WorldWideScience

Sample records for reaction center structure

  1. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T L; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2014-05-01

    This review presents a broad overview of the research that enabled the structure determination of the bacterial reaction centers from Blastochloris viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, with a focus on the contributions from Duysens, Clayton, and Feher. Early experiments performed in the laboratory of Duysens and others demonstrated the utility of spectroscopic techniques and the presence of photosynthetic complexes in both oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The laboratories of Clayton and Feher led efforts to isolate and characterize the bacterial reaction centers. The availability of well-characterized preparations of pure and stable reaction centers allowed the crystallization and subsequent determination of the structures using X-ray diffraction. The three-dimensional structures of reaction centers revealed an overall arrangement of two symmetrical branches of cofactors surrounded by transmembrane helices from the L and M subunits, which also are related by the same twofold symmetry axis. The structure has served as a framework to address several issues concerning bacterial photosynthesis, including the directionality of electron transfer, the properties of the reaction center-cytochrome c 2 complex, and the coupling of proton and electron transfer. Together, these research efforts laid the foundation for ongoing efforts to address an outstanding question in oxygenic photosynthesis, namely the molecular mechanism of water oxidation.

  2. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  3. Nuclear Reaction and Structure Databases of the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritychenko, B.; Arcilla, R.; Herman, M. W.; Oblozinsky, P.; Rochman, D.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Tuli, J. K.; Winchell, D. F.

    2006-01-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) collects, evaluates, and disseminates nuclear physics data for basic research and applied nuclear technologies. In 2004, the NNDC migrated all databases into modern relational database software, installed new generation of Linux servers and developed new Java-based Web service. This nuclear database development means much faster, more flexible and more convenient service to all users in the United States. These nuclear reaction and structure database developments as well as related Web services are briefly described

  4. High-pressure modulation of the structure of the bacterial photochemical reaction center at physiological and cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpmann, Kõu; Kangur, Liina; Lõhmus, Ants; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-07-01

    The optical absorption and fluorescence response to external high pressure of the reaction center membrane chromoprotein complex from the wild-type non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated using the native pigment cofactors as local molecular probes of the reaction center structure at physiological (ambient) and cryogenic (79 K) temperatures. In detergent-purified complexes at ambient temperature, abrupt blue shift and accompanied broadening of the special pair band was observed at about 265 MPa. These reversible in pressure features were assigned to a pressure-induced rupture of a lone hydrogen bond that binds the photo-chemically active L-branch primary electron donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactor to the surrounding protein scaffold. In native membrane-protected complexes the hydrogen bond rupture appeared significantly restricted and occurred close to about 500 MPa. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the special pair hydrogen bond in isolate complexes was estimated to be equal to about 12 kJ mol-1. In frozen samples at cryogenic temperatures the hydrogen bond remained apparently intact up to the maximum utilized pressure of 600 MPa. In this case, however, heterogeneous spectral response of the cofactors from the L-and M-branches was observed due to anisotropic build-up of the protein structure. While in solid phase, the special pair fluorescence as a function of pressure exactly followed the respective absorption spectrum at a constant Stokes shift, at ambient temperature, the two paths began to deviate strongly from one other at the hydrogen bond rupture pressure. This effect was tentatively interpreted by different emission properties of hydrogen-bound and hydrogen-unbound special pair exciton states.

  5. Investigation of the structure of photosynthetic reaction centers. Progress report, June 1, 1981-April 1, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Willigen, H.

    1982-04-01

    The investigation is concerned with the application of Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Nuclear Triple Resonance (TRIPLE) in the study of the photo excited triplet state of photosynthetic resonance methods hyperfine interactions between unpaired electrons and nuclear spins can be measured, giving an insight in the electronic and geometric structure of paramagnetic systems. During this initial phase of the project, research has focused on the following areas. (1) Instrumental aspects associated with the application of ENDOR and TRIPLE on the photo excited triplets randomly oriented in solid solution. (2) Exploration of the conditions required for these studies employing ground state triplet systems. (3) Study of photo excited triplet states of model systems such as naphthylene, zinc and magnesium tetraphenyl-porphyrin in polymethylmethacrylate or polycrystalline benzophenone. Progress made in these areas is discussed

  6. Correlation of paramagnetic states and molecular structure in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: The symmetry of the primary electron donor in Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.R.; Budil, D.E.; Gast, P.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The orientation of the principal axes of the primary electron donor triplet state measured in single crystals of photosynthetic reaction centers is compared to the x-ray structures of the bacteria Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides R-26 and Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis. The primary donor of Rps. viridis is significantly different from that of Rb. sphaeroides. The measured directions of the axes indicate that triplet excitation is almost completely localized on the L-subunit half of the dimer in Rps. viridis but is more symmetrically distributed on the dimeric donor in Rb. sphaeroides R-26. The large reduction of the zero field splitting parameters relative to monomeric bacteriochlorophyll triplet in vitro suggests significant participation of asymmetrical charge transfer electronic configurations in the special pair triplet state of both organisms

  7. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  8. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  9. Conformational regulation of charge recombination reactions in a photosynthetic bacterial reaction center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katona, Gergely; Snijder, Arjan; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel

    2005-01-01

    In bright light the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides stabilizes the P(+)(870).Q(-)(A) charge-separated state and thereby minimizes the potentially harmful effects of light saturation. Using X-ray diffraction we report a conformational change that occurs within the cy...... the cytoplasmic domain of this RC in response to prolonged illumination with bright light. Our observations suggest a novel structural mechanism for the regulation of electron transfer reactions in photosynthesis....

  10. Nuclear reactions as structure probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Bernard; Cugnon, Joseph; Roussel-Chomaz, Patricia; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Oliveira Santos, Francois de; Bauge, Eric; Poves, Alfredo; Keeley, Nicholas; Simenel, Cedric; Avez, Benoit; Lacroix, Denis; Baye, Daniel; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Pons, Alexandre

    2007-09-01

    This publication gathers courses which aim at giving a view on new experiments which are performed by using radioactive beams, notably low intensity beams, in different accelerators, and allow the structure of very exotic nuclei to be characterized. Experimental as well as theoretical aspects are thus addressed. The contributions propose: a brief history of nuclear reactions and of instruments used to study them from the discovery of nucleus to the DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation); an overview of nuclear reactions; experimental techniques; the theory of collisions at low energy; resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; to probe nuclear structure with nucleons; shell model and spectroscopic factors; analysis of transfer reactions and determination of spectroscopic factors; microscopic approaches of nuclear dynamics; theoretical aspects of dissociation reactions; experimental aspects of knockout reactions; research in oenology with the chemical characterisation of defective ageing of dry white wines

  11. Sodium concrete reaction - Structural considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferskakis, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the sodium concrete reaction phenomenon, with emphasis on structural considerations, is presented. Available test results for limestone, basalt, and magnetite concrete with various test article configurations are reviewed. Generally, tests indicate reaction is self limiting before all sodium is used. Uncertainties, however, concerning the mechanism for penetration of sodium into concrete have resulted in different theories about a reaction model. Structural behavior may be significant in the progression of the reaction due to thermal-structuralchemical interactions involving tensile cracking, compressive crushing, or general deterioration of concrete and the exposure of fresh concrete surfaces to react with sodium. Structural behavior of test articles and potential factors that could enhance the progression of the reaction are discussed

  12. Structure and function of cytochrome c2 in electron transfer complexes with the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: optical linear dichroism and EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drepper, F; Mathis, P

    1997-02-11

    The photosynthetic reaction center (RC) and its secondary electron donor the water-soluble cytochrome (cyt) c2 from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been used in cross-linked and non-cross-linked complexes, oriented in compressed gels or partially dried multilayers, to study the respective orientation of the primary donor P (BChl dimer) and of cyt c2. Three methods were used: (i) Polarized optical absorption spectra at 295 and 10 K were measured and the linear dichroism of the two individual transitions (Qx, Qy), which are nearly degenerate within the alpha-band of reduced cyt c2, was determined. Attribution of the polarization directions to the molecular axes within the heme plane yielded the average cyt orientation in the complexes. (ii) Time-resolved flash absorption measurements using polarized light allowed determination of the orientation of cyt c2 in complexes which differ in their kinetics of electron transfer. (iii) EPR spectroscopy of ferricyt c2 in cross-linked RC-cyt c2 complexes was used to determine the angle between the heme and the membrane plane. The results suggest the following structural properties for the docking of cyt c2 to the RC: (i) In cross-linked complexes, the two cytochromes displaying half-lives of 0.7 and 60 micros for electron transfer to P+ are similarly oriented (difference plane is parallel to the symmetry axis of the RC (0 degrees +/- 10 degrees). Moreover, the Qy transition, which is assumed to be polarized within the ring III-ring I direction of the heme plane, makes an angle of 56 degrees +/- 1 degree with the symmetry axis. (iii) The dichroism spectrum for the fast phase (0.7 micros) for the non-cross-linked cyt c2-RC complex suggests an orientation similar to that of cross-linked cyt c2, but the heme plane is tilted about 20 degrees closer to the membrane. An alternative model is that two or more bound states of cyt c2 with heme plane tilt angles between 0 degrees and 30 degrees allow the fast electron

  13. The Type 1 Homodimeric Reaction Center in Heliobacterium modesticaldum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    In this funding period, we (i) found that strong illumination of Heliobacterium modesticaldum cells results in saturation of the electron acceptor pool, leading to reduction of the acceptor side and the creation of a back-reacting state that gives rise to delayed fluorescence; (ii) noted that when the FX cluster is reduced in purified reaction centers, no electron transfer occurs beyond A0, even though a quinone is present; (iii) observed by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) studies of whole cells of Heliobacterium mobilis that primary charge separation is retained even after conversion of the majority of BChl g to Chl aF. ; and (iv) purified a homogeneous preparation of reaction center cores, which led to promising crystallization trials to obtain a three-dimensional structure.

  14. Enriched reaction center preparation from green photosynthetic bacteria. [Chlorobium limicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, J M; Giddings, Jr, T H; Shaw, E K

    1976-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a reaction-center complex I from Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum 6230 (Tassajara) was incubated in 2 M guanidine . HCl and then chromatographed on cross-linked dextran or agarose gel. Two principal components were separated: a larger component with photochemical activity (bacteriochlorophyll a reaction-center complex II) and a smaller component without activity (bacteriochlorophyll a protein). Complex II contains carotenoid, bacteriochlorophyll a, reaction center(s), and cytochromes b and c, but lacks the well characterized bacteriochlorophyll a protein contained in Complex I. Complex II carries out a light-induced reduction of cytochrome b along with an oxidation of cytochrome c.

  15. Bio-Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Incorporating Reaction Center and Reaction Center Plus Light Harvesting Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Houman

    Harvesting solar energy can potentially be a promising solution to the energy crisis now and in the future. However, material and processing costs continue to be the most important limitations for the commercial devices. A key solution to these problems might lie within the development of bio-hybrid solar cells that seeks to mimic photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and to take advantage of the low material costs, negative carbon footprint, and material abundance. The bio-photoelectrochemical cell technologies exploit biomimetic means of energy conversion by utilizing plant-derived photosystems which can be inexpensive and ultimately the most sustainable alternative. Plants and photosynthetic bacteria harvest light, through special proteins called reaction centers (RCs), with high efficiency and convert it into electrochemical energy. In theory, photosynthetic RCs can be used in a device to harvest solar energy and generate 1.1 V open circuit voltage and ~1 mA cm-2 short circuit photocurrent. Considering the nearly perfect quantum yield of photo-induced charge separation, efficiency of a protein-based solar cell might exceed 20%. In practice, the efficiency of fabricated devices has been limited mainly due to the challenges in the electron transfer between the protein complex and the device electrodes as well as limited light absorption. The overarching goal of this work is to increase the power conversion efficiency in protein-based solar cells by addressing those issues (i.e. electron transfer and light absorption). This work presents several approaches to increase the charge transfer rate between the photosynthetic RC and underlying electrode as well as increasing the light absorption to eventually enhance the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of bio-hybrid solar cells. The first approach is to decrease the electron transfer distance between one of the redox active sites in the RC and the underlying electrode by direct attachment of the of protein complex

  16. Mathematical Model of Synthesis Catalyst with Local Reaction Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a catalyst granule with a porous ceramic passive substrate and point active centers on which an exothermic synthesis reaction occurs. A rate of the chemical reaction depends on the temperature according to the Arrhenius law. Heat is removed from the pellet surface in products of synthesis due to heat transfer. In our work we first proposed a model for calculating the steady-state temperature of a catalyst pellet with local reaction centers. Calculation of active centers temperature is based on the idea of self-consistent field (mean-field theory. At first, it is considered that powers of the reaction heat release at the centers are known. On the basis of the found analytical solution, which describes temperature distribution inside the granule, the average temperature of the reaction centers is calculated, which then is inserted in the formula for heat release. The resulting system of transcendental algebraic equations is transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations of relaxation type and solved numerically to achieve a steady-state value. As a practical application, the article considers a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst granule with active cobalt metallic micro-particles. Cobalt micro-particles are the centers of the exothermic reaction of hydrocarbons macromolecular synthesis. Synthesis occurs as a result of absorption of the components of the synthesis gas on metallic cobalt. The temperature distribution inside the granule for a single local center and reaction centers located on the same granule diameter is found. It was found that there is a critical temperature of reactor exceeding of which leads to significant local overheating of the centers - thermal explosion. The temperature distribution with the local reaction centers is qualitatively different from the granule temperature, calculated in the homogeneous approximation. It is shown that, in contrast to the homogeneous approximation, the

  17. CSMB | Center For Structural Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Structural Molecular Biologyat ORNL is dedicated to developing instrumentation and methods for determining the 3-dimensional structures of proteins,...

  18. Structural studies on reaction centers from thermophilic photosynthetic bacteria and its functional utilizations. Tainetsusei kogosei saikin ni yuraisuru kogosei hanno chushin no kozo kaimei to kino kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, T; Morishita, Y; Kobayashi, M; Kanno, S [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1992-10-31

    This paper describes the results of the experiment in which crystallization of protein of reactive center purified from the photosynthetic film of thermophilic purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium tepidum whose hyrogen donor in photosynthesis is H2S instead of H2O was attempted. Crystallization was carried out by the vapor diffusion method and particularly by using ethylene glycol as precipitator at 4[degree]C after various investigations on the conditions of crystallization. By X-ray diffraction, this crystal was found to belong to the rhombic system, and it was estimated that the lattice constants, a, b, c equal to 140[angstrom], 190[angstrom] and 80[angstrom] respectively. This bacterium is a thermophilic bacterium having the optimum growth temperature of 48-50 [degree]C and utilizes CO2 or H2CO3 as corbon source, ammonium, urea etc. as nitrogen source and thiosulfate as sulfur source. Moreover, another purpose of this investigation was to determine the thermophilic location by elucidating its configuration (although, as a result, the analysis of configuration had no sufficient resolution). It was confirmed that the enzyme system of photosynthetic film and its cytoplasm obtained by ultrasonic spallation of this cell have CO2 fixing activity utilizing light energy. 23 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Photosynthetic antennas and reaction centers: Current understanding and prospects for improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, R.E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-09-01

    A brief introduction to the principles, structures and kinetic processes that take place in natural photosynthetic reaction center complexes is presented. Energy is first collected by an antenna system, and is transferred to a reaction center complex where primary electron transfer takes place. Secondary reactions lead to oxidation of water and reduction of CO{sub 2} in some classes of organisms. Antenna systems are highly regulated to maximize energy collection efficiency while avoiding photodamage. Some areas that are presently not well understood are listed.

  20. Quantum measurement corrections to CIDNP in photosynthetic reaction centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kominis, Iannis K

    2013-01-01

    Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization is a signature of spin order appearing in many photosynthetic reaction centers. Such polarization, significantly enhanced above thermal equilibrium, is known to result from the nuclear spin sorting inherent in the radical pair mechanism underlying long-lived charge-separated states in photosynthetic reaction centers. We will show here that the recently understood fundamental quantum dynamics of radical-ion-pair reactions open up a new and completely unexpected pathway toward obtaining chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization signals. The fundamental decoherence mechanism inherent in the recombination process of radical pairs is shown to produce nuclear spin polarizations of the order of 10 4 times (or more) higher than the thermal equilibrium value at the Earth's magnetic field relevant to natural photosynthesis. This opens up the possibility of a fundamentally new exploration of the biological significance of high nuclear polarizations in photosynthesis. (paper)

  1. Nuclear structure in deep-inelastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    The paper concentrates on recent deep inelastic experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory and the nuclear structure effects evident in reactions between super heavy nuclei. Experiments indicate that these reactions evolve gradually from simple transfer processes which have been studied extensively for lighter nuclei such as 16 O, suggesting a theoretical approach connecting the one-step DWBA theory to the multistep statistical models of nuclear reactions. This transition between quasi-elastic and deep inelastic reactions is achieved by a simple random walk model. Some typical examples of nuclear structure effects are shown. 24 refs., 9 figs

  2. The breakdown of vinyl ethers as a two-center synchronous reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokidova, T. S.; Shestakov, A. F.

    2009-11-01

    The experimental data on the molecular decomposition of vinyl ethers of various structures to alkanes and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones in the gas phase were analyzed using the method of intersecting parabolas. The enthalpies and kinetic parameters of decomposition were calculated for 17 reactions. The breakdown of ethers is a two-center concerted reaction characterized by a very high classical potential barrier to the thermally neutral reaction (180-190 kJ/mol). The kinetic parameters (activation energies and rate constants) of back reactions of the formation of vinyl ethers in the addition of aldehydes or ketones to alkanes were calculated using the method of intersecting parabolas. The factors that influenced the activation energy of the decomposition and formation of ethers were discussed. Quantum-chemical calculations of several vinyl ether decomposition reactions were performed. Ether formation reactions were compared with the formation of unsaturated alcohols as competitive reactions, which can occur in the interaction of carbonyl compounds with alkenes.

  3. A workshop report on nuclear reaction and cluster structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A work shop was held in June 1984 at RCNP (Research Center for Nuclear Physics), Osaka University, to discuss theory of nuclear reactions based on studies from microscopic or cluster structure viewpoints. About forty researchers participated in this work shop and 27 paperes were presented. All these papers with English abstracts are gathered in this collective report. (Aoki, K.)

  4. Probing the influence of the center atom coordination structure in iron phthalocyanine multi-walled carbon nanotube-based oxygen reduction reaction catalysts by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingxiang; Li, Zhipan; Xia, Dingguo; Zheng, Lirong; Liao, Yi; Li, Kai; Zuo, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Three different pentacoordinate iron phthalocyanine (FePc) electrocatalysts with an axial ligand (pyridyl group, Py) anchored to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are prepared by a microwave method as high performance composite electrocatalysts (FePc-Py/MWCNTs) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For comparison, tetracoordinate FePc electrocatalysts without an axial ligand anchored to MWCNTs (FePc/MWCNTs) are assembled in the same way. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), Raman spectroscopy (RS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are used to characterize the obtained electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples is measured by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), and the onset potential of all of the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts is found to be more positive than that of their FePc/MWCNTs counterparts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are employed to elucidate the relationship between molecular structure and electrocatalytic activity. XPS indicates that higher concentrations of Fe3+ and pyridine-type nitrogen play critical roles in determining the electrocatalytic ORR activity of the samples. XAFS spectroscopy reveals that the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts have a coordination geometry around Fe that is closer to the square pyramidal structure, a higher concentration of Fe3+, and a smaller phthalocyanine ring radius compared with those of FePc/MWCNTs.

  5. On intermediate structures in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, I.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptions of the nuclear reaction theory are reinvestigated on the basis of the continuum shell model. The correlation of the resonance states via the continuum can lead to intermediate structures in the cross section. (Auth.)

  6. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  7. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shlyk, O.; Samish, I.; Matěnová, M.; Dulebo, A.; Poláková, H.; Kaftan, David; Scherz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAR 16 (2017), s. 1-13, č. článku 44580. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00703S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BACTERIAL REACTION CENTERS * INDUCED STRUCTURAL-CHANGES * ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  8. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of 16 O(e,e'p), 12 C(e,e'pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in 12 C(e,e'p 0 ) and 16 O(e,e'p 0 ), comparison of the 12 C(e, e'p 0 ) and 16 O(e,e'p 3 ) reactions, quadrupole strength in the 16 O(e,e'α 0 ) reaction, quadrupole strength in the 12 C(e,e'α) reaction, analysis of the 12 C(e,e'p 1 ) and 16 O(e,e'p 3 ) angular distributions, analysis of the 40 Ca(e,e'x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q 12 C(e,e'x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments)

  9. Regulation of Germinal Center Reactions by B and T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonseok Chung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Break of B cell tolerance to self-antigens results in the development of autoantibodies and, thus, leads to autoimmunity. How B cell tolerance is maintained during active germinal center (GC reactions is yet to be fully understood. Recent advances revealed several subsets of T cells and B cells that can positively or negatively regulate GC B cell responses in vivo. IL-21-producing CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells comprise a distinct lineage of helper T cells—termed follicular helper T cells (TFH—that can provide help for the development of GC reactions where somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation take place. Although the function of TFH cells is beneficial in generating high affinity antibodies against infectious agents, aberrant activation of TFH cell or B cell to self-antigens results in autoimmunity. At least three subsets of immune cells have been proposed as regulatory cells that can limit such antibody-mediated autoimmunity, including follicular regulatory T cells (TFR, Qa-1 restricted CD8+ regulatory T cells (CD8+TREG, and regulatory B cells (BREG. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of GC B cell regulation with specific emphasis on the newly identified immune cell subsets involved in this process.

  10. Unified studies of structure and reactions in light unstable nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized two-center cluster model (GTCM, which can treat covalent, ionic and atomic configurations in general systems with two inert cores plus valence nucleons, is formulated in the basis of the microscopic cluster model. In this model, the covalent configurations constructed by the molecular orbital (MO method and the atomic (or ionic configuration obtained by the valence bonding (VB method can be described in a consistent manner. GTCM is applied to the light neutron-rich system, 10,12Be = α + α + XN (X = 2,4, and the unified studies of the structural changes and the reaction problem are performed. In the structure study, the calculated energy levels are characterized in terms of the chemical bonding like structures, such as the covalent MO or ionic VB structures. The chemical bonding structures changes from level to level within a small energy interval. In the unbound region, the structure problem with the total system of α + α + XN and the reaction problem, induced by the collision of an asymptotic VB state of α+6,8He, are combined by GTCM. The properties of unbound resonant states are discussed in a close connection to the reaction mechanism, and some enhancement factors originated from the properties of the intrinsic states are predicted in the reaction observables. The unified calculation of the structures and the reactions is applied to the Coulomb shift problem in the mirror system, such the 10Be and 10C nuclei. The Coulomb displacement energy of the mirror systems are discussed.

  11. Light ion reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the many contributions to the subject 'Light ion reaction mechanism and nuclear structure', a few are selected and reviewed which highlight the present state of the field. Some contributions to the conference dealing with nuclear interactions are briefly outlined in the second section following an introductory section. Lane model calculations are compared with data for 9 Be and results are given showing angular distributions of the cross sections, the analyzing powers and the spin-rotation parameters for p - 40 Ca. Real central potential for d + 32 s resulting from the FB-analysis are compared with frozen density folding and delta-function folding. The third section deals with reaction mechanism. Data are cited which show near-side and far-side contributions to the calculated analyzing powers in the 116 Sn(d,p) 117 Sn (11.2 - ) transition. Calculations are compared with experimental A y and -(A yy + 2)/3. Also given are measurements of the cross sections and analyzing powers of the continuum energy spectra for the 58 Ni(p,p'x), along with relations between the analyzing powers and momentum transfer. The fourth section addresses nuclear structure. Cross sections and analyzing powers measured at 22 MeV for the reaction 208 Pb(p,t) 206 Pb(3 2 + ) are cited and considered. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Development of the structural materials information center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a Structural Aging Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify potential structural safety issues related to continued service of nuclear power plants and to establish criteria for evaluating and resolving these issues. One of the tasks in this program focuses on the establishment of a Structural Materials Information Center where data and information on the time variation of concrete and other structural material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors are being collected and assembled into a database. This database will be used to assist in the prediction of potential long-term deterioration of critical structural components in nuclear power plants and to establish limits on hostile environmental exposure for these structures and materials. Two complementary database formats have been developed. The Structural Materials Handbook is an expandable, hard copy handbook that contains complete sets of data and information for selected portland cement concrete, metallic reinforcement, prestressing tendon, and structural steel materials. The Structural Materials Electronic Database is accessible by an IBM-compatible personal computer and provides an efficient means for searching the various database files to locate materials with similar properties. The database formats have been developed to accommodate data and information on the time-variation of concrete and other structural material properties. To date, the database includes information on concrete, reinforcement, prestressing, and structural steel materials

  13. Moessbauer spectroscopy on the reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, E.; Goldanskii, V.I.; Birk, A.; Parak, F.; Fritzsch, G.; Sinning, I.; Michel, H.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins called 'reaction centers' (RC) can be isolated from many photosynthetic bacteria. They have one non-heme iron in a quinone acceptor region. The RC of Rhodopseudomonas viridis contains an additional tightly bound tetra-heme cytochrome c subunit. The electronic configuration of both cytochrome and the non-heme iron has been studied in the crystallized protein by Moessbauer spectroscopy at different redox potentials, pH-values, and with an addition of o-phenanthroline. At high potentials (E h =+500 mV) all heme irons are in the low spin Fe 3+ -state, and at low potential (E h = 1 50 mV) they are low spin Fe 2+ with the same Moessbauer parameters for all hemes independent of pH. Redox titrations change the relative area of the reduced and oxidized states in agreement with other methods. The non-heme iron shows a high spin Fe 2+ configuration independent of E h and pH with parameters comparable to those of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Surprisingly, there is strong evidence for another non-heme iron species in part of the molecules with a Fe 2+ low spin configuration. Incubation with o-phenanthroline decreases the relative Fe 2+ hs-area and increases the contribution of Fe 2+ ls-area. Above 210 K the mean square displacement, 2 >, of the RC-crystals increases more than linearly with temperature. This may be correlated with the increase of the electron transfer rate and indicates that intramolecular mobility influences the functional activity of a protein. (orig.)

  14. Electrostatic dominoes: long distance propagation of mutational effects in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebban, P; Maróti, P; Schiffer, M; Hanson, D K

    1995-07-04

    Two point mutants from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, both modified in the M protein of the photosynthetic reaction center, have been studied by flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy. These strains carry either the M231Arg --> Leu or M43ASN --> Asp mutations, which are located 9 and 15 A, respectively, from the terminal electron acceptor QB. In the wild-type Rb. sphaeroides structure, M231Arg is involved in a conserved salt bridge with H125Glu and H232Glu and M43Asn is located among several polar residues that form or surround the QB binding site. These substitutions were originally uncovered in phenotypic revertants isolated from the photosynthetically incompetent L212Glu-L213Asp --> Ala-Ala site-specific double mutant. As second-site suppressor mutations, they have been shown to restore the proton transfer function that is interrupted in the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant. The electrostatic effects that are induced in reaction centers by the M231Arg --> Leu and M43Asn --> Asp substitutions are roughly the same in either the double-mutant or wild-type backgrounds. In a reaction center that is otherwise wild type in sequence, they decrease the free energy gap between the QA- and QB- states by 24 +/- 5 and 45 +/- 5 meV, respectively. The pH dependences of K2, the QA-QB QAQB- equilibrium constant, are altered in reaction centers that carry either of these substitutions, revealing differences in the pKas of titratable groups compared to the wild type.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Structure and reactions of quantum halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, A.S.; Riisager, K.; Fedorov, D.V.; Garrido, E.

    2004-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the basic principles of the physics of quantum halo systems, defined as bound states of clusters of particles with a radius extending well into classically forbidden regions. Exploiting the consequences of this definition, the authors derive the conditions for occurrence in terms of the number of clusters, binding energy, angular momentum, cluster charges, and excitation energy. All these quantities must be small. The article discusses the transitions between different cluster divisions and the importance of thresholds for cluster or particle decay, with particular attention to the Efimov effect and the related exotic states. The pertinent properties can be described by the use of dimensionless variables. Then universal and specific properties can be distinguished, as shown in a series of examples selected from nuclear, atomic, and molecular systems. The neutron dripline is especially interesting for nuclei and negative ions for atoms. For molecules, in which the cluster division comes naturally, a wider range of possibilities exists. Halos in two dimensions have very different properties, and their states are easily spatially extended, whereas Borromean systems are unlikely and spatially confined. The Efimov effect and the Thomas collapse occur only for dimensions between 2.3 and 3.8 and thus not for 2. High-energy reactions directly probe the halo structure. The authors discuss the reaction mechanisms for high-energy nuclear few-body halo breakup on light, intermediate, and heavy nuclear targets. For light targets, the strong interaction dominates, while for heavy targets, the Coulomb interaction dominates. For intermediate targets these processes are of comparable magnitude. As in atomic and molecular physics, a geometric impact-parameter picture is very appropriate. Finally, the authors briefly consider the complementary processes involving electroweak probes available through beta decay, electromagnetic transitions, and

  16. Development of the Structural Materials Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a Structural Aging Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify potential structural safety issues related to continued service of nuclear power plants and to establish criteria for evaluating and resolving these issues. One of the tasks in this program focuses on the establishment of a Structural Materials Information Center where data and information on the time variation of concrete and other structural material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors are being collected and assembled into a data base. This data base will be used to assist in the prediction of potential long-term deterioration of critical structural components in nuclear power plants and to establish limits on hostile environmental exposure for these structures and materials. Two complementary data base formats have been developed. The Structural Materials Handbook is an expandable, hard-copy reference document that contains complete sets of data and information for selected portland cement concrete, metallic reinforcement, prestressing tendon, and structural steel materials. Baseline data, reference properties and environmental information are presented in the handbook as tables, notes and graphs. The handbook, which will be published in four volumes, serves as the information source for the electronic data base. The Structural Materials Electronic Data Base is accessible by an IBM-compatible personal computer and provides an efficient means for searching the various data base files to locate materials with similar properties. Properties will be reported in the International System of Units (SI) and in customary units whenever possible. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Proton capture reactions and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikstra, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental studies are described of the structure of 40 Ca and 42 Sc with measurements at proton-capture of (p, gamma) reactions. Where possible, an attempt has been made to interpret the results of the measurements in termsof existing models. The 40 Ca and 42 Sc nuclides were excited by bombarding 39 K and 41 Ca targets, respectively with low energy protons (E p = 0.3-3.0 MeV), that were produced by the Utrecht 3MV van de Graaff accelerator. From the measured energy and intensity of the gamma-rays created in the subsequent decay of the cuclei, information was obtained on the existence and properties of their excited states. In addition properties of two T = 3/2 levels at high excitation energy of the 9 Be nucleus were investigated. These levels were excited by the resonant absorption of gamma-rays from the 11 B(p, gamma) 12 C reaction. The results of the measurements are interpreted by a comparison to the analoque β-decay of 9 Li and to shell model calculations. The total decay energy of the superallowed O + → O + transition between the ground states of 42 Sc and 42 Ca was determined by measurements in Utrecht of the proton separation energy S p of 42 Sc and in Oak Ridge of S n of 42 Sc and 42 Ca. The results were used for verification of the conserved vector current hypothesis, which implies that the ft values of all superallowed O + → O + β-decays are the same. An attempt was made to describe properties of odd-parity states of A = 37-41 nuclei with a variant of the Warburton, Becker, Millener and Brown (WBMB) interaction.Finally a new method for the assignment of nuclear spins by a simple statistical analysis of spectroscopic information is proposed. (author). 169 refs.; 22 figs.; 24 schemes; 29 tabs

  18. RxnFinder: biochemical reaction search engines using molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qian-Nan; Deng, Zhe; Hu, Huanan; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions play a key role to help sustain life and allow cells to grow. RxnFinder was developed to search biochemical reactions from KEGG reaction database using three search criteria: molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity. RxnFinder is helpful to get reference reactions for biosynthesis and xenobiotics metabolism. RxnFinder is freely available via: http://sdd.whu.edu.cn/rxnfinder. qnhu@whu.edu.cn.

  19. [On the influence of local molecular environment on the redox potential of electron transfer cofactors in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasil'nikov, P M; Noks, P P; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The addition of cryosolvents (glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide) to a water solution containing bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers changes the redox potential of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer, but does not affect the redox potential of the quinone primary acceptor. It has been shown that the change in redox potential can be produced by changes of the electrostatic interactions between cofactors and the local molecular environment modified by additives entered into the solution. The degree of influence of a solvent on the redox potential of various cofactors is determined by degree of availability of these cofactors for molecules of solvent, which depends on the arrangement of cofactors in the structure of reaction centers.

  20. Bacterial Reaction Centers Purified with Styrene Maleic Acid Copolymer Retain Native Membrane Functional Properties and Display Enhanced Stability**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainsbury, David J K; Scheidelaar, Stefan; van Grondelle, Rienk; Killian, J Antoinette; Jones, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins often present daunting challenges for biophysical characterization, a fundamental issue being how to select a surfactant that will optimally preserve the individual structure and functional properties of a given membrane protein. Bacterial reaction centers offer a rare opportunity to compare the properties of an integral membrane protein in different artificial lipid/surfactant environments with those in the native bilayer. Here, we demonstrate that reaction centers purified using a styrene maleic acid copolymer remain associated with a complement of native lipids and do not display the modified functional properties that typically result from detergent solubilization. Direct comparisons show that reaction centers are more stable in this copolymer/lipid environment than in a detergent micelle or even in the native membrane, suggesting a promising new route to exploitation of such photovoltaic integral membrane proteins in device applications. PMID:25212490

  1. Nuclear Reaction Data File for Astrophysics (NRDF/A) in Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Masaaki; Furutachi, Naoya; Makinaga, Ayano; Togashi, Tomoaki; Otuka, Naohiko

    2010-01-01

    The activities of the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre is explained. The main task of the centre is data compilation of Japanese nuclear reaction data in collaboration of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres. As one of recent activities, preparation of a new database (NRDF/A) and evaluation of astronuclear reaction data are reported. Collaboration in the nuclear data activities among Asian countries is proposed.

  2. Structure of fungal oxyluciferin, the product of the bioluminescence reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, K V; Osipova, Z M; Petushkov, V N; Rodionova, N S; Tsarkova, A S; Kotlobay, A A; Chepurnykh, T V; Gorokhovatsky, A Yu; Yampolsky, I V; Gitelson, J I

    2017-11-01

    The structure of fungal oxyluciferin was determined, the enzymatic bioluminescence reaction under substrate saturation conditions with discrete monitoring of formed products was conducted, and the structures of the end products of the reaction were established. On the basis of these studies, the scheme of oxyluciferin degradation to the end products was developed. The structure of fungal oxyluciferin was confirmed by counter synthesis.

  3. The reaction mechanism of the (3HE,T) reaction and applications to nuclear structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis we present a study on the reaction meachanism of the (3He,t) reaction at 70-80 MeV bombarding energy and on structures of the residual nuclei excited in this reaction: 24-Al, 26-Al, 28-P, 32-Cl, 40-Sc, 42-Sc and 58-Cu... Zie: Summary

  4. Transplant organizational structures: viewpoints from established centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouljoud, M; Klintmalm, G; Whitehouse, S

    2012-10-01

    This personal viewpoint report summarizes the responses of a survey targeting established transplant programs with a structured framework, such as center, institute, or department, and stability of leadership to assure valuable experiential observations. The 18-item survey was sent to 20 US institutions that met inclusion criteria. The response rate was 100%. Seventeen institutions had a distinct transplant governance structure. A majority of respondents perceived that their type of transplant structure was associated with enhanced recognition within their institution (85%), improved regulatory compliance (85%), transplant volume growth (75%), improved quality outcomes (75%) and increased funding for transplant-related research (75%). The prevailing themes in respondents' remarks were the perceived need for autonomy of the transplant entity, alignment among services and finances and alignment of authority with responsibility. Many respondents suggested that a dialogue be opened about effective transplant infrastructure that overcomes the boundaries of traditional academic department silos. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Isolated photosystem I reaction centers on a functionalized gated high electron mobility transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliza, Sazia A; Lee, Ida; Tulip, Fahmida S; Mostafa, Salwa; Greenbaum, Elias; Ericson, M Nance; Islam, Syed K

    2011-09-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale (~6 nm) reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs. © 2011 IEEE

  6. Isolated Photosystem I Reaction Centers on a Functionalized Gated High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliza, Sazia A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lee, Ida [ORNL; Tulip, Fahmida S [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mostafa, Salwa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale nm reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs.

  7. Chalcogenide metal centers for oxygen reduction reaction: Activity and tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjun; Gago, Aldo; Timperman, Laure; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes materials design methods, oxygen reduction kinetics, tolerance to small organic molecules and fuel cell performance of chalcogenide metal catalysts, particularly, ruthenium (Ru x Se y ) and non-precious transition metals (M x X y : M = Co, Fe and Ni; X = Se and S). These non-platinum catalysts are potential alternatives to Pt-based catalysts because of their comparable catalytic activity (Ru x Se y ), low cost, high abundance and, in particular, a high tolerance to small organic molecules. Developing trends of synthesis methods, mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction and applications in direct alcohol fuel cells as well as the substrate effect are highlighted.

  8. 11. IAEA consultants' meeting of the nuclear reaction data centers. Obninsk, 7-11 October 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 co-ordination meeting in Obninsk, Russia, of the national and regional nuclear reaction data centers, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation; the exchanged and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ENDF format, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials

  9. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  10. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; Schwerer, O.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author)

  11. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Lemmel, H D [eds.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs.

  12. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G; Schwerer, O [eds.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author) Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: Studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Allison, D.P.; Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.; Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation.

