at approximately 6 months post-disaster (Survey 1) and a purposive convenience sample (N = 438) of Joplin adults at approximately 2.5 years post-disaster (Survey 2). For both surveys we assessed tornado experience, posttraumatic stress, depression, mental health service utilization, and sociodemographics. For Survey 2 we also assessed social support and parent report of child strengths and difficulties. Results. Probable PTSD relevance was 12.63% at Survey 1 and 26.74% at Survey 2, while current depression prevalence was 20.82% at Survey 1 and 13.33% at Survey 2. Less education and more tornado experience was generally related to greater likelihood of experiencing probable PTSD and current depression for both surveys. Men and younger participants were more likely to report current depression at Survey 1. Low levels of social support (assessed only at Survey 2) were related to more probable PTSD and current depression. For both surveys, we observed low rates of mental health service utilization, and these rates were also low for participants reporting probable PTSD and current depression. At Survey 2 we assessed parent report of child (ages 4 to 17) strengths and difficulties and found that child difficulties were more frequent for younger children (ages 4 to 10) than older children (ages 11 to 17), and that parents reporting probable PTSD reported a greater frequency of children with borderline or abnormal difficulties. Discussion. Overall our results indicate that long-term (multi-year) community disaster mental health monitoring, assessment, referral, outreach, and services are needed following a major

  20. Chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, Brian.

    1991-01-01

    Chain Reaction is a work of recent American political history. It seeks to explain how and why America came to depend so heavily on its experts after World War II, how those experts translated that authority into political clout, and why that authority and political discretion declined in the 1970s. The author's research into the internal memoranda of the Atomic Energy Commission substantiates his argument in historical detail. It was not the ravages of American anti-intellectualism, as so many scholars have argued, that brought the experts back down to earth. Rather, their decline can be traced to the very roots of their success after World War II. The need to over-state anticipated results in order to garner public support, incessant professional and bureaucratic specialization, and the sheer proliferation of expertise pushed arcane and insulated debates between experts into public forums at the same time that a broad cross section of political participants found it easier to gain access to their own expertise. These tendencies ultimately undermined the political influence of all experts. (author)

  1. Polarization phenomena in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, K.; Ishihara, M.; Takahashi, N.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter presents a few key experiments which provide direct evidence of the polarization phenomena in heavy-ion reactions. The theory of polarization observables and measurements is given with the necessary formulae. The polarization phenomena is described and studies of product nuclear polarization in heavy-ion reactions are discussed. Studies of heavy-ion reactions induced by polarized beams are examined

  2. Solar nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharov, G

    1978-04-01

    The current state of neutrino solar astrophysics is outlined, showing the contradictions between the experimental results of solar neutrino detection and the standard solar models constructed on the basis of the star structure and development theory, which give values for high-energy neutrino fluxes considerably exceeding the upper experimental limit. A number of hypotheses interpreting the experimental results are summarized. The hypotheses are critically assessed and experiments are recommended for refining or verifying experimental data. Also dealt with are nuclear reactions in the Sun, as is the attempt to interpret the anomalous by high /sup 3/He fluxes from the Sun and the relatively small amounts of solar neutrinos and gamma quanta. The importance is emphasized of the simultaneous and complex measurement of the fluxes of neutrons, gamma radiation, and isotopes of hydrogen, helium, and boron from the Sun as indicators of nuclear reactions in the Sun.

  3. Barriers affecting successful technology enablement of supply chain: An Indian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, R.; Haleem, A.; Farooquie, J. A.

    2018-03-01

    In order to compete, organizations need to focus on improving supply chain and technology acts as a major enabler. Technology enablement of supply chain has not always been successful and has been examined by many researchers. The purpose of this paper is to do a systematic literature review of technology enabled supply chain from a strategic viewpoint. The literature is examined from two perspectives. Firstly, it studies the growing interest in technology-enabled supply chain in India. Secondly, it studies barriers affecting technology enablement of supply chain. The literature review identifies that technology enabled supply chain helps in improving performance via effective decision making, monitoring entire supply chain, faster reaction to customer service problems, etc. The research has emphasized the importance of 12 barriers affecting technology enablement. This research will help as a guide for practitioners in order to successfully implement technology and fills the gap in existing literature by highlighting and consolidating the significant research work done in past.

  4. RCNP E398 {sup 16}O,{sup 12}C(p,p’) experiment: Measurement of the γ-ray emission probability from giant resonances in relation to {sup 16}O,{sup 12}C(ν,ν’) reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, I.; Yamada, Y.; Mori, T.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M. [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.; Aoi, N.; Ideguchi, E.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ito, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Yamamoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Akimune, H. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Okamoto 8-9-1, Higashinada, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    We propose to measure the γ-ray emission probability from excited states above 5 MeV including giant resonance of {sup 16}O and {sup 12}C as a function of excitation energy in 1-MeV step. Here, we measure both the excitation energy (E{sub x}=5-30MeV) at the forward scattering angles (0°-3°) of the {sup 16}O, {sup 12}C (p, p’) reaction using Grand-Raiden Spectrometer and the energy of γ-rays (E{sub γ}) using an array of NaI(Tl) counters. The purpose of the experiment is to provide the basic and important information not only for the γ-ray production from primary neutral-current neutrino-oxygen (-carbon) interactions but also for that from the secondary hadronic (neutron-oxygen and -carbon) interactions.

  5. Fragmentation processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrain, R.

    1984-08-01

    Projectile and nuclear fragmentation are defined and processes referred to are recalled. The two different aspects of fragmentation are considered but the emphasis is also put on heavy ion induced reactions. The preliminary results of an experiment performed at GANIL to study peripheral heavy ions induced reactions at intermediate energy are presented. The results of this experiment will illustrate the characteristics of projectile fragmentation and this will also give the opportunity to study projectile fragmentation in the transition region. Then nuclear fragmentation is considered which is associated with more central collisions in the case of heavy ion induced reactions. This aspect of fragmentation is also ilustrated with two heavy ion experiments in which fragments emitted at large angle have been observed

  6. Fundamental plant biology enabled by the space shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Wheeler, Ray M; Levine, Howard G; Ferl, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between fundamental plant biology and space biology was especially synergistic in the era of the Space Shuttle. While all terrestrial organisms are influenced by gravity, the impact of gravity as a tropic stimulus in plants has been a topic of formal study for more than a century. And while plants were parts of early space biology payloads, it was not until the advent of the Space Shuttle that the science of plant space biology enjoyed expansion that truly enabled controlled, fundamental experiments that removed gravity from the equation. The Space Shuttle presented a science platform that provided regular science flights with dedicated plant growth hardware and crew trained in inflight plant manipulations. Part of the impetus for plant biology experiments in space was the realization that plants could be important parts of bioregenerative life support on long missions, recycling water, air, and nutrients for the human crew. However, a large part of the impetus was that the Space Shuttle enabled fundamental plant science essentially in a microgravity environment. Experiments during the Space Shuttle era produced key science insights on biological adaptation to spaceflight and especially plant growth and tropisms. In this review, we present an overview of plant science in the Space Shuttle era with an emphasis on experiments dealing with fundamental plant growth in microgravity. This review discusses general conclusions from the study of plant spaceflight biology enabled by the Space Shuttle by providing historical context and reviews of select experiments that exemplify plant space biology science.

  7. Breakthrough Science Enabled by Smallsat Optical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjian, V.

    2017-12-01

    The recent NRC panel on "Achieving Science with Cubesats" found that "CubeSats have already proven themselves to be an important scientific tool. CubeSats can produce high-value science, as demonstrated by peer-reviewed publications that address decadal survey science goals." While some science is purely related to the size of the collecting aperture, there are plentiful examples of new and exciting experiments that can be achieved using the relatively inexpensive Cubesat platforms. We will present various potential science applications that can benefit from higher bandwidth communication. For example, on or near Earth orbit, Cubesats could provide hyperspectral imaging, gravity field mapping, atmospheric probing, and terrain mapping. These can be achieved either as large constellations of Cubesats or a few Cubesats that provide multi-point observations. Away from the Earth (up to 1AU) astrophysical variability studies, detections of solar particles between the Earth and Venus, mapping near earth objects, and high-speed videos of the Sun will also be enabled by high bandwidth communications.

  8. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  9. An Internet enabled impact limiter material database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wix, S.; Kanipe, F.; McMurtry, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents a detailed explanation of the construction of an interest enabled database, also known as a database driven web site. The data contained in the internet enabled database are impact limiter material and seal properties. The technique used in constructing the internet enabled database presented in this paper are applicable when information that is changing in content needs to be disseminated to a wide audience.

  10. An internet enabled impact limiter material database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wix, S.; Kanipe, F.; McMurtry, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents a detailed explanation of the construction of an internet enabled database, also known as a database driven web site. The data contained in the internet enabled database are impact limiter material and seal properties. The techniques used in constructing the internet enabled database presented in this paper are applicable when information that is changing in content needs to be disseminated to a wide audience. (authors)

  11. An internet enabled impact limiter material database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.; Kanipe, F.; McMurtry, W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed explanation of the construction of an internet enabled database, also known as a database driven web site. The data contained in the internet enabled database are impact limiter material and seal properties. The techniques used in constructing the internet enabled database presented in this paper are applicable when information that is changing in content needs to be disseminated to a wide audience. (authors)

  12. An Internet enabled impact limiter material database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.; Kanipe, F.; McMurtry, W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed explanation of the construction of an interest enabled database, also known as a database driven web site. The data contained in the internet enabled database are impact limiter material and seal properties. The technique used in constructing the internet enabled database presented in this paper are applicable when information that is changing in content needs to be disseminated to a wide audience

  13. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, David J. [The George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR.

  14. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR

  15. Study of the violation of the T and CP symmetries in the reactions Λb0 → Λ0 + a vector meson. Validation of the Front-end electronics for the PreShower detector of the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, E.

    2007-11-01

    This thesis probes the beauty baryon physics in the framework of the LHCb experiment. The present study deals with the Λ b 0 → Λ 0 V decays where V is a vector meson such as J/Ψ(μ + μ - ), φ(K + K - ), ω(π + π - π0) or the ρ 0 - ω 0 (π + π - ) mixing. These processes allow to test independently the CP symmetry, which violation has not been observed yet in the baryonic sector, and the T symmetry, which experimental proofs are limited. Among the possible perspectives, a precise measurement of the Λ b 0 lifetime could contribute to the resolution of the raising theoretical-experimental puzzle. A phenomenological model of the Λ b 0 → Λ 0 V decays has been performed, from which branching ratios and angular distributions have been estimated. An advanced study of the reconstruction and the selection of these reactions by the LHCb apparatus shows that the channel Λ b 0 → Λ 0 J/Ψ is the dominant channel on both statistics and purity aspects. The Λ b 0 lifetime measure is the most imminent result; the constrains on asymmetries due to CP and T violation require several data taking years. Besides, an instrumental work has been achieved on the read-out electronics, called Front-End, of the experiment pre-shower. This contribution takes into account the validation of the prototype boards and the development of tools required by the qualification of the 100 production boards. (author)

  16. Modeling of fluctuating reaction networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipshtat, A.; Biham, O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text:Various dynamical systems are organized as reaction networks, where the population size of one component affects the populations of all its neighbors. Such networks can be found in interstellar surface chemistry, cell biology, thin film growth and other systems. I cases where the populations of reactive species are large, the network can be modeled by rate equations which provide all reaction rates within mean field approximation. However, in small systems that are partitioned into sub-micron size, these populations strongly fluctuate. Under these conditions rate equations fail and the master equation is needed for modeling these reactions. However, the number of equations in the master equation grows exponentially with the number of reactive species, severely limiting its feasibility for complex networks. Here we present a method which dramatically reduces the number of equations, thus enabling the incorporation of the master equation in complex reaction networks. The method is examplified in the context of reaction network on dust grains. Its applicability for genetic networks will be discussed. 1. Efficient simulations of gas-grain chemistry in interstellar clouds. Azi Lipshtat and Ofer Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004), 170601. 2. Modeling of negative autoregulated genetic networks in single cells. Azi Lipshtat, Hagai B. Perets, Nathalie Q. Balaban and Ofer Biham, Gene: evolutionary genomics (2004), In press

  17. Males in Enabling: Painting a portrait through narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Armstrong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The number of males entering higher education via an enabling pathway is slowly increasing; yet, males still battle with the anti-intellectual attitude that is prevalent in regional areas of Australia. Previous research undertaken by the authors began exploring the factors that inhibited or enhanced the male experience within an enabling course. This paper expands upon this research with a deeper focus on the male experience through personalised accounts derived from individual interviews. Using qualitative methodology and narrative inquiry, the findings provide a deeper understanding of the issues that males of different ages face when creating a new identity as a university student. This paper shares insights into what motivated the male students to enter university via an enabling pathway; the actual personal experiences both positive and negative during this time; and the effect that this commitment to study had on them personally and the people around them. The lens of transformative theory underpins this research through exploring frames of reference that align with the students’ experiences. Portraiture prose shares the individual stories which are analysed and the key findings extrapolated.

