WorldWideScience

Sample records for reaction equilibrium constant

  1. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  2. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  3. Thermodynamic properties and equilibrium constant of chemical reaction in nanosystem: An theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Jianping; Zhao, Ruihua; Xue, Yongqiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► There is an obvious influence of the size on thermodynamic properties for the reaction referring nano-reactants. ► Gibbs function, enthalpy, entropy and equilibrium constant are dependent on the reactant size. ► There is an approximate linear relation between them. - Abstract: The theoretical relations of thermodynamic properties, the equilibrium constant and reactant size in nanosystem are described. The effects of size on thermodynamic properties and the equilibrium constant were studied using nanosize zinc oxide and sodium bisulfate solution as a reaction system. The experimental results indicated that the molar Gibbs free energy, the molar enthalpy and the molar entropy of the reaction decrease, but the equilibrium constant increases with decreasing reactant size. Linear trends were observed between the reciprocal of size for nano-reactant and thermodynamic variable, which are consistent with the theoretical relations.

  4. The reactions of neutral iron clusters with D2O: Deconvolution of equilibrium constants from multiphoton processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiller, B.H.; Bechthold, P.S.; Parks, E.K.; Pobo, L.G.; Riley, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    The chemical reactions of neutral iron clusters with D 2 O are studied in a continuous flow tube reactor by molecular beam sampling and time-of-flight mass spectrometry with laser photoionization. Product distributions are invariant to a four-fold change in reaction time demonstrating that equilibrium is attained between free and adsorbed D 2 O. The observed negative temperature dependence is consistent with an exothermic, molecular addition reaction at equilibrium. Under our experimental conditions, there is significant photodesorption of D 2 O (Fe/sub n/(D 2 O)/sub m/ + hν → Fe/sub n/ + m D 2 O) along with ionization due to absorption of multiple photons from the ionizing laser. Using a simple model based on a rate equation analysis, we are able to quantitatively deconvolute this desorption process from the equilibrium constants. 8 refs., 1 fig

  5. A Simple Model to Access Equilibrium Constants of Reactions Type A ⇋ B Using Monte Carlo Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Farias, L. A. M. Cardoso, N. M. Oliveira Neto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple theoretical model to describe equilibrium properties of homogeneous re-versible chemical reactions is proposed and applied to an A ⇋ B type reaction. Forthis purpose the equilibrium properties are analyzed by usual Monte Carlo simula-tion. It is shown that the equilibrium constant (Ke for this kind of reaction exhibitsdistinct characteristics for Eba 1, where Eba is the ratio be-tween the reverse and forward activation energies. For Eba 1 and increase(decrease the temperature our results recover the principle of Le Chˆtelier applied ato temperature effects. The special and interesting case is obtained for Eba = 1 sinceKe = 1 for all range of temperature. Another important parameter in our analysisis θA , defined as temperature measured with relation the activation energy of theforward reaction. For fixed values of Eba and for θA ≫ 1 the equilibrium constantapproaches 1, showing that all transitions are equally likely, no matter the differencein the energy barriers. The data obtained in our simulations show the well knownrelationship between Ke , Eb , Ea and kB T . Finally we argue that this theoreticalmodel can be applied to a family of homogeneous chemical reactions characterizedby the same Eba and θA showing the broad application of this stochastic model tostudy chemical reactions. Some of these results will be discussed in terms of collisiontheory.

  6. Equilibrium constants in aqueous lanthanide and actinide chemistry from time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy: The role of ground and excited state reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard, I.; Luetzenkirchen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Equilibrium constants for aqueous reactions between lanthanide or actinide ions and (in-) organic ligands contain important information for various radiochemical problems, such as nuclear reprocessing or the migration of radioelements in the geosphere. We study the conditions required to determine equilibrium constants by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Based on a simulation study it is shown that the possibility to determine equilibrium constants depends upon the reaction rates in the photoexcited states of the lanthanide or actinide ions. (orig.)

  7. Effect of temperature on a free energy and equilibrium constants during dry flue gas desulphurisation chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuburović Miloš

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available During dry flue gas desulphurisation (FGD dry particles of reagents are inserted (injected in the stream of flue gas, where they bond SO2. As reagents, the most often are used compounds of calcium (CaCO3, CaO or Ca(OH2. Knowledge of free energy and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions during dry FGD is necessary for understanding of influence of flue gas temperature to course of these chemical reactions as well as to SO2 bonding from flue gases.

  8. Equilibrium-constant expressions for aqueous plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Equilibrium-constant expressions for Pu disproportionation reactions traditionally contain three or four terms representing the concentrations or fractions of the oxidation states. The expressions can be rewritten so that one of the oxidation states is replaced by a term containing the oxidation number of the plutonium. Experimental estimations of the numerical values of the constants can then be checked in several ways. (author)

  9. A hetero retro Diels-Alder reaction in aqueous solution : A dramatic water-induced increase of the equilibrium constant and inhibition of cycloreversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, J.W; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    The adduct of the Diels-Alder reaction of nitrosobenzene with cyclopentadiene is not stable in solution. The equilibrium constant for the reaction depends strongly on the medium and water induces a spectacular shift to the adduct. Comparison with the bimolecular addition of nitrosobenzene to

  10. Equilibrium Constant as Solution to the Open Chemical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zilbergleyt, B.

    2008-01-01

    According to contemporary views, equilibrium constant is relevant only to true thermodynamic equilibria in isolated systems with one chemical reaction. The paper presents a novel formula that ties-up equilibrium constant and chemical system composition at any state, isolated or open as well. Extending the logarithmic logistic map of the Discrete Thermodynamics of Chemical Equilibria, this formula maps the system population at isolated equilibrium into the population at any open equilibrium at...

  11. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant volume is next considered as example of application, observing the changes occurring in the composition of the combustion gases depending on temperature.

  12. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  13. Colorimetric Determination of the Iron(III)-Thiocyanate Reaction Equilibrium Constant with Calibration and Equilibrium Solutions Prepared in a Cuvette by Sequential Additions of One Reagent to the Other

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; Barlag, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The well-known colorimetric determination of the equilibrium constant of the iron(III-thiocyanate complex is simplified by preparing solutions in a cuvette. For the calibration plot, 0.10 mL increments of 0.00100 M KSCN are added to 4.00 mL of 0.200 M Fe(NO[subscript 3])[subscript 3], and for the equilibrium solutions, 0.50 mL increments of…

  14. Rate constants of the equilibrium reactions SO⨪4 + HNO3 ⇄ HSO-4 + NO3 and SO⨪4 + NO-3 ⇄ SO2-4 + NO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgager, T.; Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.

    1993-01-01

    Rate constants of the following equilibrium reactions were determined by pulse radiolysis at high solute concentrations: SO4.- + HNO, half arrow right over half arrow left HSO4- + NO3. [k(f) = (2.7 +/- 0.5) x 10(6) M-1 s-1, k(r) = (5.6 +/- 1.0) x 10(3) M-1 s-1] and SO4.- + NO3- half arrow right...

  15. One-group constant libraries for nuclear equilibrium state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors

    1997-03-01

    One-group constant libraries for the nuclear equilibrium state were generated for both liquid sodium cooled MOX fuel type fast reactor and PWR type thermal reactor with Equilibrium Cell Iterative Calculation System (ECICS) using JENDL-3.2, -3, -2 and ENDF/B-VI nuclear data libraries. ECICS produced one-group constant sets for 129 heavy metal nuclides and 1238 fission products. (author)

  16. Application of 3H-labelled silation reagents to determine the kinetic and equilibrium constants of the silylation reactions for mass spectrometry of steroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, H.F.

    1976-01-01

    Using the 3 H-labelled silation agents hexamethyl disilazane, trimethyl chlorosilane, and bis-(trimethylsilyl-) acetamide, the silation rate and efficiency of the silation of hydroxyl-substituted steroids was controlled. To determine the reactivity and specificity, 5d-androstane derivatives with defined keto- and hydroxyl groups were used. It was found that the silation process is best reproducible at room temperature. Steroid hormone silation is quantitative and reproducible with BSA, but less reproducible with HMDS with TMCS additives. The reaction rate increases with increasing amounts of TMCS, but a decomposition of the steroid hormones is observed at the same time. At a reaction temperature of 22 0 C, the experiment proceeds optimally with regard to reaction rate and steroid loss due to decomposition. The silated steroids are stable. (AJ) [de

  17. Molecular equilibrium structures from experimental rotational constants and calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, F; Jorgensen, P; Olsen, Jeppe

    2002-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out of the accuracy of molecular equilibrium geometries obtained from least-squares fits involving experimental rotational constants B(0) and sums of ab initio vibration-rotation interaction constants alpha(r)(B). The vibration-rotation interaction constants have been...... calculated for 18 single-configuration dominated molecules containing hydrogen and first-row atoms at various standard levels of ab initio theory. Comparisons with the experimental data and tests for the internal consistency of the calculations show that the equilibrium structures generated using Hartree......-Fock vibration-rotation interaction constants have an accuracy similar to that obtained by a direct minimization of the CCSD(T) energy. The most accurate vibration-rotation interaction constants are those calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ level. The equilibrium bond distances determined from these interaction...

  18. Using the Wolfsberg--Schactschneider program to calculate equilibrium constants for isotopic acetylenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.K.K.; Pyper, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Equilibrium constants were calculated for the gas-phase isotopic exchange reactions C 2 H 2 + C 2 D 2 = 2C 2 HD and C 2 H 2 + D 2 O = C 2 D 2 + H 2 O at temperatures ranging from 40 to 2000 0 K. No corrections to the harmonic approximation were made. The results agree quite well with experimental measurements

  19. Non-equilibrium reaction rates in chemical kinetic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy

    2018-05-01

    Within the recently proposed asymptotic method for solving the Boltzmann equation for chemically reacting gas mixture, the chemical kinetic equations has been derived. Corresponding one-temperature non-equilibrium reaction rates are expressed in terms of specific heat capacities of the species participate in the chemical reactions, bracket integrals connected with the internal energy transfer in inelastic non-reactive collisions and energy transfer coefficients. Reactions of dissociation/recombination of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules are considered. It is shown that all reaction rates are the complex functions of the species densities, similarly to the unimolecular reaction rates. For determining the rate coefficients it is recommended to tabulate corresponding bracket integrals, additionally to the equilibrium rate constants. Correlation of the obtained results with the irreversible thermodynamics is established.

  20. Investigation of reaction equilibrium in reactor materials by EMF methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, H.; Teske, K.; Reetz, T.; Rettig, D.; Kozlov, F.A.; Kuznecov, E.K.

    1979-01-01

    By means of electrochemical cells with solid electrolytes measurements of the chemical activities of oxygen and hydrogen in a sodium test loop were performed. The reaction equilibrium of oxygen and hydrogen in dilute solutions of sodium was investigated. The activities of both oxygen and hydrogen decrease with increasing concentration of the reaction partner. From the relation between the activivy of one component and the analytic concentration of the reaction partner the equilibrium constant of the reaction 0+H = OH was determinded to lg K sub(diss) = -(1,502+-0,216)-(1356+-140)/T. An electrochemical cell with an iron membrane and a solid electrolyte was used to measure the activity of carbon in a carborizing medium. The cell output was stable over a period of more than 1000 hours at a carbon activity of 1. (orig.) [de

  1. Rate constant for reaction of hydroxyl radicals with bicarbonate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, G.V.; Elliot, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for reaction of hydroxyl radicals with the bicarbonate ion has been determined to be 8.5 x 10 6 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . This value was calculated from: the measured rate of formation of the CO 3 - radical in pulsed electron irradiation of bicarbonate solutions over the pH range 7.0 to 9.4; the pK for the equilibrium HCO 3 - = CO 3 2- + H + ; and the rate constant for hydroxyl radicals reacting with the carbonate ion. (author)

  2. Determination of equilibrium constants of formation and decomposition of 11-tungstophosphate heteropolyanion by the method of Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detusheva, L.G.; Khankhasaeva, S.Ts.; Yurchenko, Eh.N.; Lazarenko, T.P.; Kozhevnikov, I.V.

    1990-01-01

    Method of quantitative IR spectroscopy was used to determine equilibrium constants of formation of H x PW 11 O 39 (7-x)- (1) from H y P 2 W 21 O 71 (6-Y)- and W 10 O 32 4- at pH 2.8-4.0 and its decomposition at pH 7-8. Equilibrium constant of (1) formation in logarithmic coordinates changes linearly with growth of initial concentration of H 3 PW 12 O 40 (2) from 0.005 to 0.1 mol/l. Equilibrium constant of (1) decomposition is characterized by complex dependence on initial concentration of (2) due to proceeding of parallel reactions. Equilibrium concentrations of compounds in solutions of tungstophosphoric heteropolyacid at pH 3.25 and 7.68, calculated according to determined equilibrium constants and determined by the method of NMR on 31 P nuclei, were correlated

  3. Using nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) for simultaneous determination of concentration and equilibrium constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoatov, Mirzo; Galievsky, Victor A; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Jankowski, Hanna K; Krylov, Sergey N

    2015-03-03

    Nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) is a versatile tool for studying affinity binding. Here we describe a NECEEM-based approach for simultaneous determination of both the equilibrium constant, K(d), and the unknown concentration of a binder that we call a target, T. In essence, NECEEM is used to measure the unbound equilibrium fraction, R, for the binder with a known concentration that we call a ligand, L. The first set of experiments is performed at varying concentrations of T, prepared by serial dilution of the stock solution, but at a constant concentration of L, which is as low as its reliable quantitation allows. The value of R is plotted as a function of the dilution coefficient, and dilution corresponding to R = 0.5 is determined. This dilution of T is used in the second set of experiments in which the concentration of T is fixed but the concentration of L is varied. The experimental dependence of R on the concentration of L is fitted with a function describing their theoretical dependence. Both K(d) and the concentration of T are used as fitting parameters, and their sought values are determined as the ones that generate the best fit. We have fully validated this approach in silico by using computer-simulated NECEEM electropherograms and then applied it to experimental determination of the unknown concentration of MutS protein and K(d) of its interactions with a DNA aptamer. The general approach described here is applicable not only to NECEEM but also to any other method that can determine a fraction of unbound molecules at equilibrium.

  4. Achieving Chemical Equilibrium: The Role of Imposed Conditions in the Ammonia Formation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Under conditions of constant temperature T and pressure P, chemical equilibrium occurs in a closed system (fixed mass) when the Gibbs free energy G of the reaction mixture is minimized. However, when chemical reactions occur under other conditions, other thermodynamic functions are minimized or maximized. For processes at constant T and volume V,…

  5. Co-solvent effects on reaction rate and reaction equilibrium of an enzymatic peptide hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangler, A; Canales, R; Held, C; Luong, T Q; Winter, R; Zaitsau, D H; Verevkin, S P; Sadowski, G

    2018-04-25

    This work presents an approach that expresses the Michaelis constant KaM and the equilibrium constant Kth of an enzymatic peptide hydrolysis based on thermodynamic activities instead of concentrations. This provides KaM and Kth values that are independent of any co-solvent. To this end, the hydrolysis reaction of N-succinyl-l-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide catalysed by the enzyme α-chymotrypsin was studied in pure buffer and in the presence of the co-solvents dimethyl sulfoxide, trimethylamine-N-oxide, urea, and two salts. A strong influence of the co-solvents on the measured Michaelis constant (KM) and equilibrium constant (Kx) was observed, which was found to be caused by molecular interactions expressed as activity coefficients. Substrate and product activity coefficients were used to calculate the activity-based values KaM and Kth for the co-solvent free reaction. Based on these constants, the co-solvent effect on KM and Kx was predicted in almost quantitative agreement with the experimental data. The approach presented here does not only reveal the importance of understanding the thermodynamic non-ideality of reactions taking place in biological solutions and in many technological applications, it also provides a framework for interpreting and quantifying the multifaceted co-solvent effects on enzyme-catalysed reactions that are known and have been observed experimentally for a long time.

  6. Reaction Equilibrium of the ω-Transamination of (S)-Phenylethylamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voges, Matthias; Abu, Rohana; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on the thermodynamic equilibrium of the ω-transaminase-catalyzed reaction of (S)-phenylethylamine with cyclohexanone to acetophenone and cyclohexylamine in aqueous solution. For this purpose, the equilibrium concentrations of the reaction were experimentally investigated under...... varying reaction conditions. It was observed that the temperature (30 and 37 °C), the pH (between pH 7 and pH 9), as well as the initial reactant concentrations (between 5 and 50 mmol·kg-1) influenced the equilibrium position of the reaction. The position of the reaction equilibrium was moderately shifted...... position to the reactant side. In order to explain these effects, the activity coefficients of the reacting agents were calculated and the activity-based thermodynamic equilibrium constant Kth of the reaction was determined. For this purpose, the activity coefficients of the reacting agents were modeled...

  7. Decay to Equilibrium for Energy-Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan

    2018-02-06

    We derive thermodynamically consistent models of reaction-diffusion equations coupled to a heat equation. While the total energy is conserved, the total entropy serves as a driving functional such that the full coupled system is a gradient flow. The novelty of the approach is the Onsager structure, which is the dual form of a gradient system, and the formulation in terms of the densities and the internal energy. In these variables it is possible to assume that the entropy density is strictly concave such that there is a unique maximizer (thermodynamical equilibrium) given linear constraints on the total energy and suitable density constraints. We consider two particular systems of this type, namely, a diffusion-reaction bipolar energy transport system, and a drift-diffusion-reaction energy transport system with confining potential. We prove corresponding entropy-entropy production inequalities with explicitly calculable constants and establish the convergence to thermodynamical equilibrium, first in entropy and later in L norm using Cziszár–Kullback–Pinsker type inequalities.

  8. Decay to Equilibrium for Energy-Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan; Hittmeir, Sabine; Markowich, Peter A.; Mielke, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We derive thermodynamically consistent models of reaction-diffusion equations coupled to a heat equation. While the total energy is conserved, the total entropy serves as a driving functional such that the full coupled system is a gradient flow. The novelty of the approach is the Onsager structure, which is the dual form of a gradient system, and the formulation in terms of the densities and the internal energy. In these variables it is possible to assume that the entropy density is strictly concave such that there is a unique maximizer (thermodynamical equilibrium) given linear constraints on the total energy and suitable density constraints. We consider two particular systems of this type, namely, a diffusion-reaction bipolar energy transport system, and a drift-diffusion-reaction energy transport system with confining potential. We prove corresponding entropy-entropy production inequalities with explicitly calculable constants and establish the convergence to thermodynamical equilibrium, first in entropy and later in L norm using Cziszár–Kullback–Pinsker type inequalities.

  9. KEMOD: A mixed chemical kinetic and equilibrium model of aqueous and solid phase geochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, G.T.; Iskra, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the development of a mixed chemical Kinetic and Equilibrium MODel in which every chemical species can be treated either as a equilibrium-controlled or as a kinetically controlled reaction. The reaction processes include aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, oxidation/reduction, and acid/base reactions. Further development and modification of KEMOD can be made in: (1) inclusion of species switching solution algorithms, (2) incorporation of the effect of temperature and pressure on equilibrium and rate constants, and (3) extension to high ionic strength

  10. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  11. Understanding Chemical Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium with Interlocking Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are essential core concepts of chemistry but are challenging topics for many students, both at the high school and undergraduate university level. Visualization at the molecular level is valuable to aid understanding of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. This activity provides a discovery-based method to…

  12. Galvanic Cells and the Determination of Equilibrium Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosmer, Jonathan L.; Peters, Dennis G.

    2012-01-01

    Readily assembled mini-galvanic cells can be employed to compare their observed voltages with those predicted from the Nernst equation and to determine solubility products for silver halides and overall formation constants for metal-ammonia complexes. Results obtained by students in both an honors-level first-year course in general chemistry and…

  13. Determination of the Tetramer-Dimer Equilibrium Constant of Rabbit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hemoglobin is a tetrameric protein which is able to dissociate into dimers. The dimers can in turn dissociate into tetramers. It has been found that dimers are more reactive than tetramers. The difference in the reactivity of these two species has been used to determine the tetramerdimer dissociation constant of various ...

  14. Profiles of equilibrium constants for self-association of aromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Davies, David B; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2009-04-28

    Analysis of the noncovalent, noncooperative self-association of identical aromatic molecules assumes that the equilibrium self-association constants are either independent of the number of molecules (the EK-model) or change progressively with increasing aggregation (the AK-model). The dependence of the self-association constant on the number of molecules in the aggregate (i.e., the profile of the equilibrium constant) was empirically derived in the AK-model but, in order to provide some physical understanding of the profile, it is proposed that the sources for attenuation of the equilibrium constant are the loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom, the ordering of molecules in the aggregates and the electrostatic contribution (for charged units). Expressions are derived for the profiles of the equilibrium constants for both neutral and charged molecules. Although the EK-model has been widely used in the analysis of experimental data, it is shown in this work that the derived equilibrium constant, K(EK), depends on the concentration range used and hence, on the experimental method employed. The relationship has also been demonstrated between the equilibrium constant K(EK) and the real dimerization constant, K(D), which shows that the value of K(EK) is always lower than K(D).

  15. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobbs Gary

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Results Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the

  16. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-08-16

    Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the literature. They also give better estimates of

  17. Quasi-equilibrium channel model of an constant current arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The rather simple method of calculation of electronic and gas temperature in the channel of arc of plasma generator is offered. This method is based on self-consistent two-temperature channel model of an electric arc. The method proposed enables to obtain radial allocation of gas and electronic temperatures in a non-conducting zone of an constant current arc, for prescribed parameters of discharge (current intensity and power of the discharge, with enough good precision. The results obtained can be used in model and engineering calculations to estimate gas and electronic temperatures in the channel of an arc plasma generator.

  18. The Equilibrium Constant for Bromothymol Blue: A General Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Using Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Elsbeth; Doyle, Robert; Gross, Erin; Mattson, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly undergraduate laboratory experiment is described in which students use visible spectroscopy to determine a numerical value for an equilibrium constant, K[subscript c]. The experiment correlates well with the lecture topic of equilibrium even though the subject of the study is an acid-base…

  19. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  20. Equilibrium method for estimating the first hydrolysis constant of tetravalent plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    A new method for estimating the numerical value of the first hydrolysis constant of tetravalent plutonium is illustrated by examples. It uses the pH and the equilibrium fractions of two of the Pu oxidation states. They are substituted into one or more of a choice of formulas that render explicit estimates of the hydrolysis constant. (author)

  1. Equilibrium composition for the reaction of plutonium hydride with air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lexi; Sun Ying; Xue Weidong; Zhu Zhenghe; Wang Rong; Luo Deli

    2002-01-01

    There are six independent constituents with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH 2.7 (s), PuN(s), Pu 2 O 3 (s), N 2 , O 2 and H 2 , therefore, the system described involves of 2 independent reactions, both ΔG 0 <<0. The calculated equilibrium compositions are in agreement with those of the experimental, which indicates that the chemical equilibrium is nearly completely approached. Therefore, it is believed that the reaction rate of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The author has briefly discussed the simultaneous reactions and its thermodynamic coupling effect

  2. Surface-dependent chemical equilibrium constants and capacitances for bare and 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane coated silica nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, Jared; Pennathur, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    , and pK+ are constant and independent of surface composition. Our theoretical model consists of three parts: (i) a chemical equilibrium model of the bare or coated wall, (ii) a chemical equilibrium model of the buffered bulk electrolyte, and (iii) a self-consistent Gouy–Chapman–Stern triple-layer model...... of the electrochemical double layer coupling these two equilibrium models. To validate our model, we used both pH-sensitive dye-based capillary filling experiments as well as electro-osmotic current-monitoring measurements. Using our model we predict the dependence of ζ potential, surface charge density, and capillary...

  3. Angular distributions in pre-equilibrium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Gupta, S.K.; Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay

    1982-10-01

    A new model is proposed for calculating angular distributions in preequilibrium reactions. In this model, as in the model of Feshbach et al. the system consisting of target plus projectile initially branches into two sets of states with either no particle in the continuum (multistep compound states) or with at least one particle in the continuum (multistep direct states). The two chains of states are treated independently by solving two sets of master equations. The multistep compound emission is assumed to be isotropic while the angular distribution of the multistep direct emission is described using the fast particle model of Mantzouranis et al. The angular distributions for 14.6 MeV neutrons calculated using this model are found to be in better agreement with the data than the fast particle model. (author)

  4. Determination of the equilibrium constant of FeZrCl6 formation from FeCl3 and ZrCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdonosov, S.S.; Kharisov, B.I.; Nikitin, M.I.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium pressures of chlorine formed in the course of reaction FeCl 3 +ZrCl 4 ↔ FeZrCl 6 +0.5 Cl 2 were determined at the temperatures of 250-325 deg C. The values of equilibrium constant K p of the reaction mentioned at the temperatures of 250, 275, 300 and 325 deg were calculated, taking into consideration the determined values of p Cl2 and literature data on equilibrium pressures of ZrCl 4 and FeCl 3 vapours

  5. Evaluation of enthalpy of interfacial reactions from temperature dependency of interfacial equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallay, Nikola; Cop, Ana

    2005-01-01

    Temperature dependency of equilibrium at metal oxide-aqueous electrolyte solution interface was analyzed by numerical simulation. Derivations of inner surface potential with respect to temperature were performed at constant values of several different parameters. When surface charge density in inner plane was kept constant the reasonable results were obtained, i.e. the electrostatic contribution to enthalpy of protonation of amphotheric surface sites was found to be positive in the pH region below the point of zero potential and negative above this point. All other examined possibilities produced opposite results. Derivation of empirical interfacial equilibrium constant at constant surface potential indicated that electrostatic effect on protonation entropy is negligible and that electrostatic contributions to reaction Gibbs energy and enthalpy are equal and directly related to the surface potential in the inner plane

  6. Rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the interest in the chemistry of germane in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and because previously reported kinetic reaction rate studies at 298 K gave results differing by a factor of 200, laboratory measurements were performed to determine the reaction rate constant for H + GeH4. Results of the study at 298 K, obtained via the direct technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence, yield the reaction rate constant, k = (4.08 + or - 0.22) x 10(exp -12) cu cm/s.

  7. Non-equilibrium effects in high temperature chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction rate data were collected for chemical reactions occurring at high temperatures during reentry of space vehicles. The principle of detailed balancing is used in modeling kinetics of chemical reactions at high temperatures. Although this principle does not hold for certain transient or incubation times in the initial phase of the reaction, it does seem to be valid for the rates of internal energy transitions that occur within molecules and atoms. That is, for every rate of transition within the internal energy states of atoms or molecules, there is an inverse rate that is related through an equilibrium expression involving the energy difference of the transition.

  8. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  9. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 1. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the H-dependent axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloxime by various N- and S-donor ligands. D Sudarshan Reddy N Ravi Kumar Reddy V Sridhar S Satyanarayana. Inorganic and Analytical ...

  10. Accurate and approximate thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    In favourable cases it is possible to calculate thermal rate constants for polyatomic reactions to high accuracy from first principles. Here, we discuss the use of flux correlation functions combined with the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach to efficiently calculate cumulative reaction probabilities and thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions. Three isotopic variants of the H 2 + CH 3 → CH 4 + H reaction are used to illustrate the theory. There is good agreement with experimental results although the experimental rates generally are larger than the calculated ones, which are believed to be at least as accurate as the experimental rates. Approximations allowing evaluation of the thermal rate constant above 400 K are treated. It is also noted that for the treated reactions, transition state theory (TST) gives accurate rate constants above 500 K. TST theory also gives accurate results for kinetic isotope effects in cases where the mass of the transfered atom is unchanged. Due to neglect of tunnelling, TST however fails below 400 K if the mass of the transferred atom changes between the isotopic reactions

  11. Explicit integration of extremely stiff reaction networks: partial equilibrium methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidry, M W; Hix, W R; Billings, J J

    2013-01-01

    In two preceding papers (Guidry et al 2013 Comput. Sci. Disc. 6 015001 and Guidry and Harris 2013 Comput. Sci. Disc. 6 015002), we have shown that when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper, we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the approach to equilibrium and show that explicit asymptotic methods, combined with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that can plausibly deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that such explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been possible before in a number of fields. (paper)

  12. Pre-equilibrium decay processes in energetic heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blann, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Boltzmann master equation (BME) is defined for application to precompound decay in heavy ion reactions in the 10 100 MeV/nucleon regime. Predicted neutron spectra are compared with measured results for central collisions of 20 Ne and 12 C with 165 Ho target nuclei. Comparisons are made with subthreshold π 0 yields in heavy ion reactions between 35 and 84 MeV/nucleon, and with the π 0 spectra. The BME is found to be an excellent tool for investigating these experimentally observed aspects of non-equilibrium heavy ion reactions. 18 refs., 8 figs

  13. Determination of rate constants for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, A.; Walter, T.; Stimming, U. [Munich Technical Univ., Garching (Germany). Dept. of Physics

    2008-07-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells is a complex and fundamental electrochemical reaction. However, greater insight is needed into this multi-electron reaction in order to develop efficient and innovative catalysts. The rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) is a useful tool for studying reaction intermediates of the ORR and to better understand the reaction pathway. Carbon materials such as carbon nanofilaments-platelets (CNF-PL) have high electrical conductivity and may be considered for fuel cells. In particular Pt and RuSe{sub x}, deposited on CNF-PL materials could act as efficient catalysts in fuel cells. This study used the RRDE to evaluate the oxygen reduction kinetics of these catalysts in oxygen-saturated, diluted sulphuric acid at room temperature. Kinetic data and hydrogen peroxide formation were determined by depositing a thin-film of the catalyst on the Au disc. The values for the constants k1, k2 and k3 were obtained using diagnostic criteria and expressions to calculate the rate constants of the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction for RuSe on new carbon supports. A potential dependency of the constants k1 and k2 for RuSe{sub x}/CNF-PL was observed. The transition of the Tafel slopes for this catalyst was obtained. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  14. The determination methods of the velocity constant for electrochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, R.

    1963-01-01

    In a brief introduction are recalled the fundamental mechanisms of the electrochemical reaction and the definition of the intrinsic velocity constant of a such reaction. By the nature of the different parameters which enter in this definition are due some experimental problems which are examined. Then are given the principles of the measurement methods of the velocity constant. These methods are developed with the mathematical expression of the different rates of the mass transfer to an electrode. In each case are given the experimental limits of use of the methods and the size order of the velocity constant that can be reached. A list of fundamental works to be consulted conclude this work. (O.M.) [fr

  15. Semiclassical Calculation of Reaction Rate Constants for Homolytical Dissociations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2002-01-01

    There is growing interest in extending organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) to III-V materials that exhibit large thermal decomposition at their optimum growth temperature, such as indium nitride. The group III nitrides are candidate materials for light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. To overcome decomposition of the deposited compound, the reaction must be conducted at high pressures, which causes problems of uniformity. Microgravity may provide the venue for maintaining conditions of laminar flow under high pressure. Since the selection of optimized parameters becomes crucial when performing experiments in microgravity, efforts are presently geared to the development of computational OMCVD models that will couple the reactor fluid dynamics with its chemical kinetics. In the present study, we developed a method to calculate reaction rate constants for the homolytic dissociation of III-V compounds for modeling OMCVD. The method is validated by comparing calculations with experimental reaction rate constants.

  16. Computing multi-species chemical equilibrium with an algorithm based on the reaction extents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2013-01-01

    -negative constrains. The residual function, representing the distance to the equilibrium, is defined from the chemical potential (or Gibbs energy) of the chemical system. Local minimums are potentially avoided by the prioritization of the aqueous reactions with respect to the heterogeneous reactions. The formation......A mathematical model for the solution of a set of chemical equilibrium equations in a multi-species and multiphase chemical system is described. The computer-aid solution of model is achieved by means of a Newton-Raphson method enhanced with a line-search scheme, which deals with the non...... and release of gas bubbles is taken into account in the model, limiting the concentration of volatile aqueous species to a maximum value, given by the gas solubility constant.The reaction extents are used as state variables for the numerical method. As a result, the accepted solution satisfies the charge...

  17. Factors affecting the equilibrium constant of homolysis of complexes with metal-carbon σ bonds in aqueous solutions. Pulse radiolysis studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerstein, D.; Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba

    1989-01-01

    Pulse-Radiolysis is a powerful technique for the determination of the equilibrium constants of the homolytic cleavage of metal-carbon σ bonds in aqueous solutions. In most systems studied the observed reaction is: L m-1 M (n+1) -R + L ↔ ML m. n + ·R. Therefore the results do not enable a direct determination of the metal-carbon bond dissociation energies. The results obtained indicate that these equilibrium constants are not directly related to the redox potential of either L .m M (n) or of ·R, or to the activation energies for the homolytic cleavage of a family of similarly substituted ethanes. (author)

  18. Effects of Confinement on Chemical Reaction Equilibrium in Nanoporous Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, W.R.; Lísal, Martin; Brennan, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 3984, - (2006), s. 743-751 ISSN 0302-9743 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507 Grant - others:NRCC(CA) OGP 1041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanoporous materials * chemical reaction equilibrium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.402, year: 2005

  19. Calculation of thermodynamic equilibrium for reactions of plutonium with air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lexi; Sun Ying; Luo Deli; Xue Weidong; Zhu Zhenghe; Wang Rong

    2000-01-01

    There are six independent component with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH 2.7 (s), PuN(s), Pu 2 O 3 (s), N 2 (g) and H 2 (g), therefore, the system described involves of 2 independent reactions, both ΔG degree << O. The mass balances calculated for gas and solid phases are in good agreement with those of experimental, indicating the chemical equilibrium is nearly approached. So, it is believed that the reaction ratio of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The results are meaningful to the storage of plutonium

  20. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  1. Effect of Temperature on Acidity and Hydration Equilibrium Constants of Delphinidin-3-O- and Cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside Calculated from Uni- and Multiwavelength Spectroscopic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidot, Kévin; Achir, Nawel; Mertz, Christian; Sinela, André; Rawat, Nadirah; Prades, Alexia; Dangles, Olivier; Fulcrand, Hélène; Dornier, Manuel

    2016-05-25

    Delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside and cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside are the main anthocyanins of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces, traditionally used to make a bright red beverage by decoction in water. At natural pH, these anthocyanins are mainly in their flavylium form (red) in equilibrium with the quinonoid base (purple) and the hemiketal (colorless). For the first time, their acidity and hydration equilibrium constants were obtained from a pH-jump method followed by UV-vis spectroscopy as a function of temperature from 4 to 37 °C. Equilibrium constant determination was also performed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR). Acidity and hydration constants of cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside at 25 °C were 4.12 × 10(-5) and 7.74 × 10(-4), respectively, and were significantly higher for delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside (4.95 × 10(-5) and 1.21 × 10(-3), respectively). MCR enabled the obtaining of concentration and spectrum of each form but led to overestimated values for the equilibrium constants. However, both methods showed that formations of the quinonoid base and hemiketal were endothermic reactions. Equilibrium constants of anthocyanins in the hibiscus extract showed comparable values as for the isolated anthocyanins.

  2. Recent developments in semiclassical mechanics: eigenvalues and reaction rate constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.

    1976-04-01

    A semiclassical treatment of eigenvalues for a multidimensional non-separable potential function and of the rate constant for a chemical reaction with an activation barrier is presented. Both phenomena are seen to be described by essentially the same semiclassical formalism, which is based on a construction of the total Hamiltonian in terms of the complete set of ''good'' action variables (or adiabatic invariants) associated with the minimum in the potential energy surface for the eigenvalue case, or the saddle point in the potential energy surface for the case of chemical reaction

  3. Decomposition of atmospheric water content into cluster contributions based on theoretical association equilibrium constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slanina, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Water vapor is treated as an equilibrium mixture of water clusters (H 2 O)/sub i/ using quantum-chemical evaluation of the equilibrium constants of water associations. The model is adapted to the conditions of atmospheric humidity, and a decomposition algorithm is suggested using the temperature and mass concentration of water as input information and used for a demonstration of evaluation of the water oligomer populations in the Earth's atmosphere. An upper limit of the populations is set up based on the water content in saturated aqueous vapor. It is proved that the cluster population in the saturated water vapor, as well as in the Earth's atmosphere for a typical temperature/humidity profile, increases with increasing temperatures

  4. Thermodynamic Modeling and Optimization of the Copper Flash Converting Process Using the Equilibrium Constant Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-zhou; Zhou, Jie-min; Tong, Chang-ren; Zhang, Wen-hai; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Jin-liang

    2018-05-01

    Based on the principle of multiphase equilibrium, a mathematical model of the copper flash converting process was established by the equilibrium constant method, and a computational system was developed with the use of MetCal software platform. The mathematical model was validated by comparing simulated outputs, industrial data, and published data. To obtain high-quality blister copper, a low copper content in slag, and increased impurity removal rate, the model was then applied to investigate the effects of the operational parameters [oxygen/feed ratio (R OF), flux rate (R F), and converting temperature (T)] on the product weights, compositions, and the distribution behaviors of impurity elements. The optimized results showed that R OF, R F, and T should be controlled at approximately 156 Nm3/t, within 3.0 pct, and at approximately 1523 K (1250 °C), respectively.

  5. Equilibrium and Dynamic Osmotic Behaviour of Aqueous Solutions with Varied Concentration at Constant and Variable Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, Ivan L.; Manev, Emil D.; Sazdanova, Svetla V.; Kolikov, Kiril H.

    2013-01-01

    Osmosis is essential for the living organisms. In biological systems the process usually occurs in confined volumes and may express specific features. The osmotic pressure in aqueous solutions was studied here experimentally as a function of solute concentration (0.05–0.5 M) in two different regimes: of constant and variable solution volume. Sucrose, a biologically active substance, was chosen as a reference solute for the complex tests. A custom made osmotic cell was used. A novel operative experimental approach, employing limited variation of the solution volume, was developed and applied for the purpose. The established equilibrium values of the osmotic pressure are in agreement with the theoretical expectations and do not exhibit any evident differences for both regimes. In contrast, the obtained kinetic dependences reveal striking divergence in the rates of the process at constant and varied solution volume for the respective solute concentrations. The rise of pressure is much faster at constant solution volume, while the solvent influx is many times greater in the regime of variable volume. The results obtained suggest a feasible mechanism for the way in which the living cells rapidly achieve osmotic equilibrium upon changes in the environment. PMID:24459448

  6. Determination of the Equilibrium Constants of a Weak Acid: An Experiment for Analytical or Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Russell A.

    1998-05-01

    A simple experiment, utilizing readily available equipment and chemicals, is described. It allows students to explore the concepts of chemical equilibria, nonideal behavior of aqueous solutions, least squares with adjustment of nonlinear model parameters, and errors. The relationship between the pH of a solution of known initial concentration and volume of a weak acid as it is titrated by known volumes of a monohydroxy strong base is developed rigorously assuming ideal behavior. A distinctive feature of this work is a method that avoids dealing with the problems presented by equations with multiple roots. The volume of base added is calculated in terms of a known value of the pH and the equilibrium constants. The algebraic effort involved is nearly the same as the alternative of deriving a master equation for solving for the hydrogen ion concentration or activity and results in a more efficient computational algorithm. This approach offers two advantages over the use of computer software to solve directly for the hydrogen ion concentration. First, it avoids a potentially lengthy iterative procedure encountered when the polynomial exceeds third order in the hydrogen ion concentration; and second, it provides a means of obtaining results with a hand calculator that can prove useful in checking computer code. The approach is limited to weak solutions to avoid dealing with molalities and to insure that the Debye-Hückel limiting law is applicable. The nonlinear least squares algorithm Nonlinear Fit, found in the computational mathematics library Mathematica, is utilized to fit the measured volume of added base to the calculated value as a function of the measured pH subject to variation of all the equilibrium constants as parameters (including Kw). The experiment emphasizes both data collection and data analysis aspects of the problem. Data for the titration of phosphorous acid, H3PO3, by NaOH are used to illustrate the approach. Fits of the data without corrections

  7. CONCENTRATION DEPENDENCE OF STERN LAYER CAPACITANCES AND SURFACE EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS IN SILICA-BASED NANOFLUIDIC CHANNELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, J.; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of the unique physics at the solid-liquid interface in nanofluidic channels is essential for the advancement of basic scientific knowledge and the development of novel applications for pharmaceuticals, environmental health and safety, energy harvesting and biometrics [1......]. The current models used to describe surface phenomena in nanofluidics can differ by orders of magnitude from experimentally measured values [2]. To mitigate the discrepancies, we hypothesize that the Stern-layer capacitance Cs and the surface equilibrium constants pKa, vary with the composition of the solid...

  8. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öström, Jonatan, E-mail: jonatan.ostrom@gmail.com; Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.gustafsson@ltu.se [Applied Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Science and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Bezrukov, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  9. Surface-dependent chemical equilibrium constants and capacitances for bare and 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane coated silica nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, Jared; Pennathur, Sumita; Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the solid-liquid interface of fused-silica nanofabricated channels with and without a hydrophilic 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane (cyanosilane) coating. We develop a model that relaxes the assumption that the surface parameters C(1), C(2), and pK(+) are constant and independent of surface composition. Our theoretical model consists of three parts: (i) a chemical equilibrium model of the bare or coated wall, (ii) a chemical equilibrium model of the buffered bulk electrolyte, and (iii) a self-consistent Gouy-Chapman-Stern triple-layer model of the electrochemical double layer coupling these two equilibrium models. To validate our model, we used both pH-sensitive dye-based capillary filling experiments as well as electro-osmotic current-monitoring measurements. Using our model we predict the dependence of ζ potential, surface charge density, and capillary filling length ratio on ionic strength for different surface compositions, which can be difficult to achieve otherwise. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Water dimers in the atmosphere III: equilibrium constant from a flexible potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Yohann; Goldman, Nir; Saykally, R J; Leforestier, Claude

    2006-04-27

    We present new results for the water dimer equilibrium constant K(p)(T) in the range 190-390 K, using a flexible potential energy surface fitted to spectroscopical data. The increased numerical complexity due to explicit consideration of the monomer vibrations is handled via an adiabatic (6 + 6)d decoupling between intra- and intermolecular modes. The convergence of the canonical partition function of the dimer is ensured by computing all energy levels up to dissociation for total angular momentum values J = 0-5 and using an extrapolation scheme to higher values. The newly calculated values for K(p)(T) are in very good agreement with available experimental data at room temperature. At higher temperatures, an analysis of the convergence of the partition function reveals that quasi-bound states are likely to contribute to the equilibrium constant. Additional thermodynamical quantities (deltaG, deltaH, deltaS, and C(p)) have also been determined and fit to quadratic expressions a + bT + cT2.

  11. Species-Specific Thiol-Disulfide Equilibrium Constant: A Tool To Characterize Redox Transitions of Biological Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Somlyay, Máté; Noszál, Béla

    2015-08-13

    Microscopic redox equilibrium constants, a new species-specific type of physicochemical parameters, were introduced and determined to quantify thiol-disulfide equilibria of biological significance. The thiol-disulfide redox equilibria of glutathione with cysteamine, cysteine, and homocysteine were approached from both sides, and the equilibrium mixtures were analyzed by quantitative NMR methods to characterize the highly composite, co-dependent acid-base and redox equilibria. The directly obtained, pH-dependent, conditional constants were then decomposed by a new evaluation method, resulting in pH-independent, microscopic redox equilibrium constants for the first time. The 80 different, microscopic redox equilibrium constant values show close correlation with the respective thiolate basicities and provide sound means for the development of potent agents against oxidative stress.

  12. Partial equilibrium in induced redox reactions of plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikol' skii, B P; Posvol' skii, M V; Krylov, L I; Morozova, Z P

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of oxidation-reduction reactions of Pu in buffer solutions containing bichromate and a reducing agent which reacted with hexavalent chromium at pH=3.5. In most cases sodium nitrite was used. A rather slow reduction of Pu (6) with NaNO/sub 2/ in the course of which tetravalent plutonium was formed via disproportionation reaction of plutonium (5), became very rapid upon the addition of bichromate to the solution. The yield of tetravalent plutonium increased with an increase in the concentration of NaNO/sub 2/ and the bichromate but never reached 100%. This was due to a simultaneous occurrenc of the induced oxidation reaction of Pu(4), leading to a partial equilibrium between the valence forms of plutonium in the nitrite-bichromate system which on the whole was in a nonequilibrium state. It was shown that in the series of reactions leading to the reduction of plutonium the presence of bivalent chromium was a necessary link.

  13. Density Functional Study of Chemical Reaction Equilibrium for Dimerization Reactions in Slit and Cylindrical Nanopores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Lísal, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 16 (2009), 164713-1-24 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507; GA AV ČR KAN400720701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : density functional theory * reaction ensemble Monte Carlo * reaction equilibrium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.093, year: 2009

  14. Remarkable nanoconfinement effects on chemical equilibrium manifested in nucleotide dimerization and H-D exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Micha; Rubinovich, Leonid

    2011-10-06

    Nanoconfinement entropic effects on chemical equilibrium involving a small number of molecules, which we term NCECE, are revealed by two widely diverse types of reactions. Employing statistical-mechanical principles, we show how the NCECE effect stabilizes nucleotide dimerization observed within self-assembled molecular cages. Furthermore, the effect provides the basis for dimerization even under an aqueous environment inside the nanocage. Likewise, the NCECE effect is pertinent to a longstanding issue in astrochemistry, namely the extra deuteration commonly observed for molecules reacting on interstellar dust grain surfaces. The origin of the NCECE effect is elucidated by means of the probability distributions of the reaction extent and related variations in the reactant-product mixing entropy. Theoretical modelling beyond our previous preliminary work highlights the role of the nanospace size in addition to that of the nanosystem size, namely the limited amount of molecules in the reaction mixture. Furthermore, the NCECE effect can depend also on the reaction mechanism, and on deviations from stoichiometry. The NCECE effect, leading to enhanced, greatly variable equilibrium "constants", constitutes a unique physical-chemical phenomenon, distinguished from the usual thermodynamical properties of macroscopically large systems. Being significant particularly for weakly exothermic reactions, the effects should stabilize products in other closed nanoscale structures, and thus can have notable implications for the growing nanotechnological utilization of chemical syntheses conducted within confined nanoreactors.

  15. Understanding Chemical Equilibrium Using Entropy Analysis: The Relationship between [delta]S[subscript tot](sys[superscript o]) and the Equilibrium Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy analyses as a function of the extent of reaction are presented for a number of physicochemical processes, including vaporization of a liquid, dimerization of nitrogen dioxide, and the autoionization of water. Graphs of the total entropy change versus the extent of reaction give a visual representation of chemical equilibrium and the second…

  16. The universal statistical distributions of the affinity, equilibrium constants, kinetics and specificity in biomolecular recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiliang Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We uncovered the universal statistical laws for the biomolecular recognition/binding process. We quantified the statistical energy landscapes for binding, from which we can characterize the distributions of the binding free energy (affinity, the equilibrium constants, the kinetics and the specificity by exploring the different ligands binding with a particular receptor. The results of the analytical studies are confirmed by the microscopic flexible docking simulations. The distribution of binding affinity is Gaussian around the mean and becomes exponential near the tail. The equilibrium constants of the binding follow a log-normal distribution around the mean and a power law distribution in the tail. The intrinsic specificity for biomolecular recognition measures the degree of discrimination of native versus non-native binding and the optimization of which becomes the maximization of the ratio of the free energy gap between the native state and the average of non-native states versus the roughness measured by the variance of the free energy landscape around its mean. The intrinsic specificity obeys a Gaussian distribution near the mean and an exponential distribution near the tail. Furthermore, the kinetics of binding follows a log-normal distribution near the mean and a power law distribution at the tail. Our study provides new insights into the statistical nature of thermodynamics, kinetics and function from different ligands binding with a specific receptor or equivalently specific ligand binding with different receptors. The elucidation of distributions of the kinetics and free energy has guiding roles in studying biomolecular recognition and function through small-molecule evolution and chemical genetics.

  17. Iteration scheme for implicit calculations of kinetic and equilibrium chemical reactions in fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    An iteration scheme for the implicit treatment of equilibrium chemical reactions in partial equilibrium flow has previously been described. Here we generalize this scheme to kinetic reactions as well as equilibrium reactions. This extends the applicability of the scheme to problems with kinetic reactions that are fast in regions of the flow field but slow in others. The resulting scheme thereby provides a single unified framework for the implicit treatment of an arbitrary number of coupled equilibrium and kinetic reactions in chemically reacting fluid flow. 10 refs., 2 figs

  18. Pre-equilibrium particle decay in the photonuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.R.; Chang, C.C.

    1976-11-01

    Calculations of particle energy spectra resulting from the photonuclear reactions at energies below the meson production threshold have been carried out in the framework of combining the pre-equilibrium exiton model and the quasi-deuteron model. A 2p-2h initial state in the exciton model is assumed because in the energy region above giant resonance the quasi-deuteron absorption is the dominant process. With these combined models, the subsequent secondary interactions of the emerging particle with the rest of the nucleus following the initial photon-nucleus interaction are appropriately taken into account. The experimental difference energy spectra of fast photoneutrons from several elements (Al, Cu, In, Sn, Ta, Pb, Bi and U) at bremsstrahlung energies of 55 and 85 MeV and the photoproton energy spectra from 12 C at bremsstrahlung energy 110 MeV were compared with the theoretical predictions. General agreements in both spectral shapes and cross sections are obtained. The relative yields of the reactions (γ, xn) resulting from monoenergetic photons on 127 I at 50, 100 and 150 MeV are also predicted reasonably well by the combined models together with the conventional evaporation theory

  19. Discovering a Change in Equilibrium Constant with Change in Ionic Strength: An Empirical Laboratory Experiment for General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzberg, Richard J.