  15. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.; Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation

  16. Utilizing the dynamic stark shift as a probe for dielectric relaxation in photosynthetic reaction centers during charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2013-09-26

    In photosynthetic reaction centers, the electric field generated by light-induced charge separation produces electrochromic shifts in the transitions of reaction center pigments. The extent of this Stark shift indirectly reflects the effective field strength at a particular cofactor in the complex. The dynamics of the effective field strength near the two monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (BA and BB) in purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers has been explored near physiological temperature by monitoring the time-dependent Stark shift during charge separation (dynamic Stark shift). This dynamic Stark shift was determined through analysis of femtosecond time-resolved absorbance change spectra recorded in wild type reaction centers and in four mutants at position M210. In both wild type and the mutants, the kinetics of the dynamic Stark shift differ from those of electron transfer, though not in the same way. In wild type, the initial electron transfer and the increase in the effective field strength near the active-side monomer bacteriochlorophyll (BA) occur in synchrony, but the two signals diverge on the time scale of electron transfer to the quinone. In contrast, when tyrosine is replaced by aspartic acid at M210, the kinetics of the BA Stark shift and the initial electron transfer differ, but transfer to the quinone coincides with the decay of the Stark shift. This is interpreted in terms of differences in the dynamics of the local dielectric environment between the mutants and the wild type. In wild type, comparison of the Stark shifts associated with BA and BB on the two quasi-symmetric halves of the reaction center structure confirm that the effective dielectric constants near these cofactors are quite different when the reaction center is in the state P(+)QA(-), as previously determined by Steffen et al. at 1.5 K (Steffen, M. A.; et al. Science 1994, 264, 810-816). However, it is not possible to determine from static, low-temperature measurments if the

  17. Resident Reactions to Person-Centered Communication by Long-Term Care Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Sibalija, Jovana; Scotchmer, Emma

    2016-09-01

    Long-term care staff caregivers who are person centered incorporate the life history, preferences, and feelings of residents with dementia during care interactions. Communication is essential for person-centered care. However, little is known about residents' verbal reactions when staff use person-centered communication. Accordingly, this study investigated the impact of person-centered communication and missed opportunities for such communication by staff on resident reactions. Conversations (N = 46) between staff-resident dyads were audio-recorded during routine care tasks over 12 weeks. Staff utterances were coded for person-centered communication and missed opportunities. Resident utterances were coded for positive reactions, such as cooperation, and negative reactions, such as distress. Linear regression analyses revealed that the more staff used person-centered communication, the more likely that residents reacted positively. Additionally, the more missed opportunities in a conversation, the more likely that the residents reacted negatively. Conversation illustrations elaborate on the quantitative findings and implications for staff training are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Pigment organization and their interactions in reaction centers of photosystem II: optical spectroscopy at 6 K of reaction centers with modified pheophytin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, M; Shkuropatov, A Y; Permentier, H; de Wijn, R; Hoff, A J; Shuvalov, V A; van Gorkom, H J

    2001-09-25

    Photosystem II reaction centers (RC) with selectively exchanged pheophytin (Pheo) molecules as described in [Germano, M., Shkuropatov, A. Ya., Permentier, H., Khatypov, R. A., Shuvalov, V. A., Hoff, A. J., and van Gorkom, H. J. (2000) Photosynth. Res. 64, 189-198] were studied by low-temperature absorption, linear and circular dichroism, and triplet-minus-singlet absorption-difference spectroscopy. The ratio of extinction coefficients epsilon(Pheo)/epsilon(Chl) for Q(Y) absorption in the RC is approximately 0.40 at 6 K and approximately 0.45 at room temperature. The presence of 2 beta-carotenes, one parallel and one perpendicular to the membrane plane, is confirmed. Absorption at 670 nm is due to the perpendicular Q(Y) transitions of the two peripheral chlorophylls (Chl) and not to either Pheo. The "core" pigments, two Pheo and four Chl absorb in the 676-685 nm range. Delocalized excited states as predicted by the "multimer model" are seen in the active branch. The inactive Pheo and the nearby Chl, however, mainly contribute localized transitions at 676 and 680 nm, respectively, although large CD changes indicate that exciton interactions are present on both branches. Replacement of the active Pheo prevents triplet formation, causes an LD increase at 676 and 681 nm, a blue-shift of 680 nm absorbance, and a bleach of the 685 nm exciton band. The triplet state is mainly localized on the Chl corresponding to B(A) in purple bacteria. Both Pheo Q(Y) transitions are oriented out of the membrane plane. Their Q(X) transitions are parallel to that plane, so that the Pheos in PSII are structurally similar to their homologues in purple bacteria.

  19. Conservation-dissipation structure of chemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Wen-An

    2012-12-01

    In this Brief Report, we show that balanced chemical reaction systems governed by the law of mass action have an elegant conservation-dissipation structure. From this structure a number of important conclusions can be easily deduced. In particular, with the help of this structure we can rigorously justify the classical partial equilibrium approximation in chemical kinetics.

  20. Color centers in KCN: a structural analysis of crystalline domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, L.C.S. do.

    1976-03-01

    Pure singlecrystals of KCN exposed to X-rays showed several color centers detected by EPR. The F center was identified through the correlation of its optical absorption band which satisfies the Ivey law for the KCN lattice parameter and the EPR spectrum typical of a center in an anionic site. Two other color centers were identified: N - 2 and HCN - . Two centers assigned to hydrogen atoms have their models proposed: U 2 and U 3 centers. Two other centers remain unidentified: an anionic and an extrinsic centers. The orthorhombic character of the N - 2 center EPR parameters allowed an structural analysis of the crystal line domains in the orthorhombic phase. The optical absorption spectrum of the HCN - center in KCl matrix was investigated and showed a set of resolved bands with a constant energy splitting; this splitting was associated to a vibrational mode of the excited state of this molecular ion. (author) [pt

  1. Structural parameter identifiability analysis for dynamic reaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidescu, Florin Paul; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2008-01-01

    method based on Lie derivatives. The proposed systematic two phase methodology is illustrated on a mass action based model for an enzymatically catalyzed reaction pathway network where only a limited set of variables is measured. The methodology clearly pinpoints the structurally identifiable parameters...... where for a given set of measured variables it is desirable to investigate which parameters may be estimated prior to spending computational effort on the actual estimation. This contribution addresses the structural parameter identifiability problem for the typical case of reaction network models....... The proposed analysis is performed in two phases. The first phase determines the structurally identifiable reaction rates based on reaction network stoichiometry. The second phase assesses the structural parameter identifiability of the specific kinetic rate expressions using a generating series expansion...

  2. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at three REDS-II blood centers in Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalez, TT; Sabino, EC; Schlumpf, KS; Wright, DJ; Leao, S; Sampaio, D; Takecian, PL; Proietti, AB; Murphy, E; Busch, M; Custer, B; NHLBI Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II REDS-II, International Component,

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids before donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries.A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 20...

  3. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The past year has seen continued progress in our efforts. On the experimental side, we completed data acquisition on our major remaining involvement at NIKHEF, the 12 C(e,e'pp) experiment. We advanced the analysis of most of projects in low lying nuclear structure and giant resonances, of which several were completed and published. We received approval for several new experiments, and have made major contributions to design and development of detectors to be used at Bates and CEBAF. Our data interpretation efforts have been extended and enhanced with the availability of our new computer cluster. In this paper we briefly report on most of these efforts

  4. The nuclear structure and low-energy reactions (NSLER) collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, D J

    2006-01-01

    The long-term vision of the Nuclear Structure and Low-Energy Reactions (NSLER) collaboration is to arrive at a comprehensive and unified description of nuclei and their reactions that is grounded in the interactions between the constituent nucleons. For this purpose, we will develop a universal energy density functional for nuclei and replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that will deliver maximum predictive power with minimal uncertainties that are well quantified. Nuclear structure and reactions play an essential role in the science to be investigated at rare isotope facilities, and in nuclear physics applications to the Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship Program, next-generation reactors, and threat reduction. We anticipate an expansion of the computational techniques and methods we currently employ, and developments of new treatments, to take advantage of petascale architectures and demonstrate the capability of the leadership class machines to deliver new science heretofore impossible

  5. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at 3 REDS-II blood centers in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalez, T. T.; Sabino, E. C.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Wright, D.J.; Leao, S.; Sampaio, D.; Takecian, P. L.; Carneiro-Proietti, AB; Murphy, E.; Busch, M.; Custer, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids prior to donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 2009. Vasovagal reactions (VVRs) along with donor demographic and biometric data were collected. Reactions were defined as any presyncopal or syncopal event during the donation process. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of VVRs. Results Of 724,861 donor presentations, 16,129 (2.2%) VVRs were recorded. Rates varied substantially between the three centers: 53, 290 and 381 per 10,000 donations in Recife, São Paulo and Belo Horizonte, respectively. Although the reaction rates varied, the donor characteristics associated with VVRs were similar [younger age (18–29), replacement donors, first time donors, low estimated blood volume (EBV)]. In multivariable analysis controlling for differences between the donor populations in each city younger age, first-time donor status and lower EBV were the factors most associated with reactions. Conclusion Factors associated with VVRs in other locations are also evident in Brazil. The difference in VVR rates between the three centers might be due to different procedures for identifying and reporting the reactions. Potential interventions to reduce the risk of reactions in Brazil should be considered. PMID:22073941

  6. Biological diversity of photosynthetic reaction centers and the solid-state photo-CIDNP effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Esha

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from plants, heliobacteria and green sulphur bacteria has been investigated with photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) MAS NMR. In photosystem (PS) I of spinach, all signals appear negative which is proposed by a predominance of the

  7. The effects of light-induced reduction of the photosystem II reaction center

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutý, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 15 (2009), s. 923-933 ISSN 1610-2940 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Photosystem II * Reaction center * Pheophytin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.336, year: 2009

  8. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  9. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  10. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.J.

    1991-05-01

    This report discusses topics in the following areas: Hadronic structure; hadrons in nuclei; hot hadronic matter; relativistic nuclear physics and NN interaction; leptonic emissions from high-Z heavy ion collisions; theoretical studies of heavy ion dynamics; nuclear pre-equilibrium reactions; classical chaotic dynamics and nuclear structure; and, theory of nuclear fission

  11. How to observe simple structures in deep inelastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frascaria, N.

    1981-10-01

    Evidence is presented for the observation of simple structures at high excitation energy in the energy spectra of fragments from numerous ion reactions. Techniques employed in the single as well as in the coincidence experiments are discussed. The main characteristics of these structures are pointed out and some possible interpretations of the experimental observations are given

  12. Structure and Reaction Mechanism of Pyrrolysine Synthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix; Beck, Philipp; Bacher, Adelbert; Groll, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine, is catalyzed by PylD, a structurally and mechanistically unique dehydrogenase. This catalyzed reaction includes an induced-fit mechanism achieved by major structural rearrangements of the N-terminal helix upon substrate binding. Different steps of the reaction trajectory are visualized by complex structures of PylD with substrate and product. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Structure and Reaction Mechanism of Pyrrolysine Synthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2013-05-29

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine, is catalyzed by PylD, a structurally and mechanistically unique dehydrogenase. This catalyzed reaction includes an induced-fit mechanism achieved by major structural rearrangements of the N-terminal helix upon substrate binding. Different steps of the reaction trajectory are visualized by complex structures of PylD with substrate and product. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Reactions of carbon radicals generated by 1,5-transposition of reactive centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZIVORAD CEKOVIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Radical intermediates can undergo specific reactions, such as intramolecular rearrangements, i.e., the transpositions of radical centers, which are not known in classical ionic organic reactions. 1,5-Transposition of a radical center to a non-activated carbon atom are of great synthetic importance. It can be successfully applied for the introduction of different functional groups (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, halogens onto a carbon atom remote from the present functional group. In addition to functionalization of a remote non-activated carbon atom, the formation of new C-C bonds on the d-carbon atom have also been achieved. 1,5-Transposition of the radical centers takes place from alkoxyl, aminyl and carbon radicals to a remote carbon atom. Relocation of the radical centers preferentially involves 1,5-transfer of a hydrogen atom, although migrations of some other groups are known. The reactions of the carbon radical generated by 1,5-relocation of the radical center are presented and their synthetic applications are reviewed.

  15. NCI designated cancer center funding not influenced by organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Margaret E; Yagoda, Daniel; Thurman, Paul W; Luna, Jorge M; Figg, William Douglas

    2009-05-01

    National Cancer Institutes (NCI) designated cancer centers use one of three organizational structures. The hypothesis of this study is that there are differences in the amount of annual NCI funding per faculty member based on a cancer center's organizational structure. The study also considers the impact of secondary factors (i.e., the existence of a clinical program, the region and the size of the city in which the cancer center is located) on funding and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators at each cancer center. Of the 63 cancer centers, 44 use a matrix structure, 16 have a freestanding structure, and three have a Department of Oncology structure. Kruskal-Wallis tests reveal no statistically significant differences in the amount of funding per faculty member or the number of HHMI investigators between centers with a matrix, freestanding or Department of Oncology structure. Online research and telephone interviews with each cancer center were used to gather information, including: organizational structure, the presence of a clinical program, the number of faculty members, and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators. Statistical tests were used to assess the impact which organizational structure has on the amount of funding per faculty member and number of HHMI investigators. While the results seem to suggest that the organizational structure of a given cancer center does not impact the amount of NCI funding or number of HHMI investigators which it attracts, the existence of this relationship is likely masked by the small sample size in this study. Further studies may be appropriate to examine the effect organizational structure has on other measurements which are relevant to cancer centers, such as quality and quantity of research produced.

  16. Molar extinction coefficients and other properties of an improved reaction center preparation from Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, R.K.; Clayton, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reaction centers have been purified from chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas viridis by treatment with lauryl dimethyl amine oxide followed by hydroxyapatite chromatography and precipitation with ammonium sulfate. The absorption spectrum at low temperature shows bands at 531 and 543 nm, assigned to two molecules of bacteriopheophytin b. The 600 nm band of bacteriochlorophyll b is resolved at low temperature into components at 601 and 606.5 nm. At room temperature the light-induced difference spectrum shows a negative band centered at 615 nm, where the absorption spectrum shows only a week shoulder adjacent to the 600 nm band. The fluorescence spectrum shows a band at 1000 nm and no fluorescence corresponding to the 830 nm absorption band. Two molecules of cytochrome 558 and three of cytochrome 552 accompany each reaction center. The differential extinction coefficient (reduced minus oxidized) of cytochrome 558 nm was estimated as 20 +- 2 mM/sup -1/.cm/sup -1/ through a coupled reaction with equine cytochrome c. The extinction coefficient of reaction centers at 960 nm was determined to be 123 +- 25 mM/sup -1/.cm/sup -1/ by measuring the light-induced bleaching of P-960 and the coupled oxidation of cytochrome 558. The corresponding extinction coefficient at 830 nm is 300 +- 65 mM/sup -1/.cm/sup -1/. The absorbance ratio ..cap alpha../sub 280nm/..cap alpha../sub 830nm/ in our preparations was 2.1, and there was 190 kg protein per mol of reaction centers. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed three major components of apparent molecular weights 31,000, 37,000, and 41,000.

  17. Electron transfer reactions in structural units of copper proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, M.

    1975-01-01

    In previous pulse radiolysis studies it was suggested that the reduction of the Cu(II) ions in copper proteins by the hydrated electron is a multi-step electron migration process. The technique has been extended to investigate the reduction of some structural units of these proteins. These studies include: the reaction of the hydrated electron with peptides, the reaction of the disulphide bridge with formate radical ion and radicals produced by the reduction of peptides, and the reaction of Cu(II)-peptide complex with esub(aq)sup(-) and CO 2 - . Using these results the reduction mechanism of copper and other proteins will be discussed. (author)

  18. Dependence of ICF reaction dynamics on target structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Kamal; Dutt, Sunil; GulI, Muntazir; Ahmad, Tauseef; Rizvi, I.A.; Ali, Sabir; Agarwal, Avinash; Kumar, R.; Chaubey, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    The projectile structure is also found responsible for the ICF reaction processes. It is found that projectile having bigger alpha cluster is more unstable towards break up. In this context, a comparative study of 12 C and 16 O ion-beams induced reactions with different targets has been done. The deduced ICF contributions for different systems have been plotted against the target charge of different targets. It is observed that target properties may also be responsible for the interplay between CF and ICF reaction dynamics

  19. Fragment molecular orbital study on electron tunneling mechanisms in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2012-11-01

    The tunneling mechanisms of electron transfers (ETs) in photosynthetic reaction center of Blastochloris viridis are studied by the ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method combined with the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) and the bridge Green function (GF) calculations of the electronic coupling T(DA) and the tunneling current method for the ET pathway analysis at the fragment-based resolution. For the ET from batctriopheophytin (H(L)) to menaquinone (MQ), a major tunneling current through Trp M250 and a minor back flow via Ala M215, Ala M216, and His M217 are quantified. For the ET from MQ to ubiquinone, the major tunneling pathway via the nonheme Fe(2+) and His L190 is identified as well as minor pathway via His M217 and small back flows involving His L230, Glu M232, and His M264. At the given molecular structure from X-ray experiment, the spin state of the Fe(2+) ion, its replacement by Zn(2+), or its removal are found to affect the T(DA) value by factors within 2.2. The calculated T(DA) values, together with experimentally estimated values of the driving force and the reorganization energy, give the ET rates in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  20. Midwest Structural Sciences Center, 2006-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    be created and compared to experimental data (which also Fig. C2.1: The beam fixed in the testing apparatus and mounted on the electromagnetic ...structural components, a riveted stiffened panel, Fig. C3.3, was considered as the next test case. This stiffened panel was analyzed using displacement

  1. Midwest Structural Sciences Center 2009 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    two-layer laminate . The current fluid-thermal structure coupled simulation is aimed at reproducing results of a wind tun- nel experiment of...Random Variables using Convolution , Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Submitted Decem- ber 2007 30 Song J., and W.-H. Kang, 2007. Matrix-based system

  2. Centers of structures in electromagnetism--a critical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1982-01-01

    Some principles for finding reference points or centers of structures in electromagnetism are outlined. It is pointed out that the centers which are found depend on arbitrary choices. Since some of the principles are based on Friis's transmission formula and the radar equation, these are given...

  3. NASA Lewis Research Center's materials and structures division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weymueller, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center on materials and structures are discussed. Programs are noted on powder metallurgy superalloys, eutectic alloys, dispersion strengthened alloys and composite materials. Discussions are included on materials applications, coatings, fracture mechanics, and fatigue

  4. Probing cluster structures through sub-barrier transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafferty D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleon transfer probabilities and excitation energy distributions have been measured in 16,18O, 19F + 208Pb at energies between 90% - 100% of the Coulomb barrier. A strong 2p2n enhancement is observed for all reactions, though most spectacularly in the 18O induced reaction. Results are interpreted in terms of the Semiclassical model, which seems to suggest α-cluster transfer in all studied systems. The relation to cluster-states in the projectile is discussed, with the experimental results consistent with previous structure studies. Dissipation of energy in the collisions of 18O is compared between different reaction modes, with cluster transfer associated with dissipation over a large number of internal states. Cluster transfer is shown to be a long range dissipation mechanism, which will inform the development of future models to treat these dynamic processes in reactions.

  5. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yuming, E-mail: ymsun@ytu.edu.cn; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-20

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C{sub 2}-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What’s more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  6. Functional type 2 photosynthetic reaction centers found in the rare bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Yonghui; Feng, Fuying; Medová, Hana; Dean, Jason; Koblížek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most fundamental biological processes on Earth. To date, species capable of performing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophy have been reported in six bacterial phyla. Here we report a phototrophic bacterium belonging to the rare and understudied phylum Gemmatimonadetes. This strain, isolated from a freshwater lake in the Gobi Desert, contains fully functional photosynthetic reaction centers. Its photosynthesis genes appear to originate from an ancient horizonta...

  7. Model of deep centers formation and reactions in electron irradiated InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.; Suski, J.; Gilleron, M.

    1986-01-01

    We present a model of the production of deep centers and their reactions following electron irradiations in InP. We propose that the dominant hole traps in p-InP and electron traps in p + n InP junctions are complexes between shallow acceptors and a common intrinsic entity, the phosphorus interstitial or vacancy. The reactions observed below and above room temperature are then due to a local mobility of this entity, which can be obtained as well by thermal as by electronic stimulation of the reactions. This model implies the long-range migration (at least down to 16 K) of this entity, and explains the strongly different behavior of n-InP compared to p-InP samples

  8. Incidence of transfusion reactions: a multi-center study utilizing systematic active surveillance and expert adjudication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Roubinian, Nareg H.; Chowdhury, Dhuly; Brambilla, Don; Murphy, Edward L.; Wu, Yanyun; Ness, Paul M.; Gehrie, Eric A.; Snyder, Edward L.; Hauser, R. George; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Kleinman, Steve; Kakaiya, Ram; Strauss, Ronald G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevalence estimates of serious hazards of transfusion vary widely. We hypothesized that the current reporting infrastructure in the United States fails to capture many transfusion reactions, and undertook a multi-center study utilizing active surveillance, data review, and adjudication to test this hypothesis. Study Design and Methods A retrospective record review was completed for a random sample of 17% of all inpatient transfusion episodes over 6 months at 4 academic tertiary care hospitals, with an episode defined as all blood products released to a patient in 6 hours. Data were recorded by trained clinical research nurses, and serious reactions were adjudicated by a panel of transfusion medicine experts. Results Of 4857 transfusion episodes investigated, 1.1% were associated with a serious reaction. Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) was the most frequent serious reaction noted, being identified in 1% of transfusion episodes. Despite clinical notes describing a potential transfusion association in 59% of these cases, only 5.1% were reported to the transfusion service. Suspected transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI/possible TRALI), anaphylactic, and hypotensive reactions were noted in 0.08%, 0.02%, and 0.02% of transfusion episodes. Minor reactions, including febrile non-hemolytic and allergic, were noted in 0.62% and 0.29% of transfusion episodes, with 30–50% reported to the transfusion service. Conclusion Underreporting of cardiopulmonary transfusion reactions is striking among academic, tertiary care hospitals. Complete and accurate reporting is essential to identify, define, establish pathogenesis, and mitigate/treat transfusion reactions. A better understanding of the failure to report may improve the accuracy of passive reporting systems. PMID:27460200

  9. Theoretical nuclear reaction and structure studies using hyperons and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotanch, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    This report details research progress and results obtained during the 12 month period from January 1991 through 31 December 1991. The research project, entitled ''Theoretical Nuclear Reaction and Structure Studies Using Hyperons and Photons,'' is supported by grant DE-FG05-88ER40461 between North Carolina State University and the United States Department of Energy. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator, Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, has conducted a research program addressing theoretical investigations of reactions involving hyperons and photons. The new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following sections

  10. Structure elucidation of chromogen resulting from jaffe's reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, I.; Tariq, M.I.; Siddiqui, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    Jaffe's reaction is a reaction of creatinine with alkaline picric acid resulting in red chromogen. This color is being used widely for the estimation of creatinine in biological fluids without knowing the exact structure of the chromogen. The red species is isolated and its UV/Visible, /sup 1/H- and /sup 13/C- NMR studies are carried out. It is found that the red species is not a pure compound but a mixture of stereoisomers. Moreover, the red species in water reflects the same UV /Visible spectra as given by the reaction of creatinine with alkaline picrate in aqueous media The red species is a 2:3 molar Meisenheimer a-complex of creatinine-picric acid. (author)

  11. The evolutionary pathway from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis examined by comparison of the properties of photosystem II and bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J P; Williams, J C

    2011-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II.

  12. Electronic structure of deep impurity centers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosten, A.B. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports an experimental study of deep level impurity centers in silicon, with much attention for theoretical interpretation of the data. A detailed picture of the electronic structure of several centers was obtained by magnetic resonance techniques, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and field scanned ENDOR (FSE). The thesis consists of two parts. The first part deals with chalcogen (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) related impurities, which are mostly double donors. The second part is about late transition metal (nickel, palladium and platinum) impurities, which are single (Pd,Pt) or double (Ni) acceptor centers. (author). 155 refs.; 51 figs.; 23 tabs

  13. Theoretical nuclear reaction and structure studies using hyperons and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotanch, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    Research in three principal areas is summarized: (1) Work in elementary hadron structure seeks to further the understanding of hadron structure within the framework of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and QCD-based models. A comparative study of meson properties employed three relativistic models: an extended Dziembowski model, a generalized light-front approach, and a completely covariant null plane approach. (2) Work on the electromagnetic production of strangeness addressed systems involving the strange quark (hyperons) and hyperon electromagnetic production and radiative capture processes. (3) In the work on medium-energy photonuclear reactions, a large-scale continuum shell-model calculation was performed for (γ,N) and (N,γ) reactions at low and medium energies spanning the Δ isobar region

  14. Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG), Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Steering Committee progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    The Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG) was approved as an organisation of Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University and established on April 1, 2007. In addition to nuclear data activities carried out by JCPRG (Japan-Charged Particle Nuclear Reaction Data Group), the centre is concerned with the evaluation of nuclear reaction data in nucleosynthesis in the universe. In order efficiently to compile reaction data obtained by using radioactive ion beam, the centre signed a research contract with RIKEN Nishina Center. We are scanning 16 journals for Japanese charged-particle and photo-nuclear nuclear reaction data compilation. From April 2006 to March 2007, CPND and PhND in 45 references (453 records, 1.83 MB) have been newly compiled for NRDF. Usually new data are released at the JCPRG web site several months prior to EXFOR. Since the 2006 NRDC meeting, we have made 104 new entries and have revised or deleted 142 old entries. Intensive numerical data compilations have been done. These data were shown in tabular form in dissertations which are (partially) published in Journals. About 30 new entries were compiled from these data. We have prepared CINDA batches for CPND published in Japan every half year. Each batch covers 6 issues of each of 4 Japanese journals JPJ, PTP, NST and JNRS. Bibliographies for neutron induced reaction data have been compiled by JAEA Nuclear Data Center as before. A new web-based NRDF search and plot system on MySQL was released in July, 2007. New compilation, which has been finalized for NRDF, but not for EXFOR, can be obtained from this site. DARPE (another NRDF search and plot system written in Perl) is also available at http://www.jcprg.org/darpe/. EXFOR/ENDF (http://www.jcprg.org/exfor/) search and plot system is available. We have also developed following utilities: PENDL (http://www.jcprg.org/endf/) and RENORM (http://www.jcprg.org/renorm). We are developing a new search system of CINDA. This is an extension of EXFOR/ENDF search

  15. Spectroscopic properties of reaction center pigments in photosystem II core complexes: revision of the multimer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Diner, Bruce A; Schlodder, Eberhard; Renger, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Absorbance difference spectra associated with the light-induced formation of functional states in photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (e.g., P(+)Pheo(-),P(+)Q(A)(-),(3)P) are described quantitatively in the framework of exciton theory. In addition, effects are analyzed of site-directed mutations of D1-His(198), the axial ligand of the special-pair chlorophyll P(D1), and D1-Thr(179), an amino-acid residue nearest to the accessory chlorophyll Chl(D1), on the spectral properties of the reaction center pigments. Using pigment transition energies (site energies) determined previously from independent experiments on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes, good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra is obtained. The only difference in site energies of the reaction center pigments in D1-D2-cytb559 and photosystem II core complexes concerns Chl(D1). Compared to isolated reaction centers, the site energy of Chl(D1) is red-shifted by 4 nm and less inhomogeneously distributed in core complexes. The site energies cause primary electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures to be initiated by an excited state that is strongly localized on Chl(D1) rather than from a delocalized state as assumed in the previously described multimer model. This result is consistent with earlier experimental data on special-pair mutants and with our previous calculations on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes. The calculations show that at 5 K the lowest excited state of the reaction center is lower by approximately 10 nm than the low-energy exciton state of the two special-pair chlorophylls P(D1) and P(D2) which form an excitonic dimer. The experimental temperature dependence of the wild-type difference spectra can only be understood in this model if temperature-dependent site energies are assumed for Chl(D1) and P(D1), reducing the above energy gap from 10 to 6 nm upon increasing the temperature from 5 to 300 K. At physiological temperature, there are

  16. Proton conduction within the reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus: the electrostatic role of the protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Maróti, P; Hanson, D K; Baciou, L; Schiffer, M; Sebban, P

    1994-01-01

    Light-induced charge separation in the photosynthetic reaction center results in delivery of two electrons and two protons to the terminal quinone acceptor QB. In this paper, we have used flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy to study three strains that share identical amino acid sequences in the QB binding site, all of which lack the protonatable amino acids Glu-L212 and Asp-L213. These strains are the photosynthetically incompetent site-specific mutant Glu-L212/Asp-L213-->Ala-L212/Ala-L213 ...

  17. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  18. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP)

  19. Direct nuclear reactions and the structure of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterfeld, F.

    1985-01-01

    The present thesis deals with two different aspects of direct nuclear reactions, namely on the one hand with the microscopic calculation of the imaginary optical potential for the elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering as well as on the other hand with the microscopic analysis of giant magnetic resonances in atomic nuclei which are excited by (p,n) charge-exchange reactions. In the first part of the thesis the imaginary part of the optical potential for the elastic proton- and neutron-nucleus scattering is microscopically calculated in the framework of the so called nuclear-structure approximation to the optical potential. The calculations are performed in the Feshbach formalism in second-order perturbation theory corresponding to an effective projectile-target-nucleon interaction. In the second part of this thesis in the framework of microscopic nuclear models a complete analysis of different A(p,n)B charge-exchange reactions at high incident energies 160 MeV 90 Zr(p,n) reaction three collective spin-isospin resonances could be uniquely identified. (orig./HSI) [de

  20. Basic reactions of osteoblasts on structured material surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Meyer

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess how bone substitute materials determine bone formation in vivo it is useful to understand the mechanisms of the material surface/tissue interaction on a cellular level. Artificial materials are used in two applications, as biomaterials alone or as a scaffold for osteoblasts in a tissue engineering approach. Recently, many efforts have been undertaken to improve bone regeneration by the use of structured material surfaces. In vitro studies of bone cell responses to artificial materials are the basic tool to determine these interactions. Surface properties of materials surfaces as well as biophysical constraints at the biomaterial surface are of major importance since these features will direct the cell responses. Studies on osteoblast-like cell reactivity towards materials will have to focus on the different steps of protein and cell reactions towards defined surface properties. The introduction of new techniques allows nowadays the fabrication of materials with ordered surface structures. This paper gives a review of present knowledge on the various stages of osteoblast reactions on material surfaces, focused on basic cell events under in vitro conditions. Special emphasis is given to cellular reactions towards ordered nano-sized topographies.

  1. Reaction enhancement of initially distant scalars by Lagrangian coherent structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, Kenneth R.; Crimaldi, John P.; Meiss, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent fluid flows have long been recognized as a superior means of diluting initial concentrations of scalars due to rapid stirring. Conversely, experiments have shown that the structures responsible for this rapid dilution can also aggregate initially distant reactive scalars and thereby greatly enhance reaction rates. Indeed, chaotic flows not only enhance dilution by shearing and stretching but also organize initially distant scalars along transiently attracting regions in the flow. To show the robustness of this phenomenon, a hierarchical set of three numerical flows is used: the periodic wake downstream of a stationary cylinder, a chaotic double gyre flow, and a chaotic, aperiodic flow consisting of interacting Taylor vortices. We demonstrate that Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), as identified by ridges in finite time Lyapunov exponents, are directly responsible for this coalescence of reactive scalar filaments. When highly concentrated filaments coalesce, reaction rates can be orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted in a well-mixed system. This is further supported by an idealized, analytical model that was developed to quantify the competing effects of scalar dilution and coalescence. Chaotic flows, known for their ability to efficiently dilute scalars, therefore have the competing effect of organizing initially distant scalars along the LCS at timescales shorter than that required for dilution, resulting in reaction enhancement

  2. Quinone reduction via secondary B-branch electron transfer in mutant bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Kirmaier, Christine; Udawatte, Chandani S M; Hofman, Samuel J; Holten, Dewey; Hanson, Deborah K

    2003-02-18

    Symmetry-related branches of electron-transfer cofactors-initiating with a primary electron donor (P) and terminating in quinone acceptors (Q)-are common features of photosynthetic reaction centers (RC). Experimental observations show activity of only one of them-the A branch-in wild-type bacterial RCs. In a mutant RC, we now demonstrate that electron transfer can occur along the entire, normally inactive B-branch pathway to reduce the terminal acceptor Q(B) on the time scale of nanoseconds. The transmembrane charge-separated state P(+)Q(B)(-) is created in this manner in a Rhodobacter capsulatus RC containing the F(L181)Y-Y(M208)F-L(M212)H-W(M250)V mutations (YFHV). The W(M250)V mutation quantitatively blocks binding of Q(A), thereby eliminating Q(B) reduction via the normal A-branch pathway. Full occupancy of the Q(B) site by the native UQ(10) is ensured (without the necessity of reconstitution by exogenous quinone) by purification of RCs with the mild detergent, Deriphat 160-C. The lifetime of P(+)Q(B)(-) in the YFHV mutant RC is >6 s (at pH 8.0, 298 K). This charge-separated state is not formed upon addition of competitive inhibitors of Q(B) binding (terbutryn or stigmatellin). Furthermore, this lifetime is much longer than the value of approximately 1-1.5 s found when P(+)Q(B)(-) is produced in the wild-type RC by A-side activity alone. Collectively, these results demonstrate that P(+)Q(B)(-) is formed solely by activity of the B-branch carriers in the YFHV RC. In comparison, P(+)Q(B)(-) can form by either the A or B branches in the YFH RC, as indicated by the biexponential lifetimes of approximately 1 and approximately 6-10 s. These findings suggest that P(+)Q(B)(-) states formed via the two branches are distinct and that P(+)Q(B)(-) formed by the B side does not decay via the normal (indirect) pathway that utilizes the A-side cofactors when present. These differences may report on structural and energetic factors that further distinguish the functional

  3. An efficient synthesis of α-amino-δ-valerolactones by the ugi five-center three-component reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Bae; Lee, Duck Hyung; Park, Soo Jung; Keum, Gyo Chang; Jang, Min Seok; Kang, Soon Bang; Kim, You Seung

    2002-01-01

    A novel approach to α-amino-δ-valerolactones derivatives 8 by the intramolecular Ugi five-center three-component reaction (U-5C-3CR) using the multifunctional starting material, L-pentahomoserine 5 is described

  4. Quasi-elastic reactions: an interplay of reaction dynamics and nuclear structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recchia F.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleon transfer reactions have been investigated in 40Ar+208Pb with the Prisma+Clara set-up. The experimental differential cross sections of different neutron transfer channels have been obtained at three different angular settings taking into account the transmission through the spectrometer. The experimental yields of the excited states have been determined via particle-γ coincidences. In odd Ar isotopes, we reported a signif cant population of 11/2− states, reached via neutron transfer. Their structure matches a stretched conf guration of the valence neutron coupled to vibration quanta.

  5. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  6. Theoretical studies in nuclear reaction and nuclear structure. Final report, January 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, M.K.; Griffin, J.J.

    1977-07-01

    Progress in theoretical research is reported under the following readings: (1) few nuclear reactions, Eikonal approximations, and optical models; (2) pion reactions; (3) nuclear structure by reaction studies; (4) nuclear dynamics

  7. Customer-Centered Structuring in University Libraries and Personnel Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Yılmaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM aims at creating a client-centered organizati- on and providing customer satisfaction. This study reviews TQM and its applica- tions in university libraries and examines employees' satisfaction with their work respectively. It was hypothesized that library personnel is not satisfıed because university libraries lack customer-centered (users and personnel structuring. Survey method was used to gather data. The questionnaire was administered to the 66 employees of Hacettepe University (HU libraries. High-level administra- tors of HU libraries were also interviewed. Data w ere analyzed using “t test” and “one-way analysis ofvariance (ANOVA”.

  8. Molecular modeling and computational simulation of the photosystem-II reaction center to address isoproturon resistance in Phalaris minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Durg Vijay; Agarwal, Shikha; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna

    2012-08-01

    Isoproturon is the only herbicide that can control Phalaris minor, a competitive weed of wheat that developed resistance in 1992. Resistance against isoproturon was reported to be due to a mutation in the psbA gene that encodes the isoproturon-binding D1 protein. Previously in our laboratory, a triazole derivative of isoproturon (TDI) was synthesized and found to be active against both susceptible and resistant biotypes at 0.5 kg/ha but has shown poor specificity. In the present study, both susceptible D1((S)), resistant D1((R)) and D2 proteins of the PS-II reaction center of P. minor have been modeled and simulated, selecting the crystal structure of PS-II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus (2AXT.pdb) as template. Loop regions were refined, and the complete reaction center D1/D2 was simulated with GROMACS in lipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphoglycerol, POPG) environment along with ligands and cofactor. Both S and R models were energy minimized using steepest decent equilibrated with isotropic pressure coupling and temperature coupling using a Berendsen protocol, and subjected to 1,000 ps of MD simulation. As a result of MD simulation, the best model obtained in lipid environment had five chlorophylls, two plastoquinones, two phenophytins and a bicarbonate ion along with cofactor Fe and oxygen evolving center (OEC). The triazole derivative of isoproturon was used as lead molecule for docking. The best worked out conformation of TDI was chosen for receptor-based de novo ligand design. In silico designed molecules were screened and, as a result, only those molecules that show higher docking and binding energies in comparison to isoproturon and its triazole derivative were proposed for synthesis in order to get more potent, non-resistant and more selective TDI analogs.