  18. Reactions of stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Luc; Harder, Hartwig; Novelli, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl oxides (Criegee intermediates) were proposed as key intermediates in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes in 1975 by Rudolf Criegee. Despite the importance of ozonolysis in atmospheric chemistry, direct observation of these intermediates remained elusive, with only indirect experimental evidence for their role in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, e.g. through scavenging experiments. Direct experimental observation of stabilized CI has only been achieved since 2008. Since then, a concerted effort using experimental and theoretical means is in motion to characterize the chemistry and kinetics of these reactive intermediates. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the chemistry of Criegee intermediates with a series of coreactants which may be of importance in the atmosphere, in experimental setups, or both. This includes the CI+CI cross-reaction, which proceeds with a rate coefficient near the collision limit and can be important in experimental conditions. The CI + alkene reactions show strong dependence of the rate coefficient depending on the coreactants, but is generally found to be rather slow. The CI + ozone reaction is sufficiently fast to occur both in experiment and the free troposphere, and acts as a sink for CI. The reaction of CI with hydroperoxides, ROOH, is complex, and leads both to the formation of oligomers, as to the formation of reactive etheroxides, with a moderately fast rate coefficient. The importance of these reactions is placed in the context of the reaction conditions in different atmospheric environments ranging from unpolluted to highly polluted.

  19. Adverse drug reactions in tuberculosis patients due to directly observed treatment strategy therapy: Experience at an outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in the city of Imphal, Manipur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarjit Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As to the profile of adverse drug reactions (ADRs due to directly observed treatment, short course (DOTS, there is no report available in patients receiving antituberculosis (anti-TB chemotherapy in Manipur, India. One of the main reasons for non-adherence to anti-TB therapy (ATT is ADRs, even under DOTS. Aims: This study aimed to determine the incidence of ADRs due to DOTS therapy with a TB population of Manipur, India. Setting and Design: A prospective institution-based cohort study, and performed during July 2009-December 2010. Materials and Methods: The study included 102 diagnosed TB patients on anti-TB treatment under DOTS. Every patient was followed-up for the duration he/she received the treatment. Statistical Analysis: Frequency of different ADRs was assessed and p value was determined. Results: Incidence of TB was more among males than female (76.47% against 23.53%. Seventy-one patients (69.01% showed one or more ADR. Incidence of ADRs based on affected organ was: Gastrointestinal (GI disorders in 38 patients (53.52%, generalized weakness in 12 patients (16.9%, liver dysfunction in 11 patients (15.49%, allergic skin reactions in six patients (8.45%, neurological system disorders in two patients (2.82%, and fever in two patients (2.82%. However, 30.99% did not experience any ADRs. Conclusion: Incidence of ADRs due to DOTS therapy was 69.01%. Majority of cases suffered from GI symptoms. This highlighted the importance of developing strategies to ameliorate ADRs both to improve the quality of patient care and to control TB safely.

  20. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  1. Radiotracer experiments on lignin reactions, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Noritsugu; Araki, Hiroshi; Suganuma, Nobuo.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of the specific carbon atoms of lignin during the cooking process was studied. Pine wood meal containing the protolignin labelled with 14-C was prepared, and treated under sulfate cooking conditions. The incorporation and distribution of radioactivity were traced in three fractions separated from the black liquor according to their solubilities and molecular weights. The gamma position carbon at the end of side chain of phenylpropane unit in lignin was eliminated easily from the high molecular weight portion in considerable extent during the cooking process, and a part of the eliminated carbon condenses again with the aromatic ring. However, a large portion of the eliminated gamma-carbon was found in the low molecular fraction of water soluble part of the black liquor. The radioactivity of alpha-carbons in the side chains adjacent to aromatic rings was found to be distributed in three fractions similarly to that of beta-carbons, except that the incorporation of radioactivity of alpha-carbons was slightly low in high molecular fraction, and slightly high in low molecular water soluble fraction as compared with that of beta-carbons and aromatic ring carbons. The number of residual carbon atoms per one monomer unit in high molecular kraft lignin was calculated from the specific incorporation ratio of radioactivity. The carbon skelton was estimated and the molecular formula was given by the elementary analysis and molecular weight determination. (Iwakiri, K.)

  2. The Grid-Enabled NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawenda, M.; Meyer, N.; Stroinski, M.; Popenda, L.; Gdaniec, Z.; Adamiak, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    The laboratory equipment used for experimental work is very expensive and unique as well. Only big regional or national centers could afford to purchase and use it, but on a very limited scale. That is a real problem that disqualifies all other research groups not having direct access to these instruments. Therefore the proposed framework plays a crucial role in equalizing the chances of all research groups. The Virtual Laboratory (VLab) project focuses its activity on embedding laboratory equipments in grid environments (handling HPC and visualization), touching some crucial issues not solved yet. In general the issues concern the standardization of the laboratory equipment definition to treat it as a simple grid resource, supporting the end user under the term of the workflow definition, introducing the accounting issues and prioritizing jobs which follow experiments on equipments. Nowadays, we have a lot of various equipments, which can be accessed remotely via network, but only on the way allowing the local management console/display to move through the network to make a simpler access. To manage an experimental and post-processing data as well as store them in a organized way, a special Digital Science Library was developed. The project delivers a framework to enable the usage of many different scientific facilities. The physical layer of the architecture includes the existing high-speed network like PIONIER in Poland, and the HPC and visualization infrastructure. The application, in fact the framework, can be used in all experimental disciplines, where access to physical equipments are crucial, e.g., chemistry (spectrometer), radio astronomy (radio telescope), and medicine (CAT scanner). The poster presentation will show how we deployed the concept in chemistry, supporting these disciplines with grid environment and embedding the Bruker Avance 600 MHz and Varian 300 MHz spectrometers. (author)

  3. Nuclear structure in deep-inelastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    The paper concentrates on recent deep inelastic experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory and the nuclear structure effects evident in reactions between super heavy nuclei. Experiments indicate that these reactions evolve gradually from simple transfer processes which have been studied extensively for lighter nuclei such as 16 O, suggesting a theoretical approach connecting the one-step DWBA theory to the multistep statistical models of nuclear reactions. This transition between quasi-elastic and deep inelastic reactions is achieved by a simple random walk model. Some typical examples of nuclear structure effects are shown. 24 refs., 9 figs

  4. Ejection of Coulomb Crystals from a Linear Paul Ion Trap for Ion-Molecule Reaction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K A E; Pollum, L L; Petralia, L S; Tauschinsky, A; Rennick, C J; Softley, T P; Heazlewood, B R

    2015-12-17

    Coulomb crystals are being increasingly employed as a highly localized source of cold ions for the study of ion-molecule chemical reactions. To extend the scope of reactions that can be studied in Coulomb crystals-from simple reactions involving laser-cooled atomic ions, to more complex systems where molecular reactants give rise to multiple product channels-sensitive product detection methodologies are required. The use of a digital ion trap (DIT) and a new damped cosine trap (DCT) are described, which facilitate the ejection of Coulomb-crystallized ions onto an external detector for the recording of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra. This enables the examination of reaction dynamics and kinetics between Coulomb-crystallized ions and neutral molecules: ionic products are typically cotrapped, thus ejecting the crystal onto an external detector reveals the masses, identities, and quantities of all ionic species at a selected point in the reaction. Two reaction systems are examined: the reaction of Ca(+) with deuterated isotopologues of water, and the charge exchange between cotrapped Xe(+) with deuterated isotopologues of ammonia. These reactions are examples of two distinct types of experiment, the first involving direct reaction of the laser-cooled ions, and the second involving reaction of sympathetically-cooled heavy ions to form a mixture of light product ions. Extensive simulations are conducted to interpret experimental results and calculate optimal operating parameters, facilitating a comparison between the DIT and DCT approaches. The simulations also demonstrate a correlation between crystal shape and image shape on the detector, suggesting a possible means for determining crystal geometry for nonfluorescing ions.

  5. Measurement of polarization observables in the reaction {gamma}p{yields} p{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} using linearly polarized photons with the CBELSA/TAPS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhoyan, Vahe

    2012-07-27

    The spectrum and the properties of baryon resonances can be studied using photons with energies appropriate to excite baryonic states. Double meson photoproduction allows access to cascading resonance decays via other excited states. Also, at higher energies the importance of the double meson photoproduction increases due to higher cross-sections in comparison to single meson photoproduction. To study baryon resonances, the measurement of polarization observables as well as the measurement of differential cross-sections plays a very important role. In this work the three-body polarization observables I{sup s}, I{sup c} and the respective twobody asymmetry {Sigma} were measured for the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} in an incoming photon energy range of E{sub {gamma}} = 970 - 1650 MeV. The data were acquired with the CBELSA/TAPS experiment located at the ELSA accelerator in Bonn, using a linearly polarized photon beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. The observables I{sup s} and I{sup c} which occur in two-meson final states are measured for the first time in the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The corresponding two-body asymmetry {Sigma} is measured in an extended energy range in comparison to already existing data. A comparison with theoretical models shows that the polarization observables provide valuable input to study resonance contributions and their decay modes. The D{sub 33}(1700) {yields} {Delta}{pi} decay is studied based on the comparison of the Bonn-Gatchina Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) predictions with the data. Furthermore, a comparison of the data with the Bonn-Gatchina PWA and the Fix isobar model predictions allows to distinguish between these two models. Additionally, band-like structures and peaks are observed in the mass ranges of {Delta}(1232), D{sub 13}(1520), F{sub 15}(1680), f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 2}(1270) in the according Dalitz plots and invariant mass distributions. The contributions of these

  6. HADES results in elementary reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramstein B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  7. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2014-03-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and

  8. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and experimental

  9. Enabling smart retail settings via mobile augmented reality shopping apps

    OpenAIRE

    Dacko, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Retail settings are being challenged to become smarter and provide greater value to both consumers and retailers. An increasingly recognised approach having potential for enabling smart retail is mobile augmented reality (MAR) apps. In this research, we seek to describe and discover how, why and to what extent MAR apps contribute to smart retail settings by creating additional value to customers as well as benefiting retailers. In particular, by adopting a retail customer experience perspecti...

  10. Selective C(sp3 )-H Aerobic Oxidation Enabled by Decatungstate Photocatalysis in Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudadio, Gabriele; Govaerts, Sebastian; Wang, Ying; Ravelli, Davide; Koolman, Hannes F; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Djuric, Stevan W; Noël, Timothy

    2018-04-03

    A mild and selective C(sp 3 )-H aerobic oxidation enabled by decatungstate photocatalysis has been developed. The reaction can be significantly improved in a microflow reactor enabling the safe use of oxygen and enhanced irradiation of the reaction mixture. Our method allows for the oxidation of both activated and unactivated C-H bonds (30 examples). The ability to selectively oxidize natural scaffolds, such as (-)-ambroxide, pregnenolone acetate, (+)-sclareolide, and artemisinin, exemplifies the utility of this new method. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. A New Road to Reaction, Part 3. Teaching the Heat Effect of Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Wobbe; Verdonk, Adri H.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the need to present beginning chemistry students with a variety of experiences dealing with chemical reactions to develop the individual student's concept of these processes. Presents information and experiments dealing with the heat effect of chemical reactions. Includes a discussion on exothermic and endothermic processes in laboratory…

  12. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  13. Optical Coherent Receiver Enables THz Wireless Bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Liu, Kexin; Zhang, Hangkai

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a 45 Gbit/s 400 GHz photonic wireless communication system enabled by an optical coherent receiver, which has a high potential in fast recovery of high data rate connections, for example, in disaster....