    1999-05-01

    Students are challenged to investigate the hypothesis that an equilibrium constant, Kc, measured as a product and quotient of molar concentrations, is constant at constant temperature. Spectrophotometric measurements of absorbance of a solution of Fe3+(aq) and SCN-(aq) treated with different amounts of KNO3 are made to determine Kc for the formation of FeSCN2+(aq). Students observe a regular decrease in the value of Kc as the concentration of added KNO3 is increased.

  20. Standard Gibbs energies of formation and equilibrium constants from ab-initio calculations: Covalent dimerization of NO2 and synthesis of NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awasthi, Neha; Ritschel, Thomas; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Knecht, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • ΔG and K eq for NO 2 dimerization and NH 3 synthesis calculated via ab-initio methods. • Vis-á-vis experiments, W1 and CCSD(T) are accurate and G3B3 also does quite well. • CBS-APNO most accurate for NH 3 reaction but shows limitations in modeling NO 2 . • Temperature dependence of ΔG and K eq is calculated for the NH 3 reaction. • Good agreement of calculated K eq with experiments and the van’t Hoff approximation. -- Abstract: Standard quantum chemical methods are used for accurate calculation of thermochemical properties such as enthalpies of formation, entropies and Gibbs energies of formation. Equilibrium reactions are widely investigated and experimental measurements often lead to a range of reaction Gibbs energies and equilibrium constants. It is useful to calculate these equilibrium properties from quantum chemical methods in order to address the experimental differences. Furthermore, most standard calculation methods differ in accuracy and feasibility of the system size. Hence, a systematic comparison of equilibrium properties calculated with different numerical algorithms would provide a useful reference. We select two well-known gas phase equilibrium reactions with small molecules: covalent dimer formation of NO 2 (2NO 2 ⇌ N 2 O 4 ) and the synthesis of NH 3 (N 2 + 3 H 2 ⇌ 2NH 3 ). We test four quantum chemical methods denoted by G3B3, CBS-APNO, W1 and CCSD(T) with aug-cc-pVXZ basis sets (X = 2, 3, and 4), to obtain thermochemical data for NO 2 , N 2 O 4 , and NH 3 . The calculated standard formation Gibbs energies Δ f G° are used to calculate standard reaction Gibbs energies Δ r G° and standard equilibrium constants K eq for the two reactions. Standard formation enthalpies Δ f H° are calculated in a more reliable way using high-level methods such as W1 and CCSD(T). Standard entropies S° for the molecules are calculated well within the range of experiments for all methods, however, the values of standard formation

  1. Description of the equilibrium conditions of chemical reactions in various solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehl, H.

    1983-01-01

    Empirical knowledge is taken as the basis for establishing a method to predict the equilibrium conditions of reactions of macrocyclic polyethers and monovalent metal cations in various solvents. The reactions in the solvents under review can be well described by the donor number DN according to Gutmann, and by the parameters alpha and pi-asterisk for the H bonding donor and polarity/polarisability, respectively, using a three-parameter equation according to Kamlet/Taft. This applies to both protic and aprotic solvents. The calculations rely on data found in the literature and on own experimental results obtained by microcalorimetric examinations. The evaluation methods evolved for this purpose also allow, by means of additional dilution experiments, to convert the ''integral'', microcalorimetrically obtained complex stability constants, (i.e. those non-discriminating between different types of state such as ions or ion pairs) to the corresponding ''differentiating'' constants (referring to purely ionic quantities), and this applied to the various solvents used. The method does not use foreign ions and can thus also be applied to those cases for which the normal standardisation of reaction conditions published in the literature cannot be maintained (e.g. for reasons of solubility). In some cases it was possible to obtain additional information on the dissociation behaviour of the salts used, which revealed differently strong inclination to form higher aggregations in solution, as shown e.g. by the strong concentration dependence of the salt ion pair dissociation constants obtained. (orig./EF) [de

  2. Determination of Equilibrium Constant and Relative Brightness in FRET-FCS by Including the Third-Order Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingyi; He, Shanshan; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2017-12-21

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) encodes the information on the equilibrium constant (K), the relative fluorescence brightness of fluorophore (Q), and the forward and backward reaction rate constants (k + and k - ) on a physical or chemical relaxation. However, it has been a long-standing problem to completely resolve the FCS data to get the thermodynamic and kinetic information. Recently, we have solved the problem for fluorescence autocorrelation spectroscopy (FACS). Here, we extend the method to fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS), which appears when FCS is coupled with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Among 12 total second-order and third-order pre-exponential factors in a relaxation process probed by the FRET-FCS technique, 3 are independent. We presented and discussed 3 sets of explicit solutions to use these pre-exponential factors to calculate K and Q. Together with the relaxation time, the acquired K will allow people to obtain k + and k - , so that the goal of deciphering the FRET-FCS data will be fully reached. The theory is verified by extensive computer simulations and tested experimentally on a system of oligonucleotide hybridization.

  3. Rare events in many-body systems: reactive paths and reaction constants for structural transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picciani, M.

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with the study of fundamental physics phenomena, with applications to nuclear materials of interest. We have developed methods for the study of rare events related to thermally activated structural transitions in many body systems. The first method involves the numerical simulation of the probability current associated with reactive paths. After deriving the evolution equations for the probability current, a Diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm is implemented in order to sample this current. This technique, called Transition Current Sampling was applied to the study of structural transitions in a cluster of 38 atoms with Lennard-Jones potential (LJ-38). A second algorithm, called Transition Path Sampling with local Lyapunov bias (LyTPS), was then developed. LyTPS calculates reaction rates at finite temperature by following the transition state theory. A statistical bias based on the maximum local Lyapunov exponents is introduced to accelerate the sampling of reactive trajectories. To extract the value of the equilibrium reaction constants obtained from LyTPS, we use the Multistate Bennett Acceptance Ratio. We again validate this method on the LJ-38 cluster. LyTPS is then used to calculate migration constants for vacancies and divacancies in the α-Iron, and the associated migration entropy. These constants are used as input parameter for codes modeling the kinetic evolution after irradiation (First Passage Kinetic Monte Carlo) to reproduce numerically resistivity recovery experiments in α-Iron. (author) [fr

  4. Analysis of responsive characteristics of ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel with consideration of effect of equilibrium constant by a chemo-electro-mechanical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Lai, Fukun; Luo, Rongmo

    2009-11-17

    A multiphysics model is presented in this paper for analysis of the influence of various equilibrium constants on the smart hydrogel responsive to the ionic strength of environmental solution, and termed the multieffect-coupling ionic-strength stimulus (MECis) model. The model is characterized by a set of partial differential governing equations by consideration of the mass and momentum conservations of the system and coupled chemical, electrical, and mechanical multienergy domains. The Nernst-Planck equations are derived by the mass conservation of the ionic species in both the interstitial fluid of the hydrogel and the surrounding solution. The binding reaction between the fixed charge groups of the hydrogel and the mobile ions in the solution is described by the fixed charge equation, which is based on the Langmuir monolayer theory. As an important effect for the binding reaction, the equilibrium constant is incorporated into the fixed charge equation. The kinetics of the hydrogel swelling/deswelling is illustrated by the mechanical equation, based on the law of momentum conservation for the solid polymeric networks matrix within the hydrogel. The MECis model is examined by comparison of the numerical simulations and experiments from open literature. The analysis of the influence of different equilibrium constants on the responsive characteristics of the ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel is carried out with detailed discussion.

  5. An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999

  6. Reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 in the temperature range 233-400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 were measured in the temperature range 233-400 K using a discharge flow system with photofragment emission detection. In the range 233-253 K, the constants are approximately a constant value, and then increase with increasing temperature. This result suggests that the reaction may have two different channels. An expression representing the reaction rate constants is presented.

  7. Evaluation of equilibrium constants for deprotonation and lactonisation of α-D-isosaccharinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Kitamura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    A great deal of disagreement exists in the literature regarding the intrinsic deprotonation and lactonisation constants of α-D-isosaccharinic acid (ISA). Based on a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and interpretations using the specific ion interaction theory (SIT) of extensive experimental Ca(ISA) 2 (cr) solubility data involving α-D-isosaccharinic acid, the reliable value of log 10 K° for [HISA(aq) ⇌ ISA - + H + ] is -3.27 ± 0.01 and for [HISA(aq) ⇌ ISL(α-D-isosaccharinate-1,4-lactone)(aq) + H 2 O] is 0.49 ± 0.09. These data also provide log 10 K° of -3.76 ± 0.09 for the reaction [ISL(aq) + H 2 O ⇌ ISA - + H + ] and -3.88 ± 0.09 for the composite reaction [HISA(aq) + ISL(aq) ⇌ ISA - + H + ]. Reinterpretation of extensive Ca(ISA) 2 (cr) solubility data using the SIT activity coefficient model provides log 10 K° of -6.40 ± 0.09 for [Ca(ISA) 2 (cr) ⇌ Ca 2+ + 2(ISA) - ] and of 1.70 ± 0.09 for [Ca 2+ + ISA - ⇌ CaISA + ] which are consistent with all of the available values. (author)

  8. Reaction of H2 with O2 in Excited Electronic States: Reaction Pathways and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelevkin, Alexey V; Loukhovitski, Boris I; Sharipov, Alexander S

    2017-12-21

    Comprehensive quantum chemical analysis with the use of the multireference state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field approach was carried out to study the reactions of H 2 with O 2 in a 1 Δ g , b 1 Σ g + , c 1 Σ u - , and A' 3 Δ u electronically excited states. The energetically favorable reaction pathways and possible intersystem crossings have been revealed. The energy barriers were refined employing the extended multiconfiguration quasi-degenerate second-order perturbation theory. It has been shown that the interaction of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (A' 3 Δ u ) with H 2 occurs through the H-abstraction process with relatively low activation barriers that resulted in the formation of the HO 2 molecule in A″ and A' electronic states, respectively. Meanwhile, molecular oxygen in singlet sigma states (b 1 Σ g + and c 1 Σ u - ) was proved to be nonreactive with respect to the molecular hydrogen. Appropriate rate constants for revealed reaction and quenching channels have been estimated using variational transition-state theory including corrections for the tunneling effect, possible nonadiabatic transitions, and anharmonicity of vibrations for transition states and reactants. It was demonstrated that the calculated reaction rate constant for the H 2 + O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) process is in reasonable agreement with known experimental data. The Arrhenius approximations for these processes have been proposed for the temperature range T = 300-3000 K.

  9. Ozonation of norfloxacin and levofloxacin in water: Specific reaction rate constants and defluorination reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Wencui; Ben, Weiwei; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Qiang, Zhimin

    2018-03-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of two typical fluoroquinolones (FQs), norfloxacin (NF) and levofloxacin (LOF), by ozone in water were investigated. Semi-continuous mode and competition kinetics mode experiments were conducted to determine the reaction rate constants of target FQs with ozone and OH, separately. Results indicate that both NF and LOF were highly reactive toward ozone, and the reactivity was strongly impacted by the solution pH. The specific reaction rate constants of the diprotonated, monoprotonated and deprotonated species were determined to be 7.20 × 10 2 , 8.59 × 10 3 , 4.54 × 10 5  M -1  s -1 respectively for NF and 1.30 × 10 3 , 1.40 × 10 4 , 1.33 × 10 6  M -1  s -1 respectively for LOF. The reaction rate constants of target FQs toward OH were measured to be (4.81-7.41) × 10 9  M -1  s -1 in the pH range of 6.3-8.3. Furthermore, NF was selected as a model compound to clarify the degradation pathways, with a particular focus on the defluorination reaction. The significant release of F - ions and the formation of three F-free organic byproducts indicated that defluorination was a prevalent pathway in ozonation of FQs, while six F-containing organic byproducts indicated that ozone also attacked the piperazinyl and quinolone moieties. Escherichia coli growth inhibition tests revealed that ozonation could effectively eliminate the antibacterial activity of target FQ solutions, and the residual antibacterial activity had a negative linear correlation with the released F - concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Simulation of weak polyelectrolytes: a comparison between the constant pH and the reaction ensemble method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsgesell, Jonas; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2017-03-01

    The reaction ensemble and the constant pH method are well-known chemical equilibrium approaches to simulate protonation and deprotonation reactions in classical molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. In this article, we demonstrate the similarity between both methods under certain conditions. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of a weak polyelectrolyte in order to compare the titration curves obtained by both approaches. Our findings reveal a good agreement between the methods when the reaction ensemble is used to sweep the reaction constant. Pronounced differences between the reaction ensemble and the constant pH method can be observed for stronger acids and bases in terms of adaptive pH values. These deviations are due to the presence of explicit protons in the reaction ensemble method which induce a screening of electrostatic interactions between the charged titrable groups of the polyelectrolyte. The outcomes of our simulation hint to a better applicability of the reaction ensemble method for systems in confined geometries and titrable groups in polyelectrolytes with different pKa values.

  11. Reaction-rate formula in out of equilibrium quantum field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Niegawa, A.; Okano, K.; Ozaki, H.

    1999-01-01

    A complete derivation, from first principles, of the reaction-rate formula for a generic reaction taking place in an out of equilibrium quantum-field system is given. It is shown that the formula involves no finite-volume correction. Each term of the reaction-rate formula represents a set of physical processes that contribute to the reaction under consideration.

  12. Isotopic equilibrium constants of the deuterium exchange between HDO and H2S, H2Se and H2Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, D.

    1959-11-01

    We have determined experimentally the equilibrium constant K of each of the following isotope exchanges: SH 2 + OHD ↔ SHD + OH 2 ; SeH 2 + OHD ↔ SeHD + OH 2 ; TeH 2 + OHD ↔ TeHD + OH 2 . In gaseous phase, statistical thermodynamics leads to the expression: K (Z OHD x Z RH 2 )/(Z OH 2 x Z RHD ) x e W/T (R being the elements S, Se or Te). Z, the partition functions, have been calculated and, through our experimental results, the constant W has been determined. Having obtained W, the equilibrium constant K has been calculated for a series of temperatures. (author) [fr

  13. Constrained least squares methods for estimating reaction rate constants from spectroscopic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, S.; Boelens, H.F.M.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Smilde, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Model errors, experimental errors and instrumental noise influence the accuracy of reaction rate constant estimates obtained from spectral data recorded in time during a chemical reaction. In order to improve the accuracy, which can be divided into the precision and bias of reaction rate constant

  14. Estimating reaction rate constants: comparison between traditional curve fitting and curve resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, S.; Boelens, H. F. M.; Hoefsloot, H. C. J.; Smilde, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    A traditional curve fitting (TCF) algorithm is compared with a classical curve resolution (CCR) approach for estimating reaction rate constants from spectral data obtained in time of a chemical reaction. In the TCF algorithm, reaction rate constants an estimated from the absorbance versus time data

  15. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly; Kim, Young Jin; Jardine, Philip M.; Watson, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M. partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M. species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions

  16. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  17. Distance-dependent diffusion-controlled reaction of •NO and O2•- at chemical equilibrium with ONOO-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Horacio; Möller, Matías N; Steinmann, Daniel; Nauser, Thomas; Koppenol, Willem H; Denicola, Ana; Radi, Rafael

    2010-12-16

    The fast reaction of (•)NO and O(2)(•-) to give ONOO(-) has been extensively studied at irreversible conditions, but the reasons for the wide variations in observed forward rate constants (3.8 ≤ k(f) ≤ 20 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) remain unexplained. We characterized the diffusion-dependent aqueous (pH > 12) chemical equilibrium of the form (•)NO + O(2)(•-) = ONOO(-) with respect to its dependence on temperature, viscosity, and [ONOO(-)](eq) by determining [ONOO(-)](eq) and [(•)NO](eq). The equilibrium forward reaction rate constant (k(f)(eq)) has negative activation energy, in contrast to that found under irreversible conditions. In contradiction to the law of mass action, we demonstrate that the equilibrium constant depends on ONOO(-) concentration. Therefore, a wide range of k(f)(eq) values could be derived (7.5-21 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). Of general interest, the variations in k(f) can thus be explained by its dependence on the distance between ONOO(-) particles (sites of generation of (•)NO and O(2)(•-)).

  18. BGK-type models in strong reaction and kinetic chemical equilibrium regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaco, R; Bianchi, M Pandolfi; Soares, A J

    2005-01-01

    A BGK-type procedure is applied to multi-component gases undergoing chemical reactions of bimolecular type. The relaxation process towards local Maxwellians, depending on mass and numerical densities of each species as well as common velocity and temperature, is investigated in two different cases with respect to chemical regimes. These cases are related to the strong reaction regime characterized by slow reactions, and to the kinetic chemical equilibrium regime where fast reactions take place. The consistency properties of both models are stated in detail. The trend to equilibrium is numerically tested and comparisons for the two regimes are performed within the hydrogen-air and carbon-oxygen reaction mechanism. In the spatial homogeneous case, it is also shown that the thermodynamical equilibrium of the models recovers satisfactorily the asymptotic equilibrium solutions to the reactive Euler equations

  19. Non-equilibrium reactive flux: A unified framework for slow and fast reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2017-10-21

    The flux formulation of reaction rate theory is recast in terms of the expectation value of the reactive flux with an initial condition that corresponds to a non-equilibrium, factorized reactant density. In the common case of slow reactive processes, the non-equilibrium expression reaches the plateau regime only slightly slower than the equilibrium flux form. When the reactants are described by a single quantum state, as in the case of electron transfer reactions, the factorized reactant density describes the true initial condition of the reactive process. In such cases, the time integral of the non-equilibrium flux expression yields the reactant population as a function of time, allowing characterization of the dynamics in cases where there is no clear separation of time scales and thus a plateau regime cannot be identified. The non-equilibrium flux offers a unified approach to the kinetics of slow and fast chemical reactions and is ideally suited to mixed quantum-classical methods.

  20. Modelling of the migration of lanthanoids and actinoids in ground water; the medium dependence of equilibrium constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, G.; Bruno, J.; Ferri, D.; Grenthe, I.; Salvatore, F.; Spahiu, K.

    1982-01-01

    The examples given in this communication indicate that it is possible to obtain a good estimate of the medium dependence of equilibrium constants by using the specific interaction theory. The theory is applicable both when extrapolating equilibrium constants to zero ionic strength and for the estimation of activity coefficients in mixtures of electrolytes. Many interaction coefficients are available in the literature, or can be calculated from published mean activity coefficient or isopiestic data. The magnitude of interaction coefficients can often be correlated with the charge and size of ions. This offers a possibility to estimate the coefficients for complexes, for which direct experimental information is difficult to get. The specific interaction theory is superior to the empirical equations of the Davies type. There is superior to the empirical equations of the Davies type. There is sufficient experimental information on interaction coefficients to warrant the implementation of the specific interaction approach in existing specifiation codes

  1. Determination, at equilibrium, of association constants of labelled or unlabelled ligands by a non-graphical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertz, G.; Longchampt, J.; Crepy, O.; Judas, O.; Jayle, M.-F.

    1976-01-01

    Determination, at equilibrium of association constants of labelled or unlabelled ligands by a non-graphical method are described. This work deals with the determination of association constants at equilibrium by a non-graphical method in binding systems containing one specific receptor. Equations have been derived from that originally described by Lea (Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 322, 68-74), the terms of which are obtained from the data of simple displacement curves of a bound radioactive ligand by unlabelled competitors identical or different in nature. By knowing the function relating the variations of the bound ligand (B) to the affinity constant (Ksub(i)) and the quantity (Msub(i)) of competitor for a given system, it is possible to calculate any of these parameters when the two others are measured. Thus, it becomes easy to compare the relative affinities of different receptors for the same ligand or that of one receptor for various labelled or unlabelled ligands. Furthermore, theoretical displacement curves can be drawn and compared to experimental data, only when knowing the affinity constant of a specific binding system in given conditions. These modes of calculation have been tested in a study of interactions between various steroids and a fraction of human serum proteins precipitated by ammonium sulfate (30-45%) and containing the sex hormone-binding globulin. Association constants thus obtained agree well with those reported in the literature and determined by graphical procedures

  2. Constant rate thermal analysis of a dehydrogenation reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perejon, A.; Perez-Maqueda, L. A.; Sanchez-Jimenez, P.E.; Criado, J. M.; Murafa, Nataliya; Šubrt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 84 (2016), s. 81454-81460 ISSN 2046-2069 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : solid-state reaction s * hydrogen storage properties * milled magnesium hydride Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  3. Reaction rate constant for uranium in water and water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRIMBLE, D.J.

    1998-11-09

    The literature on uranium oxidation in water and oxygen free water vapor was reviewed. Arrhenius rate equations were developed from the review data. These data and equations will be used as a baseline from which to compare reaction rates measured for K Basin fuel.

  4. The determination methods of the velocity constant for electrochemical reactions; Les methodes de determination de la constante de vitesse des reactions electrochimiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, R

    1963-07-01

    In a brief introduction are recalled the fundamental mechanisms of the electrochemical reaction and the definition of the intrinsic velocity constant of a such reaction. By the nature of the different parameters which enter in this definition are due some experimental problems which are examined. Then are given the principles of the measurement methods of the velocity constant. These methods are developed with the mathematical expression of the different rates of the mass transfer to an electrode. In each case are given the experimental limits of use of the methods and the size order of the velocity constant that can be reached. A list of fundamental works to be consulted conclude this work. (O.M.) [French] Dans une breve introduction sont rappeles les mecanismes fondamentaux de la reaction electrochimique et la definition de la constante de vitesse intrinseque d'une telle reaction. De la nature des differents parametres qui entrent dans celle definition, decoulent un certain nombre de problemes experimentaux qui sont passes en revue. On donne ensuite les principes des methodes de mesure de la constante de vitesse. L'exposition de ces methodes est developpee a l'aide de l'expression mathematique des differents regimes de transfert de masse a une electrode. On s'attache dans chaque cas, a donner les limitations experimentales d'utilisation des methodes et l'ordre de grandeur de la constante de vitesse qu'elles permettent d'atteindre. Une liste des ouvrages fondamentaux a consulter conclut ce travail. (auteur)

  5. Pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions: An introduction to classical and quantum-mechanical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Akkermans, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In studies of light-ion induced nuclear reactions one distinguishes three different mechanisms: direct, compound and pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions. These reaction processes can be subdivided according to time scales or, equivalently, the number of intranuclear collisions taking place before emission. Furthermore, each mechanism preferably excites certain parts of the nuclear level spectrum and is characterized by different types of angular distributions. This presentation includes description of the classical, exciton model, semi-classical models, with some selected results, and quantum mechanical models. A survey of classical versus quantum-mechanical pre-equilibrium reaction theory is presented including practical applications

  6. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  7. Numerical simulation of air hypersonic flows with equilibrium chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, Vladislav; Karpenko, Anton; Volkov, Konstantin

    2018-05-01

    The finite volume method is applied to solve unsteady three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes. High-temperature gas effects altering the aerodynamics of vehicles are taken into account. Possibilities of the use of graphics processor units (GPUs) for the simulation of hypersonic flows are demonstrated. Solutions of some test cases on GPUs are reported, and a comparison between computational results of equilibrium chemically reacting and perfect air flowfields is performed. Speedup of solution on GPUs with respect to the solution on central processor units (CPUs) is compared. The results obtained provide promising perspective for designing a GPU-based software framework for practical applications.

  8. Rate constants for some electrophilic reactions of benzyl, benzhydryl, and trityl cations in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujdak, R.J.; Jones, R.L.; Dorfman, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute rate constants have been determined by the pulse radiolysis technique for several electrophilic reactions of the benzyl, the benzhydryl, and the trityl cation in 1,2-dichloroethane solution. The rate constants for the reactions of these carbonium ions with chloride ion, with bromide ion, and with iodide ion are all very nearly the same, namely 6 x 10 10 M -1 s -1 at 24 0 C. The values very likely represent the diffusion controlled limit for the ion combination reactions. The rate constants for the reactions with triethylamine, tri-n-propylamine, and tri-n-butylamine range from 2.0 x 10 9 to 7 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 at 24 0 C. With increasing phenyl substitution, the decreasing trend in the magnitude of the rate constant is consistent with the combined electronic and steric effects. With increasing size of the amine, the decrease in the value of the rate constant seems to indicate that the steric effect predominates. The values of the rate constants for reactions of benzyl and benzhydryl cation with methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol indicate the following. The rate constant is higher for reaction with the alcohol dimer in solution than with alcohol monomer. The rate constants for reaction with alcohol monomer have values of 1 x 10 8 M -1 s -1 or lower

  9. METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific “microequilibrium” constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  10. Attainment of chemical equilibrium in effusive beam sources of the heterogeneous reaction type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildenbrand, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Effusive beam sources derived from gas-solid reactions provide a very important pathway for widening the scope of high temperature thermodynamic studies, but the attainment of chemical equilibrium within these sources is problematical. Some of the underlying kinetic factors associated with the use of these sources are discussed. As one might expect, it is important to maximize the ratio of reactive surface area to exit orifice area. Equilibrium seems to be achieved more readily among the products of gas-solid reactions than among reactant and products, as suggested by the quasi-equilibrium model. Some experiences with the use of heterogeneous reaction sources are described, and two definitive tests for the establishment of equilibrium are outlined

  11. Rates and equilibrium constants of the ligand-induced conformational transition of an HCN ion channel protein domain determined by DEER spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collauto, Alberto; DeBerg, Hannah A; Kaufmann, Royi; Zagotta, William N; Stoll, Stefan; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2017-06-14

    Ligand binding can induce significant conformational changes in proteins. The mechanism of this process couples equilibria associated with the ligand binding event and the conformational change. Here we show that by combining the application of W-band double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy with microfluidic rapid freeze quench (μRFQ) it is possible to resolve these processes and obtain both equilibrium constants and reaction rates. We studied the conformational transition of the nitroxide labeled, isolated carboxy-terminal cyclic-nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of the HCN2 ion channel upon binding of the ligand 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Using model-based global analysis, the time-resolved data of the μRFQ DEER experiments directly provide fractional populations of the open and closed conformations as a function of time. We modeled the ligand-induced conformational change in the protein using a four-state model: apo/open (AO), apo/closed (AC), bound/open (BO), bound/closed (BC). These species interconvert according to AC + L ⇌ AO + L ⇌ BO ⇌ BC. By analyzing the concentration dependence of the relative contributions of the closed and open conformations at equilibrium, we estimated the equilibrium constants for the two conformational equilibria and the open-state ligand dissociation constant. Analysis of the time-resolved μRFQ DEER data gave estimates for the intrinsic rates of ligand binding and unbinding as well as the rates of the conformational change. This demonstrates that DEER can quantitatively resolve both the thermodynamics and the kinetics of ligand binding and the associated conformational change.

  12. A procedure to find thermodynamic equilibrium constants for CO2 and CH4 adsorption on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, T T; van Erp, T S; Bedeaux, D; Kjelstrup, S; Grande, C A

    2015-03-28

    Thermodynamic equilibrium for adsorption means that the chemical potential of gas and adsorbed phase are equal. A precise knowledge of the chemical potential is, however, often lacking, because the activity coefficient of the adsorbate is not known. Adsorption isotherms are therefore commonly fitted to ideal models such as the Langmuir, Sips or Henry models. We propose here a new procedure to find the activity coefficient and the equilibrium constant for adsorption which uses the thermodynamic factor. Instead of fitting the data to a model, we calculate the thermodynamic factor and use this to find first the activity coefficient. We show, using published molecular simulation data, how this procedure gives the thermodynamic equilibrium constant and enthalpies of adsorption for CO2(g) on graphite. We also use published experimental data to find similar thermodynamic properties of CO2(g) and of CH4(g) adsorbed on activated carbon. The procedure gives a higher accuracy in the determination of enthalpies of adsorption than ideal models do.

  13. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of intrinsic equilibrium constants at an alumina/electrolyte interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SLOBODAN K. MILONJIC

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic ionization and complexation constants at an alumina/electrolyte interface were studied by the site binding model, while the sorption of alkali cations from aqueous solutions was interpreted by the triple-layer model. The surface properties of alumina were investigated by the potentiometric acid-base titration method. The point of zero charge (pHpzc of alumina obtained by this method was found to be 7.2. The obtained mean values of the intrinsic protonation and ionization constants of the surface hydroxyl groups and the intrinsic surface complexation constant, in different electrolytes, are pKinta1 = 4.4, pKinta2 = 9.6 and pKintM+ = 9.5, respectively.

  15. Lyapunov Functions, Stationary Distributions, and Non-equilibrium Potential for Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, David F; Craciun, Gheorghe; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    We consider the relationship between stationary distributions for stochastic models of reaction systems and Lyapunov functions for their deterministic counterparts. Specifically, we derive the well-known Lyapunov function of reaction network theory as a scaling limit of the non-equilibrium potent...

  16. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS) to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66’s pKa. PMID:26506245

  17. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongwu Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66's pKa.

  18. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-10-01

    Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS) to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66's pKa.

  19. The time dependence of rate constants of esub(aq)sup(-) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burcl, R.; Byakov, V.M.; Grafutin, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    Published data about the time dependence of rate constants k(esub(aq)sup(-)+Ac) of esub(aq)sup(-) reactions with the acceptor Ac are analyzed, using the results of rate constant k(Ps+Ac) measurements for positronium reactions. It is shown that neither esub(aq)sup(-) nor Ps reaction rate constants depend on time in the observable range. Experimentally found concentration dependence of k(esub(aq)sup(-)+Ac) is due to other factors, connected with the existence of electric charge of esub(aq)sup(-), e.g. ionic strength, tunnelling effect etc. (author)

  20. Models of direct reactions and quantum pre-equilibrium for nucleon scattering on spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.

    2006-01-01

    When a nucleon collides with a target nucleus, several reactions may occur: elastic and inelastic scatterings, charge exchange... In order to describe these reactions, different models are involved: the direct reactions, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus models. Our goal is to study, within a quantum framework and without any adjustable parameter, the direct and pre-equilibrium reactions for nucleons scatterings off double closed-shell nuclei. We first consider direct reactions: we are studying nucleon scattering with the Melbourne G-matrix, which represents the interaction between the projectile and one target nucleon, and with random phase approximation (RPA) wave functions which describe all target states. This is a fully microscopic approach since no adjustable parameters are involved. A second part is dedicated to the study of nucleon inelastic scattering for large energy transfer which necessarily involves the pre-equilibrium mechanism. Several models have been developed in the past to deal with pre-equilibrium. They start from the Born expansion of the transition amplitude which is associated to the inelastic process and they use several approximations which have not yet been tested. We have achieved some comparisons between second order cross sections which have been calculated with and without these approximations. Our results allow us to criticize some of these approximations and give several directions to improve the quantum pre-equilibrium models. (author)

  1. Use of equilibrium constant expression for initial screening of potential antithyroid agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, I.; Nanawar, M.A.; Tasneem, A.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic antithyroid agents act through inhibition of enzyme or by making stable charge transfer (CT) complex with iodine. Iodine acts as s-acceptor and the synthetic compound as n-donor. Study of CT complexation of various drugs with iodine using UV/visible spectroscopy has revealed a positive correlation between the formation constant (Kc) and in vivo an activity. Some alkyl derivatives of 9H-purine-6-thiol were synthesized and evaluated in vitro as well as in vivo for potential antithyroid effects. The compounds exhibited 1:1 charge transfer complexation with iodine and have quite high values of formation constants. The blood assays of rats treated with these compounds and histological study of the thyroid tissues indicated the hyperactivity of gland. These compounds are expected to have lesser side effects as the sulfa group, a cause of toxicity in many medicines, is blocked. Phenyl derivative proved to be the most potent antithyroid agent comparable with methimazole. (author)

  2. Rate Constants for the Reactions of Hydroxyl Radical with Several Alkanes, Cycloalkanes, and Dimethyl Ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMore, W.; Bayes, K.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiements were used to measure rate constants and temperature denpendencies of the reactions of OH with propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, and dimethyl ether.

  3. The correlation schemes in calculations of the rate constants of some radiation chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorets, P.A.; Shostenko, A.G.; Kim, V.

    1983-01-01

    The various correlation relationships of the evaluation of the rate constants of radiation chemical reactions of addition, abstraction and isomerization were considered. It was shown that neglection of the influence of solvent can result in errors in calculations of rate constants equalling two orders in magnitude. Several examples of isokinetic relationship are given. The methods of calculation of transmission coefficient of reaction addition have been discussed. (author)

  4. Rate constants for the reaction of OH radicals with 1-chloroalkanes at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, F.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1992-01-01

    The rate constants for the reaction of OH radicals with a series of 1-chloroalkanes were measured at 295 K and at a total pressure of 1 atm. The rate constants were obtained by using the absolute technique of pulse radiolysis combined with kinetic UV-spectroscopy. The results are discussed in terms...

  5. A Study of Interactions between Mixing and Chemical Reaction Using the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Fatemeh; Janbozorgi, Mohammad; Sheikhi, M. Reza H.; Metghalchi, Hameed

    2016-10-01

    The rate-controlled constrained-equilibrium (RCCE) method is employed to study the interactions between mixing and chemical reaction. Considering that mixing can influence the RCCE state, the key objective is to assess the accuracy and numerical performance of the method in simulations involving both reaction and mixing. The RCCE formulation includes rate equations for constraint potentials, density and temperature, which allows taking account of mixing alongside chemical reaction without splitting. The RCCE is a dimension reduction method for chemical kinetics based on thermodynamics laws. It describes the time evolution of reacting systems using a series of constrained-equilibrium states determined by RCCE constraints. The full chemical composition at each state is obtained by maximizing the entropy subject to the instantaneous values of the constraints. The RCCE is applied to a spatially homogeneous constant pressure partially stirred reactor (PaSR) involving methane combustion in oxygen. Simulations are carried out over a wide range of initial temperatures and equivalence ratios. The chemical kinetics, comprised of 29 species and 133 reaction steps, is represented by 12 RCCE constraints. The RCCE predictions are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the same kinetics, termed detailed kinetics model (DKM). The RCCE shows accurate prediction of combustion in PaSR with different mixing intensities. The method also demonstrates reduced numerical stiffness and overall computational cost compared to DKM.

  6. Computational Approaches to the Chemical Equilibrium Constant in Protein-ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo-Acosta, Joel José; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    The physiological role played by protein-ligand recognition has motivated the development of several computational approaches to the ligand binding affinity. Some of them, termed rigorous, have a strong theoretical foundation but involve too much computation to be generally useful. Some others alleviate the computational burden by introducing strong approximations and/or empirical calibrations, which also limit their general use. Most importantly, there is no straightforward correlation between the predictive power and the level of approximation introduced. Here, we present a general framework for the quantitative interpretation of protein-ligand binding based on statistical mechanics. Within this framework, we re-derive self-consistently the fundamental equations of some popular approaches to the binding constant and pinpoint the inherent approximations. Our analysis represents a first step towards the development of variants with optimum accuracy/efficiency ratio for each stage of the drug discovery pipeline. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Uncertain Henry's law constants compromise equilibrium partitioning calculations of atmospheric oxidation products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gas–particle partitioning governs the distribution, removal, and transport of organic compounds in the atmosphere and the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. The large variety of atmospheric species and their wide range of properties make predicting this partitioning equilibrium challenging. Here we expand on earlier work and predict gas–organic and gas–aqueous phase partitioning coefficients for 3414 atmospherically relevant molecules using COSMOtherm, SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry (SPARC, and poly-parameter linear free-energy relationships. The Master Chemical Mechanism generated the structures by oxidizing primary emitted volatile organic compounds. Predictions for gas–organic phase partitioning coefficients (KWIOM/G by different methods are on average within 1 order of magnitude of each other, irrespective of the numbers of functional groups, except for predictions by COSMOtherm and SPARC for compounds with more than three functional groups, which have a slightly higher discrepancy. Discrepancies between predictions of gas–aqueous partitioning (KW/G are much larger and increase with the number of functional groups in the molecule. In particular, COSMOtherm often predicts much lower KW/G for highly functionalized compounds than the other methods. While the quantum-chemistry-based COSMOtherm accounts for the influence of intra-molecular interactions on conformation, highly functionalized molecules likely fall outside of the applicability domain of the other techniques, which at least in part rely on empirical data for calibration. Further analysis suggests that atmospheric phase distribution calculations are sensitive to the partitioning coefficient estimation method, in particular to the estimated value of KW/G. The large uncertainty in KW/G predictions for highly functionalized organic compounds needs to be resolved to improve the quantitative treatment of SOA formation.

  8. Research on the quantum multistep theory for pre-equilibrium nuclear reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Su Zong Di; Abdurixit, A; Wang Shu Nuan; Li Bao Xian; Huang Zhong; Liu Jian Feng; Zhang Benai; Zhu Yao Yin; Li Zhi Wen

    2002-01-01

    The Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin (FKK) quantum multistep theory of the pre-equilibrium reaction is further improved and perfected. A unified description for the multistep compound (MSC) process of the pre-equilibrium reaction and the compound nucleus (CN) process of full equilibrium reaction can be presented. This formula can integrate MSC and CN theories with the optical model and Hauser-Feshbach formula, and can get self-consistent expression. In multistep direct (MSD) process of the pre-equilibrium reaction, the mu-step cross section can be expressed by the convolution of mu one-step cross section. And the one step cross section for continuum can be written as the product of an averaged DWBA matrix element and the state density. For calculating the multistep direct reaction cross section, two methods, the state densities and full microscopic model, are used and compared. Some typical experiments are analyzed by using the work mentioned above. The calculated results are reasonable and in good agreement with the e...

  9. The efficiency of driving chemical reactions by a physical non-equilibrium is kinetically controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göppel, Tobias; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-07-27

    An out-of-equilibrium physical environment can drive chemical reactions into thermodynamically unfavorable regimes. Under prebiotic conditions such a coupling between physical and chemical non-equilibria may have enabled the spontaneous emergence of primitive evolutionary processes. Here, we study the coupling efficiency within a theoretical model that is inspired by recent laboratory experiments, but focuses on generic effects arising whenever reactant and product molecules have different transport coefficients in a flow-through system. In our model, the physical non-equilibrium is represented by a drift-diffusion process, which is a valid coarse-grained description for the interplay between thermophoresis and convection, as well as for many other molecular transport processes. As a simple chemical reaction, we consider a reversible dimerization process, which is coupled to the transport process by different drift velocities for monomers and dimers. Within this minimal model, the coupling efficiency between the non-equilibrium transport process and the chemical reaction can be analyzed in all parameter regimes. The analysis shows that the efficiency depends strongly on the Damköhler number, a parameter that measures the relative timescales associated with the transport and reaction kinetics. Our model and results will be useful for a better understanding of the conditions for which non-equilibrium environments can provide a significant driving force for chemical reactions in a prebiotic setting.

  10. Equilibrium star formation in a constant Q disc: model optimization and initial tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Thilker, David A.; Zwaan, Martin A.

    2013-10-01

    We develop a model for the distribution of the interstellar medium (ISM) and star formation in galaxies based on recent studies that indicate that galactic discs stabilize to a constant stability parameter, which we combine with prescriptions of how the phases of the ISM are determined and for the star formation law (SFL). The model predicts the gas surface mass density and star formation intensity of a galaxy given its rotation curve, stellar surface mass density and the gas velocity dispersion. This model is tested on radial profiles of neutral and molecular ISM surface mass density and star formation intensity of 12 galaxies selected from the H I Nearby Galaxy Survey sample. Our tests focus on intermediate radii (0.3 to 1 times the optical radius) because there are insufficient data to test the outer discs and the fits are less accurate in detail in the centre. Nevertheless, the model produces reasonable agreement with the ISM mass and star formation rate integrated over the central region in all but one case. To optimize the model, we evaluate four recipes for the stability parameter, three recipes for apportioning the ISM into molecular and neutral components, and eight versions of the SFL. We find no clear-cut best prescription for the two-fluid (gas and stars) stability parameter Q2f and therefore for simplicity, we use the Wang and Silk approximation (QWS). We found that an empirical scaling between the molecular-to-neutral ISM ratio (Rmol) and the stellar surface mass density proposed by Leroy et al. works marginally better than the other two prescriptions for this ratio in predicting the ISM profiles, and noticeably better in predicting the star formation intensity from the ISM profiles produced by our model with the SFLs we tested. Thus, in the context of our modelled ISM profiles, the linear molecular SFL and the two-component SFL work better than the other prescriptions we tested. We incorporate these relations into our `constant Q disc' model.

  11. Reaction mechanisms and rate constants of waste degradation in landfill bioreactor systems with enzymatic-enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, P A; Hettiaratchi, J P A; Mehrotra, A K; Kumar, S

    2014-06-01

    Augmenting leachate before recirculation with peroxidase enzymes is a novel method to increase the available carbon, and therefore the food supply to microorganisms at the declining phase of the anaerobic landfill bioreactor operation. In order to optimize the enzyme-catalyzed leachate recirculation process, it is necessary to identify the reaction mechanisms and determine rate constants. This paper presents a kinetic model developed to ascertain the reaction mechanisms and determine the rate constants for enzyme catalyzed anaerobic waste degradation. The maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) for MnP enzyme-catalyzed reactors was 0.076 g(TOC)/g(DS).day. The catalytic turnover number (k(cat)) of the MnP enzyme-catalyzed was 506.7 per day while the rate constant (k) of the un-catalyzed reaction was 0.012 per day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Studies of nuclear second moments for pre-equilibrium nuclear reaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Yoshida, S.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear second moments, important inputs to pre-equilibrium reaction theories, are evaluated by assuming a simple model. The positive definite nature of the second moments is examined, and the nuclear level densities are calculated using positive definite second moments. (orig.)

  13. Equilibrium chemical reaction of supersonic hydrogen-air jets (the ALMA computer program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghobashi, S.

    1977-01-01

    The ALMA (axi-symmetrical lateral momentum analyzer) program is concerned with the computation of two dimensional coaxial jets with large lateral pressure gradients. The jets may be free or confined, laminar or turbulent, reacting or non-reacting. Reaction chemistry is equilibrium.

  14. Determine equilibrium dissociation constant of drug-membrane receptor affinity using the cell membrane chromatography relative standard method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weina; Yang, Liu; Lv, Yanni; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Yanmin; He, Langchong

    2017-06-23

    The equilibrium dissociation constant (K D ) of drug-membrane receptor affinity is the basic parameter that reflects the strength of interaction. The cell membrane chromatography (CMC) method is an effective technique to study the characteristics of drug-membrane receptor affinity. In this study, the K D value of CMC relative standard method for the determination of drug-membrane receptor affinity was established to analyze the relative K D values of drugs binding to the membrane receptors (Epidermal growth factor receptor and angiotensin II receptor). The K D values obtained by the CMC relative standard method had a strong correlation with those obtained by the frontal analysis method. Additionally, the K D values obtained by CMC relative standard method correlated with pharmacological activity of the drug being evaluated. The CMC relative standard method is a convenient and effective method to evaluate drug-membrane receptor affinity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Recurrence Relations for the Equilibrium Means of Distributions Arising in Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.K. Elsheikh

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we derive recurrence relations that describe how the equilibrium mean of the number molecules of a reactant varies with each of the parameters defining the initial state for four basic reversible chemical reactions. In essence, the relations provide a rationale for updating the equilibrium mean following the addition (or removal of a molecule of one of the types involved in the reaction, there being a relation for each type. With a new parameterization introduced for each reaction, the relations provide a convenient means of evaluating the means, variances and other important moments without any need to work out the underlying distributions. As an application, the relations are used to numerically assess-approximate expressions for the means and variances.

  16. Solvent effect on the rate and equilibrium of reaction between 10-phenylphenoxarsine and methyl iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, V.I.; Gumerov, N.S.; Rakhmatullin, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    Effect of solvent nature on nucleophilic capacity of three-coordinated arsenic and the equilibrium state of 10-phenylphenoxarsine (PA) reaction with methyl iodide are studied. Kinetic investigations are carried out by the conductometry at 24,35,45 deg C. It is established that quaternization of PA with methyl iodide when substituting a solvent (ketone for alcohol) increases 3-14 times with simultaneous growth of the activation energy value. When transforming from aprotic solvents to protic ones PA interaction equilibrium with methyl iodide shifts to the side of arsonic salt formation

  17. Reaction rate constant of HO2+O3 measured by detecting HO2 from photofragment fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, E. R.; Suto, Masako; Lee, Long C.; Coffey, Dewitt, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A room-temperature discharge-flow system investigation of the rate constant for the reaction 'HO2 + O3 yields OH + 2O2' has detected HO2 through the OH(A-X) fluorescence produced by photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. A reaction rate constant of 1.9 + or - 0.3 x 10 to the -15th cu cm/molecule per sec is obtained from first-order decay of HO2 in excess O3; this agrees well with published data.

  18. Kinetics of reaction dimer fatty acid C_36 with 1,9 diamino nonane and determination of thermodynamic constants by use of thermogravimetric analysis tga, and rheological constants for the resulted polyamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, H.; Falah, Al; Hammoy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Study the kinetics degradation of poly (dimeric acid C_36 with 1.9 – diamino nonane) was carried out by thermal analysis (TGA), and thermodynamic and equilibrium constants have been defined, moreover, study the kinetics of reaction between 1.9 – diamino nonane and dimer fatty acid C_36 was carried out in molten state, the reaction was performed at 160°, the acid value, and percentage of carboxylic functions of the product were determined. The polyamidation reaction was found to be of overall second order until conversion of 97% at 160°, then the order of reaction changes. The degree of dispersion, number molecular weight, weight molecular weight ,and viscosity molecular weight have been calculated during different times.The relationships between degree of dispersion, number Average molecular weight, weight average molecular weight, and viscosity molecular weight with time is linear at160°. Spectroscopy studies were carried out by infra-red and ultraviolet spectroscopy (author).

  19. Improved Simulation of the Pre-equilibrium Triton Emission in Nuclear Reactions Induced by Nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P. E.; Blann, M.

    2014-04-01

    A new approach is proposed for the calculation of non-equilibrium triton energy distributions in nuclear reactions induced by nucleons of intermediate energies. It combines models describing the nucleon pick-up, the coalescence and the triton knock-out processes. Emission and absorption rates for excited particles are represented by the pre-equilibrium hybrid model. The model of Sato, Iwamoto, Harada is used to describe the nucleon pick-up and the coalescence of nucleons from exciton configurations starting from (2p,1h) states. The contribution of the direct nucleon pick-up is described phenomenologically. Multiple pre-equilibrium emission of tritons is accounted for. The calculated triton energy distributions are compared with available experimental data.

  20. Phenomenological model for non-equilibrium deuteron emission in nucleon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeders, C.H.M.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for the calculation of non-equilibrium deuteron energy distributions in nuclear reactions induced by nucleons of intermediate energies. It combines the model of the nucleon pick-up, the coalescence and the deuteron knock-out. Emission and absorption rates for excited particles are described by the pre-equilibrium hybrid model. The model of Sato, Iwamoto, Harada is used to describe the nucleon pick-up and the coalescence of nucleons from the exciton configurations starting from (2p, 1h). The model of deuteron knock-out is formulated taking into account the Pauli principle for the nucleon-deuteron interaction inside a nucleus. The contribution of the direct nucleon pick-up is described phenomenologically. The multiple pre-equilibrium emission of particles is taken into account. The calculated deuteron energy distributions are compared with experimental data from 12 C to 209 Bi. (orig.)

  1. Pre-equilibrium assumptions and statistical model parameters effects on reaction cross-section calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1992-02-01

    A systematic study on effects of statistical model parameters and semi-classical pre-equilibrium emission models has been carried out for the (n,p) reactions on the 56 Fe and 60 Co target nuclei. The results obtained by using various assumptions within a given pre-equilibrium emission model differ among them more than the ones of different models used under similar conditions. The necessity of using realistic level density formulas is emphasized especially in connection with pre-equilibrium emission models (i.e. with the exciton state density expression), while a basic support could be found only by replacement of the Williams exciton state density formula with a realistic one. (author). 46 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Pre-equilibrium emission of nucleons from reactions induced by medium-energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolija, M.; Holuh, E.; Cindro, N.; Hilscher, D.

    1984-01-01

    Recent data on fast-nucleon emission in heavy-ion-induced reactions are analysed successfully in terms of pre-equilibrium models; it is shown that the relevant parameters of those models preserve the physical meaning they have in light-ion-induced reactions. The initial exciton number obtained from a Griffin-plot analysis and the initial number of degrees of freedom, which is the relevant parameter of the modified HMB model, appear to be approximately equal for a given reaction at a given energy. It is inferred that, for heavy-ion reactions, the determination of such a parameter is substantially dominated by the centre-of-mass energy per nucleon above the Coulomb barrier, in contrast with the results of nucleon-induced reactions

  3. Out-of-equilibrium catalysis of chemical reactions by electronic tunnel currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhioev, Alan A; Kosov, Daniel S; von Oppen, Felix

    2013-04-07

    We present an escape rate theory for current-induced chemical reactions. We use Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's functions to derive a Langevin equation for the reaction coordinate. Due to the out of equilibrium electronic degrees of freedom, the friction, noise, and effective temperature in the Langevin equation depend locally on the reaction coordinate. As an example, we consider the dissociation of diatomic molecules induced by the electronic current from a scanning tunnelling microscope tip. In the resonant tunnelling regime, the molecular dissociation involves two processes which are intricately interconnected: a modification of the potential energy barrier and heating of the molecule. The decrease of the molecular barrier (i.e., the current induced catalytic reduction of the barrier) accompanied by the appearance of the effective, reaction-coordinate-dependent temperature is an alternative mechanism for current-induced chemical reactions, which is distinctly different from the usual paradigm of pumping vibrational degrees of freedom.