  9. Reaction-diffusion controlled growth of complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorduin, Willem; Mahadevan, L.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how the emergence of complex forms and shapes in biominerals came about is both of fundamental and practical interest. Although biomineralization processes and organization strategies to give higher order architectures have been studied extensively, synthetic approaches to mimic these self-assembled structures are highly complex and have been difficult to emulate, let alone replicate. The emergence of solution patterns has been found in reaction-diffusion systems such as Turing patterns and the BZ reaction. Intrigued by this spontaneous formation of complexity we explored if similar processes can lead to patterns in the solid state. We here identify a reaction-diffusion system in which the shape of the solidified products is a direct readout of the environmental conditions. Based on insights in the underlying mechanism, we developed a toolbox of engineering strategies to deterministically sculpt patterns and shapes, and combine different morphologies to create a landscape of hierarchical multi scale-complex tectonic architectures with unprecedented levels of complexity. These findings may hold profound implications for understanding, mimicking and ultimately expanding upon nature's morphogenesis strategies, allowing the synthesis of advanced highly complex microscale materials and devices. WLN acknowledges the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research for financial support

  10. Fiscal reaction under endogenous structural changes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei G. Simonassi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the importance of fiscal policy in smoothing the impact of shocks such as the international financial and economic crises, the paper analyzes the sustainability of the Brazilian fiscal policy by taking into consideration the possibility of multiple endogenous structural breaks on the coefficients of government reaction function. From monthly data in the period 1991–2008, tests on the reliable estimates dictate the occurrence of structural change in May 1994, and another in February 2003. There has been a situation of fiscal solvency in Brazil, but only from May 1994 the hitherto innocuous actions of government to formulate policies on public debt turn out to be significant, as it rose twofold after February 2003. This reinforces the existence of a more flexible alternative to implement strategic policy in Brazil, if an eventual alternative for increasing public spending is a way of hindering the effects of international financial crises without compromising the fiscal targets.

  11. Energetic change of the primary quinone in photosynthetic reaction center. Mutation, delayed fluorescence and model calculations (Theses of the Ph.D. dissertation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinyu, L.

    2007-01-01

    intensities of prompt and delayed fluorescence emitted by the primary donor of the reaction center. By use of the values of the free energy gaps, I calculated the in situ midpoint redox potential of the Q A /Q A - redox couple in the mutants and the wild type and compared these values with each other. Based on the available data of reaction center structures I gave a possible explanation to the substantial change in E m of Q A in case of mutants. The available X-ray structures of reaction center make possible to calculate the thermo- dynamic properties of the mutants with computer simulations. Using docking simulations in wild type and mutant reaction centers, I calculated the binding free energies of the quinone and semiquinone molecules to the Q A packet and estimated the midpoint redox potential of the Q A /Q A - redox couple. Additionally, by use of the free energy perturbation method, I modeled the reductions process of the primary quinone molecule in wild-type and mutant re- action centers. With the application of cardiolipin (diphosphatide-glycerol) as a model-lipid, I investigated the interaction between the reaction center protein and the lipid environment. I described how it affects to the charge-recombination process and how it influences the free energy level of the charge couple (P + Q A - ) relative to the free energy level of the excited primary donor. With the investigation of the delayed fluorescence emission of the reaction center embedded into membrane fragment (chromatophore) I gave further information about the effects of reaction center proteins and lipid membranes on the energetic properties of Q A . In addition to these studies, I characterized the complex kinetics of the decay of delayed fluorescence emitted by chromatophore and also gave a description of the new fastest kinetic component

  12. How exciton-vibrational coherences control charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Romero, Elisabet; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-12-14

    In photosynthesis absorbed sun light produces collective excitations (excitons) that form a coherent superposition of electronic and vibrational states of the individual pigments. Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy allows a visualization of how these coherences are involved in the primary processes of energy and charge transfer. Based on quantitative modeling we identify the exciton-vibrational coherences observed in 2D photon echo of the photosystem II reaction center (PSII-RC). We find that the vibrations resonant with the exciton splittings can modify the delocalization of the exciton states and produce additional states, thus promoting directed energy transfer and allowing a switch between the two charge separation pathways. We conclude that the coincidence of the frequencies of the most intense vibrations with the splittings within the manifold of exciton and charge-transfer states in the PSII-RC is not occurring by chance, but reflects a fundamental principle of how energy conversion in photosynthesis was optimized.

  13. Chemical proprieties of the iron-quinone complex in mutated reaction centers of Rb. sphaeroides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hałas, Agnieszka; Derrien, Valerie; Sebban, Pierre; Matlak, Krzysztof; Korecki, Józef; Kruk, Jerzy; Burda, Kvĕtoslava

    2012-01-01

    We investigated type II bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers, which contain a quinone - iron complex (Q A -Fe-Q B ) on their acceptor side. Under physiological conditions it was observed mainly in a reduced high spin state but its low spin ferrous states were also observed. Therefore, it was suggested that it might regulate the dynamical properties of the iron–quinone complex and the protonation and deprotonation events in its neighbourhood. In order to get insight into the molecular mechanism of the NHFe low spin state formation, we preformed Mössbauer studies of a wild type of Rb. sphaeroides and its two mutated forms. Our Mössbauer measurements show that the hydrophobicity of the Q A binding site can be crucial for stabilization of the high spin ferrous state of NHFe.

  14. Alumina plate containing photosystem I reaction center complex oriented inside plate-penetrating silica nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamidaki, Chihiro; Kondo, Toru; Noji, Tomoyasu; Itoh, Tetsuji; Yamaguchi, Akira; Itoh, Shigeru

    2013-08-22

    The photosynthetic photosystem I reaction center complex (PSI-RC), which has a molecular diameter of 21 nm with 100 pigments, was incorporated into silica nanopores with a 100-nm diameter that penetrates an alumina plate of 60-μm thickness to make up an inorganic-biological hybrid photocell. PSI-RCs, purified from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, were stable inside the nanopores and rapidly photoreduced a mediator dye methyl viologen. The reduced dye was more stable inside nanopores suggesting the decrease of dissolved oxygen. The analysis by a cryogenic electron spin paramagnetic resonance indicated the oriented arrangement of RCs inside the 100-nm nanopores, with their surface parallel to the silica wall and perpendicular to the plane of the alumina plate. PSI RC complex in the semicrystalline orientation inside silica nanopores can be a new type of light energy conversion unit to supply strong reducing power selectively to other molecules inside or outside nanopores.

  15. Kinetics of several oxygenated carbon-centered free radical reactions with NO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Matti P; Arppe, Suula L; Timonen, Raimo S

    2013-05-16

    Five oxygenated carbon-centered free radical reactions with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have been studied in direct time-resolved measurements. Experiments were conducted in a temperature-controlled flow tube reactor coupled to a 193 nm exciplex laser photolysis and a resonance gas lamp photoionization mass spectrometer. Reactions were investigated under pseudofirst-order conditions, with the NO2 concentrations of the experiments in great excess over the initial radical concentrations ([R]0 CH3CO radical reactions with NO2 and, hence, includes the three smallest hydroxyalkyl radical species (CH2OH, CH2CH2OH, and CH3CHOH). The obtained rate coefficients are high with the temperature-dependent rate coefficients given by a formula k(T) = k300K × (T/300 K)(-n) as (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO2) = (8.95 ± 2.70) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-0.54±0.27) (T = 298-363 K), k(CH2CH2OH + NO2) = (5.99 ± 1.80) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-1.49±0.45)(T = 241-363 K), k(CH3CHOH + NO2) = (7.48 ± 2.24) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-1.36±0.41) (T = 266-363 K), k(CH3OCH2 + NO2) = (7.85 ± 2.36) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-0.93±0.28) (T = 243-363 K), and k(CH3CO + NO2) = (2.87 ± 0.57) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-2.45±0.49) (T = 241-363 K), where the uncertainties refer to the estimated overall uncertainties of the values obtained. The determined rate coefficients show negative temperature dependence with no apparent bath gas pressure dependence under the current experimental conditions (241-363 K and about 1-3 Torr helium). This behavior is typical for a radical-radical addition mechanism with no potential energy barrier above the energy of the separated reactants in the entrance channel of the reaction. Unfortunately the absence of detected product signals prevented gaining deeper insight into the reaction mechanism.

  16. Using (n,xnγ) reactions to probe collective nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, S.W.; Brown, T.B.; Warr, N.; Hannant, C.D.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The (n,n'γ) reaction has been utilized at the University of Kentucky accelerator laboratory for many years to study the structure of stable nuclei (1,2). Through the use of γ-ray excitation function and angular distribution measurements, detailed level schemes of stable nuclei can be established. In recent years, the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) has been applied following the inelastic neutron scattering reaction to determine the lifetimes of nuclear states (3), and collimated neutron 'beams' have been employed in γ-γ coincidence measurements with an array of HPGe detectors in a close geometry (4,5). Recently, γ-ray detection facilities (6,7) for reactions induced by spallation neutrons, with energies of several hundred MeV, have become available at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and initial measurements indicate that a large variety of reactions are possible. Evidence has been obtained for reactions with as many as 27 particles emitted (7). While the mechanisms of such reactions may be of interest, the primary spectroscopic advantage of utilizing higher-energy neutrons appears to be that neutron-rich nuclei which are not normally available for study with fusion-evaporation reactions can be accessed. As a complement to these measurements with very energetic neutrons, (n2nγ) and (n,3nγ) reaction studies have been explored with neutrons from the 2 H(d,n) and 3 H(d,n) reactions and the facilities at the University of Kentucky. Neutron energies as high as 22 MeV have been employed. Initial evaluations have focussed on data from the 186 W(n,2nγ) 185 W and 186 W(n,3nγ) 184 W reactions and indicate that a great deal of information can be obtained. The advantages of these measurements, as well as comparisons with data from reactions with spallation neutrons, will be presented. This work was supported under grant PHY-9803784 from the U.S. National Science Foundation. (author)

  17. Interplay between excitation kinetics and reaction-center dynamics in purple bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; RodrIguez, Ferney J; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthesis is arguably the fundamental process of life, since it enables energy from the Sun to enter the food chain on the Earth. It is a remarkable non-equilibrium process in which photons are converted to many-body excitations, which traverse a complex biomolecular membrane, where they are captured and fuel chemical reactions within a reaction center (RC) in order to produce nutrients. The precise nature of these dynamical processes-which lie at the interface between quantum and classical behavior and involve both noise and coordination-is still being explored. Here, we focus on a striking recent empirical finding concerning an illumination-driven transition in the biomolecular membrane architecture of the purple bacteria Rsp. photometricum. Using stochastic realizations to describe a hopping rate model for excitation transfer, we show numerically and analytically that this surprising shift in preferred architectures can be traced to the interplay between the excitation kinetics and the RC dynamics. The net effect is that the bacteria profit from efficient metabolism at low illumination intensities while using dissipation to avoid an oversupply of energy at high illumination intensities.

  18. Center of gravity estimation using a reaction board instrumented with fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui; Roriz, Paulo; Marques, Manuel B.; Frazão, Orlando

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present work is to construct a reaction board based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) that could be used for estimation of the 2D coordinates of the projection of center of gravity (CG) of an object. The apparatus is consisted of a rigid equilateral triangular board mounted on three supports at the vertices, two of which have cantilevers instrumented with FBGs. When an object of known weight is placed on the board, the bending strain of the cantilevers is measured by a proportional wavelength shift of the FBGs. Applying the equilibrium conditions of a rigid body and proper calibration procedures, the wavelength shift is used to estimate the vertical reaction forces and moments of force at the supports and the coordinates of the object's CG projection on the board. This method can be used on a regular basis to estimate the CG of the human body or objects with complex geometry and density distribution. An example is provided for the estimation of the CG projection coordinates of two orthopaedic femur bone models, one intact, and the other with a hip stem implant encased. The clinical implications of changing the normal CG location by means of a prosthesis have been discussed.

  19. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draayer, Jerry P. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-09-28

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  20. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, Jerry P.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  1. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  2. Reactions of oxygen containing structures in coal pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodek, W.; Kirschstein, J.; Van Heek, K.-H. (DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-03-01

    In coal pyrolysis O-containing structures such as ether bridges and phenolic groups play an important role. Their reactions were studied by non-isothermal pyrolysis of a high volatile bituminous coal and some model polymers with gas chromatographic detection of the gaseous pyrolysis products. The coal was separated into the maceral groups vitrinite, exinite and inertinite, which showed markedly different pyrolysis behaviour. The formation of CO, methane and benzene was measured versus temperature. By comparison with polyphenyleneoxide and phenol-formaldehyde resins, it was found that the main volatilization, during which most of the tar is evolved, is initiated by cleavage of alkyl-aryl-ethers. Rearrangements of the primarily formed radicals lead to the formation of CO and methane at higher temperatures. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  4. Proton conduction within the reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus: the electrostatic role of the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, P; Hanson, D K; Baciou, L; Schiffer, M; Sebban, P

    1994-06-07

    Light-induced charge separation in the photosynthetic reaction center results in delivery of two electrons and two protons to the terminal quinone acceptor QB. In this paper, we have used flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy to study three strains that share identical amino acid sequences in the QB binding site, all of which lack the protonatable amino acids Glu-L212 and Asp-L213. These strains are the photosynthetically incompetent site-specific mutant Glu-L212/Asp-L213-->Ala-L212/Ala-L213 and two different photocompetent derivatives that carry both alanine substitutions and an intergenic suppressor mutation located far from QB (class 3 strain, Ala-Ala + Arg-M231-->Leu; class 4 strain, Ala-Ala + Asn-M43-->Asp). At pH 8 in the double mutant, we observe a concomitant decrease of nearly 4 orders of magnitude in the rate constants of second electron and proton transfer to QB compared to the wild type. Surprisingly, these rates are increased to about the same extent in both types of suppressor strains but remain > 2 orders of magnitude smaller than those of the wild type. In the double mutant, at pH 8, the loss of Asp-L213 and Glu-L212 leads to a substantial stabilization (> or = 60 meV) of the semiquinone energy level. Both types of compensatory mutations partially restore, to nearly the same level, the original free energy difference for electron transfer from primary quinone QA to QB. The pH dependence of the electron and proton transfer processes in the double-mutant and the suppressor strains suggests that when reaction centers of the double mutant are shifted to lower pH (1.5-2 units), they function like those of the suppressor strains at physiological pH. Our data suggest that the main effect of the compensatory mutations is to partially restore the negative electrostatic environment of QB and to increase an apparent "functional" pK of the system for efficient proton transfer to the active site. This emphasizes the role of the protein in tuning the

  5. Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minute, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

  6. Kinetics of Several Oxygen-Containing Carbon-Centered Free Radical Reactions with Nitric Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Matti P; Ihlenborg, Marvin; Pekkanen, Timo T; Timonen, Raimo S

    2015-07-16

    Kinetics of four carbon-centered, oxygen-containing free radical reactions with nitric oxide (NO) were investigated as a function of temperature at a few Torr pressure of helium, employing flow tube reactors coupled to a laser-photolysis/resonance-gas-discharge-lamp photoionization mass spectrometer (LP-RPIMS). Rate coefficients were directly determined from radical (R) decay signals under pseudo-first-order conditions ([R]0 ≪ [NO]). The obtained rate coefficients showed negative temperature dependences, typical for a radical-radical association process, and can be represented by the following parametrizations (all in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO) = (4.76 × 10(-21)) × (T/300 K)(15.92) × exp[50700/(RT)] (T = 266-363 K, p = 0.79-3.44 Torr); k(CH3CHOH + NO) = (1.27 × 10(-16)) × (T/300 K)(6.81) × exp[28700/(RT)] (T = 241-363 K, p = 0.52-3.43 Torr); k(CH3OCH2 + NO) = (3.58 ± 0.12) × 10(-12) × (T/300 K)(-3.17±0.14) (T = 221-363 K, p = 0.50-0.80 Torr); k(T)3 = 9.62 × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-5.99) × exp[-7100/(RT)] (T = 221-473 K, p = 1.41-2.95 Torr), with the uncertainties given as standard errors of the fits and the overall uncertainties estimated as ±20%. The rate of CH3OCH2 + NO reaction was measured in two density ranges due to its observed considerable pressure dependence, which was not found in the studied hydroxyalkyl reactions. In addition, the CH3CO + NO rate coefficient was determined at two temperatures resulting in k298K(CH3CO + NO) = (5.6 ± 2.8) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). No products were found during these experiments, reasons for which are briefly discussed.

  7. Assembly of photosynthetic reaction center with ABA tri-block polymersomes: highlights on the protein localization.

    KAUST Repository

    Tangorra, Roberto Rocco

    2015-07-07

    The reconstitution of the integral membrane protein photosynthetic reaction center (RC) in polymersomes, i. e. artificial closed vesicles, was achieved by the micelle-to-vesicle transition technique, a very mild protocol based on size exclusion chromatography often used to drive the incorporation of proteins contemporarily to liposomes formation. An optimized protocol was used to successfully reconstitute the protein in a fully active state in polymersomes formed by the tri-block copolymers PMOXA22-PDMS61-PMOXA22. The RC is very sensitive to its solubilizing environment and was used to probe the positioning of the protein in the vesicles. According to charge-recombination experiments and to the enzymatic activity assay, the RC is found to accommodate in the PMOXA22 region of the polymersome, facing the water bulk solution, rather than in the PDMS61 transmembrane-like region. Furthermore, polymersomes were found to preserve protein integrity efficiently as the biomimetic lipid bilayers but show a much longer temporal stability than lipid based vesicles.

  8. Early bacteriopheophytin reduction in charge separation in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingyi; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Paparelli, Laura; Jones, Michael R; Groot, Marie Louise

    2013-06-04

    A question at the forefront of biophysical sciences is, to what extent do quantum effects and protein conformational changes play a role in processes such as biological sensing and energy conversion? At the heart of photosynthetic energy transduction lie processes involving ultrafast energy and electron transfers among a small number of tetrapyrrole pigments embedded in the interior of a protein. In the purple bacterial reaction center (RC), a highly efficient ultrafast charge separation takes place between a pair of bacteriochlorophylls: an accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B) and bacteriopheophytin (H). In this work, we applied ultrafast spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral region to Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs to accurately track the timing of the electron on BA and HA via the appearance of the BA and HA anion bands. We observed an unexpectedly early rise of the HA⁻ band that challenges the accepted simple picture of stepwise electron transfer with 3 ps and 1 ps time constants. The implications for the mechanism of initial charge separation in bacterial RCs are discussed in terms of a possible adiabatic electron transfer step between BA and HA, and the effect of protein conformation on the electron transfer rate. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assembly of photosynthetic reaction center with ABA tri-block polymersomes: highlights on the protein localization.

    KAUST Repository

    Tangorra, Roberto Rocco; Operamolla, Alessandra; Milano, Francesco; Hassan Omar, Omar; Henrard, John; Comparelli, Roberto; Italiano, Francesca; Agostiano, Angela; De Leo, Vincenzo; Marotta, Roberto; Falqui, Andrea; Farinola, Gianluca; Trotta, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of the integral membrane protein photosynthetic reaction center (RC) in polymersomes, i. e. artificial closed vesicles, was achieved by the micelle-to-vesicle transition technique, a very mild protocol based on size exclusion chromatography often used to drive the incorporation of proteins contemporarily to liposomes formation. An optimized protocol was used to successfully reconstitute the protein in a fully active state in polymersomes formed by the tri-block copolymers PMOXA22-PDMS61-PMOXA22. The RC is very sensitive to its solubilizing environment and was used to probe the positioning of the protein in the vesicles. According to charge-recombination experiments and to the enzymatic activity assay, the RC is found to accommodate in the PMOXA22 region of the polymersome, facing the water bulk solution, rather than in the PDMS61 transmembrane-like region. Furthermore, polymersomes were found to preserve protein integrity efficiently as the biomimetic lipid bilayers but show a much longer temporal stability than lipid based vesicles.

  10. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaas, Josh V; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-31

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the Q(B) site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the Q(A) and Q(B) sites. Disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the Q(A)⁻Q(B)⁻ biradical and competitive binding assays.

  11. The Legnaro National Laboratories and the SPES facility: nuclear structure and reactions today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Fiorentini, Gianni

    2016-11-01

    There is a very long tradition of studying nuclear structure and reactions at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics). The wide expertise acquired in building and running large germanium arrays has made the laboratories one of the most advanced research centers in γ-ray spectroscopy. The ’gamma group’ has been deeply involved in all the national and international developments of the last 20 years and is currently one of the major contributors to the AGATA project, the first (together with its American counterpart GRETINA) γ-detector array based on γ-ray tracking. This line of research is expected to be strongly boosted by the coming into operation of the SPES radioactive ion beam project, currently under construction at LNL. In this report, written on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Nobel prize awarded to Aage Bohr, Ben R Mottelson and Leo Rainwater and particularly focused on the physics of nuclear structure, we intend to summarize the different lines of research that have guided nuclear structure and reaction research at LNL in the last decades. The results achieved have paved the way for the present SPES facility, a new laboratories infrastructure producing and accelerating radioactive ion beams of fission fragments and other isotopes.

  12. The Legnaro National Laboratories and the SPES facility: nuclear structure and reactions today and tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, Giacomo; Fiorentini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    There is a very long tradition of studying nuclear structure and reactions at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics). The wide expertise acquired in building and running large germanium arrays has made the laboratories one of the most advanced research centers in γ -ray spectroscopy. The ’gamma group’ has been deeply involved in all the national and international developments of the last 20 years and is currently one of the major contributors to the AGATA project, the first (together with its American counterpart GRETINA) γ -detector array based on γ -ray tracking. This line of research is expected to be strongly boosted by the coming into operation of the SPES radioactive ion beam project, currently under construction at LNL. In this report, written on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Nobel prize awarded to Aage Bohr, Ben R Mottelson and Leo Rainwater and particularly focused on the physics of nuclear structure, we intend to summarize the different lines of research that have guided nuclear structure and reaction research at LNL in the last decades. The results achieved have paved the way for the present SPES facility, a new laboratories infrastructure producing and accelerating radioactive ion beams of fission fragments and other isotopes. (invited comment)

  13. Reduction reactions applied for synthesizing different nano-structured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque Brocchi, Eduardo de; Correia de Siqueira, Rogério Navarro [Department of Materials Engineering, PUC-Rio, Rua Marquês de São Vicente, 225, Gávea, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Motta, Marcelo Senna [Basck Ltd. (United Kingdom); Moura, Francisco José, E-mail: moura@puc-rio.br [Department of Materials Engineering, PUC-Rio, Rua Marquês de São Vicente, 225, Gávea, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Solórzano-Naranjo, Ivan Guillermo [Department of Materials Engineering, PUC-Rio, Rua Marquês de São Vicente, 225, Gávea, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Different materials have been synthesized by alternative routes: nitrates thermal decomposition to prepare oxide or co-formed oxides and reduction by hydrogen or graphite to obtain mixed oxides, composites or alloys. These chemical-based synthesis routes are described and thermodynamics studies and kinetics data are presented to support its feasibility. In addition, selective reduction reactions have been applied to successfully produce metal/ceramic composites, and alloys. Structural characterization has been carried out by X-ray Diffraction and, more extensively, Transmission Electron Microscopy operating in conventional diffraction contrast (CTEM) and high-resolution mode (HRTEM), indicated the possibility of obtaining oxide and alloy crystals of sizes ranging between 20 and 40 nm. - Highlights: • The viability in obtaining Ni–Co, Cu–Al, Mn–Al co-formed nano oxides was evaluated. • Partial and complete H{sub 2} reduction were used to produce alloy, composite and Spinel. • XRD, TEM and HREM techniques were used to characterize the obtained nanostructures.

  14. Nuclear structure and reaction studies at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, G.W.; Ray, R.L.

    1990-10-01

    This document constitutes the (1988--1991) technical progress report for the ongoing medium energy physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy through special Research Grant FG05-88ER40444. The experiments discussed are conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The overall motivation for the work discussed in this document is driven by three main objectives: (1) provide hadron-nucleon and hadron-nucleus scattering data which serve to facilitate the study of effective two-body interactions, test (and possibly determine) nuclear structure, and help study reaction mechanisms and dynamics;(2) provide unique, first-of-a-kind ''exploratory'' hadron-nucleus scattering data in the hope that such data will lead to discovery of new phenomena and new physics; and (3) perform precision tests of fundamental interactions, such as rare decay searches, whose observation would imply fundamental new physics

  15. Studies of nuclear structure in antinucleon charge-exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.

    1986-01-01

    The antinucleon-nucleus charge exchange reaction is discussed an its use as a probe of isovector excitations in nuclei is described. Attention is drawn to the fact that the (anti p,anti n) reaction will predominantly excite ''pionic'' (i.e., longitudinal spin) modes in nuclei. Comparison between (anti p,anti n) and (n,p) reactions is made. Plans for (anti p,anti n) experiments in the near future are mentioned. 21 refs., 3 figs

  16. Purification and spectroscopic characterization of photosystem II reaction center complexes isolated with or without Triton X-100.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijckelhoff, C.; van Roon, H.; Groot, M.L.; van Grondelle, R.; Dekker, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The pigment composition of the isolated photosystem II reaction center complex in its most stable and pure form currently is a matter of considerable debate. In this contribution, we present a new method based on a combination of gel filtration chromatography and diode array detection to analyze the

  17. Report on the consultants` meeting on technical aspects of the co-operation of nuclear reaction data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, H D; Schwerer, O; Wienke, H [eds.

    1995-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convenes in annual intervals coordination meetings of the Network of the Nuclear Reaction Data Center. The present meeting dealt with technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Refs, figs and tabs.

  18. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  19. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosyntetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  20. Report on the consultants' meeting on technical aspects of the co-operation of nuclear reaction data centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.; Schwerer, O.; Wienke, H.

    1995-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convenes in annual intervals coordination meetings of the Network of the Nuclear Reaction Data Center. The present meeting dealt with technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Direct reactions for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Katherine Louise

    2014-01-01

    Direct reactions are powerful probes for studying the atomic nucleus. Modern direct reaction studies are illuminating both the fundamental nature of the nucleus and its role in nucleosynthetic processes occurring in the cosmos. This report covers experiments using knockout reactions on neutron-deficient fragmentation beams, transfer reactions on fission fragment beams, and theoretical sensitivity studies relating to the astrophysical r-process. Results from experiments on 108,106 Sn at the NSCL, and on 131 Sn at HRIBF are presented as well as the results from the nucleosynthesis study.

  2. Direct Reactions for Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Katherine Louise [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Experimental Low-Energy Nuclear Physics Group

    2014-12-18

    Direct reactions are powerful probes for studying the atomic nucleus. Modern direct reaction studies are illuminating both the fundamental nature of the nucleus and its role in nucleosynthetic processes occurring in the cosmos. This report covers experiments using knockout reactions on neutron-deficient fragmentation beams, transfer reactions on fission fragment beams, and theoretical sensitivity studies relating to the astrophysical r-process. Results from experiments on 108,106Sn at the NSCL, and on 131Sn at HRIBF are presented as well as the results from the nucleosynthesis study.

  3. Engineered Alloy Structures by Friction Stir Reaction Processing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative surface modification technology incorporating friction stir reaction processing for producing...

  4. B-side charge separation in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: nanosecond time scale electron transfer from HB- to QB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmaier, Christine; Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K; Holten, Dewey

    2003-02-25

    We report time-resolved optical measurements of the primary electron transfer reactions in Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction centers (RCs) having four mutations: Phe(L181) --> Tyr, Tyr(M208) --> Phe, Leu(M212) --> His, and Trp(M250) --> Val (denoted YFHV). Following direct excitation of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P) to its lowest excited singlet state P, electron transfer to the B-side bacteriopheophytin (H(B)) gives P(+)H(B)(-) in approximately 30% yield. When the secondary quinone (Q(B)) site is fully occupied, P(+)H(B)(-) decays with a time constant estimated to be in the range of 1.5-3 ns. In the presence of excess terbutryn, a competitive inhibitor of Q(B) binding, the observed lifetime of P(+)H(B)(-) is noticeably longer and is estimated to be in the range of 4-8 ns. On the basis of these values, the rate constant for P(+)H(B)(-) --> P(+)Q(B)(-) electron transfer is calculated to be between approximately (2 ns)(-)(1) and approximately (12 ns)(-)(1), making it at least an order of magnitude smaller than the rate constant of approximately (200 ps)(-)(1) for electron transfer between the corresponding A-side cofactors (P(+)H(A)(-) --> P(+)Q(A)(-)). Structural and energetic factors associated with electron transfer to Q(B) compared to Q(A) are discussed. Comparison of the P(+)H(B)(-) lifetimes in the presence and absence of terbutryn indicates that the ultimate (i.e., quantum) yield of P(+)Q(B)(-) formation relative to P is 10-25% in the YFHV RC.

  5. Spectral properties of chlorines and electron transfer with their participation in the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchupak, E. E.; Ivashin, N. V.

    2014-02-01

    Structural factors that provide localization of excited states and determine the properties of primary donor and acceptor of electron in the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII RC) are studied. The results of calculations using stationary and time-dependent density functional theory indicate an important role of protein environments of chlorophylls PA, PB, BA, and BB and pheophytins HA and HB in the area with a radius of no greater than ≤10 Å in the formation of excitonic states of PSII RC. When the neighboring elements are taken into account, the wavelength of long-wavelength Q y transition of chlorophyll molecules is varied by about 10 nm. The effect is less developed for pheophytin molecules (Δλ ≅ 2 nm). The following elements strongly affect energy of the transition: HisA198 and HisD197 amino-acid residues that serve as ligands of magnesium atoms affect PA and PB, respectively; MetA183 affects PA; MetA172 and MetD198 affect BA; water molecules that are located above the planes of the BA and BB macrocycles form H bonds with carbonyl groups; and phytol chains of PA and PB affect BA, BB, HA, and HB. The analysis of excitonic states, mutual positions of molecular orbitals of electron donors and acceptors, and matrix elements of electron transfer reaction shows that (i) charge separation between BA and HA and PB and BA is possible in the active A branch of cofactors of PSII RC and (ii) electron transfer is blocked at the BB - HB fragment in inactive B branch of PSII RC.

  6. Data acquisition and analysis at the Structural Biology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, M.L.; Coleman, T.A.; Daly, R.T.; Pflugrath, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC), a national user facility for macromolecular crystallography located at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source, is currently being built and commissioned. SBC facilities include a bending-magnet beamline, an insertion-device beamline, laboratory and office space adjacent to the beamlines, and associated instrumentation, experimental apparatus, and facilities. SBC technical facilities will support anomalous dispersion phasing experiments, data collection from microcrystals, data collection from crystals with large molecular structures and rapid data collection from multiple related crystal structures for protein engineering and drug design. The SBC Computing Systems and Software Engineering Group is tasked with developing the SBC Control System, which includes computing systems, network, and software. The emphasis of SBC Control System development has been to provide efficient and convenient beamline control, data acquisition, and data analysis for maximal facility and experimenter productivity. This paper describes the SBC Control System development, specifically data acquisition and analysis at the SBC, and the development methods used to meet this goal

  7. Nuclear structure effects on calculated fast neutron reaction cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrigeanu, V.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of accurate low-lying level schemes for reaction cross section calculation and need for microscopically calculated levels are proved with reference to fast neutron induced reactions in the A = 50 atomic mass range. The uses of the discrete levels both for normalization of phenomenological level density approaches and within Hauser-Feshbach calculations are discussed in this respect. (Author)

  8. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  9. Changing structure to improve function: one academic health center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, B; Davis, L; Kohler, P O

    1997-04-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) have been under siege for the past few years, with decreased federal and state funding for educational and research programs and increasing competition in the health care marketplace. In addition, many AHCs are burdened with the bureaucratic red tape of large educational institutions, which makes agility in responding to a demanding health care market difficult. The authors describe the response to these threats by Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU), an approach that has been different from those of most similar institutions. OHSU chose to change its structure from being part of the state system of higher education to being an independent public corporation. The authors outline the political process of building widespread support for the legislation passed in 1995, the key features of the restructuring, the challenges faced before and after the transition to a public corporation, and lessons learned in this metamorphosis to a new form.

  10. Equilibration kinetics in isolated and membrane-bound photosynthetic reaction centers upon illumination: a method to determine the photoexcitation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Anthony J; Goushcha, Alexander O; Barabash, Yuri M; Kharkyanen, Valery N; Scott, Gary W

    2009-07-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer, following variation of actinic light intensity, for photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of purple bacteria (isolated and membrane-bound) were analyzed by measuring absorbance changes in the primary photoelectron donor absorption band at 865 nm. The bleaching of the primary photoelectron donor absorption band in RCs, following a sudden increase of illumination from the dark to an actinic light intensity of I(exp), obeys a simple exponential law with the rate constant alphaI(exp) + k(rec), in which alpha is a parameter relating the light intensity, measured in mW/cm(2), to a corresponding theoretical rate in units of reciprocal seconds, and k(rec) is the effective rate constant of the charge recombination in the photosynthetic RCs. In this work, a method for determining the alpha parameter value is developed and experimentally verified for isolated and membrane-bound RCs, allowing for rigorous modeling of RC macromolecule dynamics under varied photoexcitation conditions. Such modeling is necessary for RCs due to alterations of the forward photoexcitation rates and relaxation rates caused by illumination history and intramolecular structural dynamics effects. It is demonstrated that the classical Bouguer-Lambert-Beer formalism can be applied for the samples with relatively low scattering, which is not necessarily the case with strongly scattering media or high light intensity excitation.

  11. Comparison of Ground Reaction Forces, Center of Pressure and Body Center of Mass Changes in the Voluntary, Semi-Voluntary and Involuntary Gait Termination in Healthy Young Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    behrooz teymourian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was comparing the ground reaction forces, center of pressure and body center of mass changes in voluntary, semi-voluntary and involuntary gait termination in healthy young men. Methods: In this study, 12 young men performed termination of gait in three different patterns. The variable of peak antero-posterior and vertical forces in two directions at both limbs, the time to reach peak and average forces in every limb in both directions, the center of pressure displacement of medio-lateral and antero-posterior direction for each limb and the net center of pressure and the displacement of the center of mass motion in all three motion plates were recorded using motion analysis system and force plate.The repeated measurements test was used to compare three patterns of gait termination at significance level of p&le0.5. Results: The results showed a significant difference in variables of peak antero-posterior force, the time to reach peak antero-posterior force and mean antero-posterior forces of the leading limb, the peak antero-posterior force of the trialing limbs, the depth force of leading limbs, medio-lateral cop of leading limbs displacement and vertical displacement of the center of mass, among different patterns of gait termination. Conclusion: While walking, the probability of a fall or collision damage, when a sudden or unexpected stop is required, increases. Therefore, more coordination between neuromuscular systems is required.

  12. Identification of protein W, the elusive sixth subunit of the Rhodopseudomonas palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Philip J; Hitchcock, Andrew; Swainsbury, David J K; Qian, Pu; Martin, Elizabeth C; Farmer, David A; Dickman, Mark J; Canniffe, Daniel P; Hunter, C Neil

    2018-02-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) core complex revealed the presence of a sixth protein component, variably referred to in the literature as helix W, subunit W or protein W. The position of this protein prevents closure of the LH1 ring, possibly to allow diffusion of ubiquinone/ubiquinol between the RC and the cytochrome bc 1 complex in analogous fashion to the well-studied PufX protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The identity and function of helix W have remained unknown for over 13years; here we use a combination of biochemistry, mass spectrometry, molecular genetics and electron microscopy to identify this protein as RPA4402 in Rps. palustris CGA009. Protein W shares key conserved sequence features with PufX homologs, and although a deletion mutant was able to grow under photosynthetic conditions with no discernible phenotype, we show that a tagged version of protein W pulls down the RC-LH1 complex. Protein W is not encoded in the photosynthesis gene cluster and our data indicate that only approximately 10% of wild-type Rps. palustris core complexes contain this non-essential subunit; functional and evolutionary consequences of this observation are discussed. The ability to purify uniform RC-LH1 and RC-LH1-protein W preparations will also be beneficial for future structural studies of these bacterial core complexes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Report compiled by Research Center for Carbonaceous Resources, Institute for Chemical Reaction Science, Tohoku University; Tohoku Daigaku Hanno Kagaku Kenkyusho tanso shigen hanno kenkyu center hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The Research Center for Carbonaceous Resources was established in April 1991 for the purpose of developing a comprehensive process for converting carbonaceous resources into clean fuels or into materials equipped with advanced functions. In this report, the track records etc. of the center are introduced. Under study in the conversion process research department is the organization of a comprehensive coal conversion process which will be a combination of solvent extraction, catalytic decomposition, and catalytic gasification, whose goal is to convert coal in a clean way at high efficiency. Under study in the conversion catalyst research department are the development of a coal denitrogenation method, development of a low-temperature gasification method by use of inexpensive catalysts, synthesis of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons in a methane/carbon dioxide reaction, etc. Other endeavors under way involve the designing and development of new organic materials such as new carbon materials and a study of the foundation on which such efforts stand, that is, the study of the control of reactions between solids. Furthermore, in the study of interfacial reaction control, the contact gasification of coal, brown coal ion exchange capacity and surface conditions, carbonization of cation exchanged brown coal, etc., are being developed. (NEDO)

  14. Photochemistry and reactions of OH- defects and F centers in alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morato, S.P.; Luety, F.

    1978-01-01

    Aditively colored KCl:OH - crystals showed under a combined UV and VIS irradiation, a nearly complete and irreversible destruction of all F centers and visible absorption in the crystal. Only upon heating the crystal above 650 0 C the F center coloration becomes partially restored. The photodissociation of the OH - (under UV light) together with the photoionization of the F center (under VIS light) produces a not effects where all the F centers are converted into U centers. These photoreactions produces high contrast visible images that are completely stable under light at RT. Besides the optical information storage aspect of this effect these photoreaction s can also be used for controlled production of Usub(A) centers if the crystal also contains a foreign metallic impurity such a Na + ion [pt

  15. Complementarity between neutron capture and heavy-ion reactions in nuclear structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schult, O.W.B.