  14. Web Enabled DROLS Verity TopicSets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tong, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The focus of this effort has been the design and development of automatically generated TopicSets and HTML pages that provide the basis of the required search and browsing capability for DTIC's Web Enabled DROLS System...

  15. Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business Environment in the ... the scope of operations of private sector enterprises in the West Bank and Gaza. ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management.

  16. Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-05-01

    Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents provides materials that clarify the authority for Federal agencies to enter into utility energy services contracts (UESCs), as well as sample documents and resources to ease utility partnership contracting.

  17. Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Karen; Vasquez, Deb

    2017-01-01

    The Federal Energy Management Program's 'Utility Energy Service Contracts: Enabling Documents' provide legislative information and materials that clarify the authority for federal agencies to enter into utility energy service contracts, or UESCs.

  18. 5G-Enabled Tactile Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Simsek, Meryem; Aijaz, Adnan; Dohler, Mischa; Sachs, Joachim; Fettweis, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The long-term ambition of the Tactile Internet is to enable a democratization of skill, and how it is being delivered globally. An integral part of this is to be able to transmit touch in perceived real-time, which is enabled by suitable robotics and haptics equipment at the edges, along with an unprecedented communications network. The fifth generation (5G) mobile communications systems will underpin this emerging Internet at the wireless edge. This paper presents the most important technolo...

  19. Integrated Photonics Enabled by Slow Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Chen, Yuntian; Ek, Sara

    2012-01-01

    In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources.......In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources....

  20. High-temperature epoxidation of soybean oil in flow : speeding up elemental reactions wanted and unwanted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortese, B.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Hessel, V.

    2012-01-01

    The soybean oil epoxidation reaction is investigated theoretically through kinetic modeling of temperature effects enabled through flow processing under superheated conditions. Different from previous studies on such processing, here a complex reaction network superimposed by multiphase transport is

  1. Enabling Self-Monitoring Data Exchange in Participatory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Campos, Guillermo; Ofoghi, Bahadorreza; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The development of new methods, devices and apps for self-monitoring have enabled the extension of the application of these approaches for consumer health and research purposes. The increase in the number and variety of devices has generated a complex scenario where reporting guidelines and data exchange formats will be needed to ensure the quality of the information and the reproducibility of results of the experiments. Based on the Minimal Information for Self Monitoring Experiments (MISME) reporting guideline we have developed an XML format (MISME-ML) to facilitate data exchange for self monitoring experiments. We have also developed a sample instance to illustrate the concept and a Java MISME-ML validation tool. The implementation and adoption of these tools should contribute to the consolidation of a set of methods that ensure the reproducibility of self monitoring experiments for research purposes.

  2. Nuclear reactions an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown – mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos – to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.   The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no ...

  3. Experimental study and numerical modelling of geochemical reactions occurring during uranium in situ recovery (ISR) mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Simon, R.

    2011-09-01

    The in situ Recovery (ISR) method consists of ore mining by in situ chemical leaching with acid or alkaline solutions. ISR takes place underground and is therefore limited to the analysis of the pumped solutions, hence ISR mine management is still empirical. Numerical modelling has been considered to achieve more efficient management of this process. Three different phenomena have to be taken into account for numerical simulations of uranium ISR mining: (1) geochemical reactions; (2) the kinetics of these reactions, and (3) hydrodynamic transport with respect to the reaction kinetics. Leaching tests have been conducted on ore samples from an uranium mine in Tortkuduk (Kazakhstan) where ISR is conducted by acid leaching. Two types of leaching experiments were performed: (1) tests in batch reactors; and (2) extraction in flow through columns. The assumptions deduced from the leaching tests were tested and validated by modelling the laboratory experiments with the numerical codes CHESS and HYTEC, both developed at the Geosciences research center of Mines ParisTech. A well-constrained 1D hydrogeochemical transport model of the ISR process at laboratory-scale was proposed. It enables to translate the chemical release sequence that is observed during experiments into a geochemical reaction sequence. It was possible to highlight the controlling factors of uranium dissolution, and the precipitation of secondary mineral phase in the deposit, as well as the determination of the relative importance of these factors. (author)

  4. Spallation reactions - physics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelic, A.; Ricciardi, M.; Schmidt, K-H.

    2009-01-01

    Spallation reactions have become an ideal tool for studying the equation of state and thermal instabilities of nuclear matter. In astrophysics, the interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium have to be understood in detail for deducing their original composition and their production mechanisms. Renewed interest in spallation reactions with protons around 1 GeV came up recently with the developments of spallation neutron sources. The project of an accelerator-driven system (ADS) as a technological solution for incinerating the radioactive waste even intensified the efforts for better understanding the physics involved in the spallation process. Experiments on spallation reactions were performed for determining the production cross sections and properties of particles, fragments and heavy residues. Traditional experiments on heavy residues, performed in direct kinematics, were limited to the direct observation of long-lived radioactive nuclides and did not provide detailed information on the kinematics of the reaction. Therefore, an innovative experimental method has been developed, based on inverse kinematics, which allowed to identify all reaction residues in-flight, using the high resolution magnetic spectrometer FRS of GSL Darmstadt. It also gives direct access to the reaction kinematics. An experimental campaign has been carried out in a Europe-wide collaboration, investigating the spallation of several nuclei ranging from 56 Fe to 238 U Complementary experiments were performed with a full-acceptance detection system, yielding total fission cross sections. Recently, another detection system using the large acceptance ALADIN dipole and the LAND neutron detector was introduced to measure light particles in coincidence with the heavy residues. Another intense activity was dedicated to developing codes, which cover nuclear reactions occurring in an ADS. The first phase of the reaction is successfully described by a sequence of quasi-free nucleon

  5. [EXPERIENCE OF STUDY AND POSSIBLE WAYS OF ELIMINATION OF FALSE POSITIVE AND FALSE NEGATIVE RESULTS DURING EXECUTION OF POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ON AN EXAMPLE OF JUNIN VIRUS RNA DETECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizikova, T E; Lebedev, V N; Pantyukhov, V B; Borisevich, S V; Merkulov, V A

    2015-01-01

    Experience of study and possible ways of elimination of false positive and false negative results during execution of polymerase chain reaction on an example of Junin virus RNA detection. MATERIALSS AND METHODS: Junin virus--causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) strain XJpR37/5787 was obtained from the State collection of pathogenicity group I causative agents of the 48th Central Research Institute. Reagent kit for detection of Junin virus RNA by RT-PCR was developed in the Institute and consists of 4 sets: for isolation of RNA, execution of reverse-transcription reaction, execution of PCR and electrophoretic detection of PCR products. RT-PCR was carried out by a standard technique. Continuous cell cultures of African green monkey Vero B, GMK-AH-1(D) were obtained from the museum of cell culture department of the Centre. An experimental study of the effect of various factors of impact on the sample under investigation ("thawing-freezing", presence of formaldehyde, heparin) on the obtaining of false negative results during Junin virus RNA detection by using RT-PCR was studied. Addition of 0.01% heparin to the samples was shown to completely inhibit PCR. Addition of 0.05% formaldehyde significantly reduces sensitivity of the method. A possibility of reduction of analysis timeframe from 15 to 5 days was shown during detection of the causative agent in samples with low concentration of the latter by growing the samples and subsequent analysis of the material obtained by using RT-PCR. During detection of causative agent by using RT-PCR false negative results could appear in the presence of formaldehyde and heparin in the sample. A possibility of elimination of false negative PCR results due to concentration of the causative agent in the sample under investigation at a level below sensitivity threshold was shown on the example of Junin virus RNA detection by using growing of the pathogen in appropriate accumulation system with subsequent analysis of the

  6. Dynamics of traveling reaction pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovzhenko, A. Yu.; Rumanov, E. N.

    2007-01-01

    The growth of activator losses is accompanied by the decay of a traveling reaction pulse. In a ring reactor, this propagation threshold is present simultaneously with a threshold related to the ring diameter. The results of numerical experiments with pulses of an exothermal reaction reveal the transition from pulse propagation to a homogeneous hot regime, established regimes with periodic variations of the pulse velocity, and oscillatory decay of the pulse. When the medium becomes 'bistable' as a result of the variation in parameters, this factor does not prevent the propagation of pulses, but leads to changes in the pulse structure

  7. Theory of inclusive pionic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Salcedo, L.L.; Strottman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A theory is developed for all the inclusive pion nuclear reactions, quasielastic, single charge exchange, double charge exchange and absorption, around the resonance region. The theory is based on the isobar hole model and makes an expansion in the number of particle-hole excitations. Up to 3p3h for pion absorption and 2p2h for quasielastic or charge exchange, where good convergence is found, are considered. The results obtained with this theory agree remarkably well with experiment for the different reactions and different nuclei in a wide region of energies around resonance

  8. Heavy ion reactions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsson, Bo.

    1977-01-01

    A review on heavy ion experiments at energies >0.1GeV/nucleon is presented. Reaction cross-sections, isotope production cross-sections and pion production in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Some recent models for heavy ion reactions like the abrasion-ablation model, the fireball model and the different shock-wave models are also presented

  9. Enabling Open Innovation: Lessons from Haier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arie Y.Lewin; Liisa V(a)likangas; Jin Chen

    2017-01-01

    Open innovation has become a dominant innovation paradigm.However,the actual adoption of open innovation organizational designs and practices remains elusive,and ongoing examples of large companies practicing open innovation in mature industries or beyond R&D activities are rare.Despite the continuing interest in open innovation and the surging research on the topic,not much is documented about how,in particular,large companies interpret and implement open innovation or develop and sustain an innovation-enabling culture.This paper reports on a study of Haier's adoption of six radical innovations as it implements an open innovation organization over a period of seven years.The study is unique in that the cases reveal how open innovation is enabled by the socially enabling mechanisms developed under Chairman Ruimin Zhang's leadership.These varied enabling mechanisms open the organization to serendipity at every level,from the bottom up to suppliers.Most importantly,the mechanisms imprint and sustain an open innovation culture recognized as important-yet often left unarticulated in terms of how it is practiced-in the prior literature.The paper contributes to and highlights the centrality of socially enabling mechanisms underlying an organization's innovation absorptive capacity.

  10. Student Research in Rocket and Plume-Reaction Kinetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fontijn, Arthur

    1998-01-01

    Semi-empirical configuration interaction (SECI) theory has been extended to predict activation barriers for combustion reactions of boron group halide oxidation reactions, Good agreement with experiments has been obtained...