  4. Rate constant and reaction coordinate of Trp-cage folding in explicit water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juraszek, J.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    We report rate constant calculations and a reaction coordinate analysis of the rate-limiting folding and unfolding process of the Trp-cage mini-protein in explicit solvent using transition interface sampling. Previous transition path sampling simulations revealed that in this (un)folding process the

  5. Library of neutron reaction cross-sections in the ABBN-93 constant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabrodskaya, S.V.; Korchagina, Zh.A.; Koshcheev, V.N.; Nikolaev, M.N.; Tsibulya, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The library of neutron reaction group cross-sections in the ABBN-93 constant set is described. The format used for data representation, the content and purpose of the sub-libraries and their practical application in the SCALE criticality safety estimation system are discussed. (author)

  6. Rate constant computation on some elementary reactions of Hg during combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Bo-wen; Bai, Jing-ru [Northeast Dianli Univ., Jilin (China). Inst. of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The geometry optimizations of reactants, products and transition states were made by the quantum chemistry MP2 method at the SDD basis function level for Hg, and 6-311++G(3df, 3pd) for others. The properties of stable minimums were validated by vibration frequencies analysis. Furthermore, the microcosmic chemical reaction mechanisms of reactions were investigated by ab initio calculations of quantum chemistry. On the basis of the geometry optimization, reaction rate constants within 298-2,000 K are calculated neither from experimental data nor by estimated, but directly from Quantum Chemistry software-Khimera.

  7. Ion exchange equilibrium for some uni-univalent and uni-divalent reaction systems using strongly basic anion exchange resin Duolite A-102 D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Lokhande

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The study on thermodynamics of ion exchange equilibrium for uni-univalent Cl-/I-, Cl-/Br-, and uni-divalent Cl-/SO42-, Cl-/C2O42- reaction systems was carried out using ion exchange resin Duolite A-102 D. The equilibrium constant K was calculated by taking into account the activity coefficient of ions both in solution as well as in the resin phase. The K values calculated for uni-univalent and uni-divalent anion exchange reaction systems was observed to increase with rise in temperature, indicating the endothermic exchange reactions having enthalpy values of 13.7, 38.0, 23.9, 22.9 kJ/mol, respectively.

  8. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of highly rarefied neutron gas under creative and destructive reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayasaka, Hideo

    1978-01-01

    The thermodynamic structures of non-equilibrium steady states of a highly rarefied neutron gas in various media are considered in terms of the irreversible processes due to creative and destructive reactions of neutrons with nuclei of these media and to neutrons supplied from external sources. The respective subsystems of the stationary neutron gas are regarded as imperfect equilibrium systems in the presence of the medium and the external neutron sources, and are treated like different species in a mixture. The entropy production due to neutron-nuclear reactions has a minimum value at the steady state. The distribution function of such a neutron gas is determined from the extremum condition in which entropy does not change, and is expressed as a shifted Boltzmann distribution specified by the respective values of the generalized chemical potential for each energy level. (author)

  9. Rate constant for the reaction of O(3P) with diacetylene from 210 to 423 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, M. B.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction of O(3P) with diacetylene (C4H2) has been measured as a function of pressure and temperature by the flash-photolysis/resonance-fluorescence method. At 298 K and below, no pressure dependence of the rate constant was observed, but at 423 K a moderate (factor-of-2) increase was detected in the range 3 to 75 torr Ar.Results at or near the high-pressure limit are represented by an Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 210 to 423 K. The results are compared with previous determinations, all of which employed the discharge-flow/mass-spectrometry technique. The mechanism of the reaction is considered, including both primary and secondary processes. The heats of formation of the reactants, adducts, and products for the O(3P) + C4H2 reaction are discussed and contrasted with those for O(3P) + C2H2.

  10. Rate Constant and Temperature Dependence for the Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals with 2-Flouropropane (FC-281ea) and Comparison with an Estimated Rate Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMore, W.; Wilson, E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiments were used to measure the rate constant and temperature dependence of the reaction of OH radicals with 2-fluoropropane (HFC-281ea), using ethane, propane, ethyl chloride as reference standards.

  11. Convergence to Equilibrium in Energy-Reaction-Diffusion Systems Using Vector-Valued Functional Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Alexander; Mittnenzweig, Markus

    2018-04-01

    We discuss how the recently developed energy dissipation methods for reaction diffusion systems can be generalized to the non-isothermal case. For this, we use concave entropies in terms of the densities of the species and the internal energy, where the importance is that the equilibrium densities may depend on the internal energy. Using the log-Sobolev estimate and variants for lower-order entropies as well as estimates for the entropy production of the nonlinear reactions, we give two methods to estimate the relative entropy by the total entropy production, namely a somewhat restrictive convexity method, which provides explicit decay rates, and a very general, but weaker compactness method.

  12. Pre-equilibrium (exciton) model and the heavy-ion reactions with cluster emission

    CERN Document Server

    Betak, E

    2015-01-01

    We bring the possibility to include the cluster emission into the statistical pre-equilibrium (exciton) model enlarged for considering also the heavy ion collisions. At this moment, the calculations have been done without treatment of angular momentum variables, but all the approach can be straightforwardly applied to heavy-ion reactions with cluster emission including the angular momentum variables. The direct motivation of this paper is a possibility of producing the superdeformed nuclei, which are easier to be detected in heavy-ion reactions than in those induced by light projectiles (nucleons, deuterons, $\\alpha$-particles).

  13. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays to measure equilibrium dissociation constants: GAL4-p53 binding DNA as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffler, Michael A; Walters, Ryan D; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D) ) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel; the DNA migrates more slowly when bound to a protein. To determine a K(D) the amount of unbound and protein-bound DNA in the gel is measured as the protein concentration increases. By performing this experiment, students will be introduced to making affinity measurements and gain experience in performing quantitative EMSAs. The experiment describes measuring the K(D) for the interaction between the chimeric protein GAL4-p53 and its DNA recognition site; however, the techniques are adaptable to other DNA binding proteins. In addition, the basic experiment described can be easily expanded to include additional inquiry-driven experimentation. © 2012 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun; Khaled, Fathi; Ning, Hongbo; Ma, Liuhao; Farooq, Aamir; Ren, Wei

    2017-01-01

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  15. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  16. Evaluation of Chemical Kinetic for Mathematics Model Reduction of Cadmium Reaction Rate, Constant and Reaction Orde in to Electrochemical Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno

    2007-01-01

    The experiment was reduction of cadmium rate with electrochemical influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. The aim of the experiment was to know the influence, mathematic model reduction of cadmium the reaction rate, reaction rate constant and reaction orde influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. Result of research indicate the time processing if using plate of copper electrode is during 30 minutes and using plate of aluminium electrode is during 20 minutes. Condition of strong current that used in process of electrochemical is only 0.8 ampere and concentration effective is 5.23 mg/l. The most effective type Al of electrode plate for reduction from waste and the efficiency of reduction is 98 %. (author)

  17. Reactions of cisplatin with cysteine and methionine at constant pH; a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Tomás; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2010-02-07

    Interactions of hydrated cisplatin complexes cis-[Pt(NH(3))(2)Cl(H(2)O)](+) and cis-[Pt(NH(3))(2)(OH)(H(2)O)](+) with cysteine and methionine in an aqueous solution at constant pH were explored using computational methods. Thermodynamic parameters of considered reactions were studied in a broad pH range, taking up to 4 protonation states of each molecule into account. Reaction free energies at constant pH were obtained from standard Gibbs free energies using the Legendre transformation. Solvation free energies and pK(a) values were calculated using the PCM model with UAHF cavities, recently adapted by us for transition metal complexes. The root mean square error of pK(a) values on a set of model platinum complexes and amino acids was equal to 0.74. At pH 7, the transformed Gibbs free energies differ by up to 15 kcal mol(-1) from the Gibbs free energies of model reactions with a constant number of protons. As for cysteine, calculations confirmed a strong preference for kappaS monodenate bonding in a broad pH range. The most stable product of the second reaction step, which proceeds from monodentate to chelate complex, is the kappa(2)S,N coordinated chelate. The reaction with methionine is more complex. In the first step all three considered methionine donor atoms (N, S and O) are thermodynamically preferred products depending on the platinum complex and the pH. This is in accordance with the experimental observation of a pH dependent migration between N and S donor atoms in a chemically related system. The most stable chelates of platinum with methionine are kappa(2)S,N and kappa(2)N,O bonded complexes. The comparison of reaction free energies of both amino acids suggests, that the bidentate methionine ligand can be displaced even by the monodentate cysteine ligand under certain conditions.

  18. The Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in the Radiolysis of Fe2+-Cu2+ Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbakke, Erling; Sehested, Knud; Rasmussen, O. Lang

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis and gamma radiolysis have been used to study the reaction mechanism in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe2+ and Cu2+. A reaction scheme has been developed and confirmed by computation of the corresponding complete set of differential equations. The rate constants for some ...... 10^{8}$ and $1.3\\times 10^{8}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$ in pH 2.1 H2 SO4 and HClO4, respectively.......Pulse radiolysis and gamma radiolysis have been used to study the reaction mechanism in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe2+ and Cu2+. A reaction scheme has been developed and confirmed by computation of the corresponding complete set of differential equations. The rate constants for some...... of the reactions have been determined at different pH's. $k_{{\\rm Cu}^{+}+{\\rm O}_{2}}=4.6\\times 10^{5}$ and $1.0\\times 10^{6}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$, $k_{{\\rm Cu}^{+}+{\\rm Fe}^{3+}}=5.5\\times 10^{6}$ and $1.3\\times 10^{7}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$, $k_{{\\rm Cu}({\\rm III)}+{\\rm Fe}^{2+}}=3.3\\times...

  19. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  20. The Rate Constant for the Reaction H + C2H5 at T = 295 - 150K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Andre S.; Payne, Walter A.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Cody, Regina J.; Stief, Louis J.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction between the hydrogen atom and the ethyl (C2H3) radical is predicted by photochemical modeling to be the most important loss process for C2H5 radicals in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. This reaction is also one of the major sources for the methyl radicals in these atmospheres. These two simplest hydrocarbon radicals are the initial species for the synthesis of larger hydrocarbons. Previous measurements of the rate constant for the H + C2H5 reaction varied by a factor of five at room temperature, and some studies showed a dependence upon temperature while others showed no such dependence. In addition, the previous studies were at higher temperatures and generally higher pressures than that needed for use in planetary atmospheric models. The rate constant for the reaction H + C2H5 has been measured directly at T = 150, 202 and 295 K and at P = 1.0 Torr He for all temperatures and additionally at P = 0.5 and 2.0 Torr He at T = 202 K. The measurements were performed in a discharge - fast flow system. The decay of the C2H5 radical in the presence of excess hydrogen was monitored by low-energy electron impact mass spectrometry under pseudo-first order conditions. H atoms and C2H5 radicals were generated rapidly and simultaneously by the reaction of fluorine atoms with H2 and C2H6, respectively. The total rate constant was found to be temperature and pressure independent. The measured total rate constant at each temperature are: k(sub 1)(295K) = (1.02+/-0.24)x10(exp -10), k(sub 1)(202K) = (1.02+/-0.22)x10(exp -10) and k(sub 1)(150K) = (0.93+/-0.21)x10(exp -10), all in units of cu cm/molecule/s. The total rate constant derived from all the combined measurements is k(sub 1) = (l.03+/-0.17)x10(exp -10) cu cm/molecule/s. At room temperature our results are about a factor of two higher than the recommended rate constant and a factor of three lower than the most recently published study.

  1. Chemical Reaction Equilibrium in Nanoporous Materials: NO Dimerization Reaction in Carbon Slit Nanopores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lísal, Martin; Brennan, J.K.; Smith, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 6 (2006), s. 64712.1-64712.14 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400720507; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400720409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanopore * NO dimerization * reaction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2006

  2. The rate constant for the CO + H2O2 reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction CO + H2O2 -> HOCO + OH (R1) at 713 K is determined based on the batch reactor experiments of Baldwin et al. [ R. R. Baldwin, R. W. Walker, S. J. Webster, Combust. Flame 15 (1970) 167] on decomposition of H2O2 sensitized by CO. The value, k(1) (713 K) = 8.1 x 10...

  3. Rate constant for the reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of the radical-radical reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br has been determined at 298 K in a discharge flow system near 1 torr pressure with detection of SO and BrO via collision-free sampling mass spectrometry. The rate constant was determined using two different methods: measuring the decay of SO radicals in the presence of an excess of BrO and measuring the decay of BrO radicals in excess SO. The results from the two methods are in reasonable agreement and the simple mean of the two values gives the recommended rate constant at 298 K, k = (5.7 + or - 2.0) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s. This represents the first determination of this rate constant and it is consistent with a previously derived lower limit based on SO2 formation. Comparison is made with other radical-radical reactions involving SO or BrO. The reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br is of interest for models of the upper atmosphere of the earth and provides a potential coupling between atmospheric sulfur and bromine chemistry.

  4. Effects of the anion salt nature on the rate constants of the aqueous proton exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Jose M; Garzon, Andres; Crovetto, Luis; Orte, Angel; Lopez, Sergio G; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2012-04-28

    The proton-transfer ground-state rate constants of the xanthenic dye 9-[1-(2-methyl-4-methoxyphenyl)]-6-hydroxy-3H-xanthen-3-one (TG-II), recovered by Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS), have proven to be useful to quantitatively reflect specific cation effects in aqueous solutions (J. M. Paredes, L. Crovetto, A. Orte, J. M. Alvarez-Pez and E. M. Talavera, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 1685-1694). Since these phenomena are more sensitive to anions than to cations, in this paper we have accounted for the influence of salts with the sodium cation in common, and the anion classified according to the empirical Hofmeister series, on the proton transfer rate constants of TG-II. We demonstrate that the presence of ions accelerates the rate of the ground-state proton-exchange reaction in the same order than ions that affect ion solvation in water. The combination of FLCS with a fluorophore undergoing proton transfer reactions in the ground state, along with the desirable feature of a pseudo-dark state when the dye is protonated, allows one unique direct determination of kinetic rate constants of the proton exchange chemical reaction. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  5. Studying Equilibrium in the Chemical Reaction between Ferric and Iodide Ions in Solution Using a Simple and Inexpensive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaychuk, Pavel Anatolyevich; Kuvaeva, Alyona Olegovna

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the study of the chemical equilibrium based on the reaction between ferric and iodide ions in solution with the formation of ferrous ions, free iodine, and triiodide ions is developed. The total concentration of iodide and triiodide ions in the reaction mixture during the reaction is determined by the argentometric…

  6. Reaction paths and equilibrium end-points in solid-solution aqueous-solution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, P.D.; Reardon, E.J.; Plummer, Niel; Busenberg, E.

    1990-01-01

    Equations are presented describing equilibrium in binary solid-solution aqueous-solution (SSAS) systems after a dissolution, precipitation, or recrystallization process, as a function of the composition and relative proportion of the initial phases. Equilibrium phase diagrams incorporating the concept of stoichiometric saturation are used to interpret possible reaction paths and to demonstrate relations between stoichiometric saturation, primary saturation, and thermodynamic equilibrium states. The concept of stoichiometric saturation is found useful in interpreting and putting limits on dissolution pathways, but there currently is no basis for possible application of this concept to the prediction and/ or understanding of precipitation processes. Previously published dissolution experiments for (Ba, Sr)SO4 and (Sr, Ca)C??O3orth. solids are interpreted using equilibrium phase diagrams. These studies show that stoichiometric saturation can control, or at least influence, initial congruent dissolution pathways. The results for (Sr, Ca)CO3orth. solids reveal that stoichiometric saturation can also control the initial stages of incongruent dissolution, despite the intrinsic instability of some of the initial solids. In contrast, recrystallisation experiments in the highly soluble KCl-KBr-H2O system demonstrate equilibrium. The excess free energy of mixing calculated for K(Cl, Br) solids is closely modeled by the relation GE = ??KBr??KClRT[a0 + a1(2??KBr-1)], where a0 is 1.40 ?? 0.02, a1, is -0.08 ?? 0.03 at 25??C, and ??KBr and ??KCl are the mole fractions of KBr and KCl in the solids. The phase diagram constructed using this fit reveals an alyotropic maximum located at ??KBr = 0.676 and at a total solubility product, ???? = [K+]([Cl-] + [Br-]) = 15.35. ?? 1990.

  7. Application of a non-equilibrium reaction model for describing horizontal well performance in foamy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luigi, A.; Saputelli, B.; Carlas, M.; Canache, P.; Lopez, E. [DPVS Exploracion y Produccion (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    This study was designed to determine the activation energy ranges and frequency factor ranges in chemical reactions in heavy oils of the Orinoco Belt in Venezuela, in order to account for the kinetics of physical changes that occur in the morphology of gas-oil dispersion. A non-equilibrium reaction model was used to model foamy oil behaviour observed at SDZ-182 horizontal well in the Zuata field. Results showed that activation energy for the first reaction ranged from 0 to 0.01 BTU/lb-mol and frequency factor from 0.001 to 1000 l/day. For the second reaction the activation energy was 50x10{sub 3} BTU/lb-mol and the frequency factor 2.75x10{sub 1}2 l/day. The second reaction was highly sensitive to the modifications in activation energy and frequency factor. However, both the activation energy and frequency factor were independent of variations for the first reaction. In the case of the activation energy, the results showed that the high sensitivity of this parameter reflected the impact that temperature has on the representation of foamy oil behaviour. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  8. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Samuel M., E-mail: samuel.greene@chem.ox.ac.uk; Shan, Xiao, E-mail: xiao.shan@chem.ox.ac.uk; Clary, David C., E-mail: david.clary@chem.ox.ac.u [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  9. Addition and spin exchange rate constants by longitudinal field μSR: the Mu + NO reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senba, Masayoshi; Gonzalez, A.C.; Kempton, J.R.; Arseneau, D.J.; Pan, J.J.; Tempelmann, A.; Fleming, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The addition reaction Mu + NO + M → MuNO + M and the spin exchange reaction Mu(↑) + NO(↓)→Mu(↓)+NO(↑) have been measured by longitudinal field μSR at room temperature in the presence of up to 58 atm of N 2 as inert collider. The pressure dependence of the longitudinal relaxation rate due to the addition reaction (λ c ) demonstrates that the system is still in the low pressure regime in this pressure range. The corresponding termolecular rate constant has been determined as k 0.Mu =(1.10±0.25)x10 -32 cm 6 molecules -2 s -1 , almost 4 times smaller than the corresponding H atom reaction k 0,H =3.90x10 -32 cm 6 molecules -2 s -1 . The average value of the spin exchange rate constants in the 2.5-58 atm pressure range, k SE = (3.16±0.06)x10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , is in good agreement with previous values obtained by transverse field μSR. (orig.)

  10. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of hypochlorous acid with protein side chains and peptide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    , absolute second-order rate constants for the reactions of HOCl with protein side chains, model compounds, and backbone amide (peptide) bonds have been determined at physiological pH values. The reactivity of HOCl with potential reactive sites in proteins is summarized by the series: Met (3.8 x 10(7) M(-1......Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a potent oxidant, which is produced in vivo by activated phagocytes. This compound is an important antibacterial agent, but excessive or misplaced production has been implicated in a number of human diseases, including atherosclerosis, arthritis, and some cancers....... Proteins are major targets for this oxidant, and such reaction results in side-chain modification, backbone fragmentation, and cross-linking. Despite a wealth of qualitative data for such reactions, little absolute kinetic data is available to rationalize the in vitro and in vivo data. In this study...

  11. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  12. Reaction paths and rate constants of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with environmental species under tropospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, C.; Wahner, A.; Zetzsch, C.

    1987-01-01

    The uv-laser absorption technique in a multipath cell (with excimer-laser photolysis for radical production) is used to investigate the rate constants of the reaction of OH with carbon monoxide. The pressure dependence and the influence of collision partners (measurements in pure oxygen up to one atmosphere) of this important atmospheric chemical reaction are determined. In the kinetic measurements detection limits of 10 7 OH cm -3 are reached with millisecond time resolution. Furthermore the application of the cw-Laser for stationary OH measurements (for example in smog chambers or the free troposphere) is described. The possibilities and limits of different detection methods are discussed with respect to of noise spectra. Modifications of the apparatus with a frequency modulation technique are presented, with an extrapolated detection limit of 10 5 OH cm -3 . (orig.) With 43 refs., 16 figs [de

  13. Discovery of a Significant Acetone•Hydroperoxy Adduct Chaperone Effect and Its Impact on the Determination of Room Temperature Rate Constants for Acetonylperoxy/Hydroperoxy Self-Reactions and Cross Reaction Via Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieman, F. J.; Hui, A. O.; Okumura, M.; Sander, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    previously reported. This complex formation/chaperone mechanism is similar to that found for methanol, but different in that it occurs at room temperature. No precursor concentration dependence was found for the acetonylperoxy radical reactions. The equilibrium constant for the complex formation will also be presented.

  14. Rate constants for the reaction of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons at 298 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, C.; Treacy, J.; Sidebottom, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    Rate constant ratios of the reactions of CF3O radicals with a number of hydrocarbons have been determined at 298 +/- 2 K and atmospheric pressure using a relative rate method. Using a previously determined value k(CF30 + C2H6) = 1.2 x 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 these rate constant ratios provide...... estimates of the rate constants: k(CF3O + CH4) = (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10(-14), k(CF3O + c-C3H6) = (3.6 +/- 0.2) x 10(-13), k(CF3O + C3H8) = (4.7 +/- 0.7) x 10(-12), k(CF3O + (CH3)3CH) = (7.2 +/- 0.5) x 10(-12), k(CF3O + C2H4) = (3.0 +/- 0.1) x 10(-11) and k(CF3O + C6H6) = (3.6 +/- 0.1) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule-1 s......-1. The importance of the reactions of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions is discussed....

  15. The Equilibrium and Pre-equilibrium Triton Emission Spectra of Some Target Nuclei for ( n, xt) Reactions up to 45 MeV Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Özkorucuklu, S.; Büyükuslu, H.; Yıldırım, G.

    2010-08-01

    Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 59Co and 209Bi have been investigated up to 45 MeV incident neutron energy. In the calculations of the triton emission spectra, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  16. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium with Poker Chips: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on laboratory exercise at the general chemistry level introduces students to chemical equilibrium through a simulation that uses poker chips and rate equations. More specifically, the exercise allows students to explore reaction tables, dynamic chemical equilibrium, equilibrium constant expressions, and the equilibrium constant based on…

  17. Rate Constants for Reactions of Radiation-Produced Transients in Aqueous Solutions of Actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, S.; Sullivan, J.C.; Ross, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Rate constants have been critically compiled for reactions of ions of the actinides Am, Cf, Cm, Np, Pu, Th, and U, as well as the element Tc, in different oxidation states with various chemical species in aqueous solution. The reactants include products of the radiolysis of water (hydrated electrons, hydrogen atoms, hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide) and transient species derived from other solutes (e.g., carbonate radical). The data are useful in the estimation of migration properties of actinides, which are relevant to waste management studies

  18. Determination of reaction rate constants for alkylation of 4-(p-nitrobenzyl) pyridine by different alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walles, S A

    1980-02-01

    The rate constants have been determined for the reaction between some different alkylating agents and 4-(p-nitrobenzyl) pyridine (NBP) in methanol. These constants have been compared with those for alkylation of aniline in water. All the constants were lower in methanol than in water but in different degrees. The rate constants of the different alkylating agents have been calculated at a nucleophilic strength n=2. The genetic risk defined as the degree of alkylation of a nucleophile (n=2) is equivalent to the rate constant kn=2 and the target dose. The dependence of the genetic risk on the rate constant (kn=2) is discussed.

  19. General method and thermodynamic tables for computation of equilibrium composition and temperature of chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Vearl N; Gordon, Sanford; Morrell, Virginia E

    1951-01-01

    A rapidly convergent successive approximation process is described that simultaneously determines both composition and temperature resulting from a chemical reaction. This method is suitable for use with any set of reactants over the complete range of mixture ratios as long as the products of reaction are ideal gases. An approximate treatment of limited amounts of liquids and solids is also included. This method is particularly suited to problems having a large number of products of reaction and to problems that require determination of such properties as specific heat or velocity of sound of a dissociating mixture. The method presented is applicable to a wide variety of problems that include (1) combustion at constant pressure or volume; and (2) isentropic expansion to an assigned pressure, temperature, or Mach number. Tables of thermodynamic functions needed with this method are included for 42 substances for convenience in numerical computations.

  20. Linear free energy relationships between aqueous phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and free energy of activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2011-04-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites on organic compounds and initiates complex radical chain reactions in aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Computer based kinetic modeling requires a reaction pathway generator and predictions of associated reaction rate constants. Previously, we reported a reaction pathway generator that can enumerate the most important elementary reactions for aliphatic compounds. For the reaction rate constant predictor, we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) between aqueous phase literature-reported HO(•) reaction rate constants and theoretically calculated free energies of activation for H-atom abstraction from a C-H bond and HO(•) addition to alkenes. The theoretical method uses ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, Gaussian 1-3, for gas phase reactions and a solvation method, COSMO-RS theory, to estimate the impact of water. Theoretically calculated free energies of activation are found to be within approximately ±3 kcal/mol of experimental values. Considering errors that arise from quantum mechanical calculations and experiments, this should be within the acceptable errors. The established LFERs are used to predict the HO(•) reaction rate constants within a factor of 5 from the experimental values. This approach may be applied to other reaction mechanisms to establish a library of rate constant predictions for kinetic modeling of AOPs.

  1. Equilibrium coverage of OHad in correlation with platinum catalyzed fuel cell reactions in HClO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Yujia; Arenz, Matthias; Wiberg, Gustav Karl Henrik

    2015-01-01

    We employ a recently developed stripping protocol to examine the equilibrium coverage of oxygenated species and their influence on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR). In particular we aim to distinguish between dynamic and steady state conditions...

  2. Use of the cation exchange equilibrium method for the determination of stability constants of Co(II) with soil humic and fulvic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, J.Z.; Zhou, C.Y.; Dong, W.M.; Tao, Z.Y.

    1999-01-01

    The stability constants for tracer concentrations of Co(II) complexes with both the red earth humic and fulvic acids were determined at pH 5.9 and ionic strength 0.010 mol/l by using the ARDAKANI-STEVENSON cation exchange equilibrium method and the radiotracer 60 Co. It was found that the 1:1 complexes of Co(II) with the red earth humic and fulvic acids were formed and that the average values of logβ (stability constant) of humic and fulvic acid complexes were 5.76±0.19 and 4.42±0.03, respectively. (author)

  3. Calculation of the acid-base equilibrium constants at the alumina/electrolyte interface from the ph dependence of the adsorption of singly charged ions (Na+, Cl-)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gololobova, E. G.; Gorichev, I. G.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Skvortsova, I. V.

    2011-05-01

    A procedure was proposed for the calculation of the acid-base equilibrium constants at an alumina/electrolyte interface from experimental data on the adsorption of singly charged ions (Na+, Cl-) at various pH values. The calculated constants (p K {1/0}= 4.1, p K {2/0}= 11.9, p K {3/0}= 8.3, and p K {4/0}= 7.7) are shown to agree with the values obtained from an experimental pH dependence of the electrokinetic potential and the results of potentiometric titration of Al2O3 suspensions.

  4. Calculating Equilibrium Constants in the SnCl2-H2O-NaOH System According to Potentiometric Titration Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskaeva, L. N.; Fedorova, E. A.; Yusupov, R. A.; Markov, V. F.

    2018-05-01

    The potentiometric titration of tin chloride SnCl2 is performed in the concentration range of 0.00009-1.1 mol/L with a solution of sodium hydroxide NaOH. According to potentiometric titration data based on modeling equilibria in the SnCl2-H2O-NaOH system, basic equations are generated for the main processes, and instability constants are calculated for the resulting hydroxo complexes and equilibrium constants of low-soluble tin(II) compounds. The data will be of interest for specialists in the field of theory of solutions.

  5. Rate Constant of the Reaction between CH3O2 Radicals and OH Radicals Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Song, Bo; Tomas, Alexandre; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2016-11-17

    The reaction between CH 3 O 2 and OH radicals has been studied in a laser photolysis cell using the reaction of F atoms with CH 4 and H 2 O for the simultaneous generation of both radicals, with F atoms generated through 248 nm photolysis of XeF 2 . An experimental setup combining cw-Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and high repetition rate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to a laser photolysis cell has been used. The absolute concentration of CH 3 O 2 was measured by cw-CRDS, while the relative concentration of OH(v = 0) radicals was determined by LIF. To remove dubiety from the quantification of CH 3 O 2 by cw-CRDS in the near-infrared, its absorption cross section has been determined at 7489.16 cm -1 using two different methods. A rate constant of k 1 = (1.60 ± 0.4) × 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 has been determined at 295 K, nearly a factor of 2 lower than an earlier determination from our group ((2.8 ± 1.4) × 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 ) using CH 3 I photolysis as a precursor. Quenching of electronically excited I atoms (from CH 3 I photolysis) in collision with OH(v = 0) is suspected to be responsible for a bias in the earlier, fast rate constant.

  6. Low-Temperature Experimental and Theoretical Rate Constants for the O(1D) + H2 Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Kevin M; Suleimanov, Yury V

    2017-03-09

    In the present joint experimental and theoretical study, we report thermal rate constants for the O( 1 D) + H 2 reaction within the 50-300 K temperature range. Experimental kinetics measurements were performed using a continuous supersonic flow reactor coupled with pulsed laser photolysis for O( 1 D) production and pulsed laser-induced fluorescence in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength range (VUV LIF) for O( 1 D) detection. Theoretical rate constants were obtained using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) approach over the two lowest potential energy surfaces 1 1 A' and 1 1 A″, which possess barrierless and thermally activated energy profiles, respectively. Both the experimental and theoretical rate constants exhibit a weak temperature dependence. The theoretical results show the dominant role of the 1 1 A' ground state and that contribution of the 1 1 A″ excited state to the total thermal rate decreases dramatically at lower temperature. Agreement between the experimental and theoretical results is good, and the discrepancy does not exceed 25%. It is argued that these differences are likely to be due to nonadiabatic couplings between the 1 1 A' and 2 1 A' surfaces.

  7. Extrapolation of rate constants of reactions producing H2 and O2 in radiolysis of water at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, R.; Ghandi, K.; Hackman, B.; Liu, G.

    2014-01-01

    One target of our research is to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions and add corrections to estimate the rate constants at the higher temperatures reached by the SCWR reactors. The focus of this work was to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions that produce Hydrogen or Oxygen with a rate constant below 10 10 mol -1 s -1 at room temperature. The extrapolation is done taking into account the change in the diffusion rate of the interacting species and the cage effect with thermodynamic conditions. The extrapolations are done over a wide temperature range and under isobaric conditions. (author)

  8. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N 2 flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure

  9. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V., E-mail: e.kustova@spbu.ru [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr. 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M., E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N{sub 2} flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  10. Quantum chemical and conventional TST calculations of rate constants for the OH + alkane reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo-Perez, Graciela; Alvarez-Idaboy, J. Raul; Jimenez, Annia Galano; Cruz-Torres, Armando

    2005-01-01

    Reactions of OH with methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, and n-butane have been modeled using ab initio (MP2) and hybrid DFT (BHandHLYP) methods, and the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Furthermore, single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level were carried out at the optimized geometries. The rate constants have been calculated using the conventional transition-state theory (CTST). Arrhenius equations are proposed in the temperature range of 250-650 K. Hindered Internal Rotation partition functions calculations were explicitly carried out and included in the total partition functions. These corrections showed to be relevant in the determination of the pre-exponential parameters, although not so important as in the NO 3 + alkane reactions [G. Bravo-Perez, J.R. Alvarez-Idaboy, A. Cruz-Torres, M.E. Ruiz, J. Phys. Chem. A 106 (2002) 4645]. The explicit participation of the tunnel effect has been taken into account. The calculated rate coefficients provide a very good agreement with the experimental data. The best agreement for the overall alkane + OH reactions seemed to occur when the BHandHLYP geometries and partition functions are used. For propane and i-butane, in addition to the respective secondary and tertiary H-abstraction channels, the primary one has been considered. These pathways are confirmed to be significant in spite of the large differences in activation energies between primary and secondary or primary and tertiary channels, respectively of propane and i-butane reactions and should not be disregarded

  11. Rate constants for the slow Mu + propane abstraction reaction at 300 K by diamagnetic RF resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Donald G; Cottrell, Stephen P; McKenzie, Iain; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2015-08-14

    The study of kinetic isotope effects for H-atom abstraction rates by incident H-atoms from the homologous series of lower mass alkanes (CH4, C2H6 and, here, C3H8) provides important tests of reaction rate theory on polyatomic systems. With a mass of only 0.114 amu, the most sensitive test is provided by the rates of the Mu atom. Abstraction of H by Mu can be highly endoergic, due to the large zero-point energy shift in the MuH bond formed, which also gives rise to high activation energies from similar zero-point energy corrections at the transition state. Rates are then far too slow near 300 K to be measured by conventional TF-μSR techniques that follow the disappearance of the spin-polarised Mu atom with time. Reported here is the first measurement of a slow Mu reaction rate in the gas phase by the technique of diamagnetic radio frequency (RF) resonance, where the amplitude of the MuH product formed in the Mu + C3H8 reaction is followed with time. The measured rate constant, kMu = (6.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1) at 300 K, is surprisingly only about a factor of three slower than that expected for H + C3H8, indicating a dominant contribution from quantum tunneling in the Mu reaction, consistent with elementary transition state theory calculations of the kMu/kH kinetic isotope effect.

  12. Gas-phase reaction rate constants for atmospheric pressure ionization in ion-mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandiver, V.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an instrumental technique in which gaseous ions are formed from neutral molecules by proton and charge transfer from reactant ions through collisional ionization. An abbreviated rate theory has been proposed for atmospheric pressure ionization (API) in IMS, but supporting experimental measurements have not been reported. The objectives of this thesis were (1) assessment of existing API rate theory using positive and negative product ions in IMS, (2) measurement of API equilibria and kinetics for binary mixtures, and (3) investigating of cross-ionizations with multiple-product ions in API reactions. Although IMS measurements and predictions from rate theory were comparable, shapes and slopes of response curves for both proton transfer and electron capture were not described exactly by existing theory. In particular, terms that are needed for calculation of absolute rate constants were unsuitable in the existing theory. These included recombination coefficients,initial number of reactant ions, and opposing ion densities

  13. Combined steam and carbon dioxide reforming of methane and side reactions: Thermodynamic equilibrium analysis and experimental application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Won-Jun; Jeong, Dae-Woon; Shim, Jae-Oh; Kim, Hak-Min; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Son, In Hyuk; Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Selected variables have a significant influence on yields of synthesis gas. • (CO_2 + H_2O)/CH_4 affects the temperature which can achieve the maximum conversion. • Coke is formed at low temperatures even with excess oxidizing agent. • The occurrence of RWGS becomes critical in real chemical reactions. • Equilibrium conversions are maintained for 500 h without detectable deactivation. - Abstract: Thermodynamic equilibrium analysis of the combined steam and carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CSCRM) and side reactions was performed using total Gibbs free energy minimization. The effects of (CO_2 + H_2O)/CH_4 ratio (0.9–2.9), CO_2:H_2O ratio (3:1–1:3), and temperature (500–1000 °C) on the equilibrium conversions, yields, coke yield, and H_2/CO ratio were investigated. A (CO_2 + H_2O)/CH_4 ratio greater than 1.2, a CO_2:H_2O ratio of 1:2.1, and a temperature of at least 850 °C are preferable reaction conditions for the synthesis gas preparation in the gas to liquid process. Simulated conditions were applied to the CSCRM reaction and the experimental data were compared with the thermodynamic equilibrium results. The thermodynamic equilibrium results were mostly consistent with the experimental data, but the reverse water gas shift reaction rapidly occurred in the real chemical reaction and under excess oxidizing agent conditions. In addition, a long-term stability test (under simulated conditions) showed that the equilibrium conversion was maintained for 500 h and that the coke formation on the used catalyst was not observed.

  14. Rate constant for reaction of vitamin C with protein radicals in γ-irradiated aqueous albumin solution at 295K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Yoshimura, Toru; Mita, Kazuya; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1995-01-01

    When an aqueous solution of albumin (0.1 kg dm -3 ) is irradiated by γ-rays at 295 K, albumin radicals with a long lifetime are observed by ESR. The reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals has been studied at 295 K in the albumin solution, which is considered as a model of cells. The rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals was measured as 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 S -1 , which is much smaller than the reported constants (10 6 -10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ) for the reaction of vitamin C with radicals in a dilute aqueous solution. The small rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C is ascribed to the reaction in polymer coils in the albumin solution, since vitamin C and albumin radicals diffuse very slowly in the coils. (author)

  15. Estimation of rate constants of PCB dechlorination reactions using an anaerobic dehalogenation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Filiz; Imamoglu, Ipek

    2017-02-15

    This study aims to estimate anaerobic dechlorination rate constants (k m ) of reactions of individual PCB congeners using data from four laboratory microcosms set up using sediment from Baltimore Harbor. Pathway k m values are estimated by modifying a previously developed model as Anaerobic Dehalogenation Model (ADM) which can be applied to any halogenated hydrophobic organic (HOC). Improvements such as handling multiple dechlorination activities (DAs) and co-elution of congeners, incorporating constraints, using new goodness of fit evaluation led to an increase in accuracy, speed and flexibility of ADM. DAs published in the literature in terms of chlorine substitutions as well as specific microorganisms and their combinations are used for identification of pathways. The best fit explaining the congener pattern changes was found for pathways of Phylotype DEH10, which has the ability to remove doubly flanked chlorines in meta and para positions, para flanked chlorines in meta position. The range of estimated k m values is between 0.0001-0.133d -1 , the median of which is found to be comparable to the few available published biologically confirmed rate constants. Compound specific modelling studies such as that performed by ADM can enable monitoring and prediction of concentration changes as well as toxicity during bioremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. On the use temperature parameterized rate coefficients in the estimation of non-equilibrium reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.; Chikhaoui, Aziz

    2006-06-01

    The present paper considers a detailed analysis of the nonequilibrium effects for a model reactive system with the Chapman-Eskog (CE) solution of the Boltzmann equation as well as an explicit time dependent solution. The elastic cross sections employed are a hard sphere cross section and the Maxwell molecule cross section. Reactive cross sections which model reactions with and without activation energy are used. A detailed comparison is carried out with these solutions of the Boltzmann equation and the approximation introduced by Cukrowski and coworkers [J. Chem. Phys. 97 (1992) 9086; Chem. Phys. 89 (1992) 159; Physica A 188 (1992) 344; Chem. Phys. Lett. A 297 (1998) 402; Physica A 275 (2000) 134; Chem. Phys. Lett. 341 (2001) 585; Acta Phys. Polonica B 334 (2003) 3607.] based on the temperature of the reactive particles. We show that the Cukrowski approximation has limited applicability for the large class of reactive systems studied in this paper. The explicit time dependent solutions of the Boltzmann equation demonstrate that the CE approach is valid only for very slow reactions for which the corrections to the equilibrium rate coefficient are very small.

  17. Chemical equilibrium relations used in the fireball model of relativistic heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    The fireball model of relativistic heavy-ion collision uses chemical equilibrium relations to predict cross sections for particle and composite productions. These relations are examined in a canonical ensemble model where chemical equilibrium is not explicitly invoked

  18. Ion-neutral gas reactions in a collision/reaction cell in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Correlation of ion signal decrease to kinetic rate constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Patrick J. [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, 120 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olesik, John W., E-mail: olesik.2@osu.edu [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Reaction gas flow rate dependent Ar{sub 2}{sup +} and Ar{sup +} signals are correlated to fundamental kinetic rate coefficients. A simple calculation, assuming that gas exits the reaction cell due only to effusion, is described to estimate the gas pressure in the reaction cell. The value of the product of the kinetic rate constant and the ion residence time in the reaction cell can be determined from experimental measurement of the decrease in an ion signal as a function of reaction gas flow rate. New kinetic rate constants are determined for the reaction of CH{sub 3}F with Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. - Highlights: • How to determine pressure and the product of the kinetic rate constant times the ion residence time in reaction cell • Relate measured ICP-DRC-MS signals versus gas flow rate to kinetic rate constants measured previously using SIFT-MS • Describe how to determine previously unmeasured kinetic rate constants using ICP-DRC-MS.

  19. Equilibrium dialysis-ligand exchange: adaptation of the method for determination of conditional stability constants of radionuclide-fulvic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaus, M.A.; Hummel, W.; Van Loon, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    The equilibrium dialysis-ligand exchange technique (EDLE) is used to determine conditional stability constants for the complexation of metal ions with humic acid, particularly in high pH solutions. Here, this technique has been adapted to measure conditional stability constants with fulvic acid. Fulvic acid permeates across all membranes during the experiment. The quantities involved therefore have to be determined analytically and taken into account when calculating the conditional stability constants. Co(II) and Laurentian Soil fulvic (LFA) acid were selected as a test system in order to investigate the time scale required to establish chemical and diffusion equilibria. After an incubation time of approximately two days, the conditional stability constants measured for the formation of Co-LFA-complexes are not time dependent, although across the whole time period investigated, LFA was still diffusing in increasing amounts across the dialysis membrane. This work demonstrates that the modified EDLE technique can be used in the determination of conditional metal stability constants of fulvic acid. (authors)

  20. A model for a countercurrent gas—solid—solid trickle flow reactor for equilibrium reactions. The methanol synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Kuczynski, M.

    1987-01-01

    The theoretical background for a novel, countercurrent gas—solid—solid trickle flow reactor for equilibrium gas reactions is presented. A one-dimensional, steady-state reactor model is developed. The influence of the various process parameters on the reactor performance is discussed. The physical

  1. DNA unwinding induced by photoaddition of psoralen derivatives and determination of dark-binding equilibrium constants by gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesehahn, G.; Hearst, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    Derivatives of furo[3,2-g]coumarin (psoralen) can bind to the DNA double helix and, in the presence of long-wavelength uv light, the bound psoralen may react covalently with pyrimidine residues on one or both strands of the helix. By using agarose gel electrophoresis, we have determined the unwinding angle associated with each of four different psoralen derivatives to be 28 0 +- 4 0 . For 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (trioxsalen) the unwinding angle was found to be independent of the initial DNA superhelix density in the range that is accessible to agarose gel electrophoresis. Also by using agarose gel electrophoresis, we have determined the unwinding angle for ethidium intercalation. This was done by the total relaxation of supercoiled DNA in the presence of a series of ethidium concentrations. By using published values for the association constant for ethidium binding to DNA and evaluating the final superhelix density (after removal of ethidium) of the DNA on gels, we calculated an unwinding angle of 29 0 +- 3 0 . Assuming an unwinding angle of 28 0 for the noncovalent intercalation of psoralen derivatives, we used the same procedure to determine intercalation binding constants. The association constants for 4'-aminomethyltrioxsalen were 300 to 1400 M -1 in NaCl at 0.2 to 0.05 M and 300 to 2500 M -1 in Mg 2+ at 4 to 0.5 mM. The association constant for 4'-hydroxymethyltrioxsalen in 0.5 mM Mg 2+ was determined to be 70 M -1

  2. Chemical equilibrium of glycerol carbonate synthesis from glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiabo; Wang Tao

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Transesterification of glycerol with cyclic carbonates or alkyl carbonates is thermodynamically favourable for the preparation of glycerol carbonate from glycerol. → The reaction of glycerol and carbon dioxide is thermodynamically limited. → High temperature and low pressure is favourable to the reaction of glycerol and urea. → Increasing temperature can increase the chemical equilibrium constant for the reaction of glycerol and dimethyl carbonate. → For the reaction of glycerol and ethylene carbonate, increasing temperature can decrease the chemical equilibrium constant. - Abstract: In this paper, the chemical equilibrium for the glycerol carbonate preparation from glycerol was investigated. The chemical equilibrium constants were calculated for the reactions to produce glycerol carbonate from glycerol. The theoretical calculation was compared with the experimental results for the transesterification of glycerol with dimethyl carbonate. Transesterification of glycerol with cyclic carbonates or alkyl carbonates is thermodynamically favourable for producing glycerol carbonate from glycerol according to the equilibrium constant. Increasing temperature can increase the chemical equilibrium constant for the reaction of glycerol with dimethyl carbonate. For the reaction of glycerol with ethylene carbonate, increasing temperature can decrease the chemical equilibrium constant. The reaction of glycerol with carbon dioxide is thermodynamically limited. High temperature and low pressure are favourable to the reaction of glycerol and urea.

  3. Communication: Equilibrium rate coefficients from atomistic simulations: The O(3P) + NO(2Π) → O2(X3Σg−) + N(4S) reaction at temperatures relevant to the hypersonic flight regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Bemish, Raymond J.; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The O( 3 P) + NO( 2 Π) → O 2 (X 3 Σ g − ) + N( 4 S) reaction is among the N- and O- involving reactions that dominate the energetics of the reactive air flow around spacecraft during hypersonic atmospheric re-entry. In this regime, the temperature in the bow shock typically ranges from 1000 to 20 000 K. The forward and reverse rate coefficients for this reaction derived directly from trajectory calculations over this range of temperature are reported in this letter. Results compare well with the established equilibrium constants for the same reaction from thermodynamic quantities derived from spectroscopy in the gas phase which paves the way for large-scale in silico investigations of equilibrium rates under extreme conditions

  4. Communication: Equilibrium rate coefficients from atomistic simulations: The O((3)P) + NO((2)Π) → O2(X(3)Σg(-)) + N((4)S) reaction at temperatures relevant to the hypersonic flight regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Bemish, Raymond J; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-03-07

    The O((3)P) + NO((2)Π) → O2(X(3)Σg(-)) + N((4)S) reaction is among the N- and O- involving reactions that dominate the energetics of the reactive air flow around spacecraft during hypersonic atmospheric re-entry. In this regime, the temperature in the bow shock typically ranges from 1000 to 20,000 K. The forward and reverse rate coefficients for this reaction derived directly from trajectory calculations over this range of temperature are reported in this letter. Results compare well with the established equilibrium constants for the same reaction from thermodynamic quantities derived from spectroscopy in the gas phase which paves the way for large-scale in silico investigations of equilibrium rates under extreme conditions.

  5. Nonequilibrium method for estimating the first hydrolysis constant of tetravalent plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Six discrete formulas are used to estimate the equilibrium constant of the first hydrolysis reaction of tetravalent plutonium. They apply the pH, the oxidation number, one equilibrium constant, and fractions of two of the plutonium oxidation states. The new formulas are not restricted to the equilibrium condition. (author)

  6. Rate constant measurements for the overall reaction of OH + 1-butanol → products from 900 to 1200 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Genny A; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M; Bowman, Craig T

    2012-03-15

    The rate constant for the overall reaction OH + 1-butanol → products was determined in the temperature range 900 to 1200 K from measurements of OH concentration time histories in reflected shock wave experiments of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as a fast source of OH radicals with 1-butanol in excess. Narrow-linewidth laser absorption was employed for the quantitative OH concentration measurement. A detailed kinetic mechanism was constructed that includes updated rate constants for 1-butanol and TBHP kinetics that influence the near-first-order OH concentration decay under the present experimental conditions, and this mechanism was used to facilitate the rate constant determination. The current work improves upon previous experimental studies of the title rate constant by utilizing a rigorously generated kinetic model to describe secondary reactions. Additionally, the current work extends the temperature range of experimental data in the literature for the title reaction under combustion-relevant conditions, presenting the first measurements from 900 to 1000 K. Over the entire temperature range studied, the overall rate constant can be expressed in Arrhenius form as 3.24 × 10(-10) exp(-2505/T [K]) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The influence of secondary reactions on the overall OH decay rate is discussed, and a detailed uncertainty analysis is performed yielding an overall uncertainty in the measured rate constant of ±20% at 1197 K and ±23% at 925 K. The results are compared with previous experimental and theoretical studies on the rate constant for the title reaction and reasonable agreement is found when the earlier experimental data were reinterpreted.

  7. Experimental determination of the high-temperature rate constant for the reaction of OH with sec-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Genny A; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M; Bowman, Craig T

    2012-10-04

    The overall rate constant for the reaction of OH with sec-butanol [CH(3)CH(OH)CH(2)CH(3)] was determined from measurements of the near-first-order OH decay in shock-heated mixtures of tert-butylhydroperoxide (as a fast source of OH) with sec-butanol in excess. Three kinetic mechanisms from the literature describing sec-butanol combustion were used to examine the sensitivity of the rate constant determination to secondary kinetics. The overall rate constant determined can be described by the Arrhenius expression 6.97 × 10(-11) exp(-1550/T[K]) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), valid over the temperature range of 888-1178 K. Uncertainty bounds of ±30% were found to adequately account for the uncertainty in secondary kinetics. To our knowledge, the current data represent the first efforts toward an experimentally determined rate constant for the overall reaction of OH with sec-butanol at combustion-relevant temperatures. A rate constant predicted using a structure-activity relationship from the literature was compared to the current data and previous rate constant measurements for the title reaction at atmospheric-relevant temperatures. The structure-activity relationship was found to be unable to correctly predict the measured rate constant at all temperatures where experimental data exist. We found that the three-parameter fit of 4.95 × 10(-20)T(2.66) exp(+1123/T[K]) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) better describes the overall rate constant for the reaction of OH with sec-butanol from 263 to 1178 K.