    1978-01-01

    The study of the complementarity of certain nuclear reactions in nuclear structure studies includes spectroscopic methods, nuclear rotation and coupling of nucleons to the core, and the de-excitation and structure of high lying states. 23 references

  16. On the nature of organic and inorganic centers that bifurcate electrons, coupling exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, John W; Beratan, David N; Schut, Gerrit J; Adams, Michael W W

    2018-04-19

    Bifurcating electrons to couple endergonic and exergonic electron-transfer reactions has been shown to have a key role in energy conserving redox enzymes. Bifurcating enzymes require a redox center that is capable of directing electron transport along two spatially separate pathways. Research into the nature of electron bifurcating sites indicates that one of the keys is the formation of a low potential oxidation state to satisfy the energetics required of the endergonic half reaction, indicating that any redox center (organic or inorganic) that can exist in multiple oxidation states with sufficiently separated redox potentials should be capable of electron bifurcation. In this Feature Article, we explore a paradigm for bifurcating electrons down independent high and low potential pathways, and describe redox cofactors that have been demonstrated or implicated in driving this unique biochemistry.

  17. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  18. Glial reaction in visual centers upon whole-body combined irradiation with microwaves and x-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logvinov, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    A single whole-body preirradiation with thermogenous microwaves modifies the dynamics of the glial reactions of visual centers of ginea pigs induced by median lethal X-radiation doses. A combination of the two factors products the synergistic effect, estimated by the degree of alteration of astrocytes and oligodendroglyocytes at early times after exposure, leads to early activation of microglia, and reduces radiation-induced alterations in glia at later times (25-60 days)

  19. Probing the nuclear structure with heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broglia, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclei display distortions in both ordinary space and in gauge space. It is suggested that it is possible to learn about the spatial distribution of the Nilsson orbitals and about the change of the pairing gap with the rotational frequency through the analysis of one- and two-nucleon transfer reactions induced in heavy-ion collisions

  20. Structure-reactivity modeling using mixture-based representation of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Pavel; Madzhidov, Timur; Gimadiev, Timur; Bodrov, Andrey; Nugmanov, Ramil; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-09-01

    We describe a novel approach of reaction representation as a combination of two mixtures: a mixture of reactants and a mixture of products. In turn, each mixture can be encoded using an earlier reported approach involving simplex descriptors (SiRMS). The feature vector representing these two mixtures results from either concatenated product and reactant descriptors or the difference between descriptors of products and reactants. This reaction representation doesn't need an explicit labeling of a reaction center. The rigorous "product-out" cross-validation (CV) strategy has been suggested. Unlike the naïve "reaction-out" CV approach based on a random selection of items, the proposed one provides with more realistic estimation of prediction accuracy for reactions resulting in novel products. The new methodology has been applied to model rate constants of E2 reactions. It has been demonstrated that the use of the fragment control domain applicability approach significantly increases prediction accuracy of the models. The models obtained with new "mixture" approach performed better than those required either explicit (Condensed Graph of Reaction) or implicit (reaction fingerprints) reaction center labeling.

  1. Reactions driving conformational movements (molecular motors) in gels: conformational and structural chemical kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Toribio F

    2017-01-18

    In this perspective the empirical kinetics of conducting polymers exchanging anions and solvent during electrochemical reactions to get dense reactive gels is reviewed. The reaction drives conformational movements of the chains (molecular motors), exchange of ions and solvent with the electrolyte and structural (relaxation, swelling, shrinking and compaction) gel changes. Reaction-driven structural changes are identified and quantified from electrochemical responses. The empirical reaction activation energy (E a ), the reaction coefficient (k) and the reaction orders (α and β) change as a function of the conformational energy variation during the reaction. This conformational energy becomes an empirical magnitude. E a , k, α and β include and provide quantitative conformational and structural information. The chemical kinetics becomes structural chemical kinetics (SCK) for reactions driving conformational movements of the reactants. The electrochemically stimulated conformational relaxation model describes empirical results and some results from the literature for biochemical reactions. In parallel the development of an emerging technological world of soft, wet, multifunctional and biomimetic tools and anthropomorphic robots driven by reactions of the constitutive material, as in biological organs, can be now envisaged being theoretically supported by the kinetic model.

  2. Complex nuclear-structure phenomena revealed from the nuclide production in fragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, M.V.; Kelic, A.; Napolitani, P.; Schmidt, K.H.; Yordanov, O.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Rejmund, F.

    2003-12-01

    Complex structural effects in the nuclide production from the projectile fragmentation of 1 A GeV 238 U nuclei in a titanium target are reported. The structure seems to be insensitive to the excitation energy induced in the reaction. This is in contrast to the prominent structural features found in nuclear fission and in transfer reactions, which gradually disappear with increasing excitation energy. Using the statistical model of nuclear reactions, relations to structural effects in nuclear binding and in the nuclear level density are demonstrated. (orig.)

  3. Purple-bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers and quantum-dot hybrid-assemblies in lecithin liposomes and thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashev, Eugeny P; Knox, Petr P; Gorokhov, Vladimir V; Grishanova, Nadezda P; Seifullina, Nuranija Kh; Krikunova, Maria; Lokstein, Heiko; Paschenko, Vladimir Z

    2016-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) absorb ultraviolet and long-wavelength visible light energy much more efficiently than natural bacterial light-harvesting proteins and can transfer the excitation energy to photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Inclusion of RCs combined with QDs as antennae into liposomes opens new opportunities for using such hybrid systems as a basis for artificial energy-transforming devices that potentially can operate with greater efficiency and stability than devices based only on biological components or inorganic components alone. RCs from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and QDs (CdSe/ZnS with hydrophilic covering) were embedded in lecithin liposomes by extrusion of a solution of multilayer lipid vesicles through a polycarbonate membrane or by dialysis of lipids and proteins dispersed with excess detergent. The efficiency of RC and QD interaction within the liposomes was estimated using fluorescence excitation spectra of the photoactive bacteriochlorophyll of the RCs and by measuring the fluorescence decay kinetics of the QDs. The functional activity of the RCs in hybrid complexes was fully maintained, and their stability was even increased. The efficiency of energy transfer between QDs and RCs and conditions of long-term stability of function of such hybrid complexes in film preparations were investigated as well. It was found that dry films containing RCs and QDs, maintained at atmospheric humidity, are capable of maintaining their functional activity for at least some months as judged by measurements of their spectral characteristics, efficiency of energy transfer from QDs to RCs and RC electron transport activity. Addition of trehalose to the films increases the stability further, especially for films maintained at low humidity. These stable hybrid film structures are promising for further studies towards developing new phototransformation devices for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Metastable Structures in Cluster Catalysis from First-Principles: Structural Ensemble in Reaction Conditions and Metastability Triggered Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Geng; Sautet, Philippe

    2018-02-28

    Reactivity studies on catalytic transition metal clusters are usually performed on a single global minimum structure. With the example of a Pt 13 cluster under a pressure of hydrogen, we show from first-principle calculations that low energy metastable structures of the cluster can play a major role for catalytic reactivity and that hence consideration of the global minimum structure alone can severely underestimate the activity. The catalyst is fluxional with an ensemble of metastable structures energetically accessible at reaction conditions. A modified genetic algorithm is proposed to comprehensively search for the low energy metastable ensemble (LEME) structures instead of merely the global minimum structure. In order to reduce the computational cost of density functional calculations, a high dimensional neural network potential is employed to accelerate the exploration. The presence and influence of LEME structures during catalysis is discussed by the example of H covered Pt 13 clusters for two reactions of major importance: hydrogen evolution reaction and methane activation. The results demonstrate that although the number of accessible metastable structures is reduced under reaction condition for Pt 13 clusters, these metastable structures can exhibit high activity and dominate the observed activity due to their unique electronic or structural properties. This underlines the necessity of thoroughly exploring the LEME structures in catalysis simulations. The approach enables one to systematically address the impact of isomers in catalysis studies, taking into account the high adsorbate coverage induced by reaction conditions.

  5. The binding of quinone to the photosynthetic reaction centers: kinetics and thermodynamics of reactions occurring at the QB-site in zwitterionic and anionic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavelli, Fabio; Trotta, Massimo; Ciriaco, Fulvio; Agostiano, Angela; Giotta, Livia; Italiano, Francesca; Milano, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    Liposomes represent a versatile biomimetic environment for studying the interaction between integral membrane proteins and hydrophobic ligands. In this paper, the quinone binding to the QB-site of the photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been investigated in liposomes prepared with either the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) or the negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) to highlight the role of the different phospholipid polar heads. Quinone binding (K Q) and interquinone electron transfer (L AB) equilibrium constants in the two type of liposomes were obtained by charge recombination reaction of QB-depleted RC in the presence of increasing amounts of ubiquinone-10 over the temperature interval 6-35 °C. The kinetic of the charge recombination reactions has been fitted by numerically solving the ordinary differential equations set associated with a detailed kinetic scheme involving electron transfer reactions coupled with quinone release and uptake. The entire set of traces at each temperature was accurately fitted using the sole quinone release constants (both in a neutral and a charge separated state) as adjustable parameters. The temperature dependence of the quinone exchange rate at the QB-site was, hence, obtained. It was found that the quinone exchange regime was always fast for PC while it switched from slow to fast in PG as the temperature rose above 20 °C. A new method was introduced in this paper for the evaluation of constant K Q using the area underneath the charge recombination traces as the indicator of the amount of quinone bound to the QB-site.

  6. Structure and reactions of drip-line nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, P.G. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Secondary radioactive beams produced at intermediate-energy heavy-ion accelerators have in a short time span added a new dimension to the research on nuclear species at the limits of particle stability, and new detection techniques have made it possible to study reactions caused by incident beams of as little as one particle per second. Imminent developments such as the M.S.U. Coupled-Cyclotron Facility are expected to extend the range and to permit the observation of many previously inaccessible species. For a perspective on the progress in this area one only needs to go about fifteen years back to a time when it had just become possible to study the radioactivity of rare nuclear species such as {sup 11}Li. In presenting early experiments with secondary beams produced in fragmentation James Symons said {open_quotes}... In the introduction to this paper we questioned the applicability of high-energy heavy-ion accelerators to this field. Our experience at the Bevalac leads us to believe that this question does indeed have a positive answer. If the physics interest justifies it, then high-energy heavy-ion beams can certainly be expected to play a role in the study of nuclei at the limits of stability.{close_quotes} At the time, very few, if any, realized how prophetic this remark was. In the present paper the interpretation of the longitudinal-momentum distributions from the nuclear fragmentation of single-nucleon halos is discussed. It is pointed out that these measurements, at least for the cases studied so far, directly reflect the halo wave function, and that there is no direct contribution from the reaction mechanism. This is an important difference from the radial momentum distributions, for which diffractive processes play an important role. The author discusses stripping reactions of {sup 11}Be and {sup 8}B on light nuclei yielding {sup 10}Be and {sup 7}Be.

  7. 179Ta and 180Ta structure by transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warde, Elias.

    1979-01-01

    Transfer reactions (α,t); ( 3 He,d); (p,t) and (p,d) have been used to study the nuclear spectroscopy of 179 Ta and 180 Ta. In 179 Ta, 5/2 - and 9/2 - states of the 1/2(541) configuration have been identified. The core-quasiproton interaction has to be taken into account in order to explain the two-nucleon transfer intensities in the 181 Ta(p,t) 179 Ta reaction. A level scheme has been proposed for 180 Ta for the first time. Especially the ground state is identified with the (1 + ,1) level of the [7/2 + (404)sub(p), 9/2 + (624)sub(n)] configuration and spin (9 - ,9) of the configuration [9/2 - (514)sub(p), 9/2 + (624)sub(n)] has been assigned to the long-lived isomer. From the observed configurations in 180 Ta, the matrix elements of the effective residual interaction vsub(np) have been deduced and compared to theoretical predictions [fr

  8. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahzoon, M H; Charity, R J; Dickhoff, W H; Dussan, H; Waldecker, S J

    2014-04-25

    A comprehensive description of all single-particle properties associated with the nucleus Ca40 is generated by employing a nonlocal dispersive optical potential capable of simultaneously reproducing all relevant data above and below the Fermi energy. The introduction of nonlocality in the absorptive potentials yields equivalent elastic differential cross sections as compared to local versions but changes the absorption profile as a function of angular momentum suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential to allow for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by (e, e'p) and (p, 2p) reactions are correctly incorporated, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum nucleons, as experimentally determined by data from Jefferson Lab. These high-momentum nucleons provide a substantial contribution to the energy of the ground state, indicating a residual attractive contribution from higher-body interactions for Ca40 of about 0.64  MeV/A.

  9. Magnitude and direction of the change in dipole moment associated with excitation of the primary electron donor in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockhart, D.J.; Boxer, S.G.

    1987-02-10

    The magnitude and direction of the change in dipole moment, ..delta mu.., associated with the Q/sub y/ transition of the dimeric primary electron donor (special pair or P870) in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides reaction centers have been measured by Stark spectroscopy at 20 /sup 0/C. The magnitude of ..delta mu.. is found to be f/sup -1/ (10.3 +/- 0.7) D, where f is a correction factor for the local dielectric properties of the protein matrix. With the spherical cavity approximation and an effective local dielectric constant of 2, f = 1.2, and absolute value of ..delta mu.. is 8.6 +/- 0.6 D. Absolute value of ..delta mu.. for the Q/sub y/ transition of the special pair is approximately a factor of 3.4 and 2 greater than for the monomeric bacteriochlorophylls and bacteriopheophytins, respectively, in the reaction center. The angle between ..delta mu.. and the transition dipole moment for excitation of the first singlet electron state of the special pair was found to be 24 +/- 2/sup 0/. The measured values are combined to suggest a physical model in which the lowest excited singlet state of the special pair has substantial charge-transfer character and where charge is separated between the two monomers comprising the dimeric special pair. This leads to the hypothesis that the first charge-separated state in bacterial photosynthesis is formed directly upon photoexcitation. These data provide stringent values for comparison with theoretical calculations of the electronic structure of the chromophores in the reaction center.

  10. Conformational differences between the methoxy groups of QA and QB site ubisemiquinones in bacterial reaction centers: a key role for methoxy group orientation in modulating ubiquinone redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2013-07-09

    Ubiquinone is an almost universal, membrane-associated redox mediator. Its ability to accept either one or two electrons allows it to function in critical roles in biological electron transport. The redox properties of ubiquinone in vivo are determined by its environment in the binding sites of proteins and by the dihedral angle of each methoxy group relative to the ring plane. This is an attribute unique to ubiquinone among natural quinones and could account for its widespread function with many different redox complexes. In this work, we use the photosynthetic reaction center as a model system for understanding the role of methoxy conformations in determining the redox potential of the ubiquinone/semiquinone couple. Despite the abundance of X-ray crystal structures for the reaction center, quinone site resolution has thus far been too low to provide a reliable measure of the methoxy dihedral angles of the primary and secondary quinones, QA and QB. We performed 2D ESEEM (HYSCORE) on isolated reaction centers with ubiquinones (13)C-labeled at the headgroup methyl and methoxy substituents, and have measured the (13)C isotropic and anisotropic components of the hyperfine tensors. Hyperfine couplings were compared to those derived by DFT calculations as a function of methoxy torsional angle allowing estimation of the methoxy dihedral angles for the semiquinones in the QA and QB sites. Based on this analysis, the orientation of the 2-methoxy groups are distinct in the two sites, with QB more out of plane by 20-25°. This corresponds to an ≈50 meV larger electron affinity for the QB quinone, indicating a substantial contribution to the experimental difference in redox potentials (60-75 mV) of the two quinones. The methods developed here can be readily extended to ubiquinone-binding sites in other protein complexes.

  11. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  12. Relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Zone of reactions and space-time structure of fireball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchishkin, D.; Muskeyev, A.; Yezhov, S.

    2010-01-01

    A zone of reactions is determined and then exploited as a tool in studying the space-time structure of an interacting system formed in a collision of relativistic nuclei. The time dependence of the reaction rates integrated over spatial coordinates is also considered. Evaluations are made with the help of the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The relation of the boundaries of different zones of reactions and the hypersurfaces of sharp chemical and kinetic freeze-outs is discussed.

  13. Theory of nuclear structure and reactions. Annual technical progress report, April 1, 1984-March 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macfarlane, M.H.; Serot, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    In the period covered by this report, work focused on five main areas: (1) relativistic effects in intermediate-energy nuclear reactions; (2) the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear physics; (3) quantum hadrodynamics and relativistic nuclear mean-field theory; (4) structure and reaction effects in intermediate-energy nuclear reactions; and (5) weak and electromagnetic interactions in nuclei. Results and publications in these areas are summarized. Publications are listed

  14. R&D Characteristics and Organizational Structure: Case Studies of University-Industry Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Maureen McArthur

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few decades, university-industry research centers have been developed in large numbers and emphasized as a valuable policy tool for innovation. Yet little is known about the heterogeneity of organizational structure within these centers, which has implications regarding policy for and management of these centers. This dissertation…

  15. Spin structure of the 3He from the dd → 3Hen reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladygin, V.P.; Ladygina, N.B.

    1995-01-01

    The polarization observables in the reaction dd → 3 Hen are considered. Their high sensitivity to the 3 He wave function at short distances is shown. Using of both polarized target and beam allows to extend sufficiently the number of possible experiments and to separate 3 He structure from the reaction mechanisms using different relative orientations of initial deuteron spins. 27 refs., 5 figs

  16. Electrochemical lithium migration to mitigate alkali-silica reaction in existing concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva De Souza, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deterioration process that affects the durability of concrete structures worldwide. During the reaction, hydroxyl and alkali ions present in the pore solution react with reactive silica from the aggregate, forming a hygroscopic ASR gel. Alternatively, the silica

  17. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrasi, F.; D''Onofrio, A.; Campajola, L.; Imbriani, G.; Gialanella, L.; Greife, U.; Rolfs, C.; Strieder, F.; Trautvetter, H.P.; Roca, V.; Romano, M.; Straniero, O.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely 7 Be(p,γ) 8 B and 12 C(α,γ) 16 O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  18. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples from photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M. R.; Madeo, Jennifer; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Quinones such as ubiquinone are the lipid soluble electron and proton carriers in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and oxygenic bacteria. Quinones undergo controlled redox reactions bound to specific sites in integral membrane proteins such as the cytochrome bc1 oxidoreductase. The quinone reactions in bacterial photosynthesis are amongst the best characterized, presenting a model to understand how proteins modulate cofactor chemistry. The free energy of ubiquinone redox reactions in aqueous solution and in the QA and QB sites of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are compared. In the primary QA site ubiquinone is reduced only to the anionic semiquinone (Q•−) while in the secondary QB site the product is the doubly reduced, doubly protonated quinol (QH2). The ways in which the protein modifies the relative energy of each reduced and protonated intermediate are described. For example, the protein stabilizes Q•− while destabilizing Q= relative to aqueous solution through electrostatic interactions. In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms for stabilizing the intermediate semiquinones are compared. Evidence for the protein sequestering anionic compounds by slowing both on and off rates as well as by binding the anion more tightly is reviewed. PMID:18979192

  19. Evolution of dispersion fuel meat structure caused by interface reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2000-01-01

    In reactor operation, the resultant layers are formed by interdiffusion at the fuel particle-matrix interfaces of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. This results in the evolution of meat structure. On the basis of Monte-Carlo method, the author developed simulation method of fuel meat, and simulated the stochastic space locations of spherical fuel particles in the meat. The fuel volume fraction is 43%, and the particles are in definite size distribution. For the 13551 simulated particle samples, the evolution of meat structure is calculated with layer thickness ranging from 0 to 16 μm. The parameters of meat structure include the U 3 Si 2 fuel volume fraction, resultant layer volume fraction, Al matrix volume fraction, particle contact probability and overlap degree as functions of layer thickness

  20. Tight-binding model of the photosystem II reaction center: application to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Abramavicius, Darius; Fuller, Franklin D; Ogilvie, Jennifer P; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optimized tight-binding electron–hole model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC). Our model incorporates two charge separation pathways and spatial correlations of both static disorder and fast fluctuations of energy levels. It captures the main experimental features observed in time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) optical spectra at 77 K: peak pattern, lineshapes and time traces. Analysis of 2D spectra kinetics reveals that specific regions of the 2D spectra of the PSII RC are sensitive to the charge transfer states. We find that the energy disorder of two peripheral chlorophylls is four times larger than the other RC pigments. (paper)

  1. Tight-binding model of the photosystem II reaction center: application to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Fuller, Franklin D.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.; Mukamel, Shaul; Abramavicius, Darius

    2013-07-01

    We propose an optimized tight-binding electron-hole model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC). Our model incorporates two charge separation pathways and spatial correlations of both static disorder and fast fluctuations of energy levels. It captures the main experimental features observed in time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) optical spectra at 77 K: peak pattern, lineshapes and time traces. Analysis of 2D spectra kinetics reveals that specific regions of the 2D spectra of the PSII RC are sensitive to the charge transfer states. We find that the energy disorder of two peripheral chlorophylls is four times larger than the other RC pigments.

  2. The influence of phase transfer catalyst structure on reaction selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demlov, Eh.V.

    1995-01-01

    A concise review is given of systematic studies which are concerned with the tuning of regio, frequentio-, chemo-, and diastereoselectivity by the structure or type of phase transfer catalyst. Use of MEI as an alkylating agent is described. Refs. 36, figs. 11

  3. Self-centering connections for traffic sign supporting structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Steel structures supporting traffic sign panels are designed as intended to dissipate energy by : yielding structural members during severe wind loading (ex. strong hurricanes). Yielding results : in inelastic deformations, which are permanent damage...

  4. Study of the Mn-binding sites in photosystem II using antibodies raised against lumenal regions of the D1 and D2 reaction center proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, Enrique Agustin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The experiments discussed in this thesis focus on identifying the protein segments or specific amino acids which provide ligands to the Mn cluster of photosystem II (PS II). This Mn cluster plays a central role in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PS II. The Mn cluster is thought to be bound by lumenal regions of the PS II reaction center proteins known as D1 and D2. First, several peptides were synthesized which correspond to specific lumenal segments of the D1 and D2 proteins. Next, polyclonal antibodies were successfully elicited using three of these peptides. The peptides recognized by these antibodies correspond to protein segments of the spinach reaction center proteins: Ile-321 to Ala-344 of D1 (D1-a), Asp-319 to Arg-334 of D1 (D1-b), and Val-300 to Asn-319 of D2 (D2-a). These antibodies were then used in assays which were developed to structurally or functionally probe the potential Mn-binding regions of the D1 and D2 proteins.

  5. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The research program of our group touches five areas of nuclear physics: (1) Nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) Studies at the interface between structure and reactions; (3) Production and study of hot nuclei; (4) Incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and (5) Development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. The papers from these areas are discussed in this report

  6. Structural evolution and reaction mechanism of lithium nickelate (LiNiO2 during the carbonation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela González-Varela

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lithium nickelate (LiNiO2 was synthesized using the lithium excess method, and then characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption. Finally, differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses were performed in CO2 presence, at high temperatures. Results show that LiNiO2 is able to react with CO2 through a complex structural evolution process, where lithium atoms are released to produce Li2CO3, while some nickel atoms are rearranged on different Li1-xNi1+xO2 crystalline phases. LiNiO2-CO2 reaction kinetic parameters were determined assuming a first-order reaction, where kinetic constants tended to increase as a function of temperature. However, kinetic constant values did not follow a linear trend. This atypical behavior was attributed to LiNiO2 sintering and crystalline evolution performed as a function of temperature.

  7. Investigation of structural properties associated with alkali-silica reaction by means of macro- and micro-structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Xiangyin; Fournier, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    Structural properties associated with alkali-silica reaction were systematically investigated by means of macro-structural accelerated mortar prism expansion levels testing, combined with micro-structural analysis. One part of this study is to determine the reactivity of the aggregate by means of accelerated mortar bar tests, and also to evaluate perlite aggregate constituents, especially the presence of deleterious components and find main causes of the alkali-silica reaction, which was based on the petrographic studies by optical microscope and the implication of X-ray diffraction on the aggregate. Results implied that the aggregate was highly alkali-silica reactive and the main micro-crystalline quartz-intermediate character and matrix that is mainly composed of chalcedony are potentially suitable for alkali-silica reaction. The other part is to study the long-term effect of lithium salts against alkali-silica reaction by testing accelerated mortar prism expansion levels. The macro-structural results were also consistent with the micro-structural mechanisms of alkali-silica reaction of mortar prisms containing this aggregate and the effect of chemical admixtures by means of the methods of scanning electron microscope-X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was indicated by these techniques that lithium salts, which were introduced into concrete containing reactive aggregate at the mixing stage, suppressed the alkali-silica reaction by producing non-expansive crystalline materials

  8. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Technical progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental research on nuclear structure and reactions both published and in progress is summarized. Included are fusion reactions, strongly damped heavy ion collisions, and nuclear structure at high angular momentum. A list of publications is included

  9. The (n,p) reaction as a probe of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, K.P.; Celler, A.

    1988-08-01

    An account is given of some results of studies of the (n,p) reaction on nuclear targets at TRIUMF. The (n,p) reaction, inducing spin flip transitions in isospin space, appears to exhibit a unique sensitivity to certain aspects of nuclear structure. The TRIUMF facility is the first to exploit the (n,p) reaction as a detailed probe of nuclear structure at energies above 65 MeV. In the (n,p) reaction Fermi transitions are absent, but there is a dramatic impact on Gamow-Teller and other collective transactions. Some nuclear transition matrix elements can be estimated on the basis of (n,p) measurements. Experiments have been carried out at TRIUMF on Li 6 , Fe 5 4, and Zr 9 0 targets. The calibration of the (n,p) reaction as a probe of the Gamow-Teller strength B + GT has been achieved for three targets. (L.L.) (45 refs., 10 figs.)

  10. Nuclear structure effects in multi-nucleon transfer and sequential fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    The role of the nuclear structure in multi-nucleon transfer and sequential fission reactions has been discussed. The recent results on multi-nucleon transfer and transfer induced fission reaction, have brought out many interesting features in understanding the reaction mechanism and collective dynamics of heavy ion reactions. The structure of the projectile nucleus has strong influence on the transfer of multi-nucleons and/or clusters from the projectile to the target. The mechanism of multi-nucleon transfer between two heavy nuclei is a complex process which has a strong dependence on the ground state Q-value of the reaction as well as on the number of transferred nucleons

  11. Dynamical structure analysis of crystalline-state reaction and elucidation of chemical reactivity in crystalline environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    It was found that a chiral alkyl group bonded to the cobalt atom in a cobalt complex crystal was racemized with retention of the single crystal form on exposure to visible light. Such reactions, which are called crystalline-state reactions, have been found in a variety of cobalt complex crystals. The concept of reaction cavity was introduced to explain the reaction rate quantitatively and the chirality of the photo-product. The new diffractometers and detectors were made for rapid data collection. The reaction mechanism was also elucidated using neutron diffraction analysis. The unstable reaction intermediates were analyzed using cryo-trapping method. The excited-state structures were obtained at the equilibrium state between ground and excited states. (author)

  12. Two-step excitation structure changes of luminescence centers and strong tunable blue emission on surface of silica nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lei, E-mail: nanoyang@qq.com; Jiang, Zhongcheng; Dong, Jiazhang; Zhang, Liuqian [Hunan University, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Pan, Anlian, E-mail: anlian.pan@gmail.com; Zhuang, Xiujuan [Hunan University, Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Physics and Technology of Hunan Province (China)

    2015-10-15

    We report a scheme for investigating two-step stimulated structure change of luminescence centers. Amorphous silica nanospheres with uniform diameter of 9–15 nm have been synthesized by Stöber method. Strong hydroxyl-related infrared-absorption band is observed in infrared spectrum. The surface hydroxyl groups exert great influence on the luminescent behavior of silica. They provide stable and intermediate energy states to accommodate excitation electrons. The existence of these surface states reduces the energy barrier of photochemical reactions, creating conditions for two-step excitation process. By carefully examining excitation and emission process, the nearest excitation band is absent in both optical absorption spectrum and excitation spectrum. This later generated state confirms the generation of new luminescence centers as well as the existence of photochemical reactions. Stimulated by different energies, two-step excitation process impels different photochemical reactions, prompting generation of different lattice defects on surface area of silica. Thereby, tunable luminescence is achieved. After thermal treatment, strong gap excitation band appears with the disappearance of strong surface excitation band. Strong blue luminescence also disappears. The research is significance to precise introducing structural defects and controlling position of luminescence peaks.

  13. Reduction reactions of water soluble cyano-cobalt(III)-porphyrins: Metal versus ligand centered processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosseri, S.; Neta, P.; Harriman, A.; Hambright, P.

    1990-01-01

    Reduction reactions of dicyano-cobalt(III)-porphyrins [potential in vivo cyanide scavenger drugs] were studied by radiolytic and electrochemical methods using the water soluble tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS) and tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP). For [(CN)2CoIIITPPS]-, reduction occurs stepwise to the CoII, CoI, and finally to the phlorin anion. This behavior is similar to that of the cobalt porphyrins in the absence of cyanide, except that the cyanide ligand shifts the reduction potentials to much more negative values. On the other hand, under radiolytic conditions, [(CN)2CoIIITMPyP]- is reduced on the porphyrin macrocycle by one electron to give the CoIII pi-radical anion, which disproportionates into the initial complex and the two-electron ring reduced CoIII phlorin. The radical anion is also formed by intramolecular electron transfer subsequent to the reaction of CoIITMPyP and cyanide. The results are compared with the chemistry of Vitamin B-12

  14. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  15. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon's mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  16. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon's mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e + e - problem and heavy ion dynamics

  17. Structure and lyoluminescent reactions of free radicals of irradiated lactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyushkov, V.V.; Panasyuk, S.L.; Yudin, I.V.

    1983-01-01

    To determine mechanisms of processes, resulting in lyoluminescence the structure of fren radicals in γ-irradiated lactose was investigated by the method of electron paramagnetic resonance. Analysis of dependences of different radical content in irradiated crystals and lyoluminescent characteristics of these samples on the period of their storing enabled to confirm suggested earlier luminescence mechanism with lambdasub(max)=630 nm of irradiated carbon-hydrate in neutral and acid media. The possibility of controlling the content of different types of radicals in samples by lyoluminescent method was shown

  18. Density functional theoretical study on the C-F and C-O oxidative addition reaction at an AI center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Seong [Dept. of Science Education, Kyungnam University, Masan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun; Hwang, Sungu [Dept. of Nanomechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Miryang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, B3LYP/LACVP** level calculations were chosen because the level of theory was applied successfully to calculations of the thermodynamic and kinetic features of the oxidative addition reactions of alkyl and aryl halides to pincer-type complexes. This study examined the effects of the substituents on the phenyl rings of the Al(I) center. Isopropyl side chains in the phenyl rings attached to N atoms of the pincer ligand were replaced with a methyl (Me) (2) or tertiary butyl ( t Bu) group. The oxidative addition of C[BOND]F and C[BOND]O bonds to an Al (I) center was investigated computationally by DFT calculations. The geometries, thermodynamic, and kinetic features were in good agreement with the experimental data, as in previous studies on the transition metal complexes. The computational results showed that the DFT calculations could provide qualitative insight into the reactivity and thermodynamics of the oxidative addition reactions of C[BOND]F bonds.

  19. The nuclear structure dependence of (p,α) reactions on light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, W.

    1985-01-01

    As the theoretical predictions on nuclear structure and on nucleon-nucleon correlations implied by the nuclear wave functions are not subject to an immediate experimental verification the authors require a reaction theory connecting these state functions with observable quantities. The application of (rho,α) reactions as a spectroscopic tool has found widespread interest, as a number of microscopic descriptions of the reaction mechanism have facilitated the extraction of nuclear structure information. A microscopic formulation results in a strong dependence of the cross section on the nuclear structure of the reaction partners. The different basic configurations of the transferred nucleon system contribute coherently, thus causing a great sensitivity to the relative phases of the wave functions' amplitudes. A major disadvantage inherent to these microscopic theories of multinucleon-transfer reactions is based on the destruction of the transition amplitude's formal symmetry in the dynamic and in the nuclear structure part. In order to retain the factorization of the reaction amplitude, the authors applied the cluster ansatz to the microscopic theory of an earlier studies. The attractive features of this procedure are the conservation of the coherence properties of the structure term and the straightforward determination of transition strengths, independent of an elaborate DWBA treatment

  20. Stereoselective synthesis of organosulfur compounds incorporating N-aromatic heterocyclic motifs and quaternary carbon centers via a sulfa-Michael triggered tandem reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tianyou; Cheng, Lu; Zhang, Sean Xiao-An; Liao, Weiwei

    2015-06-14

    A novel sulfa-Michael addition (SMA)-triggered tandem reaction was developed by combining a SMA reaction with a simultaneous rearomatization process utilizing a less reactive carbonyl group as an intramolecular electrophile partner, which provided a unique synthetic route to access various organosulfur compounds incorporating an N-aromatic heterocyclic motif and quaternary carbon centers.

  1. A Cell-Centered Multiphase ALE Scheme With Structural Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Timothy Alan [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-04-16

    A novel computational scheme has been developed for simulating compressible multiphase flows interacting with solid structures. The multiphase fluid is computed using a Godunov-type finite-volume method. This has been extended to allow computations on moving meshes using a direct arbitrary-Eulerian- Lagrangian (ALE) scheme. The method has been implemented within a Lagrangian hydrocode, which allows modeling the interaction with Lagrangian structural regions. Although the above scheme is general enough for use on many applications, the ultimate goal of the research is the simulation of heterogeneous energetic material, such as explosives or propellants. The method is powerful enough for application to all stages of the problem, including the initial burning of the material, the propagation of blast waves, and interaction with surrounding structures. The method has been tested on a number of canonical multiphase tests as well as fluid-structure interaction problems.

  2. Crystal structure of a trapped phosphate intermediate in vanadium apochloroperoxidase catalyzing a dephosphorylation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Macedo-Ribeiro, S.; Renirie, R.; Wever, R.; Messerschmidt, A.

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of the apo form of vanadium chloroperoxidase from Curvularia inaequalis reacted with para-nitrophenylphosphate was determined at a resolution of 1.5 Å. The aim of this study was to solve structural details of the dephosphorylation reaction catalyzed by this enzyme. Since the

  3. Experimental collaboration for thick concrete structures with alkali-silica reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezell, N. Dianne Bull; Hayes, Nolan; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Clayton, Dwight; Ma, Z. John; Le Pape, Sihem; Le Pape, Yann

    2018-04-01

    Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) is a reaction that occurs over time in concrete between alkaline cement paste and reactive, non-crystalline silica in aggregates. An expansive gel is formed within the aggregates which results in micro-cracks in aggregates and adjacent cement paste. The reaction requires the presence of water and has been predominantly detected in groundwater-impacted portions of below grade structures, with limited impact to exterior surfaces in above grade structures. ASR can potentially affect concrete properties and performance characteristics such as compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, shear strength, and tensile strength. Since ASR degradation often takes significant amounts of time, developing ASR detection techniques is important to the sustainability and extended operation lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) designed and built an experiment representative of typical NPP structures to study ASR in thick concrete structures.

  4. Chief, Structural Biophysics Laboratory | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SBL Chief is expected to establish a strong research program in structural biology/biophysics in addition to providing leadership of the SBL and the structural biology community in the NCI Intramural Program.  Applicants should hold a Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D., or equivalent doctoral degree in a relevant discipline, and should possess outstanding communication skills and documented leadership experience.  Tenured faculty or industrial scientists of equivalent rank with a demonstrated commitment to structural biophysics should apply.  Salary will be commensurate with experience and accomplishments.  This position is not restricted to U.S. citizens. A full civil service package of benefits (including health insurance, life insurance, and retirement) is available. This position is subject to a background investigation.  The NIH is dedicated to building a diverse community in its training and employment programs.

  5. Effect of microchannel structure on the reaction performance of methanol steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Minqiang; Wu, Qiuyu; Jiang, Lianbo; Zeng, Dehuai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of microchannel cross-section and distribution on MSR are investigated. • Microchannel distribution shows much more influence on reaction performance. • SLDR and ELR with rectangular cross-section present better reaction performance. • DLSR and EUU with tooth cross-section have better reaction performance. • Equal-distribution of microchannels present the best reaction performance. - Abstract: Methanol steam reforming inside microchannel reactors is regarded as one of effective methods for supplying hydrogen for fuel cells. Microchannel structure plays an important role on the reaction performance of methanol steam reforming. Parallel and uniform-distributed microchannels with rectangular cross-section are generally adopted. In this work, two kinds of microchannel cross-sections and four kinds of microchannel distributions are selected to investigate the effect of microchannel structure on the reaction performance of methanol steam reforming. The result indicates that microchannel distribution shows much more influences on the reaction performance of methanol steam reforming than the microchannel cross-section. Sparse-distribution in the Left direction and Dense-distribution in the Right direction (SLDR) as well as Equal-distribution in the Left–Right direction (ELR) with rectangular cross-section present relatively good reaction performances, whereas Dense-distribution in the Left direction and Sparse-distribution in the Right direction (DLSR) as well as Equal-distribution in the Upside–Underside direction (EUU) with tooth cross-section have relatively good performances. ELR presents the best reaction performances of methanol steam reforming among all the investigated microchannel structures, whether rectangular or tooth cross-section

  6. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, F; D` Onofrio, A [Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); [INFN, Napoli (Italy); Campajola, L; Imbriani, G [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, L [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Greife, U; Rolfs, C; Strieder, F; Trautvetter, H P [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Roca, V; Romano, M [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Straniero, O [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  7. β-Telluroacroleins and β-tellurovinyl ketones: synthesis, reactions and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadekov, I.D.