  11. Fast and calibration free determination of first order reaction kinetics in API synthesis using in-situ ATR-FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehbein, Moritz C; Husmann, Sascha; Lechner, Christian; Kunick, Conrad; Scholl, Stephan

    2018-05-01

    In early stages of drug development only sparse amounts of the key substances are available, which is problematic for the determination of important process data like reaction kinetics. Therefore, it is important to perform experiments as economically as possible, especially in regards to limiting compounds. Here we demonstrate the use of a temperature step experiment enabling the determination of complete reaction kinetics in a single non-isothermal experiment. In contrast to the traditionally used HPLC, the method takes advantage of the high measuring rate and the low amount of labor involved in using in-situ ATR-FTIR to determine time-dependent concentration-equivalent data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanomaterial-Enabled Wearable Sensors for Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Swetha, Puchakayala; Zhu, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Highly sensitive wearable sensors that can be conformably attached to human skin or integrated with textiles to monitor the physiological parameters of human body or the surrounding environment have garnered tremendous interest. Owing to the large surface area and outstanding material properties, nanomaterials are promising building blocks for wearable sensors. Recent advances in the nanomaterial-enabled wearable sensors including temperature, electrophysiological, strain, tactile, electrochemical, and environmental sensors are presented in this review. Integration of multiple sensors for multimodal sensing and integration with other components into wearable systems are summarized. Representative applications of nanomaterial-enabled wearable sensors for healthcare, including continuous health monitoring, daily and sports activity tracking, and multifunctional electronic skin are highlighted. Finally, challenges, opportunities, and future perspectives in the field of nanomaterial-enabled wearable sensors are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The ENABLER - Based on proven NERVA technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, J.M.; Pierce, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    The ENABLER reactor for use in a nuclear thermal propulsion engine uses the technology developed in the NERVA/Rover program, updated to incorporate advances in the technology. Using composite fuel, higher power densities per fuel element, improved radiation resistant control components and the advancements in use of carbon-carbon materials; the ENABLER can provide a specific impulse of 925 seconds, an engine thrust to weight (excluding reactor shield) approaching five, an improved initial mass in low Earth orbit and a consequent reduction in launch costs and logistics problems. This paper describes the 75,000 lbs thrust ENABLER design which is a low cost, low risk approach to meeting tommorrow's space propulsion needs

  14. The ENABLER - Based on proven NERVA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Julie M.; Pierce, Bill L.

    The ENABLER reactor for use in a nuclear thermal propulsion engine uses the technology developed in the NERVA/Rover program, updated to incorporate advances in the technology. Using composite fuel, higher power densities per fuel element, improved radiation resistant control components and the advancements in use of carbon-carbon materials; the ENABLER can provide a specific impulse of 925 seconds, an engine thrust to weight (excluding reactor shield) approaching five, an improved initial mass in low Earth orbit and a consequent reduction in launch costs and logistics problems. This paper describes the 75,000 lbs thrust ENABLER design which is a low cost, low risk approach to meeting tommorrow's space propulsion needs.

  15. Enabling Routes as Context in Mobile Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brilingaite, Agne; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Zokaite, Nora

    2004-01-01

    With the continuing advances in wireless communications, geo-positioning, and portable electronics, an infrastructure is emerging that enables the delivery of on-line, location-enabled services to very large numbers of mobile users. A typical usage situation for mobile services is one characterized...... by a small screen and no keyboard, and by the service being only a secondary focus of the user. It is therefore particularly important to deliver the "right" information and service at the right time, with as little user interaction as possible. This may be achieved by making services context aware.Mobile...

  16. Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Tengborn, E

    Research on the structure of exotic nuclei is one of the most intriguing topics in present day nuclear physics. With the use of facilities for isotope separation on-line, such as ISOLDE at CERN, short-lived isotopes can be studied experimentally. Since 2002, the REX-ISOLDE facility enables radioactive ions produced by ISOLDE to be post-accelerated, increasing the energy of the ions enough to do nuclear transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. In this thesis, transfer reactions are used to study the structure of neutron-rich lithium isotopes through a series of experiments at REX-ISOLDE. The first experiment used a 9Li beam at 2.36 MeV/u impinging on a deuterated polyethylene target to study 10Li, 9Li and 8Li. For the (d,p)-channel the resonance ground state and a first excited state are observed and the results agree with theoretical calculations. The elastic channel agrees with Optical Model, OM, calculations. For the (d,t)-channel the shape of the angular distribution agrees with Distorted Wave Born Approx...

  17. Federated and Cloud Enabled Resources for Data Management and Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, R.; Gordon, M.; Potter, R. G.; Satchwill, B.

    2011-12-01

    The emergence of cloud computing over the past three years has led to a paradigm shift in how data can be managed, processed and made accessible. Building on the federated data management system offered through the Canadian Space Science Data Portal (www.cssdp.ca), we demonstrate how heterogeneous and geographically distributed data sets and modeling tools have been integrated to form a virtual data center and computational modeling platform that has services for data processing and visualization embedded within it. We also discuss positive and negative experiences in utilizing Eucalyptus and OpenStack cloud applications, and job scheduling facilitated by Condor and Star Cluster. We summarize our findings by demonstrating use of these technologies in the Cloud Enabled Space Weather Data Assimilation and Modeling Platform CESWP (www.ceswp.ca), which is funded through Canarie's (canarie.ca) Network Enabled Platforms program in Canada.

  18. Encouraging engagement in enabling programs: The students’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzi Hellmundt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Student retention is a key concern in tertiary education enabling programs with research showing that early engagement leads to higher completion rates (Hodges et al., 2013. But how do students new to university education learn how to engage effectively? This article outlines an engagement framework that foregrounds Guidance, Encouragement, Modelling and Structure (GEMS as a holistic approach to facilitating effective student engagement. This framework was developed from qualitative data gleaned from students enrolled in the Preparing for Success Program at Southern Cross University, New South Wales, Australia. The findings from the students indicate that the GEMS framework activates student potential and enables them to use existing knowledge and experience to not only deepen and broaden their learning but also successfully prepare for further study.

  19. GNSS CORS hardware and software enabling new science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, P.

    2009-12-01

    GNSS CORS networks are enabling new opportunities for science and public and private sector business. This paper will explore how the newest geodetic monitoring software and GNSS receiver hardware from Trimble Navigation Ltd are enabling new science. Technology trends and science opportunities will be explored. These trends include the installation of active GNSS control, automation of observations and processing, and the advantages of multi-observable and multi-constellation observations, all performed with the use of off the shelf products and industry standard open-source data formats. Also the possibilities with moving science from an after-the-fact postprocessed model to a real-time epoch-by-epoch solution will be explored. This presentation will also discuss the combination of existing GNSS CORS networks with project specific installations used for monitoring. Experience is showing GNSS is able to provide higher resolution data than previous methods, providing new tools for science, decision makers and financial planners.

  20. Deep eutectic solvents as performance additives in biphasic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lan, Dongming; Wang, Xuping; Zhou, Pengfei; Hollmann, F.; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents act as surfactants in biphasic (hydrophobic/aqueous) reaction mixtures enabling higher interfacial surface areas at lower mechanical stress as compared to simple emulsions. Exploiting this effect the rate of a chemoenzymatic epoxidation reaction was increased more than

  1. Fused-Ring Formation by an Intramolecular "Cut-and-Sew" Reaction between Cyclobutanones and Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lin; Jin, Likun; Dong, Guangbin

    2018-03-01

    The development of a catalytic intramolecular "cut-and-sew" transformation between cyclobutanones and alkynes to construct cyclohexenone-fused rings is described herein. The challenge arises from the need for selective coupling at the more sterically hindered proximal position, and can be addressed by using an electron-rich, but less bulky, phosphine ligand. The control experiment and 13 C-labelling study suggest that the reaction may start with cleavage of the less hindered distal C-C bond of cyclobutanones, followed by decarbonylation and CO reinsertion to enable Rh insertion at the more hindered proximal position. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Memory Reactivation Enables Long-Term Prevention of Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herszage, Jasmine; Censor, Nitzan

    2017-05-22

    The ability of the human brain to successively learn or perform two competing tasks constitutes a major challenge in daily function. Indeed, exposing the brain to two different competing memories within a short temporal offset can induce interference, resulting in deteriorated performance in at least one of the learned memories [1-4]. Although previous studies have investigated online interference and its effects on performance [5-13], whether the human brain can enable long-term prevention of future interference is unknown. To address this question, we utilized the memory reactivation-reconsolidation framework [2, 12] stemming from studies at the synaptic level [14-17], according to which reactivation of a memory enables its update. In a set of experiments, using the motor sequence learning task [18] we report that a unique pairing of reactivating the original memory (right hand) in synchrony with novel memory trials (left hand) prevented future interference between the two memories. Strikingly, these effects were long-term and observed a month following reactivation. Further experiments showed that preventing future interference was not due to practice per se, but rather specifically depended on a limited time window induced by reactivation of the original memory. These results suggest a mechanism according to which memory reactivation enables long-term prevention of interference, possibly by creating an updated memory trace integrating original and novel memories during the reconsolidation time window. The opportunity to induce a long-term preventive effect on memories may enable the utilization of strategies optimizing normal human learning, as well as recovery following neurological insults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanotechnologv Enabled Biological and Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an enabling technology that will impact almost all economic sectors: one of the most important and with great potential is the health/medical sector. - Nanomaterials for drug delivery - Early warning sensors - Implantable devices - Artificial parts with improved characteristics Carbon nanotubes and nanofibers show promise for use in sensor development, electrodes and other biomedical applications.

  4. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  5. Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business Environment in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The prospect of indefinite Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories, and their extreme dependence on foreign assistance and Israeli-controlled customs revenues, had led to the conclusion that the Palestinian ...

  6. Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business Environment in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The prospect of indefinite Israeli occupation of the ... Impact of implementing the Palestinian banking law on the performance of the private sector [Arabic language]. Documents. Impact of the commercial agents law ...

  7. Enabling DRM-preserving Digital content Redistribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnan Nair, S.; Popescu, B.C.; Gamage, C.D.; Crispo, B.; Tanenbaum, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, the process of online digital content distribution has involved a limited number of centralised distributors selling protected contents and licenses authorising the use of the se contents, to consumers. In this paper, we extend this model by introducing a security scheme that enables

  8. Enablements and constraints to school leadership practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are many schools in developing countries which, despite the challenges they face, defy the odds and continue to perform at exceptionally high levels. We cast our gaze on one of these resilient schools in South Africa, and sought to learn about the leadership practices prevalent in this school and the enablements and ...

  9. Sustainable Venture Capital Investments: An Enabler Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Antarciuc

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Investing in sustainable projects can help tackle the current sustainability challenges. Venture capital investments can contribute significantly to the growth of sustainable start-ups. Sustainable venture capital (SVC research is just emerging. This paper identifies enablers for sustainable venture capital investments in Saudi Arabia taking into account different stakeholders and firm’s tangible and intangible resources. Using perspectives from venture capital experts in Saudi Arabia and the grey-based Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL method, this study pinpoints the most critical enablers and investigates their causal and effect interconnections. The methodological process consists of reviewing the SVC literature and consulting the experts to identify the SVC enablers, creating a questionnaire, acquiring the answers from four experts, analyzing the data with grey-based DEMATEL and performing a sensitivity analysis. The government use of international standards, policies and regulations for sustainable investments, the commitment of the venture capitalists to sustainability and their deep understanding of sustainable business models are the most influential enablers. The paper concludes with implications for different actors, limitations and prospective directions for the sustainable venture capital research.

  10. 75 FR 13235 - IP-Enabled Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 63 [WC Docket No. 04-36; FCC 09-40] IP-Enabled Services AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission ACTION: Final rule; announcement of effective date... Internet Protocol (VoIP) service the discontinuance obligations that apply to domestic non-dominant...

  11. Extreme Networks' 10-Gigabit Ethernet enables

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    " Extreme Networks, Inc.'s 10-Gigabit switching platform enabled researchers to transfer one Terabyte of information from Vancouver to Geneva across a single network hop, the world's first large-scale, end-to-end transfer of its kind" (1/2 page).

  12. Treatment and Managing Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of reactions. Learn more here. Milk Egg Peanut Tree Nuts Soy Wheat Fish Shellfish Sesame Other Food ... a severe reaction. Consider wearing an emergency medical identification (e.g., bracelet, other jewelry). What to Read ...

  13. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  14. Preequilibrium Nuclear Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1988-01-01

    After a survey on existing experimental data on precompound reactions and a description of preequilibrium reactions, theoretical models and quantum mechanical theories of preequilibrium emission are presented. The 25 papers of this meeting are analyzed separately

  15. Managing Your Emotional Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Managing Your Emotional Reactions KidsHealth / For Teens / Managing Your Emotional Reactions ... Think about what you might do next time. Emotions 101 The skills we use to manage our ...

  16. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    array (CLARA), extensive investigations of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics have been carried out. In the present paper aspects of these studies will be presented, focussing more closely on the reaction mechanism, in particular on the ...