  8. A model to assess the feasibility of shifting reaction equilibrium by acetone removal in the transamination of ketones using 2-propylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufvesson, Pär; Bach, Christian; Woodley, John M

    2014-02-01

    Acetone removal by evaporation has been proposed as a simple and cheap way to shift the equilibrium in the biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis of optically pure chiral amines, when 2-propylamine is used as the amine donor. However, dependent on the system properties, this may or may not be a suitable strategy. To avoid excessive laboratory work a model was used to assess the process feasibility. The results from the current study show that a simple model of the acetone removal dependence on temperature and sparging gas flowrate can be developed and fits the experimental data well. The model for acetone removal was then coupled to a simple model for biocatalyst kinetics and also for loss of substrate ketone by evaporation. The three models were used to simulate the effects of varying the critical process parameters and reaction equilibrium constants (K eq) as well as different substrate ketone volatilities (Henry's constant). The simulations were used to estimate the substrate losses and also the maximum yield that could be expected. The approach was seen to give a clear indication for which target amines the acetone evaporation strategy would be feasible and for which amines it would not. The study also shows the value of a modeling approach in conceptual process design prior to entering a biocatalyst screening or engineering program to assess the feasibility of a particular process strategy for a given target product. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. QSARs for phenols and phenolates: oxidation potential as a predictor of reaction rate constants with photochemically produced oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William A; Oueis, Yan; O'Connor, Meghan; Rinaman, Johanna E; Taggart, Miranda G; McCarthy, Rachel E; Foster, Kimberley A; Latch, Douglas E

    2017-03-22

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for prediction of the reaction rate constants of phenols and phenolates with three photochemically produced oxidants, singlet oxygen, carbonate radical, and triplet excited state sensitizers/organic matter, are developed. The predictive variable is the one-electron oxidation potential (E 1 ), which is calculated for each species using density functional theory. The reaction rate constants are obtained from the literature, and for singlet oxygen, are augmented with new experimental data. Calculated E 1 values have a mean unsigned error compared to literature values of 0.04-0.06 V. For singlet oxygen, a single linear QSAR that includes both phenols and phenolates is developed that predicts experimental rate constants, on average, to within a factor of three. Predictions for only 6 out of 87 compounds are off by more than a factor of 10. A more limited data set for carbonate radical reactions with phenols and phenolates also gives a single linear QSAR with prediction of rate constant being accurate to within a factor of three. The data for the reactions of phenols with triplet state sensitizers demonstrate that two sensitizers, 2-acetonaphthone and methylene blue, most closely predict the reactivity trend of triplet excited state organic matter with phenols. Using sensitizers with stronger reduction potentials could lead to overestimation of rate constants and thus underestimation of phenolic pollutant persistence.

  10. Investigation of Chemical Equilibrium Kinetics by the Electromigration Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhikov, G A; Bontchev, G D; Maslov, O D; Milanov, M V; Dmitriev, S N

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of the chemical reaction rates for complex formation as well as hydrolysis type reactions by the method of horizontal zone electrophoresis is outlined. The correlation between chemical equilibrium kinetics and electrodiffusion processes in a constant d.c. electric field is described. In model electromigration experiments the reaction rate constant of the complex formation of Hf(IV) and DTPA is determined.

  11. Application of an Artificial Neural Network to the Prediction of OH Radical Reaction Rate Constants for Evaluating Global Warming Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Thomas C

    2016-03-03

    Rate constants for reactions of chemical compounds with hydroxyl radical are a key quantity used in evaluating the global warming potential of a substance. Experimental determination of these rate constants is essential, but it can also be difficult and time-consuming to produce. High-level quantum chemistry predictions of the rate constant can suffer from the same issues. Therefore, it is valuable to devise estimation schemes that can give reasonable results on a variety of chemical compounds. In this article, the construction and training of an artificial neural network (ANN) for the prediction of rate constants at 298 K for reactions of hydroxyl radical with a diverse set of molecules is described. Input to the ANN consists of counts of the chemical bonds and bends present in the target molecule. The ANN is trained using 792 (•)OH reaction rate constants taken from the NIST Chemical Kinetics Database. The mean unsigned percent error (MUPE) for the training set is 12%, and the MUPE of the testing set is 51%. It is shown that the present methodology yields rate constants of reasonable accuracy for a diverse set of inputs. The results are compared to high-quality literature values and to another estimation scheme. This ANN methodology is expected to be of use in a wide range of applications for which (•)OH reaction rate constants are required. The model uses only information that can be gathered from a 2D representation of the molecule, making the present approach particularly appealing, especially for screening applications.

  12. Reaction networks as systems for resource allocation: a variational principle for their non-equilibrium steady states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Martino

    Full Text Available Within a fully microscopic setting, we derive a variational principle for the non-equilibrium steady states of chemical reaction networks, valid for time-scales over which chemical potentials can be taken to be slowly varying: at stationarity the system minimizes a global function of the reaction fluxes with the form of a Hopfield Hamiltonian with hebbian couplings, that is explicitly seen to correspond to the rate of decay of entropy production over time. Guided by this analogy, we show that reaction networks can be formally re-cast as systems of interacting reactions that optimize the use of the available compounds by competing for substrates, akin to agents competing for a limited resource in an optimal allocation problem. As an illustration, we analyze the scenario that emerges in two simple cases: that of toy (random reaction networks and that of a metabolic network model of the human red blood cell.

  13. Ratiometric analysis in hyperpolarized NMR (I): test of the two-site exchange model and the quantification of reaction rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin Z; Kadlececk, Stephen; Xu, He N; Daye, Dania; Pullinger, Benjamin; Profka, Harrilla; Chodosh, Lewis; Rizi, Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for the analysis of in vivo hyperpolarized (13) C NMR data from the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction usually make assumptions on the stability of rate constants and/or the validity of the two-site exchange model. In this study, we developed a framework to test the validity of the assumption of stable reaction rate constants and the two-site exchange model in vivo via ratiometric fitting of the time courses of the signal ratio L(t)/P(t). Our analysis provided evidence that the LDH enzymatic kinetics observed by hyperpolarized NMR are in near-equilibrium and satisfy the two-site exchange model for only a specific time window. In addition, we quantified both the forward and reverse exchange rate constants of the LDH reaction for the transgenic and mouse xenograft models of breast cancer using the ratio fitting method developed, which includes only two modeling parameters and is less sensitive to the influence of instrument settings/protocols, such as flip angles, degree of polarization and tracer dosage. We further compared the ratio fitting method with a conventional two-site exchange modeling method, i.e. the differential equation fitting method, using both the experimental and simulated hyperpolarized NMR data. The ratio fitting method appeared to fit better than the differential equation fitting method for the reverse rate constant on the mouse tumor data, with less relative errors on average, whereas the differential equation fitting method also resulted in a negative reverse rate constant for one tumor. The simulation results indicated that the accuracy of both methods depends on the width of the transport function, noise level and rate constant ratio; one method may be more accurate than the other based on the experimental/biological conditions aforementioned. We were able to categorize our tumor models into specific conditions of the computer simulation and to estimate the errors of rate quantification. We also discussed possible

  14. A model to assess the feasibility of shifting reaction equilibrium by acetone removal in the transamination of ketones using 2‐propylamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufvesson, Pär; Bach, Christian; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    also shows the value of a modeling approach in conceptual process design prior to entering a biocatalyst screening or engineering program to assess the feasibility of a particular process strategy for a given target product. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 309–319. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....... strategy. To avoid excessive laboratory work a model was used to assess the process feasibility. The results from the current study show that a simple model of the acetone removal dependence on temperature and sparging gas flowrate can be developed and fits the experimental data well. The model for acetone...... removal was then coupled to a simple model for biocatalyst kinetics and also for loss of substrate ketone by evaporation. The three models were used to simulate the effects of varying the critical process parameters and reaction equilibrium constants (K eq) as well as different substrate ketone...

  15. Studies of Redox Equilibria at Elevated Temperatures I. The Estimation of Equilibrium Constants and Standard Potentials for Aqueous Systems up to 374 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Derek

    1969-07-01

    A method is described for the estimation of equilibrium constants for aqueous systems at temperatures up to 374 deg C from entropy and free energy data for 25 deg C and data on the variation of heat capacity with temperature. Partial molal heat capacities of aqueous ions are estimated on the basis of the principle that, with suitably chosen standard states, the partial molal entropies of ions of a particular class at any given temperature are linearly related to the corresponding entropies at some reference temperature. The method suggested is compared with other methods, based on the Van't Hoff isobar and on an extension of the conventional scale of ionic free energy at 25 deg C, and the general dependence of aqueous equilibria on ionic heat capacity is considered.

  16. Atmospheric reaction of Cl + methacrolein: a theoretical study on the mechanism, and pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuihong; Xu, Baoen; Zhang, Shaowen

    2014-05-22

    Methacrolein is a major degradation product of isoprene, the reaction of methacrolein with Cl atoms may play some roles in the degradation of isoprene where these species are relatively abundant. However, the energetics and kinetics of this reaction, which govern the reaction branching, are still not well understood so far. In the present study, two-dimensional potential energy surfaces were constructed to analyze the minimum energy path of the barrierless addition process between Cl and the C═C double bond of methacrolein, which reveals that the terminal addition intermediate is directly formed from the addition reaction. The terminal addition intermediate can further yield different products among which the reaction paths abstracting the aldehyde hydrogen atom and the methyl hydrogen atom are dominant reaction exits. The minimum reaction path for the direct aldehydic hydrogen atom abstraction is also obtained. The reaction kinetics was calculated by the variational transition state theory in conjunction with the master equation method. From the theoretical model we predicted that the overall rate constant of the Cl + methacrolein reaction at 297 K and atmospheric pressure is koverall = 2.3× 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the branching ratio of the aldehydic hydrogen abstraction is about 12%. The reaction is pressure dependent at P pressure limit at about 100 Torr. The calculated results could well account for the experimental observations.

  17. Temperature dependence of the rate constant for reactions of hydrated electrons with H, OH and H2O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, K.; Løgager, T.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants, for the reactions of hydrated electrons with H atoms, OH radicals and H2O2 has been determined. The reaction with H atoms, studied in the temperature range 20-250-degrees-C gives k(20-degrees-C) = 2.4 x 10(10) M-1 s-1 and the activation energy E......-1 and E(A) = 15.6 kJ mol-1 (3.7 kcal mol-1) measured from 5-150-degrees-C. Thus, the activation energy for all three fast reactions is close to that expected for diffusion controlled reactions. As phosphates were used as buffer system, the rate constant and activation energy for the reaction......(A) = 14.0 kJ mol-1 (3.3 kcal mol-1). For reaction with OH radicals the corresponding values are, k(20-degrees-C) = 3.1 x 10(10) M-1 s-1 and E(A) = 14.7 kJ mol-1 (3.5 kcal mol-1) determined in the temperature range 5-175-degrees-C. For reaction with H2O2 the values are, k(20-degrees-C) = 1.2 x 10(10) M-1 s...

  18. Estimating reaction rate constants from a two-step reaction: a comparison between two-way and three-way methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, S.; Smilde, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, two different spectral datasets are used in order to estimate reaction rate constants using different algorithms. Dataset 1 consists of short-wavelength near-infrared (SW NIR) spectra taken in time of the two-step epoxidation of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone using tert-butyl

  19. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

  20. The V3+-V5+ redox equilibrium reaction and magnetic properties of vanadium ions in binary alkali silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.S.; Singh, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation-reduction equilibrium in binary alkali silicate glasses containing V 3+ , V 4+ and V 5+ ions was studied at 1400 degC in air atmosphere. The ionic equation representing the V 3+ -V 5+ redox equilibrium reaction was used to represent the V 3+ -V 4+ -V 5+ redox reactions in glasses as V 4+ ion was an intermediate species. The V 3+ -V 5+ redox equilibrium was found to shift more towards the oxidized state with the increasing ionic radii of alkali ions or with the increasing concentration of alkali oxide in the same series of glasses. The slopes of the straight lines obtained on plotting log ([V 5+ ]/[V 3+ ][pO 2 ] 1/2 ) against mol% R 2 O (R + = Li + , Na + and K + ions) in binary alkali silicate glasses were approximately inversely proportional to the coulombic force between the alkali ions and nonbridging oxygen ions. This indicates the redox equilibrium shifted more towards oxidized state with increasing oxygen ion activity in the glass. The loss of vanadium from the glass melts with the duration of heat treatment was observed due to volatilization at high temperature, which did not influence the V 3+ -V 5+ redox equilibrium. Magnetic susceptibility of the present glasses, measured at room temperature, did not show any sign of paramagnetism which might be due to the presence of smaller concentration of V 3+ and V 4+ ions in the glass. Further, it indicated a strong diamagnetism because of the presence of higher proportion of vanadium in pentavalent state in the glasses. However, the optical absorption spectra or a silicate glass containing ions of vanadium indicated the presence of V 3+ , V 4+ and V 5+ ions. (author)

  1. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  2. Kinetics analysis for development of a rate constant estimation model for ultrasonic degradation reaction of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Tomoki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound has been used as an advanced oxidation method for wastewater treatment. Sonochemical degradation of organic compounds in aqueous solution occurs by pyrolysis and/or reaction with hydroxyl radicals. Moreover, kinetics of sonochemical degradation has been proposed. However, the effect of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate has not been investigated. In our previous study, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate of methylene blue was proposed. In this study, sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was performed at various frequencies. Apparent degradation rate constant was evaluated assuming that sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was a first-order reaction. Specifically, we focused on effects of ultrasonic frequency and power on rate constant, and the applicability of our proposed model was demonstrated. Using this approach, maximum sonochemical degradation rate was observed at 490 kHz, which agrees with a previous investigation into the effect of frequency on the sonochemical efficiency value evaluated by KI oxidation dosimetry. Degradation rate increased with ultrasonic power at every frequency. It was also observed that threshold power must be reached for the degradation reaction to progress. The initial methylene blue concentration and the apparent degradation rate constant have a relation of an inverse proportion. Our proposed model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant using ultrasonic power and sonochemical efficiency value can apply to this study which extended the frequency and initial concentration range. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry: Pt. 12; Rate constants for reactions of nonmetallic inorganic radicals in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helman, W P; Ross, A B [Notre Dame Univ., IN (USA). Radiation Chemistry Data Center

    1990-01-01

    Rate constants have been determined by pulse radiolysis, flash photolysis, and other methods, for a wide variety of reactions involving transient radicals in aqueous solution. Reliable rate constants have been established for reactions of radicals from water (e{sub aq}{sup -}, {center dot}H, {center dot}OH/{center dot}O{sup -}) and the data have been tabulated (Buxton, 1988) through 1986. Kinetic data for HO{sub 2}{center dot}/O{sub 2}{center dot}{sup -} were tabulated. (Bielski, 1985) from papers published through 1983. A compilation of rate constants, from the literature through Mid-1987, for other nonmetallic inorganic radicals has also appeared recently (Neta, 1988). Together, these compilations contain rate constants for more than 6,000 different reactions, reported in about 2,000 references. The present bibliography provides a list of relevant references which have been collected since the publication of the above-mentioned compilations. The list contains references received through the end of December, 1989. (author).

  4. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: measurements and site-specific rate rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badra, Jihad; Elwardany, Ahmed E; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-06-28

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (C=O) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (C=O), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):

  5. Pre-equilibrium emission and nuclear level densities in neutron induced reactions on Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Ivascu, I.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1989-01-01

    The experimentally well known (n,p), (n,α) and (n,2n) reaction excitation functions, from threshold to 20 MeV incident energy, and neutron, proton and alpha-particle emission spectra at 14.8 MeV from Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes are calculated in the frame of a generalized Geometry-Dependent-Hybrid pre-equilibrium emission model, including angular momentum and parity conservation and alpha-particle emission, and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Use of a consistent statistical model parameter set enables the validation of the pre-equilibrium emission model. Moreover, an enhanced pre-equilibrium emission from higher spin composite system states, associated with higher incident orbital momenta, has been evidenced. Higher orbital momenta involved also in the emergent channels of this process are suggested by calculations of the residual nuclei level populations. Finally, the unitary account of the (n, p) and (n, 2n) reaction excitation functions for Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes has allowed the proper establishment of the limits of the transition excitation range between the two different nuclear level density models used at medium and higher excitation energies, respectively. (author). 83 refs, 15 figs

  6. Equilibrium study on the reactions of boric acid with some cis-diaqua ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    borate complexes ... of this group of ligands with trivalent metal ions.1,4 The present paper describes the results of a systematic equilibrium ..... Harned H S and Owen B B 1958 Physical chemistry of electrolytic solution (New York: Reinhold). 11.

  7. Direct Dynamics Simulation of the Thermal 3CH2 + 3O2 Reaction. Rate Constant and Product Branching Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Sandhiya; Pratihar, Subha; Machado, Francisco Bolivar Correto; Hase, William Louis

    2018-04-26

    The reaction of 3CH2 with 3O2 is of fundamental importance in combustion and the reaction is complex as a result of multiple extremely exothermic product channels. In the present study, direct dynamics simulations were performed to study the reaction on both the singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces (PESs). The simulations were performed at the UM06/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Trajectories were calculated at a temperature of 300 K and all reactive trajectories proceeded through the carbonyl oxide Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, on both the singlet and triplet PESs. The triplet surface leads to only one product channel, H2CO + O(3P), while the singlet surface leads to 8 product channels with their relative importance as: CO + H2O > CO + OH + H ~ H2CO + O(1D) > HCO + OH ~ CO2 + H2 ~ CO + H2 + O(1D) > CO2 + H + H > HCO + O(1D) + H. Reaction on the singlet PES is barrierless, consistent with experiment and the total rate constant on the singlet surface is 0.93 ± 0.22 x 10-12 cm3molecule-1s-1 in comparison to the recommended experimental rate constant of 3.3 x 10-12 cm3molecule-1s-1. The simulation product yields for the singlet PES are compared with experiment and the most significant differences are for H, CO2, and H2O. Reaction on the triplet surface is also barrierless, inconsistent with experiment. A discussion is given of the need for future calculations to address the: (1) barrier on the triplet PES for 3CH2 + 3O2 → 3CH2OO; (2) temperature dependence of the 3CH2 + 3O2 reaction rate constant and product branching ratios; and (3) possible non-RRKM dynamics of the 1CH2OO Criegee intermediate.

  8. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas-Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Macleod, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second-order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D 4 ), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D 5 ), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D 6 ) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140-mL gas-phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D 4 and D 5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10 -12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7-2.2) × 10 -12 ) and 2.6 × 10 -12 (CI: (2.3-2.9) × 10 -12 ) cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D 6 is 2.8 × 10 -12 (CI: (2.5-3.2) × 10 -12 ) cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D 5 were 33% higher than for D 4 (CI: 30-37%), whereas the rates for D 6 were only 8% higher than for D 5 (CI: 5-10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D 4 , D 5 , and D 6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol.

  9. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas‐Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second‐order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140‐mL gas‐phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10−12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7–2.2) × 10−12) and 2.6 × 10−12 (CI: (2.3–2.9) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10−12 (CI: (2.5–3.2) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30–37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5–10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol. PMID:27708500

  10. Reaction constants, in cyclohexane, of lauryl-amines with tetrabromo-phenolphthalein magenta E acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.J.

    1966-11-01

    Trilauryl amine is an extracting agent used for plutonium purification. Its main degradation product is di-laurylamine. The titration of this impurity is carried out by spectro-colorimetry in cyclohexane using bromophtalein Magenta E as coloured acid indicator. The reported dissociation constants for alcoylammonium salts are too closed to lead to a discrimination between secondary and tertiary amines. The present spectrophotometric study shows that the ratios of various dissociation constants for bromophtalein Magenta E salts are notably different from those for salts of simple coloured acids like 2,4 dinitro phenol. The structural changes accompanying the colorations are discussed in order to explain this phenomenon. (author) [fr

  11. The D(+) + H2 reaction: differential and integral cross sections at low energy and rate constants at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Lezana, Tomás; Scribano, Yohann; Honvault, Pascal

    2014-08-21

    The D(+) + H2 reaction is investigated by means of a time independent quantum mechanical (TIQM) and statistical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods. Differential cross sections and product rotational distributions obtained with these two theoretical approaches for collision energies between 1 meV and 0.1 eV are compared to analyze the dynamics of the process. The agreement observed between the TIQM differential cross sections and the SQM predictions as the energy increases revealed the role played by the complex-forming mechanism. The importance of a good description of the asymptotic regions is also investigated by calculating rate constants for the title reaction at low temperature.

  12. A survey of the reaction rate constants for the thermal dissociation and recombination of nitrogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraffa, Lionel; Dulikravich, George S.; Keeney, Timothy C.; Deiwert, George S.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the present report is to survey the various values of forward and backward reaction rate constants used by investigators in the field of high-temperature (T greater than 2000 K) gas reactions involving nitrogen and oxygen only. The objective is to find those values that correlate well so that they can be used for the studies of hypersonic flow and supersonic combustion with reasonable confidence. Relatively good agreement among these various values is observed for temperatures lower than 10,000 K.

  13. First-Principles Computed Rate Constant for the O + O2 Isotopic Exchange Reaction Now Matches Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Grégoire; Honvault, Pascal; Kochanov, Roman; Tyuterev, Vladimir

    2018-04-19

    We show, by performing exact time-independent quantum molecular scattering calculations, that the quality of the ground electronic state global potential energy surface appears to be of utmost importance in accurately obtaining even as strongly averaged quantities as kinetic rate constants. The oxygen isotope exchange reaction, 18 O + 32 O 2 , motivated by the understanding of a complex long-standing problem of isotopic ozone anomalies in the stratosphere and laboratory experiments, is explored in this context. The thermal rate constant for this key reaction is now in quantitative agreement with all experimental data available to date. A significant recent progress at the frontier of three research domains, advanced electronic structure calculations, ultrasensitive spectroscopy, and quantum scattering calculations, has therefore permitted a breakthrough in the theoretical modeling of this crucial collision process from first principles.

  14. Variational transition-state theory study of the rate constant of the DMS·OH scavenging reaction by O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Anguita, Juan M; González-Lafont, Àngels; Lluch, José M

    2011-07-30

    The chemical tropospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS, CH3SCH3) degradation involves several steps highly dependent on the environmental conditions. So, intensive efforts have been devoted during the last years to enhance the understanding of the DMS oxidation mechanism under different conditions. The reaction of DMS with OH is considered to be the most relevant process that initiates the whole oxidation process. The experimental observations have been explained by a two-channel mechanism consisting of a H-abstraction process leading to CH3S(O)CH3 and HO2 and an addition reaction leading to the DMS·OH adduct. In the presence of O2, the DMS·OH adduct is competitively scavenged increasing the contribution of the addition channel to the overall DMS oxidation. Recent experimental measurements have determined from a global fit that the rate constant of this scavenging process is independent of pressure and temperature but this rate constant cannot be directly measured. In this article, a variational transition-state theory calculation of the low- and high-pressure rate constants for the reaction between DMS·OH and O2 has been carried out as a function of temperature. Our proposal is that the slight temperature dependence of the scavenging rate constant can only be explained if the H-abstraction bottleneck is preceded by a dynamical bottleneck corresponding to the association process between the DMS·OH adduct and the O2 molecule. The agreement between the low-pressure and high-pressure rate constants confirms the experimental observations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. USE OF ROUGH SETS AND SPECTRAL DATA FOR BUILDING PREDICTIVE MODELS OF REACTION RATE CONSTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model for predicting the log of the rate constants for alkaline hydrolysis of organic esters has been developed with the use of gas-phase min-infrared library spectra and a rule-building software system based on the mathematical theory of rough sets. A diverse set of 41 esters ...

  16. Rate Constant Change of Photo Reaction of Bacteriorhodopsin Observed in Trimeric Molecular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujiuchi, Yutaka; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Goto, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the time evolution of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin in glycerol mixed purple membrane at around 196 K under irradiation by red light, a kinetic model was constructed. The change of absorption with irradiation at times of 560 nm and 412 nm was analyzed for the purpose of determining reaction rates of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin and its product M intermediate. In this study it is shown that reaction rates of conversion from bacteriorhodopsin to the M intermediate can be explained by a set of linear differential equations. This model analysis concludes that bacteriorhodopsin in which constitutes a trimer unit with other two bacteriorhodopsin molecules changes into M intermediates in the 1.73 of reaction rate, in the initial step, and according to the number of M intermediate in a trimer unit, from three to one, the reaction rate of bacteriorhodopsin into M intermediates smaller as 1.73, 0.80, 0.19 which caused by influence of inter-molecular interaction between bacteriorhodopsin.

  17. Electrochemical quantification of the thermodynamic equilibrium constant of the tenoxicam-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex formed on the surface of a poly-β cyclodextrin-modified carbon paste electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzmán-Hernández, D.S.; Palomar-Pardavé, M.; Rojas-Hernández, A.; Corona-Avendaño, S.; Romero-Romo, M.; Ramírez-Silva, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A carbon paste electrode (CPE) was modified with a β-CD polymer. • Tenoxicam oxidation on the CPE/poly-β-CD was adsorption controlled. • Influence of pH, scan rate, angular velocity and concentration was evaluated. • Fittings of i-E plots were done considering an irreversible surface reaction. • Electrochemical evaluation of the surface inclusion constant is presented. - Abstract: In this work it is shown that when a carbon paste electrode, CPE, is modified with a β-cyclodextrin polymer, the tenoxicam oxidation becomes an adsorption controlled process due to formation of a surface inclusion complex with the β-CD molecules comprising the surface of the polymer. It was found that such surface inclusion complex can be formed independently of the tenoxicam predominant species, Tenox’, in the aqueous solution namely: H 2 Tenox + , HTenox or Tenox − , depending on the solution pH. The electrochemical quantification of the thermodynamic constant of the equilibrium Tenox’ + β-CD (polymer) = Tenox’-β-CD (polymer) was estimated as log K incl. = 4.26 ± 0.01. Furthermore, from the analyses of the experimental voltammograms according with Laviron's equation for an irreversible surface reaction [E. Laviron, J. Electroanal. Chem. 52 (1974) 355-393] it is shown that the surface concentration, Γ R , of tenoxicam increases as its concentration in solution does, reaching a maximum value of 1.51 × 10 −10 mol cm −2 at 64 μM

  18. Association equilibrium constants and populations of clusters (H2O)n(g) and (D2O)n(g): differences between isotopomers and a possible relation to isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slanina, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Equilibrium constants of H 2 O(g) and D 2 O(g) associations to clusters (H 2 O) n (g) and (D 2 O) n (g) were calculated on the basis of the ab initio SCF CI MCY-B water-water pair potential. Populations of the components of equilibrium cluster mixtures were evaluated at various temperatures and pressures for both isotopomeric series. Differences between the H and D steam are pointed out and possible consequences are discussed. (author)

  19. The reactivity of anion-exchange resins by applying OT-for-OH exchange reaction in the equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Naoki; Nihei, Makoto; Imaizumi, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    In order to reveal the behavior of hydroxyl group in isotope exchange reaction, OT-for-OH exchange reaction between each anion-exchange resin (OH - form) and tritiated water (abbreviated as HTO water below) was observed at 80degC under the equilibrium. Anion-exchange resins used were Amberlite IRA-400, IRA-410 (both strongly basic), and IRA-94S (weakly basic). It can be thought that an HTO molecule dissociates into H + +OT - (or T + +OH - ). The activity of each resin based on OT-for-OH exchange reaction was measured with a liquid scintillation counter. From the above-mentioned, the following five were found. Isotope exchange reaction as 'atomic group' occurred between the OH group in each anion-exchange resin and the OT group in HTO water. The reactivity of strongly basic anion-exchange resin is larger than that of weakly basic one. The ratio of the reactivity of these resins can roughly be expressed as follows: (IRA-410): (IRA-400): (IRA-94S)=42: 7: 1. The degree of OT-for-OH exchange reaction may be smaller than that of T-for-H exchange reaction. The method used and results obtained in this work may be helpful to obtain the data for the prevention of T-contamination, especially to obtain the data from certain atomic groups including T. (author)

  20. Extra entropy production due to non-equilibrium phase transitions in relativistic heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.P.; Lukacs, B.

    1984-04-01

    In a fluid-dynamical model the extra entropy production is calculated which arises from a non-equilibrium phase transition from nuclear to quark matter. The dynamics of processes producing extra entropy are treated in linear approximation. It is shown that there is a considerable extra entropy production provided the transition is not too fast. In measuring the entropy at the break-up, an excess entropy might signalize the phase transition to a transient quark-gluon plasma. (D.Gy.)

  1. Neutron skin effect of some Mo isotopes in pre-equilibrium reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It can help to investigate nuclear surface properties (and also neutron skin thickness effects) depending on the incident nucleon en- ergy PEQ reactions and it gives more information about new nuclear reaction mechanism studies [11,12]. We study molybdenum in the present work because Mo and Mo containing alloys are.

  2. Reaction F + C2H4: Rate Constant and Yields of the Reaction Products as a Function of Temperature over 298-950 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedjanian, Yuri

    2018-03-29

    The kinetics and products of the reaction of F + C 2 H 4 have been studied in a discharge flow reactor combined with an electron impact ionization mass spectrometer at nearly 2 Torr total pressure of helium in the temperature range 298-950 K. The total rate constant of the reaction, k 1 = (1.78 ± 0.30) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , determined under pseudo-first-order conditions, monitoring the kinetics of F atom consumption in excess of C 2 H 4 , was found to be temperature independent in the temperature range used. H, C 2 H 3 F, and HF were identified as the reaction products. Absolute measurements of the yields of these species allowed to determine the branching ratios, k 1b / k 1 = (0.73 ± 0.07) exp(-(425 ± 45)/ T) and k 1a / k 1 = 1 - (0.73 ± 0.07) exp(-(425 ± 45)/ T) and partial rate constants for addition-elimination (H + C 2 H 3 F) and H atom abstraction (HF + C 2 H 3 ) pathways of the title reaction: k 1a = (0.80 ± 0.07) × 10 -10 exp(189 ± 37/ T) and k 1b = (1.26 ± 0.13) × 10 -10 exp(-414 ± 45/ T) cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , respectively, at T = 298-950 K and with 2σ quoted uncertainties. The overall reaction rate constant can be adequately described by both the temperature independent value and as a sum of k 1a and k 1b . The kinetic and mechanistic data from the present study are discussed in comparison with previous absolute and relative measurements and theoretical calculations.

  3. Variational RRKM calculation of thermal rate constant for C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Taghva Manesh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides quantitative results for the rate constants of unimolecular C–H bond fission reactions in the nitro methane at elevated temperatures up to 2000 K. In fact, there are three different hydrogen atoms in the nitro methane. The potential energy surface for each C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane was investigated by ab initio calculations. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of the species involved in this process were optimized at the MP2 level of theory, using the cc-pvdz basis set. Since C–H bond fission channel is a barrierless reaction, we have used variational RRKM theory to predict rate coefficients. By means of calculated rate coefficients at different temperatures, the Arrhenius expression of the channel over the temperature range of 100–2000 K is k(T = 5.9E19∗exp(−56274.6/T.

  4. Pre-equilibrium decay process in alpha particle induced reactions on thulium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Rao, A.V.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1994-01-01

    Alpha particle induced reactions on the target elements Thulium and Tantalum were investigated upto 60 MeV using stacked foil activation technique and Ge(Li) gamma ray spectroscopy method. Excitation functions for six reactions of 169 Tm(α,xn); x=1-4 and 181 Ta(α,xn); x=2,4 were studied. The experimental results were compared with the updated version of Hybrid model (ALICE/90) using initial exciton configuration n 0 =4(4pOh). A general agreement was found for all the reactions with this option. (author)

  5. Pre-equilibrium decay process in alpha particle induced reactions on thulium and tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Rao, A.V.; Chintalapudi, S.N. (Inter Univ. Consortium for Dept. of atomic Energy Facilities, Calcutta (India))

    1994-01-01

    Alpha particle induced reactions on the target elements Thulium and Tantalum were investigated upto 60 MeV using stacked foil activation technique and Ge(Li) gamma ray spectroscopy method. Excitation functions for six reactions of [sup 169]Tm([alpha],xn); x=1-4 and [sup 181]Ta([alpha],xn); x=2,4 were studied. The experimental results were compared with the updated version of Hybrid model (ALICE/90) using initial exciton configuration n[sub 0]=4(4pOh). A general agreement was found for all the reactions with this option. (author).

  6. Rate constants for the reactions of free radicals with oxygen in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, B.; Ingold, K.U.; Scaiano, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of the rections of several free radicals with oxygen have been examined in solution at 300 K using laser flash photolysis techniques. The reactions of resonance-stabilized radicals are only slightly slower than those of nonstabilized radicals: for example, for tert-butyl (in cyclohexane), 4.93 x 10 9 ; benzyl, 2.36 x 10 9 (in cyclohexane); cyclohexadienyl (in benzene), 1.64 x 10 9 M -1 s -1 . The reaction of butyl-tin (n-Bu 3 Sn.) radicals is unusually fast (7.5 x 10 9 M -1 s -1 ), a fact that has been tentatively attributed to a relaxation of spin selection rules due to heavy atom effects. 1 table

  7. Reaction of plutonium with water kinetic and equilibrium behavior of binary and ternary phases in the Pu + O + H system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschke, J.M.; Hodges, A.E. III; Bixby, G.E.; Lucas, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic and equilibrium behavior of the Pu + O + H system has been studied by measuring the production of hydrogen gas formed by a sequence of hydrolysis reactions. The kinetic dependence of the Pu + H 2 O reaction on salt concentration and temperature has been defined. The metal is quantitatively converted to a fine black powder which has been identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride, PuOH. Other hydrolysis products formed in aqueous media include a second oxide hydride, Pu 7 O 9 H 3 , and the oxides Pu 2 O 3 , Pu 7 O 12 , Pu 9 O 16 , Pu 10 O 18 , Pu 12 O 22 , and PuO 2 . Thermal decomposition products of PuOH include Pu 2 O 2 H and PuO. A tentative phase diagram for Pu + O + H is presented and structural relationships of the oxide hydrides and oxides are discussed. 10 figures, 5 tables

  8. The effect of the initial exciton numbers on 54,56Fe(p, xp) Pre-Equilibrium Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bölükdemir, M. H.; Tel, E.; Aydın, A.; Okuducu, S.; Kaplan, A.

    2011-01-01

    In pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions, the geometry-dependent hybrid model is applied with the use of the neutron and proton densities to investigate the effect of initial exciton numbers on the nucleon emission spectra. The initial exciton numbers calculated with the theoretical neutron and proton densities have been obtained within the Skryme-Hartree-Fock method with SKM* and SLy4 forces on target nuclei in the 54,56 Fe(p, xp) reaction at 61.5-MeV incident proton energy by using a new calculationmethod of Tel et al. Also, the differences between the initial exciton numbers for protons and neutrons as a function of nuclear radius, focusing on systematic discrepancies correlated to differences in the proton and neutron densities have been investigated.

  9. Feasibility of Batch Reactive Distillation with Equilibrium-Limited Consecutive Reactions in Rectifier, Stripper, or Middle-Vessel Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lukács

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A general overall feasibility methodology of batch reactive distillation of multireaction systems is developed to study all the possible configurations of batch reactive distillation. The general model equations are derived for multireaction system with any number of chemical equilibrium-limited reactions and for any number of components. The present methodology is demonstrated with the detailed study of the transesterification of dimethyl carbonate in two reversible cascade reactions in batch reactive distillation process. Pure methanol is produced as distillate, and pure diethyl carbonate is produced at the bottom simultaneously in middle-vessel column; in each section, continuous feeding of ethanol is necessary. The results of feasibility study are successfully validated by rigorous simulations.

  10. Site-specific reaction rate constant measurements for various secondary and tertiary H-abstraction by OH radicals

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2015-02-01

    Reaction rate constants for nine site-specific hydrogen atom (H) abstraction by hydroxyl radicals (OH) have been determined using experimental measurements of the rate constants of Alkane+OH→Products reactions. Seven secondary (S 20, S 21, S 22, S 30, S 31, S 32, and S 33) and two tertiary (T 100 and T 101) site-specific rate constants, where the subscripts refer to the number of carbon atoms (C) connected to the next-nearest-neighbor (N-N-N) C atom, were obtained for a wide temperature range (250-1450K). This was done by measuring the reaction rate constants for H abstraction by OH from a series of carefully selected large branched alkanes. The rate constant of OH with four different alkanes, namely 2,2-dimethyl-pentane, 2,4-dimethyl-pentane, 2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane (iso-octane), and 2,2,4,4-tetramethyl-pentane were measured at high temperatures (822-1367K) using a shock tube and OH absorption diagnostic. Hydroxyl radicals were detected using the narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the R1(5) transition of OH spectrum near 306.69nm.Previous low-temperature rate constant measurements are added to the current data to generate three-parameter rate expressions that successfully represent the available direct measurements over a wide temperature range (250-1450. K). Similarly, literature values of the low-temperature rate constants for the reaction of OH with seven normal and branched alkanes are combined with the recently measured high-temperature rate constants from our group [1]. Subsequent to that, site-specific rate constants for abstractions from various types of secondary and tertiary H atoms by OH radicals are derived and have the following modified Arrhenius expressions:. S20=8.49×10-17T1.52exp(73.4K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(250-1450K) S21=1.07×10-15T1.07exp(208.3K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(296-1440K) S22=2.88×10-13T0.41exp(-291.5K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(272-1311K) S30=3.35×10-18T1.97exp(323.1K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(250-1366K) S31=1.60×10-18T2.0exp(500.0K/T)cm3

  11. Rate constants for the reaction of e-aq with EDTA and some metal EDTA-complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buitenhuis, R.; Bakker, C.M.N.; Stock, F.R.; Louwrier, P.W.F.

    1977-01-01

    The rate constants for the reaction e - aq + EDTA were measured as a function of the pH by the pulse-radiolysis technique. Between pH = 6and pH = 10 this rate constant can be represented by the equation k = 4.7 x 10 6 x (fraction of HEDTA 3- )+1.0 x 10 8 x (fraction H 2 EDTA 2 -)M -1 s -1 . Also the rate constants for reactions of e - aq with the following metal-EDTA complexes were measured: CuEDTA 2- , HgEDTA 2- , CoEDTA 2- , InEDTA - , NiEDTA 2- , GaEDTA - , MnEDTA 2- , ZnEDTA 2- , CdEDTA 2- , PbEDTA 2- . Ionic strength variation indicates that the reacting ions are not hydrolized to an appreciable amount at pH = 11.5. It is found that some of the products show light absorption in the region between 300 and 400 nm. (orig.) [de

  12. Molecular-Level Simulations of Chemical Reaction Equilibrium and Diffusion in Slit and Cylindrical Nanopores: Model Dimerisation Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lísal, Martin; Předota, Milan; Brennan, J.K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 13 (2013), s. 1103-1120 ISSN 0892-7022 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09914S Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08651S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : molecular dynamics * reaction ensemble Monte Carlo * slit and cylindrical nanopores Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.119, year: 2013

  13. Non-equilibrium statistical mechanical approach for describing heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sventek, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    With the availability of heavy-ion projectiles (A > 4) at low to intermediate energies (4 < E/A < 10), products showing various stages of relaxation for certain macroscopic variables (center-of-mass energy, orbital angular momentum, etc.) were produced in various reactions. The distributions for these macroscopic variables showed a correlation between the stage of relaxation reached and the net amount of mass transfer which had occurred in the reaction. There was also evidence that there was an asymmetry in the number of net transfers necessary for complete relaxation between stripping ad pickup reactions. A model for describing the time-evolution of these reactions has been formulated, the keystone of which is a master-equation approach for describing the time-dependence of the mass-asymmetry. This, coupled with deterministic equations of motion for the other macroscopic coordinates in the reaction lead to calculated distributions which provide an excellent qualitative description of these reactions, and, in some cases, quantitatively reproduce the experimental data quite well

  14. Three Rate-Constant Kinetic Model for Permanganate Reactions Autocatalyzed by Colloidal Manganese Dioxide: The Oxidation of L-Phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F; Ferrando, Jordi

    2014-12-26

    The reduction of permanganate ion to MnO(2)-Mn(2)O(3) soluble colloidal mixed oxide by l-phenylalanine in aqueous phosphate-buffered neutral solutions has been followed by a spectrophotometric method, monitoring the decay of permanganate ion at 525 nm and the formation of the colloidal oxide at 420 nm. The reaction is autocatalyzed by the manganese product, and three rate constants have been required to fit the experimental absorbance-time kinetic data. The reaction shows base catalysis, and the values of the activation parameters at different pHs have been determined. A mechanism including both the nonautocatalytic and the autocatalytic reaction pathways, and in agreement with the available experimental data, has been proposed. Some key features of this mechanism are the following: (i) of the two predominant forms of the amino acid, the anionic form exhibits a stronger reducing power than the zwitterionic form; (ii) the nonautocatalytic reaction pathway starts with the transfer of the hydrogen atom in the α position of the amino acid to permanganate ion; and (iii) the autocatalytic reaction pathway involves the reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II) by the amino acid and the posterior reoxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(IV) by permanganate ion.

  15. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of NO with a series of peroxy radicals in the gas at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, J.; Nielsen, O.J.; Wallington, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    The rate constants for the reaction of NO with a series of peroxy radicals: CH3O2, C2H5O2, (CH3)3CCH2O2, (CH3)3CC(CH3)2CH2O2, CH2FO2, CH2ClO2, CH2BrO2, CHF2O2, CF2ClO2, CHF2CF2O2, CF3CF2O2, CFCl2CH2O2 and CF2ClCH2O2 were measured at 298 K and a total pressure of 1 atm. The rate constants were...

  16. Non-invasive estimation of dissipation from non-equilibrium fluctuations in chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muy, S; Kundu, A; Lacoste, D

    2013-09-28

    We show how to extract an estimate of the entropy production from a sufficiently long time series of stationary fluctuations of chemical reactions. This method, which is based on recent work on fluctuation theorems, is direct, non-invasive, does not require any knowledge about the underlying dynamics and is applicable even when only partial information is available. We apply it to simple stochastic models of chemical reactions involving a finite number of states, and for this case, we study how the estimate of dissipation is affected by the degree of coarse-graining present in the input data.

  17. Chemical equilibrium and reaction modeling of arsenic and selenium in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical processes and soil factors that affect the concentrations of As and Se in soil solution were discussed. Both elements occur in two redox states differing in toxicity and reactivity. Methylation and volatilization reactions occur in soils and can act as detoxification pathways. Precip...

  18. Monte Carlo Adiabatic Simulation of Equilibrium Reacting Systems: The Ammonia Synthesis Reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lísal, Martin; Bendová, Magdalena; Smith, W.R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 235, č. 1 (2005), s. 50-57 ISSN 0378-3812 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1588 Grant - others:NRCC(CA) OGP1041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : Monte Carlo * reaction * ammonia Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.478, year: 2005

  19. Determination of constant of chemical reaction rate in the process of steel treatment in the endothermal atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulikhandanov, E.L.; Kislenkov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The high-temperature method was applied to measuring a relative variation in the electrical resistance of a thin steel foil prepared from the 12KhN3A, 18Kh2N4VA, 20KhGNR, and 20Kh3MVF steels during its carburization and decarburization, and determined was the temperature dependence of the reaction rate of the interaction of the endothermal atmosphere of different compositions with the analloyed γ-Fe. A connection has been established between the reaction rate constant and the thermodynamic activity of carbon in the alloyed austenite at the temperature of about 925 deg C, corresponding to the cementation temperature. This provides the quantitative estimation of the above value for any alloyed steels and with the presence of numerical values of diffusion coefficients; this also enables one to carry out an accurate calculation of the distribution of carbon throughout the depth of a layer when effecting the cementation in the endothermal atmosphere

  20. The ion exchange properties and equilibrium constants of Li+, Na+ and K+ on zirconium phosphate highly dispersed on a cellulose acetate fibers surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgo Claudemir Adriano

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly dispersed zirconium phosphate was prepared by reacting celullose acetate/ZrO2 (ZrO2 = 11 wt%, 1.0 mmol g-1 of zirconium atom per gram of the material with phosphoric acid. High power decoupling magic angle spinning (HPDEC-MAS 31P NMR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data indicated that HPO4(2- is the species present on the membrane surface. The specific concentration of acidic centers, determined by ammonia gas adsorption, is 0.60 mmol g-1. The ion exchange capacities for Li+, Na+ and K+ ions were determined from ion exchange isotherms at 298 K and showed the following values (in mmol g-1: Li+= 0.05, Na+= 0.38 and K+= 0.57. Due to the strong cooperative effect, the H+/Na+ and H+/K+ ion exchange is of non ideal nature. These ion exchange equilibria were treated with the use of models of fixed tridentate centers, which consider the surface of the sorbent as polyfunctional sorption centers. Both the observed ion exchange capacities with respect to the alkaline metal ions and the equilibrium constants are discussed by taking into consideration the sequence of the ionic hydration radii for Li+, Na+ and K+. The matrix affinity for the ions decreases with increasing the cations hydration radii from K+ to Li+. The high values of the separation factors S Na+/Li+ and S K+/Li+ (up to several hundreds support the application of this material for the quantitative separation of Na+ and K+ from Li+ from a mixture containing these three ions.

  1. Energy dependence of the reaction rate constants of Ar+, Ar++ and N2+ ions with Cl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukac, P.; Holubcik, L.; Morva, I.; Lindinger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Dry etching processes using low temperature plasmas in Cl 2 and in Cl 2 -noble gas or nitrogen mixtures are common in the manufacture of semiconductor devices, but their chemical mechanisms are often poorly understood. Results are given for the reaction rate constant measurements of Ar + , Ar ++ , N 2 + ions with chlorine as a function of mean relative kinetic energy. The experiments were performed by using the innsbruck flow drift tube (IFDT) apparatus. Measurements were done at various E/N values, where E is the electric field strength and N the buffer gas density in the drift section. The mean relative kinetic energy KE CM between the ions and the neutral chlorine Cl 2 was calculated using the Wanniers formula. It was found that The N 2 + , Ar + and Ar ++ positive ions react with chlorine Cl 2 very fast and the corresponding reaction rate coefficients depend on the mean relative kinetic energy. For the reaction of Ar - with Cl 2 , its reaction coefficient depends also on the buffer gas. It can imply the enhancement of Cl 2 + ions during etching of Si in the Ar/Cl 2 mixtures. (nevyjel)

  2. Simulation of square wave voltammetry of three electrode reactions coupled by two reversible chemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Lovrić, Milivoj

    2017-01-01

    Three fast and reversible electrode reactions that are connected by two reversible chemical reactions that are permanently in the equilibrium are analysed theoretically for square wave voltammetry. The dependence of peak potentials on the dimensionless equilibrium constants of chemical reactions is calculated. The influence of the basic thermodynamic parameters on the square wave voltammetric responses is analysed.

  3. Extrapolation of rate constants of reactions producing H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} in radiolysis of water at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblanc, R.; Ghandi, K.; Hackman, B.; Liu, G. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    One target of our research is to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions and add corrections to estimate the rate constants at the higher temperatures reached by the SCWR reactors. The focus of this work was to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions that produce Hydrogen or Oxygen with a rate constant below 10{sup 10} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} at room temperature. The extrapolation is done taking into account the change in the diffusion rate of the interacting species and the cage effect with thermodynamic conditions. The extrapolations are done over a wide temperature range and under isobaric conditions. (author)

  4. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: Measurements and site-specific rate rules

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (CO) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (CO), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):P1,CO = 7.38 × 10-14 exp(-274 K/T) + 9.17 × 10-12 exp(-2499 K/T) (285-1355 K)S10,CO = 1.20 × 10-11 exp(-2046 K/T) + 2.20 × 10-13 exp(160 K/T) (222-1464 K)S11,CO = 4.50 × 10-11 exp(-3000 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1440 K/T) (248-1302 K)S11′,CO = 3.80 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1550 K/T) (263-1370 K)S 21,CO = 5.00 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 4.00 × 10-13 exp(775 K/T) (297-1376 K) © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  5. Spent nuclear fuel project recommended reaction rate constants for corrosion of N-Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.; Pajunen, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating spent nuclear fuel presently stored in the Hanford Site's K Basins. The SNF Project has been tasked by the DOE with moving the spent N-Reactor fuel from wet storage to contained dry storage in order to reduce operating costs and environmental hazards. The chemical reactivity of the fuel must be understood at each process step and during long-term dry storage. Normally, the first step would be to measure the N-fuel reactivity before attempting thermal-hydraulic transfer calculations; however, because of the accelerated project schedule, the initial modeling was performed using literature values for uranium reactivity. These literature values were typically found for unirradiated, uncorroded metal. It was fully recognized from the beginning that irradiation and corrosion effects could cause N-fuel to exhibit quite different reactivities than those commonly found in the literature. Even for unirradiated, uncorroded uranium metal, many independent variables affect uranium metal reactivity resulting in a wide scatter of data. Despite this wide reactivity range, it is necessary to choose a defensible model and estimate the reactivity range of the N-fuel until actual reactivity can be established by characterization activities. McGillivray, Ritchie, and Condon developed data and/or models that apply for certain samples over limited temperature ranges and/or reaction conditions (McGillivray 1994, Ritchie 1981 and 1986, and Condon 1983). These models are based upon small data sets and have relatively large correlation coefficients

  6. The reaction O((3)P) + HOBr: Temperature dependence of the rate constant and importance of the reaction as an HOBr stratospheric loss process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, F. L.; Monks, P. S.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.; Toumi, R.