    2002-01-01

    Data on synthesis, reactivity, spectral characteristics and structure of new telluroorganic synthons, i.e. β-tellurovinylcarbonyl compounds, were generalized and systematized. Synthesis and reactions of β-telluroacroleins and similar cations were considered individually for each type of β-tellurovinylcarbonyl compounds. Special attention was paid to the use of the compounds for preparing tellurium-containing heterocycles. Reactions characteristics of carbonyl groups and tellurium-containing substituents, as well as transformation, as a result of which β-tellurovinylcarbonyl compounds and products of their reactions form tellurium-containing heterocycles, were discussed [ru

  8. Strain-induced structural changes and chemical reactions. 1: Thermomechanical and kinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitas, V.I.; Nesterenko, V.F.; Meyers, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Strain-induced chemical reactions were observed recently (Nesterenko et al) in experiments in the shear band in both Ti-Si and Nb-Si mixtures. Reactions can start in the solid state or after melting of at least one component. One of the aims is to find theoretically whether there are possible macroscopic mechanisms of mechanical intensification of the above and other chemical reactions due to plastic shear in the solid state. Continuum thermodynamical theory of structural changes with an athermal kinetics, which includes martensitic phase transformations, plastic strain-induced chemical reactions and polymorphic transformations, is developed at finite strains. The theory includes kinematics, criterion of structural change and extremum principle for determination of all unknown variable parameters for the case with neglected elastic strains. Thermodynamically consistent kinetic theory of thermally activated structural changes is suggested. The concept of the effective temperature is introduced which takes into account that temperature can vary significantly (on 1,000 K) during the chemical reactions under consideration. The theory will be applied in Part 2 of the paper for the description of chemical reactions in the shear band

  9. Advances in RNA Structure Determination | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent years have witnessed a revolution in the field of RNA structure and function. Until recently the main contribution of RNA in cellular and disease functions was considered to be a role defined by the central dogma, namely DNA codes for mRNAs, which in turn encode for proteins, a notion facilitated by non-coding ribosomal RNA and tRNA. It was also assumed at the time

  10. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ω sp , for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers

  11. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Jankowiak, Ryszard, E-mail: ryszard@ksu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ω{sub sp}, for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers.

  12. Evaluating trauma center structural performance: The experience of a Canadian provincial trauma system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Moore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indicators of structure, process, and outcome are required to evaluate the performance of trauma centers to improve the quality and efficiency of care. While periodic external accreditation visits are part of most trauma systems, a quantitative indicator of structural performance has yet to be proposed. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a trauma center structural performance indicator using accreditation report data. Materials and Methods: Analyses were based on accreditation reports completed during on-site visits in the Quebec trauma system (1994-2005. Qualitative report data was retrospectively transposed onto an evaluation grid and the weighted average of grid items was used to quantify performance. The indicator of structural performance was evaluated in terms of test-retest reliability (kappa statistic, discrimination between centers (coefficient of variation, content validity (correlation with accreditation decision, designation level, and patient volume and forecasting (correlation between visits performed in 1994-1999 and 1998-2005. Results: Kappa statistics were >0.8 for 66 of the 73 (90% grid items. Mean structural performance score over 59 trauma centers was 47.4 (95% CI: 43.6-51.1. Two centers were flagged as outliers and the coefficient of variation was 31.2% (95% CI: 25.5% to 37.6%, showing good discrimination. Correlation coefficients of associations with accreditation decision, designation level, and volume were all statistically significant (r = 0.61, -0.40, and 0.24, respectively. No correlation was observed over time (r = 0.03. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of quantifying trauma center structural performance using accreditation reports. The proposed performance indicator shows good test-retest reliability, between-center discrimination, and construct validity. The observed variability in structural performance across centers and over-time underlines the importance of

  13. Orientations of Iron-Sulfur Clusters FA and FB in the Homodimeric Type-I Photosynthetic Reaction Center of Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toru; Matsuoka, Masahiro; Azai, Chihiro; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-Oka, Hirozo

    2016-05-12

    Orientations of the FA and FB iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters in a structure-unknown type-I homodimeric heriobacterial reaction center (hRC) were studied in oriented membranes of the thermophilic anaerobic photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacterium modesticaldum by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and compared with those in heterodimeric photosystem I (PS I). The Rieske-type FeS center in the cytochrome b/c complex showed a well-oriented EPR signal. Illumination at 14 K induced an FB(-) signal with g-axes of gz = 2.066, gy = 1.937, and gx = 1.890, tilted at angles of 60°, 60°, and 45°, respectively, with respect to the membrane normal. Chemical reduction with dithionite produced an additional signal of FA(-), which magnetically interacted with FB(-), with gz = 2.046, gy = 1.942, and gx = 1.911 at 30°, 60°, and 90°, respectively. The angles and redox properties of FA(-) and FB(-) in hRC resemble those of FB(-) and FA(-), respectively, in PS I. Therefore, FA and FB in hRC, named after their g-value similarities, seem to be located like FB and FA, not like FA and FB, respectively, in PS I. The reducing side of hRC could resemble those in PS I, if the names of FA and FB are interchanged with each other.

  14. Investigation of structural integrity for turbine generator foundation affected by alkali-silica reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryo Fujimoto; Hiroshi Shimizu; Hisashi Sekimoto; Yuichi Watanabe; Tatsuya Ishikawa

    2005-01-01

    Turbine Generator Foundation is a reinforced concrete structure having a table deck to support equipments and columns to support the table deck. After operation of the plant, the expansion of the table deck in turbine longitudinal axis in the structure has been observed. By investigation of concrete material property, it is found that the expansion has been caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). In this study, we evaluate the material properties of the structure affected by ASR and safety margin of capacity of the structure by nonlinear analysis using beam element model with those material properties. (authors)

  15. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Determinations of Structure and Reaction Kinetics of Epoxy/Amine Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    AD- AISA 542 MCDONNELL DOUGLAS RESEARCH LABS ST LOUIS MO FIG 7/4 MAGNETIC RESONANCE DETERMINATIONS OF STRUCTURE AND REACTION KIN--ETC (U) DEC Al I M...solvent content (methylene chloride). DD I JAN73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Doe Fntered

  17. Electrophilic properties of patulin. Adduct structures and reaction pathways with 4-bromothiophenol and other model nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliege, R; Metzler, M

    2000-05-01

    The mycotoxin patulin (PAT) is believed to exert its cytotoxic and chromosome-damaging effects by forming covalent adducts with essential cellular thiols. Since the chemical structures of such adducts are unknown to date, we have studied the reaction of PAT and its O-acetylated derivative with the monofunctional thiol model compound 4-bromothiophenol (BTP), which was chosen due to analytical advantages. By means of analytical and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography, 16 adducts of PAT and 3 adducts of acetyl-PAT were isolated and their chemical structures elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR, IR, and UV spectroscopy. Time course studies and analysis of daughter product formation from isolated intermediate adducts led to a detailed scheme for the reaction of PAT with BTP. The structures of adducts of PAT formed with other model nucleophiles, e. g., the aliphatic thiol 2-mercaptoethanol and the aromatic amine 4-bromoaniline, were also elucidated and found to corroborate the reaction scheme. In addition, one further reaction pathway was observed with 2-mercaptoethanol, which appears to be independent from those found for BTP. Our study with model nucleophiles provides insights into the electrophilic reactivity of PAT and proved to be useful for the structure elucidation of PAT adducts with biological nucleophiles of toxicological relevance, as will be reported by Fliege and Metzler [(2000) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 13, 373-381].

  18. Concluding remarks of the International symposium on structure and reactions of unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    A brief history of unstable beams is given, followed by a short description of the experimental facilities. The structure and reaction of unstable nuclei is discussed, and the neutron-halo nuclei are studied. Some considerations are given related to exotic-beam facilities. (K.A.) 14 refs., 2 figs

  19. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrea, Keith R.

    2001-01-01

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-(sigma) bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as(pi)-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can

  20. Langmuir-Blodgett and X-ray diffraction studies of isolated photosystem II reaction centers in monolayers and multilayers: physical dimensions of the complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphaus, R A; Fang, J Y; Picorel, R; Chumanov, G; Wang, J Y; Cotton, T M; Seibert, M

    1997-04-01

    The photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) is a hydrophobic intrinsic protein complex that drives the water-oxidation process of photosynthesis. Unlike the bacterial RC complex, an X-ray crystal structure of the PSII RC is not available. In order to determine the physical dimensions of the isolated PSII RC complex, we applied Langmuir techniques to determine the cross-sectional area of an isolated RC in a condensed monolayer film. Low-angle X-ray diffraction results obtained by examining Langmuir-Blodgett multilayer films of alternating PSII RC/Cd stearate monolayers were used to determine the length (or height; z-direction, perpendicular to the plane of the original membrane) of the complex. The values obtained for a PSII RC monomer were 26 nm2 and 4.8 nm, respectively, and the structural integrity of the RC in the multilayer film was confirmed by several approaches. Assuming a cylindrical-type RC structure, the above dimensions lead to a predicted volume of about 125 nm3. This value is very close to the expected volume of 118 nm3, calculated from the known molecular weight and partial specific volume of the PSII RC proteins. This same type of comparison was also made with the Rhodobacter sphaeroides RC based on published data, and we conclude that the PSII RC is much shorter in length and has a more regular solid geometric structure than the bacterial RC. Furthermore, the above dimensions of the PSII RC and those of PSII core (RC plus proximal antenna) proteins protruding outside the plane of the PSII membrane into the lumenal space as imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy (Seibert, Aust. J. Pl. Physiol. 22, 161-166, 1995) fit easily into the known dimensions of the PSII core complex visualized by others as electron-density projection maps. From this we conclude that the in situ PSII core complex is a dimeric structure containing two copies of the PSII RC.

  1. Electron transfer. 93. Further reactions of transition-metal-center oxidants with vitamin B12s (Cob(I)alamin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, G.C.; Ghosh, S.K.; Gould, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    Vitamin B 12s (cob(I)alamin) reduces europium(III), titanium(IV) (TiO(C 2 O 4 ) 2 2- ), and uranium(VI) in aqueous solution. These oxidants undergo one-electron changes, leading in each case to the cobalt product cob(II)alamin (B 12r ). The reduction of Eu 3+ , which is inhibited by TES buffer, but not by glycine, is outer sphere. Its limiting specific rate (1 x 10 2 M -1 s -1 ), incorporated in the Marcus treatment, yields a B 12s ,B 12r self-exchange rate of 10 4.8±0.5 M -1 s -1 . Reductions of TiO(C 2 O 4 ) 2 2- are accelerated by H + and by acetic acid. Kinetic patterns suggest three competing reaction paths involving varying degrees of protonation of the Ti(IV) center or its association with acetic acid. The very rapid reduction of U(VI) (k = 4 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 ) yields U(V) in several buffering media, even when B 12s is taken in excess. The much slower conversion of U(V) to U(IV), although thermodynamically favored, appears to be retarded by the extensive reorganization of the coordination sphere of oxo-bound U(V) that must accompany its acceptance of an additional electron. The observed specific rate for the B 12s -U(VI) reaction is in reasonable agreement, in the framework of the Marcus formalism, with reported values of the formal potential and the self-exchange rate for U(V,VI). 37 references, 4 tables

  2. Electronically stimulated deep-center reactions in electron-irradiated InP: Comparison between experiment and recombination-enhancement theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.

    1987-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the recombination enhancement of several defect reactions involving the main deep centers in low-temperature electron-irradiated InP. A fairly good agreement is obtained with the Weeks-Tully-Kimerling theory for the activation energies of the enhanced process. On the other hand, a thorough investigation of a thermally and electronically stimulated defect transformation shows evidence that one major approximation (local vibrational equilibrium) fails, and that the recently proposed [H. Sumi, Phys. Rev. B 29, 4616 (1984)] mechanism of coherent recombination on deep centers is responsible for altered reaction rates at high injection levels

  3. Menaquinone-7 in the reaction center complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme functions as the electron acceptor A1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, B; Frigaard, N-U; Yang, F

    1998-01-01

    Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules of menaqui......Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules...

  4. Tuning cofactor redox potentials: the 2-methoxy dihedral angle generates a redox potential difference of >160 mV between the primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) quinones of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; Mattis, Aidas J; O'Malley, Patrick J; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A

    2013-10-15

    Only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. (13)C hyperfine sublevel correlation measurements of the 2-methoxy in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with quantum mechanics calculations of the (13)C couplings as a function of the dihedral angle. X-ray structures support dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of ~180 mV. This is consistent with the failure of a ubiquinone analogue lacking the 2-methoxy to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ≈160-195 mV.

  5. Structure of the excited states of 11Be reached through the reaction d(10Be,p)11Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaunay, F.

    2003-10-01

    The one-neutron transfer reaction d( 10 Be,p) 11 Be has been studied at 32 A.MeV at GANIL with a 10 Be secondary beam. Protons were detected by the silicon strip array MUST. The ground state and excited states of 11 Be at 0.32, 1.78 and 3.41 MeV were populated, demonstrating the feasibility of transfer reactions induced by radioactive beams leading to bound and unbound states. A DWBA (distorted wave born approximation) analysis indicates for the 3.41 MeV state spin and parity 3/2 + or 5/2 + and a spectroscopic factor of 0.18 or 0.11, respectively. A broad structure centered at 10 MeV is also observed and corresponds to transfer to the 1d sub-shells. If one assumes that only the 1d3/2 orbital contributes to this structure, the splitting of the 1d neutron states in 11 Be is estimated to be 6.3 MeV. Using a 2-particle-RPA (random phase approximation) model, we have shown that neutron-neutron correlations play an important role in the inversion between the 2s1/2 and 1p1/2 neutron states in 11 Be. (author)

  6. Methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured Ruthenium-Palladium nanoparticles: Relationship between structure and electrochemical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Markus; Jurzinsky, Tilman; Ziegenbalg, Dirk; Cremers, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    In this work the relationship between structural composition and electrochemical characteristics of Palladium(Pd)-Ruthenium(Ru) nanoparticles during alkaline methanol oxidation reaction is investigated. The comparative study of a standard alloyed and a precisely Ru-core-Pd-shell structured catalyst allows for a distinct investigation of the electronic effect and the bifunctional mechanism. Core-shell catalysts benefit from a strong electronic effect and an efficient Pd utilization. It is found that core-shell nanoparticles are highly active towards methanol oxidation reaction for potentials ≥0.6 V, whereas alloyed catalysts show higher current outputs in the lower potential range. However, differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) experiments reveal that the methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured catalysts proceeds via the incomplete oxidation pathway yielding formaldehyde, formic acid or methyl formate. Contrary, the alloyed catalyst benefits from the Ru atoms at its surface. Those are found to be responsible for high methanol oxidation activity at lower potentials as well as for complete oxidation of CH3OH to CO2 via the bifunctional mechanism. Based on these findings a new Ru-core-Pd-shell-Ru-terrace catalyst was synthesized, which combines the advantages of the core-shell structure and the alloy. This novel catalyst shows high methanol electrooxidation activity as well as excellent selectivity for the complete oxidation pathway.

  7. Structural zinc(II thiolate complexes relevant to the modeling of Ada repair protein: Application toward alkylation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The TtZn(II-bound perchlorate complex [TtZn–OClO3] 1 (Ttxyly = hydrotris[N-xylyl-thioimidazolyl]borate was used for the synthesis of zinc(II-bound ethanthiothiol complex [TtZn–SCH2CH3] 2 and its hydrogen-bond containing analog Tt–ZnSCH2CH2–NH(COOC(CH33 3. These thiolate complexes were examined as structural models for the active sites of Ada repair protein toward methylation reactions. The Zn[S3O] coordination sphere in complex 1 includes three thione donors from the ligand Ttixyl and one oxygen donor from the perchlorate coligand in ideally tetrahedral arrangement around the zinc center. The average Zn(1–S(thione bond length is 2.344 Å, and the Zn(1–O(1 bond length is 1.917 Å.

  8. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A ≅ 182 region, structure of 182 Hg and 182 Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in 136 Pm and the anomalous h 11/2 proton crossing in the A∼135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier α particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative 209 Bi + 136 Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4π channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector)

  9. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a progress report on activities of the Washington University group in nuclear reaction studies for the period Sept 1, 1992 to Aug 31, 1993. This group has a research program which touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin; studies at the interface between structure and reactions; production and study of hot nuclei; reaction mechanism studies; development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. Specific activities of the group include in part: superdeformation in 82 Sr; structure of and identical bands in 182 Hg and 178 Pt; a highly deformed band in 136 Pm; particle decay of the 164 Yb compound nucleus; fusion reactions; proton evaporation; two-proton decay of 12 O; modeling and theoretical studies; excited 16 O disassembly into four alpha particles; 209 Bi + 136 Xe collisions at 28.2 MeV/amu; and development work on 4π solid angle gamma detectors, and x-ray detectors

  10. Structures of riboswitch RNA reaction states by mix-and-inject XFEL serial crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagno, J. R.; Liu, Y.; Bhandari, Y. R.; Conrad, C. E.; Panja, S.; Swain, M.; Fan, L.; Nelson, G.; Li, C.; Wendel, D. R.; White, T. A.; Coe, J. D.; Wiedorn, M. O.; Knoska, J.; Oberthuer, D.; Tuckey, R. A.; Yu, P.; Dyba, M.; Tarasov, S. G.; Weierstall, U.; Grant, T. D.; Schwieters, C. D.; Zhang, J.; Ferré-D'Amaré, A. R.; Fromme, P.; Draper, D. E.; Liang, M.; Hunter, M. S.; Boutet, S.; Tan, K.; Zuo, X.; Ji, X.; Barty, A.; Zatsepin, N. A.; Chapman, H. N.; Spence, J. C. H.; Woodson, S. A.; Wang, Y.-X.

    2017-01-01

    Riboswitches are structural RNA elements that are generally located in the 5‧ untranslated region of messenger RNA. During regulation of gene expression, ligand binding to the aptamer domain of a riboswitch triggers a signal to the downstream expression platform. A complete understanding of the structural basis of this mechanism requires the ability to study structural changes over time. Here we use femtosecond X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) pulses to obtain structural measurements from crystals so small that diffusion of a ligand can be timed to initiate a reaction before diffraction. We demonstrate this approach by determining four structures of the adenine riboswitch aptamer domain during the course of a reaction, involving two unbound apo structures, one ligand-bound intermediate, and the final ligand-bound conformation. These structures support a reaction mechanism model with at least four states and illustrate the structural basis of signal transmission. The three-way junction and the P1 switch helix of the two apo conformers are notably different from those in the ligand-bound conformation. Our time-resolved crystallographic measurements with a 10-second delay captured the structure of an intermediate with changes in the binding pocket that accommodate the ligand. With at least a 10-minute delay, the RNA molecules were fully converted to the ligand-bound state, in which the substantial conformational changes resulted in conversion of the space group. Such notable changes in crystallo highlight the important opportunities that micro- and nanocrystals may offer in these and similar time-resolved diffraction studies. Together, these results demonstrate the potential of ‘mix-and-inject’ time-resolved serial crystallography to study biochemically important interactions between biomacromolecules and ligands, including those that involve large conformational changes.

  11. Synthesis of unidirectional structures of SiO2-Ag using Au nanoparticles as nucleation centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa S, G.; Mendoza A, D.; Gutierrez W, C.; Perez H, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports a method to synthesize Ag unidirectional structures covered with SiO 2 by sol-gel technique using Au nanoparticles as nucleation centers of the unidirectional structures. In the first phase unidirectional structures of SiO 2 -Ag CI are obtained by sol-gel, using TEOS as a precursor of metallic structures (Ag) and the incorporation of Au nanoparticles as nucleation centers for growth of unidirectional structures. In the second stage, one-way systems are subjected to thermal treatment in H 2 atmosphere for obtain AG 0 particles through mechanisms that diffusion and coalescence of silver to form structures that have a thin cover of SiO 2 . Analysis by scanning electron microscopy, transmission and atomic force microscopy allowed to determine the chemical composition and microstructural properties of unidirectional systems SiO 2 -Ag. (Author)

  12. STRUCTURE TENSOR IMAGE FILTERING USING RIEMANNIAN L1 AND L∞ CENTER-OF-MASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Angulo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Structure tensor images are obtained by a Gaussian smoothing of the dyadic product of gradient image. These images give at each pixel a n×n symmetric positive definite matrix SPD(n, representing the local orientation and the edge information. Processing such images requires appropriate algorithms working on the Riemannian manifold on the SPD(n matrices. This contribution deals with structure tensor image filtering based on Lp geometric averaging. In particular, L1 center-of-mass (Riemannian median or Fermat-Weber point and L∞ center-of-mass (Riemannian circumcenter can be obtained for structure tensors using recently proposed algorithms. Our contribution in this paper is to study the interest of L1 and L∞ Riemannian estimators for structure tensor image processing. In particular, we compare both for two image analysis tasks: (i structure tensor image denoising; (ii anomaly detection in structure tensor images.

  13. Reaction Control System Thruster Cracking Consultation: NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter s reaction control system (RCS) primary thruster serial number 120 was found to contain cracks in the counter bores and relief radius after a chamber repair and rejuvenation was performed in April 2004. Relief radius cracking had been observed in the 1970s and 1980s in seven thrusters prior to flight; however, counter bore cracking had never been seen previously in RCS thrusters. Members of the Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conducted a detailed review of the relevant literature and of the documentation from the previous RCS thruster failure analyses. It was concluded that the previous failure analyses lacked sufficient documentation to support the conclusions that stress corrosion cracking or hot-salt cracking was the root cause of the thruster cracking and lacked reliable inspection controls to prevent cracked thrusters from entering the fleet. The NESC team identified and performed new materials characterization and mechanical tests. It was determined that the thruster intergranular cracking was due to hydrogen embrittlement and that the cracking was produced during manufacturing as a result of processing the thrusters with fluoride-containing acids. Testing and characterization demonstrated that appreciable environmental crack propagation does not occur after manufacturing.

  14. Multi-Center Electronic Structure Calculations for Plasma Equation of State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B G; Johnson, D D; Alam, A

    2010-12-14

    We report on an approach for computing electronic structure utilizing solid-state multi-center scattering techniques, but generalized to finite temperatures to model plasmas. This approach has the advantage of handling mixtures at a fundamental level without the imposition of ad hoc continuum lowering models, and incorporates bonding and charge exchange, as well as multi-center effects in the calculation of the continuum density of states.

  15. Influence of reaction time on the structure of polyaniline synthesized on a pre-pilot scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Carvalho Mazzeu

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this work is to follow the structural variations of polyaniline (PAni obtained by chemical oxidation on a pre-pilot scale, with different reaction times. Synthesis of PAni is well known, but when it is carried out on a pre-pilot scale, several factors can lead to structural changes and understanding these changes is important to improve controls on the synthesis process. The polymers formed were characterized by spectroscopic techniques (Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared - FTIR and UV-Visible. Degree of oxidation and yield were calculated for each reaction time. The analysis by FTIR, the calculated degree of oxidation and the yield showed significant changes in polymer structure at reaction times of 65 and 80 min. This result was attributed to the excessive oxidation of PAni, with the breaking of its polymer chain. The changes observed in the structure of PAni gave subsidies to the optimization of the process of obtaining polyaniline by chemical synthesis.

  16. The effect of alkali-aggregate reaction on concrete bridge structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grković Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows contemporary issues related to unfavorable effects of concrete alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR on concrete bridge structures (CBS. Although AAR unfavorable effects on CBS were identified in 1930s, it was much later that AAR was acknowledged as one of the most pronounced deterioration processes in concrete that results in damages to concrete structures. There are two basic forms of AAR: alkali-silica reaction (ASR and alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR. Compared to ACR, ASR is more prominent, especially in certain geographic parts of the world. Damages to concrete caused by the ASR have negative effect primarily on usability and durability of CBS, what is followed by the decrease in load bearing capacity of structural components and reliability of the whole structure, shortening of service life (SL and costly repairs. For CBS, simultaneous occurrence of ASR and other degradation processes in concrete, such as those caused by the presence of moisture, water, temperature variations and use of deicing salt during winter, are especially damaging. Based on review of the most relevant literature, this paper is focused on mechanisms and mechanisms factors of the ASR, related contemporary research and reliability design guidelines for CBS that are based on prevention of the initiation and development of ASR.

  17. Close correlation between the reaction mechanism and inner structure of loosely halo-nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianye; Tianshui Normal Univ., Tianshui; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou; Guo Wenjun; Ren Zhongzhou; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou; Xing Yongzhong; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou

    2006-01-01

    It was based on the comparisons of the variance properties of fragment multiplicities FM's and nuclear stoppings R's for the neutron-halo colliding system with those of FZ's and R's for the proton-halo colliding system with the increases of beam energy in more detail, the closely correlations between the reaction mechanism and the inner structures of halo-nuclei is found. From above comparisons it is found that the variance properties of fragment multiplicities and nuclear stopping with the increases of beam energy are quite different for the neutron-halo and proton halo colliding systems, such as the effects of loosely bound neutron-halo structure on the fragment multiplicities and nuclear stopping are obviously larger than those for the proton-halo colliding system. This is due to that the structures of halo-neutron nucleus 11 Li is more loosely than that of the proton-halo nucleus 23 Al. In this case, the fragment multiplicity and nuclear stopping of halo nuclei may be used as a possible probe for studying the reaction mechanism and the correlation between the reaction mechanism and the inner structure of halo-nuclei. (authors)

  18. Pathways and timescales of primary charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center as revealed by a simultaneous fit of time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Andrizhiyevskaya, E.G.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2005-01-01

    We model the dynamics of energy transfer and primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers. Different exciton models with specific site energies of the six core pigments and two peripheral chlorophylls (Chls) in combination with different charge transfer schemes have

  19. Hydrogen bonds in the vicinity of the special pair of the bacterial reaction center probed by hydrostatic high-pressure absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangur, Liina; Jones, Michael R; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-12-01

    Using the native bacteriochlorophyll a pigment cofactors as local probes, we investigated the response to external hydrostatic high pressure of reaction center membrane protein complexes from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Wild-type and engineered complexes were used with a varied number (0, 1 or 2) of hydrogen bonds that bind the reaction center primary donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactors to the surrounding protein scaffold. A pressure-induced breakage of hydrogen bonds was established for both detergent-purified and membrane-embedded reaction centers, but at rather different pressures: between 0.2 and 0.3GPa and at about 0.55GPa, respectively. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the single hydrogen bond present in wild-type reaction centers was estimated to be equal to 13-14kJ/mol. In the mutant with two symmetrical hydrogen bonds (FM197H) a single cooperative rupture of the two bonds was observed corresponding to an about twice stronger bond, rather than a sequential rupture of two individual bonds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Structure of Character Strengths: Variable- and Person-Centered Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Najderska

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the structure of character strengths (Peterson and Seligman, 2004 following both variable-centered and person-centered approaches. We used the International Personality Item Pool-Values in Action (IPIP-VIA questionnaire. The IPIP-VIA measures 24 character strengths and consists of 213 direct and reversed items. The present study was conducted in a heterogeneous group of N = 908 Poles (aged 18–78, M = 28.58. It was part of a validation project of a Polish version of the IPIP-VIA questionnaire. The variable-centered approach was used to examine the structure of character strengths on both the scale and item levels. The scale-level results indicated a four-factor structure that can be interpreted based on four of the five personality traits from the Big Five theory (excluding neuroticism. The item-level analysis suggested a slightly different and limited set of character strengths (17 not 24. After conducting a second-order analysis, a four-factor structure emerged, and three of the factors could be interpreted as being consistent with the scale-level factors. Three character strength profiles were found using the person-centered approach. Two of them were consistent with alpha and beta personality metatraits. The structure of character strengths can be described by using categories from the Five Factor Model of personality and metatraits. They form factors similar to some personality traits and occur in similar constellations as metatraits. The main contributions of this paper are: (1 the validation of IPIP-VIA conducted in variable-centered approach in a new research group (Poles using a different measurement instrument; (2 introducing the person-centered approach to the study of the structure of character strengths.

  1. The use of lithium compounds for inhibiting alkali-aggregate reaction effects in pavement structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapała-Sławeta, J.; Owsiak, Z.

    2018-05-01

    Internal corrosion of concrete caused by the reaction of reactive aggregate with sodium and potassium hydroxides from cement is a threat to the durability of concrete pavements. Traditional methods for reducing the negative effects of the reaction include the use of unreactive aggregates, low alkali cements, mineral additives or chemical admixtures, incorporated during mixing. Lowering the relative humidity of the concrete below 80% is another measure for limiting the destructive reaction. The incorporation of lithium compounds, in particular lithium nitrate and lithium hydroxide, to the concrete mix is a method of limiting alkali-silica reaction effects. The challenge is to reduce the negative effects of aggregate reactivity in members in which the reaction has occurred because the aggregate happened to be reactive. The paper presents ways of limiting the deterioration of ASR-affected concrete in road pavements and other forms of transportation infrastructure, mainly through the use of lithium compounds, i.e. lithium nitrate. Impregnation methods that allow the penetration of lithium ions into the concrete structure were characterized, as was the effectiveness of the solutions applied.

  2. Effect of projectile structure on evaporation residue yields in incomplete fusion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, K S; Sudarshan, K; Shrivastava, B D; Goswami, A; Tomar, B S

    2003-01-01

    The excitation functions of heavy residues, representing complete and incomplete fusion products, produced in the reaction of sup 1 sup 2 C and sup 1 sup 3 C on sup 1 sup 8 sup 1 Ta have been measured over the projectile energy range of 5 to 6.5 MeV/nucleon by the recoil catcher method and off-line gamma-ray spectrometry. Comparison of the measured excitation functions with those calculated using the PACE2 code based on the statistical model revealed the occurrence of incomplete fusion reactions in the formation of alpha emission products. The fraction of incomplete fusion cross sections in the sup 1 sup 2 C + sup 1 sup 8 sup 1 Ta reaction was found to be higher, by a factor of approx 2, than that in the sup 1 sup 3 C + sup 1 sup 8 sup 1 Ta reaction. The results have been discussed in terms of the effect of alpha cluster structure of the projectile on incomplete fusion reactions.

  3. Synthesis, optimization and structural characterization of a chitosan-glucose derivative obtained by the Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullón, Beatriz; Montenegro, María I; Ruiz-Matute, Ana I; Cardelle-Cobas, Alejandra; Corzo, Nieves; Pintado, Manuela E

    2016-02-10

    Chitosan (Chit) was submitted to the Maillard reaction (MR) by co-heating a solution with glucose (Glc). Different reaction conditions as temperature (40, 60 and 80 °C), Glc concentration (0.5%, 1%, and 2%, w/v), and reaction time (72, 52 and 24h) were evaluated. Assessment of the reaction extent was monitored by measuring changes in UV absorbance, browning and fluorescence. Under the best conditions, 2% (w/v) of Chit, 2% (w/v) of Glc at 60°C and 32 h of reaction time, a chitosan-glucose (Chit-Glc) derivative was purified and submitted to structural characterization to confirm its formation. Analysis of its molecular weight (MW) and the degree of substitution (DS) was carried out by HPLC-Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) and a colloid titration method, respectively. FT-IR and (1)H NMR were also used to analyze the functional groups and evaluate the introduction of Glc into the Chit molecule. According to our objectives, the results obtained in this work allowed to better understand the key parameters influencing the MR with Chit as well as to confirm the successful introduction of Glc into the Chit molecule obtaining a Chit-Glc derivative with a DS of 64.76 ± 4.40% and a MW of 210.37 kDa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Atmospheric reaction systems as null-models to identify structural traces of evolution in metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Holme

    Full Text Available The metabolism is the motor behind the biological complexity of an organism. One problem of characterizing its large-scale structure is that it is hard to know what to compare it to. All chemical reaction systems are shaped by the same physics that gives molecules their stability and affinity to react. These fundamental factors cannot be captured by standard null-models based on randomization. The unique property of organismal metabolism is that it is controlled, to some extent, by an enzymatic machinery that is subject to evolution. In this paper, we explore the possibility that reaction systems of planetary atmospheres can serve as a null-model against which we can define metabolic structure and trace the influence of evolution. We find that the two types of data can be distinguished by their respective degree distributions. This is especially clear when looking at the degree distribution of the reaction network (of reaction connected to each other if they involve the same molecular species. For the Earth's atmospheric network and the human metabolic network, we look into more detail for an underlying explanation of this deviation. However, we cannot pinpoint a single cause of the difference, rather there are several concurrent factors. By examining quantities relating to the modular-functional organization of the metabolism, we confirm that metabolic networks have a more complex modular organization than the atmospheric networks, but not much more. We interpret the more variegated modular arrangement of metabolism as a trace of evolved functionality. On the other hand, it is quite remarkable how similar the structures of these two types of networks are, which emphasizes that the constraints from the chemical properties of the molecules has a larger influence in shaping the reaction system than does natural selection.

  5. Notable light-free catalytic activity for pollutant destruction over flower-like BiOI microspheres by a dual-reaction-center Fenton-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Yan, Dengbiao; Lyu, Lai; Hu, Chun; Jiang, Ning; Zhang, Lili

    2018-10-01

    BiOI is widely used as photocatalysts for pollutant removal, water splitting, CO 2 reduction and organic transformation due to its excellent photoelectric properties. Here, we report for the first time that a light-free catalyst consisting of the flower-like BiOI microspheres (f-BiOI MSs) exposing (1 0 1) and (1 1 0) crystal planes prepared by a hydrothermal method in ethylene glycol environment can rapidly eliminate the refractory BPA within only ∼3 min through a Fenton-like process. The reaction activity is ∼190 times higher than that of the conventional Fenton catalyst Fe 2 O 3 . A series of characterizations and experiments reveal the formation of the dual reaction centers on f-BiOI MSs. The electron-rich O centers efficiently reduce H 2 O 2 to OH, while the electron-poor oxygen vacancies capture electrons from the adsorbed pollutants and divert them to the electron-rich area during the Fenton-like reactions. By these processes, pollutants are degraded and mineralized quickly in a wide pH range. Our findings address the problems of the classical Fenton reaction and are useful for the development of efficient Fenton-like catalysts through constructing dual reaction centers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Linking Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Structure on the Way to the Drip Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, Willem

    2012-10-01

    The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied on data from the (e,e'p) reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The dispersive optical model (DOM), originally conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. The DOM provides the starting point to provide a framework in which nuclear reactions and structure data can be analyzed consistently to provide unambiguous spectroscopic information including its asymmetry dependence. Recent extensions of this approach include the treatment of non-locality to describe experimental data like the nuclear charge density based on information of the spectral density below the Fermi energy, the application of the DOM ingredients to the description of transfer reactions, a comparison of the microscopic content of the nucleon self-energy based on Faddeev-RPA calculations emphasizing long-range correlations with DOM potentials, and a study of the relation between a self-energy which includes the effect of short-range correlations with DOM potentials. The most recent Dom implementation currently in progress abandons the constraint of local potentials completely to allow an accurate description of various properties of the nuclear ground state.

  7. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  8. Study of structure modification influence of polymer matrix on the impurity centers luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akylbaev, Zh.S.; Karitskay, S.G.; Nikitina, L.A.; Kobzev, G.I.

    2002-01-01

    Data on study of influence of polymer matrix structure change on impurity centers fluorescence are cited. In the capacity of polymer matrix the polyvinyl butyryl (PVB) serves, and as fluorescence centers the dye molecules the crystal violet (CV) are serving. Computerized simulation of processes of PVB matrixes structuring under the oxygen action from air, produced under annealing of the film at thermal treatment of liquid polymer. Calculation of KV spectral lines wave length under optimization of the dye-polymer system is carried out by the Mm+ molecular mechanics method, and then by semi-empiric method ZINDO1

  9. Reactive scattering from oriented molecules: The three-center reaction K+ICl --> KI+Cl, KCl+I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, H. J.; Möller, J.

    1992-12-01

    In a crossed molecular beam experiment, we have measured the angular and time-of-flight (TOF) distributions of the products KCl and KI formed in the reaction K+ICl→KI+Cl, KCl+I at an elevated collision energy of Etr=1.64 eV. Employing the brute force method, we have prepared an oriented ICl beam and studied in addition also the orientation dependence of these distributions. The results are (i) KCl is the dominant product, but also KI is substantially formed with a branching ratio of 4:1; (ii) the double differential reaction cross section in the center-of-mass frame (contour maps) indicates that all products are preferentially forward scattered and constrained to the forward hemisphere; (iii) the KCl flux consists of two distinct components which differ markedly in kinetic energy and dependence on the ICl orientation; there are also indications of the existence of two components of KI; (iv) 65%, 84%, and 64% of the available energy is vested into the internal degrees of freedom for the fast, slow component of KCl and KI, respectively; (v) the existence of two components can be rationalized on the basis of the harpooning mechanism where the jumping electron accesses the ground state or one of the low excited states of the ICl- ion and triggers the subsequent explosion of the ion with more or less kinetic energy of the fragments depending on the initially populated state; (vi) the energies released during dissociation of ICl- in the 2Σ ground state and the first 2Π state are ≤0.19 and ≤1.2 eV, respectively; (vii) the fast KCl component features a negative steric effect suggesting favorable product formation for attacks of K to the I end of ICl, the steric effect of the slow KI component is positive, i.e., attacks to the Cl end form products favorably; the other components exhibit no significant steric effect; (viii) the steric effects can be quantitatively rationalized using the same model as mentioned above; (ix) the magnitude of the steric effect suggests a

  10. Structure sensitive reactions over Co, Fe and mixed metal clusters in zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suib, S.L.

    1992-08-01

    Transient and steady state kinetic studies of structure sensitive reactions of cyclopropane (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) and hydrogen over zeolites is the first area of this studied. Low level impurity Fe{sup 3+} ions in zeolites complicate interpretation of spectroscopic and catalytic studies of these systems. We focused our efforts on selectively substituting Fe{sup 3+} ions in the frameworks of various zeolites to understand their role in catalytic reactions such as with c-C{sub 3}H{sub 6} and H{sub 2}. These studies led to isomorphous substitution of other ions like B{sup 3+} and their use in isomerization of n-butenes to isobutylene. The third area of research involves the synthesis, characterization and catalysis of a new class of molecular sieve manganese oxide tunnel structure materials.