  17. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  18. Thermonuclear reaction rates. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Fowler, W.A.; Caughlan, G.R.; Zimmerman, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar thermonuclear reaction rates are revised and updated, adding a number of new important reaction rates. Several reactions with large negative Q-values are included, and examples of them are discussed. The importance of the decay rates for Mg-26(p,n) exp 26 Al and Al-26(n,p) exp 26 Mg for stellar studies is emphasized. 19 references

  19. Maillard Reaction: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia d'Almeida Francisquini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is an important subject of study in food science and technology and different areas of knowledge are involved such as chemistry, food engineering, nutrition and food technology. The objective of this paper is to present the basic concepts of the Maillard reaction, such as the reaction stages, the main compounds producced and some technological consequences for dairy products.

  20. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  1. Gas phase reactions of organic iodine in containment conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkalae, T.; Holm, J.; Auvinen, A.; Zilliacus, R.; Kajolinna, T.; Tapper, U.; Gaenneskog, H.; Ekberg, C.

    2010-01-01

    In case of a hypothetical severe accident it is very likely that iodine at least partly deposits on painted walls of a reactor containment building. Iodine may react with painted surfaces to form organic iodine species. These organic species are a possible source of volatile iodine, which may increase the fraction of releasable iodine. Therefore, it is important to study the transport of organic iodine in containment conditions. Another question is, in which form are the organic iodides transported as gaseous molecules or as aerosol particles resulting from organic iodides reacting with radiolysis products. To answer this last question methyl iodide was fed into the EXSI facility in an air mixture. In some experiments the flow contained also humidity. The reactions took place in a quartz tube heated either to 50 deg. C, 90 deg. C or 120 deg. C. UV-light was used as a source of radiation to produce ozone from oxygen. A separate generator was also applied to reach higher ozone concentrations. Nucleated aerosol particles were collected on plane filters and gaseous iodine species were trapped in trapping bottles. Aerosol mass flow rate and size distribution as well as speciation of gaseous reaction products were measured with several on-line instruments. Collected aerosol particles were analysed with SEM. It was found that the formation of aerosol particles was very fast when ozone and methyl iodide were present in the facility. Even a very low concentration of ozone produced high number concentration of particles. The measured aerosol mass concentration increased with increasing temperature and ozone concentration. Because the particle diameter was quite small (<180 nm), their settling velocity is low. Therefore, iodine containing aerosols may exist in containment atmosphere for a long period of time. Part of methyl iodide was always transported through the facility regardless of experimental conditions. All ozone was consumed in the reactions when only UV-light was

  2. Transfer and breakup reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1986-04-01

    The origin of the quasi-elastic peak in peripheral heavy-ion reactions is discussed in terms of inelastic scattering and transfer reactions to unbound states of the primary projectile-like fragment. The situation is analogous to the use of reverse kinematics in fusion reactions, a technique in which the object of study is moving with nearly the beam velocity. It appears that several important features of the quasi-elastic peak may be explained by this approach. Projectile-breakup reactions have attractive features for the study of nuclear structure. They may also be used to determine the partition of excitation energy in peripheral reactions. At intermediate energies, neutron-pickup reactions leading to four-body final states become important. Examples of experiments are presented that illustrate these points. 15 refs., 14 figs

  3. Measurement of inertial confinement fusion reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoshi; Wang Feng; Tang Daorun; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Liu Yonggang; Xu Tao; Chen Ming; Mei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Fusion reaction rate is an important parameter for measuring compression during the implosion in inertial confinement fusion experiment. We have developed a system for fusion reaction history measurement with high temporal resolution. The system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, optical system and streak camera. We have applied this system on the SG-III prototype for fusion reaction rate measuring. For the first time, fusion reaction rate history have been measured for deuterium-tritium filled targets with neutrons yields about 10 10 . We have analyzed possible influence factor during fusion reaction rate measuring. It indicates that the instrument measures fusion reaction bang time at temporal resolutions as low as 30 ps.(authors)

  4. The efficiency of driving chemical reactions by a physical non-equilibrium is kinetically controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göppel, Tobias; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-07-27

    An out-of-equilibrium physical environment can drive chemical reactions into thermodynamically unfavorable regimes. Under prebiotic conditions such a coupling between physical and chemical non-equilibria may have enabled the spontaneous emergence of primitive evolutionary processes. Here, we study the coupling efficiency within a theoretical model that is inspired by recent laboratory experiments, but focuses on generic effects arising whenever reactant and product molecules have different transport coefficients in a flow-through system. In our model, the physical non-equilibrium is represented by a drift-diffusion process, which is a valid coarse-grained description for the interplay between thermophoresis and convection, as well as for many other molecular transport processes. As a simple chemical reaction, we consider a reversible dimerization process, which is coupled to the transport process by different drift velocities for monomers and dimers. Within this minimal model, the coupling efficiency between the non-equilibrium transport process and the chemical reaction can be analyzed in all parameter regimes. The analysis shows that the efficiency depends strongly on the Damköhler number, a parameter that measures the relative timescales associated with the transport and reaction kinetics. Our model and results will be useful for a better understanding of the conditions for which non-equilibrium environments can provide a significant driving force for chemical reactions in a prebiotic setting.

  5. On the Effect of Microwave Energy on Lipase-Catalyzed Polycondensation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Pellis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microwave energy (MWe is, nowadays, widely used as a clean synthesis tool to improve several chemical reactions, such as drug molecule synthesis, carbohydrate conversion and biomass pyrolysis. On the other hand, its exploitation in enzymatic reactions has only been fleetingly investigated and, hence, further study of MWe is required to reach a precise understanding of its potential in this field. Starting from the authors’ experience in clean synthesis and biocatalyzed reactions, this study sheds light on the possibility of using MWe for enhancing enzyme-catalyzed polycondensation reactions and pre-polymer formation. Several systems and set ups were investigated involving bulk and organic media (solution phase reactions, different enzymatic preparations and various starting bio-based monomers. Results show that MWe enables the biocatalyzed synthesis of polyesters and pre-polymers in a similar way to that reported using conventional heating with an oil bath, but in a few cases, notably bulk phase polycondensations under intense microwave irradiation, MWe leads to a rapid enzyme deactivation.

  6. Enabling ICU patients to die at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Emma; Bates, Lucy; Liderth, Emma; Jones, Samantha; Sheen, Sheryl; Ginty, Andrew; Northmore, Melanie

    2014-10-07

    There is often an overlap between intensive care medicine and palliative medicine. When all curative treatment options have been explored, keeping the patient comfortable and free from pain is the main concern for healthcare practitioners. Patient autonomy in end of life decisions has not been encouraged in the intensive care unit (ICU), until now, because of its specialised and technical nature. Staff at the Royal Bolton Hospital have broken down the barriers to enabling ICU patients to die in their own homes, and have developed a system of collaborative working that can help to fulfil a patient's final wish to go home. This article describes how ICU staff developed a process that enabled two ventilated patients to be transferred home for end of life care.

  7. Femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty for advanced keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yathish Shivanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To assess the efficacy and advantages of femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty (FLEK over conventional penetrating keratoplasty (PKP in advanced keratoconus. Materials and Methods: Detailed review of literature of published randomized controlled trials of operative techniques in PKP and FLEK. Results: Fifteen studies were identified, analyzed, and compared with our outcome. FLEK was found to have better outcome in view of better and earlier stabilization uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, and better refractive outcomes with low astigmatism as compared with conventional PKP. Wound healing also was noticed to be earlier, enabling early suture removal in FLEK. Conclusions: Studies relating to FLEK have shown better results than conventional PKP, however further studies are needed to assess the safety and intraoperative complications of the procedure.

  8. Enablers & Barriers for Realizing Modularity Benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storbjerg, Simon Haahr; Brunø, Thomas Ditlev; Thyssen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    far less attention compared to the theories and methods concerning modularization of technical systems. Harvesting the full potential of modularization, particularly in relation to product development agility, depends on more than an optimal architecture. Key enablers in this context......Although modularization is becoming both a well-described domain in academia and a broadly applied concept in business, many of today’s firm still struggle to realize the promised benefits of this approach. Managing modularization is a complex matter, and in spite of this, a topic that has received...... are the organizational and systems related aspects. Recognizing the need for guidance to realize the benefits of modularity, the purpose of this study is through a literature study and a case study to improve the insight into the organizational and systems related enablers and barriers with regard to obtaining the full...

  9. NASP - Enabling new space launch options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froning, David; Gaubatz, William; Mathews, George

    1990-10-01

    Successful NASP developments in the United States are bringing about the possibility of effective, fully reusable vehicles for transport of people and cargo between earth and space. These developments include: extension of airbreathing propulsion to a much higher speed; densification of propellants for greater energy per unit volume of mass; structures with much greater strength-to-weight at high temperatures; computational advancements that enable more optimal design and integration of airframes, engines and controls; and advances in avionics, robotics, artificial intelligence and automation that enable accomplishment of earth-to-orbit (ETO) operations with much less manpower support and cost. This paper describes the relative magnitude of improvement that these developments may provide.

  10. Enabling Sustainable Improvement in IT Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Renaud

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Firms must embrace processes that enable the information technology (IT function to become a strategic partner to the business functions it serves. Process ambidexterity is a way for processes to be augmented to improve alignment and adaptability to new markets and technologies. By applying the principles of process ambidexterity, the key elements required for sustainable change within the capabilities that comprise the IT function of the firm are identified. Furthermore, the scope and depth of the dysfunction that is widespread across large firms that depend upon IT are outlined to provide a contextual basis for presenting a solution framework to address sustainable change. This framework for sustainable change is of primary benefit to IT executives seeking to systematically transform the IT function and enable IT entrepreneurship.

  11. The reactions K-p→Λπ0, Λeta, Λeta' at 4.2 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzano, F.; Hemingway, R.J.; Loverre, P.F.; Marechal, B.; Schrempp, B.; Blokzijl, R.; Hoogland, W.; Kluyver, J.C.; Massaro, G.G.G.; Tiecke, H.G.; Walle, R.T. van de; Vergeest, J.S.M.

    1977-01-01

    In a high statistics CERN 2 m bubble chamber experiment the differential cross sections and polarizations of the Λ for the reactions K - p→Λπ 0 , Λeta, Λeta' at 4.2 GeV/c have been measured. The reaction K - p→Λeta exhibits a pronounced dip around -t approximately 0.5 (GeV/c) 2 and all three reactions show a significant backward peaking (-u 2 ). The Λ polarization in the reaction K - p→Λπ 0 is measured to be significantly different from zero throughout most of the available t-range. Forward cross sections enable a determination of Rsub(T), the ratio of singlet/octet coupling eta 1 KK**/eta 8 KK**. Backward cross sections are utilized to estimate the effective eta-nucleon coupling constant gsub(etaNN) 2 over the -u range 0-1.5 (GeV/c) 2 . (Auth.)

  12. Ethics case reflection sessions: Enablers and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Molewijk, Bert; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2018-03-01

    In previous research on ethics case reflection (ECR) sessions about specific cases, healthcare professionals in childhood cancer care were clarifying their perspectives on the ethical issue to resolve their main concern of consolidating care. When perspectives were clarified, consequences in the team included 'increased understanding', 'group strengthening' and 'decision grounding'. Additional analysis of the data was needed on conditions that could contribute to the quality of ECR sessions. The aim of this study was to explore conditions for clarifying perspectives during ECR sessions. Data were collected from observations and interviews and the results emerged from an inductive analysis using grounded theory. Participants and research context: Six observations during ECR sessions and 10 interviews were performed with healthcare professionals working in childhood cancer care and advanced paediatric homecare. Ethical considerations: The study was approved by a regional ethical review board. Participants were informed about their voluntary involvement and that they could withdraw their participation without explaining why. Two categories emerged: organizational enablers and barriers and team-related enablers and barriers. Organizational enablers and barriers included the following sub-categories: the timing of the ECR session, the structure during the ECR session and the climate during the ECR session. Sub-categories to team-related enablers and barriers were identified as space for inter-professional perspectives, varying levels of ethical skills and space for the patient's and the family's perspectives. Space for inter-professional perspectives included the dominance of a particular perspective that can result from hierarchical positions. The medical perspective is relevant for understanding the child's situation but should not dominate the ethical reflection. Conditions for ECR sessions have been explored and the new knowledge can be used when training

  13. Contextual Interaction Design Research: Enabling HCI

    OpenAIRE

    Murer , Martin; Meschtscherjakov , Alexander; Fuchsberger , Verena; Giuliani , Manuel; Neureiter , Katja; Moser , Christiane; Aslan , Ilhan; Tscheligi , Manfred

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) has always been about humans, their needs and desires. Contemporary HCI thinking investigates interactions in everyday life and puts an emphasis on the emotional and experiential qualities of interactions. At the Center for Human-Computer Interaction we seek to bridge meandering strands in the field by following a guiding metaphor that shifts focus to what has always been the core quality of our research field: Enabling HCI, as a leitmo...