    1995-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction O((3)P) + HOBr has been measured between T = 233K and 423K using the discharge-flow kinetic technique coupled to mass spectrometric detection. The value of the rate coefficient at room temperature is (2.5 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -11)cu cm/molecule/s and the derived Arrhenius expression is (1.4 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp -10) exp((-430 +/- 260)/T)cu cm/molecule/s. From these rate data the atmospheric lifetime of HOBr with respect to reaction with O((3)P) is about 0.6h at z = 25 km which is comparable to the photolysis lifetime based on recent measurements of the UV cross section for HOBr. Implications for HOBr loss in the stratosphere have been tested using a 1D photochemical box model. With the inclusion of the rate parameters and products for the O + HOBr reaction, calculated concentration profiles of BrO increase by up to 33% around z = 35 km. This result indicates that the inclusion of the O + HOBr reaction in global atmospheric chemistry models may have an impact on bromine partitioning in the middle atmosphere.

  7. Cluster emission at pre-equilibrium stage in Heavy Nuclear Reactions. A Model considering the Thermodynamics of Small Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Martinez, A.; Damiani, D.; Guzman Martinez, F.; Rodriguez Hoyos, O.; Rodriguez Manso, A.

    2015-01-01

    Cluster emission at pre-equilibrium stage, in heavy ion fusion reactions of 12 C and 16 O nuclei with 116 Sn, 208 Pb, 238 U are studied. the energy of the projectile nuclei was chosen at 0.25GeV, 0.5GeV and 1GeV. A cluster formation model is developed in order to calculate the cluster size. Thermodynamics of small systems was used in order to examine the cluster behavior inside the nuclear media. This model is based on considering two phases inside the compound nucleus, on one hand the nuclear media phase, and on the other hand the cluster itself. The cluster acts like an instability inside the compound nucleus, provoking an exchange of nucleons with the nuclear media through its surface. The processes were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. We obtained that the cluster emission probability shows great dependence on the cluster size. This project is aimed to implement cluster emission processes, during the pre-equilibrium stage, in the frame of CRISP code (Collaboration Rio-Sao Paulo). (Author)

  8. An ab initio chemical reaction model for the direct simulation Monte Carlo study of non-equilibrium nitrogen flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, T K; Bhandarkar, U V; Puranik, B P

    2017-08-28

    A new ab initio based chemical model for a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) study suitable for simulating rarefied flows with a high degree of non-equilibrium is presented. To this end, Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) cross sections for N 2 +N 2 →N 2 +2N are calculated and published using a global complete active space self-consistent field-complete active space second order perturbation theory N 4 potential energy surface and quasi-classical trajectory algorithm for high energy collisions (up to 30 eV). CID cross sections are calculated for only a selected set of ro-vibrational combinations of the two nitrogen molecules, and a fitting scheme based on spectroscopic weights is presented to interpolate the CID cross section for all possible ro-vibrational combinations. The new chemical model is validated by calculating equilibrium reaction rate coefficients that can be compared well with existing shock tube and computational results. High-enthalpy hypersonic nitrogen flows around a cylinder in the transition flow regime are simulated using DSMC to compare the predictions of the current ab initio based chemical model with the prevailing phenomenological model (the total collision energy model). The differences in the predictions are discussed.

  9. Noise-Induced Modulation of the Relaxation Kinetics around a Non-Equilibrium Steady State of Non-Linear Chemical Reaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confi...

  10. FORMATION CONSTANTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEY WORDS: Metal complexes, Schiff base ligand, Formation constant, DFT calculation ... best values for the formation constants of the proposed equilibrium model by .... to its positive charge distribution and the ligand deformation geometry.

  11. Thermodynamic Simulation of Equilibrium Composition of Reaction Products at Dehydration of a Technological Channel in a Uranium-Graphite Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavliuk, A. O.; Zagumennov, V. S.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.; Bespala, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    The problems of accumulation of nuclear fuel spills in the graphite stack in the course of operation of uranium-graphite nuclear reactors are considered. The results of thermodynamic analysis of the processes in the graphite stack at dehydration of a technological channel, fuel element shell unsealing and migration of fission products, and activation of stable nuclides in structural elements of the reactor and actinides inside the graphite moderator are given. The main chemical reactions and compounds that are produced in these modes in the reactor channel during its operation and that may be hazardous after its shutdown and decommissioning are presented. Thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition is performed using the specialized code TERRA. The results of thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition in different cases of technological channel dehydration in the course of the reactor operation show that, if the temperature inside the active core of the nuclear reactor increases to the melting temperature of the fuel element, oxides and carbides of nuclear fuel are produced. The mathematical model of the nonstationary heat transfer in a graphite stack of a uranium-graphite reactor in the case of the technological channel dehydration is presented. The results of calculated temperature evolution at the center of the fuel element, the replaceable graphite element, the air gap, and in the surface layer of the block graphite are given. The numerical results show that, in the case of dehydration of the technological channel in the uranium-graphite reactor with metallic uranium, the main reaction product is uranium dioxide UO2 in the condensed phase. Low probability of production of pyrophoric uranium compounds (UH3) in the graphite stack is proven, which allows one to disassemble the graphite stack without the risk of spontaneous graphite ignition in the course of decommissioning of the uranium-graphite nuclear reactor.

  12. Reaction kinetics aspect of U3O8 kernel with gas H2 on the characteristics of activation energy, reaction rate constant and O/U ratio of UO2 kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damunir

    2007-01-01

    The reaction kinetics aspect of U 3 O 8 kernel with gas H 2 on the characteristics of activation energy, reaction rate constant and O/U ratio of UO 2 kernel had been studied. U 3 O 8 kernel was reacted with gas H 2 in a reduction furnace at varied reaction time and temperature. The reaction temperature was varied at 600, 700, 750 and 850 °C with a pressure of 50 mmHg for 3 hours in gas N 2 atmosphere. The reation time was varied at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours at a temperature of 750 °C using similar conditions. The reaction product was UO 2 kernel. The reaction kinetic aspect between U 3 O 8 and gas H 2 comprised the minimum activation energy (ΔE), the reaction rate constant and the O/U ratio of UO 2 kernel. The minimum activation energy was determined from a straight line slope of equation ln [{D b . R o {(1 - (1 - X b ) ⅓ } / (b.t.Cg)] = -3.9406 x 10 3 / T + 4.044. By multiplying with the straight line slope -3.9406 x 10 3 , the ideal gas constant (R) 1.985 cal/mol and the molarity difference of reaction coefficient 2, a minimum activation energy of 15.644 kcal/mol was obtained. The reaction rate constant was determined from first-order chemical reaction control and Arrhenius equation. The O/U ratio of UO 2 kernel was obtained using gravimetric method. The analysis result of reaction rate constant with chemical reaction control equation yielded reaction rate constants of 0.745 - 1.671 s -1 and the Arrhenius equation at temperatures of 650 - 850 °C yielded reaction rate constants of 0.637 - 2.914 s -1 . The O/U ratios of UO 2 kernel at the respective reaction rate constants were 2.013 - 2.014 and the O/U ratios at reaction time 1 - 4 hours were 2.04 - 2.011. The experiment results indicated that the minimum activation energy influenced the rate constant of first-order reaction and the O/U ratio of UO 2 kernel. The optimum condition was obtained at reaction rate constant of 1.43 s -1 , O/U ratio of UO 2 kernel of 2.01 at temperature of 750 °C and reaction time of 3

  13. Asymptotic behavior of equilibrium states of reaction-diffusion systems with mass conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Jann-Long; Morita, Yoshihisa; Shieh, Tien-Tsan

    2018-01-01

    We deal with a stationary problem of a reaction-diffusion system with a conservation law under the Neumann boundary condition. It is shown that the stationary problem turns to be the Euler-Lagrange equation of an energy functional with a mass constraint. When the domain is the finite interval (0 , 1), we investigate the asymptotic profile of a strictly monotone minimizer of the energy as d, the ratio of the diffusion coefficient of the system, tends to zero. In view of a logarithmic function in the leading term of the potential, we get to a scaling parameter κ satisfying the relation ε : =√{ d } =√{ log ⁡ κ } /κ2. The main result shows that a sequence of minimizers converges to a Dirac mass multiplied by the total mass and that by a scaling with κ the asymptotic profile exhibits a parabola in the nonvanishing region. We also prove the existence of an unstable monotone solution when the mass is small.

  14. Use of the nonsteady monotonic heating method for complex determination of thermophysical properties of chemically reacting mixture in the case of non-equilibrium proceeding of the chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebryanyj, G.Z.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical analysis is made for the monotonic heating method as applied for complex determination of thermophysical properties of chemically reacting gases. The possibility is shown of simultaneous determination of frozen and equilibrium heat capacity, frozen and equilibrium heat conduction provided non-equilibrium occuring of the reaction in the wide range of temperatures and pressures. The monotonic heating method can be used for complex determination of thermophysical properties of chemically reacting systems in case of non-equilibrium proceeding of the chemical reaction

  15. The effect of addition of primary positive salts, complex salt, on the ionic strength and rate constant at various temperatures by reaction kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurade, S. S.; Ramteke, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have investigated the rate of reaction by using ionic strength at different temperatures. The main goal of this experiment is to determine the relation between ionic strength with reaction rate, reaction time and rate constant with temperature. It is observed that the addition of positive salt indicate the increasing ionic strength with increase in run time at various temperatures. Thus the temperature affects the speed of reaction and mechanism by which chemical reaction occurs and time variable plays vital role in the progress of reaction at different temperatures.

  16. Theoretical calculation of reorganization energy for electron self-exchange reaction by constrained density functional theory and constrained equilibrium thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hai-Sheng; Ming, Mei-Jun; Ma, Jian-Yi; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2013-08-22

    Within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT), the diabatic or charge localized states of electron transfer (ET) have been constructed. Based on the diabatic states, inner reorganization energy λin has been directly calculated. For solvent reorganization energy λs, a novel and reasonable nonequilibrium solvation model is established by introducing a constrained equilibrium manipulation, and a new expression of λs has been formulated. It is found that λs is actually the cost of maintaining the residual polarization, which equilibrates with the extra electric field. On the basis of diabatic states constructed by CDFT, a numerical algorithm using the new formulations with the dielectric polarizable continuum model (D-PCM) has been implemented. As typical test cases, self-exchange ET reactions between tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and their corresponding ionic radicals in acetonitrile are investigated. The calculated reorganization energies λ are 7293 cm(-1) for TCNE/TCNE(-) and 5939 cm(-1) for TTF/TTF(+) reactions, agreeing well with available experimental results of 7250 cm(-1) and 5810 cm(-1), respectively.

  17. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  18. The /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling constants and the conformational equilibrium of alkyl phenyl sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krividin, L.B.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1985-08-10

    The authors measure the direct geminal and vicinal spinspin coupling constants between the C-13 nuclei of the phenyl group in the series of alkyl phenyl sulfides C/sub 6/H/sub 5/SR. It was shown that the variation in most of the discussed constants is determined by the ratio of the planar and orthogonal conformers. Linear relationships were obtained between the C-13-C-13 constants and the fractions of the planar conformer. The C-13-C-13 spin-spin coupling constants in the planar and orthogonal conformers of the compounds were calculated by means of empirical relationships.

  19. The chemistry of bromine in the stratosphere: Influence of a new rate constant for the reaction BrO + HO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirre, Michel; Marceau, Francois J.; Lebras, Georges; Maguin, Francoise; Poulet, Gille; Ramaroson, Radiela

    1994-01-01

    The impact of new laboratory data for the reaction BrO + HO2 yields HOBr + O2 in the depletion of global stratospheric ozone has been estimated using a one-dimensional photochemical model taking into account the heterogeneous reaction on sulphate aerosols which converts N2O5 into HNO3. Assuring an aerosol loading 2 times as large as the 'background' and a reaction probability of 0.1 for the above heterogeneous reaction, the 6 fold increase in the measured rate constant for the reaction of BrO with HO2 increases the computed depletion of global ozone produced by 20 ppt of total bromine from 2.01 percent to 2.36 percent. The use of the higher rate constant increases the HOBr mixing ratio and makes the bromine partitioning and the ozone depletion very sensitive to the branching ratio of the potential channel forming HBr in the BrO + HO2 reaction.

  20. Solvent effect on the degree of (a)synchronicity in polar Diels-Alder reactions from the perspective of the reaction force constant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Diana; Martínez-Araya, Jorge I; Jaque, Pablo

    2017-12-29

    In this work, we computationally evaluated the influence of six different molecular solvents, described as a polarizable continuum model at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) level, on the activation barrier/reaction rate, overall energy change, TS geometry, and degree of (a)synchronicity of two concerted Diels-Alder cycloadditions of acrolein (R1) and its complex with Lewis acid acrolein···BH 3 (R2) to cyclopentadiene. In gas-phase, we found that both exothermicity and activation barrier are only reduced by about 2.0 kcal mol -1 , and the asynchronicity character of the mechanism is accentuated when BH 3 is included. An increment in the solvent's polarity lowers the activation energy of R1 by 1.3 kcal mol -1 , while for R2 the reaction rate is enhanced by more than 2000 times at room temperature (i.e., the activation energy decreases by 4.5 kcal mol -1 ) if the highest polar media is employed. Therefore, a synergistic effect is achieved when both external agents, i.e., Lewis acid catalyst and polar solvent, are included together. This effect was ascribed to the ability of the solvent to favor the encounter between cyclopentadiene and acrolein···BH 3 . This was validated by the asymmetry of the TS which becomes highly pronounced when either both or just BH 3 is considered or the solvent's polarity is increased. Finally, the reaction force constant κ(ξ) reveals that an increment in the solvent's polarity is able to turn a moderate asynchronous mechanism of the formation of the new C-C σ-bonds into a highly asynchronous one. Graphical abstract A synergistic effect is achieved when both external agents, i.e., Lewis acid catalyst and polar solvent, are included together: lowered energy barriers and increased asynchronicities.

  1. 13C High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Enzyme-Substrate Reactions at Equilibrium. Substrate Strain Studies of Chymotrypsin-N-Acetyltyrosine Semicarbazide Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robillard, George; Shaw, Elliott; Shulman, R.G.

    1974-01-01

    N-Acetyl-L-tyrosine semicarbazide is hydrolyzed by chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1) to N-acetyl-L-tyrosine and semicarbazide. If a high concentration of semicarbazide is present, the equilibrium for the reaction can be shifted from hydrolysis to synthesis. Using N-acetyl-L-[13C]tyrosine enriched at the

  2. The Nature of the Interplay among Components of Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Reaction Rate and Chemical Equilibrium Topics of Novice and Experienced Chemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Fatma Nur; Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, Esen

    2018-01-01

    We examined the interactions among pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) components of novice and experienced chemistry teachers in teaching reaction rate and chemical equilibrium topics in this qualitative multiple-case design study. For this aim, three chemistry teachers who had different levels of teaching experience in chemistry teaching were…

  3. Lecture 2: Equilibrium statistical treatment of angular momenta associated with collective modes in fission and heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1979-01-01

    The angular momentum effects in deep inelastic processes and fission have been studied in the limit of statistical equilibrium. The model consists of two touching liquid drop spheres. Angular momentum fractionation has been found to occur along the mass asymmetry coordinate. If neutron competition is included (i.e., in compound nucleus formation and fission), the fractionation occurs only to a slight degree, while extensive fractionation is predicted if no neutron competition occurs (i.e., in fusion--fission without compound nucleus formation). Thermal fluctuations in the angular momentum are predicted to occur due to degrees of freedom which can bear angular momentum, like wriggling, tilting, bending, and twisting. The coupling of relative motion to one of the wriggling modes, leading to fluctuations between orbital and intrinsic angular momentum, is considered first. Next the effect of the excitation of all the collective modes on the fragment spin is treated. General expressions for the first and second moments of the fragment spins are derived as a function of total angular momentum and the limiting behavior at large and small total angular momentum is examined. Furthermore, the effect of collective mode excitation on the fragment spin alignment is explored and is discussed in light of recent experiments. The relevance of the present study to the measured first and second moments of the γ-ray multiplicities as well as to sequential fission angular distributions is illustrated by applying the results of the theory to a well studied heavy ion reaction

  4. Experimental determination of thermodynamic equilibrium in biocatalytic transamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufvesson, Pär; Jensen, Jacob S; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Woodley, John M

    2012-08-01

    The equilibrium constant is a critical parameter for making rational design choices in biocatalytic transamination for the synthesis of chiral amines. However, very few reports are available in the scientific literature determining the equilibrium constant (K) for the transamination of ketones. Various methods for determining (or estimating) equilibrium have previously been suggested, both experimental as well as computational (based on group contribution methods). However, none of these were found suitable for determining the equilibrium constant for the transamination of ketones. Therefore, in this communication we suggest a simple experimental methodology which we hope will stimulate more accurate determination of thermodynamic equilibria when reporting the results of transaminase-catalyzed reactions in order to increase understanding of the relationship between substrate and product molecular structure on reaction thermodynamics. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Predicting the Rate Constant of Electron Tunneling Reactions at the CdSe-TiO2 Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Douglas A; Forrest, Ryan P; Corcelli, Steven A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2015-06-18

    Current interest in quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) motivates an understanding of the electron transfer dynamics at the quantum dot (QD)-metal oxide (MO) interface. Employing transient absorption spectroscopy, we have monitored the electron transfer rate (ket) at this interface as a function of the bridge molecules that link QDs to TiO2. Using mercaptoacetic acid, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, 8-mercaptooctanoic acid, and 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid, we observe an exponential attenuation of ket with increasing linker length, and attribute this to the tunneling of the electron through the insulating linker molecule. We model the electron transfer reaction using both rectangular and trapezoidal barrier models that have been discussed in the literature. The one-electron reduction potential (equivalent to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) of each molecule as determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to estimate the effective barrier height presented by each ligand at the CdSe-TiO2 interface. The electron transfer rate (ket) calculated for each CdSe-ligand-TiO2 interface using both models showed the results in agreement with the experimentally determined trend. This demonstrates that electron transfer between CdSe and TiO2 can be viewed as electron tunneling through a layer of linking molecules and provides a useful method for predicting electron transfer rate constants.

  6. Rate constants for the reactions of OH with CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, and CH3Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, K.-J.; Demore, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    Rate constants for the reactions of OH with CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, and CH3Br have been measured by a relative rate technique in which the reaction rate of each compound was compared to that of HFC-152a (CH3CHF2) and (for CH2Cl2) HFC-161 (CH3CH2F). Using absolute rate constants for HFC-152a and HFC-161, which we have determined relative to those for CH4, CH3CCl3, and C2H6, temperature dependent rate constants of both compounds were derived. The derived rate constant for CH3Br is in good agreement with recent absolute measurements. However, for the chloromethanes all the rate constants are lower at atmospheric temperatures than previously reported, especially for CH2Cl2 where the present rate constant is about a factor of 1.6 below the JPL 92-20 value. The new rate constant appears to resolve a discrepancy between the observed atmospheric concentrations and those calculated from the previous rate constant and estimated release rates.

  7. Solvent effect on the rate and equilibrium of reaction between 10-phenylphenoxarsine and methyl iodide. Vliyanie rastvoritelya na skorost' i ravnovesie reaktsii 10-fenilfenoksarsina s iodistym metilom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, V I; Gumerov, N S; Rakhmatullin, R R [Kazanskij Khimiko-Tekhnologicheskij Inst., Kazan (USSR)

    1990-02-01

    Effect of solvent nature on nucleophilic capacity of three-coordinated arsenic and the equilibrium state of 10-phenylphenoxarsine (PA) reaction with methyl iodide are studied. Kinetic investigations are carried out by the conductometry at 24,35,45 deg C. It is established that quaternization of PA with methyl iodide when substituting a solvent (ketone for alcohol) increases 3-14 times with simultaneous growth of the activation energy value. When transforming from aprotic solvents to protic ones PA interaction equilibrium with methyl iodide shifts to the side of arsonic salt formation.

  8. Chemical equilibrium. [maximizing entropy of gas system to derive relations between thermodynamic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The entropy of a gas system with the number of particles subject to external control is maximized to derive relations between the thermodynamic variables that obtain at equilibrium. These relations are described in terms of the chemical potential, defined as equivalent partial derivatives of entropy, energy, enthalpy, free energy, or free enthalpy. At equilibrium, the change in total chemical potential must vanish. This fact is used to derive the equilibrium constants for chemical reactions in terms of the partition functions of the species involved in the reaction. Thus the equilibrium constants can be determined accurately, just as other thermodynamic properties, from a knowledge of the energy levels and degeneracies for the gas species involved. These equilibrium constants permit one to calculate the equilibrium concentrations or partial pressures of chemically reacting species that occur in gas mixtures at any given condition of pressure and temperature or volume and temperature.

  9. Thermodynamic and microscopic equilibrium constants of molecular species formed from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and 2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid in aqueous and D2O solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpoganicz, B.; Martell, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Schiff base formation between pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and 2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (APP) has been investigated by measurement of the corresponding NMR and electronic absorption spectra. A value of 0.26 was found for the formation constant of the completely deprotonated Schiff base species, and is much smaller than the values reported for pyridoxal-β-chloroalanine and pyridoxal-O-phosphoserine. The protonation constants for the aldehyde and hydrate forms of PLP were determined in D 2 O by measurement of the variation of chemical shifts with pD (pH in D 2 O). The hydration constants of PLP were determined in a pD range 2-12, and species distributions were calculated. The protonation constants of the APP-PLP Schiff base determined by NMR in D 2 O were found to have the log values 12.54, 8.10, 6.70, and 5.95, and the species distributions were calculated for a range of pD values. Evidence is reported for hydrogen bonding involving the phosphate and phosphonate groups of the diprotonated Schiff base. The cis and trans forms of the Schiff bases were distinguished with the aid of the nuclear Overhauser effect. 43 references, 9 figures, 3 tables

  10. Benzodiazepine receptor equilibrium constants for flumazenil and midazolam determined in humans with the single photon emission computer tomography tracer [123I]iomazenil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbaek, C; Friberg, L; Holm, S

    1993-01-01

    twice, once without receptor blockade and once with a constant degree of partial blockade of the benzodiazepine receptors by infusion of nonradioactive flumazenil (Lanexat) or midazolam (Dormicum). Single photon emission computer tomography and blood sampling were performed intermittently for 6 h after...

  11. Equilibrium constant and nitrogen activity and the parameters of interaction eN(N), rN(N,Cr), rN(N,Mn) in high nitrogen steels of Fe-Cr-Mn-N type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyazhin, A.G.; Siwka, J.; Rashev, T.

    1999-01-01

    In the paper a description of a thermodynamic of liquid solutions of Fe-Cr-Mn-N type with using a concept of parameters of an interaction has been presented. A temperature relationship of the equilibrium constant K N(Fe) and values of self interaction parameters e N (N) , r N (N,Cr) , r N (N,Mn) and t N (N,Cr,Cr) has been determined for mean values of temperatures of liquid metal equal 1990 K and 2090 K. By application of a theory of regular solutions those values were recalculated for a temperature 1873 K. (orig.)

  12. The Ligand Substitution Reactions of Hydrophobic Vitamin B12 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Chemistry ... The equilibrium constants, K, for the reaction of five-membered heterocyclic nitrogenous bases (the azoles imidazole, pyrazole and 1,2,4-triazole) with displacement of ... Keywords: Hydrophobic vitamin B12, cobalt corrinoids, equilibrium constants, solvent polarity, trans influence.

  13. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  14. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  15. Determination of H-atom reaction rate constants by the competition kinetic technique using riboflavin as a standard solute [Paper No. RD-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, Kamal; Moorthy, P.N.; Rao, K.N.

    1982-01-01

    Riboflavin has been used as a standard solute to evaluate H-atom rate constants of other solutes by steady state radiolytic competition kinetic method. The bleaching of absorbance of riboflavin at 445 nm as a result of its reaction with H-atoms is made use of in estimating its decomposition. The merits and demerits of this method are discussed. (author)

  16. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: Measurements and site-specific rate rules

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    -pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct

  17. Isotopic equilibrium constants of the deuterium exchange between HDO and H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}Se and H{sub 2}Te; Etude des constantes des equilibres isotopiques du deuterium entre l'eau et les hydrures des metalloides de la deuxieme famille

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-11-15

    We have determined experimentally the equilibrium constant K of each of the following isotope exchanges: SH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SHD + OH{sub 2}; SeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SeHD + OH{sub 2}; TeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} TeHD + OH{sub 2}. In gaseous phase, statistical thermodynamics leads to the expression: K (Z{sub OHD} x Z{sub RH{sub 2}})/(Z{sub OH{sub 2}} x Z{sub RHD}) x e{sup W/T} (R being the elements S, Se or Te). Z, the partition functions, have been calculated and, through our experimental results, the constant W has been determined. Having obtained W, the equilibrium constant K has been calculated for a series of temperatures. (author) [French] Nous avons determine experimentalement la constante K de chacun des equilibres isotopiques suivants: SH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SHD + OH{sub 2}; SeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SeHD + OH{sub 2}; TeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} TeHD + OH{sub 2}. En phase gazeuse, la thermodynamique donne l'expression: K = (Z{sub OHD} x Z{sub RH{sub 2}})/(Z{sub OH{sub 2}} x Z{sub RHD}) x e{sup W/T} (R representant un atome de soufre, selenium ou tellure). Les fonctions de partition Z de chacune des molecules ont ete calculees et, grace a nos resultats experimentaux, nous avons determine la constante W. Connaissant W, la constante d'equilibre K a pu etre tabulee en fonction de la temperature. (auteur)

  18. The reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane - Temperature dependence of the rate constant and implications for germane photochemistry in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the formation and loss processes for GeH4 are required in order to provide data to help determine the major chemical form in which germanium exists in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. The reaction of hydrogen atoms with germane is one of the most important of these reactions. The absolute rate constant for this reaction as a function of temperature and pressure is studied. Flash photolysis of dilute mixtures of GeH4 in argon, combined with time-resolved detection of H atoms via Lyman alpha resonance fluorescence, is employed to measure the reaction rate. The reaction is shown to be moderately rapid, independent of total pressure, but possessing a positive temperature dependence.

  19. Measurement of the Dissociation-Equilibrium Constants for Low Affinity Antibiotic Binding Interaction with Bacterial Ribosomes by the T2 (CPMG) and Line-Broadening Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, L.; Gharbi-Benarous, J.; Bertho, G.; Mauvais, P.; Girault, J.-P.

    1999-10-01

    In this study the dissociation constants of the low antibiotic-ribosomes interaction were determined by the T2 (CPMG), the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill spin-echo decay rate and the line-broadening methods. Three MLSB antibiotics were studied, a macrolide roxithromycin, a ketolide HMR 3647 and a lincosamide clindamycin for their weak interaction with three bacterial ribosomes, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Nous avons mesuré la constante de dissociation, Kd correspondant à l'interaction faible antibiotique-ribosome bactérien pour des antibiotiques de différentes classes, un macrolide (roxithromycine), un kétolide (HMR 3647) et une lincosamide (clindamycine) avec des ribosomes de différentes souches bactériennes (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus sensible ou résistant à l'erythromycin) par deux méthodes : l'une basée sur la variation des largeurs de raies et l'autre sur les temps de relaxation transversaux T2 en utilisant une séquence CPMG.

  20. Room-temperature and temperature-dependent QSRR modelling for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constants of organic chemicals using ensemble learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Mohan, D; Singh, K P

    2016-07-01

    Experimental determinations of the rate constants of the reaction of NO3 with a large number of organic chemicals are tedious, and time and resource intensive; and the development of computational methods has widely been advocated. In this study, we have developed room-temperature (298 K) and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models based on the ensemble learning approaches (decision tree forest (DTF) and decision treeboost (DTB)) for predicting the rate constant of the reaction of NO3 radicals with diverse organic chemicals, under OECD guidelines. Predictive powers of the developed models were established in terms of statistical coefficients. In the test phase, the QSRR models yielded a correlation (r(2)) of >0.94 between experimental and predicted rate constants. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined. An attempt has been made to provide the mechanistic interpretation of the selected features for QSRR development. The proposed QSRR models outperformed the previous reports, and the temperature-dependent models offered a much wider applicability domain. This is the first report presenting a temperature-dependent QSRR model for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constant at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards NO3 radicals in the atmosphere, hence, their persistence and exposure risk assessment.

  1. Quantum mechanical calculations of state-to-state cross sections and rate constants for the F + DCl → Cl + DF reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Niyazi; Kłos, Jacek; Roncero, Octavio

    2015-06-07

    We present accurate state-to-state quantum wave packet calculations of integral cross sections and rate constants for the title reaction. Calculations are carried out on the best available ground 1(2)A' global adiabatic potential energy surface of Deskevich et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224303 (2006)]. Converged state-to-state reaction cross sections have been calculated for collision energies up to 0.5 eV and different initial rotational and vibrational excitations, DCl(v = 0, j = 0 - 1; v = 1, j = 0). Also, initial-state resolved rate constants of the title reaction have been calculated in a temperature range of 100-400 K. It is found that the initial rotational excitation of the DCl molecule does not enhance reactivity, in contract to the reaction with the isotopologue HCl in which initial rotational excitation produces an important enhancement. These differences between the isotopologue reactions are analyzed in detail and attributed to the presence of resonances for HCl(v = 0, j), absent in the case of DCl(v = 0, j). For vibrational excited DCl(v = 1, j), however, the reaction cross section increases noticeably, what is also explained by another resonance.

  2. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics and energy distribution function of neutron gas in constant power reactor under coupling of neutrons and medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayasaka, Hideo

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics and the energy distribution function of the neutron gas in a constant power reactor are considered, taking into account the burn-up of fuel. To separate the secular motion of neutrons owing to fuel burn-up and the microscopic fluctuations of neutrons around this motion, a long time of the order of several months is divided into m equal intervals, and the respective states corresponding to m small time intervals are treated as quasi-stationary states. The local energy distribution function of the neutron gas in the quasi-stationary state is given by a generalized Boltzmann distribution specified by the respective generalized activity coefficient for each subsystem. The effects of fuel burn-up on the respective distribution functions for successive small time intervals are taken into account through various quantities relating to reactor physics, depending upon the fuel burn-up, by successive approximation. (author)

  3. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Ramaswamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  4. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-28

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF) of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  5. A mathematical analysis of Prx2-STAT3 disulfide exchange rate constants for a bimolecular reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Troy F; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2018-03-22

    Appreciation of peroxiredoxins as the major regulators of H 2 O 2 concentrations in human cells has led to a new understanding of redox signaling. In addition to their status as the primary reducers of H 2 O 2 to water, the oxidized peroxiredoxin byproduct of this reaction has recently been shown capable of participation in H 2 O 2 -mediated signaling pathways through disulfide exchange reactions with the transcription factor STAT3. The dynamics of peroxidase-transcription factor disulfide exchange reactions have not yet been considered in detail with respect to how these reactions fit into the larger network of competing reactions in human cells. In this study, we used a kinetic model of oxidation and reduction reactions related to H 2 O 2 metabolism in the cytosol of human cells to study the dynamics of peroxiredoxin-2 mediated oxidation of the redox-regulated transcription factor STAT3. In combination with previously reported experimental data, the model was used to estimate the rate coefficient of a biomolecular reaction between Prx2 and STAT3 for two sets of assumptions that constitute lower and upper bound cases. Using these estimates, we calculated the relative rates of the reaction of oxidized peroxiredoxin-2 and STAT3 and other competing reactions in the cytosol. These calculations revealed that peroxiredoxin-2-mediated oxidation of STAT3 likely occurs at a much slower rate than competing reactions in the cytosol. This analysis suggests the existence of more complex mechanisms, potentially involving currently unknown protein-protein recognition partners, which facilitate disulfide exchange reactions between peroxiredoxin-2 and STAT3. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reaction of carbon tetrachloride with methane in a non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, and characterisation of the polymer thus formed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaikwad, Vaibhav [Process Safety and Environment Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Kennedy, Eric, E-mail: Eric.Kennedy@newcastle.edu.au [Process Safety and Environment Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Mackie, John [Process Safety and Environment Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Holdsworth, Clovia [Centre for Organic Electronics, Chemistry Building, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Molloy, Scott; Kundu, Sazal; Stockenhuber, Michael [Process Safety and Environment Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Dlugogorski, Bogdan [School of Engineering and Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • CCl{sub 4} remediation using non-equilibrium plasma and non-oxidative conditions is proposed. • The reaction mechanism relies on experimental data and quantum chemical analysis. • Comprehensive mass balance for the reaction is provided. • CCl{sub 4} is converted to an environmentally benign and potentially useful polymer. • Characterisation of the polymer structure based on NMR and FTIR analyses is presented. - Abstract: In this paper we focus on the development of a methodology for treatment of carbon tetrachloride utilising a non-equilibrium plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, which is not singularly aimed at destroying carbon tetrachloride but rather at converting it to a non-hazardous, potentially valuable commodity. This method encompasses the reaction of carbon tetrachloride and methane, with argon as a carrier gas, in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The reaction is performed under non-oxidative conditions. Possible pathways for formation of major products based on experimental results and supported by quantum chemical calculations are outlined in the paper. We elucidate important parameters such as carbon tetrachloride conversion, product distribution, mass balance and characterise the chlorinated polymer formed in the process.

  7. Analysing chemical equilibrium conditions when studying butyl acetate synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño; Fernando Leiva Lenis; Luis Alejandro Boyacá Mendivelso; Gerardo Rodríguez Niño; Luis María Carballo Suárez

    2010-01-01

    This work studied the liquid phase of acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (P atm = 560 mmHg),using an ion exchange resin (Lewatit K-2431) as catalyst. A set of assays were carried out for determining the effect of catalyst load, temperature and molar ratio (acid/alcohol) on chemical equilibrium constant. Components’ selective sorption on the resin matrix was noticed; its effect on equilibrium conditions was verified, by using different acid/alcohol starting ratios. A non-ide...

  8. Thermodynamics of ion exchange equilibrium for some uni ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study on thermodynamics of ion exchange equilibrium for uni-univalent Cl-/I-, Cl-/Br-, and uni-divalent Cl-/SO42-, Cl-/C2O42- reaction systems was carried out using ion exchange resin Indion FF-IP. The equilibrium constant K was calculated by taking into account the activity coefficient of ions both in solution as well as ...

  9. The reaction of fluorine atoms with methanol: yield of CH3O/CH2OH and rate constant of the reactions CH3O + CH3O and CH3O + HO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Vereecken, Luc; Fittschen, Christa

    2018-04-25

    Xenondifluoride, XeF2, has been photolysed in the presence of methanol, CH3OH. Two reaction pathways are possible: F + CH3OH → CH2OH + HF and F + CH3OH → CH3O + HF. Both products, CH2OH and CH3O, will be converted to HO2 in the presence of O2. The rate constants for the reaction of both radicals with O2 differ by more than 3 orders of magnitude, which allows an unequivocal distinction between the two reactions when measuring HO2 concentrations in the presence of different O2 concentrations. The following yields have then been determined from time-resolved HO2 profiles: φCH2OH = (0.497 ± 0.013) and φCH3O = (0.503 ± 0.013). Experiments under low O2 concentrations lead to reaction mixtures containing nearly equal amounts of HO2 (converted from the first reaction) and CH3O (from the second reaction). The subsequent HO2 decays are very sensitive to the rate constants of the reaction between these two radicals and the following rate constants have been obtained: k(CH3O + CH3O) = (7.0 ± 1.4) × 10-11 cm3 s-1 and k(CH3O + HO2) = (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10-10 cm3 s-1. The latter reaction has also been theoretically investigated on the CCSD(T)//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory and CH3OH + O2 have been identified as the main products. Using μVTST, a virtually pressure independent rate constant of k(CH3O + HO2) = 4.7 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 has been obtained, in good agreement with the experiment.

  10. Isothermal Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium in the Quaternary Water + 2-Propanol + Acetic Acid + Isopropyl Acetate System with Chemical Reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teodorescu, M.; Aim, Karel; Wichterle, Ivan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2001), s. 261-266 ISSN 0021-9568 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/1446 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : vapor-liquid equilibrium * quaternary water Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.960, year: 2001

  11. Utilization of a Microcomputer for the Study of an Iodine Oxidation and Equilibrium Reaction: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which incorporates the use of a microcomputer to enhance understanding of combined kinetic and equilibrium phenomena, to increase experimental capabilities when working with large numbers of students and limited equipment, and for the student to develop a better understanding of experimental design. (JN)

  12. Limitation on the constant of heavy lepton radiative decay according to data of the e+e- → γ + γ reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gakh, G.I.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of a heavy lepton in an intermediate state on the differential and total cross sections of the e + e - → γγ reaction has been investigated in order to obtain information on heavy lepton radiative decay L → eγ. On the basis of experimental data on the reaction the limitations on the constant lambda of the decay L → eγ are obtained as functions of the heavy lepton mass. It turns out that the upper limit for lambda rapidly increases with the heavy lepton mass and at m > 1 GeV lambda 2 > 0.1

  13. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD{sub 3}CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, David R., E-mail: drglowacki@gmail.com [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Department of Computer Science, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1UB (United Kingdom); PULSE Institute and Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Orr-Ewing, Andrew J. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Harvey, Jeremy N. [Department of Chemistry, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2015-07-28

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD{sub 3}CN → DF + CD{sub 2}CN reaction in CD{sub 3}CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD{sub 3}CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD{sub 3}CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ∼23 kcal mol{sup −1} localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD{sub 3}CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational

  14. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD3CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, David R; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Harvey, Jeremy N

    2015-07-28

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD3CN → DF + CD2CN reaction in CD3CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD3CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD3CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ∼23 kcal mol(-1) localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD3CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational relaxation of the nascent DF results in a spectral

  15. Site-specific reaction rate constant measurements for various secondary and tertiary H-abstraction by OH radicals

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    absorption of the R1(5) transition of OH spectrum near 306.69nm.Previous low-temperature rate constant measurements are added to the current data to generate three-parameter rate expressions that successfully represent the available direct measurements over a

  16. Rate constants and temperature effects for reactions of Cl2sm-bullet- with unsaturated alcohols and hydrocarbons in aqueous and acetonitrile/water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmaja, S.; Neta, P.; Huie, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for reactions of the dichlorine radical anion, Cl 2 sm-bullet- , with unsaturated alcohols and hydrocarbons have been measured at various temperatures. The alcohol reactions were measured in aqueous solutions and the hydrocarbon reactions in 1:1 aqueous acetonitirle (ACN) solutions. The rate constants for two alcohols and one hydrocarbon were also examined as a function of solvent composition. The room temperature rate constants varied between 10 6 and 10 9 M -1 s -1 . The pre-exponential factors, A, were about (1-5) x 10 9 M -1 s -1 for the alcohols in aqueous solutions and about (0.1-1) x 10 9 M -1 s -1 for the hydrocarbons in aqueous ACN solutions. The activation energies, E a , varied considerably, between 4 and 12 kJ mol -1 for the alcohols and between 2 and 8 kJ mol -1 for the hydrocarbons. The rate constants, k 298 , decrease with increasing ionization potential (IP) of the unsaturated compound, in agreement with an electrophilic addition mechanism. The activation energies for the unsaturated alcohols decrease when the IP decreases from 9.7 to 9.1 eV but appear to level off at lower IP. Most alkenes studied had IP a . Upon addition of ACN to the aqueous solution, the values of log k 298 decreased linearly by more than 1 order of magnitude with increasing ACN mole fraction. This decrease appears to result from a combination of changes in the activation energy and in the pre-exponential factor. The reason for these changes may lie in changes in the solvation shell of the Cl 2 sm-bullet- radical, which will affect the A factor, in combination with changes in solvation of Cl - , which will affect the energetics of the reactions as well. 20 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of CF3O2 and CF3O radicals with NO at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, J.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1993-01-01

    Using a pulse radiolysis UV absorption technique and subsequent simulations of experimental NO2 and FNO absorption transients, rate constants for reaction between CF3O and CF3O2 radicals with NO were determined, CF3O2+NO-->CF3O+NO2 (3), CF3O+NO-->CF2O+FNO (5). k3 was derived to be (1.68+/-0.26)x10...

  18. Rate constant for the H˙ + H2O → ˙OH + H2 reaction at elevated temperatures measured by pulse radiolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroya, Y; Yamashita, S; Lertnaisat, P; Sanguanmith, S; Meesungnoen, J; Jay-Gerin, J-P; Katsumura, Y

    2017-11-22

    Maintaining the structural integrity of materials in nuclear power plants is an essential issue associated with safe operation. Hydrogen (H 2 ) addition or injection to coolants is a powerful technique that has been widely applied such that the reducing conditions in the coolant water avoid corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Because the radiation-induced reaction of ˙OH + H 2 → H˙ + H 2 O plays a crucial role in these systems, the rate constant has been measured at operation temperatures of the reactors (285-300 °C) by pulse radiolysis, generating sufficient data for analysis. The reverse reaction H˙ + H 2 O → ˙OH + H 2 is negligibly slow at ambient temperature; however, it accelerates considerably quickly at elevated temperatures. Although the reverse reaction reduces the effectiveness of H 2 addition, reliable rate constants have not yet been measured. In this study, the rate constants have been determined in a temperature range of 250-350 °C by pulse radiolysis in an aqueous I - solution.

  19. The rate constant of the reaction NCN + H2 and its role in NCN and NO modeling in low pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faßheber, Nancy; Lamoureux, Nathalie; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2015-06-28

    Bimolecular reactions of the NCN radical play a key role in modeling prompt-NO formation in hydrocarbon flames. The rate constant of the so-far neglected reaction NCN + H2 has been experimentally determined behind shock waves under pseudo-first order conditions with H2 as the excess component. NCN3 thermal decomposition has been used as a quantitative high temperature source of NCN radicals, which have been sensitively detected by difference UV laser absorption spectroscopy at [small nu, Greek, tilde] = 30383.11 cm(-1). The experiments were performed at two different total densities of ρ≈ 4.1 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) and ρ≈ 7.4 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) (corresponding to pressures between p = 324 mbar and p = 1665 mbar) and revealed a pressure independent reaction. In the temperature range 1057 K rate constant can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 4.1 × 10(13) exp(-101 kJ mol(-1)/RT) (Δlog k = ±0.11). The pressure independent reaction as well as the measured activation energy is consistent with a dominating H abstracting reaction channel yielding the products HNCN + H. The reaction NCN + H2 has been implemented together with a set of reactions for subsequent HNCN and HNC chemistry into the detailed GDFkin3.0_NCN mechanism for NOx flame modeling. Two fuel-rich low-pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames served as examples to quantify the impact of the additional chemical pathways. Although the overall NCN consumption by H2 remains small, significant differences have been observed for NO yields with the updated mechanism. A detailed flux analysis revealed that HNC, mainly arising from HCN/HNC isomerization, plays a decisive role and enhances NO formation through a new HNC → HNCO → NH2→ NH → NO pathway.

  20. Theoretical study and rate constant calculation for the reactions of SH (SD) with Cl2, Br2, and BrCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jing-Yao; Li, Ze-Sheng; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2005-01-30

    The mechanisms of the SH (SD) radicals with Cl2 (R1), Br2 (R2), and BrCl (R3) are investigated theoretically, and the rate constants are calculated using a dual-level direct dynamics method. The optimized geometries and frequencies of the stationary points are calculated at the MP2/6-311G(d,p) and MPW1K/6-311G(d,p) levels. Higher-level energies are obtained at the approximate QCISD(T)/6-311++G(3df, 2pd) level using the MP2 geometries as well as by the multicoefficient correlation method based on QCISD (MC-QCISD) using the MPW1K geometries. Complexes with energies less than those of the reactants or products are located at the entrance or the exit channels of these reactions, which indicate that the reactions may proceed via an indirect mechanism. The enthalpies of formation for the species XSH/XSD (X = Cl and Br) are evaluated using hydrogenation working reactions method. By canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT), the rate constants of SH and SD radicals with Cl2, Br2, and BrCl are calculated over a wide temperature range of 200-2000 K at the a-QCISD(T)/6-311++G(3df, 2pd)//MP2/6-311G(d, p) level. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental rate constants is obtained in the measured temperature range. Our calculations show that for SH (SD) + BrCl reaction bromine abstraction (R3a or R3a') leading to the formation of BrSH (BrSD) + Cl in a barrierless process dominants the reaction with the branching ratios for channels 3a and 3a' of 99% at 298 K, which is quite different from the experimental result of k3a'/k3' = 54 +/- 10%. Negative activation energies are found at the higher level for the SH + Br2 and SH + BrCl (Br-abstraction) reactions; as a result, the rate constants show a slightly negative temperature dependence, which is consistent with the determination in the literature. The kinetic isotope effects for the three reactions are "inverse". The values of kH/kD are 0.88, 0.91, and 0.69 at room temperature, respectively, and they increase

  1. Investigation of complexing equilibrium of polyacrylate-anion with cadmium ions by polarographic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avlyanov, Zh K; Kabanov, N M; Zezin, A B

    1985-01-01

    Polarographic investigation of cadmium complex with polyacrylate-anion in aqueous KCl solution is carried out. It is shown that the polarographic method allows one to define equilibrium constants of polymer metallic complex (PMC) formation even in the case when current magnitudes are defined by PMC dissociation reaction kinetic characteristics. The obtained equilibrium constants of stepped complexing provide the values of mean coordination PAAxCd complex number of approximately 1.5, that coincides with the value obtained by the potentiometric method.

  2. Investigation of complexing equilibrium of polyacrylate-anion with cadmium ions by polarographic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avlyanov, Zh.K.; Kabanov, N.M.; Zezin, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Polarographic investigation of cadmium complex with polyacrylate-anion in aqueous KCl solution is carried out. It is shown that the polarographic method allows one to define equilibrium constants of polymer metallic complex (PMC) formation even in the case, when current magnitudes are defined by PMC dissociation reaction kinetic characteristics. The obtained equilibrium constants of stepped complexing provide the values of mean coordination PAAxCd complex number of approximately 1.5, that coinsides with the value obtained by the potentiometric method

  3. Direct measurements of the total rate constant of the reaction NCN + H and implications for the product branching ratio and the enthalpy of formation of NCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassheber, Nancy; Dammeier, Johannes; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2014-06-21

    The overall rate constant of the reaction (2), NCN + H, which plays a key role in prompt-NO formation in flames, has been directly measured at temperatures 962 K rate constants are best represented by the combination of two Arrhenius expressions, k2/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 3.49 × 10(14) exp(-33.3 kJ mol(-1)/RT) + 1.07 × 10(13) exp(+10.0 kJ mol(-1)/RT), with a small uncertainty of ±20% at T = 1600 K and ±30% at the upper and lower experimental temperature limits.The two Arrhenius terms basically can be attributed to the contributions of reaction channel (2a) yielding CH + N2 and channel (2b) yielding HCN + N as the products. A more refined analysis taking into account experimental and theoretical literature data provided a consistent rate constant set for k2a, its reverse reaction k1a (CH + N2 → NCN + H), k2b as well as a value for the controversial enthalpy of formation of NCN, ΔfH = 450 kJ mol(-1). The analysis verifies the expected strong temperature dependence of the branching fraction ϕ = k2b/k2 with reaction channel (2b) dominating at the experimental high-temperature limit. In contrast, reaction (2a) dominates at the low-temperature limit with a possible minor contribution of the HNCN forming recombination channel (2d) at T < 1150 K.

  4. IR absorption spectrum (4200-3100 cm-1) of H2O and (H2O)2 in CCl4. Estimates of the equilibrium constant and evidence that the atmospheric water absorption continuum is due to the water dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaisen, Flemming M.

    2009-01-01

    IR absorption spectra, 4200-3100 cm -1 , of water in CCl 4 solutions are presented. It is shown that for saturated solutions significant amounts of water are present as dimer (ca. 2%). The IR spectra of the monomer and dimer are retrieved. The integrated absorption coefficients of the monomer absorption are significantly enhanced relative to the gas phase values. The dimer spectrum consists of 5 bands, of which 4 were expected from data from cold beams and cold matrices. The origin of the 'extra' band is discussed. In addition it is argued that the dimer absorption bands intensities must be enhanced relative to the gas phase values. Based on recent calculations of band strengths, and observed frequency shifts relative to the gas phase, the intensity enhancement factors are estimated as well as the monomer/dimer equilibrium constant in CCl 4 solution at T=296 K (K c =1.29 mol -1 L). It is noted that the observed dimer spectrum has a striking resemblance with the water vapour continuum determined by Burch in 1985 which was recently remeasured by Paynter et al. and it is concluded that the atmospheric water absorption continuum in the investigated spectral region must be due to water dimer. Based on the newly published spectral data a revised value of the gas phase equilibrium constant is suggested (K p =0.035 atm -1 at T=296 K) as well as a value for the standard enthalpy of formation, ΔH 0 =15.4 kJ mol -1 .