  11. Structure sensitive reactions over Co, Fe and mixed metal clusters in zeolites. Annual technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suib, S.L.

    1992-08-01

    Transient and steady state kinetic studies of structure sensitive reactions of cyclopropane (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) and hydrogen over zeolites is the first area of this studied. Low level impurity Fe{sup 3+} ions in zeolites complicate interpretation of spectroscopic and catalytic studies of these systems. We focused our efforts on selectively substituting Fe{sup 3+} ions in the frameworks of various zeolites to understand their role in catalytic reactions such as with c-C{sub 3}H{sub 6} and H{sub 2}. These studies led to isomorphous substitution of other ions like B{sup 3+} and their use in isomerization of n-butenes to isobutylene. The third area of research involves the synthesis, characterization and catalysis of a new class of molecular sieve manganese oxide tunnel structure materials.

  12. Fusion reaction yield in focused discharges with variable energy and plasma fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolotti, A.; Brzosko, J.S.; Chiara, P. De; Kilic, H.; Mezzetti, F.; Nardi, V.; Powell, C.; Wang, J.

    1992-01-01

    The same linear correlation between the distribution parameters (ΔT and Max ΔV) of the radial current density J between electrodes and the fusion reaction yield per pulse, Y, in the plasma focus (PF) pinch was quantitatively determined from different PF machines. Contact prints of current-sheath fragments (CSF) ejected from the pinch are obtained from 2.5-MeV-D + ions. CSF's show the same submillimetric fine structure of the pinch. (author) 3 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Role of Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction center residue M214 in the composition, absorbance properties, and conformations of H(A) and B(A) cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saer, Rafael G; Hardjasa, Amelia; Rosell, Federico I; Mauk, A Grant; Murphy, Michael E P; Beatty, J Thomas

    2013-04-02

    In the native reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the side chain of (M)L214 projects orthogonally toward the plane and into the center of the A branch bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) macrocycle. The possibility that this side chain is responsible for the dechelation of the central Mg(2+) of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) was investigated by replacement of (M)214 with residues possessing small, nonpolar side chains that can neither coordinate nor block access to the central metal ion. The (M)L214 side chain was also replaced with Cys, Gln, and Asn to evaluate further the requirements for assembly of the RC with BChl in the HA pocket. Photoheterotrophic growth studies showed no difference in growth rates of the (M)214 nonpolar mutants at a low light intensity, but the growth of the amide-containing mutants was impaired. The absorbance spectra of purified RCs indicated that although absorbance changes are associated with the nonpolar mutations, the nonpolar mutant RC pigment compositions are the same as in the wild-type protein. Crystal structures of the (M)L214G, (M)L214A, and (M)L214N mutants were determined (determined to 2.2-2.85 Å resolution), confirming the presence of BPhe in the HA pocket and revealing alternative conformations of the phytyl tail of the accessory BChl in the BA site of these nonpolar mutants. Our results demonstrate that (i) BChl is converted to BPhe in a manner independent of the aliphatic side chain length of nonpolar residues replacing (M)214, (ii) BChl replaces BPhe if residue (M)214 has an amide-bearing side chain, (iii) (M)214 side chains containing sulfur are not sufficient to bind BChl in the HA pocket, and (iv) the (M)214 side chain influences the conformation of the phytyl tail of the BA BChl.

  14. Crystal structure of an EAL domain in complex with reaction product 5'-pGpG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Robert-Paganin

    Full Text Available FimX is a large multidomain protein containing an EAL domain and involved in twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here two crystallographic structures of the EAL domain of FimX (residues 438-686: one of the apo form and the other of a complex with 5'-pGpG, the reaction product of the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP. In both crystal forms, the EAL domains form a dimer delimiting a large cavity encompassing the catalytic pockets. The ligand is trapped in this cavity by its sugar phosphate moiety. We confirmed by NMR that the guanine bases are not involved in the interaction in solution. We solved here the first structure of an EAL domain bound to the reaction product 5'-pGpG. Though isolated FimX EAL domain has a very low catalytic activity, which would not be significant compared to other catalytic EAL domains, the structure with the product of the reaction can provides some hints in the mechanism of hydrolysis of the c-di-GMP by EAL domains.

  15. Report of seminar on relativistic approach to nuclear reaction and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    A seminar on 'Relativistic Approach to Nuclear Reaction and Nuclear Structure' was held in 1985 at Osaka University. This booklet includes twenty-four reports given at the seminar, which deal with: Conventional Nonrelativistic Description of Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Spin-Orbit Interactions; Relativistic Approach to Nuclear Structure; Atomic and Molecular Structure Calculations; Electromagnetic Interaction in Nucleus and Relativistic Effect; Nuclear Magnetic Moment in the Relativistic Mean Field Theory, Effective Mass and Particle-Vibration Coupling in the Relativistic σ-ω Model; Gauge Invariance in Relativistic Many-Body Theory; Relativistic Description of Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction in Review; σ-Particle in NN Interaction; Nuclear Optical Potentials Based on the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock Approach; Elastic Backscattering and Optical Potential; Description of Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Reactions; Dirac Phenomenology at E(p) = 65 MeV; Relativistic Impulse Approximation; Reaction Studies with Intermediate Energy Deuterons at SATURNE; Folding Model for Intermediate-Energy Deutron Scattering; Folding Model for Polarized Deutron Scattering at 700 MeV; Dirac Approach Problems and a Different Viewpoint; Relativistic Approach and EMC Effect; Quasielastic Electron Scattering; Response Function of Quasielastic Electron Scattering; Relativistic Hartree Response Function for Quasielastic Electron Scattering on 12 C and 40 Ca; Backflow-, Retardation- and Relativistic Effects on the Longitudinal Response Function of Nuclear Matter; Pion-Photoproduction in the σ-ω Model. (Nogami, K.)

  16. Crystal structure of an EAL domain in complex with reaction product 5'-pGpG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-Paganin, Julien; Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Réty, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    FimX is a large multidomain protein containing an EAL domain and involved in twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here two crystallographic structures of the EAL domain of FimX (residues 438-686): one of the apo form and the other of a complex with 5'-pGpG, the reaction product of the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP. In both crystal forms, the EAL domains form a dimer delimiting a large cavity encompassing the catalytic pockets. The ligand is trapped in this cavity by its sugar phosphate moiety. We confirmed by NMR that the guanine bases are not involved in the interaction in solution. We solved here the first structure of an EAL domain bound to the reaction product 5'-pGpG. Though isolated FimX EAL domain has a very low catalytic activity, which would not be significant compared to other catalytic EAL domains, the structure with the product of the reaction can provides some hints in the mechanism of hydrolysis of the c-di-GMP by EAL domains.

  17. The influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction of ghee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Angela E; Fairbanks, Antony J; Golding, Matt; Andrewes, Paul; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2015-04-15

    Food systems, such as cream and butter, have an emulsion or emulsion-like structure. When these food emulsions are heated to high temperatures to make products such as ghee, the Maillard reaction forms a range of volatile flavour compounds. The objective of this paper was to unravel the specific influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction pathways that occur during the cooking of ghee using model systems. Switching the dispersed phase from oil to water provided a means of altering the ratios of volatile compounds produced in the cooked samples. The oil-in-water emulsion generated a volatile compound profile similar to that of the fat containing two phase model matrix, whereas the water-in-oil emulsion produced a different ratio of these compounds. The ability to generate different volatile compound profiles through the use of inverted emulsion structures could point to a new avenue for control of the Maillard reaction in high temperature food systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A dataset of 200 structured product labels annotated for adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Shooshan, Sonya E; Rodriguez, Laritza; Aronson, Alan R; Lang, Francois; Rogers, Willie; Roberts, Kirk; Tonning, Joseph

    2018-01-30

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs), unintended and sometimes dangerous effects that a drug may have, are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality during medical care. To date, there is no structured machine-readable authoritative source of known ADRs. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) partnered with the National Library of Medicine to create a pilot dataset containing standardised information about known adverse reactions for 200 FDA-approved drugs. The Structured Product Labels (SPLs), the documents FDA uses to exchange information about drugs and other products, were manually annotated for adverse reactions at the mention level to facilitate development and evaluation of text mining tools for extraction of ADRs from all SPLs. The ADRs were then normalised to the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). We present the curation process and the structure of the publicly available database SPL-ADR-200db containing 5,098 distinct ADRs. The database is available at https://bionlp.nlm.nih.gov/tac2017adversereactions/; the code for preparing and validating the data is available at https://github.com/lhncbc/fda-ars.

  19. Photosynthesis Is Widely Distributed among Proteobacteria as Demonstrated by the Phylogeny of PufLM Reaction Center Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes F. Imhoff

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different photosystems for performing bacteriochlorophyll-mediated photosynthetic energy conversion are employed in different bacterial phyla. Those bacteria employing a photosystem II type of photosynthetic apparatus include the phototrophic purple bacteria (Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonas and Chloroflexus with their photosynthetic relatives. The proteins of the photosynthetic reaction center PufL and PufM are essential components and are common to all bacteria with a type-II photosynthetic apparatus, including the anaerobic as well as the aerobic phototrophic Proteobacteria. Therefore, PufL and PufM proteins and their genes are perfect tools to evaluate the phylogeny of the photosynthetic apparatus and to study the diversity of the bacteria employing this photosystem in nature. Almost complete pufLM gene sequences and the derived protein sequences from 152 type strains and 45 additional strains of phototrophic Proteobacteria employing photosystem II were compared. The results give interesting and comprehensive insights into the phylogeny of the photosynthetic apparatus and clearly define Chromatiales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales as major groups distinct from other Alphaproteobacteria, from Betaproteobacteria and from Caulobacterales (Brevundimonas subvibrioides. A special relationship exists between the PufLM sequences of those bacteria employing bacteriochlorophyll b instead of bacteriochlorophyll a. A clear phylogenetic association of aerobic phototrophic purple bacteria to anaerobic purple bacteria according to their PufLM sequences is demonstrated indicating multiple evolutionary lines from anaerobic to aerobic phototrophic purple bacteria. The impact of pufLM gene sequences for studies on the environmental diversity of phototrophic bacteria is discussed and the possibility of their identification on the species level in environmental samples is pointed out.

  20. Structure and function of the tetraheme cytochrome associated to the reaction center of Roseobacter denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, D; Richaud, P; Breton, J; Verméglio, A

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized the tetrahemic RC bound cytochrome isolated from the quasi-photosynthetic bacterium Roseobacter denitrificans in terms of absorption spectrum, redox property and orientation with respect to the membrane plane. The heme, designated H1, which possesses the highest redox midpoint potential (+290 mV), absorbs at 555 nm. Its plane makes an angle of 40 degrees with the membrane plane. The second high potential heme, H2 (+240 mV), peaks at 554 nm and makes a tilt of 55 degrees with the membrane. The two low potential hemes, L1 and L2, present a similar and rather high redox midpoint potential (+90 mV). They absorb at 553 nm and 550 nm. One of these hemes is oriented at 40 degrees while the other makes an angle of 90 degrees with the membrane plane. The soluble cytochrome c551 completes the cyclic electron transfer between the RC and the bc1 complex. Both the oxidation and the re-reduction of cytochrome c551 are diffusible processes. Under semi-aerobic conditions, one of the low potential hemes is photo-oxidized under illumination but only extremely slowly re-reduced. This explains the requirement of high aerobic conditions for growth of Roseobacter denitrificans cells in the light.

  1. Ground Reaction Forces Generated During Rhythmical Squats as a Dynamic Loads of the Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantak, Marek

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic forces generated by moving persons can lead to excessive vibration of the long span, slender and lightweight structure such as floors, stairs, stadium stands and footbridges. These dynamic forces are generated during walking, running, jumping and rhythmical body swaying in vertical or horizontal direction etc. In the paper the mathematical models of the Ground Reaction Forces (GRFs) generated during squats have been presented. Elaborated models was compared to the GRFs measured during laboratory tests carried out by author in wide range of frequency using force platform. Moreover, the GRFs models were evaluated during dynamic numerical analyses and dynamic field tests of the exemplary structure (steel footbridge).

  2. Charge stabilization by reaction center protein immobilized to carbon nanotubes functionalized by amine groups and poly(3-thiophene acetic acid) conducting polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, T.; Magyar, M.; Nagy, L. [Department of Medical Physics and Informatics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Nemeth, Z.; Hernadi, K. [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Endrodi, B.; Bencsik, G.; Visy, Cs. [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Horvath, E.; Magrez, A.; Forro, L. [Institute of Physics of Complex Matter, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    A large number of studies have indicated recently that photosynthetic reaction center proteins (RC) bind successfully to nanostructures and their functional activity is largely retained. The major goal of current research is to find the most efficient systems and conditions for the photoelectric energy conversion and for the stability of this bio-nanocomposite. In our studies, we immobilized the RC protein on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) through specific chemical binding to amine functional groups and through conducting polymer (poly(3-thiophene acetic acid), PTAA). Both structural (TEM, AFM) and functional (absorption change and conductivity) measurements has shown that RCs could be bound effectively to functionalized CNTs. The kinetics of the light induced absorption change indicated that RCs were still active in the composite and there was an interaction between the protein cofactors and the CNTs. The light generated photocurrent was measured in an electrochemical cell with transparent CNT electrode designed specially for this experiment. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Electrostatics of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center. Protonation of Glu L 212 and Asp L 213 - A new method of calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptushenko, Vasily V; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Krishtalik, Lev I

    2015-12-01

    Continuum electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies of anions from water into aprotic solvents gives the figures erroneous by order of magnitude. This is due to the hydrogen bond disruption that suggests the necessity to reconsider the traditional approach of the purely electrostatic calculation of the transfer energy from water into protein. In this paper, the method combining the experimental estimates of the transfer energies from water into aprotic solvent and the electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies from aprotic solvent into protein is proposed. Hydrogen bonds between aprotic solvent and solute are taken into account by introducing an imaginary aprotic medium incapable to form hydrogen bonds with the solute. Besides, a new treatment of the heterogeneous intraprotein dielectric permittivity based on the microscopic protein structure and electrometric measurements is elaborated. The method accounts semi-quantitatively for the electrostatic effect of diverse charged amino acid substitutions in the donor and acceptor parts of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Analysis of the volatile secondary acceptor site QB revealed that in the conformation with a minimal distance between quinone QB and Glu L 212 the proton uptake upon the reduction of QB is prompted by Glu L 212 in alkaline and by Asp L 213 in slightly acidic regions. This agrees with the pH dependences of protonation degrees and the proton uptake. The method of pK calculation was applied successfully also for dissociation of Asp 26 in bacterial thioredoxin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Structure-Function Study of RecA: The Structural Basis for ATP Specificity in the Strand Exchange Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegner, Julie; Spruill, Natalie; Plesniak, Leigh A.

    1999-11-01

    The terms "structure" and "function" can assume a variety of meanings. In biochemistry, the "structure" of a protein can refer to its sequence of amino acids, the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms within a subunit, or the arrangement of subunits into a larger oligomeric or filamentous state. Likewise, the function of biological macromolecules can be examined at many levels. The function of a protein can be described by its role in an organism's survival or by a chemical reaction that it promotes. We have designed a three-part biochemical laboratory experiment that characterizes the structure and function of the Escherichia coli RecA protein. The first part examines the importance of RecA in the survival of bacteria that have been exposed to UV light. This is the broadest view of function of the enzyme. Second, the students use an in vitro assay of RecA whereby the protein promotes homologous recombination. Because RecA functions not catalytically, but rather stoichiometrically, in this recombination reaction, the oligomeric state of RecA in complex with DNA must also be discussed. Finally, through molecular modeling of X-ray crystallographic structures, students identify functionally important features of the ATP cofactor binding site of RecA.

  5. (3He,α) reaction mechanism at high energy and neutron inner shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, J. van de.

    1980-01-01

    The ( 3 He,α) reaction on 12 C, 16 O, 28 Si, 58 Ni, 90 Zr, 118 Sn, 124 Sn and 208 Pb targets has been studied at Esub( 3 He) = 217 MeV (or 205 MeV) in order to investigate the reaction mechanism at high energy and large momentum transfer. The reaction yields large cross sections at very forward angles and strongly enhances the largest orbital momentum transfer. The angular distribution shapes are well reproduced in the frame-work of the Z-R- D.W.B.A. analysis if we use a unique empirical α-potential: Vsub(α)(Esub(α)) = Vsub( 3 He)(3/4 Esub(α)) + Vsub(n)(1/4 Esub(α)). The excitation energy spectra have been measured up to 100 MeV in the residual light and medium nuclei and up to about 16 MeV in heavy nuclei. In addition to the well-known low-lying levels, peaks or broad structures are observed for each nucleus at higher excitation energies. They are attributed to pick up from inner shells: 1s( 11 C and 15 O), 1p( 27 Si), 1d5/2 + 1p( 57 Ni), 1f7/2( 89 Zr) 1g9/2 117 Sn, 123 Sn and 1h11/2( 207 Pb). Selectivity and localization of direct and indirect pick up ( 3 He,α) reactions were studied. Finite range calculations show that this reaction is not very sensitive to the details of the range from function but only to D 0 coefficient and range R. A microscopic α-nucleus optical potential calculated with n-n dependent and independent density forces is able to reproduce both elastic scattering and pick up reaction angular distributions [fr

  6. Structure of Hordeum vulgare NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase 2. Unwinding the reaction mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine G. [Carlsberg Laboratory (Denmark); Enzyme and Protein Chemistry, Department of Systems BioIogy, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte [Enzyme and Protein Chemistry, Department of Systems BioIogy, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Henriksen, Anette, E-mail: anette@crc.dk [Carlsberg Laboratory (Denmark)

    2009-09-01

    The first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, a protein involved in seed development and germination, has been determined. The structure is in a conformation that excludes NADPH binding and indicates that a domain reorientation facilitated by Trx binding precedes NADPH binding in the reaction mechanism. Thioredoxins (Trxs) are protein disulfide reductases that regulate the intracellular redox environment and are important for seed germination in plants. Trxs are in turn regulated by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), which provide reducing equivalents to Trx using NADPH to recycle Trxs to the active form. Here, the first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, HvNTR2 from Hordeum vulgare (barley), is presented, which is also the first structure of a monocot plant NTR. The structure was determined at 2.6 Å resolution and refined to an R{sub cryst} of 19.0% and an R{sub free} of 23.8%. The dimeric protein is structurally similar to the structures of AtNTR-B from Arabidopsis thaliana and other known low-molecular-weight NTRs. However, the relative position of the two NTR cofactor-binding domains, the FAD and the NADPH domains, is not the same. The NADPH domain is rotated by 25° and bent by a 38% closure relative to the FAD domain in comparison with AtNTR-B. The structure may represent an intermediate between the two conformations described previously: the flavin-oxidizing (FO) and the flavin-reducing (FR) conformations. Here, analysis of interdomain contacts as well as phylogenetic studies lead to the proposal of a new reaction scheme in which NTR–Trx interactions mediate the FO to FR transformation.

  7. Structure of Hordeum vulgare NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase 2. Unwinding the reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine G.; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Henriksen, Anette

    2009-01-01

    The first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, a protein involved in seed development and germination, has been determined. The structure is in a conformation that excludes NADPH binding and indicates that a domain reorientation facilitated by Trx binding precedes NADPH binding in the reaction mechanism. Thioredoxins (Trxs) are protein disulfide reductases that regulate the intracellular redox environment and are important for seed germination in plants. Trxs are in turn regulated by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), which provide reducing equivalents to Trx using NADPH to recycle Trxs to the active form. Here, the first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, HvNTR2 from Hordeum vulgare (barley), is presented, which is also the first structure of a monocot plant NTR. The structure was determined at 2.6 Å resolution and refined to an R cryst of 19.0% and an R free of 23.8%. The dimeric protein is structurally similar to the structures of AtNTR-B from Arabidopsis thaliana and other known low-molecular-weight NTRs. However, the relative position of the two NTR cofactor-binding domains, the FAD and the NADPH domains, is not the same. The NADPH domain is rotated by 25° and bent by a 38% closure relative to the FAD domain in comparison with AtNTR-B. The structure may represent an intermediate between the two conformations described previously: the flavin-oxidizing (FO) and the flavin-reducing (FR) conformations. Here, analysis of interdomain contacts as well as phylogenetic studies lead to the proposal of a new reaction scheme in which NTR–Trx interactions mediate the FO to FR transformation

  8. Structural characterization of tartrate dehydrogenase: a versatile enzyme catalyzing multiple reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Radhika; Viola, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    The first structure of an NAD-dependent tartrate dehydrogenase (TDH) has been solved to 2 (angstrom) resolution by single anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing as a complex with the intermediate analog oxalate, Mg 2+ and NADH. This TDH structure from Pseudomonas putida has a similar overall fold and domain organization to other structurally characterized members of the hydroxy-acid dehydrogenase family. However, there are considerable differences between TDH and these functionally related enzymes in the regions connecting the core secondary structure and in the relative positioning of important loops and helices. The active site in these complexes is highly ordered, allowing the identification of the substrate-binding and cofactor-binding groups and the ligands to the metal ions. Residues from the adjacent subunit are involved in both the substrate and divalent metal ion binding sites, establishing a dimer as the functional unit and providing structural support for an alternating-site reaction mechanism. The divalent metal ion plays a prominent role in substrate binding and orientation, together with several active-site arginines. Functional groups from both subunits form the cofactor-binding site and the ammonium ion aids in the orientation of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. A lysyl amino group (Lys192) is the base responsible for the water-mediated proton abstraction from the C2 hydroxyl group of the substrate that begins the catalytic reaction, followed by hydride transfer to NAD. A tyrosyl hydroxyl group (Tyr141) functions as a general acid to protonate the enolate intermediate. Each substrate undergoes the initial hydride transfer, but differences in substrate orientation are proposed to account for the different reactions catalyzed by TDH.

  9. The Structure and Functioning of a Low-Budget Center for Applied Linguistics: The Brazilian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes de Matos, Francisco

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure and functioning of the "Centro de Linguistica Aplicada do Instituto de Idiomas Yazigi" of Sao Paulo and comments on its role in promoting applied linguistics studies in Latin America. Also outlines the Center's historical background and its educational services, particularly those related to the teaching of…

  10. Pattern of Adverse Drug Reactions in Children Attending the Department of Pediatrics in a Tertiary Care Center: A Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishour Kumar Digra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM To study the pattern of various adverse drug reactions (ADRs occurring in children attending the Department of Pediatrics, SMGS Hospital, Jammu over 1 year. Subjects and Methods This was a prospective study, with study population of patients attending Department of Pediatrics over a period of 1 year. A structured format was used to enroll the participants. A pilot study was conducted to test the suitability of the format and feasibility of the study. The study was carried out to review various pattern of ADRs by using the Naranjo probability scale, and severity was assessed by using the Hartwig severity scale. ADRs were classified according to the classification used by the Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring Center, Central Drugs Standard Control Organization, New Delhi, India. Results In the present study, 104 patients were found to have developed acute drug reactions. Among these, 83.6% were type B, 14.42% type A, and 1.92% were type U. Furthermore, 25.96% ADRs were due to anticonvulsants, followed by antibiotics (22.11%, antipyretics (11.53%, vaccination (8.65%, steroids (6.73%, decongestants (5.67%, snake antivenom and antiemetics (3.84%, and fluids, insulin, and antacids (1.92%. The patients’ dermatological system was involved in 67.30%, followed by the central nervous system (CNS in 11.53% patients. Renal system was involved in 6.73% patients. Cardiac, musculoskeletal, metabolic, and other systems were involved in 4.80%, 3.84%, 2.88%, and 0.96%, respectively. According to the Hartwig severity scale of ADRs, 64.4% patients had moderate ADRs, 29.8% patients had severe ADRs, and 5.76% had mild ADRs. In the present study, 64.4% patients expressed moderate severity, whereas 29.8% expressed high severity and 5.76% expressed mild ADRs. Conclusion ADRs were seen in 71% of the patients between 1 and 5 years of age, 26% in the age group of 5–10 years, and 3% were more than 10 years old. Anticonvulsants (25.96% and antibiotics (22.11% were

  11. Transformation of meta-stable calcium silicate hydrates to tobermorite: reaction kinetics and molecular structure from XRD and NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the integrity of well-bore systems that are lined with Portland-based cements is critical to the successful storage of sequestered CO2 in gas and oil reservoirs. As a first step, we investigate reaction rates and mechanistic pathways for cement mineral growth in the absence of CO2 by coupling water chemistry with XRD and NMR spectroscopic data. We find that semi-crystalline calcium (alumino-)silicate hydrate (Al-CSH) forms as a precursor solid to the cement mineral tobermorite. Rate constants for tobermorite growth were found to be k = 0.6 (± 0.1) × 10-5 s-1 for a solution:solid of 10:1 and 1.6 (± 0.8) × 10-4 s-1 for a solution:solid of 5:1 (batch mode; T = 150°C). This data indicates that reaction rates for tobermorite growth are faster when the solution volume is reduced by half, suggesting that rates are dependent on solution saturation and that the Gibbs free energy is the reaction driver. However, calculated solution saturation indexes for Al-CSH and tobermorite differ by less than one log unit, which is within the measured uncertainty. Based on this data, we consider both heterogeneous nucleation as the thermodynamic driver and internal restructuring as possible mechanistic pathways for growth. We also use NMR spectroscopy to characterize the site symmetry and bonding environment of Al and Si in a reacted tobermorite sample. We find two [4]Al coordination structures at δiso = 59.9 ppm and 66.3 ppm with quadrupolar product parameters (PQ) of 0.21 MHz and 0.10 MHz (± 0.08) from 27Al 3Q-MAS NMR and speculate on the Al occupancy of framework sites by probing the protonation environment of Al metal centers using 27Al{1H}CP-MAS NMR. PMID:19144195

  12. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and structurally related amines by chlorine dioxide: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; He, Yi-Liang; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a group of widely prescribed antibiotics and have been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven FQs (ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL), lomefloxacin (LOM), pipemidic acid (PIP) and flumequine (FLU)) and three structurally related amines (1-phenylpiperazine (PP), N-phenylmorpholine (PM) and 4-phenylpiperidine (PD)) toward chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) were investigated to elucidate the behavior of FQs during ClO(2) disinfection processes. The reaction kinetics are highly pH-dependent, can be well described by a second-order kinetic model incorporating speciation of FQs, and follow the trend of OFL > ENR > CIP ∼ NOR ∼ LOM > > PIP in reactivity. Comparison among FQs and related amines and product characterization indicate that FQs' piperazine ring is the primary reactive center toward ClO(2). ClO(2) likely attacks FQ's piperazinyl N4 atom followed by concerted fragmentation involving piperazinyl N1 atom, leading to dealkylation, hydroxylation and intramolecular ring closure at the piperazine moiety. While FQs with tertiary N4 react faster with ClO(2) than FQs with secondary N4, the overall reactivity of the piperazine moiety also depends strongly on the quinolone ring through electronic effects. The reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to model the decay of CIP by ClO(2) in surface water samples, but overestimate the decay in wastewater samples. Overall, transformation of FQs, particularly for those with tertiary N4 amines, could be expected under typical ClO(2) disinfection conditions. However, the transformation may not eliminate antibacterial activity because of little destruction at the quinolone ring. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Prevalence of reactions secundary to mosquito bites Aedes aegypti at en el Regional Center of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, de Monterrey, Nuevo Leon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Diaz, Sandra Nora; Cruz, Alfredo Arias; Sedó Mejía, Giovanni A; Rojas Lozano, Antonio A; Valenzuela, Enrique Avitia; Vidaurri Ojeda, Alma C

    2010-01-01

    although systemic reactions resulting from hymenoptera stings have been studied extensively, the prevalence of allergic reactions to mosquitoes is unknown. to investigate the prevalence of allergic reactions to Aedes aegypti bites in patients seeking treatment at the Allergy and Clinical Immunology Regional Center of Jose E Gonzalez University Hospital in Monterrey, Mexico. we carried out a cross-sectional, descriptive study that included patients receiving skin tests for aeroallergens; skin sensitivity to mosquito bites was also tested. A questionnaire was used to obtain information about previous allergic reactions to mosquito bites. a total of 482 patients between 2 and 60 years of age were included; 53% were female, 407 (84.4%) had a history of local reactions to mosquito bites. Twelve patients (2.4%) stated a history of large local reaction; three (0.6%) of them with a positive skin prick test, one (0.2%) of those had systemic reaction history to mosquito. Eighty five (17.6%) patients had a positive mosquito skin test and 307 (63.6%) had a positive skin test for at least one aeroallergen. Seventy-eight (91.7%) of the 85 patients with a positive mosquito skin test had a history of local skin reactions to mosquito bite (odds ratio: 2.303 [confidence interval (CI) 1.037-5.10]. There was no statistically significance association between allergic diseases and mosquito allergy. adverse reactions and allergic reactions to mosquito bites occur frequently. However mosquito allergy is low. Further studies are required to determine the prevalence of mosquito allergy in the general population.

  14. Structural and surface changes of cobalt modified manganese oxide during activation and ethanol steam reforming reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gac, Wojciech; Greluk, Magdalena; Słowik, Grzegorz; Turczyniak-Surdacka, Sylwia

    2018-05-01

    Surface and structural changes of unmodified manganese and cobalt-manganese oxide during activation and ethanol steam reforming reaction conditions (ESR) were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction/oxidation (TPR/TPO) and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that synthesis of cobalt manganese oxide by the redox precipitation method led to the formation of strongly dispersed cobalt ionic species within cryptomelane-based manganese oxide structure. Development of large cube-like MnO nanoparticles with spherical cobalt metallic crystallites decorated by manganese oxide on the high oxidation state and potassium species was observed during reduction. Cobalt manganese catalyst showed high initial activity and selectivity to H2 and CO2 in ethanol stem reforming reaction in the range of 390-480 °C. The drop of ethanol conversion and changes of selectivity with the time-on-stream were observed. An increase of reaction temperature led to intensification of deactivation phenomena. TEM studies evidenced coexistence of Co and CoOx nanoparticles formed under ethanol steam reforming conditions, partially covered by filamentous and encapsulating carbonaceous deposits.

  15. Polarization structure of reactions at theta/sub C.M./ = π/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, G.R.; Moravcsik, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    The polarization structure of a reaction of particles with arbitrary spins is described at 90 0 for the case when one or several pairs of identical particles form the reaction. The simplification of the structure is described in the optimal formalism, and particularly in the helicity and transversity frames, and the reduction in the number of independent amplitudes is tabulated for arbitrary spins and for a large assortment of combinations of symmetries. The constraints due to only one pair of identical particles are particularly stressed since these have hardly been utilized in the past. The results are illustrated on elastic proton-proton scattering, and data for this reaction at 800 MeV are analyzed at 90 0 both phenomenologically and with a specific aim of testing suggestions for the existence of dibaryon resonances. It is shown that at 800 MeV and 90 0 the proton-proton scattering data are compatible with a resonance of the type that has been suggested, though the data do not demand such a resonance

  16. Detecting alkali-silica reaction in thick concrete structures using linear array ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull Ezell, N. Dianne; Albright, Austin; Clayton, Dwight; Santos-Villalobos, Hector

    2018-03-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) depend heavily on concrete structures, making the long-term performance of these structures crucial for safe operation, especially with license period extensions to 60 years and possibly beyond. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a reaction that occurs over time in concrete between alkaline cement paste and reactive, noncrystalline silica (aggregates). In the presence of water, an expansive gel is formed within the aggregates, which results in microcracks in aggregates and adjacent cement paste. ASR can potentially affect concrete properties and performance characteristics such as compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, flexural stiffness, shear strength, and tensile strength. Currently, no nondestructive evaluation methods have proven effective in identifying ASR before surface cracks form. ASR is identified visibly or by petrographic analysis. Although ASR definitely impacts concrete material properties, the performance of concrete structures exhibiting ASR depends on whether or not the concrete is unconfined or confined with reinforcing bars. Confinement by reinforcing bars restrainsthe expansion of ASR-affected concrete, similar to prestressing, thus improving the performance of a structure. Additionally, there is no direct correlation between the mechanical properties of concrete sample cores and the in-situ properties of the concrete. The University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and a consortium of universities have developed an accelerated ASR experiment. Three large concrete specimens, representative of NPP infrastructure, were constructed containing both embedded and surface instruments. This paper presents preliminary analysis of these specimens using a frequency-banded synthetic aperture focusing technique.

  17. Self-Centering Seismic Lateral Force Resisting Systems: High Performance Structures for the City of Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Brent Chancellor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Structures designed in accordance with even the most modern buildings codes are expected to sustain damage during a severe earthquake; however; these structures are expected to protect the lives of the occupants. Damage to the structure can require expensive repairs; significant business downtime; and in some cases building demolition. If damage occurs to many structures within a city or region; the regional and national economy may be severely disrupted. To address these shortcomings with current seismic lateral force resisting systems and to work towards more resilient; sustainable cities; a new class of seismic lateral force resisting systems that sustains little or no damage under severe earthquakes has been developed. These new seismic lateral force resisting systems reduce or prevent structural damage to nonreplaceable structural elements by softening the structural response elastically through gap opening mechanisms. To dissipate seismic energy; friction elements or replaceable yielding energy dissipation elements are also included. Post-tensioning is often used as a part of these systems to return the structure to a plumb; upright position (self-center after the earthquake has passed. This paper summarizes the state-of-the art for self-centering seismic lateral force resisting systems and outlines current research challenges for these systems.

  18. Description of the Structural Materials Information Center being established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, B.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a Structural aging Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify potential structural safety issues related to continued service of nuclear power plants and to establish criteria for evaluating and resolving these issues. One of the tasks in this program focuses on the establishment of a Structural Materials Information Center where data and information on the time variation of concrete and concrete-related material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors will be collected and assembled into a database. This database will be used to assist in the prediction of potential long-term deterioration of critical structural components in nuclear power plants and to establish limits on hostile environmental exposure for these structures and materials. Materials property data and information will be collected at the Structural Materials Information Center from open literature, published references, and identifiable sources. Initially, the database will include portland cement concrete, metallic reinforcement, prestressing tendon and structural steel materials. Then, as data and information for other material systems are obtained, the database will be expanded and updated. The database will be developed and presented in two complementary formats. The Structural Materials Handbook will be published in four volumes as an expandable, hard copy handbook. The Materials Electronic Database will be developed to reflect the same information as contained in the handbook, but will be formatted for use on an IBM or IBM-compatible personal computer

  19. Structure, activity, and stability of platinum alloys as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg

    In this thesis I present our work on theoretical modelling of platinum alloys as catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). The losses associated with the kinetics of the ORR is the main bottleneck in low-temperature fuel cells for transport applications, and more active catalysts...... are essential for wide-spread use of this technology. platinum alloys have shown great promise as more active catalysts, which are still stable under reaction conditions. We have investigated these systems on multiple scales, using either Density Functional Theory (DFT) or Effective Medium Theory (EMT......), depending on the length and time scales involved. Using DFT, we show how diffusion barriers in transition metal alloys in the L12 structure depend on the alloying energy, supporting the assumption that an intrinsically more stable alloy is also more stable towards diffusion-related degradation...

  20. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    The research conducted by the program is: (1) to investigate in detail the role of energy and angular momentum dissipation in the mechanisms of subbarrier fusion, in fusion at and above the barrier, in quasi-elastic and in strongly damped reactions of heavy ions; (2) to extend the above reaction mechanism studies in the regime of 10 to 50 MeV/amu employing techniques of complete detection including γ-rays, light charged particles, neutrons and heavy ions in real or kinematic 4π counting when possible; (3) the study of structural and shape changes of nuclei at very high spins and excitations; and (4) the development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above studies. 76 refs., 27 figs

  1. Structural and morphological characterization of TiO2 powders prepared using Pechini and combustion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, P.C.; Almeida, E.P.; Costa, A.C.F.M. da; Lira, H.L.; Kiminami, R.H.G.A.

    2010-01-01

    TiO 2 is a semiconductor oxide and polymorphic and can exist in three crystallographic forms: anatase, rutile and broquita, and forms anatase and rutile are the major interests in scientific research. Thus, this study aims to synthesize TiO 2 by Pechini methods and combustion reaction and to evaluate the influence of synthesis methods in structural and morphological characteristics of the samples. The nanopowders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, and particle size distribution and scanning electron microscopy. The results of X-ray diffraction showed that the samples obtained by the Pechini method showed the single phase anatase with crystallite size of 20 nm and surface area of 49.44 m 2 /g, whereas the samples synthesized by combustion reaction using glycine as fuel showed the rutile phase as major phase and traces of anatase phase, with crystallite size of 65 nm and surface area 4.34 m 2 /g. (author)

  2. X-ray Crystal Structures Elucidate the Nucleotidyl Transfer Reaction of Transcript Initiation Using Two Nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Gleghorn; E Davydova; R Basu; L Rothman-Denes; K Murakami

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the pre- and postcatalytic forms of the initiation complex of bacteriophage N4 RNA polymerase that provide the complete set of atomic images depicting the process of transcript initiation by a single-subunit RNA polymerase. As observed during T7 RNA polymerase transcript elongation, substrate loading for the initiation process also drives a conformational change of the O helix, but only the correct base pairing between the +2 substrate and DNA base is able to complete the O-helix conformational transition. Substrate binding also facilitates catalytic metal binding that leads to alignment of the reactive groups of substrates for the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. Although all nucleic acid polymerases use two divalent metals for catalysis, they differ in the requirements and the timing of binding of each metal. In the case of bacteriophage RNA polymerase, we propose that catalytic metal binding is the last step before the nucleotidyl transfer reaction.