  14. Naval Science & Technology: Enabling the Future Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    corn for disruptive technologies Laser Cooling Spintronics Bz 1st U.S. Intel satellite GRAB Semiconductors GaAs, GaN, SiC GPS...Payoff • Innovative and game-changing • Approved by Corporate Board • Delivers prototype Innovative Naval Prototypes (5-10 Year) Disruptive ... Technologies Free Electron Laser Integrated Topside EM Railgun Sea Base Enablers Tactical Satellite Large Displacement UUV AACUS Directed

  15. Self-optimisation and model-based design of experiments for developing a C–H activation flow process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Echtermeyer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A recently described C(sp3–H activation reaction to synthesise aziridines was used as a model reaction to demonstrate the methodology of developing a process model using model-based design of experiments (MBDoE and self-optimisation approaches in flow. The two approaches are compared in terms of experimental efficiency. The self-optimisation approach required the least number of experiments to reach the specified objectives of cost and product yield, whereas the MBDoE approach enabled a rapid generation of a process model.

  16. MicroRNA-671-3p inhibits the development of breast cancer: A study based on in vitro experiments, in-house quantitative polymerase chain reaction and bioinformatics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Quan; Lan, Ai-Hua; Zhong, Jin-Cai; Chen, Gang; Feng, Zhen-Bo; Wei, Kang-Lai

    2018-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are highly conserved small noncoding RNA molecules involved in gene regulation. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that miRNAs act as oncogenes or antioncogenes in various types of cancer, including breast cancer (BC). However, the exact role of miR-671-3p in BC has not yet been reported. In the present study, in vitro experiments were implemented to explore the effects of miR-671-3p on the proliferation and apoptosis of BC cells, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was conducted using in-house clinical BC samples to address the expression level and clinical value of miR-671-3p in BC. Simultaneously, miR-671-3p target genes were collected, and subsequent bioinformatics analyses were executed to probe the potential signaling pathway through which miR-671-3p influenced the occurrence and progression of BC. According to the results, the expression level of miR-671-3p was lower in BC tissues compared with that in adjacent non-tumorous tissues (P=0.048), and the area under the curve was 0.697 (95% confidence interval=0.538-0.856), with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.818 and 0.579, respectively. Forced miR-671-3p expression in the BC cell line MDA-MB-231 evidently arrested cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, in silico enrichment analyses suggested that miR-671-3p may be involved in the initiation and progression of BC through the targeting of genes associated with the Wnt signaling pathway. In conclusion, the present study findings suggested that miR-671-3p may function as a tumor suppressor in BC by influencing the Wnt signaling cascade, which provides a prospective molecular target for the therapy of BC. PMID:29620195

  17. Insights into the mechanisms on chemical reactions: reaction paths for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Rosen, E.; Eades, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report reaction paths for two prototypical chemical reactions: Li + HF, an electron transfer reaction, and OH + H 2 , an abstraction reaction. In the first reaction we consider the connection between the energetic terms in the reaction path Hamiltonian and the electronic changes which occur upon reaction. In the second reaction we consider the treatment of vibrational effects in chemical reactions in the reaction path formalism. 30 refs., 9 figs

  18. Reaction rate of propene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peipei; Su, Kehe; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2011-10-01

    The reaction rate of propene pyrolysis was investigated based on the elementary reactions proposed in Qu et al., J Comput Chem 2009, 31, 1421. The overall reaction rate was developed with the steady-state approximation and the rate constants of the elementary reactions were determined with the variational transition state theory. For the elementary reaction having transition state, the vibrational frequencies of the selected points along the minimum energy path were calculated with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level and the energies were improved with the accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2). For the elementary reaction without transition state, the frequencies were calculated with CASSCF/6-311G(d,p) and the energies were refined with the multireference configuration interaction method MRCISD/6-311G(d,p). The rate constants were evaluated within 200-2000 K and the fitted three-parameter expressions were obtained. The results are consistent with those in the literatures in most cases. For the overall rate, it was found that the logarithm of the rate and the reciprocal temperature have excellent linear relationship above 400 K, predicting that the rate follows a typical first-order law at high temperatures of 800-2000 K, which is also consistent with the experiments. The apparent activation energy in 800-2000 K is 317.3 kJ/mol from the potential energy surface of zero Kelvin. This value is comparable with the energy barriers, 365.4 and 403.7 kJ/mol, of the rate control steps. However, the apparent activation energy, 215.7 kJ/mol, developed with the Gibbs free energy surface at 1200 K is consistent with the most recent experimental result 201.9 ± 0.6 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Web-enabling technologies for the factory floor: a web-enabling strategy for emanufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Ricardo; Lastra, Jose L. M.; Tuokko, Reijo O.

    2001-10-01

    This paper is intended to address the different technologies available for Web-enabling of the factory floor. It will give an overview of the importance of Web-enabling of the factory floor, in the application of the concepts of flexible and intelligent manufacturing, in conjunction with e-commerce. As a last section, it will try to define a Web-enabling strategy for the application in eManufacturing. This is made under the scope of the electronics manufacturing industry, so every application, technology or related matter is presented under such scope.

  20. Microdosimetric concepts for indirect radiation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlit, W.

    1976-01-01

    It is the aim of microdosimetric models to get information about the influence of microscopic energy deposition by radiation on radiation reactions. Two parameters are always of interest: the energy necessary to produce a certain reaction and the volume in which this energy has to be desposited. In the simple case of an aqueous solution with point targets a complete description of radiation reactions in targets with various concentrations can be given. This model takes into consideration the distinct energy deposition on the particle track, diffusion of radicals and a mean energy necessary for a certain reaction at the target. Typical dose effect curves are obtained which allow the determination of all these quantities from experiments. The model has been tested with the oxydation of iron atoms in aqueous solutions and has been applied for more complex targets such as different alcohols and amino acids. The oxygen consumption in these reactions is used as an easy method for continuous measurement of these indirect reactions. It is the aim of such experiments to get enough quantitative microscopic data on indirect radiation reactions that these reactions can also be followed in living cells

  1. Automated Planning Enables Complex Protocols on Liquid-Handling Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Ellis; Rudolf, Fabian; Kaltenbach, Hans-Michael; Stelling, Jörg

    2018-03-16

    Robotic automation in synthetic biology is especially relevant for liquid handling to facilitate complex experiments. However, research tasks that are not highly standardized are still rarely automated in practice. Two main reasons for this are the substantial investments required to translate molecular biological protocols into robot programs, and the fact that the resulting programs are often too specific to be easily reused and shared. Recent developments of standardized protocols and dedicated programming languages for liquid-handling operations addressed some aspects of ease-of-use and portability of protocols. However, either they focus on simplicity, at the expense of enabling complex protocols, or they entail detailed programming, with corresponding skills and efforts required from the users. To reconcile these trade-offs, we developed Roboliq, a software system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) methods to integrate (i) generic formal, yet intuitive, protocol descriptions, (ii) complete, but usually hidden, programming capabilities, and (iii) user-system interactions to automatically generate executable, optimized robot programs. Roboliq also enables high-level specifications of complex tasks with conditional execution. To demonstrate the system's benefits for experiments that are difficult to perform manually because of their complexity, duration, or time-critical nature, we present three proof-of-principle applications for the reproducible, quantitative characterization of GFP variants.

  2. Reactions to threatening health messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hoor, Gill A; Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Kalagi, Janice; de Groot, Lianne; Grootjans, Karlijne; Huschens, Alexander; Köhninger, Constanze; Kölgen, Lizan; Pelssers, Isabelle; Schütt, Toby; Thomas, Sophia; Ruiter, Robert A C; Kok, Gerjo

    2012-11-21

    Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness) may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93). Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72). Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal.

  3. STUDIES ON ENDOTHELIAL REACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Nathan Chandler

    1923-01-01

    operative. On the other hand, there may be an increase in the phagocytic activity of the endothelium of the sinusoids which might take up more bacteria under these changed conditions. Several investigators have claimed, recently, that there is an increased activity of the liver endothelium following splenectomy, their experiments being directed chiefly toward determining the fate of the erythrocytes. Pearce (1918) in reporting the effects of experimental splenectomy in dogs, states that there are definite compensatory changes in the lymph nodes, in the form of an increased proliferation of endothelial phagocytes, and that the stellate cells of the liver sinusoids often show a similar compensatory increase in number. In both cases the cells are, apparently, formed in situ rather than transported to the organs. He says: ‘Such findings suggest the development of a compensatory function on the part of the lymph-nodes and possibly the liver,’ and suggests that, in times of stress ‘the stellate cells of the liver thus assume, in part at least, the function of destroying red blood-corpuscles by phagocytosis.’ Incidentally, he presents an excellent discussion of the history and subject of splenectomy. Motohashi (1922) reports a great increase in the hemophagic power of the hepatic endothelium and an increase in the number of endothelial elements, after some 45 days following splenectomy in rabbits. Nishikawa and Takagi (1922) have observed similar phenomena with white rats, the Kupffer cells taking up erythrocytes in large numbers in splenectomized animals, whereas controls never show similar propensities on the part of these cells. It may be that different substances cause different reactions on the part of the hepatic endothelium. Contributory Experiment.—A side experiment was performed with five rabbits, two splenectomized and three controls, into which uniform doses of pneumococci were injected intravenously. They all died of septicemia after a few days. The results

  4. Identifying enabling management practices for employee engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Joubert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A currently emerging viewpoint is that today's management practices no longer add value to organisations. The focus of this article is to conduct a systematic review of the scholarly literature on management practices that could be related to employee engagement. Research purpose: This study searched for evidence in support of the notion of a management value chain, and enabling management practices within each value chain component that could relate to employee engagement. Motivation for the study: An alternative management value chain model could contribute towards a better understanding of which management practices may potentially impact employee engagement. Research design, approach, and method: This is a non-empirical (theoretical study, based on a systematic, in-depth literature review to identify the key management components and enabling practices within this proposed management value chain. Scholarly research databases were sourced for relevant peer reviewed research conducted since 1990, not excluding important contributions prior to 1990. The literature was systematically searched, selected, studied, and contextualized within this study. Main findings: Support was found for the notion of a management value chain, for enabling management practices within each proposed management value chain component, and it was also established these management practices indeed have an impact on employee engagement. Practical/managerial/implications: The possibility that management work can be presented as a generic management value chain allows managers to approach engaging management practices more systematically. Contribution/value-add: This study highlights the importance of some management practices that have never been seen as part of management work.

  5. A wireless sensor enabled by wireless power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hong; Lin, Chii-Ruey

    2012-11-22

    Through harvesting energy by wireless charging and delivering data by wireless communication, this study proposes the concept of a wireless sensor enabled by wireless power (WPWS) and reports the fabrication of a prototype for functional tests. One WPWS node consists of wireless power module and sensor module with different chip-type sensors. Its main feature is the dual antenna structure. Following RFID system architecture, a power harvesting antenna was designed to gather power from a standard reader working in the 915 MHz band. Referring to the Modbus protocol, the other wireless communication antenna was integrated on a node to send sensor data in parallel. The dual antenna structure integrates both the advantages of an RFID system and a wireless sensor. Using a standard UHF RFID reader, WPWS can be enabled in a distributed area with a diameter up to 4 m. Working status is similar to that of a passive tag, except that a tag can only be queried statically, while the WPWS can send dynamic data from the sensors. The function is the same as a wireless sensor node. Different WPWSs equipped with temperature and humidity, optical and airflow velocity sensors are tested in this study. All sensors can send back detection data within 8 s. The accuracy is within 8% deviation compared with laboratory equipment. A wireless sensor network enabled by wireless power should be a totally wireless sensor network using WPWS. However, distributed WPWSs only can form a star topology, the simplest topology for constructing a sensor network. Because of shielding effects, it is difficult to apply other complex topologies. Despite this limitation, WPWS still can be used to extend sensor network applications in hazardous environments. Further research is needed to improve WPWS to realize a totally wireless sensor network.