  5. Light charged clusters emitted in 32 MeV/nucleon Xe,124136+Sn,112124 reactions: Chemical equilibrium and production of 3He and 6He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, R.; Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Chbihi, A.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Fable, Q.; Francalanza, L.; Frankland, J. D.; Galichet, E.; Gruyer, D.; Guinet, D.; Henri, M.; La Commara, M.; Le Neindre, N.; Lombardo, I.; Lopez, O.; Manduci, L.; Marini, P.; Pârlog, M.; Roy, R.; Saint-Onge, P.; Verde, G.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.; Indra Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    Background: The isovector part of the nuclear equation of state remains partly unknown and is the subject of many studies. The degree of equilibration between the two main collision partners in heavy ion reactions may be used to study the equation of state since it is connected to isospin (N /Z ) transport properties of nuclear matter. Purpose: We aim to test chemical equilibrium attainment by measuring isotopic characteristics of emitted elements as a function of impact parameter. Method: We study four Xe,124136+Sn,112124 reactions at 32 MeV/nucleon. The data were acquired with the INDRA detector at the GANIL (Caen, France) facility. Combined (projectile+target) systems are identical for two studied reactions, therefore it is possible to study the path towards chemical equilibrium from different neutron to proton ratio (N /Z ) entrance channels. The study is limited to identified isotopes detected in the forward part of the center of mass in order to focus on the evolution of projectile-like fragment isotopic content and the benefit of excellent detection performances of the forward part of the apparatus. Results: Light charged particle productions, multiplicities, and abundance ratios dependence against impact parameter are studied. It is measured to almost identical mean characteristics for the two 124Xe+124Sn and 136Xe+112Sn systems for central collisions. Comparing all four studied systems it is shown that mean values evolve from projectile N /Z to projectile+target N /Z dependence. Those identical mean characteristics concern all light charged particles except 3He whose mean behavior is strongly different. Conclusions: Our inclusive analysis (no event selection) shows that N /Z equilibration between the projectile-like and the target-like is realized to a high degree for central collisions. The light charged particle production mean value difference between 124Xe+124Sn and 136Xe+112Sn systems for central collisions is of the order of a few %. This slight

  6. Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium emissions in proton-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    necessary for the domain of fission-reactor technology for the calculation of nuclear transmutation ... tions occur in three stages: INC, pre-equilibrium and equilibrium (or compound. 344. Pramana ... In the evaporation phase of the reaction, the.

  7. Measurement of the neutron activation constants Q0 and k0 for the 27Al(n, γ)28Al reaction at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir Radulovic; Andrej Trkov; Radojko Jacimovic; Robert Jeraj

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the neutron activation constants Q 0 and k 0 for the 27 Al(n, γ) 28 Al reaction have been performed in two irradiation channels with different spectral characteristics at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor. In the determination of Q 0 the fission spectrum contribution to the reaction rates has been corrected for. The final experimental value of the Q 0 factor was found to differ significantly from the adopted value in the k 0 -database. The experimental value of the k 0 factor is in agreement with the recommended value in the k 0 -database. The thermal cross-section and resonance integral for the reaction were found to be in good agreement with the values calculated from the cross-sections from the ENDF/B-VII.1 library. (author)

  8. Standard Glbbs Energy of Formation of the Hydroxyl Radical in Aqueous Solution. Rate Constants for the Reaction C102- -t O3 S 03- -t CIO,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klaning, U. K.; Sehested, Knud; Holcman, J.

    1985-01-01

    The rate constants of the following reactions were determined by pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow experiments: C102- + O3 + C102 + 03-(k f= (4 f 1) X lo6 dm3 mol-' s-', k, = (1.8 f 0.2) X lo5 dm3 mol-' s-]); C102 + OH - C103- + H+ (k = (4.0 * 0.4) X lo9 dm3 mol-' s-l); C102 + 0- - C103- (k = (2.......7 * 0.4) X lo9 dm3 mol-' s-l); and O3 + C102 - C103 + O2 (k = (1.05 f 0.10) X lo3 dm3 mol-l s-'), where kf is the forward rate of reaction and k, is the reverse rate of reaction. The standard Gibbs energy of formation of OH in aqueous solution A&O,,(OH) and the corresponding standard oxidation potential...

  9. I. Activation energies for the gas phase reactions of hydrogen atom with carbon monoxide and with ethylene. II. Rate constants for the reactions of benzyl cation with triethylphosphine and with triethylarsine in 1,2-dichloroethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Two H-atom reactions H + CO + H 2 → HCO + H 2 and H + C 2 H 4 → C 2 H 5 * were separately studied from room temperature to about 100 0 C, and the activation energies for these two reactions were determined in this temperature range. For H + C 2 H 4 system, a small activation energy of 0.2 kcal/mole was obtained in the present narrow temperature range. The low activation energy indicates that the pre-exponential factor has a predominant contribution to the rate constant of this reaction and has about the same magnitude as that of the rate constant. For H + CO system, a fairly large activation energy of more than 7 kcal/mole was speculated in the potential energy surfaces of the system. The activation energy obtained in the present work, however, has a low value of about 2 kcal/mole. This low value reveals the low level of crossing of this reaction in the potential energy surface and thus indicates considerable complexity involved in the surface. Carbonium ions can be formed from chosen solutes in pulse-irradiated 1,2-dichloroethane (RCl) solutions. Upon irradiation, the electrons generated from the ionization of the solvent become localized on chloride ions as a result of their reaction with the neutral solvent molecules. The solvent counterion, RCl + , on the other hand, is free to exchange charge with the solute molecule. By choosing appropriate solutes, carbonium ion can be formed through a dissociative ionization process in the exchange. The benzyl cation was formed from its precursor compound dibenzylmercury and its reactions with two nucleophiles, triethylphosphine and triethylarsine, were separately studied. The formation and decay of benzyl cation were observed at 363 nm, the position of the maximum of its absorption band, and the second-order rate constants for the two reactions were determined at room temperature

  10. Isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaka, M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems, according to the calculations of the equilibrium constants for oxygen isotopic exchange reactions, and the calculations of the oxygen isotope separation factors between two phases. The equilibrium constants (K65, K67, K68 and K69) of 16 O- 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O exchange reactions between diatomic oxides were calculated in a wide temperature range on the basis of quantum statistical mechanics. Many equilibrium constants showed the anomalous mass effects, and then had the crossover temperatures and the mass independent fractionation (MIF) temperatures which held K67 = K65, K67 = K68, or K67 = K69, etc. For example, the equilibrium constants for the reactions between OH and the other diatomic oxides (MO) showed the anomalous mass effects, when M was Li, Na, Mg, K, Fe, Al, Ge, Zr, Pt, etc. The 16 O 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O oxygen isotope separation factors (S65, S67, S68 and S69) between two phases were calculated, when OH and CO were in the first phase, and SiO was in the second phase. Although the oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria in the two phases had no MIF and crossover temperatures, the separation factors showed the anomalous mass effects and had the temperatures. According to what is called the normal mass effects for the equilibrium constant of isotopic exchange reaction, the value of InK68/InK67 is 1.885. Therefore, the value of InS68/InS67 should be 1.885 too. The value calculated, however, widely changed. It can be concluded from the results obtained in the present work that some oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria cause the anomalous mass effects, the anomalous oxygen isotope separation factors, and then isotope anomalies

  11. Time-Dependent Quantum Wave Packet Study of the Si + OH → SiO + H Reaction: Cross Sections and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero Santamaría, Alejandro; Dayou, Fabrice; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus; Monnerville, Maurice

    2017-03-02

    The dynamics of the Si( 3 P) + OH(X 2 Π) → SiO(X 1 Σ + ) + H( 2 S) reaction is investigated by means of the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach using an ab initio potential energy surface recently developed by Dayou et al. ( J. Chem. Phys. 2013 , 139 , 204305 ) for the ground X 2 A' electronic state. Total reaction probabilities have been calculated for the first 15 rotational states j = 0-14 of OH(v=0,j) at a total angular momentum J = 0 up to a collision energy of 1 eV. Integral cross sections and state-selected rate constants for the temperature range 10-500 K were obtained within the J-shifting approximation. The reaction probabilities display highly oscillatory structures indicating the contribution of long-lived quasibound states supported by the deep SiOH/HSiO wells. The cross sections behave with collision energies as expected for a barrierless reaction and are slightly sensitive to the initial rotational excitation of OH. The thermal rate constants show a marked temperature dependence below 200 K with a maximum value around 15 K. The TDWP results globally agree with the results of earlier quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations carried out by Rivero-Santamaria et al. ( Chem. Phys. Lett. 2014 , 610-611 , 335 - 340 ) with the same potential energy surface. In particular, the thermal rate constants display a similar temperature dependence, with TDWP values smaller than the QCT ones over the whole temperature range.

  12. Differentiating inflamed and normal lungs by the apparent reaction rate constants of lactate dehydrogenase probed by hyperpolarized (13)C labeled pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N; Kadlececk, Stephen; Shaghaghi, Hoora; Zhao, Huaqing; Profka, Harilla; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Rizi, Rahim; Li, Lin Z

    2016-02-01

    Clinically translatable hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C-NMR can probe in vivo enzymatic reactions, e.g., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-catalyzed reaction by injecting HP (13)C-pyruvate into the subject, which is converted to (13)C labeled lactate by the enzyme. Parameters such as (13)C-lactate signals and lactate-to-pyruvate signal ratio are commonly used for analyzing the HP (13)C-NMR data. However, the biochemical/biological meaning of these parameters remains either unclear or dependent on experimental settings. It is preferable to quantify the reaction rate constants with a clearer physical meaning. Here we report the extraction of the kinetic parameters of the LDH reaction from HP (13)C-NMR data and investigate if they can be potential predictors of lung inflammation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (12 controls, 14 treated) were used. One dose of bleomycin (2.5 U/kg) was administered intratracheally to the treatment group. The lungs were removed, perfused, and observed by the HP-NMR technique, where a HyperSense dynamic nuclear polarization system was used to generate the HP (13)C-pyruvate for injecting into the lungs. A 20 mm (1)H/(13)C dual-tuned coil in a 9.4-T Varian vertical bore NMR spectrometer was employed to acquire the (13)C spectral data every 1 s over a time period of 300 s using a non-selective, 15-degree radiofrequency pulse. The apparent rate constants of the LDH reaction and their ratio were quantified by applying ratiometric fitting analysis to the time series data of (13)C labeled pyruvate and lactate. The apparent forward rate constant kp =(3.67±3.31)×10(-4) s(-1), reverse rate constant kl =(4.95±2.90)×10(-2) s(-1), rate constant ratio kp /kl =(7.53±5.75)×10(-3) for the control lungs; kp =(11.71±4.35)×10(-4) s(-1), kl =(9.89±3.89)×10(-2) s(-1), and kp /kl =(12.39±4.18)×10(-3) for the inflamed lungs at the 7(th) day post treatment. Wilcoxon rank-sum test showed that the medians of these kinetic parameters of the 7-day cohort were significantly

  13. The use of digital simulation to improve the cyclic voltammetric determination of rate constants for homogeneous chemical reactions following charge transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozo, J.D.; Carbajo, J.; Sturm, J.C.; Nunez-Vergara, L.J.; Moscoso, R.; Squella, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is a very useful electrochemical tool used to study reaction systems that include chemical steps that are coupled to electron transfers. This type of system generally involves the chemical reaction of an electrochemically generated free radical. Published methods exist that are used to determine the kinetics of electrochemically initiated chemical reactions from the measurements of the peak current ratio (i pa /i pc ) of a cyclic voltammogram. The published method requires working curves to relate a kinetic parameter to the peak current ratio. In the presented work, a digital simulation package was used to obtain improved working curves for specific working conditions. The curves were compared with the published results for the first- and second-order chemical reactions following the charge transfer step mechanisms. According to the presented results, the previously published working curve is reliable for a mechanism with a first-order chemical reaction; however, a change in the switching potential requires a recalculation of the curve. In the case of mechanisms with a second-order step (dimerisation and disproportionation), several different views exist on how the second-order chemical term should be expressed so that different values of the constant are obtained. Parameters such as electrode type, electrode area, electroactive species concentration, switching potential, scan rate and method for peak current ratio calculation modify the working curves and must always be specified. We propose a standardised method to obtain the most reliable kinetic constant values. The results of this work will permit researchers who handle simulation software to construct their own working curves. Additionally, those who do not have the simulation software could use the working curves described here. The revelations of the presented experiments may be useful to a broad chemistry audience because this study presents a simple and low-cost procedure for the

  14. Is the sun constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, J.B.; Dearborn, D.S.P.

    1979-01-01

    Small fluctuations in the solar constant can occur on timescales much shorter than the Kelvin time. Changes in the ability of convection to transmit energy through the superadiabatic and transition regions of the convection zone cause structure adjustments which can occur on a time scale of days. The bulk of the convection zone reacts to maintain hydrostatic equilibrium (though not thermal equilibrium) and causes a luminosity change. While small radius variations will occur, most of the change will be seen in temperature

  15. Determination of the absolute second-order rate constant for the reaction Na + O3 → NaO + O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, David; Marshall, Paul; Plane, J.M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute second-order rate constant for the reaction Na + O 3 -> NaO + O 2 (k 1 ) has been determined by time-resolved atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy at lambda = 589 nm [Na(3 2 Psub(j)) 2 Ssub(1/2))] following pulsed irradiation, coupled with monitoring of O 3 by light absorption in the ultra-violet; this yields k 1 (500 K) = 4(+4,-2) x 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , resolving large differences for various estimates of this important quantity used in modelling the sodium layer in the mesosphere. (author)

  16. Virtual Instrument for Determining Rate Constant of Second-Order Reaction by pX Based on LabVIEW 8.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hu; Li, Jiang-Yuan; Tang, Yong-Huai

    2009-01-01

    The virtual instrument system based on LabVIEW 8.0 for ion analyzer which can measure and analyze ion concentrations in solution is developed and comprises homemade conditioning circuit, data acquiring board, and computer. It can calibrate slope, temperature, and positioning automatically. When applied to determine the reaction rate constant by pX, it achieved live acquiring, real-time displaying, automatical processing of testing data, generating the report of results; and other functions. This method simplifies the experimental operation greatly, avoids complicated procedures of manual processing data and personal error, and improves veracity and repeatability of the experiment results.

  17. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of NO3 radicals with a series of dienes at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermann, T.; Nielsen, O.J.; Skov, H.

    1992-01-01

    The rate constants for the reaction of NO3 radicals with a series of 7 dienes, 1,3-butadiene, isoprene, 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene, trans-1,3-pentadiene, cis-1,3-pentadiene, trans,trans-2,4-hexadiene, and 1,3-cyclohexadiene, were measured at 295 K and at a total pressure of 1 atm. The rate consta...... were obtained using the absolute technique of pulse radiolysis combined with kinetic UV-VIS spectroscopy. The results are discussed in terms of reactivity trends and previous literature data....

  18. A calorimetric and equilibrium investigation of the reaction {l_brace}methyl ferulate(aq) + H{sub 2}O(l) = methanol(aq) + ferulic acid(aq){r_brace}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Robert N., E-mail: robert.goldberg@nist.go [Biochemical Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20876 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Lang, Brian E., E-mail: brian.lang@nist.go [Biochemical Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20876 (United States); Selig, Michael J., E-mail: michael.selig@nrel.go [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Biosciences Center, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Decker, Stephen R., E-mail: steve.decker@nrel.go [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Biosciences Center, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Microcalorimetry and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) have been used to conduct a thermodynamic investigation of the reaction: {l_brace}methyl ferulate(aq) + H{sub 2}O(l) = methanol(aq) + ferulic acid(aq){r_brace}, as catalyzed by feruloyl esterase. Values of the apparent equilibrium constant K' = (29.6 {+-} 0.7) (T = 298.15 K, citrate buffer at pH 4.98, ionic strength I = 0.39 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}) and of the calorimetrically determined enthalpy of reaction {Delta}{sub r}H(cal) = (4.0 {+-} 0.9) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} (T = 298.15 K and citrate buffer at pH 4.81, I = 0.36 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}) were measured. A chemical equilibrium model, together with pKs and standard enthalpies of reaction {Delta}{sub r}H{sup 0} for the H{sup +}(aq) binding reactions of the reactants and products, was then used to calculate the values K = (1.89 {+-} 0.06) . 10{sup -4}, {Delta}{sub r}H{sup o} = (7.3 {+-} 1.7) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, {Delta}{sub r}G{sup o} = (21.25 {+-} 0.07) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, and {Delta}{sub r}S{sup o} = - (46.8 {+-} 5.7) J {center_dot} K{sup -1} {center_dot} mol{sup -1} for the chemical reference reaction {l_brace}methyl ferulate(aq) + H{sub 2}O(l) = methanol(aq) + ferulic acid{sup -}(aq) + H{sup +}(aq){r_brace}. These values of K and {Delta}{sub r}H{sup o} are similar in magnitude to the corresponding values reported for the reaction {l_brace}propyl gallate(aq) + H{sub 2}O(l) = 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid{sup -}(aq) + 1-propanol(aq) + H{sup +}(aq){r_brace}. The results obtained in this study can be used in a chemical equilibrium model to calculate how K' and other standard transformed properties such as the standard transformed enthalpy {Delta}{sub r}H'{sup o}, standard transformed Gibbs free energy {Delta}{sub r}G'{sup o}, and the change in binding of H{sup +}(aq), {Delta}{sub r}N(H{sup +}), vary with the independent variables T, pH, and I.

  19. Rate Constant and RRKM Product Study for the Reaction Between CH3 and C2H3 at T = 298K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, R. Peyton, Jr.; Payne, Walter A., Jr.; Chillier, Xavier D. F.; Stief, Louis J.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Tardy, D. C.

    2000-01-01

    The total rate constant k1 has been determined at P = 1 Torr nominal pressure (He) and at T = 298 K for the vinyl-methyl cross-radical reaction CH3 + C2H3 yields products. The measurements were performed in a discharge flow system coupled with collision-free sampling to a mass spectrometer operated at low electron energies. Vinyl and methyl radicals were generated by the reactions of F with C2H4 and CH4, respectively. The kinetic studies were performed by monitoring the decay of C2H3 with methyl in excess, 6 rate coefficient was determined to be k1(298 K) = (1.02 +/- 0.53)x10(exp -10) cubic cm/molecule/s with the quoted uncertainty representing total errors. Numerical modeling was required to correct for secondary vinyl consumption by reactions such as C2H3 + H and C2H3 + C2H3. The present result for k1 at T = 298 K is compared to two previous studies at high pressure (100-300 Torr He) and to a very recent study at low pressure (0.9-3.7 Torr He). Comparison is also made with the rate constant for the similar reaction CH3 + C2H5 and with a value for k1 estimated by the geometric mean rule employing values for k(CH3 + CH3) and k(C2H3 + C2H3). Qualitative product studies at T = 298 K and 200 K indicated formation of C3H6, C2H2, and C2H5 as products of the combination-stabilization, disproportionation, and combination-decomposition channels, respectively, of the CH3 + C2H3 reaction. We also observed the secondary C4H8 product of the subsequent reaction of C3H5 with excess CH3; this observation provides convincing evidence for the combination-decomposition channel yielding C3H5 + H. RRKM calculations with helium as the deactivator support the present and very recent experimental observations that allylic C-H bond rupture is an important path in the combination reaction. The pressure and temperature dependencies of the branching fractions are also predicted.

  20. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  1. Rate Constants and H-Atom Product Yields for the Reactions of O(1D) Atoms with Ethane and Acetylene from 50 to 296 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Reyes, Dianailys; Hickson, Kevin M

    2018-05-01

    The gas phase reactions of atomic oxygen in its first excited state with ethane and acetylene have been investigated in a continuous supersonic flow reactor over the temperature range 50 K to 296 K. O(1D) atoms were produced by pulsed laser photolysis of ozone at 266 nm. Two different types of experiments, kinetics measurements and H-atom product yield determinations, were performed by detecting O(1D) atoms and H(2S) atoms respectively by vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence. The measured rate constants are in agreement with previous work at room temperature and little or no temperature dependence was observed as the temperature is decreased to 50 K. H-atoms yields were found to be independent of temperature for the reaction of O(1D) with ethane. These product yields are discussed in the context of earlier dynamics measurements at higher temperature. Due to the influence of secondary reactions, no H-atom yields could be obtained for the reaction of O(1D) with acetylene.

  2. Conservation of fusion reaction optimum yield in focused discharges with variable voltage and energy but constant geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, L.; Bortolotti, A.; Brzosko, J.; DeChiara, P.; Kilic, H.; Mezzetti, F.; Nardi, V.; Powell, C.; Wang, J.

    1992-01-01

    The D-D fusion reaction yield per pulse, Y n , of focused discharges is monitored by changing the capacitor bank voltage Vo by a factor 2 without any change of construction parameters and of the filling gas pressure of two plasma focus machines PF1 (C1 congruent 50 microfarad, L1 congruent 20 nanohenry) and PF2 (C2 = 1.2Cl, L2 = 2L1). The interval Δ = 1 ± (ΔW)/W of the capacitor bank energy values W on which the scaling Y n ∼ W 2 applies is greater for PF2, where the corresponding variation ΔI2 of the peak electrode current I2 is smaller (in agreement with Lw/C2 > L1/C1) than for PF1. Suitable figure of merit (in terms of ΔI, ΔW, L, C, etc.) are used for determining the relative importance of (i), the induced variations of the pinch fine structure and of (ii), the variations of the insulator surface at the PF breech, with bearing on the initial stage of the current sheath formation. Schlieren and magnetic probe data monitor the current sheath structure and propagation speed. The D + ion emission from the pinch is monitored in the energy interval 50 keV to 25 MeV for clarifying the links between the pinch fine structure and the set of leading macroscopic parameters of the PF discharges

  3. Quantitation of movement of the phosphoryl group during catalytic transfer in the arginine kinase reaction: {sup 31}P relaxation measurements on enzyme-bound equilibrium mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Bruce D. [Indiana University, Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI), Department of Physics (United States); Jarori, Gotam K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (India); Nageswara Rao, B.D. [Indiana University, Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI), Department of Physics (United States)], E-mail: brao@iupui.edu

    2002-05-15

    {sup 31}P nuclear spin relaxation measurements have been made on enzyme-bound equilibrium mixtures of lobster-muscle arginine kinase in the presence of substituent activating paramagnetic cation Co(II) (in place of Mg(II)), i.e., on samples in which the reaction, E{center_dot}CoATP{center_dot}arginine {r_reversible} E{center_dot}CoADP{center_dot}P-arginine, is in progress. The results have been analyzed on the basis of a previously published theory (Nageswara Rao, B.D. (1995) J. Magn. Reson., B108, 289-293) to determine the structural changes in the reaction complex accompanying phosphoryl transfer. The analysis enables the determination of the change in the Co(II)-{sup 31}P ({gamma}-P(ATP)) vector as the transferable phosphoryl group moves over and attaches to arginine to form P-arginine. It is shown that the Co(II)-{sup 31}P distance of {approx}3.0 A, representing direct coordination of Co(II) to {gamma}-P(ATP), changes to {approx}4.0 A when P-arginine is formed in the enzyme-bound reaction complex. This elongation of the Co(II)-{sup 31}P vector implies an excursion of at least 1.0 A for the itinerant phosphoryl group on the surface of the enzyme.

  4. Quantitation of movement of the phosphoryl group during catalytic transfer in the arginine kinase reaction: 31P relaxation measurements on enzyme-bound equilibrium mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Bruce D.; Jarori, Gotam K.; Nageswara Rao, B.D.

    2002-01-01

    31 P nuclear spin relaxation measurements have been made on enzyme-bound equilibrium mixtures of lobster-muscle arginine kinase in the presence of substituent activating paramagnetic cation Co(II) (in place of Mg(II)), i.e., on samples in which the reaction, E·CoATP·arginine ↔ E·CoADP·P-arginine, is in progress. The results have been analyzed on the basis of a previously published theory (Nageswara Rao, B.D. (1995) J. Magn. Reson., B108, 289-293) to determine the structural changes in the reaction complex accompanying phosphoryl transfer. The analysis enables the determination of the change in the Co(II)- 31 P (γ-P(ATP)) vector as the transferable phosphoryl group moves over and attaches to arginine to form P-arginine. It is shown that the Co(II)- 31 P distance of ∼3.0 A, representing direct coordination of Co(II) to γ-P(ATP), changes to ∼4.0 A when P-arginine is formed in the enzyme-bound reaction complex. This elongation of the Co(II)- 31 P vector implies an excursion of at least 1.0 A for the itinerant phosphoryl group on the surface of the enzyme

  5. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of  ∼  10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ, we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity  =  0 %, an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05  ×  10−4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4  ×  10−5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition at the atmosphere–soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  6. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  7. Investigation of chemical equilibrium kinetics by the electromigration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozhikov, G.A.; Ivanov, P.I.; Maslov, O.D.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Bontchev, G.D.; Milanov, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of the chemical reaction rates for complex formation as well as hydrolysis type reactions by the method of horizontal zone electrophoresis is outlined. The correlation between chemical equilibrium kinetics and electrodiffusion processes in a constant d.c. electric field is described. In model electromigration experiments the reaction rate constant of the formation a complex by Hf(IV) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is determined. The electrophoretic mobility, diffusion coefficient and stability constant of the [HfDTPA] - complex are calculated, taking into account experimental electrophoretic data obtained at 298.15±0.05 K and constant ionic strength. No-carrier-added 175 Hf radionuclide was used in electromigration experiments at concentrations of 10 -10 -10 -11 M. (orig.)

  8. Simultaneous Speciation, Structure, and Equilibrium Constant Determination in the Ni2+-EDTA-CN- Ternary System via High-Resolution Laboratory X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Theoretical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajnóczi, Éva G; Németh, Zoltán; Vankó, György

    2017-11-20

    Even quite simple chemical systems can involve many components and chemical states, and sometimes it can be very difficult to differentiate them by their hardly separable physical-chemical properties. The Ni II -EDTA-CN - (EDTA = ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) ternary system is a good example for this problem where, in spite of its fairly simple components and numerous investigations, several molecular combinations can exist, all of them not having been identified unambiguously yet. In order to achieve a detailed understanding of the reaction steps and chemical equilibria, methods are required in which the structural transitions in the different reaction steps can be followed via element-selective complex spectral feature sets. With the help of our recently developed von Hámos type high-resolution laboratory X-ray absorption spectrometer, both the structural variations and stability constants of the forming complexes were determined from the same measurement series, proving that X-ray absorption spectroscopy can be considered as a multifaced, table-top tool in coordination chemistry. Furthermore, with the help of theoretical calculations, independent structural evidence was also given for the formation of the [NiEDTA(CN)] 3- mixed complex.

  9. On the Theory of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Involving Electron Transfer. V. Comparison and Properties of Electrochemical and Chemical Rate Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1962-01-01

    Using a theory of electron transfers which takes cognizance of reorganization of the medium outside the inner coordination shell and of changes of bond lengths inside it, relations between electrochemical and related chemical rate constants are deduced and compared with the experimental data. A correlation is found, without the use of arbitrary parameters. Effects of weak complexes with added electrolytes are included under specified conditions. The deductions offer a way of coordinating a variety of data in the two fields, internally as well as with each those in another. For example, the rate of oxidation or reduction of a series of related reactants by one reagent is correlated with that of another and with that of the corresponding electrochemical oxidation-reduction reaction, under certain specified conditions. These correlations may also provide a test for distinguishing an electron from an atom transfer mechanism. (auth)

  10. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of O(3P) atoms with ethylene, propylene, and propylene-d6 over the temperature range 258--861 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of O( 3 P) with ethylene, propylene, and propylene-d6 were determined over the temperature range 258--861 K using a laser photolysis-chemiluminescence technique. The following empirical expressions are the best fits to the data: k/sub ethylene/ = 2.12 x 10 -13 T -63 e -1370 /sup ///sup R//sup T/, k/sub propylene/ = 3.40 x 10 -19 T/sup 2.56/e/sup 1130/RT/, and k/sub propylene-d/6 = 3.40 x 10 -19 T/sup 2.53/ e/sup 1210/R/T cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . A simple transition state theory model is shown to provide a reasonable explanation for non-Arrhenius temperature behavior

  11. Photocatalytic mineralization of commercial herbicides in a pilot-scale solar CPC reactor: photoreactor modeling and reaction kinetics constants independent of radiation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina-Márquez, Jose; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2009-12-01

    The six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM) of the radiation field in the photoreactor, combined with reaction kinetics and fluid-dynamic models, has proved to be suitable to describe the degradation of water pollutants in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactors, combining simplicity and accuracy. In this study, the above approach was extended to model the photocatalytic mineralization of a commercial herbicides mixture (2,4-D, diuron, and ametryne used in Colombian sugar cane crops) in a solar, pilot-scale, compound parabolic collector (CPC) photoreactor using a slurry suspension of TiO(2). The ray-tracing technique was used jointly with the SFM to determine the direction of both the direct and diffuse solar photon fluxes and the spatial profile of the local volumetric rate of photon absorption (LVRPA) in the CPC reactor. Herbicides mineralization kinetics with explicit photon absorption effects were utilized to remove the dependence of the observed rate constants from the reactor geometry and radiation field in the photoreactor. The results showed that the overall model fitted the experimental data of herbicides mineralization in the solar CPC reactor satisfactorily for both cloudy and sunny days. Using the above approach kinetic parameters independent of the radiation field in the reactor can be estimated directly from the results of experiments carried out in a solar CPC reactor. The SFM combined with reaction kinetics and fluid-dynamic models proved to be a simple, but reliable model, for solar photocatalytic applications.

  12. Modeling the pH and temperature dependence of aqueousphase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants of organic micropollutants using QSPR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita

    2017-11-01

    Designing of advanced oxidation process (AOP) requires knowledge of the aqueous phase hydroxyl radical ( ● OH) reactions rate constants (k OH ), which are strictly dependent upon the pH and temperature of the medium. In this study, pH- and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models based on the decision tree boost (DTB) approach were developed for the prediction of k OH of diverse organic contaminants following the OECD guidelines. Experimental datasets (n = 958) pertaining to the k OH values of aqueous phase reactions at different pH (n = 470; 1.4 × 10 6 to 3.8 × 10 10  M -1  s -1 ) and temperature (n = 171; 1.0 × 10 7 to 2.6 × 10 10  M -1  s -1 ) were considered and molecular descriptors of the compounds were derived. The Sanderson scale electronegativity, topological polar surface area, number of double bonds, and halogen atoms in the molecule, in addition to the pH and temperature, were found to be the relevant predictors. The models were validated and their external predictivity was evaluated in terms of most stringent criteria parameters derived on the test data. High values of the coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and small root mean squared error (RMSE) in respective training (> 0.972, ≤ 0.12) and test (≥ 0.936, ≤ 0.16) sets indicated high generalization and predictivity of the developed QSPR model. Other statistical parameters derived from the training and test data also supported the robustness of the models and their suitability for screening new chemicals within the defined chemical space. The developed QSPR models provide a valuable tool for predicting the ● OH reaction rate constants of emerging new water contaminants for their susceptibility to AOPs.

  13. Rate Constants for the Reactions of OH with CH(sub 3)Cl, CH(sub 2) C1(sub 2), CHC1(sub 3)and CH(sub 3)Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H-J.; DeMore, W.

    1994-01-01

    Rate constants for the reactions of OH with CH3C1, CH2Cl2, CHCl3 and CH3Br have been measured by a relative rate technique in which the reaction rate of each compound was compared to that of HFC-152a (CH3CHF2)and for CH2Cl2, HFC-161 (CH3CH2F).

  14. Full-dimensional analytical potential energy surface describing the gas-phase Cl + C2H6 reaction and kinetics study of rate constants and kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Cipriano; Espinosa-Garcia, Joaquin

    2018-02-07

    Within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation a full-dimensional analytical potential energy surface, PES-2017, was developed for the gas-phase hydrogen abstraction reaction between the chlorine atom and ethane, which is a nine body system. This surface presents a valence-bond/molecular mechanics functional form dependent on 60 parameters and is fitted to high-level ab initio calculations. This reaction presents little exothermicity, -2.30 kcal mol -1 , with a low height barrier, 2.44 kcal mol -1 , and intermediate complexes in the entrance and exit channels. We found that the energetic description was strongly dependent on the ab initio level used and it presented a very flat topology in the entrance channel, which represents a theoretical challenge in the fitting process. In general, PES-2017 reproduces the ab initio information used as input, which is merely a test of self-consistency. As a first test of the quality of the PES-2017, a theoretical kinetics study was performed in the temperature range 200-1400 K using two approaches, i.e. the variational transition-state theory and quasi-classical trajectory calculations, with spin-orbit effects. The rate constants show reasonable agreement with experiments in the whole temperature range, with the largest differences at the lowest temperatures, and this behaviour agrees with previous theoretical studies, thus indicating the inherent difficulties in the theoretical simulation of the kinetics of the title reaction. Different sources of error were analysed, such as the limitations of the PES and theoretical methods, recrossing effects, and the tunnelling effect, which is negligible in this reaction, and the manner in which the spin-orbit effects were included in this non-relativistic study. We found that the variation of spin-orbit coupling along the reaction path, and the influence of the reactivity of the excited Cl( 2 P 1/2 ) state, have relative importance, but do not explain the whole discrepancy. Finally, the

  15. Crystal structures of salts of mono- and triprotonated [3(6)]adamanzane, 1,5,9,13-tetraazatricyclo[7.7.3.3(5,13)]docosane, and equilibrium studies of the reactions between mono-, di- and triprotonated species, respectively, having none, one and two lone pairs pointing outwards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Johan; Pretzmann, Ulla; Olsen, Carl Erik

    1998-01-01

    -ray diffraction techniques. In acidic solution i(+),i,i,i-H[3(6)]adz(+) reacts with one hydrogen ion and at the same time undergoes inversion at one nitrogen group to give the diprotonated species i(+),i,i,o(+)-H-2[3(6)]adz(2+) as shown by H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy and glass-electrode measurements....... The thermodynamic data for the concentration equilibrium constant for the protonation/inversion reaction are -log K-ial= 3.122(5) M, Delta H degrees(K-ial)=12.0(8) kJ mol(-1), Delta S degrees(K-ial)= -20(3) J mol(-1) K-1 (25 degrees C, I=1 M (Na,H)Cl. The equilibration reaction between the mono-and dipotonated...

  16. Relationship Between Equilibrium Hydrogen Pressure and Exchange Current for the Hydrogen Electrode-Reaction at Mmni(3.9-X)Mn(0.4)A1(X)Co(0.7) Alloy Electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senoh, H.; Morimoto, K.; Inoue, H.; Iwakura, C.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2000-01-01

    We present a theoretical relationship between equilibrium hydrogen pressure and exchange current for the hydrogen electrode reaction which considers the degree of hydrogen coverage at the electrode surface. Electrochemical measurements at MmNi3.9–xMn0.4AlxCo0.7 (0 x 0.8) electrodes were performed to

  17. Ion exchange equilibrium for some uni-univalent and uni-divalent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study on thermodynamics of ion exchange equilibrium for uni-univalent Cl-/I-, Cl-/Br-, and uni-divalent Cl-/SO42-, Cl-/C2O42- reaction systems was carried out using ion exchange resin Duolite A-102 D. The equilibrium constant K was calculated by taking into account the activity coefficient of ions both in solution as well ...

  18. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  19. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of association constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares 'Systematic Trial-and-Error Procedure' (STEP) for spectrophotometric evaluation of association constant (equilibrium constant) K and molar absorption coefficient E for a 1:1 molecular complex, A + B = C, with error analysis according to Conrow et al. (1964). An analysis of the Charge...

  1. Ab initio calculation of transition state normal mode properties and rate constants for the H(T)+CH4(CD4) abstraction and exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, G.C.; Walch, S.P.; Wagner, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    We present ab initio (GVB--POL--CI) calculations for enough of the region about the abstraction and exchange saddle points for H(T)+CH 4 (CD 4 ) to perform a full normal mode analysis of the transition states. The resulting normal mode frequencies are compared to four other published surfaces: an ab initio UHF--SCF calculation by Carsky and Zahradnik, a semiempirical surface by Raff, and two semiempirical surfaces by Kurylo, Hollinden, and Timmons. Significant quantitative and qualitative differences exist between the POL--CI results and those of the other surfaces. Transition state theory rate constants and vibrationally adiabatic reaction threshold energies were computed for all surfaces and compared to available experimental values. For abstraction, the POL--CI rates are in good agreement with experimental rates and in better agreement than are the rates of any of the other surfaces. For exchange, uncertainties in the experimental values and in the importance of vibrationally nonadiabatic effects cloud the comparison of theory to experiment. Tentative conclusions are that the POL--CI barrier is too low by several kcal. Unless vibrationaly nonadiabatic effects are severe, the POL--CI surface is still in better agreement with experiment than are the other surfaces. The rates for a simple 3-atom transition state theory model (where CH 3 is treated as an atom) are compared to the rates for the full 6-atom model. The kinetic energy coupling of reaction coordinate modes to methyl group modes is identified as being of primary importance in determining the accuracy of the 3-atom model for this system. Substantial coupling in abstraction, but not exchange, causes the model to fail for abstraction but succeed for exchange

  2. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central 40 Ca + 40 Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80≤t≤300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables

  3. Ion exchange equilibrium for some uni-univalent and uni-divalent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    KEY WORDS: Duolite A-102 D ion exchange resin, Equilibrium constant, Endothermic ion exchange reaction,. Enthalpy, Thermodynamic study. INTRODUCTION. For proper selection of ion exchange resin in a particular technical application, it is essential to have adequate knowledge regarding their physical and chemical ...

  4. Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory and its analytic gradients: Accurate equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkaya, Uǧur; Sherrill, C. David

    2013-08-01

    Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory [or simply "optimized CEPA(0)," OCEPA(0), for short] and its analytic energy gradients are presented. For variational optimization of the molecular orbitals for the OCEPA(0) method, a Lagrangian-based approach is used along with an orbital direct inversion of the iterative subspace algorithm. The cost of the method is comparable to that of CCSD [O(N6) scaling] for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations the OCEPA(0) method is only half as expensive as CCSD since there is no need to solve the λ2-amplitude equation for OCEPA(0). The performance of the OCEPA(0) method is compared with that of the canonical MP2, CEPA(0), CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods, for equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions between radicals. For bond lengths of both closed and open-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method improves upon CEPA(0) and CCSD by 25%-43% and 38%-53%, respectively, with Dunning's cc-pCVQZ basis set. Especially for the open-shell test set, the performance of OCEPA(0) is comparable with that of CCSD(T) (ΔR is 0.0003 Å on average). For harmonic vibrational frequencies of closed-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method again outperforms CEPA(0) and CCSD by 33%-79% and 53%-79%, respectively. For harmonic vibrational frequencies of open-shell molecules, the mean absolute error (MAE) of the OCEPA(0) method (39 cm-1) is fortuitously even better than that of CCSD(T) (50 cm-1), while the MAEs of CEPA(0) (184 cm-1) and CCSD (84 cm-1) are considerably higher. For complete basis set estimates of hydrogen transfer reaction energies, the OCEPA(0) method again exhibits a substantially better performance than CEPA(0), providing a mean absolute error of 0.7 kcal mol-1, which is more than 6 times lower than that of CEPA(0) (4.6 kcal mol-1), and comparing to MP2 (7.7 kcal mol-1) there is a more than 10-fold reduction in errors. Whereas the MAE for the CCSD method is only 0.1 kcal

  5. Fluence of dielectric constant (D), (H/sup +/) and (SO/sub 4/sup -2/) on the rate of redox reaction between tris (2,2-bipyridine) iron (II) and ceric sulphate in aqueous sulphuric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, R.; Naqvi, I.I.; Farrukh, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Kinetic of the redox reaction between tris (2,2-bipyridine)iron(II) cation and ceric sulphate has been studied in aqueous sulphuric acid medium. Different methods were employed for the determination of order of reaction. The order of reaction is found to be first with respect to reductant however retarding effect of increasing initial concentration of oxidant is found. Influence of (H/sup +/), (SO/sub 4/sup 2-) and dielectric constant (D) on the rate of redox reaction has also been studied. Increase in (H/sup +/) and dielectric constant of the medium retard the rate while enhancement of the (SO/sub 4/sup 2-/) accelerates the rate first and then the reaction goes towards retardation. Effects of (H/sup +/) and (SO/sub 4/sup 2-/) were studied by using acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer for the first one and varying ionic concentrations of the salt sodium sulphate for the latter one, whereas dielectric constant was varied by using 0%, 10% and 20% ethanol-water mixtures. Results of effects of each one of the factors i.e., H/sup +/, SO/sub 4/sup 2-/ and dielectric constant (D) have been compared and on the basis of these factors, (Ce(SO/sub 4/ )/sub 3/)/sup 2-/ is suggested to be the active species of cerium(IV). However a rate law consistent with the observed kinetic data has also been derived supporting the proposed mechanism. (author)

  6. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  7. Rate constant and mechanism of the reaction Cl + CFCl₂H → CFCl₂ + HCl over the temperature range 298-670 K in N₂ or N₂/O₂ diluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, E W; Jawad, Khadija M

    2014-05-08

    The rate constant of the reaction Cl + CFCl2H (k1) has been measured relative to the established rate constant for the reaction Cl + CH4 (k2) at 760 Torr. The measurements were carried out in Pyrex reactors using a mixture of CFCl2H, CH4, and Cl2 in either N2 or N2/O2 diluent. Reactants and products were quantified by GC/FID analysis. Cl atoms were generated by irradiation of the mixture with 360 nm light to dissociate the Cl2 for temperatures up to ~550 K. At higher temperature, the Cl2 dissociated thermally, and no irradiation was used. Over the temperature range 298-670 K, k1 is consistently a factor of ~5 smaller than that of k2 with a nearly identical temperature dependence. The optimum non-Arrhenius rate constant is represented by the expression k1 = 1.14 × 10(-22) T(3.49) e(-241/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with an estimated uncertainty of ±15% including uncertainty in the reference reaction. CFCl3 formed from the reaction CFCl2 + Cl2 (k3) is the sole product in N2 diluent. In ~20% O2 at 298 K, the CFCl3 product is suppressed. The rate constant of reaction 3 was measured relative to that of reaction 4 [CFCl2 + O2 (k4)] giving the result k3/k4 = 0.0031 ± 0.0005 at 298 K. An earlier experiment by others observed C(O)FCl to be the major product of reaction channel 4 [formed via the sequence, CFCl2(O2) → CFCl2O → C(O)FCl + Cl]. Our current experiments verified that there is a Cl atom chain reaction in the presence of O2 as required by this mechanism.

  8. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 1 to 56. (A.L.B.)

  9. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  10. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is made of two tables. The first table describes the different particles (bosons and fermions) while the second one gives the nuclear constants of isotopes from the different elements with Z = 1 to 25. (J.S.)

  11. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  12. The reaction set, rate constants and g-values for the simulation of the radiolysis of light water over the range 20 deg to 350 deg C based on information available in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, A.J.; Bartels, D.M.

    2009-08-01

    An understanding of the aqueous radiolysis-induced chemistry in nuclear reactors is an important key to the understanding of materials integrity issues in reactor systems. Significant materials and chemistry issues have emerged in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and CANDU reactors that have required a detailed understanding of the radiation chemistry of the coolant. For each reactor type, specific computer radiolysis models have been developed to gain insight into radiolysis processes and to make chemistry control adjustments to address the particular issues. The objective of this report is to compile and review the radiolysis data now available and, where possible, correct the reported g-values and rate constants to provide a recommendation for the best values to use in high temperature modelling of light water radiolysis up to 350 o C. With a few exceptions, the review has been limited to those reactions that occur in slightly acid and slightly alkaline solutions, e.g., it does not address reactions involving the oxide radical anion, O - , or ionized forms of hydrogen peroxide, HO 2 - , beyond their acid-base equilibria reactions. However, a few reactions have been included where the rate constant for a reaction involving O - is significantly larger than the corresponding hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant and thus can influence the chemistry below the pK A of the hydroxyl radical. (author)

  13. RATE CONSTANTS FOR THE REACTIONS OF OH RADICALS AND CL ATOMS WITH DI-N-PROPYL ETHER AND DI-N-BUTYL ETHER AND THEIR DEUTERATED ANALOGS. (R825252)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using relative rate methods, rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with di-n-propyl ether, di-n-propyl ether-d14, di-n-butyl ether and di-n-butyl ether-d18 have been measured at 296 ? 2 K and atmos...

  14. Are fundamental constants really constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Reasons for suspecting that fundamental constants might change with time are reviewed. Possible consequences of such variations are examined. The present status of experimental tests of these ideas is discussed

  15. Time-dependent 31P saturation transfer in the phosphoglucomutase reaction. Characterization of the spin system for the Cd(II) enzyme and evaluation of rate constants for the transfer process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, C.B.; Ray, W.J. Jr.; Gorenstein, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Time-dependent 31 P saturation-transfer studies were conducted with the Cd 2+ -activated form of muscle phosphoglucomutase to probe the origin of the 100-fold difference between its catalytic efficiency (in terms of k cat ) and that of the more efficient Mg 2+ -activated enzyme. The present paper describes the equilibrium mixture of phosphoglucomutase and its substrate/product pair when the concentration of the Cd 2+ enzyme approaches that of the substrate and how the nine-spin 31 P NMR system provided by this mixture was treated. It shows that the presence of abortive complexes is not a significant factor in the reduced activity of the Cd 2+ enzyme since the complex of the dephosphoenzyme and glucose 1,6-bisphosphate, which accounts for a large majority of the enzyme present at equilibrium, is catalytically competent. It also shows that rate constants for saturation transfer obtained at three different ratios of enzyme to free substrate are mutually compatible. These constants, which were measured at chemical equilibrium, can be used to provide a quantitative kinetic rationale for the reduced steady-state activity elicited by Cd 2+ relative to Mg 2+ . They also provide minimal estimates of 350 and 150 s -1 for the rate constants describing (PO 3 - ) transfer from the Cd 2+ phosphoenzyme to the 6-position of bound glucose 1-phosphate and to the 1-position of bound glucose 6-phosphate, respectively. These minimal estimates are compared with analogous estimates for the Mg 2+ and Li + forms of the enzyme in the accompanying paper

  16. Rate constants for the reactions of OH with HFC-134a (CF3CH2F) and HFC-134 (CHF2CHF2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demore, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of rate constants for HFC-134 (CF2HCF2H) relative to CH3CCl3, HFC-125, and HFC-134a are reported. The measurements were made in a slow-flow, temperature controlled photochemical reactor, and were based on relative rates of disappearance of the parent compounds as measured by FTIR spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by 254-nm photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapor. NASA/JPL rate constants for the reference compounds are used to derive temperature-dependent rate constants of both compounds. Rate constants obtained from the different reference compounds are in excellent agreement. The presently recommended rate constant for HFC-134a is about 25 percent too high.

  17. A study of chemical equilibrium of tri-component mixtures of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, Ioana; Cristescu, I.; Peculea, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we present a model for computing the equilibrium constants for chemical reactions between hydrogen's isotopes as function of temperature. The equilibrium constants were expressed with the aid of Gibbs potential and the partition function of the mixture. We assessed the partition function for hydrogen's isotopes having in view that some nuclei are fermions and other bosons. As results we plotted the values of equilibrium constants as function of temperature. Knowing these values we determined the deuterium distribution on species (for mixture H 2 -HD-D 2 ) as function of total deuterium concentration and the tritium distribution on species (for mixtures D 2 -DT-T 2 and H 2 -HT-T 2 ) as function of total tritium concentration. (authors)

  18. Direct and Indirect Determinations of Elementary Rate Constants H + O2: Chain Branching; the Dehydration of tertiary-Butanol; the Retro Diels-Alder Reaction of Cyclohexene; the Dehydration of Isopropanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Joshua S.

    Due to growing environmental concern over the continued use of fossil fuels, methods to limit emissions and partially replace fossil fuel use with renewable biofuels are of considerable interest. Developing chemical kinetic models for the chemistry that affects combustion properties is important to understanding how new fuels affect combustion energy conversion processes in transportation devices. This thesis reports the experimental study of several important reactions (the H + O2 branching reaction, the key decomposition reactions of tertiary-butanol, the dehydration reaction of isopropanol, and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene) and develops robust analysis methods to estimate the absolute uncertainties of specific elementary rate constants derived from the experimental data. In the study of the above reactions, both a direct and indirect rate constant determination technique with associated uncertainty estimation methodologies are developed. In the study of the decomposition reactions, a direct determination technique is applied to experimental data gathered in preparation of this thesis. In the case of the dehydration reaction of tertiary-butanol and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene, both of which are used as internal standards for relative rate studies (Herzler et al. 1997) and chemical thermometry (Rosado-Reyes et al. 2013) , analysis showed an ˜20 K difference in the reaction rate between the reported results and the previous recommendations. In light of these discrepancies, an uncertainty estimation of previous recommendations illuminated an uncertainty of at least 20 K for the dehydration reaction of tertiary-butanol and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene, thus resolving the discrepancies. The determination of the H + O2 branching reaction and decomposition reactions of isopropanol used an indirect determination technique. The uncertainty of the H + O2 branching reaction rate is shown to be underestimated by previous

  19. Local equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-12-15

    From 3-6 September the First International Workshop on Local Equilibrium in Strong Interaction Physics took place in Bad-Honnef at the Physics Centre of the German Physical Society. A number of talks covered the experimental and theoretical investigation of the 'hotspots' effect, both in high energy particle physics and in intermediate energy nuclear physics.