  3. A Demonstration of Concrete Structural Health Monitoring Framework for Degradation due to Alkali-Silica Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Neal, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nath, Paromita [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bao, Yanqing [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Peter [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adams, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kosson, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This ongoing research project is seeking to develop a probabilistic framework for health diagnosis and prognosis of aging concrete structures in a nuclear power plant that is subjected to physical, chemical, environment, and mechanical degradation. The proposed framework consists of four elements: monitoring, data analytics, uncertainty quantification and prognosis. This report focuses on degradation caused by ASR (alkali-silica reaction). Controlled specimens were prepared to develop accelerated ASR degradation. Different monitoring techniques – thermography, digital image correlation (DIC), mechanical deformation measurements, nonlinear impact resonance acoustic spectroscopy (NIRAS), and vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) -- were used to detect the damage caused by ASR. Heterogeneous data from the multiple techniques was used for damage diagnosis and prognosis, and quantification of the associated uncertainty using a Bayesian network approach. Additionally, MapReduce technique has been demonstrated with synthetic data. This technique can be used in future to handle large amounts of observation data obtained from the online monitoring of realistic structures.

  4. Task analysis and structure scheme for center manager station in large container inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zheng; Gao Wenhuan; Wang Jingjin; Kang Kejun; Chen Zhiqiang

    1997-01-01

    LCIS works as follows: the accelerator generates beam pulses which are formed into fan shape; the scanning system drags a lorry with a container passing through the beam in constant speed; the detector array detects the beam penetrating the lorry; the projection data acquisition system reads the projections and completes an inspection image of the lorry. All these works are controlled and synchronized by the center manage station. The author will describe the process of the projection data acquisition in scanning mode and the methods of real-time projection data processing. the task analysis and the structure scheme of center manager station is presented

  5. Direct reactions in inverse kinematics for nuclear structure studies far off stability at low incident energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhof, P.

    1997-02-01

    The investigation of light-ion induced direct reactions with exotic beams in inverse kinematics gives access to a wide field of nuclear structure studies in the region far off stability. The present contribution will focus on the investigation of few-nucleon transfer reactions, which turn out to be most favourably studied with good-quality low-energy radioactive beams, as provided by the new generation of radioactive beam facilities presently planned or under construction at Caen, Grenoble, Munich, and elsewhere. An overview on the physics motivation, basically concerning nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics questions, is given. Of particular interest are the nuclear shell model in the region far off stability, the two-body residual interaction in nuclei, the structure of halo nuclei, as well as the understanding of the r-process scenario. The experimental conditions, along with the experimental concept, for such measurements are discussed with particular emphasis on the kinematical conditions, the observables, as well as the appropriate detection schemes. The concept of a large solid angle TPC ionization chamber as an active target for experiments with low-energy radioactive beams is presented. It turns out to be a highly effective detection scheme, well suited for the present experimental conditions, at least for light exotic beams up to Z∼20. (orig.)

  6. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the nuclear field theory program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broglia, R A; Bortignon, P F; Barranco, F; Vigezzi, E; Idini, A; Potel, G

    2016-01-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop model of Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar, and of the shell model of Marie Goeppert Meyer and Hans Jensen. The first model contributed the concepts of collective excitations. The second, those of independent-particle motion. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration and particle-rotation couplings carried out by Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson has allowed for an ever more complete, accurate and detailed description of nuclear structure. Nuclear field theory (NFT), developed by the Copenhagen–Buenos Aires collaboration, provided a powerful quantal embodiment of this unification. Reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born), but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus. It is then natural that NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with bound states (structure). As a result, spectroscopic studies of transfer to continuum states could eventually make use of the NFT rules, properly extended to take care of recoil effects. In the present contribution we review the implementation of the NFT program of structure and reactions, setting special emphasis on open problems and outstanding predictions. (invited comment)

  7. Squids, supercurrents, and slope anomalies: Nuclear structure from heavy-ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidry, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Within the past five years we have developed experimental techniques to study heavy-ion transfer reactions to high spin states in deformed nuclei. These methods have been turned into a quantitative tool to assess the influence of collective excitation on single-particle and pairing structure. I discuss some of the nuclear structure questions which are being answered in these experiments: How strong is ground state pairing? How does pairing change with angular momentum? Why is two-neutron transfer much stronger than expected at large radial separation? What is the evidence for a nuclear Josephson Effect? What is the evidence for a nuclear Berry phase effect (nuclear SQUID)? Why does one-neutron transfer populate much higher spins than would be naively expected? Conversely, why does two-neutron transfer populate much lower spins than anyone expected? The answer to each of these questions involves the influence of detailed nuclear structure on transfer reactions, and represents quantitative new information about the effect of angular momentum and excitation energy on many-body systems with a finite number of particles. 8 refs., 6 figs

  8. Structure of compensating centers in neutron irradiated n-type germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erchak, D.P.; Kosobutskij, V.S.; Stel'makh, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    Structural model of one of the main compensating defects of Ge-M1, Ge-M5, Ge-M6 in neutron irradiated (10 18 -10 20 cm -2 ) germanium, strongly alloyed (2x10 18 -3x10 19 cm -3 ) with antimony, phosphorus and arsenic respectively, is suggested. The above mentioned compensating centers are paramagnetic in a positive charge state and represent a vacancy, two nearby germanium atoms of which are replaced with two atoms of corresponding fine donor impurity. It is mainly contributed (63%- for Ge-M5 centers, 56% - for Ge-M6 centers) by orbitals of two germanium atoms neighbouring the vacancy. The angle of the bonds of each of two mentioned germanium atoms with its three neighbours and orientation of maximum electron density of hybride orbital, binding both germanium atoms, is approximately by 5 deg greater the tetrahedral one

  9. Structure around the island of inversion with single-neutron knockout reactions at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Domínguez, B; Patterson, N; Thomas, J S; Orr, N; Chartier, M; Catford, W; Achouri, N L; Angélique, J-C; Ashwood, N I; Banu, A; Bastin,B; Brown, J; Borcea, R; Franchoo, S; Freer, M; Gaudefroy, L; Laurent, B; Labiche, M; Lemmon, R C; Negoita, F; Paschalis, S; Paul, E S; Petri, M; Roussel-Chomaz, P; Staniou, M; Taylor, M J; Trache, L

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear structure of the 31Mg nucleus has been studied with the singleneutron knockout reaction. We report on the preliminary results of an experiment performed with the EXOGAM array coupled, for the first time, to the SPEG spectrometer at GANIL.We present a provisional result for the inclusive single-neutron knockout cross section of σinc= 90(5) mb. Preliminary exclusive cross sections for the measured bound states, including the ground state, are also presented. Finally, preliminary longitudinal momentum distributions for the ground state and first excited state are also shown. These results are compared to Monte Carlo Shell-Model calculations in the sd-pf region.

  10. Time variation in the reaction-zone structure of two-phase spray detonations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, T. H.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the time-varying detonation structure in a monodisperse spray is presented. The theory identifies experimentally observed reaction-zone overpressures as deriving from blast waves formed therein by the explosive ignition of the spray droplets, and follows in time the motion, change in strength, and interactions of these blast waves with one another, and with the leading shock. The results are compared with experimental data by modeling the motion of a finite-size circular pressure transducer through the theoretical data field in an x-t space.

  11. Study of the short-range 3He structure from the dd→3Hen reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladygin, V.P.; Ladygina, N.V.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment on studying of the tensor analysing power C 0,NN,0,0 and spin correlation C N,N,0,0 due to the transverse polarization of both initial particles from the dd→ 3 Hen reaction has been proposed. Those polarization observables are very sensitive to the short-range 3 He structure. This experiment is proposed to be done at the LHE Accelerator Complex using both a polarized deuteron beam and a polarized deuterium target. 25 refs., 2 figs

  12. Comparison of calculated and experimental isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for purple bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers with different quinones incorporated into the QA binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eZhao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that ONIOM type (QM/MM calculations can be used to simulate isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for neutral ubiquinone in the QA binding site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centers. Here we considerably extend upon this previous work by calculating isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for reaction centers with a variety of unlabeled and 18O labeled foreign quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. Isotope edited spectra were calculated for reaction centers with 2,3-dimethoxy-5,6-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MQ0, 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (duroquinone, DQ, and 2,3-dimethyl-l,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ incorporated, and compared to corresponding experimental spectra. The calculated and experimental spectra agree well, further demonstrating the utility and applicability of our ONIOM approach for calculating the vibrational properties of pigments in protein binding sites.The normal modes that contribute to the bands in the calculated spectra, their composition, frequency and intensity, and how these quantities are modified upon 18O labeling, are presented. This computed information leads to a new and more detailed understanding/interpretation of the experimental FTIR difference spectra. Hydrogen bonding to the carbonyl groups of the incorporated quinones is shown to be relatively weak. It is also shown that there is some asymmetry in hydrogen bonding, accounting for 10-13 cm-1 separation in the frequencies of the carbonyl vibrational modes of the incorporated quinones. The extent of asymmetry H-bonding could only be established by considering the spectra for various types of quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. The quinones listed above are tail-less. Spectra were also calculated for reaction centers with corresponding tail containing quinones incorporated, and it is found that replacement of the quinone methyl group by a phytyl or prenyl chain does not alter ONIOM calculated s

  13. Insight into the informational-structure behavior of the Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and maleic anhydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Espíritu, Moyocoyani; Esquivel, Rodolfo O; Kohout, Miroslav; Angulo, Juan Carlos; Dobado, José A; Dehesa, Jesús S; LópezRosa, Sheila; Soriano-Correa, Catalina

    2014-08-01

    The course of the Diels-Alder reactions of cyclopentadiene and maleic anhydride were studied. Two reaction paths were modelled: endo- and exo-selective paths. All structures within the transient region were characterized and analyzed by means of geometrical descriptors, physicochemical parameters and information-theoretical measures in order to observe the linkage between chemical behavior and the carriage of information. We have shown that the information-theoretical characterization of the chemical course of the reaction is in complete agreement with its phenomenological behavior in passing from reactants to products. In addition, we were able to detect the main differences between the two reaction mechanisms. This type of informational analysis serves to provide tools to help understand the chemical reactivity of the two simplest Diels-Alder reactions, which permits the establishment of a connection between the quantum changes that molecular systems exert along reaction coordinates and standard physicochemical phenomenology. In the present study, we have shown that every reaction stage has a family of subsequent structures that are characterized not solely by their phenomenological behavior but also by informational properties of their electronic density distribution (localizability, order, uniformity). Moreover, we were able to describe the main differences between endo-adduct and exo-adduct pathways. With the advent of new experimental techniques, it is in principle possible to observe the structural changes in the transient regions of chemical reactions. Indeed, through this work we have provided the theoretical concepts needed to unveil the concurrent processes associated with chemical reactions.

  14. Structure reactivity relationship in the reaction of DNA guanyl radicals with hydroxybenzoates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Trinh T.; Tang, Vicky J.; Aguilera, Joseph A. [Department of Radiology University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0610 (United States); Milligan, Jamie R., E-mail: jmilligan@ucsd.ed [Department of Radiology University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0610 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    In DNA, guanine bases are the sites from which electrons are most easily removed. As a result of hole migration to this stable location on guanine, guanyl radicals are major intermediates in DNA damage produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself and not through the intermediacy of water radicals). We have modeled this process by employing gamma irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions, a method which also produces single electron oxidized guanyl radicals in plasmid DNA in aqueous solution. The stable products formed in DNA from these radicals are detected as strand breaks after incubation with the FPG protein. When a phenolic compound is present in the solution during gamma irradiation, the formation of guanyl radical species is decreased by electron donation from the phenol to the guanyl radical. We have quantified the rate of this reaction for four different phenolic compounds bearing carboxylate substituents as proton acceptors. A comparison of the rates of these reactions with the redox strengths of the phenolic compounds reveals that salicylate reacts ca. 10-fold faster than its structural analogs. This observation is consistent with a reaction mechanism involving a proton coupled electron transfer, because intra-molecular transfer of a proton from the phenolic hydroxyl group to the carboxylate group is possible only in salicylate, and is favored by the strong 6-membered ring intra-molecular hydrogen bond in this compound.

  15. Family structure and posttraumatic stress reactions: a longitudinal study using multilevel analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background There is limited research on the relevance of family structures to the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress following disasters. We longitudinally studied the effects of marital and parental statuses on posttraumatic stress reactions after the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami and whether persons in the same households had more shared stress reactions than others. Method The study included a tourist population of 641 Norwegian adult citizens, many of them from families with children. We measured posttraumatic stress symptoms with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised at 6 months and 2 years post-disaster. Analyses included multilevel methods with mixed effects models. Results Results showed that neither marital nor parental status was significantly related to posttraumatic stress. At both assessments, adults living in the same household reported levels of posttraumatic stress that were more similar to one another than adults who were not living together. Between households, disaster experiences were closely related to the variance in posttraumatic stress symptom levels at both assessments. Within households, however, disaster experiences were less related to the variance in symptom level at 2 years than at 6 months. Conclusions These results indicate that adult household members may influence one another's posttraumatic stress reactions as well as their interpretations of the disaster experiences over time. Our findings suggest that multilevel methods may provide important information about family processes after disasters. PMID:22171549

  16. Intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions at the hadronic structural level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowinski, B [Institute of Physics, Warsaw, University of Technology, Poland, Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk, (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Form tens of MeV to several hundred of GeV is stretched out quite a large interval of energy when the interaction between hadrons (for instance, pion/nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions) can be described by the considerably simplified way with still acceptable accuracy. This happens because in this energy region hadrons (i.e. pions, nucleons etc.) remain quasiparticles of nuclear matter mostly without revealing any internal structure, their de Broglie`s wavelength is much shorter as compared to the average intranuclear nucleon`s distance, and the energy transfers in the reaction are, on the average, significantly greater than the binding energy of nucleons inside nuclei. Consequently an approach to the analysis of these phenomena based on simple geometric and probabilistic considerations is justifiable, especially for many practical purposes, in particular, for shielding and dosimetric estimations, material behaviour prediction, as well as for the approximate evaluation of electronuclear breeding effects in different composites of target materials, for nuclear passivation problems and so on. In this work basic physical reasons of such a simplified picture of intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions are presented. The most usual phenomenological models of hadronic multiple emission/production and recent results of the cascade evaporation type models, are also discussed. 2 figs.

  17. Family structure and posttraumatic stress reactions: a longitudinal study using multilevel analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nygaard Egil

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited research on the relevance of family structures to the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress following disasters. We longitudinally studied the effects of marital and parental statuses on posttraumatic stress reactions after the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami and whether persons in the same households had more shared stress reactions than others. Method The study included a tourist population of 641 Norwegian adult citizens, many of them from families with children. We measured posttraumatic stress symptoms with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised at 6 months and 2 years post-disaster. Analyses included multilevel methods with mixed effects models. Results Results showed that neither marital nor parental status was significantly related to posttraumatic stress. At both assessments, adults living in the same household reported levels of posttraumatic stress that were more similar to one another than adults who were not living together. Between households, disaster experiences were closely related to the variance in posttraumatic stress symptom levels at both assessments. Within households, however, disaster experiences were less related to the variance in symptom level at 2 years than at 6 months. Conclusions These results indicate that adult household members may influence one another's posttraumatic stress reactions as well as their interpretations of the disaster experiences over time. Our findings suggest that multilevel methods may provide important information about family processes after disasters.

  18. A Ligand Structure-Activity Study of DNA-Based Catalytic Asymmetric Hydration and Diels-Alder Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosati, F.; Roelfes, J.G.

    A structure-activity relationship study of the first generation ligands for the DNA-based asymmetric hydration of enones and Diels-Alder reaction in water is reported. The design of the ligand was optimized resulting in a maximum ee of 83% in the hydration reaction and 75% in the Diels-Alder

  19. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  20. Variation in Structure and Process of Care in Traumatic Brain Injury: Provider Profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers Participating in the CENTER-TBI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryse C Cnossen

    Full Text Available The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map the existing variation. The aim of current study is to quantify variation in general structural and process characteristics among centers participating in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI study.We designed a set of 11 provider profiling questionnaires with 321 questions about various aspects of TBI care, chosen based on literature and expert opinion. After pilot testing, questionnaires were disseminated to 71 centers from 20 countries participating in the CENTER-TBI study. Reliability of questionnaires was estimated by calculating a concordance rate among 5% duplicate questions.All 71 centers completed the questionnaires. Median concordance rate among duplicate questions was 0.85. The majority of centers were academic hospitals (n = 65, 92%, designated as a level I trauma center (n = 48, 68% and situated in an urban location (n = 70, 99%. The availability of facilities for neuro-trauma care varied across centers; e.g. 40 (57% had a dedicated neuro-intensive care unit (ICU, 36 (51% had an in-hospital rehabilitation unit and the organization of the ICU was closed in 64% (n = 45 of the centers. In addition, we found wide variation in processes of care, such as the ICU admission policy and intracranial pressure monitoring policy among centers.Even among high-volume, specialized neurotrauma centers there is substantial variation in structures and processes of TBI care. This variation provides an opportunity to study effectiveness of specific aspects of TBI care and to identify best practices with CER approaches.

  1. Dissociation reactions of the 11Be one-neutron halo: the interplay between structure and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anne, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; Saint-Laurent, M.G.; Arnell, S.E.; Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Wilhelmsen Rolander, K.; Esbensen, H.; Wolski, D.

    1992-01-01

    Reactions of a radioactive 11 Be beam at 41 MeV/u have been investigated. The absolute magnitude of the differential cross-sections of the forward neutrons in the exclusive ( 10 Be + n) channel can be accounted for quantitatively in a simple model. The narrow distribution from high-Z targets turns out to arise from Coulomb dissociation whereas the broad distribution from the beryllium target is due to diffraction dissociation

  2. Three-nucleon transfer reactions and cluster structure in the A = 15 to A = 19 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    The ( 6 Li,t) and ( 6 Li, 3 He) reactions were studied on targets of 12 C, 13 C, 14 N, 15 N, and 16 O at E/sub Li/ approx. = 44 MeV and theta/sub lab/ approx. = 15 0 . A preferential population of final states was exhibited in spectra for the A = 15 to A = 19 nuclei. The strong forward peaking of angular distributions in the 13 C( 6 Li,t) 16 O and 13 C( 6 Li, 3 He) 16 N reactions can be reproduced by DWBA calculations but not by the Hauser-Feshbach model. Such indications of a primarily direct mechanism at forward angles suggest use of these three-nucleon-transfer reactions to identify candidates for 3p-nh states. A comparison with other multinucleon transfer data, e.g., those from ( 7 Li,α) and ( 7 Li,t) reactions on 13 C and 15 N targets, further tests dominant particle-hole configurations. The relationship between ( 6 Li,t) and ( 6 Li, 3 He) spectra reveals analog states, notably T = 1, T/sub z/ = 0 levels at high excitation in 16 O. Nuclear theory is used to investigate the role of triton clustering in such structure. The 2N + L = 6 band predicted by a folded-potential model of 18 O = 15 N + t shows an underlying correspondence to the experimental levels in triton-transfer data. Triton spectroscopic factors calculated from the SU(3) shell model further suggest the broad influence of clustering phenomena in this mass region. Experimental evidence of systematic behavior in the triton binding energies of proposed p/sup -n/(sd) 3 configurations was found

  3. Effect of reaction temperature on structure and fluorescence properties of nitrogen-doped carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lyuliang University, Lyuliang 033001 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Yaling [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Feng, Xiaoting [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Feng [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Liu, Xuguang, E-mail: liuxuguang@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) from ammonia solution and citric acid were synthesized at different temperatures. • Quantum yield (QY) of NCDs depends largely on the amount of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), more FPC gives higher QY. • The law of QY of NCDs first increase and then decrease with the reaction temperature increased is found and explained. • Nitrogen doping plays significant role in getting increased UV–vis absorption and QY. - Abstract: To investigate the effect of reaction temperature and nitrogen doping on the structure and fluorescence properties of carbon dots (CDs), six kinds of nitrogen-doped CDs (NCDs) were synthesized at reaction temperatures of 120, 140, 160, 180, 200 and 220 °C, separately, by using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source. Nitrogen-free CDs (N-free CDs-180) was also prepared at 180 °C by using citric acid as the only carbon source for comparison. Results show that reaction temperature has obvious effect on carbonization degree, quantum yield (QY), ultraviolet-visible (UV–vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra but less effect on functional groups, nitrogen doping degree and fluorescence lifetime of NCDs. Compared with N-free CDs-180, NCDs-180 possesses enchanced QY and longer fluorescence lifetime. Doping nitrogen has obvious effect on UV–vis absorption and PL spectra but less effect on particles sizes and carbonization degree. The formation mechanism of NCDs is explored: QY of NCDs depends largely on the number of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), the competition between FPC formation on the surface of NCDs and carbon core growth leads to the change in number of FPC, and consequently to the NCDs with highest QY at appropriate hydrothermal temperature.

  4. Evolution of direct mechanisms with incident energy from the Coulomb-barrier to relativistic energies. - Two-center effects in nucleon transfer between nuclei. - Signatures of nucleon promotion in heavy ion reactions at barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertzen, W. von; Voit, H.; Imanishi, B.

    1988-10-01

    This report contains a review article considering the evolution of direct mechanisms with incident energy in heavy ion reactions and two theoretical articles concerning two-center effects in transfer reactions between heavy ions and the nucleon promotion in heavy ion reactions. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  5. Travelling wave and convergence in stage-structured reaction-diffusion competitive models with nonlocal delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Rui; Chaplain, M.A.J.; Davidson, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we first investigate a stage-structured competitive model with time delays, harvesting, and nonlocal spatial effect. By using an iterative technique recently developed by Wu and Zou (Wu J, Zou X. Travelling wave fronts of reaction-diffusion systems with delay. J Dynam Differen Equat 2001;13:651-87), sufficient conditions are established for the existence of travelling front solution connecting the two boundary equilibria in the case when there is no positive equilibrium. The travelling wave front corresponds to an invasion by a stronger species which drives the weaker species to extinction. Secondly, we consider a stage-structured competitive model with time delays and nonlocal spatial effect when the domain is finite. We prove the global stability of each of the nonnegative equilibria and demonstrate that the more complex model studied here admits three possible long term behaviors: coexistence, bistability and dominance as is the case for the standard Lotka-Voltera competitive model

  6. Influence of alkali-silica reaction on the physical, mechanical, and structural behaviour of reinforced concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Ricardo Antonio

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the major concrete deterioration mechanisms in the world. Cracking in concrete structures due to ASR has been observed worldwide. In Denmark numerous concrete structures have been built with a critical amount of ASR-reactive aggregate, mostly as porous opaline...... and porous calcareous opaline flint in the fine aggregate fraction. During the last few decades, an increasing number of bridges in Denmark have been severely damaged due to ASR. In the most severe cases, the ASR-damaged bridges have been demolished and reconstructed due to uncertainty about their residual...... following features in common: (a) significant amount of ASR cracks were observed on and inside the slabs, (b) the ASR cracks were oriented parallel to the plane of the slabs, and (c) ASR occurred in the fine aggregate fraction. In this PhD study, both the compressive strength and tensile strength of drilled...

  7. From bare to renormalized order parameter in gauge space: Structure and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potel, G.; Idini, A.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2017-09-01

    It is not physically obvious why one can calculate with similar accuracy, as compared to the experimental data, the absolute cross section associated with two-nucleon transfer processes between members of pairing rotational bands, making use of simple BCS (constant matrix elements) or of many-body [Nambu-Gorkov (NG), nuclear field theory (NFT)] spectroscopic amplitudes. Restoration of spontaneous symmetry breaking and associated emergent generalized rigidity in gauge space provides the answer and points to a new emergence: A physical sum rule resulting from the intertwining of structure and reaction processes, closely connected with the central role induced pairing interaction plays in structure, together with the fact that successive transfer dominates Cooper pair tunneling.

  8. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  9. Effect of Alkali-Silica Reaction on Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Structural Members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariri-Ardebili, Mohammad [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Saouma, Victor [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Le Pape, Yann [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) was discovered in the early 40s by Stanton (1940) of the California Division of Highways. Since, it has been recognized as a major degradation mechanism for concrete dams and transportation infrastructures. Sometimes described as the ’cancer of concrete’, this internal swelling mechanism causes expansion, cracking and loss of mechanical properties. There are no known economically viable solutions applicable to massive concrete to prevent the reaction once initiated. The e ciency of the mitigation strategies for ASR subjected structures is limited. Several cases of ASR in nuclear generating stations have been disclosed in Japan (Takatura et al. 2005), Canada at Gentilly 2 NPP (Tcherner and Aziz 2009) 1, and more recently, in the United States for which the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Information Notice (IN) 2011-20, ’Concrete Degradation by Alkali Silica Reaction,’ on November 18, 2011, to provide the industry with information related to the ASR identified at Seabrook. Considering that US commercial reactors in operation enter the age when ASR degradation can be visually detected and that numerous non nuclear infrastructures (transportation, energy production) have already experienced ASR in a large majority of the States (e.g., Department of Transportation survey reported by Touma (Touma 2000)), the susceptibility and significance of ASR for nuclear concrete structures must be addressed in the perspective of license renewal and long-term operation beyond 60 years. The aim of this report is to perform an extensive parametric series of 3D nonlinear finite element analyses of three di erent “beam-like” geometries, including two di erent depths, three di erent types of boundary conditions, and four other parameters: namely, the ASR volumetric expansion, the reinforcement ratio, the loss of elastic modulus induced by ASR and the loss of tensile strength caused by ASR.

  10. The electronic structure of the F-center in alkali-halides-The Bethe cluster - lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, S.L.A. de.

    1977-07-01

    The electronic structure of the F-center in alkali-halides with the NaCl structure has been studied using the Bethe Cluster lattice method. The central cluster has been taken as constituted by the vacancy and the nearest- and second-neighbors to it, respectively cations and anions. The optical transitions have been calculated and compared to experimental data on the location of the peak of the F-absorption band. The agreement obtained indicates that this method may be used to study properties of this defect in alkali halides. (Author) [pt

  11. Rare events in many-body systems: reactive paths and reaction constants for structural transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picciani, M.

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with the study of fundamental physics phenomena, with applications to nuclear materials of interest. We have developed methods for the study of rare events related to thermally activated structural transitions in many body systems. The first method involves the numerical simulation of the probability current associated with reactive paths. After deriving the evolution equations for the probability current, a Diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm is implemented in order to sample this current. This technique, called Transition Current Sampling was applied to the study of structural transitions in a cluster of 38 atoms with Lennard-Jones potential (LJ-38). A second algorithm, called Transition Path Sampling with local Lyapunov bias (LyTPS), was then developed. LyTPS calculates reaction rates at finite temperature by following the transition state theory. A statistical bias based on the maximum local Lyapunov exponents is introduced to accelerate the sampling of reactive trajectories. To extract the value of the equilibrium reaction constants obtained from LyTPS, we use the Multistate Bennett Acceptance Ratio. We again validate this method on the LJ-38 cluster. LyTPS is then used to calculate migration constants for vacancies and divacancies in the α-Iron, and the associated migration entropy. These constants are used as input parameter for codes modeling the kinetic evolution after irradiation (First Passage Kinetic Monte Carlo) to reproduce numerically resistivity recovery experiments in α-Iron. (author) [fr

  12. Significance of Alkali-Silica reaction in nuclear safety-related concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pape, Y.; Field, K.G.; Mattus, C.H.; Naus, D.J.; Busby, J.T.; Saouma, V.; Ma, Z.J.; Cabage, J.V.; Guimaraes, M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant license renewal up to 60 years and possible life extension beyond has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and particularly, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete components. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis, jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Academia and the Power Generation Industry, identified the need to develop a consistent knowledge base of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) within concrete as an urgent priority (Graves et al., 2014). ASR results in an expansion of Concrete produced by the reaction between alkali (generally from cement), reactive aggregate (like amorphous silica) and water absorption. ASR causes expansion, cracking and loss of mechanical properties. Considering that US commercial reactors in operation enter the age when ASR distress can be potentially observed and that numerous non-nuclear infrastructures (transportation, energy production) in a majority of the States have already experienced ASR-related concrete degradation, the susceptibility and significance of ASR for nuclear concrete structures must be addressed. This paper outlines an on-going research program including the investigation of the possibility of ASR in nuclear power plants, and the assessment of the residual shear bearing capacity of ASR-subjected nuclear structures. (authors)

  13. Vibronic coupling in ionized organic molecules: structural distortions and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Ffrancon

    2003-01-01

    Ionized organic molecules (radical cations) in radiation chemistry are liable to undergo vibronic coupling whenever there is a relatively small energy gap (∼0.5-1.5 eV) between their ground and excited states. As a result of this mixing, the force constant for the symmetry-allowed vibrational mode that couples these states is lowered in the ground state of the radical cation so that deformation can take place more easily along this specific mode. This pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect can then result in a permanent structural distortion of the radical cation relative to the symmetry of the parent neutral molecule. It can also bring about an energetically favored pathway for a facile chemical rearrangement along a reaction coordinate defined by the coupling mode. Examples taken from matrix-isolation studies are used to illustrate these dramatic consequences of vibronic coupling in radical cations. Thus, the bicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene and tetramethylurea radical cations are found to have twisted structures departing from the C 2v symmetry of their parent molecules, while the oxirane and bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane radical cations undergo ring-opening rearrangements along reaction coordinates that correspond to the deformational modes predicted by the pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect

  14. Reaction kinetics and transformation of carbadox and structurally related compounds with aqueous chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amisha D; Kim, Jae-Hong; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2006-12-01

    The potential release of carbadox (CDX), a commonly used antibacterial agent in swine husbandry, into water systems is of a concern due to its carcinogenic and genotoxic effects. Until this study, the reactivity of carbadox (possessing quinoxaline N,N'-dioxide and hydrazone moieties) toward aqueous chlorine has yetto be investigated in depth. Chemical reactivity, reaction kinetics, and transformation pathways of carbadox and structurally related compounds with free chlorine under typical water treatment conditions were determined. This study found that only CDX and desoxycarbadox (DCDX), a main metabolite of CDX with no ring N-oxide groups, react rapidly with free chlorine while other structurally related compounds including olaquindox, quindoxin, quinoxaline N-oxide, quinoxaline, and quinoline N-oxide do not. The reaction kinetics of CDX and DCDX with chlorine are highly pH dependent (e.g., the apparent second-order rate constant, kapp, for CDX ranges from 51.8 to 3.15 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1) at pH 4-11). The high reactivity of CDX and DCDX to chlorine involves deprotonation of their hydrazone N-H moieties where initial chlorine attack results in a reactive intermediate that is further attacked by nucleophiles in the matrix to yield non-chlorinated, hydroxylated, and larger molecular weight byproducts. All of the CDX's byproducts retain their biologically active N-oxide groups, suggesting that they may remain as active antibacterial agents.

  15. The rate of second electron transfer to QB(-) in bacterial reaction center of impaired proton delivery shows hydrogen-isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, Ágnes; Wraight, Colin A; Maróti, Péter

    2015-02-01

    The 2nd electron transfer in reaction center of photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a two step process in which protonation of QB(-) precedes interquinone electron transfer. The thermal activation and pH dependence of the overall rate constants of different RC variants were measured and compared in solvents of water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O). The electron transfer variants where the electron transfer is rate limiting (wild type and M17DN, L210DN and H173EQ mutants) do not show solvent isotope effect and the significant decrease of the rate constant of the second electron transfer in these mutants is due to lowering the operational pKa of QB(-)/QBH: 4.5 (native), 3.9 (L210DN), 3.7 (M17DN) and 3.1 (H173EQ) at pH7. On the other hand, the proton transfer variants where the proton transfer is rate limiting demonstrate solvent isotope effect of pH-independent moderate magnitude (2.11±0.26 (WT+Ni(2+)), 2.16±0.35 (WT+Cd(2+)) and 2.34±0.44 (L210DN/M17DN)) or pH-dependent large magnitude (5.7 at pH4 (L213DN)). Upon deuteration, the free energy and the enthalpy of activation increase in all proton transfer variants by about 1 kcal/mol and the entropy of activation becomes negligible in L210DN/M17DN mutant. The results are interpreted as manifestation of equilibrium and kinetic solvent isotope effects and the structural, energetic and kinetic possibility of alternate proton delivery pathways are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear Data Center (NDC) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Progress Report to the IAEA Technical Meeting of Nuclear Reaction Data Centers (NRDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Ouk

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Data Center (NDC, former Nuclear Data Evaluation Lab.) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a director, 10 permanent staffs (2 in evaluation, 1 in measurement, 2 in atomic and molecular data, 2 in processing and validation, 3 in applications), one PhD student and one secretary. KAERI/NDC recently expanded its scope of work into the atomic and molecular data where two permanent staffs are involved. Mission of KAERI/NDC is disseminating outcomes of international network as well as promoting domestic nuclear data activities and related applications.

  17. Structures, internal rotor potentials, and thermochemical properties for a series of nitrocarbonyls, nitroolefins, corresponding nitrites, and their carbon centered radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitsiriwat, Suarwee; Asatryan, Rubik; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2011-12-01

    Structures, enthalpy (Δ(f)H°(298)), entropy (S°(T)), and heat capacity (C(p)(T)) are determined for a series of nitrocarbonyls, nitroolefins, corresponding nitrites, and their carbon centered radicals using the density functional B3LYP and composite CBS-QB3 calculations. Enthalpies of formation (Δ(f)H°(298)) are determined at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31+G(2d,2p), and composite CBS-QB3 levels using several work reactions for each species. Entropy (S) and heat capacity (C(p)(T)) values from vibration, translational, and external rotational contributions are calculated using the rigid-rotor-harmonic-oscillator approximation based on the vibration frequencies and structures obtained from the density functional studies. Contribution to Δ(f)H(T), S, and C(p)(T) from the analysis on the internal rotors is included. Recommended values for enthalpies of formation of the most stable conformers of nitroacetone cc(═o)cno2, acetonitrite cc(═o)ono, nitroacetate cc(═o)no2, and acetyl nitrite cc(═o)ono are -51.6 kcal mol(-1), -51.3 kcal mol(-1), -45.4 kcal mol(-1), and -58.2 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The calculated Δ(f)H°(298) for nitroethylene c═cno2 is 7.6 kcal mol(-1) and for vinyl nitrite c═cono is 7.2 kcal mol(-1). We also found an unusual phenomena: an intramolecular transfer reaction (isomerization) with a low barrier (3.6 kcal mol(-1)) in the acetyl nitrite. The NO of the nitrite (R-ONO) in CH(3)C(═O')ONO moves to the C═O' oxygen in a motion of a stretching frequency and then a shift to the carbonyl oxygen (marked as O' for illustration purposes). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Interconnection Structures, Management and Routing Challenges in Cloud-Service Data Center Networks: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Nahar Quttoum

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Today’s data center networks employ expensive networking equipments in associated structures that were not designed to meet the increasing requirements of the current large-scale data center services. Limitations that vary between reliability, resource utilization, and high costs are challenging. The era of cloud computing represents a promise to enable large-scale data centers. Computing platforms of such cloud service data centers consist of large number of commodity low-price servers that, with a theme of virtualization on top, can meet the performance of the expensive high-level servers at only a fraction of the price. Recently, the research in data center networks started to evolve rapidly. This opened the path for addressing many of its design and management challenges, these like scalability, reliability, bandwidth capacities, virtual machines’ migration, and cost. Bandwidth resource fragmentation limits the network agility, and leads to low utilization rates, not only for the bandwidth resources, but also for the servers that run the applications. With Traffic Engineering methods, managers of such networks can adapt for rapid changes in the network traffic among their servers, this can help to provide better resource utilization and lower costs. The market is going through exciting changes, and the need to run demanding-scale services drives the work toward cloud networks. These networks that are enabled by the notation of autonomic management, and the availability of commodity low-price network equipments. This work provides the readers with a survey that presents the management challenges, design and operational constraints of the cloud-service data center networks

  19. Predicting adverse drug reaction profiles by integrating protein interaction networks with drug structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang-Chin; Wu, Xiaogang; Chen, Jake Y

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has become increasingly important, due to the rising concern on serious ADRs that can cause drugs to fail to reach or stay in the market. We proposed a framework for predicting ADR profiles by integrating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks with drug structures. We compared ADR prediction performances over 18 ADR categories through four feature groups-only drug targets, drug targets with PPI networks, drug structures, and drug targets with PPI networks plus drug structures. The results showed that the integration of PPI networks and drug structures can significantly improve the ADR prediction performance. The median AUC values for the four groups were 0.59, 0.61, 0.65, and 0.70. We used the protein features in the best two models, "Cardiac disorders" (median-AUC: 0.82) and "Psychiatric disorders" (median-AUC: 0.76), to build ADR-specific PPI networks with literature supports. For validation, we examined 30 drugs withdrawn from the U.S. market to see if our approach can predict their ADR profiles and explain why they were withdrawn. Except for three drugs having ADRs in the categories we did not predict, 25 out of 27 withdrawn drugs (92.6%) having severe ADRs were successfully predicted by our approach. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Characterization of hypersensitivity reactions reported among Andrographis paniculata users in Thailand using Health Product Vigilance Center (HPVC) database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwankesawong, Wimon; Saokaew, Surasak; Permsuwan, Unchalee; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2014-12-24

    Andrographis paniculata (andrographis) is one of the herbal products that are widely used for various indications. Hypersensitivity reactions have been reported among subjects receiving Andrographis paniculata in Thailand. Understanding of characteristics of patients, adverse events, and clinical outcomes is essential for ensuring population safety.This study aimed to describe the characteristics of hypersensitivity reactions reported in patients receiving andrographis containing products in Thailand using national pharmacovigilance database. Thai Vigibase data from February 2001 to December 2012 involving andrographis products were used. This database includes the reports submitted through the spontaneous reporting system and intensive monitoring programmes. The database contained patient characteristic, adverse events associated with andrographis products, and details on seriousness, causality, and clinical outcomes. Case reports were included for final analysis if they met the inclusion criteria; 1) reports with andrographis being the only suspected cause, 2) reports with terms consistent with the constellation of hypersensitivity reactions, and 3) reports with terms considered critical terms according to WHO criteria. Descriptive statistics were used. A total of 248 case reports of andrographis-associated adverse events were identified. Only 106 case reports specified andrographis herbal product as the only suspected drug and reported at least one term consistent with constellation of hypersensitivity reactions. Most case reports (89%) came from spontaneous reporting system with no previously documented history of drug allergy (88%). Of these, 18 case reports were classified as serious with 16 cases requiring hospitalization. For final assessment, the case reports with terms consistent with constellation of hypersensitivity reactions and critical terms were included. Thirteen case reports met such criteria including anaphylactic shock (n = 5), anaphylactic

  1. [Financing of regional occupational health service centers: structure and financial criteria in years 2000-2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlewska-Liszkowska, Izabela

    2003-01-01

    The rational planning and financing of occupational health services at the national level have to be based on an appropriate system of information about individual units and their financial status that could illustrate their financial administration. This is required not only in view of the internal needs of public money management, but also in view of the national health accounts. The major task in this regard is to assess the level and structure of financing to individual units and to check the soundness of criteria used in the process of supplying financial means. The results of such an analysis can be a valuable source of information for planning carried out also by the institutions which provide funds to cover the cost of tasks performed by individual units. The aim of the project implemented by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine was to collect, process and analyze data on the level and structure of financing of provincial occupational medicine centers. In this paper, the objectives, methodology and analytical tools are discussed. The results and structural data on the level and structure of financing of regional occupational health services centers covering a two-year period are presented. At the same time, the criteria for allocating funds were identified, which made it possible to evaluate the situation and to propose new solutions.