  6. Stability of reaction fronts in random walk simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagy, Noemi; Izsak, F.

    A model of propagating reaction fronts is given for simple autocatalytic reactions and the stability of the propagating reaction fronts are studied in several numerical experiments. The corresponding random walk simulations - extending of a recent algorithm - make possible the simultaneous treatment

  7. Thermodynamic theory of dislocation-enabled plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    The thermodynamic theory of dislocation-enabled plasticity is based on two unconventional hypotheses. The first of these is that a system of dislocations, driven by external forces and irreversibly exchanging heat with its environment, must be characterized by a thermodynamically defined effective temperature that is not the same as the ordinary temperature. The second hypothesis is that the overwhelmingly dominant mechanism controlling plastic deformation is thermally activated depinning of entangled pairs of dislocations. This paper consists of a systematic reformulation of this theory followed by examples of its use in analyses of experimentally observed phenomena including strain hardening, grain-size (Hall-Petch) effects, yielding transitions, and adiabatic shear banding.

  8. Enabling Rapid Naval Architecture Design Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael A.; Dufresne, Stephane; Balestrini-Robinson, Santiago; Mavris, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Well accepted conceptual ship design tools can be used to explore a design space, but more precise results can be found using detailed models in full-feature computer aided design programs. However, defining a detailed model can be a time intensive task and hence there is an incentive for time sensitive projects to use conceptual design tools to explore the design space. In this project, the combination of advanced aerospace systems design methods and an accepted conceptual design tool facilitates the creation of a tool that enables the user to not only visualize ship geometry but also determine design feasibility and estimate the performance of a design.

  9. PHM Enabled Autonomous Propellant Loading Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark; Figueroa, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The utility of Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) software capability applied to Autonomous Operations (AO) remains an active research area within aerospace applications. The ability to gain insight into which assets and subsystems are functioning properly, along with the derivation of confident predictions concerning future ability, reliability, and availability, are important enablers for making sound mission planning decisions. When coupled with software that fully supports mission planning and execution, an integrated solution can be developed that leverages state assessment and estimation for the purposes of delivering autonomous operations. The authors have been applying this integrated, model-based approach to the autonomous loading of cryogenic spacecraft propellants at Kennedy Space Center.

  10. Camera-enabled techniques for organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven V. Ley

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A great deal of time is spent within synthetic chemistry laboratories on non-value-adding activities such as sample preparation and work-up operations, and labour intensive activities such as extended periods of continued data collection. Using digital cameras connected to computer vision algorithms, camera-enabled apparatus can perform some of these processes in an automated fashion, allowing skilled chemists to spend their time more productively. In this review we describe recent advances in this field of chemical synthesis and discuss how they will lead to advanced synthesis laboratories of the future.

  11. Blended Learning: enabling Higher Education Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Matheos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning research and practice have been areas of growth for two decades in Canada, with over 95% of Canadian higher education institutions involved in some form of blended learning. Despite strong evidence based research and practice blended learning, for the most part, has remained at sidelined in Canadian universities. The article argues the need for blended learning to situate itself within the timely and crucial Higher Education Reform (HER agenda. By aligning the affordances of blended learning with the components of HER, blended learning can clearly serve as an enabler for HER.

  12. Product Line Enabled Intelligent Mobile Middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Kunz, Thomas; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2007-01-01

    research project called PLIMM that focuses on user-centered application scenarios. PLIMM is designed based on software product line ideas which make it possible for specialized customization and optimization for different purposes and hardware/software platforms. To enable intelligence, the middleware...... needs access to a range of context models. We model these contexts with OWL, focusing on user-centered concepts. The basic building block of PLIMM is the enhanced BDI agent where OWL context ontology logic reasoning will add indirect beliefs to the belief sets. Our approach also addresses the handling...

  13. Framework for Enabling User-Generated Content

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Karin H

    2012-01-01

    User-generated content, UGC, is a modern topic today and refers to media and creative works created by Internet users and posted on the Internet. More and more application developers wants to offer sharing functionalities in their applications and on their websites. The alternatives of doing so today are to use UGC platforms API, like Facebook and Twitter, to upload the content to that specific platform or to implement the framework ShareKit that enables the user to share their content on mul...

  14. Enabling information sharing in a port

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Peter Bjerg; Hvolby, Hans-Henrik; Dukovska-Popovska, Iskra

    2012-01-01

    Ports are integral parts of many supply chains and are as such a contributing factor to the overall efficiency of the supply chain. Ports are also dynamic entities where things changes continuously. The dynamic nature of ports is also a problem when trying to optimise the utilisation of resources...... and ensure a low lead-time. Information sharing is a very important tool to reduce the effect of dynamism. This paper attempts to explain how information sharing is enabled in such an environment, and which considerations are relevant, both in regards to the information and required technology. The paper...

  15. Nanoarchitecture Control Enabled by Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Heather A.; Limmer, Krista R.; Labukas, Joseph P.

    2017-04-01

    Ionic liquids have many advantages over traditional aqueous electrosynthesis for fabrication of functional nanoarchitectures, including enabling the integration of nanoparticles into traditional coatings, superhydrophobicity, nanofoams, and other hierarchical structures. Shape and size control through ionic liquid selection and processing conditions can synthesize nanoparticles and nanoarchitectures without the use of capping agents, surfactants, or templates that are often deleterious to the functionality of the resultant system. Here we give a brief overview of some recent and interesting applications of ionic liquids to the synthesis of nanoparticles and nanoarchitectures.

  16. Principles for enabling deep secondary design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Hansen, Magnus Rotvit Perlt

    2017-01-01

    design by analyzing two cases where secondary designers fundamentally change functionality, content and technology complexity level. The first case redesigns a decision model for agile development in an insurance company; the second creates a contingency model for choosing project management tools...... and techniques in a hospital. Our analysis of the two cases leads to the identification of four principles of design implementation that primary designers can apply to enable secondary design and four corresponding design implementation principles that secondary designers themselves need to apply....

  17. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sobrado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  18. Verification of cold nuclear fusion reaction, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Zenko; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Hirabayashi, Takakuni

    1991-01-01

    Can cold nuclear fusion reaction occur as is expected? If it occurs, what extent is its reaction probability? At present after 2 years elapsed since its beginning, the clear solution of these questions is not yet obtained. In many reaction systems employing different means, the experiments to confirm the cold nuclear fusion reaction have been attempted. In order to confirm that the nuclear fusion reaction of deuterium mutually has occurred, the neutrons, He-3, protons, tritium or generated heat, which were formed by the reaction and released from the system, are measured. Since it is considered that the frequency of the occurrence at normal temperature of the reaction is very low, it is necessary to select the most suitable method upon evaluating the limit of detection peculiar to the measuring methods. The methods of measuring neutrons, protons, gamma ray and generated heat, and the reaction systems by electrolytic process and dry process are explained. The detection of plural kinds of the reaction products and the confirmation of synchronism of signals are important. (K.I.)

  19. Nuclear reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ''hot'' nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ''flow'' measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study 40 Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs

  20. Knock-out reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Forest, T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    It is pointed out that the primary motivation for performing high energy single nucleon knock-out reactions is based on the concept of quasi-elastic scattering. The validity of and corrections to the partial wave impulse approximation and kinematical invariance of knock-out reactions and tests of the reaction mechanism are treated. The effect of distortions on the momentum distribution in the effective momentum approximation for given parameters are plotted. 12 references

  1. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: During last year the physicists of the Department of Nuclear Reactions were involved in many experiments and projects: -Low energy nuclear reactions: For the first time a heavy ion beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron C-200 was used to investigate elastic and inelastic scattering of 12 C ions from 12 C target. The experiment is a part of a long range programme devoted to study the energy dependence of the nucleus-nucleus interactions. -Multifragmentation of relativistic heavy ions: Multifragmentation reactions induced by 12 C on different heavy targets and at different energies were studied in experiments performed at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung by the ALADIN Collaboration. These asymmetric systems were investigated in order to study the interplay between preequilibrium and equilibrium phenomena in the nuclear liquid - gas phase transition. -The structure of nucleons: A novel, two-structure description of the Roper resonance was proposed on the basis of the α-p scattering data reanalysed by means of a T-matrix formalism. -Atomic physics: Emission of the X-rays by fast heavy ions (S, Ti, Fe) as they traverse the matter (thin carbon or other light element foil) was investigated in a series of experiments performed at University of Erlangen. It was demonstrated, that the characteristic K α X-rays emitted by a heavy ion can serve as a tool for Z-value control of the ion. -Material research: Semiconductor heterostructures were investigated by means of Rutherford Back Scattering and Channeling methods using the 2 MeV α particles from the Van de Graaff accelerator ''Lech'' at the Department. The following reports present the results and major successes which were achieved in 1999. (author)

  2. Reaction kinetics of polybutylene terephthalate polycondensation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darda, P. J.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.; Souren, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the forward polycondensation reaction of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PBT - prepolymer with an initial degree of polymerization of 5.5 was used as starting material. The PBT prepolymer was prepared from dimethyl

  3. Thermonuclear reaction listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukai, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    The following 10 elements, including T, are well known as nuclear fusion fuels: p, D, T, 3 He, 4 He, 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, 10 B, 11 B, ( 12 C, 13 C), where 12 C and 13 C are considered only in the calculation of Q value. Accordingly the number of the thermonuclear reactions is 55, and 78, if including carbon elements. The reactions have some branches. For the branches having two and three reaction products, the reaction products, Q value and threshold energy are calculated by using a computer. We have investigated those of the branches having more than three products from the papers of Ajzenberg-Selove and so on. And also, by the same papers, we check whether the above mentioned branch has been observed or not. The results are as follows: (I) the number of reactions which have Q 0 branches only with γ ray production, and Q 0 and neutron production is 36(17), and (IV) that of reactions whose branch with Q > 0 does not produce neutrons is 9(3). The value in the parentheses shows the number of the case of the carbon elements. For 55 thermonuclear reactions induced by lighter nuclides than 11 B, the reaction products, the values of Q and threshold energy, and the papers with reaction cross section data are presented in the tables. (author)

  4. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M Allen [Berkeley, CA; Beeman, Barton V [San Mateo, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Hadley, Dean R [Manteca, CA; Landre, Phoebe [Livermore, CA; Lehew, Stacy L [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter A [Pleasanton, CA

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  5. Tattoo reaction: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tattoo is going to be a very common practice especially among young people and we are witnessing a gradual increase of numerous potential complications to tattoo placement which are often seen by physicians, but generally unknown to the public. The most common skin reactions to tattoo include a transient acute inflammatory reaction due to trauma of the skin with needles and medical complications such as superficial and deep local infections, systemic infections, allergic contact dermatitis, photodermatitis, granulomatous and lichenoid reactions, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area (eczema, psoriasis, lichen, and morphea. In this series we present three cases of tattoo reaction.