  20. Equilibrium Dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    context of antimicrobial therapy in malnutrition. Dialysis has in the past presented technical problems, being complicated and time-consuming. A new dialysis system based on the equilibrium technique has now become available, and it is the principles and practical application of this apparatus (Kontron Diapack; Kontron.

  1. Strategic Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    An outcome in a noncooperative game is said to be self-enforcing, or a strategic equilibrium, if, whenever it is recommended to the players, no player has an incentive to deviate from it.This paper gives an overview of the concepts that have been proposed as formalizations of this requirement and of

  2. Maximin equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept which extends von Neumann and Morgenstern's maximin strategy solution by incorporating `individual rationality' of the players. Maximin equilibrium, extending Nash's value approach, is based on the evaluation of the strategic uncertainty of the whole game. We show that

  3. Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold for Chemical Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V

    2016-05-26

    The Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold (SQEM) method is a model reduction technique for chemical kinetics based on entropy maximization under constraints built by the slowest eigenvectors at equilibrium. The method is revisited here and discussed and validated through the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, and the quality of the reduction is related to the temporal evolution and the gap between eigenvalues. SQEM is then applied to detailed reaction mechanisms for the homogeneous combustion of hydrogen, syngas, and methane mixtures with air in adiabatic constant pressure reactors. The system states computed using SQEM are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the detailed mechanism, and good agreement between the reduced and the detailed descriptions is demonstrated. The SQEM reduced model of hydrogen/air combustion is also compared with another similar technique, the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE). For the same number of representative variables, SQEM is found to provide a more accurate description.

  4. Experimental determination of thermodynamic equilibrium in biocatalytic transamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufvesson, Pär; Jensen, Jacob Skibsted; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The equilibrium constant is a critical parameter for making rational design choices in biocatalytic transamination for the synthesis of chiral amines. However, very few reports are available in the scientific literature determining the equilibrium constant (K) for the transamination of ketones....... Various methods for determining (or estimating) equilibrium have previously been suggested, both experimental as well as computational (based on group contribution methods). However, none of these were found suitable for determining the equilibrium constant for the transamination of ketones. Therefore...

  5. Rate constants for a mechanism including intermediates in the interconversion of ternary complexes by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekhar, V.C.; Plapp, B.V.

    1990-01-01

    Transient kinetic data for partial reactions of alcohol dehydrogenase and simulations of progress curves have led to estimates of rate constants for the following mechanism, at pH 8.0 and 25 degrees C: E in equilibrium E-NAD+ in equilibrium *E-NAD+ in equilibrium E-NAD(+)-RCH2OH in equilibrium E-NAD+-RCH2O- in equilibrium *E-NADH-RCHO in equilibrium E-NADH-RCHO in equilibrium E-NADH in equilibrium E. Previous results show that the E-NAD+ complex isomerizes with a forward rate constant of 620 s-1. The enzyme-NAD(+)-alcohol complex has a pK value of 7.2 and loses a proton rapidly (greater than 1000 s-1). The transient oxidation of ethanol is 2-fold faster in D 2 O, and proton inventory results suggest that the transition state has a charge of -0.3 on the substrate oxygen. Rate constants for hydride ion transfer in the forward or reverse reactions were similar for short-chain aliphatic substrates (400-600 s-1). A small deuterium isotope effect for transient oxidation of longer chain alcohols is apparently due to the isomerization of the E-NAD+ complex. The transient reduction of aliphatic aldehydes showed no primary deuterium isotope effect; thus, an isomerization of the E-NADH-aldehyde complex is postulated, as isomerization of the E-NADH complex was too fast to be detected. The estimated microscopic rate constants show that the observed transient reactions are controlled by multiple steps

  6. Determination of the rate constant for the OH(X2Π) + OH(X2Π) → H2O + O(3P) reaction over the temperature range 295 to 701 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay, Gokhan; Macdonald, R Glen

    2014-01-09

    The rate constant for the radical-radical reaction OH(X(2)Π) + OH(X(2)Π) → H2O + O((3)P) has been measured over the temperature and pressure ranges 295-701 K and 2-12 Torr, respectively, in mixtures of CF4, N2O, and H2O. The OH radical was produced by the 193 nm laser photolysis of N2O. The resulting O((1)D) atoms reacted rapidly with H2O to produce the OH radical. The OH radical was detected by high-resolution time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy using a single Λ-doublet component of the OH(1,0) P1e/f(4.5) fundamental vibrational transition. A detailed kinetic model was used to determine the reaction rate constant as a function of temperature. These experiments were conducted in a new temperature controlled reaction chamber. The values of the measured rate constants are quite similar to the previous measurements from this laboratory of Bahng and Macdonald (J. Phys. Chem. A 2007 , 111 , 3850 - 3861); however, they cover a much larger temperature range. The results of the present work do not agree with recent measurements of Sangwan and Krasnoperov (J. Phys. Chem. A 2012 , 116 , 11817 - 11822). At 295 K the rate constant of the title reaction was found to be (2.52 ± 0.63) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), where the uncertainty includes both experimental scatter and an estimate of systematic errors at the 95% confidence limit. Over the temperature range of the experiments, the rate constant can be represented by k1a = 4.79 × 10(-18)T(1.79) exp(879.0/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with a uncertainty of ±24% at the 2σ level, including experimental scatter and systematic error.

  7. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  8. A Theoretical Study of the Relationship between the Electrophilicity ω Index and Hammett Constant σp in [3+2] Cycloaddition Reactions of Aryl Azide/Alkyne Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Ben El Ayouchia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the electrophilicity ω index and the Hammett constant σp has been studied for the [2+3] cycloaddition reactions of a series of para-substituted phenyl azides towards para-substituted phenyl alkynes. The electrophilicity ω index—a reactivity density functional theory (DFT descriptor evaluated at the ground state of the molecules—shows a good linear relationship with the Hammett substituent constants σp. The theoretical scale of reactivity correctly explains the electrophilic activation/deactivation effects promoted by electron-withdrawing and electron-releasing substituents in both azide and alkyne components.

  9. Sweatshop equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Nancy H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a capability-augmented model of on the job search, in which sweatshop conditions stifle the capability of the working poor to search for a job while on the job. The augmented setting unveils a sweatshop equilibrium in an otherwise archetypal Burdett-Mortensen economy, and reconciles a number of oft noted yet perplexing features of sweatshop economies. We demonstrate existence of multiple rational expectation equilibria, graduation pathways out of sweatshops in complete abs...

  10. Cheap but accurate calculation of chemical reaction rate constants from ab initio data, via system-specific, black-box force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Julien; Hartke, Bernd

    2017-10-28

    Building on the recently published quantum-mechanically derived force field (QMDFF) and its empirical valence bond extension, EVB-QMDFF, it is now possible to generate a reliable potential energy surface for any given elementary reaction step in an essentially black box manner. This requires a limited and pre-defined set of reference data near the reaction path and generates an accurate approximation of the reference potential energy surface, on and off the reaction path. This intermediate representation can be used to generate reaction rate data, with far better accuracy and reliability than with traditional approaches based on transition state theory (TST) or variational extensions thereof (VTST), even if those include sophisticated tunneling corrections. However, the additional expense at the reference level remains very modest. We demonstrate all this for three arbitrarily chosen example reactions.

  11. Rate Constants for the Reactions of OH with CO, NO and NO2, and of HO2 with NO2 in the Presence of Water Vapour at Lower-Tropospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolletter, Michael; Fuchs, Hendrik; Novelli, Anna; Ehlers, Christian; Hofzumahaus, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the chemistry of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) in the lower troposphere is not fully understood. Aside from heterogenous reactions, the daytime HONO formation in the gas-phase is not well understood (Li et al., Science, 2014). For a better understanding of HONO in the gas-phase, we have reinvestigated the reaction rate constants of important tropospheric reactions of the HOx radical family (OH and HO2) with nitrogen oxides at realistic conditions of the lower troposphere (at ambient temperature/pressure and in humid air). In this study we apply a direct pump and probe technique with high accuracy, using small radical concentrations to avoid secondary chemistry. Pulsed laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) was used to investigate the reaction rate constants of OH with CO, NO, NO2, and HO2 with NO2 in synthetic air at different water vapor concentrations (up to 5 x 1017 molecules cm-3). Photolysis of ozone in the presence of gaseous water was the source of OH. The reactions took place in a flow-tube at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The chemical decay of the radicals was monitored by laser-induced fluorescence detection in a low-pressure cell, which sampled air continuously from the end of the flow-tube. Knowing the reactant concentrations subsequently allowed to calculate the bimolecular reaction rate constants at 1 atm from the pseudo-first-order decays. In order to observe HO2 reactions, OH was converted into HO2 with an excess of CO in the flow-tube. The newly measured rate constants for OH with CO, NO and NO2 agree very well with current recommendations by NASA/JPL and IUPAC and have an improved accuracy (uncertainty < 5%). These rate coefficients are independent of the presence of water vapour. The measured rate constant of HO2 with NO2 was found to depend significantly on the water-vapour concentration (probably due to formation of HO2*H2O complexes) and to exceed current recommendations by NASA/JPL and

  12. Systems biology and the origins of life? part II. Are biochemical networks possible ancestors of living systems? networks of catalysed chemical reactions: non-equilibrium, self-organization and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The present article discusses the possibility that catalysed chemical networks can evolve. Even simple enzyme-catalysed chemical reactions can display this property. The example studied is that of a two-substrate proteinoid, or enzyme, reaction displaying random binding of its substrates A and B. The fundamental property of such a system is to display either emergence or integration depending on the respective values of the probabilities that the enzyme has bound one of its substrate regardless it has bound the other substrate, or, specifically, after it has bound the other substrate. There is emergence of information if p(A)>p(AB) and p(B)>p(BA). Conversely, if p(A)equilibrium. Moreover, in such systems, emergence results in an increase of the energy level of the ternary EAB complex that becomes closer to the transition state of the reaction, thus leading to the enhancement of catalysis. Hence a drift from quasi-equilibrium is, to a large extent, responsible for the production of information and enhancement of catalysis. Non-equilibrium of these simple systems must be an important aspect that leads to both self-organization and evolutionary processes. These conclusions can be extended to networks of catalysed chemical reactions. Such networks are, in fact, networks of networks, viz. meta-networks. In this formal representation, nodes are chemical reactions catalysed by poorly specific proteinoids, and links can be identified to the transport of metabolites from proteinoid to proteinoid. The concepts of integration and emergence can be applied to such situations and can be used to define the identity of these networks and therefore their evolution. Defined as open non-equilibrium structures, such biochemical networks possess two remarkable properties: (1) the probability of occurrence of their nodes is dependant upon the input and output of matter in, and from, the system and (2) the probability of occurrence of the nodes is strictly linked to their degree of

  13. Rates and Equilibrium of CuA to heme a electron transfer in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Grell, Ernst; Ludwig, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    were found to be 20,400 s(-1) and 10,030 s(-1), respectively, at 25 degrees C and pH 7.5, which corresponds to an equilibrium constant of 2.0. Thermodynamic and activation parameters of these intramolecular ET reactions were determined. The significance of the results, particularly the low activation...

  14. Some Considerations on the Fundamentals of Chemical Kinetics: Steady State, Quasi-Equilibrium, and Transition State Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F.

    2017-01-01

    The elementary reaction sequence A ? I ? Products is the simplest mechanism for which the steady-state and quasi-equilibrium kinetic approximations can be applied. The exact integrated solutions for this chemical system allow inferring the conditions that must fulfill the rate constants for the different approximations to hold. A graphical…

  15. Spin dynamics and zero-field splitting constants of the triplet exciplex generated by photoinduced electron transfer reaction between erythrosin B and duroquinone

    OpenAIRE

    Tachikawa, Takashi; Kobori, Yasuhiro; Akiyama, Kimio; Katsuki, Akio; Steiner, Ulrich; Tero-Kubota, Shozo

    2002-01-01

    The spin dynamics of the duroquinone anion radical generated by photoinduced electron transfer reactions from triplet erythrosin B to duroquinone has been studied by using transient absorption and pulsed FT-EPR spectroscopy. Triplet exciplex formation as the reaction intermediate is verified by the observation of spin orbit coupling induced electron spin polarization. The kinetic parameters for exciplex formation and the intrinsic enhancement factors of electron spin polarization are determin...

  16. Quantitative characterization of hazardous waste incinerator performance - Part I: Model components viewed in the context of exchange among equilibrium reactions zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atimtay, A.; Weaver, R.E.C.; Murray, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    This first paper of a series treats the algorithmic details of an efficient approach to equilibrium definition through free energy minimization and examines the region near the flame of a selected incinerator configuration, explicitly treating candidate heat and mass transfer processes occurring among the zones in local chemical equilibrium. The prospect for achieving maximum permitted flexibility of operations out of RCRA Part B Test Burn studies (in addition to achieving design improvements) will be enhanced by having a tractable yet versatile incinerator simulation capability. This approach seeks to integrate as much independent evidence on constituents processes as may be available in a quantitative aggregate from which a comparison can be drawn with what is measured in actual operations

  17. Thiazol-4-one derivatives from the reaction of monosubstituted thioureas with maleimides: structures and factors determining the selectivity and tautomeric equilibrium in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena S. Pankova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available 2-(Alkyl(arylaminothiazol-4(5H-ones can regioselectively be prepared from monoalkyl(arylthioureas and maleimides. In solution, the former heterocycles exist in a tautomeric equilibrium with 2-(alkyl(aryliminothiazolidin-4-ones and the substituent on the exocyclic nitrogen atom governs the ratio of these tautomers. Isomers with the alkyl group in the endocyclic position can be obtained from N-methyl(ethylthioureas. 2D NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations rationalize experimental results.

  18. Equilibrium Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Anderlini; Daniele Terlizzese

    2009-01-01

    We build a simple model of trust as an equilibrium phenomenon, departing from standard "selfish" preferences in a minimal way. Agents who are on the receiving end of an other to transact can choose whether to cheat and take away the entire surplus, taking into account a "cost of cheating." The latter has an idiosyncratic component (an agent's type), and a socially determined one. The smaller the mass of agents who cheat, the larger the cost of cheating suffered by those who cheat. Depending o...

  19. Inclusive Σp and pp reactions. How can one learn the nature of π, K, Λ, N exchanges and determine the coupling constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasylev, A.M.; Ginzburg, I.F.; Perlovskij, L.I.

    1977-01-01

    Inclusive experiments pp → π + +..., Σp → Λ +..., pp → K + +... are proposed in which it is possible to come very close to the π, K, N, Λ poles. In these experiments it is possible, in principle, to extract the most precise values of the coupling constants KNY, Σ π Λ,... and to state the problem which is the nature of the exchanges. A critical analysis of the pp → π + + ... data is carried out

  20. A Voltammetric Determination of the Rate Constant of a One-Way Homogeneous Chemical Reaction in a System of Two Immiscible Liquid Phases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holub, Karel; Brusová, Zuzana; Štulík, K.; Mareček, Vladimír

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 574, č. 1 (2004), s. 101-106 ISSN 0022-0728 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0822 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : liquid|liquid interfaces * homogeneous reaction * voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.228, year: 2004

  1. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  2. Numerical method for partial equilibrium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Cloutman, L.D.; Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545)

    1981-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for chemically reactive fluid flow in which equilibrium and nonequilibrium reactions occur simultaneously. The equilibrium constraints on the species concentrations are established by a quadratic iterative procedure. If the equilibrium reactions are uncoupled and of second or lower order, the procedure converges in a single step. In general, convergence is most rapid when the reactions are weakly coupled. This can frequently be achieved by a judicious choice of the independent reactions. In typical transient calculations, satisfactory accuracy has been achieved with about five iterations per time step

  3. Direct measurements of rate constants for the reactions of CH3 radicals with C2H6, C2H4, and C2H2 at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S L; Labbe, N J; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-10-10

    The shock tube technique has been used to study the reactions CH3 + C2H6 → C2H4 + CH4 + H (1), CH3 + C2H4 → Products + H (2), and CH3 + C2H2 → Products + H (3). Biacetyl, (CH3CO)2, was used as a clean high temperature thermal source for CH3-radicals for all the three reactions studied in this work. For reaction 1, the experiments span a T-range of 1153 K ≤ T ≤ 1297 K, at P ~ 0.4 bar. The experiments on reaction 2 cover a T-range of 1176 K ≤ T ≤ 1366 K, at P ~ 1.0 bar, and those on reaction 3 a T-range of 1127 K ≤ T ≤ 1346 K, at P ~ 1.0 bar. Reflected shock tube experiments performed on reactions 1-3, monitored the formation of H-atoms with H-atom Atomic Resonance Absorption Spectrometric (ARAS). Fits to the H-atom temporal profiles using an assembled kinetics model were used to make determinations for k1, k2, and k3. In the case of C2H6, the measurements of [H]-atoms were used to derive direct high-temperature rate constants, k1, that can be represented by the Arrhenius equation k1(T) = 5.41 × 10(-12) exp(-6043 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1153 K ≤ T ≤ 1297 K) for the only bimolecular process that occurs, H-atom abstraction. TST calculations based on ab initio properties calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS//M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory show excellent agreement, within ±20%, of the measured rate constants. For the reaction of CH3 with C2H4, the present rate constant results, k2', refer to the sum of rate constants, k(2b) + k(2c), from two competing processes, addition-elimination, and the direct abstraction CH3 + C2H4 → C3H6 + H (2b) and CH3 + C2H4 → C2H2 + H + CH4 (2c). Experimental rate constants for k2' can be represented by the Arrhenius equation k2'(T) = 2.18 × 10(-10) exp(-11830 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1176 K ≤ T ≤ 1366 K). The present results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The present study provides the only direct measurement for the high-temperature rate constants for these channels

  4. Transesterification of canola, palm, peanut, soybean and sunflower oil with methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, butanol and tert-butanol to biodiesel: Modelling of chemical equilibrium, reaction kinetics and mass transfer based on fatty acid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likozar, Blaž; Levec, Janez

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Modelling of chemical equilibrium, reaction kinetics and mass transfer for triglyceride transesterification with different alcohols based on fatty acid composition. - Highlights: • Catalysed transesterification to biodiesel with various oils, alcohols and catalysts. • Analysis of components and reactivity based on fatty acid composition of all species. • Simultaneous modelling of mass transfer, reaction kinetics and chemical equilibrium. • Diffusivities, distribution and mass transfer coefficients for individual components. • Correlation of kinetic parameters with molecular structure of reactants and products. - Abstract: Mechanism of alcoholysis (e.g. methanolysis) using different oils, alcohols and homogeneous base catalysts was utilized to devise chemical kinetics and thermodynamics based on fatty acid composition, differentiating among triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides and fatty acid alkyl esters (e.g. fatty acid alkyl esters, FAME) with bonded gadoleic, linoleic, linolenic, oleic, palmitic and stearic acid-originating substituents. Their concentrations were measured using an optimized high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Hydrodynamics and diffusion limitations in emulsion were considered in overall model by determining diffusivities, distribution coefficients, molar volumes, boiling points and viscosities of individual components. Pre-exponential factors and activation energies were related with structure of reactants, intermediates and products acknowledging number of carbons, double bonds and alkyl branches by linear and mixed response surface methodology. Developed model may be used with batch and continuous flow reactors, e.g. for novel micro-structured or industrial-scale process intensification, different vegetable or non-edible oils (waste cooking Jatropha or microalgae lipids)

  5. Equilibrium calculations, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deursen, A.P.J. van

    1976-01-01

    A calculation is presented of dimer intensities obtained in supersonic expansions. There are two possible limiting considerations; the dimers observed are already present in the source, in thermodynamic equilibrium, and are accelerated in the expansion. Destruction during acceleration is neglected, as are processes leading to newly formed dimers. On the other hand one can apply a kinetic approach, where formation and destruction processes are followed throughout the expansion. The difficulty of this approach stems from the fact that the density, temperature and rate constants have to be known at all distances from the nozzle. The simple point of view has been adopted and the measured dimer intensities are compared with the equilibrium concentration in the source. The comparison is performed under the assumption that the detection efficiency for dimers is twice the detection efficiency for monomers. The experimental evidence against the simple point of view that the dimers of the onset region are formed in the source already, under equilibrium conditions, is discussed. (Auth.)

  6. Defect equilibrium in PrBaCo2O5+δ at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suntsov, A.Yu.; Leonidov, I.A.; Patrakeev, M.V.; Kozhevnikov, V.L.

    2013-01-01

    A defect equilibrium model for PrBaCo 2 O 5+δ is suggested based on oxygen non-stoichiometry data. The model includes reactions of oxygen exchange and charge disproportionation of Co 3+ cations. The respective equilibrium constants, enthalpies and entropies for the reactions entering the model are obtained from the fitting of the experimental data for oxygen non-stoichiometry. The enthalpies of oxidation Co 2+ →Co 3+ and Co 3+ →Co 4+ are found to be equal to 115±9 kJ mol –1 and 45±4 kJ mol –1 , respectively. The obtained equilibrium constants were used in order to calculate variations in concentration of cobalt species with non-stoichiometry, temperature and oxygen pressure. - Graphical abstract: Variations in concentration of cobalt species with oxygen content in PrBaCo n 2+ Co z 3+ Co p 4+ O 5+δ at 650 °S. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The defect equilibrium model based on oxygen non-stoichiometry data is suggested. • Disproportionation of Co 3+ cations gives significant contribution to defect equilibrium. • The hole concentration obtained from the model is in accord with electrical properties

  7. Extraction equilibrium of uranium (VI) from phosphoric solution with HDEHP and TOPO in cyclohexane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Jianzhang; Zhou Zuming; Qin Qizong

    1988-01-01

    The extraction equilibrium of uranium(VI) from phosphoric acid solution with HDEHP and TOPO in cyclohexane has been investigated to examine the effects of extractant concentration, hydrogen ion concentration and temperature on the extraction of uranium(VI). Experimental results suggest that the composition of synergistic complex species is UO 2 (HA 2 ) 2 ·TOPO and the extraction equilibrium constant β 21 is 10 9.52 at 30 deg C. In addition, the thermodynamic functions of the extraction reaction (ΔG,ΔH,ΔS) and the infra-red spectra of synergistic complexes have also been determined

  8. Title: Elucidation of Environmental Fate of Artificial Sweeteners (Aspartame, Acesulfame K and Saccharin) by Determining Bimolecular Rate Constants with Hydroxyl Radical at Various pH and Temperature Conditions and Possible Reaction By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraji, T.; Arakaki, T.; Suzuka, T.

    2012-12-01

    Use of artificial sweeteners in beverages and food has been rapidly increasing because of their non-calorie nature. In Japan, aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose are among the most widely used artificial sweeteners. Because the artificial sweeteners are not metabolized in human bodies, they are directly excreted into the environment without chemical transformations. We initiated a study to better understand the fate of artificial sweeteners in the marine environment. The hydroxyl radical (OH), the most potent reactive oxygen species, reacts with various compounds and determines the environmental oxidation capacity and the life-time of many compounds. The steady-state OH concentration and the reaction rate constants between the compound and OH are used to estimate the life-time of the compound. In this study, we determine the bimolecular rate constants between aspartame, acefulfame K and saccharin and OH at various pH and temperature conditions using a competition kinetics technique. We use hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of OH. Bimolecular rate constant we obtained so far for aspartame was (2.6±1.2)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 3.0 and (4.9±2.3)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 5.5. Little effect was seen by changing the temperatures between 15 and 40 oC. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be -1.0 kJ mol-1 at pH = 3.0, +8.5 kJ mol-1 at pH = 5.5, which could be regarded as zero. We will report bimolecular rate constants at different pHs and temperatures for acesulfame K and saccharin, as well. Possible reaction by-products for aspartame will be also reported. We will further discuss the fate of aspartame in the coastal environment.

  9. Prediction of phase equilibrium for gas hydrate in the presence of organic inhibitors and electrolytes by using an explicit pressure-dependent Langmuir adsorption constant in the van der Waals–Platteeuw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Huai-Ying; Hsieh, Min-Kang; Chen, Yan-Ping; Chen, Po-Chun; Lin, Shiang-Tai; Chen, Li-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrate phase is described by the van der Waals and Platteeuw model. • An explicit pressure-dependent Langmuir adsorption constant is used in our model. • Phase behavior of gas hydrates with organic inhibitors and electrolytes predicted. • Our model well predicts phase behavior of gas hydrates at high pressures. -- Abstract: A new approach is developed for the prediction of the melting curve of gas hydrate with single or multiple additives, including organic inhibitors and electrolytes. This is made possible by combining a predictive equation of state for the fluid phase, the Peng–Robinson–Stryjek–Vera equation of state (PRSV EoS) combined with the COSMO-SAC activity coefficient model through the first order modified Huron–Vidal (MHV1) mixing rule, and a modified van der Waals–Platteeuw model for the hydrate phase. We have examined this method for the change of the melting condition of gas hydrate upon addition of single organic inhibitor, single electrolyte, and a mixture of organic and electrolyte. The absolute average relative deviation in temperature (AARD-T) for these three types of systems are 0.79% (695 data points, T from 230.2 K to 294.0 K, P from 0.10 MPa to 33.9 MPa), 0.16% (810 data points, T from 259.5 K to 299.1 K, P from 0.13 MPa to 71.56 MPa), and 1.56% (316 data points, T from 248.2 K to 292.9 K, P from 0.90 MPa to 73.28 MPa), respectively. We believe that the proposed model is useful for the exploitation of natural or synthetic gas hydrates with multiple additives

  10. Determination of the rate constants of the reactions CO/sub 2/+OH/sup -/ -> HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and barbituric acid -> barbiturate anion -> H/sup -/ using the pulse radiolyse technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchmann, M.N.; von Sonntag, C.

    1982-09-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of CO/sub 2/ + OH /sup -/-> HCO/sub 3//sup -/ (i) and barbituric acid -> barbiturate anion + H/sup +/ (ii) have been remeasured using as a new approach the pulse radiolysis technique with optical and conductivity detection. The rate constants obtained in the present study, ksub(j) (21/sup 0/C) = 6900 +- 700 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and ksub(II) (19/sup 0/C) = 22 +- 2 s/sup -1/ agree within experimental errors with values obtained earlier by other methods.

  11. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G chemistry textbooks and even in some more advanced texts. Similarly, the criteria for equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  12. Calculating constants of the rates of the reactions of excitation, ionization, and atomic exchange: A model of a shock oscillator with a change of the Hamiltonian of the system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, D. L.

    2017-11-01

    A new model for calculating the rates of reactions of excitation, ionization, and atomic exchange is proposed. Diatomic molecule AB is an unstructured particle M upon the exchange of elastic-vibrational (VT) energy, i.e., a model of a shock forceful oscillator with a change in Hamiltonian (SFOH). The SFOH model is based on the quantum theory of strong perturbations. The SFOH model allows generalization in simulating the rates of the reactions of excitation, ionization, and atomic exchange in the vibrational-vibrational (VV) energy exchange of diatomic molecules, and the exchange of VV- and VT-energy of polyatomic molecules. The rate constants of the excitation of metastables A 3Σ u +, B 3Π g , W 3Δ u , B'3Σ u -, a'3Σ u -, and the ionization of a nitrogen molecules from ground state X2Σ g + upon a collision with a heavy structureless particle (a nitrogen molecule), are found as examples.

  13. Transition state theory thermal rate constants and RRKM-based branching ratios for the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction based on multi-state and multi-reference ab initio calculations of interest for the Titan's chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouk, Chanda-Malis; Zvereva-Loëte, Natalia; Scribano, Yohann; Bussery-Honvault, Béatrice

    2012-10-30

    Multireference single and double configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations including Davidson (+Q) or Pople (+P) corrections have been conducted in this work for the reactants, products, and extrema of the doublet ground state potential energy surface involved in the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction. Such highly correlated ab initio calculations are then compared with previous PMP4, CCSD(T), W1, and DFT/B3LYP studies. Large relative differences are observed in particular for the transition state in the entrance channel resolving the disagreement between previous ab initio calculations. We confirm the existence of a small but positive potential barrier (3.86 ± 0.84 kJ mol(-1) (MR-AQCC) and 3.89 kJ mol(-1) (MRCI+P)) in the entrance channel of the title reaction. The correlation is seen to change significantly the energetic position of the two minima and five saddle points of this system together with the dissociation channels but not their relative order. The influence of the electronic correlation into the energetic of the system is clearly demonstrated by the thermal rate constant evaluation and it temperature dependance by means of the transition state theory. Indeed, only MRCI values are able to reproduce the experimental rate constant of the title reaction and its behavior with temperature. Similarly, product branching ratios, evaluated by means of unimolecular RRKM theory, confirm the NH production of Umemoto et al., whereas previous works based on less accurate ab initio calculations failed. We confirm the previous findings that the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction proceeds via an insertion-dissociation mechanism and that the dominant product channels are CH(2)NH + H and CH(3) + NH. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biney, P.O.

    1993-04-01

    An experimental set-up for accurate measurement of hydrogen generation rate in Lithium-Lead (Li 17 Pb 83 ) Steam or water interactions has been designed. The most important features of the design include a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature all stainless steel valve used to control the reaction time and the placement of most measuring devices below a water line to minimize leakage of the hydrogen collected. A PC based data acquisition and control system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all major components of the set-up. Initial tests indicate that the first design objective of maintaining leakproof gas collection chamber has been achieved. Initial pressure tests indicated that the pressure drop over a time span of 30 minutes was within the tolerance of the pressure transducer used to measure the pressure (within 0.690 kPa) at a nominal system pressure of 685 kPa. The experimental system hardware, data acquisition and control programs and data analysis program have been completed, tested and are currently functional

  15. Development of chemical equilibrium analysis code 'CHEEQ'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Shuichiro

    2006-08-01

    'CHEEQ' code which calculates the partial pressure and the mass of the system consisting of ideal gas and pure condensed phase compounds, was developed. Characteristics of 'CHEEQ' code are as follows. All the chemical equilibrium equations were described by the formation reactions from the mono-atomic gases in order to simplify the code structure and input preparation. Chemical equilibrium conditions, Σν i μ i =0 for the gaseous compounds and precipitated condensed phase compounds and Σν i μ i > 0 for the non-precipitated condensed phase compounds, were applied. Where, ν i and μ i are stoichiometric coefficient and chemical potential of component i. Virtual solid model was introduced to perform the calculation of constant partial pressure condition. 'CHEEQ' was consisted of following 3 parts, (1) analysis code, zc132. f. (2) thermodynamic data base, zmdb01 and (3) input data file, zindb. 'CHEEQ' code can calculate the system which consisted of elements (max.20), condensed phase compounds (max.100) and gaseous compounds. (max.200). Thermodynamic data base, zmdb01 contains about 1000 elements and compounds, and 200 of them were Actinide elements and their compounds. This report describes the basic equations, the outline of the solution procedure and instructions to prepare the input data and to evaluate the calculation results. (author)

  16. The intrinsic role of nanoconfinement in chemical equilibrium: evidence from DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinovich, Leonid; Polak, Micha

    2013-05-08

    Recently we predicted that when a reaction involving a small number of molecules occurs in a nanometric-scale domain entirely segregated from the surrounding media, the nanoconfinement can shift the position of equilibrium toward products via reactant-product reduced mixing. In this Letter, we demonstrate how most-recently reported single-molecule fluorescence measurements of partial hybridization of ssDNA confined within nanofabricated chambers provide the first experimental confirmation of this entropic nanoconfinement effect. Thus, focusing separately on each occupancy-specific equilibrium constant, quantitatively reveals extra stabilization of the product upon decreasing the chamber occupancy or size. Namely, the DNA hybridization under nanoconfined conditions is significantly favored over the identical reaction occurring in bulk media with the same reactant concentrations. This effect, now directly verified for DNA, can be relevant to actual biological processes, as well as to diverse reactions occurring within molecular capsules, nanotubes, and other functional nanospaces.

  17. Free energy correlation of rate constants for electron transfer between organic systems in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisel, D

    1975-07-15

    Recent experimental data concerning the rate constants for electron transfer reactions of organic systems in aqueous solutions and their equilibrium constants is examined for possible correlation. The data is correlated quite well by the Marcus theory, if a reorganization parameter, lambda, of 18 kcal/mole is used. Assuming that the only contribution to lambda is the free energy of rearrangement of the water molecules, an effective radius of 5 A for the reacting entities is estimated. For the zero free energy change reaction, i.e., electron exchange between a radical ion and its parent molecule, a rate constant of about 5 X 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ is predicted. (auth)

  18. Thermodynamics of open, nonisothermal chemical systems far from equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Nobuo

    1992-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of kinetic models based on a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) is studied in an attempt to seek general trends in the thermodynamic properties of open nonlinear systems. The models consist of two reversible reactions, A + nB rightleftharpoons (n + 1) B (n = 0,1,or 2) and B rightleftharpoons C, taking place in an adiabatic CSTR. The heat of reaction is incorporated, and the rate constants are assumed to follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence. The models give rise to multiple stationary states and sustained oscillations (limit cycles). The entropy difference between stationary or oscillatory states and equilibrium and the rate of entropy production in the these states are calculated as a function of the residence time in the reactor. The entropy difference and entropy production may be taken, to some extent, as indicative of the influence of irreversible processes, which disappears at equilibrium. The results of the calculations reveal the following systematic trends: (I) The entropy difference or entropy production for stable states or both always increase as the residence time is shortened, namely, as the system is displaced further from equilibrium. (II) If stable and unstable states (stationary or oscillatory) coexist under identical conditions, then the stable state invariably has a smaller value of the entropy difference or entropy production or both than the corresponding unstable state. 26 refs., 3 figs

  19. A Strategic-Equilibrium Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel J. Turbay

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The strategic equilibrium of an N-person cooperative game with transferable utility is a system composed of a cover collection of subsets of N and a set of extended imputations attainable through such equilibrium cover. The system describes a state of coalitional bargaining stability where every player has a bargaining alternative against any other player to support his corresponding equilibrium claim. Any coalition in the sable system may form and divide the characteristic value function of the coalition as prescribed by the equilibrium payoffs. If syndicates are allowed to form, a formed coalition may become a syndicate using the equilibrium payoffs as disagreement values in bargaining for a part of the complementary coalition incremental value to the grand coalition when formed. The emergent well known-constant sum derived game in partition function is described in terms of parameters that result from incumbent binding agreements. The strategic-equilibrium corresponding to the derived game gives an equal value claim to all players.  This surprising result is alternatively explained in terms of strategic-equilibrium based possible outcomes by a sequence of bargaining stages that when the binding agreements are in the right sequential order, von Neumann and Morgenstern (vN-M non-discriminatory solutions emerge. In these solutions a preferred branch by a sufficient number of players is identified: the weaker players syndicate against the stronger player. This condition is referred to as the stronger player paradox.  A strategic alternative available to the stronger players to overcome the anticipated not desirable results is to voluntarily lower his bargaining equilibrium claim. In doing the original strategic equilibrium is modified and vN-M discriminatory solutions may occur, but also a different stronger player may emerge that has eventually will have to lower his equilibrium claim. A sequence of such measures converges to the equal

  20. Aqueous complexation, precipitation, and adsorption reactions of cadmium in the geologic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachara, J.M.; Rai, D.; Felmy, A.R.; Cowan, C.E.; Smith, S.C.; Moore, D.A.; Resch, C.T.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains new laboratory data and equilibrium constants for important solubility and adsorption reactions of Cd that occur in soil and groundwater and attenuate Cd migration. In addition, extensive interaction experiments with Cd and soils from electric utility sites are described. These experiments show the importance of precipitation and adsorption reactions in soil and demonstrate how such reactions can be modeled to predict Cd attenuation near utility sites

  1. Mechanism and kinetics of LiX(X=H, D, T) + H2O reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hongjie; Duan Hao; Xing Pifeng; Tang Yongjian

    2011-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of LiX(X=H, D, T) with H 2 O was investigated at MP2/6-311G (d) level using ab initio quantum chemistry in Gaussian 03 software. The equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies and energy of various stationary points on the potential energy surfaces were calculated in the lowest singlet states. Considering the quantum correction, the reaction rate constants were calculated using classical transition state theory. The results show the reaction of LiH (LiD, LiT) with H 2 O was considerably dependent on temperature that it is lower, the reaction rate constants are smaller. (authors)

  2. Non-equilibrium entropy in excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betak, E.

    1991-06-01

    The time-dependent behaviour of entropy in excited nuclei is investigated. In distinction to recent claims, it is shown that no self-organization is involved in pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions. (author). 9 refs.; 4 figs

  3. Lactobacillus rhamnosus R11 consumed in a food supplement survived human digestive transit without modifying microbiota equilibrium as assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmesse, Olivier; Mogenet, Agnès; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Corthier, Gérard; Furet, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival of Lactobacillus rhamnosus R11 and Lactobacillus acidophilus R52 in the human digestive tract and their effects on the microbiota homeostasis. We designed an open human trial including 14 healthy volunteers. A 3-week exclusion period of fermented products was followed by a 12-day consumption period of 4 capsules daily containing 2 x 10(9)L. rhamnosus R11 and 1 x 10(8)L. acidophilus R52, and a 12-day wash-out period. The 2 strains and dominant bacterial groups of the microbiota were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the end of the capsule consumption period, high levels of L. rhamnosus R11 were detected in faecal samples from all volunteers, reaching a mean value of 7.1 log(10) colony-forming unit (CFU) equivalents/g of stool. L. acidophilus R52 was detected in the stools of only 1 volunteer, reaching a maximum level of 6.1 log(10) CFU equivalents/g of stool. Dilution plating enumerations performed in parallel provided less consistent and generally lower levels. No significant effect of capsule consumption was observed on microbiota homeostasis for the dominant faecal populations. Mean values of 8.8, 9.2, 9.9 and 10.6 log(10) CFU equivalents/g of stool were obtained for the Clostridium coccoides, Bifidobacterium sp., Bacteroides sp. and Clostridium leptum groups, respectively.

  4. The reactions of oxygen and hydrogen with liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, H.

    1981-01-01

    Results so far available as to the reactions and chemical equilibrium of oxygen and hydrogen with liquid sodium have been analyzed critically. The enthalpy values of the reactions have been discussed and supplemented on the basis of corresponding BORN-HABER cycles. The concentration and temperature functions of the hydrogen equilibrium pressure were deduced from experimental results. In relation to the solubility data the solid phases coexisting with liquid sodium in the ternary system Na-O-H have been discussed. The reaction of oxygen with hydrogen in diluted solution in liquid sodium has been investigated in more detail. Interaction coefficients, and the temperature functions of the free energy of formation and the equilibrium constant have been determined. (orig.)

  5. The H + HeH(+) → He + H2(+) reaction from the ultra-cold regime to the three-body breakup: exact quantum mechanical integral cross sections and rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fazio, Dario

    2014-06-21

    In this work, we present a quantum mechanical scattering study of the title reaction from 1 mK to 2000 K. Total integral cross sections and thermal rate constants are compared with previous theoretical and experimental data and with simpler theoretical models to understand the range of validity of the approximations used in the previous studies. The obtained quantum reactive observables have been found to be nearly insensitive to the roto-vibrational energy of the reactants at high temperatures. More sensitive to the reactant's roto-vibrational energy are the data in the cold and ultra-cold regimes. The implications of the new data presented here in the early universe scenario are also discussed and analyzed.

  6. Mathematical modeling of radiation-chemical processes in HNO3 solutions of Pu. 5. Effect of [HNO3] on rate constants of radiation-chemical and chemical reactions of Pu ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.

    1993-01-01

    Dependences of rate constants on [HNO 3 ] are obtained for the reactions Pu(IV) + OH, Pu(IV) + NO 3 , Pu(V) + NO 2 , Pu(III) + NO 2 , Pu(V) + Pu(III), Pu(IV) + Pu(IV), and Pu(V) + Pu(V). These dependences are obtained for [HNO 3 ] = 0.3-6 M using existing experimental and literature data and the data obtained using mathematical modeling. The correctness of the resulting dependences is checked by comparing the calculated and experimental kinetic laws for the behavior of Pu in 0.3, 0.4, 0.6, and 1.6 M HNO 3 . 17 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Modified Ammonia Removal Model Based on Equilibrium and Mass Transfer Principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanableh, A.; Imteaz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Yoon et al. 1 presented an approximate mathematical model to describe ammonia removal from an experimental batch reactor system with gaseous headspace. The development of the model was initially based on assuming instantaneous equilibrium between ammonia in the aqueous and gas phases. In the model, a 'saturation factor, β' was defined as a constant and used to check whether the equilibrium assumption was appropriate. The authors used the trends established by the estimated β values to conclude that the equilibrium assumption was not valid. The authors presented valuable experimental results obtained using a carefully designed system and the model used to analyze the results accounted for the following effects: speciation of ammonia between NH 3 and NH 4 + as a function of pH: temperature dependence of the reactions constants; and air flow rate. In this article, an alternative model based on the exact solution of the governing mass-balance differential equations was developed and used to describe ammonia removal without relying on the use of the saturation factor. The modified model was also extended to mathematically describe the pH dependence of the ammonia removal rate, in addition to accounting for the speciation of ammonia, temperature dependence of reactions constants, and air flow rate. The modified model was used to extend the analysis of the original experimental data presented by Yoon et al. 1 and the results matched the theory in an excellent manner

  8. Equilibrium Solubility of CO2 in Alkanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium solubility of CO2 were measured in aqueous solutions of Monoethanolamine (MEA) and N,N-diethylethanolamine(DEEA). Equilibrium cells are generally used for these measurements. In this study, the equilibrium data were measured from the calorimetry. For this purpose a reaction calorimeter...... (model CPA 122 from ChemiSens AB, Sweden) was used. The advantage of this method is being the measurement of both heats of absorption and equilibrium solubility data of CO2 at the same time. The measurements were performed for 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA solutions as a function of CO2 loading at three...... different temperatures 40, 80 and 120 ºC. The measured 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA data were compared with the literature data obtained from different equilibrium cells which validated the use of calorimeters for equilibrium solubility measurements....

  9. Computation of Phase Equilibrium and Phase Envelopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritschel, Tobias Kasper Skovborg; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    formulate the involved equations in terms of the fugacity coefficients. We present expressions for the first-order derivatives. Such derivatives are necessary in computationally efficient gradient-based methods for solving the vapor-liquid equilibrium equations and for computing phase envelopes. Finally, we......In this technical report, we describe the computation of phase equilibrium and phase envelopes based on expressions for the fugacity coefficients. We derive those expressions from the residual Gibbs energy. We consider 1) ideal gases and liquids modeled with correlations from the DIPPR database...... and 2) nonideal gases and liquids modeled with cubic equations of state. Next, we derive the equilibrium conditions for an isothermal-isobaric (constant temperature, constant pressure) vapor-liquid equilibrium process (PT flash), and we present a method for the computation of phase envelopes. We...

  10. Equilibrium and Kinetic Studies of Systems of Hydrogen Isotopes, Lithium Hydrides, Aluminum and LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper described measurements of (1) the distribution of tritium and helium throughout both phases of irradiated Li-Al alloy, (2) the migration rate of tritium during moderate heating, (3) equilibrium pressures as functions of temperature of H2, D2, or T2 in contact with lithium hydrides + aluminum, Li-Al alloy, or irradiated Li-Al alloy, (4) the equilibrium constant for the reaction as a function of temperature, and (5) extraction rates of tritium from irradiated LiAlO2 targets at elevated temperatures

  11. The Unimolecular Reactions of CF3CHF2 Studied by Chemical Activation: Assignment of Rate Constants and Threshold Energies to the 1,2-H Atom Transfer, 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF Elimination Reactions, and the Dependence of Threshold Energies on the Number of F-Atom Substituents in the Fluoroethane Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caleb A; Gillespie, Blanton R; Heard, George L; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2017-11-22

    The recombination of CF 3 and CHF 2 radicals in a room-temperature bath gas was used to prepare vibrationally excited CF 3 CHF 2 * molecules with 101 kcal mol -1 of vibrational energy. The subsequent 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions were observed as a function of bath gas pressure by following the CHF 3 , CF 3 (F)C: and C 2 F 4 product concentrations by gas chromatography using a mass spectrometer as the detector. The singlet CF 3 (F)C: concentration was measured by trapping the carbene with trans-2-butene. The experimental rate constants are 3.6 × 10 4 , 4.7 × 10 4 , and 1.1 × 10 4 s -1 for the 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions, respectively. These experimental rate constants were matched to statistical RRKM calculated rate constants to assign threshold energies (E 0 ) of 88 ± 2, 88 ± 2, and 87 ± 2 kcal mol -1 to the three reactions. Pentafluoroethane is the only fluoroethane that has a competitive H atom transfer decomposition reaction, and it is the only example with 1,1-HF elimination being more important than 1,2-HF elimination. The trend of increasing threshold energies for both 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF processes with the number of F atoms in the fluoroethane molecule is summarized and investigated with electronic-structure calculations. Examination of the intrinsic reaction coordinate associated with the 1,1-HF elimination reaction found an adduct between CF 3 (F)C: and HF in the exit channel with a dissociation energy of ∼5 kcal mol -1 . Hydrogen-bonded complexes between HF and the H atom migration transition state of CH 3 (F)C: and the F atom migration transition state of CF 3 (F)C: also were found by the calculations. The role that these carbene-HF complexes could play in 1,1-HF elimination reactions is discussed.

  12. An ab initio/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus prediction of rate constant and product branching ratios for unimolecular decomposition of propen-2-ol and related H+CH2COHCH2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Li, Ze-Rong; Liu, Cun-Xi; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2008-12-01

    Enols have been found to be important intermediates in the combustion flames of hydrocarbon [C. A. Taatjes et al., Science 308, 1887 (2005)]. The removal mechanism of enols in combustion flame has not been established yet. In this work, the potential energy surface for the unimolecular decomposition of syn-propen-2-ol and H+CH2COHCH2 recombination reactions have been first investigated by CCSD(T) method. The barrier heights, reaction energies, and geometrical parameters of the reactants, products, intermediates, and transition states have been investigated theoretically. The results show that the formation of CH3CO+CH3 via the CH3COCH3 intermediate is dominant for the unimolecular decomposition of syn-propen-2-ol and its branching ratio is over 99% in the whole temperature range from 700 to 3000 K, and its rate constant can be expressed as an analytical form in the range of T =700-3000 K at atmospheric pressure. This can be attributed to the lower energy barrier of this channel compared to the other channels. The association reaction of H with CH2COHCH2 is shown to be a little more complicated than the unimolecular decomposition of syn-propen-2-ol. The channel leading to CH3CO+CH3 takes a key role in the whole temperature range at atmospheric pressure. However at the higher pressure of 100 atm, the recombination by direct formation of syn-propen-2-ol through H addition is important at T 1400 K, the recombination channel leading to CH3CO+CH3 turns out to be significant.

  13. Computational study of the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulphide: Thermodynamics and kinetic constants estimation using ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal-Vidal, Á.; Pérez-Rodríguez, M.; Piñeiro, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • OCS hydrolysis equilibrium constants were calculated using QM composite methods. • CBS-QB3 was found to be the most adequate method for OCS thermodynamic calculations. • Calculated hydrolysis yields decrease when temperature increases. • The isotopic effect is less significant than temperature or initial concentration dependences. - Abstract: Carbonyl sulphide is the predominant sulphur compound in the atmosphere, contributing to the formation of aerosol particles affecting global climate. Human activity has significantly increased its total amount since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution due to its presence in petroleum and coal, reason why it is necessary to understand and control its emissions. On the other hand, carbonyl sulphide is an undesired substance for catalysis in important industrial processes. Hydrolysis is the most promising among the different strategies to reduce its presence, giving as products carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide. In the present work, the mechanism of reaction of carbonyl sulphide hydrolysis process in gas phase was studied from 400 K to 1500 K, equilibrium constants were obtained and reaction yields were estimated, by means of composite quantum-computational methods. Good agreement with literature experimental results confirms the suitability of the chosen methods, specially CBS-QB3, in supporting the reaction mechanism, giving accurate equilibrium constant values, and obtaining realistic yields. The effect of isotopic substitution in OCS was also studied, from 300 K to 1500 K, being much less significant than temperature dependence.

  14. Experimental determination of monoethanolamine protonation constant and its temperature dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma’mun Sholeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide as one of the major contributors to the global warming problem is produced in large quantities by many important industries and its emission seems to rise from year to year. Aminebased absorption is one of the methods to capture CO2 from its sources. As a reactive system, mass transfer and chemical reaction take place simultaneously. In a vapor-liquid equilibrium model for the CO2-amine-water system, some parameters such as mass transfer coefficients and chemical equilibrium constants need to be known. However, some parameters could be determined experimentally and the rests could be regressed from the model. The protonation constant (pKa, as one of the model parameters, could then be measured experimentally. The purpose of this study is to measure the pKa of monoethanolamine (MEA at a range of temperatures from 303 to 330K by a potentiometric titration method. The experimental data obtained were in a good agreement with the literature data. The pKa data from this work together with those from the literature were then correlated in an empirical correlation to be used for future research.