  6. Enabling technologies for oil sands development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    A review of oil sands production and expansion possibilities in Alberta were presented. The enabling technologies for oil sands projects include mining (bucketwheels, draglines, trucks, shovels conveyors, slurry hydrotransport); extraction (conditioning tumblers, pipelines, tanks, hot water, caustic, cold water, frothers); froth cleaning (centrifuges, solvent treatment); tailings (tailings ponds, consolidated tailings); and upgrading (coking, hydrotreating for SCO, hydrocracking and multiple products). The enabling technologies for in situ production include cyclic steam stimulation for vertical wells, steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) for dual horizontal wells, and cold production with wormholes. This paper described the recovery potentials of each of these processes. It also discussed the role of government and industry in research and cooperative research involving both the private and public sectors. Examples of each of these were described such as SAGD, the OSLO cold water extraction process, The consolidated tailings (CT) project, the low energy extraction process (slurry production, hydrotransport, pipeline conditioning and warm water extraction), and research in fine tailings, to demonstrate that although objectives may differ, government and industry research objectives are complementary

  7. Directory Enabled Policy Based Networking; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KELIIAA, CURTIS M.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents a discussion of directory-enabled policy-based networking with an emphasis on its role as the foundation for securely scalable enterprise networks. A directory service provides the object-oriented logical environment for interactive cyber-policy implementation. Cyber-policy implementation includes security, network management, operational process and quality of service policies. The leading network-technology vendors have invested in these technologies for secure universal connectivity that transverses Internet, extranet and intranet boundaries. Industry standards are established that provide the fundamental guidelines for directory deployment scalable to global networks. The integration of policy-based networking with directory-service technologies provides for intelligent management of the enterprise network environment as an end-to-end system of related clients, services and resources. This architecture allows logical policies to protect data, manage security and provision critical network services permitting a proactive defense-in-depth cyber-security posture. Enterprise networking imposes the consideration of supporting multiple computing platforms, sites and business-operation models. An industry-standards based approach combined with principled systems engineering in the deployment of these technologies allows these issues to be successfully addressed. This discussion is focused on a directory-based policy architecture for the heterogeneous enterprise network-computing environment and does not propose specific vendor solutions. This document is written to present practical design methodology and provide an understanding of the risks, complexities and most important, the benefits of directory-enabled policy-based networking

  8. The use of coded PCR primers enables high-throughput sequencing of multiple homolog amplification products by 454 parallel sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Binladen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The invention of the Genome Sequence 20 DNA Sequencing System (454 parallel sequencing platform has enabled the rapid and high-volume production of sequence data. Until now, however, individual emulsion PCR (emPCR reactions and subsequent sequencing runs have been unable to combine template DNA from multiple individuals, as homologous sequences cannot be subsequently assigned to their original sources.We use conventional PCR with 5'-nucleotide tagged primers to generate homologous DNA amplification products from multiple specimens, followed by sequencing through the high-throughput Genome Sequence 20 DNA Sequencing System (GS20, Roche/454 Life Sciences. Each DNA sequence is subsequently traced back to its individual source through 5'tag-analysis.We demonstrate that this new approach enables the assignment of virtually all the generated DNA sequences to the correct source once sequencing anomalies are accounted for (miss-assignment rate<0.4%. Therefore, the method enables accurate sequencing and assignment of homologous DNA sequences from multiple sources in single high-throughput GS20 run. We observe a bias in the distribution of the differently tagged primers that is dependent on the 5' nucleotide of the tag. In particular, primers 5' labelled with a cytosine are heavily overrepresented among the final sequences, while those 5' labelled with a thymine are strongly underrepresented. A weaker bias also exists with regards to the distribution of the sequences as sorted by the second nucleotide of the dinucleotide tags. As the results are based on a single GS20 run, the general applicability of the approach requires confirmation. However, our experiments demonstrate that 5'primer tagging is a useful method in which the sequencing power of the GS20 can be applied to PCR-based assays of multiple homologous PCR products. The new approach will be of value to a broad range of research areas, such as those of comparative genomics, complete mitochondrial

  9. Reaction of seawater with fresh mid-ocean ridge gabbro creates ';atypical' REE pattern and high REE fluid fluxes: Experiments at 425 and 475 °C, 400 and 1000 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beermann, O.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Holzheid, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    High-temperature MOR hydrothermalism significantly affects ocean chemistry. The Sisters Peak (SP) hydrothermal field at 5°S on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) emanates fluids >400°C [1] that have high concentrations of H2, transition metals, and rare earth elements (REE) exhibiting ';atypical' REE pattern characterized by depletions of LREE and HREE relative to MREE and no Eu anomaly [2]. This is in contrast to the ';typical' LREE enrichment and strong positive Eu anomaly known from many MOR vent fluids observed world-wide [e.g., 3]. Besides temperature, the seawater-to-rock ratio (w/r ratio) has significant control on the fluid chemistry [e.g., 4, 5]. To understand how vent fluid REE-signatures are generated during water-rock interaction processes we reacted unaltered gabbro with natural bottom seawater at 425 °C and 400 bar and at 425 and 475 °C at 1000 bar at variable w/r (mass) ratios ranging from 0.5-10 by using cold seal pressure vessels (CSPV). The run durations varied from 3-72 h. Reacted fluids were analysed for major and trace elements by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. In our experiments, ';atypical' REE fluid pattern similar to those of SP fluids were obtained at high w/r ratio (5 and 10) that might be characteristic for focused fluid-flow along e.g., detachment faults at slow-spreading MOR [6]. In contrast, more ';typical'-like REE pattern with elevated LREE and slightly positive Eu anomalies have been reproduced at low w/r ratio (0.5-1). Results of numerical simulations imply that strong positive Eu anomalies of fluids and altered gabbro from high temperature MOR hydrothermal systems can be created by intense rock leaching processes at high w/r ratio (5-10). This suggests that hydrothermal circulation through the ocean crust creates ';typical' REE fluid pattern with strong positive Eu anomalies if seawater reacts with gabbroic host rock that has been already leached in REE at high fluid fluxes. Simulations of the temporal chemical evolution of

  10. Cascade enzymatic reactions for efficient carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shunxiang; Zhao, Xueyan; Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin; Zheng, Wenyun; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Thermochemical processes developed for carbon capture and storage (CCS) offer high carbon capture capacities, but are generally hampered by low energy efficiency. Reversible cascade enzyme reactions are examined in this work for energy-efficient carbon sequestration. By integrating the reactions of two key enzymes of RTCA cycle, isocitrate dehydrogenase and aconitase, we demonstrate that intensified carbon capture can be realized through such cascade enzymatic reactions. Experiments show that enhanced thermodynamic driving force for carbon conversion can be attained via pH control under ambient conditions, and that the cascade reactions have the potential to capture 0.5 mol carbon at pH 6 for each mole of substrate applied. Overall it manifests that the carbon capture capacity of biocatalytic reactions, in addition to be energy efficient, can also be ultimately intensified to approach those realized with chemical absorbents such as MEA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-step direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    In recent years a variety of statistical theories has been developed concerning multistep direct (MSD) nuclear reactions. In addition, dominant in applications is a whole class of semiclassical models that may be subsumed under the heading of 'generalized exciton models'; these are basically MSD-type extensions on top of compound-like concepts. In this report the relation between their underlying statistical MSD-postulates are highlighted. A command framework is sketched that enables to generate the various MSD theories through assigning statistical properties to different parts of the nuclear Hamiltonian. Then it is shown that distinct forms of nuclear randomness are embodied in the mentioned theories. All these theories appear to be very similar at a qualitative level. In order to explain the high energy-tails and forward-peaked angular distribution typical for particles emitted in MSD reactions, it is imagined that the incident continuum particle stepwise looses its energy and direction in a sequence of collisions, thereby creating new particle-hole pairs in the target system. At each step emission may take place. The statistical aspect comes in because many continuum states are involved in the process. These are supposed to display chaotic behavior, the associated randomness assumption giving rise to important simplifications in the expression for MSD emission cross sections. This picture suggests that mentioned MSD models can be interpreted as a variant of essentially one and the same theory. 113 refs.; 25 figs.; 9 tabs

  12. Probing reaction dynamics with GDR decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The giant dipole resonance (GDR) has been a prolific source of information on the physics of the nucleus. Mostly it has taught us about nuclear structure, but recently experiments have utilized the GDR as a probe of nuclear reaction dynamics. In this report two examples of such investigations are discussed involving very different reactions and probing time scales that differ by a factor of ∼10 3

  13. The chemical kinetics of the reactions of lithium with steam-air mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.S.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    This work involved the experimental and analytical determination of the consequences of lithium fires in the presence of steam. Experiments were performed to characterize the chemical reactions of lithium with steam-nitrogen and steam-air mixtures. Models were introduced in the LITFIRE code to describe lithium fires in the presence of steam inside the containment building and plasma chamber of a hypothetical fusion reactor. The code was also equipped with the capability to determine the effects of decay heat and lithium fire on the temperature response of the reactor first wall in the event of a coolant disturbance. Forty-two kinetics experiments were performed in which a stream of steam-nitrogen or steam-air was passed over and reacted with approximately three grams of lithium heated to a predetermined temperature. The lithium reaction rates with the constituent gases were measured and characterized for a wide range of lithium temperatures and gas compositions. Experiments were performed with steam molar concentrations of 5, 15 and 30% and lithium temperatures ranging from 400 to 1100 degree C, inclusive. The LITFIRE code was modified to enable it to model the interactions of lithium with steam-air atmospheres. Results of the reaction kinetics experiments were used in the reaction model, and the heat transfer model was expanded to allow it to handle condensible atmospheres. Three groups of accidents were investigated: a spill on the containment building floor, a spill inside the reactor plasma chamber, and a spill inside the plasma chamber with steam injection to the containment building simulating a steam line break. The results were compared to dry air cases under the same conditions. 23 refs., 66 figs., 18 tabs

  14. ASTERIA: Arcsecond Space Telescope Enabling Research in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, M.; Seager, S.; Smith, M. W.; Pong, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    ASTERIA (Arcsecond Space Telescope Enabling Research in Astrophysics) is a technology demonstration and opportunistic science mission to advance the state of the art in CubeSat capabilities for astrophysical measurements. The goal of ASTERIA is to achieve arcsecond-level line of sight pointing error and highly stable focal plane temperature control. These technologies will enable precision photometry, i.e. the careful measurement of stellar brightness over time. This in turn provides a way to study stellar activity, transiting exoplanets, and other astrophysical phenomena, both during the ASTERIA mission and in future CubeSat constellations. ASTERIA is a 6U CubeSat (roughly 10 x 20 x 30 cm, 12 kg) that will operate in low-Earth orbit. The payload consists of a lens and baffle assembly, a CMOS imager, and a two-axis piezoelectric positioning stage on which the focal plane is mounted. A set of commercial reaction wheels provides coarse attitude control. Fine pointing control is achieved by tracking a set of guide stars on the CMOS sensor and moving the piezoelectric stage to compensate for residual pointing errors. Precision thermal control is achieved by isolating the payload from the spacecraft bus, passively cooling the detector, and using trim heaters to perform small temperature corrections over the course of an observation. The ASTERIA project is a collaboration with MIT and is funded at JPL through the Phaeton Program for training early career employees. Flight hardware was delivered in June 2017, with launch expected in August 2017 and deployment targeted for October 2017.

  15. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  16. Imaging the reactions of molecular dications: a new probe of dicationic reaction dynamics and energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan-Ping Hu, S.; Harper, S.M.; Price, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments which generated angularly resolved data to prove the dynamics of dication chemical reactions were performed using a position sensitive coincidence (PSCO) apparatus, to detect in coincidence both of the charged products from such reaction. It consists of a ion source, a hemispherical energy analyser, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Initial experiments to test the apparatus performance were runned on the atomic electron transfer reaction: Ne 2+ + Ar → Ne + + Ar + . Angular distributions, translational and internal energies of the product ions were extracted, as well as the scattering diagram among other data. (nevyjel)

  17. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  18. Precompound Reactions: Basic Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the non-zero nuclear equilibration time, the compound-nucleus scattering model fails when the incident energy exceeds 10 or 20 MeV, and precompound reactions become important. Basic ideas used in the quantum-statistical approaches to these reactions are described

  19. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  20. Fluorogenic organocatalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeisolsadati Oskouei, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, we introduce fluorescence spectroscopy as a new tool to gain insight into the interactions between the substrates and catalyst during organocatalytic reactions. The ultimate goal is to resolve the kinetics of the binding and reaction steps and obtain detailed understanding of the