  15. Equilibrium Droplets on Deformable Substrates: Equilibrium Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koursari, Nektaria; Ahmed, Gulraiz; Starov, Victor M

    2018-05-15

    Equilibrium conditions of droplets on deformable substrates are investigated, and it is proven using Jacobi's sufficient condition that the obtained solutions really provide equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformed support. At the equilibrium, the excess free energy of the system should have a minimum value, which means that both necessary and sufficient conditions of the minimum should be fulfilled. Only in this case, the obtained profiles provide the minimum of the excess free energy. The necessary condition of the equilibrium means that the first variation of the excess free energy should vanish, and the second variation should be positive. Unfortunately, the mentioned two conditions are not the proof that the obtained profiles correspond to the minimum of the excess free energy and they could not be. It is necessary to check whether the sufficient condition of the equilibrium (Jacobi's condition) is satisfied. To the best of our knowledge Jacobi's condition has never been verified for any already published equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate. A simple model of the equilibrium droplet on the deformable substrate is considered, and it is shown that the deduced profiles of the equilibrium droplet and deformable substrate satisfy the Jacobi's condition, that is, really provide the minimum to the excess free energy of the system. To simplify calculations, a simplified linear disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm is adopted for the calculations. It is shown that both necessary and sufficient conditions for equilibrium are satisfied. For the first time, validity of the Jacobi's condition is verified. The latter proves that the developed model really provides (i) the minimum of the excess free energy of the system droplet/deformable substrate and (ii) equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate.

  16. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students’ understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was randomly assigned as the non-jigsaw group (control) and other as the jigsaw group (cooperative). Students participating in the jigsaw group were divided into four “home groups” since the topic chemical equilibrium is divided into four subtopics (Modules A, B, C and D). Each of these home groups contained four students. The groups were as follows: (1) Home Group A (HGA), representin g the equilibrium state and quantitative aspects of equilibrium (Module A), (2) Home Group B (HGB), representing the equilibrium constant and relationships involving equilibrium constants (Module B), (3) Home Group C (HGC), representing Altering Equilibrium Conditions: Le Chatelier’s principle (Module C), and (4) Home Group D (HGD), representing calculations with equilibrium constants (Module D). The home groups then broke apart, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and the students moved into jigsaw groups consisting of members from the other home groups who were assigned the same portion of the material. The jigsaw groups were then in charge of teaching their specific subtopic to the rest of the students in their learning group. The main data collection tool was a Chemical Equilibrium Achievement Test (CEAT), which was applied to both the jigsaw and non-jigsaw groups The results indicated that the jigsaw group was more successful than the non-jigsaw group (individual learning method).

  17. Isospin equilibrium and non-equilibrium in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liewen; Ge Lingxiao; Zhang Xiaodong; Zhang Fengshou

    1997-01-01

    The equilibrium and non-equilibrium of the isospin degree of freedom are studied in terms of an isospin-dependent QMD model, which includes isospin-dependent symmetry energy, Coulomb energy, N-N cross sections and Pauli blocking. It is shown that there exists a transition from the isospin equilibrium to non-equilibrium as the incident energy from below to above a threshold energy in central, asymmetric heavy-ion collisions. Meanwhile, it is found that the phenomenon results from the co-existence and competition of different reaction mechanisms, namely, the isospin degree of freedom reaches an equilibrium if the incomplete fusion (ICF) component is dominant and does not reach equilibrium if the fragmentation component is dominant. Moreover, it is also found that the isospin-dependent N-N cross sections and symmetry energy are crucial for the equilibrium of the isospin degree of freedom in heavy-ion collisions around the Fermi energy. (author)

  18. Influence of collective excitations on pre-equilibrium and equilibrium processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatyuk, A.V.; Lunev, V.P.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the collective states excitations on equilibrium and preequilibrium processes in reaction is discussed. It is shown that for a consistent description of the contribution of preequilibrium and equilibrium compound processes collective states should be taken into account in the level density calculations. The microscopic and phenomenological approaches for the level density calculations are discussed. 13 refs.; 8 figs

  19. Constant physics and characteristics of fundamental constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarrach, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present some evidence which supports a surprising physical interpretation of the fundamental constants. First, we relate two of them through the renormalization group. This leaves as many fundamental constants as base units. Second, we introduce and a dimensional system of units without fundamental constants. Third, and most important, we find, while interpreting the units of the a dimensional system, that is all cases accessible to experimentation the fundamental constants indicate either discretization at small values or boundedness at large values of the corresponding physical quantity. (Author) 12 refs

  20. Energy conservation and maximal entropy production in enzyme reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobovišek, Andrej; Vitas, Marko; Brumen, Milan; Fajmut, Aleš

    2017-08-01

    A procedure for maximization of the density of entropy production in a single stationary two-step enzyme reaction is developed. Under the constraints of mass conservation, fixed equilibrium constant of a reaction and fixed products of forward and backward enzyme rate constants the existence of maximum in the density of entropy production is demonstrated. In the state with maximal density of entropy production the optimal enzyme rate constants, the stationary concentrations of the substrate and the product, the stationary product yield as well as the stationary reaction flux are calculated. The test, whether these calculated values of the reaction parameters are consistent with their corresponding measured values, is performed for the enzyme Glucose Isomerase. It is found that calculated and measured rate constants agree within an order of magnitude, whereas the calculated reaction flux and the product yield differ from their corresponding measured values for less than 20 % and 5 %, respectively. This indicates that the enzyme Glucose Isomerase, considered in a non-equilibrium stationary state, as found in experiments using the continuous stirred tank reactors, possibly operates close to the state with the maximum in the density of entropy production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Equilibrium reaction of human methemoglobin A

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    measurement of many physical parameters under a variety of conditions but also theoretical considerations of possible mechanisms through which changes in these parameters might be inter-related. (Okonjo and Abouwoye, 1992). Methemoglobin is a protein formed continuously (in. Small amounts) in normal red blood.

  2. Approach to chemical equilibrium in thermal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The experimentally measured (μ - , charged particle)/(μ - ,n) and (p,n/p,p') ratios for the emission of energetic nucleons are used to estimate the time evolution of a system of secondary nucleons produced in a direct interaction of a projectile or captured muon. The values of these ratios indicate that chemical equilibrium is not achieved among the secondary nucleons in noncomposite induced reactions, and this restricts the time scale for the emission of energetic nucleons to be about 0.7 x 10 -23 sec. It is shown that the reason why thermal equilibrium can be reached so rapidly for a particular nucleon species is that the sum of the particle spectra produced in multiple direct reactions looks surprisingly thermal. The rate equations used to estimate the reaction times for muon and nucleon induced reactions are then applied to heavy ion collisions, and it is shown that chemical equilibrium can be reached more rapidly, as one would expect

  3. Quantity Constrained General Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babenko, R.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a standard general equilibrium model it is assumed that there are no price restrictions and that prices adjust infinitely fast to their equilibrium values.In case of price restrictions a general equilibrium may not exist and rationing on net demands or supplies is needed to clear the markets.In

  4. Arrhenius Rate: constant volume burn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-06

    A constant volume burn occurs for an idealized initial state in which a large volume of reactants at rest is suddenly raised to a high temperature and begins to burn. Due to the uniform spatial state, there is no fluid motion and no heat conduction. This reduces the time evolu tion to an ODE for the reaction progress variable. With an Arrhenius reaction rate, two characteristics of thermal ignition are illustrated: induction time and thermal runaway. The Frank-Kamenetskii approximation then leads to a simple expression for the adiabatic induction time. For a first order reaction, the analytic solution is derived and used to illustrate the effect of varying the activation temperature; in particular, on the induction time. In general, the ODE can be solved numerically. This is used to illustrate the effect of varying the reaction order. We note that for a first order reaction, the time evolution of the reaction progress variable has an exponential tail. In contrast, for a reaction order less than one, the reaction completes in a nite time. The reaction order also affects the induction time.

  5. The Theory of Thermodynamics for Chemical Reactions in Dispersed Heterogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongqiang; Baojiao; Jianfeng

    1997-07-01

    In this paper, the expressions of Gibbs energy change, enthalpy change, entropy change, and equilibrium constant for chemical reactions in dispersed heterogeneous systems are derived using classical thermodynamics theory. The thermodynamical relations for the same reaction system between the dispersed and the block state are also derived. The effects of degree of dispersion on thermodynamical properties, reaction directions, and chemical equilibria are discussed. The results show that the present equation of thermodynamics for chemical reactions is only a special case of the above-mentioned formulas and that the effect of the dispersity of a heterogeneous system on the chemical reaction obeys the Le Chatelier principle of movement of equilibria.

  6. Rate Constant for the Reaction CH3 + CH3 Yields C2H6 at T = 155 K and Model Calculation of the CH3 Abundance in the Atmospheres of Saturn and Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Regina J.; Romani, Paul N.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Iannone, Mark A.; Tardy, Dwight C.; Stief, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    The column abundances of CH3 observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite on Saturn and Neptune were lower than predicted by atmospheric photochemical models, especially for Saturn. It has been suggested that the models underestimated the loss of CH3 due to poor knowledge of the rate constant k of the CH3 + CH3 self-reaction at the low temperatures and pressures of these atmospheres. Motivated by this suggestion, we undertook a combined experimental and photochemical modeling study of the CH3 + CH3 reaction and its role in determining planetary CH3 abundances. In a discharge flow-mass spectrometer system, k was measured at T = 155 K and three pressures of He. The results in units of cu cm/molecule/s are k(0.6 Torr) = 6.82 x 10(exp -11), k(1.0 Torr) = 6.98 x 10(exp -11), and k(1.5 Torr) = 6.91 x 10(exp -11). Analytical expressions for k were derived that (1) are consistent with the present laboratory data at T = 155 K, our previous data at T = 202 K and 298 K, and those of other studies in He at T = 296-298 K and (2) have some theoretical basis to provide justification for extrapolation. The derived analytical expressions were then used in atmospheric photochemical models for both Saturn and Neptune. These model results reduced the disparity with observations of Saturn, but not with observations of Neptune. However, the disparity for Neptune is much smaller. The solution to the remaining excess CH3 prediction in the models relative to the ISO observations lies, to a large extent, elsewhere in the CH3 photochemistry or transport, not in the CH3 + CH3 rate.

  7. Antibody binding constants from Farr test and other radioimmunoassays. A theoretical and experimental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.; Schalch, W.

    1980-01-01

    For the reaction of monovalently reacting antibody (116-700pIEF) with its antigen (streptococcal group A-variant polysaccharide), an apparent binding constant Ksub(a) was derived by the ammonium sulfate precipitation technique (Farr assay) which was 40 times larger than the true binding constant K = 10 6 M -1 determined by fluorescence titration and equilibrium dialysis. For monovalently reacting antibodies the time needed for re-equilibration of the binding reaction is short as compared to the time of ammonium sulfate incubation. A thermodynamic analysis was therefore performed for the case of complete equilibration of all components in solution and in the ammonium sulfate precipitate. It was found that in this limiting case Ksub(a)/K is equal to the ratio of the solubilities of the antibody and the antibody complex corrected by the activity coefficients of the components in the precipitate. For other antibody-antigen reactions in which the antibody reacts with both binding sites to the same antigen molecule, re-equilibration of the binding reaction in solution is much slower. For such systems a disturbance of the binding reaction by the precipitation is less likely and correct binding constants may be obtained by the Farr technique or other radioimmunoassays involving precipitation. (author)

  8. Cross sections and tensor analyzing powers Ayy of the reaction 1H(d-vector, pp)n in 'symmetric constant relative energy' geometries at Ed=19 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, J.; Dueweke, C.; Emmerich, R.; Imig, A.; Paetz gen Schieck, H.; Golak, J.; Witala, H.; Epelbaum, E.; Deltuva, A.; Fonseca, A.C.; Gloeckle, W.; Meissner, U.-G.; Nogga, A.; Sauer, P.U.

    2006-01-01

    We measured the cross sections and tensor analyzing powers of the 1 H(d-vector,pp)n breakup reaction at E d =19 MeV in four symmetric constant relative energy (SCRE) configurations. The data are compared with theoretical predictions from four different approaches: the first based on high-precision (semi)phenomenological potentials alone or, the second, combined with model three-nucleon forces, and the third based on chiral forces up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the chiral expansion. In these cases the Coulomb interaction is not included. In addition, a fourth approach consists in a comparison with predictions based on CD Bonn including the Δ excitation and the Coulomb force. In all cases the measured cross sections are significantly below the theoretical values, whereas the magnitudes of the tensor analyzing powers agree within the error bars in three of the four cases. The apparent discrepancies in the breakup cross sections are similar to the known differences for the space-star breakup. This adds to the data base of unsolved low-energy discrepancies (puzzles)

  9. Two-proton correlation functions for equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, W.G.; Gelbke, C.K.; Carlin, N.; De Souza, R.T.; Kim, Y.D.; Lynch, W.G.; Murakami, T.; Poggi, G.; Sanderson, D.; Tsang, M.B.; Xu, H.M.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing; Fields, D.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Planeta, R.; Viola, V.E. Jr.; Yennello, S.J.; Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Pratt, S.

    1990-01-01

    Two-proton correlation functions are compared for equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission processes investigated, respectively, in ''reverse kinematics'' for the reactions 129 Xe+ 27 Al and 129 Xe+ 122 Sn at E/A=31 MeV and in ''forward kinematics'' for the reaction 14 N+ 197 Au at E/A=75 MeV. Observed differences in the shapes of the correlation functions are understood in terms of the different time scales for equilibrium and preequilibrium emission. Transverse and longitudinal correlation functions are very similar. (orig.)

  10. Cosmological Hubble constant and nuclear Hubble constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbuniev, Amelia; Besliu, Calin; Jipa, Alexandru

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of the Universe after the Big Bang and the evolution of the dense and highly excited nuclear matter formed by relativistic nuclear collisions are investigated and compared. Values of the Hubble constants for cosmological and nuclear processes are obtained. For nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies the nuclear Hubble constant is obtained in the frame of different models involving the hydrodynamic flow of the nuclear matter. Significant difference in the values of the two Hubble constant - cosmological and nuclear - is observed

  11. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...... experiments in 0.01 m NaNO3 electrolyte (pH 3-6). The surface equilibrium constants were calculated according to the two-layer model by Dzombak & Morel (1990). Near equilibrium between protons/hydroxyls in solution and the ferrihydrite surface was obtained within minutes while equilibration with silicate...

  12. Phosphite radicals and their reactions. Examples of redox, substitution, and addition reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, K.; Asmus, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Phosphite radicals HPO 3 - and PO 3 2 -, which exist in an acid-base equilibrium with pK = 5.75, are shown to take part in various types of reactions. In the absence of scavengers, they disappear mainly by second-order disproportionation and combination; a first-order contribution to the decay is also indicated. HPO 3 - and PO 3 2 - are good reductants toward electron acceptors such as tetranitromethane. In this reaction phosphate and C(NO 2 ) 3 - are formed. Phosphite radicals can, however, also act as good oxidants, e.g., toward thiols and thiolate ions. These reactions lead to the formation of RS. radicals which were identified either directly, as in the case of penicillamine, through the optical absorption of PenS. or more indirectly through equilibration of RS. with RS- to the optically absorbing RSSR-. disulfide radical anion. A homolytic substitution reaction (S/sub H/2) occurs in the reaction of the phosphite radicals with aliphatic disulfides, yielding RS. radicals and phosphate thioester RSPO 3 2 -. Lipoic acid, as an example of a cyclic disulfide, is reduced to the corresponding RSSR-. radical anion and also undergoes the S/sub H/2 reaction with about equal probability. An addition reaction is observed between phosphite radicals and molecular oxygen. The resulting peroxo phosphate radicals establish an acid-base equilibrium HPO 5 - . reversible PO 5 2- . + H+ with a pK = 3.4. Absolute rate constants were determined for all reactions discussed

  13. A New Application for Radioimmunoassay: Measurement of Thermodynamic Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstadt, Carol N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which an equilibrium radioimmunoassay (RIA) is used to estimate thermodynamic parameters such as equilibrium constants. The experiment is simple and inexpensive, and it introduces a technique that is important in the clinical chemistry and research laboratory. Background information, procedures, and results are…

  14. Determinação das constantes cinéticas de degradação do ácido ascórbico em purê de pêssego: efeito da temperatura e concentração Determination of reaction rate constants for ascorbic acid degradation in peach pureé: effect of temperature and concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Peraça Toralles

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available O ácido ascórbico, vitamina C, é usado extensivamente na indústria de alimentos, não só devido ao seu valor nutricional, mas devido a suas contribuições funcionais na qualidade do produto. Existem muitos estudos sobre a estabilidade cinética do ácido ascórbico em bebidas, mas nenhum estudo foi encontrado sobre as constantes cinéticas de degradação do ácido ascórbico adicionado em purê de pêssego. Neste trabalho, estudou-se a cinética de degradação do ácido ascórbico em purê de pêssego da cultivar Jade, em condições anaeróbicas e na faixa de 70 a 90 °C. As concentrações de purês testadas foram 12, 22 e 32 °Brix. A análise cinética dos dados sugere que a degradação foi significativamente representada pelos modelos cinéticos de zero e primeira ordem. A velocidade de degradação do ácido ascórbico foi dependente da temperatura. A energia de ativação média foi de 45 kJ.mol-1 e independente da concentração de sólidos solúveis.Ascorbic acid (vitamin C is extensively used in the food industry, not only for its nutritional value, but also for its many functional contributions to product quality. There have been many studies on the stability of ascorbic acid in different beverages, but no study was found on the reaction rate constants for ascorbic acid degradation in peach purée. In this work, the degradation of ascorbic acid in Jade peach purée was studied in anaerobic conditions and from 70-90 °C. The peach purée concentrations tested were 12, 22 and 32 °Brix. The kinetic analysis of the data suggests that the degradation was significantly represented by zero and first-order kinetic models. The rate of ascorbic acid degradation in peach purée was temperature dependent. The average activation energy was 45 kJ.mol-1 and independent of the concentration of soluble solids.

  15. Differential Selectivity of the Escherichia coli Cell Membrane Shifts the Equilibrium for the Enzyme-Catalyzed Isomerization of Galactose to Tagatose▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Ha; Lim, Byung-Chul; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Yeong-Su; Kim, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jung-Kul; Lee, Sook-Hee; Kim, Seon-Won; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2008-01-01

    An Escherichia coli galactose kinase gene knockout (ΔgalK) strain, which contains the l-arabinose isomerase gene (araA) to isomerize d-galactose to d-tagatose, showed a high conversion yield of tagatose compared with the original galK strain because galactose was not metabolized by endogenous galactose kinase. In whole cells of the ΔgalK strain, the isomerase-catalyzed reaction exhibited an equilibrium shift toward tagatose, producing a tagatose fraction of 68% at 37°C, whereas the purified l-arabinose isomerase gave a tagatose equilibrium fraction of 36%. These equilibrium fractions are close to those predicted from the measured equilibrium constants of the isomerization reaction catalyzed in whole cells and by the purified enzyme. The equilibrium shift in these cells resulted from the higher uptake and lower release rates for galactose, which is a common sugar substrate, than for tagatose, which is a rare sugar product. A ΔmglB mutant had decreased uptake rates for galactose and tagatose, indicating that a methylgalactoside transport system, MglABC, is the primary contributing transporter for the sugars. In the present study, whole-cell conversion using differential selectivity of the cell membrane was proposed as a method for shifting the equilibrium in sugar isomerization reactions. PMID:18263746

  16. Differential selectivity of the Escherichia coli cell membrane shifts the equilibrium for the enzyme-catalyzed isomerization of galactose to tagatose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Ha; Lim, Byung-Chul; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Yeong-Su; Kim, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jung-Kul; Lee, Sook-Hee; Kim, Seon-Won; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2008-04-01

    An Escherichia coli galactose kinase gene knockout (DeltagalK) strain, which contains the l-arabinose isomerase gene (araA) to isomerize d-galactose to d-tagatose, showed a high conversion yield of tagatose compared with the original galK strain because galactose was not metabolized by endogenous galactose kinase. In whole cells of the DeltagalK strain, the isomerase-catalyzed reaction exhibited an equilibrium shift toward tagatose, producing a tagatose fraction of 68% at 37 degrees C, whereas the purified l-arabinose isomerase gave a tagatose equilibrium fraction of 36%. These equilibrium fractions are close to those predicted from the measured equilibrium constants of the isomerization reaction catalyzed in whole cells and by the purified enzyme. The equilibrium shift in these cells resulted from the higher uptake and lower release rates for galactose, which is a common sugar substrate, than for tagatose, which is a rare sugar product. A DeltamglB mutant had decreased uptake rates for galactose and tagatose, indicating that a methylgalactoside transport system, MglABC, is the primary contributing transporter for the sugars. In the present study, whole-cell conversion using differential selectivity of the cell membrane was proposed as a method for shifting the equilibrium in sugar isomerization reactions.

  17. QUIL: a chemical equilibrium code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunsford, J.L.

    1977-02-01

    A chemical equilibrium code QUIL is described, along with two support codes FENG and SURF. QUIL is designed to allow calculations on a wide range of chemical environments, which may include surface phases. QUIL was written specifically to calculate distributions associated with complex equilibria involving fission products in the primary coolant loop of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. QUIL depends upon an energy-data library called ELIB. This library is maintained by FENG and SURF. FENG enters into the library all reactions having standard free energies of reaction that are independent of concentration. SURF enters all surface reactions into ELIB. All three codes are interactive codes written to be used from a remote terminal, with paging control provided. Plotted output is also available

  18. Interfaces at equilibrium: A guide to fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmur, Abraham

    2017-06-01

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamics of interfaces are reviewed and concisely presented. The discussion starts with a short review of the elements of bulk thermodynamics that are also relevant to interfaces. It continues with the interfacial thermodynamics of two-phase systems, including the definition of interfacial tension and adsorption. Finally, the interfacial thermodynamics of three-phase (wetting) systems is discussed, including the topic of non-wettable surfaces. A clear distinction is made between equilibrium conditions, in terms of minimizing energies (internal, Gibbs or Helmholtz), and equilibrium indicators, in terms of measurable, intrinsic properties (temperature, chemical potential, pressure). It is emphasized that the equilibrium indicators are the same whatever energy is minimized, if the boundary conditions are properly chosen. Also, to avoid a common confusion, a distinction is made between systems of constant volume and systems with drops of constant volume. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Photodissociation constant of NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nootebos, M.A.; Bange, P.

    1992-01-01

    The velocity of the dissociation of NO 2 into ozone and NO mainly depends on the ultraviolet sunlight quantity, and with that the cloudiness. A correct value for this reaction constant is important for the accurate modelling of O 3 - and NO 2 -concentrations in plumes of electric power plants, in particular in the case of determination of the amount of photochemical summer smog. An advanced signal processing method (deconvolution, correlation) was applied on the measurements. The measurements were carried out from aeroplanes

  20. Dissipation and the relaxation to equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Denis J; Williams, Stephen R; Searles, Debra J

    2009-01-01

    Using the recently derived dissipation theorem and a corollary of the transient fluctuation theorem (TFT), namely the second-law inequality, we derive the unique time independent, equilibrium phase space distribution function for an ergodic Hamiltonian system in contact with a remote heat bath. We prove under very general conditions that any deviation from this equilibrium distribution breaks the time independence of the distribution. Provided temporal correlations decay, we show that any nonequilibrium distribution that is an even function of the momenta eventually relaxes (not necessarily monotonically) to the equilibrium distribution. Finally we prove that the negative logarithm of the microscopic partition function is equal to the thermodynamic Helmholtz free energy divided by the thermodynamic temperature and Boltzmann's constant. Our results complement and extend the findings of modern ergodic theory and show the importance of dissipation in the process of relaxation towards equilibrium

  1. Phase equilibrium engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brignole, Esteban Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the teaching of phase equilibria emphasizes the relationships between the thermodynamic variables of each phase in equilibrium rather than its engineering applications. This book changes the focus from the use of thermodynamics relationships to compute phase equilibria to the design and control of the phase conditions that a process needs. Phase Equilibrium Engineering presents a systematic study and application of phase equilibrium tools to the development of chemical processes. The thermodynamic modeling of mixtures for process development, synthesis, simulation, design and

  2. Equilibrium and generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies the behaviour of radionuclides when it produce a desintegration activity,decay and the isotopes stable creation. It gives definitions about the equilibrium between activity of parent and activity of the daughter, radioactive decay,isotope stable and transient equilibrium and maxim activity time. Some considerations had been given to generators that permit a disgregation of two radioisotopes in equilibrium and its good performance. Tabs

  3. Computer program to solve two-dimensional shock-wave interference problems with an equilibrium chemically reacting air model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1990-08-01

    The computer program EASI, an acronym for Equilibrium Air Shock Interference, was developed to calculate the inviscid flowfield, the maximum surface pressure, and the maximum heat flux produced by six shock wave interference patterns on a 2-D, cylindrical configuration. Thermodynamic properties of the inviscid flowfield are determined using either an 11-specie, 7-reaction equilibrium chemically reacting air model or a calorically perfect air model. The inviscid flowfield is solved using the integral form of the conservation equations. Surface heating calculations at the impingement point for the equilibrium chemically reacting air model use variable transport properties and specific heat. However, for the calorically perfect air model, heating rate calculations use a constant Prandtl number. Sample calculations of the six shock wave interference patterns, a listing of the computer program, and flowcharts of the programming logic are included.

  4. Mathematical modeling of the radiation-chemical behavior of neptunium in HNO3. Equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model of the radiation-chemical behavior of neptunium is presented for a wide range of α-and γ-irradiation doses. Equations determining the equilibrium concentrations of NP(IV), Np(V), and Np(VI) are derived for various concentrations of HNO 3 and dose rates of the ionizing irradiation. The rate constants of the reactions NP(IV) + OH, Np(IV) + NO 3 , Np(V) + NO 2 , Np(V) + H, Np(IV), and Np(V) + Np(V) are obtained by the mathematical modeling

  5. Effect of sulfur dioxide partial pressure on the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hayato; Imai, Yoshiyuki; Kasahara, Seiji; Kubo, Shinji; Onuki, Kaoru

    2007-01-01

    Effect of sulfur dioxide partial pressure on the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water, which is a unit reaction in the IS process for thermochemical hydrogen production, was studied experimentally at 323 K under iodine saturation. Quasi-equilibrium state was observed in the presence of sulfur dioxide gas at constant pressure. The composition of the poly-hydriodic acid solution formed was discussed assuming an ideal desulfurization by the reverse reaction of the Bunsen reaction. The value of HI/(HI+H 2 O) of the desulfurized solution was large at high sulfur dioxide pressure and reached the maximum of 15.7 ± 0.3 mol%. (author)

  6. Fall Back Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppe, J.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hendrickx, R.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Fall back equilibrium is a refinement of the Nash equilibrium concept. In the underly- ing thought experiment each player faces the possibility that, after all players decided on their action, his chosen action turns out to be blocked. Therefore, each player has to decide beforehand on a back-up

  7. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) under non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberthur, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) for the study of systems under non-equilibrium conditions is illustrated by three types of experiments in the field of polymer research: - the relaxation of a system from an initial non-equilibrium state towards equilibrium, - the cyclic or repetitive installation of a series of non-equilibrium states in a system, - the steady non-equilibrium state maintained by a constant dissipation of energy within the system. Characteristic times obtained in these experiments with SANS are compared with the times obtained from quasi-elastic neutron and light scattering, which yield information about the equilibrium dynamics of the system. The limits of SANS applied to non-equilibrium systems for the measurement of relaxation times at different length scales are shown and compared to the limits of quasielastic neutron and light scattering

  8. Thermochemical study of deuterium exchange reactions in water-alcohol and alcohol-alcohol systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurma, J.R.; Fenby, D.V.

    1979-01-01

    Molar excess enthalpies of water-alcohol systems have been analyzed to give equilibrium constants and enthalpies of the reactions 2ROH + D 2 O = 2ROD + H 2 O (R = CH 3 , C 2 H 5 , n-C 3 H 7 ). The equilibrium constants are significantly greater than the ''random'' value. Molar excess enthalpies of alcohol-alcohol systems have been analyzed to give enthalpies of reactions ROH + R'OD = ROD + R'OH. The enthalpies of water-alcohol and alcohol-alcohol exchange reactions form a self-consistent set and are in good agreement with values from earlier studies. Molar excess enthalpies at 298.15 K are reported for n-C 3 H 7 OH and n-C 3 H 7 OD with H 2 O, D 2 O, CH 3 OH, CH 3 OD, C 2 H 5 OH, and C 2 H 5 OD

  9. Partial chemical equilibrium in fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is given for the flow of a multicomponent fluid in which an arbitrary number of chemical reactions may occur, some of which are in equilibrium while the others proceed kinetically. The primitive equations describing this situation are inconvenient to use because the progress rates omega-dot/sub s/ for the equilibrium reactions are determined implicitly by the associated equilibrium constraint conditions. Two alternative equivalent equation systems that are more pleasant to deal with are derived. In the first system, the omega-dot/sub s/ are eliminated by replacing the transport equations for the chemical species involved in the equilibrium reactions with transport equations for the basic components of which these species are composed. The second system retains the usual species transport equations, but eliminates the nonlinear algebraic equilibrium constraint conditions by deriving an explicit expression for the omega-dot/sub s/. Both systems are specialized to the case of an ideal gas mixture. Considerations involved in solving these equation systems numerically are discussed briefly

  10. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  11. Pre-equilibrium gamma emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sudip

    1993-01-01

    Together with the direct reaction and the compound nuclear emissions the pre-equilibrium (PEQ) or pre-compound processes give a fairly complete picture of nuclear reactions induced by light ions at energies of some tens of MeV. PEQ particle emissions covering the higher energy continuum spectra have been investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. In contrast, very little work has been done on PEQ γ- emissions. The reason is that in spite of extensive work done on PEQ particle emissions, the mechanism is not yet fully understood. Also, the PEQ γ-emission cross-sections (∼ micro barns) are very small compared to the PEQ particle emission cross-sections (∼ milli barns). Yet apart from the academic interest the understanding of PEQ γ-emissions is important for applied fusion research etc. In this paper the PEQ γ-emissions is discussed and the work done in this field is reviewed. (author). 14 refs

  12. The empirical equilibrium structure of diacetylene

    OpenAIRE

    Thorwirth, S.; Harding, M. E.; Muders, D.; Gauss, J.

    2008-01-01

    High-level quantum-chemical calculations are reported at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory for the equilibrium structure and the harmonic and anharmonic force fields of diacetylene, HCCCCH. The calculations were performed employing Dunning's hierarchy of correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, cc-pCVXZ, and cc-pwCVXZ, as well as the ANO2 basis set of Almloef and Taylor. An empirical equilibrium structure based on experimental rotational constants for thirteen isotopic species of diacety...

  13. Equilibrium and non equilibrium in fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C.O.; Chernomoretz, A.; Lopez, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In this communication we present recent results regarding the interplay of equilibrium and non equilibrium in the process of fragmentation of excited finite Lennard Jones drops. Because the general features of such a potential resemble the ones of the nuclear interaction (fact that is reinforced by the similarity between the EOS of both systems) these studies are not only relevant from a fundamental point of view but also shed light on the problem of nuclear multifragmentation. We focus on the microscopic analysis of the state of the fragmenting system at fragmentation time. We show that the Caloric Curve (i e. the functional relationship between the temperature of the system and the excitation energy) is of the type rise plateau with no vapor branch. The usual rise plateau rise pattern is only recovered when equilibrium is artificially imposed. This result puts a serious question on the validity of the freeze out hypothesis. This feature is independent of the dimensionality or excitation mechanism. Moreover we explore the behavior of magnitudes which can help us determine the degree of the assumed phase transition. It is found that no clear cut criteria is presently available. (Author)

  14. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in arcs and torches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A general treatment of non-equilibrium plasma aspects is obtained by relating transport fluxes to equilibrium restoring processes in so-called disturbed Bilateral Relations. The (non) equilibrium stage of a small microwave induced plasma serves as case study.

  15. Chemical equilibrium model for high- Tc and heavy fermion superconductors: the density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallio, A.; Hissa, J.; Hayrynen, T.; Braysy, V.; Sakkinen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical equilibrium model is based on the idea of correlated electron pairs, which in singlet state can exist as quasimolecules in the superfluid and normal states of a superconductor. These preformed pairs are bosons which can undergo a Bose-Einstein condensation in analogy with the superfluidity of 4 He+ 3 He-mixture. The bosons (B ++ ) and the fermions (h + ) are in chemical equilibrium with respect to the reaction B ++ ↔ 2h + , at any temperature. The mean densities of bosons and fermions (quasiholes) n B (T) and n h (T) are determined from the thermodynamics of the equilibrium reaction in terms of a single function f(T). By thermodynamics the function f(T) is connected to equilibrium constant φ(T) by 1-f(T) = [1 + φ(T)] -1/2 . Using a simple power law, known to be valid near T = 0, for the chemical constant φ(T) α/t 2γ , t = T/T*, the mean density of quasiholes is given in closed form. This enables one to calculate the corresponding density of states (DOS) D(E) N s /N(0), by solving an integral equation. The NIS- tunneling conductivity near T = 0, given by D(E) compares well with the most recent experiments: D(E) ∼ E γ , for small E and a finite maximum of right size, corresponding to 'finite quasiparticle lifetime'. The corresponding SIS-tunneling conductivity is obtained from a simple convolution and is also in agreement with recent break junction experiments of Hancotte et al. The position of the maximum can be used to obtain the scaling temperature T*, which comes close to the one measured by Hall coefficient in the normal state. A simple explanation for the spingap effect in NMR is given. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  16. On energetics of hydrocarbon chemical reactions by ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaykin, Yu.A.; Zaykina, R.F.; Mirkin, G.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The present global energy crisis requires the industry to look for technologies that are more effective and, particularly, less energy consuming. The hydrocarbon processing technology based on the electron radiation-induced thermal chemical conversion has a great potential. Comparing the presently predominant thermocatalytic processing, it is much more energy efficient, because chemical conversions go at a minimal processing temperature and pressure. To compare energy consumption by electron irradiation with thermal and thermocatalytic technologies of hydrocarbon processing one must see major differences between them. While traditional thermocatalytic processes are equilibrium and their energetics can be evaluated based on principles of classic thermodynamics, HEET processing is non-equilibrium and this evaluation approach is not valid for it. However, a theoretical description of radiation-chemical conversion using reaction rate constants determined in thermally equilibrium systems is approximately adequate to radiation processes by substituting equilibrium concentrations of reacting particles as their non-equilibrium concentrations under irradiation. In particular, description of radical reactions initiated by radiation requires substitution of thermally equilibrium radical concentration by much higher concentration defined by the dynamic equilibrium of radical radiation generation and their recombination. The paper presents the comparative analysis of energy consumption in different stages of hydrocarbon processing using classic thermal cracking by heating versus radiation induced cracking. It is shown that in the most energy-consuming stage of processing - the chain reaction initiation necessary for concentration of active radicals, irradiation processing has the great advantage compared to thermal cracking by heating and allows cutting down the total energy consumption by approximately 40%

  17. Non-equilibrium Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Martinás

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A microeconomic, agent based framework to dynamic economics is formulated in a materialist approach. An axiomatic foundation of a non-equilibrium microeconomics is outlined. Economic activity is modelled as transformation and transport of commodities (materials owned by the agents. Rate of transformations (production intensity, and the rate of transport (trade are defined by the agents. Economic decision rules are derived from the observed economic behaviour. The non-linear equations are solved numerically for a model economy. Numerical solutions for simple model economies suggest that the some of the results of general equilibrium economics are consequences only of the equilibrium hypothesis. We show that perfect competition of selfish agents does not guarantee the stability of economic equilibrium, but cooperativity is needed, too.

  18. DIAGNOSIS OF FINANCIAL EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUCIU GHEORGHE

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis based on the balance sheet tries to identify the state of equilibrium (disequilibrium that exists in a company. The easiest way to determine the state of equilibrium is by looking at the balance sheet and at the information it offers. Because in the balance sheet there are elements that do not reflect their real value, the one established on the market, they must be readjusted, and those elements which are not related to the ordinary operating activities must be eliminated. The diagnosis of financial equilibrium takes into account 2 components: financing sources (ownership equity, loaned, temporarily attracted. An efficient financial equilibrium must respect 2 fundamental requirements: permanent sources represented by ownership equity and loans for more than 1 year should finance permanent needs, and temporary resources should finance the operating cycle.

  19. Spontaneity and Equilibrium III: A History of Misinformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient criteria for reaction spontaneity in a given direction and for spontaneity of finite transformations in single-reaction, closed systems are developed. The criteria are general in that they hold for reactions conducted under either conditions of constant T and p or constant T and V. These results are illustrated using a…

  20. The Fine Structure Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The article discusses the importance of the fine structure constant in quantum mechanics, along with the brief history of how it emerged. Al- though Sommerfelds idea of elliptical orbits has been replaced by wave mechanics, the fine struc- ture constant he introduced has remained as an important parameter in the field of ...

  1. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, J E

    1968-01-01

    The International Encyclopedia of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Volume 1: Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics covers the fundamental principles and the development of theoretical aspects of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Statistical mechanical is the study of the connection between the macroscopic behavior of bulk matter and the microscopic properties of its constituent atoms and molecules. This book contains eight chapters, and begins with a presentation of the master equation used for the calculation of the fundamental thermodynamic functions. The succeeding chapters highlight t

  2. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  3. Assessment of tautomer distribution using the condensed reaction graph approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimadiev, T. R.; Madzhidov, T. I.; Nugmanov, R. I.; Baskin, I. I.; Antipin, I. S.; Varnek, A.

    2018-03-01

    We report the first direct QSPR modeling of equilibrium constants of tautomeric transformations (logK T ) in different solvents and at different temperatures, which do not require intermediate assessment of acidity (basicity) constants for all tautomeric forms. The key step of the modeling consisted in the merging of two tautomers in one sole molecular graph ("condensed reaction graph") which enables to compute molecular descriptors characterizing entire equilibrium. The support vector regression method was used to build the models. The training set consisted of 785 transformations belonging to 11 types of tautomeric reactions with equilibrium constants measured in different solvents and at different temperatures. The models obtained perform well both in cross-validation (Q2 = 0.81 RMSE = 0.7 logK T units) and on two external test sets. Benchmarking studies demonstrate that our models outperform results obtained with DFT B3LYP/6-311 ++ G(d,p) and ChemAxon Tautomerizer applicable only in water at room temperature.

  4. Kinetics and thermochemistry of the reversible gas phase reaction HONO+NH3->3N-HONO studied by infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, P.; Ratajczak, E.; Sillesen, A.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of the reversible reaction HONO+NH3 reversible H3N-HONO (1) was studied by monitoring trans-HONO relaxation kinetics. The rate of approach towards equilibrium was studied as a function of the ammonia concentration to obtain values of the rate constants for the forward and reverse rea...

  5. Catalytic Activity of μ-Carbido-Dimeric Iron(IV) Octapropylporphyrazinate in the 3,5,7,2',4'-Pentahydroxyflavone Oxidation Reaction with tert-Butyl Hydroperoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyurin, D. V.; Zaitseva, S. V.; Kudrik, E. V.

    2018-05-01

    It is found for the first time that μ-carbido-dimeric iron(IV) octapropylporphyrazinate displays catalytic activity in the oxidation reaction of natural flavonol morin with tert-butyl hydroperoxide, with the catalyst being stable under conditions of the reaction. The kinetics of this reaction are studied. It is shown the reaction proceeds via tentative formation of a complex between the catalyst and the oxidant, followed by O‒O bond homolytic cleavage. The kinetics of the reaction is described in the coordinates of the Michaelis-Menten equation. A linear dependence of the apparent reaction rate constant on the concentration of the catalyst is observed, testifying to its participation in the limiting reaction step. The equilibrium constants and rates of interaction are found. A mechanism is proposed for the reaction on the basis of the experimental data.

  6. Scaling studies of spheromak formation and equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, C.G.; Kornack, T.W.; Brown, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Formation and equilibrium studies have been performed on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Spheromaks are formed with a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and equilibrium is established in both small (d small =0.16 m) and large (d large =3d small =0.50 m) copper flux conservers. Using magnetic probe arrays it has been verified that spheromak formation is governed solely by gun physics (in particular the ratio of gun current to flux, μ 0 I gun /Φ gun ) and is independent of the flux conserver dimensions. It has also been verified that equilibrium is well described by the force free condition ∇xB=λB (λ=constant), particularly early in decay. Departures from the force-free state are due to current profile effects described by a quadratic function λ=λ(ψ). Force-free SSX spheromaks will be merged to study magnetic reconnection in simple magnetofluid structures. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  7. Transition from equilibrium ignition to non-equilibrium burn for ICF capsules surrounded by a high-Z pusher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ji W.; Chang, Lei; Li, Yun S.; Li, Jing H.

    2011-01-01

    For the ICF capsule surrounded by a high-Z pusher which traps the radiation and confines the hot fuel, the fuel will first be ignited in thermal equilibrium with radiation at a much lower temperature than hot-spot ignition, which is also the low temperature ignition. Because of the lower areal density for ICF capsules, the equilibrium ignition must be developed into a non-equilibrium burn to shorten the reaction time and lower the drive energy. In this paper, the transition from the equilibrium ignition to non-equilibrium burn is discussed and the energy deposited by α particles required for the equilibrium ignition and non-equilibrium burn to occur is estimated.

  8. Cosmological constants and variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, John D

    2005-01-01

    We review properties of theories for the variation of the gravitation and fine structure 'constants'. We highlight some general features of the cosmological models that exist in these theories with reference to recent quasar data that is consistent with time-variation in the fine structure 'constant' since a redshift of 3.5. The behaviour of a simple class of varying alpha cosmologies is outlined in the light of all the observational constraints. We also discuss some of the consequences of varying 'constants' for oscillating universes and show by means of exact solutions that they appear to evolve monotonically in time even though the scale factor of the universe oscillates

  9. Microscopic Rate Constants of Crystal Growth from Molecular Dynamic Simulations Combined with Metadynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Kozma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation of crystal growth can be decomposed into two steps: the determination of the microscopic rate constants and a mesoscopic kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. We proposed a method to determine kinetic rate constants of crystal growth. We performed classical molecular dynamics on the equilibrium liquid/crystal interface of argon. Metadynamics was used to explore the free energy surface of crystal growth. A crystalline atom was selected at the interface, and it was displaced to the liquid phase by adding repulsive Gaussian potentials. The activation free energy of this process was calculated as the maximal potential energy density of the Gaussian potentials. We calculated the rate constants at different interfacial structures using the transition state theory. In order to mimic real crystallization, we applied a temperature difference in the calculations of the two opposite rate constants, and they were applied in kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The novelty of our technique is that it can be used for slow crystallization processes, while the simple following of trajectories can be applied only for fast reactions. Our method is a possibility for determination of elementary rate constants of crystal growth that seems to be necessary for the long-time goal of computer-aided crystal design.

  10. Pre-equilibrium complex particle emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bĕták, E.

    2002-01-01

    Semi-classical (phenomenological) pre-equilibrium emission of clusters of nucleons (complex particles) such as deuterons, tritons, helions and α particles from reactions induced by light projectiles (nucleons to α’s) is addressed. The main attention is given to the hard components in the emission energetic spectra, which play an increasing role at incident energies above 20 MeV, and are currently attributed to a presence of some kind of pre-equilibrium processes. In addition, the mechanisms of cluster reactions show special features such as the competition between pickup and knockout processes and the contributions of several successive steps in the reaction. The main frame used here to illustrate the processes and interplays of the competing mechanisms of pre-equilibrium cluster formation and emission, namely the coalescence, pick-up and knock-out, is the pre-equilibrium exciton model. It obviously contains the process of clusterization itself as its organic part. The most important case of complex particles with the largest amount of experimental data is that of alpha emission, which therefore naturally attracts most of the attention and where the widest range of possible mechanisms is available on the market. The loosely bound ejectiles, on the other side, are usually not able to demonstrate all features of the whole spectrum of contributing mechanisms, but they are nevertheless an important link between the nucleon emission and the cluster one.

  11. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  12. The cosmological constant problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs

  13. Study of PrP - I heterogeneous equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, I.G.; Mironov, K.E.; Tarasenko, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    Using static methods the authors have measured the equilibrium vapor pressure in the system PrP+I 2 at different temperatures and different initial iodine concentrations. The equilibrium reactions in the system have been determined. The reaction of PrP with iodine is irreversible. The content of PrI 3 and I 2 in the gas phase is negligible. The pressure in the system is determined by the partial pressure of phosphorus

  14. Spectroscopy and reaction kinetics of HCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yili.

    1989-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared spectrum of the C-H stretching fundamental of HCO has been studied by means of infrared flash kinetic spectroscopy. HCO was generated by flash photolysis of acetaldehyde or formaldehyde using a 308 nm (XeCl) excimer laser. The transient absorption was probed with an infrared difference frequency laser system. The high resolution spectra obtained were assigned and fitted with rotational, spin-rotational, and centrifugal distortion constants. The ν 1 band origin is 2434.48 cm/sup /minus/1/. New ground state constants have been derived from a least-squares fit combining the ν 1 data with previous microwave and FIR LMR measurements. A new set of spectroscopic constants for the (1, 0, 0) state, the equilibrium rotational constants, and the orientation of the transition dipole moment are also reported. The kinetics and product branching ratios of the HCO + NO 2 reaction have been studied using visible and infrared laser flash kinetic spectroscopy. The rate constant for the disappearance of HCO radical at 296 K is (5.7 +- 0.9) /times/ 10/sup /minus/11/ cm 3 molec/sup /minus/1/ sec/sup /minus/1/, and it is independent of the pressure of SF 6 buffer gas up to 700 torr. Less than 10% of the reaction goes through the most exothermic product channel, HNO + CO 2 . The product channel, H + CO 2 + NO, is responsible for 52% of the reaction. HONO has been observed, though not quantitatively, as a reaction product corresponding to the HONO + CO channel. 51 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  15. Immunity by equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  16. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface...... profile and its relevance to predicting coastal response to changing environmental conditions, the processes and dynamics involved in shoreface equilibrium are still not fully understood. Here, we apply a process-based empirical sediment transport model, combined with morphodynamic principles to provide......; there is no tuning or calibration and computation times are short. It is therefore easily implemented with repeated iterations to manage uncertainty....

  17. Reactor group constants and benchmark test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    The evaluated nuclear data files such as JENDL, ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2 are validated by analyzing critical mock-up experiments for various type reactors and assessing applicability for nuclear characteristics such as criticality, reaction rates, reactivities, etc. This is called Benchmark Testing. In the nuclear calculations, the diffusion and transport codes use the group constant library which is generated by processing the nuclear data files. In this paper, the calculation methods of the reactor group constants and benchmark test are described. Finally, a new group constants scheme is proposed. (author)

  18. The effect of solvent relaxation time constants on free energy gap law for ultrafast charge recombination following photoinduced charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, Valentina A; Malykhin, Roman E; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2018-05-16

    To elucidate the regularities inherent in the kinetics of ultrafast charge recombination following photoinduced charge separation in donor-acceptor dyads in solutions, the simulations of the kinetics have been performed within the stochastic multichannel point-transition model. Increasing the solvent relaxation time scales has been shown to strongly vary the dependence of the charge recombination rate constant on the free energy gap. In slow relaxing solvents the non-equilibrium charge recombination occurring in parallel with solvent relaxation is very effective so that the charge recombination terminates at the non-equilibrium stage. This results in a crucial difference between the free energy gap laws for the ultrafast charge recombination and the thermal charge transfer. For the thermal reactions the well-known Marcus bell-shaped dependence of the rate constant on the free energy gap is realized while for the ultrafast charge recombination only a descending branch is predicted in the whole area of the free energy gap exceeding 0.2 eV. From the available experimental data on the population kinetics of the second and first excited states for a series of Zn-porphyrin-imide dyads in toluene and tetrahydrofuran solutions, an effective rate constant of the charge recombination into the first excited state has been calculated. The obtained rate constant being very high is nearly invariable in the area of the charge recombination free energy gap from 0.2 to 0.6 eV that supports the theoretical prediction.

  19. Non-equilibrium versus equilibrium emission of complex fragments from hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola, V.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Yennello, S.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    The relative contributions of equilibrium and non-equilibrium mechanisms for intermediate-mass fragment emission have been deduced for Z=3-14 fragments formed in 3 He- and 14 N-induced reactions on Ag and Au targets. Complete inclusive excitation function measurements have been performed for 3 He projectiles from E/A=67 to 1,200 MeV and for 14 N from E/A=20 to 50 MeV. The data are consistent with a picture in which equilibrated emission is important at the lowest energies, but with increasing bombarding energy the cross sections are increasingly dominated by non-equilibrium processes. Non-equilibrium emission is also shown to be favored for light fragments relative to heavy fragments. These results are supported by coincidence studies of intermediate-mass fragments tagged by linear momentum transfer measurements

  20. Determination of protonation constants of hydroquinone and stability constants of Th(IV) hydroquinone complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, R.M.; Ramakumar, K.L.; Sharma, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    Protonation constants of hydroquinone and stability constants of thorium hydroquinone complexes were determined in 1 M NaClO 4 medium at 25 ± 0.5 degC, by varying concentration of thorium, using pH titration technique. Protonation constants of hydroquinone (β 1H = [HQ]/[H][Q] and β 2H = [H 2 Q]/[H] 2 [Q]) were found to be β 1H = 11.404 ± 0.014 and β 2H = 21.402 ± 0.012. The analysis of titration data of thorium-hydroquinone system appears to indicate the formation of species Th(H 2 Q) 3 (OH) and Th(H 2 O) 4 (OH). Equilibrium constants obtained for these species are -log β 13-I = 48.51 ± 0.67 and -log β 14-1 64.86 ± 1.25 respectively which are not reported in the literature. (author)