  2. Energy Center Structure Optimization by using Smart Technologies in Process Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilkina, Svetlana V.

    2018-03-01

    The article deals with practical application of fuzzy logic methods in process control systems. A control object - agroindustrial greenhouse complex, which includes its own energy center - is considered. The paper analyzes object power supply options taking into account connection to external power grids and/or installation of own power generating equipment with various layouts. The main problem of a greenhouse facility basic process is extremely uneven power consumption, which forces to purchase redundant generating equipment idling most of the time, which quite negatively affects project profitability. Energy center structure optimization is largely based on solving the object process control system construction issue. To cut investor’s costs it was proposed to optimize power consumption by building an energy-saving production control system based on a fuzzy logic controller. The developed algorithm of automated process control system functioning ensured more even electric and thermal energy consumption, allowed to propose construction of the object energy center with a smaller number of units due to their more even utilization. As a result, it is shown how practical use of microclimate parameters fuzzy control system during object functioning leads to optimization of agroindustrial complex energy facility structure, which contributes to a significant reduction in object construction and operation costs.

  3. The evolving organizational structure of academic health centers: the case of the University of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Douglas J

    2008-09-01

    The organizational structures of academic health centers (AHCs) vary widely, but they all exist along a continuum of integration--that is, the degree to which the academic and clinical missions operate under a single administrative and governance structure. This author provides a brief overview of the topic of AHC integration, including the pros and cons of more integrated or less integrated models. He then traces the evolution of the University of Florida (UF) Health Science Center, which was created in the 1950s as a fully integrated AHC and which now operates under a more distributed management and governance model. Starting as a completely integrated AHC, UF's Health Science Center reached a time of maximal nonintegration (or dys-integration) in the late 1990s and at the beginning of this decade. Circumstances are now pushing the expanding clinical and academic enterprises to be more together as they face the challenges of market competition, federal research budget constraints, and reengineering clinical operations to reduce costs, enhance access, and improve quality and patient safety. Although formal organizational integration may not be possible or appropriate for any number of legal or political reasons, the author suggests that AHCs should strive for "functional integration" to be successful in the current turbulent environment.

  4. Economic implications of home births and birth centers: a structured review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jane; Petrou, Stavros

    2008-06-01

    It is widely perceived that home births and birth centers may help decrease the costs of maternity care for women with uncomplicated pregnancies and deliveries. This structured review examines the literature relating to the economic implications of home births and birth center care compared with hospital maternity care. The bibliographic databases MEDLINE (from 1950), CINAHL (from 1982), EMBASE (from 1980), and an "in-house" database, Econ2, were searched for relevant English language publications using MeSH and free text terms. Data were extracted with respect to the study design, inclusion criteria, clinical and cost results, and details of what was included in the cost calculations. Eleven studies were included from the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, and Canada. Two studies focused on home births versus other forms and locations of care, whereas nine focused on birth centers versus other forms and locations of care. Resource use was generally lower for women cared for at home and in birth centers due to lower rates of intervention, shorter lengths of stay, or both. However, this fact did not always translate into lower costs because, in the U.K. where many studies were conducted, more midwives of a higher grade were employed to manage the birth centers than are usually employed in maternity units, and because of costs of converting existing facilities into delivery rooms. The quality of much of the literature was poor, although no studies were excluded for this reason. Selection bias was likely to be a problem in those studies not based on randomized controlled trials because, even where birth center eligibility was applied throughout, women who choose to deliver at home or in a birth center are likely to be different in terms of expectations and approach from women choosing to deliver in hospital. This review highlights the paucity of economic literature relating to home births and birth centers. Differences in results between studies may be

  5. Wakefield and Beam Centering Measurements of a Damped and Detuned X-Band Accelerator Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolphsen, Chris

    1999-01-01

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) design, X-Band (11.4 GHz) accelerator structures are used to accelerate multibunch beams to several hundred GeV. Although these structures allow for high gradient operation, their strong deflecting modes impose a number of operational constraints. In particular, the long-range transverse wakefields generated by the bunches need to be reduced by about two orders of magnitude to prevent significant beam breakup. During the past five years, a reduction scheme that employs both detuning and damping of the structure dipole modes has been developed to meet this requirement. Several prototype Damped and Detuned Structures (DDS) have been built to test and refine this scheme. The wakefield of the latest version, DDS3, has recently been measured in the Accelerator Structure Setup (ASSET) facility at SLAC. In this paper, we present these results together with predictions based on an equivalent circuit model of the structure. We also present ASSET studies in which the beam-induced dipole signals that are coupled out for damping purposes are used to center the beam in the structure

  6. Adverse reactions of Methylphenidate in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder: Report from a referral center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehpiri, Zahra; Mahmoudi-Gharaei, Javad; Faghihi, Toktam; Karimzadeh, Iman; Khalili, Hossein; Mohammadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to determine various aspects of methylphenidate adverse reactions in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Iran. Methods: During the 6 months period, all children under methylphenidate treatment alone or along with other agents attending a university-affiliated psychology clinic were screened regarding all subjective and objective adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of methylphenidate. Causality and seriousness of detected ADRs were assessed by relevant World Health Organization definitions. The Schumock and Thornton questionnaire was used to determine preventability of ADRs. Findings: Seventy-one patients including 25 girls and 46 boys with ADHD under methylphenidate treatment were enrolled within the study period. All (100%) ADHD children under methylphenidate treatment developed at least one ADR. Anorexia (74.3%), irritability (57.1%), and insomnia (47.2%) were the most frequent methylphenidate-related adverse reactions. Except for one, all other detected ADRs were determined to be mild. In addition, no ADR was considered to be preventable and serious. Conclusion: Our data suggested that although methylphenidate related adverse reactions were common in children with ADHD, but they were mainly mild and nonserious. PMID:25535621

  7. Probing the Energy Transfer Dynamics of Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complexes Through Hole-Burning and Single-Complex Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Kerry Joseph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is used to drive reactions that generate sugars to supply energy for cellular processes. It is one of the most important fundamental biological reactions and occurs in both prokaryotic (e.g. bacteria) and eukaryotic (e.g. plants and algae) organisms. Photosynthesis is also remarkably intricate, requiring the coordination of many different steps and reactions in order to successfully transform absorbed solar energy into a biochemical usable form of energy. However, the net reaction for all photosynthetic organisms can be reduced to the following, deceptively general, equation developed by Van Niel[1] H2 - D + Aimplieshv A - H2 + D where H2-D is the electron donor, e.g. H2O, H2S. A is the electron acceptor, e.g. CO2, and A-H2 is the synthesized sugar. Amazingly, this simple net equation is responsible for creating the oxidizing atmosphere of Earth and the recycling of CO2, both of which are necessary for the sustainment of the global ecosystem.

  8. Combustion synthesis by reaction and characterization of structural Ni-Zn ferrite doped with copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, J.; Santos, J.R.D.; Cunha, R.B.L.; Feitosa, C.A.; Costa, A.C.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    The present stud aims to evaluate the effect of doping with Cu 2+ ions concentrations of 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mol in the synthesis and structure of Ni-Zn ferrite. Samples were synthesized by the method of the combustion reaction and characterized by measuring the temperature as a function of reaction time, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy in Fourier transform (FTIR). The combustion temperature and time were 646, 900, 989, 975 and 735°C and 210, 175, 220, 210 and 110 seconds for the sample doped with 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mol of copper, respectively. XRD results show that all concentrations of copper evaluated, there was only a training phase inverse spinel ferrite and Ni-Zn FTIR spectra show absorption bands below 1000cm -1 , which are characteristics of the spinel type AB 2 O 4- (author)

  9. The effect of organizational factors on the structure of the buying center :the case study of corporate travel management

    OpenAIRE

    Damonte, Lowell Taylor

    1994-01-01

    In this study the researcher attempts to advance the understanding of the structure of firm buying centers for air travel services. First, an attempt is made to find empirical support for the proposition that firm air travel service buying centers can be grouped on the basis of their size, degree of complexity, centralization, and formalization. The study investigates the relationship of size, structure, and technology of the organization as a whole to the structure of the b...

  10. Dynamic thermal reaction analysis of wall structures in various cooling operation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Biao; Long, Enshen; Meng, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four different envelop structures are separately built in the same test building. • Cooling temperature and operation time were chosen as perturbations. • State Space Method is used to analyze the influence of wall sequence order. • The numerical models are validated by the comparisons of theory and test results. • The contrast of temperature change of different envelop structures was stark. - Abstract: This paper proposes a methodology of performance assessing of envelops under different cooling operation conditions, by focusing on indoor temperature change and dynamic thermal behavior performance of walls. To obtain a general relationship between the thermal environment change and the reaction of envelop, variously insulated walls made with the same insulation material are separately built in the same wall of a testing building with the four different structures, namely self-heat insulation (full insulation material), exterior insulation, internal insulation and intermediate insulation. The advantage of this setting is that the test targets are exposed to the same environmental variables, and the tests results are thus comparable. The target responses to two types of perturbations, cooling temperature and operation time were chosen as the important variations in the tests. Parameters of cooling set temperature of 22 °C and 18 °C, operation and restoring time 10 min and 15 min are set in the test models, and discussed with simulation results respectively. The results reveal that the exterior insulation and internal insulation are more sensitive to thermal environment change than self-heat insulation and intermediate insulation.

  11. Structure and reaction of electrolytic solution. Denkaishitsu yoeki no kozo to hanno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otaki, H. (Okazaki National Research Inst., Aichi (Japan))

    1990-07-05

    An electrolytic solution has been recognized as an ion transporting system since the oldest time in the history of electrochemistry, and the chemistry related thereto forms the most basic field of electrochemistry. In this article, the progress of chemistry concerning electrolytic solutions since M. Faraday is briefly stated, and in view of very scanty structural knowledge available on other solutions in comparison with the structure of water on which extensive studies have been made, the respective structures of such non-aqueous solutions as the mixed solvent of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)-acetonitrile (AN) and the mixed solvent of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-2,2,2-triphloroethanol (TFE) are studied. In addition, concerning the solvation when ions exist in such a non-aqueous solvent mixed system, the selective solvation of Cu {sup 2+} ions in the DMF-AN and Cu {sup 2+} as well as Cl {sup {minus}} ions in the DMSO-TFE is respectively explained, and the solvent effect, etc. of Cu {sup 2+} ions and Cl {sup {minus}} ions on the complex forming reaction are discussed. 17 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. AFM Imaging of Hybridization Chain Reaction Mediated Signal Transmission between Two DNA Origami Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Sarah; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-10-23

    Signal transfer is central to the controlled exchange of information in biology and advanced technologies. Therefore, the development of reliable, long-range signal transfer systems for artificial nanoscale assemblies is of great scientific interest. We have designed such a system for the signal transfer between two connected DNA nanostructures, using the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). Two sets of metastable DNA hairpins, one of which is immobilized at specific points along tracks on DNA origami structures, are polymerized to form a continuous DNA duplex, which is visible using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Upon addition of a designed initiator, the initiation signal is efficiently transferred more than 200 nm from a specific location on one origami structure to an end point on another origami structure. The system shows no significant loss of signal when crossing from one nanostructure to another and, therefore, has the potential to be applied to larger multi-component DNA assemblies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Study on the influence of Alkali-Silica reaction on structural behavior of reinforced concrete members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murazumi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Matsumoto, N.; Mitsugi, S.; Takiguchi, K.; Masuda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Expansion produced by alkali-silica reaction (ASR) has been observed in the turbine generator foundation of the unit 1, Ikata nuclear power station, Japan. The foundation is a reinforced concrete frame structure. This paper, as a part of the series of investigation and experiments, discusses tests on structural behavior of concrete members affected by ASR. The purpose of the study is to obtain experimental results on the effects of ASR on bending and shear behavior of reinforced concrete beams and shear walls, and compare with the calculated results by present evaluation methods for normal concrete structures For the experiments on bending/shear behavior of beam, bending test models with a small amount of rebar and shear test models with larger amount were made of concrete in which ASR was induced by adding alkali or concrete without ASR. It was found from the results that bending strength of the bending test models and shear strength of the shear test models did not fall, nor was it lower than the calculated strength for concrete members without ASR. In the shear wall test, the two test models were made of either concrete with ASR or one without it. Horizontal load was applied with actuators on the test model fixed on the test floor, while vertical load was applied with oil jacks. The results did not indicate that ASR lowered the stiffness or strength of the wall test models, showing the strength was able to be calculated with the same formula for reinforced concrete wall without ASR. (authors)

  14. Structure Effects of 2D Materials on α-Nickel Hydroxide for Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Chenglong; Liu, Guangli; Liu, Yujie; Yu, Lei; Wang, Yao; Xiao, Yun; Qiao, Hongyan; Dai, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xin

    2018-04-24

    To engineer low-cost, high-efficiency, and stable oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts, structure effects should be primarily understood. Focusing on this, we systematically investigated the relationship between structures of materials and their OER performances by taking four 2D α-Ni(OH) 2 as model materials, including layer-stacked bud-like Ni(OH) 2 -NB, flower-like Ni(OH) 2 -NF, and petal-like Ni(OH) 2 -NP as well as the ultralarge sheet-like Ni(OH) 2 -NS. For the first three (layer-stacking) catalysts, with the decrease of stacked layers, their accessible surface areas, abilities to adsorb OH - , diffusion properties, and the intrinsic activities of active sites increase, which accounts for their steadily enhanced activity. As expected, Ni(OH) 2 -NP shows the lowest overpotential (260 mV at 10 mA cm -2 ) and Tafel slope (78.6 mV dec -1 ) with a robust stability over 10 h among the samples, which also outperforms the benchmark IrO 2 (360 mV and 115.8 mV dec -1 ) catalyst. Interestingly, Ni(OH) 2 -NS relative to Ni(OH) 2 -NP exhibits even faster substance diffusion due to the sheet-like structure, but shows inferior OER activity, which is mainly because the Ni(OH) 2 -NP with a smaller size possesses more active boundary sites (higher reactivity of active sites) than Ni(OH) 2 -NS, considering the adsorption properties and accessible surface areas of the two samples are quite similar. By comparing the different structures and their OER behaviors of four α-Ni(OH) 2 samples, our work may shed some light on the structure effect of 2D materials and accelerate the development of efficient OER catalysts.

  15. Dissipative structure of mechanically stimulated reaction; Kikaiteki reiki hanno ni okeru san`itsu kozo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hida, M. [Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-20

    Recently various studies have been conducted concerning the state changes of materials obtained through mechanical alloying (MA) or mechano-chemical (MC) processing. What is noticeable is the quasi-steady state of almost all the materials obtained through various processes including MA and MC, and that the super cooling, supersaturating and high residue distortion realized under unbalanced conditions have not been clarified. In other words, the tracing capability to the external binding conditions is low. In this report, the appearance of the high temperature phase and high pressure phase obtained through MA or MC processing, the forming of amorphous, the mesomerism of the amorphous materials, the interesting phenomena generated by combination between the mechanical disturbance and chemical reactions were discussed with concrete examples, and a steady dissipative organization theory was approached from the viewpoint of dissipative structure development which is equal to the forming process of the quasi-steady phase. 34 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Psycho-oncology: structure and profiles of European centers treating patients with gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenburg, Annette; Amant, Frederic; Aerts, Leen; Pascal, Astrid; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Kesic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    Psycho-oncological counseling should be an integrated part of modern cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the structures and interests of psycho-oncology services within European Society of Gynecological Oncology (ESGO) centers. In 2010, a survey, which consisted of 15 questions regarding organization of psycho-oncological services and interests in training and research, was sent to all ESGO-accredited centers (n = 41). The response rate was 65.8% (27 centers). 96.3% (n = 26) of the surveys came from universities, and 3.7% (n = 1) came from nonacademic institutions. Most of the institutions (92.6%, n = 25) offer psycho-oncological care, mainly by psychologists (64%, n = 16) or psycho-oncologists (48%, n = 12). Fifty-two percent of patients are evaluated for sexual dysfunction as sequelae of their disease or treatment-related adverse effects. Fifty-two percent (n = 14) of institutions offer psychological support for cancer care providers. Eighty-five percent (n = 23) of all centers are interested in psycho-oncological training, and the preferred teaching tools are educational workshops (87%). The main issues of interest are sexual problems in patients with cancer, communication and interpersonal skills, responses of patients and their families, anxiety and adjustment disorders, and palliative care. Eighty-five percent (n = 17) of the 20 institutions look for research in the field of psycho-oncology, and 55% (n = 11) of those are already involved in some kind of research. Although psycho-oncological care is provided in most of the consulted ESGO accredited centers, almost 50% of women lack information about sexual problems. The results of the survey show the need for and interest in psycho-oncology training and research, including sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, psychological support should be offered to all cancer care providers.

  17. Towards an unified microscopic approach of the description of the nuclear structure and reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Sy Than

    2009-09-01

    This thesis contains 3 main parts. The first one: nuclear matter. The motivation of the study is to establish a link between the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction and nuclear matter properties. The properties of nuclear matter are examined using finite range effective interactions either derived from the Brueckner theory or determined in a purely phenomenological way. Skyrme-type interactions are also used for comparison. We have focused our discussion on several main aspects: the pressure ins symmetric nuclear matter and in neutron matter, the density dependence of the symmetric energy S and the nuclear matter incompressibility. The second part: the structure of finite nuclei and of the inner crust of neutrons stars. We present the non-relativistic HF and HF-BCS approaches in coordinate representation using finite-range density-dependent interactions in both the mean field and pairing channels. An iterative scheme is used for solving the integral-differential HF equations. We have studied the doubly magic nuclei, the Sn isotopes and the possible occurrence of bubble structures in the nuclei O 22 , Si 34 , Ar 46 and Ar 68 . We have also examined the different zones of the inner crust of neutron stars. The third part: nuclear reactions. Using the same effective interactions derived from the Brueckner theory we have performed a coupled channel analysis of (p,n) charge exchange reactions at 35 and 45 MeV incident energies on Ca 48 , Zr 90 , Sn 120 and Pb 208 targets leading to isobaric analog states. (A.C.)

  18. Reaction Mechanisms and Structural and Physicochemical Properties of Caffeic Acid Grafted Chitosan Synthesized in Ascorbic Acid and Hydroxyl Peroxide Redox System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Pu, Huimin; Chen, Chong; Liu, Yunpeng; Bai, Ruyu; Kan, Juan; Jin, Changhai

    2018-01-10

    The ascorbic acid (AA) and hydroxyl peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) redox pair induced free radical grafting reaction is a promising approach to conjugate phenolic groups with chitosan (CS). In order to reveal the exact mechanisms of the AA/H 2 O 2 redox pair induced grafting reaction, free radicals generated in the AA/H 2 O 2 redox system were compared with hydroxyl radical ( • OH) produced in the Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 redox system. Moreover, the structural and physicochemical properties of caffeic acid grafted CS (CA-g-CS) synthesized in these two redox systems were compared. Results showed that only ascorbate radical (Asc •- ) was produced in the AA/H 2 O 2 system. The reaction between Asc •- and CS produced novel carbon-centered radicals, whereas no new free radicals were detected when • OH reacted with CS. Thin layer chromatography, UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses all confirmed that CA was successfully grafted onto CS through Asc •- . However, CA could be hardly grafted onto CS via • OH. CA-g-CS synthesized through Asc •- exhibited lower thermal stability and crystallinity than the reaction product obtained through • OH. For the first time, our results demonstrated that the synthesis of CA-g-CS in the AA/H 2 O 2 redox system was mediated by Asc •- rather than • OH.

  19. Growth dynamics and composition of tubular structures in a reaction-precipitation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Jason John

    Self-organization in reaction precipitation systems occurs in many physical, chemical, biological, and geological systems. In particular, chemical reactions provide a wealth of examples for this intriguing process. Permanent tubular structures arise from the interplay of chemical and transport phenomena such as diffusion and fluid flow. These astonishing tubular structures are prevalent throughout nature. Examples include black smokers at hydrothermal vents, silica tubes in setting cement, soda-straw stalactites in caves, and biological structures such as the outer skeleton of certain algae. In this work, the aim is to establish and understand a laboratory scale model by examining the, seemingly simple, precipitation reaction between sodium silicate and copper sulfate as well as zinc sulfate. The tubular precipitation structures in so-called silica gardens are known to many scientists and non-scientists alike. However, little is known regarding their growth dynamics and chemical composition. We devised an injection technique which provides control over parameters that are not accessible in the classic silica garden system. For the example of cupric sulfate injection into waterglass solution, we identify three distinct growth regimes (jetting, popping, and budding) and study their concentration dependent transitions. Here we describe the composition and morphology of the tube material using techniques such as electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy. Specifically, we find that the tube wall consists of metal hydroxide that is stabilized by a thin, exterior silica layer. After synthesis the tubes can be further modified by using chemical and/or physical means. A second study aims to understand tubule formation under "reverse" conditions. More specifically, waterglass is being injected into lighter cupric sulfate solution. In these experiments, single, downward growing precipitation tubes are created. Four distinct growth regimes are observed and their

  20. Density functional theory calculations establish the experimental evidence of the DX center atomic structure in CdTe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan; Wolf, Herbert; Wichert, Thomas

    2004-06-04

    The In DX center and the DX-like configuration of the Cd host atom in CdTe are investigated using density functional theory. The simultaneous calculation of the atomic structure and the electric field gradient (EFG) allows one to correlate the theoretically predicted structure of the DX center with an experimental observable, namely, the EFG obtained from radioactive 111In/111Cd probe atoms in In doped CdTe. In this way, the experimental identification of the DX center structure is established.

  1. Nuclear structure and radioactive decay resources at the US National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A.A.; Burrows, T.W.; Pritychenko, B.; Tuli, J.K.; Winchell, D.F.

    2008-01-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center has a long tradition of evaluating nuclear structure and decay data as well as offering tools to assist in nuclear science research and applications. With these tools, users can obtain recommended values for nuclear structure and radioactive decay observables as well as links to the relevant articles. The main databases or tools are ENSDF, NSR, NuDat and the new Endf decay data library. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) stores recommended nuclear structure and decay data for all nuclei. ENSDF deals with properties such as: -) nuclear level energies, spin and parity, half-life and decay modes, -) nuclear radiation energy and intensity for different types, -) nuclear decay modes and their probabilities. The Nuclear Science References (NSR) is a bibliographic database containing nearly 200.000 nuclear sciences articles indexed according to content. About 4000 are added each year covering 80 journals as well as conference proceedings and laboratory reports. NuDat is a software product with 2 main goals, to present nuclear structure and decay information from ENSDF in a user-friendly way and to allow users to execute complex search operations in the wealth of data contained in ENSDF. The recently released Endf-B7.0 contains a decay data sub-library which has been derived from ENSDF. The way all these databases and tools have been offered to the public has undergone a drastic improvement due to advancements in information technology

  2. Nuclear structure and nuclear reaction aspects of Faessler and Greiner's rotation-vibration coupling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspelund, O.

    In the nuclear structure part, the foundations of Faessler and Greiner's rotation-vibration coupling theory are reviewed, whereafter an alternative derivation of Faessler and Greiner's Hamiltonian is presented. A non-spherical quadrupole phonon number N is defined and used in the matrix elements reported for odd-even/even-odd nuclei. These matrix elements are shown to evince oblate-prolate effects that can be exploited for assessing the signs of quadrupole deformations. In the nuclear reaction part, the wave functions emerging from the structure part are applied in a complete and consistent description of elastic and inelastic particle scattering, one-nucleon transfer, and particle/γ-ray angular correlations. The intentions are to demonstrate that anomolous angular distributions and 1=2 j-effects observed in one-nucleon transfer are interrelated phenomena, that can be satisfactorily explained in terms of the elementary vibrational excitation modes inherent in Faessler and Greiner's theory. The latter is regarded as a non-spherical approach to the theory of the quadrupole component of the nuclear potential energy surface. (Auth.)

  3. Elastic properties, reaction kinetics, and structural relaxation of an epoxy resin polymer during cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heili, Manon; Bielawski, Andrew; Kieffer, John

    The cure kinetics of a DGEBA/DETA epoxy is investigated using concurrent Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Raman scattering allows us to monitor the in-situ reaction and quantitatively assess the degree of cure. Brillouin scattering yields the elastic properties of the system, providing a measure of network connectivity. We show that the adiabatic modulus evolves non-uniquely as a function of cure degree, depending on the cure temperature and the molar ratio of the epoxy. Two mechanisms contribute to the increase in the elastic modulus of the material during curing. First, there is the formation of covalent bonds in the network during the curing process. Second, following bond formation, the epoxy undergoes structural relaxation toward an optimally packed network configuration, enhancing non-bonded interactions. We investigate to what extent the non-bonded interaction contribution to structural rigidity in cross-linked polymers is reversible, and to what extent it corresponds to the difference between adiabatic and isothermal moduli obtained from static tensile, i.e. the so-called relaxational modulus. To this end, we simultaneously measure the adiabatic and isothermal elastic moduli as a function of applied strain and deformation rate.

  4. The electrochemical transfer reactions and the structure of the iron|oxide layer|electrolyte interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrović, Željka; Metikoš-Huković, Mirjana; Babić, Ranko

    2012-01-01

    The thickness, barrier (protecting) and semiconducting properties of the potentiostatically formed oxide films on the pure iron electrode in an aqueous borate buffer solution were investigated by electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance (EQCN), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Mott–Schottky (MS) analysis. The thicknesses of the prepassive Fe(II)hydroxide layer (up to monolayer) nucleated on the bare iron surface and the passive Fe(II)/Fe(III) layer (up to 2 nm), deposited on the top of the first one, were determined using in situ gravimetry. Electronic properties of iron prepassive and passive films as well as ionic and electronic transfer reactions at the film|solution interface were discussed on the basis of a band structure model of the surface oxide film and the potential distribution at the interface. The anodic oxide film formation and cathodic decomposition are coupled processes and their reversible inter-conversion is mediated by the availability of free charge carriers on the electrode|solution interface. The structure of the reversible double layer at the iron oxide|solution interface was discussed based on the concept of the specific adsorption of the imidazolium cation on the negatively charged electrode surface at pH > pH pzc .

  5. Recent developments of nano-structured materials as the catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, SungYeon; Kim, HuiJung; Chung, Yong-Ho

    2018-04-01

    Developments of high efficient materials for electrocatalyst are significant topics of numerous researches since a few decades. Recent global interests related with energy conversion and storage lead to the expansion of efforts to find cost-effective catalysts that can substitute conventional catalytic materials. Especially, in the field of fuel cell, novel materials for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been noticed to overcome disadvantages of conventional platinum-based catalysts. Various approaching methods have been attempted to achieve low cost and high electrochemical activity comparable with Pt-based catalysts, including reducing Pt consumption by the formation of hybrid materials, Pt-based alloys, and not-Pt metal or carbon based materials. To enhance catalytic performance and stability, numerous methods such as structural modifications and complex formations with other functional materials are proposed, and they are basically based on well-defined and well-ordered catalytic active sites by exquisite control at nanoscale. In this review, we highlight the development of nano-structured catalytic materials for ORR based on recent findings, and discuss about an outlook for the direction of future researches.

  6. The structure of the antimicrobial active center of lactoferricin B bound to sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibli, D J; Hwang, P M; Vogel, H J

    1999-03-12

    Lactoferricin B (LfcinB) is a 25-residue antimicrobial peptide released from bovine lactoferrin upon pepsin digestion. The antimicrobial center of LfcinB consists of six residues (RRWQWR-NH2), and it possesses similar bactericidal activity to LfcinB. The structure of the six-residue peptide bound to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles has been determined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics refinement. The peptide adopts a well defined amphipathic structure when bound to SDS micelles with the Trp sidechains separated from the Arg residues. Additional evidence demonstrates that the peptide is oriented in the micelle such that the Trp residues are more deeply buried in the micelle than the Arg and Gln residues.

  7. Structural reconstruction of the catalytic center of LiPDF through multiple scattering calculation with MXAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Chu, Wangsheng; Ma, Sixuan; Gong, Weimin; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hu, Tiandou; Xie, Yaning; Wu, ZiYu

    2006-11-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) is essential for the normal growth of eubacterium but not for mammalians. Recently, PDF has been studied as a target for new antibiotics. In this paper, X-ray absorption spectroscopy was employed to determine the local structure around the zinc ion of PDF from Leptospira Interrogans in dry powder, because it is very difficult to obtain the crystallized sample of LiPDF. We performed X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) calculation and reconstructed successfully the local geometry of the active center, and the results from calculations show that a water molecule (Wat1) has moved towards the zinc ion and lies in the distance range to coordinate with the zinc ion weakly. In addition, the sensitivity of theoretical spectra to the different ligand bodies was evaluated in terms of goodness-of-fit.

  8. Structural reconstruction of the catalytic center of LiPDF through multiple scattering calculation with MXAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Xiaoyun [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); School of Life Science, Key Laboratory of Structural Biology, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Chu Wangsheng [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Ma Sixuan [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); Gong Weimin [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100101 Beijing (China); Benfatto, Maurizio [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Hu Tiandou [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); Xie Yaning [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China) and Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, 00044 Frascati (Italy)]. E-mail: wuzy@mail.ihep.ac.cn

    2006-11-15

    Peptide deformylase (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) is essential for the normal growth of eubacterium but not for mammalians. Recently, PDF has been studied as a target for new antibiotics. In this paper, X-ray absorption spectroscopy was employed to determine the local structure around the zinc ion of PDF from Leptospira Interrogans in dry powder, because it is very difficult to obtain the crystallized sample of LiPDF. We performed X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) calculation and reconstructed successfully the local geometry of the active center, and the results from calculations show that a water molecule (Wat1) has moved towards the zinc ion and lies in the distance range to coordinate with the zinc ion weakly. In addition, the sensitivity of theoretical spectra to the different ligand bodies was evaluated in terms of goodness-of-fit.

  9. Structural reconstruction of the catalytic center of LiPDF through multiple scattering calculation with MXAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoyun; Chu Wangsheng; Ma Sixuan; Gong Weimin; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hu Tiandou; Xie Yaning; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) is essential for the normal growth of eubacterium but not for mammalians. Recently, PDF has been studied as a target for new antibiotics. In this paper, X-ray absorption spectroscopy was employed to determine the local structure around the zinc ion of PDF from Leptospira Interrogans in dry powder, because it is very difficult to obtain the crystallized sample of LiPDF. We performed X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) calculation and reconstructed successfully the local geometry of the active center, and the results from calculations show that a water molecule (Wat1) has moved towards the zinc ion and lies in the distance range to coordinate with the zinc ion weakly. In addition, the sensitivity of theoretical spectra to the different ligand bodies was evaluated in terms of goodness-of-fit

  10. CAPITAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF THE MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC-CONSULTATIVE CENTERS IN VARNA (absolute indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubomira Koeva-Dimitrova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The capital structure analysis of medical institutions is related to the assessment of their financial sustainability. The degree of their financial sustainability indicates the extent to which the medical institution is exposed to financial risk. This financial risk is related to the use of foreign capital (debts, loans, etc. and it is defined as the probability of insolvency and possible bankruptcy due to the existence of debts which could not be repaid at some point in the foreseeable future. Objective: To analyze the capital structure of the medical diagnostic-consultative centers in Varna city and on this basis to assess their long-term solvency and existence of financial risk. Materials and Methods: The materials for the study are the published annual financial statements (up to 05. 01. 2016 in the Commercial Register for the period from year 2008 to 2014 of all MDCCs (Medical Diagnostic Consultative centers, registered in Varna - 9 in total. In the study are applied logical-mathematical methods (comparison, grouping, detail, graphical method; financial and accounting analysis (balance sheet analysis; analysis of absolute ratios for financial sustainability. Results: Upon analysis of the capital structure of MDCC's are studied the main absolute indicators characterizing the conditions for financial sustainability and the existence of financial risk regarding the solvency. A table represents the overall assessment of the degree of financial sustainability of the companies according to the type and structure of the fulfilled criteria. It was ascertained that for year 2014, DCC 3, 4, 5 and 8 have met all the conditions and according to them these hospitals have very high financial sustainability. DCC 7 has an average financial sustainability, DCC 1 and 2 are in a financial crisis and DCC 6 and 9 are facing bankruptcy. It must be emphasized that nearly half of the studied health care organizations (DCC 1, 2, 6 and 9 need urgent intervention by

  11. NCI Symposium on Chromosome Biology to bring together internationally renowned experts in the fields of chromosome structure and function | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Cancer Research’s Center of Excellence in Chromosome Biology is hosting the “Nuclear Structure, Genome Integrity and Cancer Symposium“ on November 30 - December 1, 2016 at the Natcher Conference Center, Bethesda, Maryland. Learn more ...

  12. Report on the consultants` meeting on co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers (technical aspects)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Wienke, H [eds.

    1997-10-01

    The report summarizes the co-ordination meeting of the network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres organized by the IAEA in 1997. The meeting was attended by technical staff from ten member centres of the network (representing USA, Russia, China, Japan, Hungary, OECD-NEA and IAEA) to discuss technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Observers from Belgium and Ukraine also attended the meeting. The document includes status reports of all centres and selected working papers. Refs, figs, tabs.

  13. Report on the consultants' meeting on co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers (technical aspects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Wienke, H.

    1997-10-01

    The report summarizes the co-ordination meeting of the network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres organized by the IAEA in 1997. The meeting was attended by technical staff from ten member centres of the network (representing USA, Russia, China, Japan, Hungary, OECD-NEA and IAEA) to discuss technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Observers from Belgium and Ukraine also attended the meeting. The document includes status reports of all centres and selected working papers

  14. Synthesis of the reported structure of piperazirum using a nitro-Mannich reaction as the key stereochemical determining step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Anderson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Piperazirum, isolated from Arum palaestinum Boiss, was originally assigned as r-3,c-5-diisobutyl-c-6-isopropylpiperazin-2-one. The reported structure was synthesised diastereoselectively using a key nitro-Mannich reaction to set up the C5/C6 relative stereochemistry. The structure was unambiguously assigned by single crystal X-ray diffraction but the spectroscopic data did not match those reported for the natural product. The structure of the natural product must therefore be revised.

  15. Structure and content of radiology reports, a quantitative and qualitative study in eight medical centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosmans, Jan M.L.; Weyler, Joost J.; Parizel, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale and objectives: In order to determine how the quality of the radiology report can be improved, the variation in content, form and length of the report needs to be examined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare the length and structure of radiology reports (reports of abdominal CT examinations) in eight hospitals in the Netherlands and Flanders, the Dutch speaking part of Belgium. Materials and methods: Eight hundred reports - 100 from each collaborating center - were collected. After exclusion of the reports that did not fulfill the criteria for a standard CT examination of the abdomen, 525 were retained for further study. The structure of each report was analyzed and the constituting parts (technical information, description of the findings, conclusion, advice, remark, note) were determined. The character and word count of the report and its constituting parts were measured and the results were grouped according to the country (Netherlands vs. Belgium/Flanders), the qualification of the radiologist (staff members vs. residents.) and the nature of the hospital (university medical centers vs. community hospitals). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the Netherlands and Flanders, and between staff members and residents. The authors also found a wide variety in the lay-out and the overall content of the radiology report. Conclusion: While most of the differences we found are probably rooted in local tradition, a standard model for the radiology report in centers sharing the same language may be a means to avoid interpretation mistakes by referring physicians, and to promote better care.

  16. Conformational heterogeneity of the bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor HA in reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas viridis revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, J; Bibikova, M; Oesterhelt, D; Nabedryk, E

    1999-08-31

    The light-induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectra corresponding to the photoreduction of either the HA bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor (HA-/HA spectrum) or the QA primary quinone (QA-/QA spectrum) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodopseudomonas viridis are reported. These spectra have been compared for wild-type (WT) RCs and for two site-directed mutants in which the proposed interactions between the carbonyls on ring V of HA and the RC protein have been altered. In the mutant EQ(L104), the putative hydrogen bond between the protein and the 9-keto C=O of HA should be affected by changing Glu L104 to a Gln. In the mutant WF(M250), the van der Waals interactions between Trp M250 and the 10a-ester C=O of HA should be modified. The characteristic effects of both mutations on the FTIR spectra support the proposed interactions and allow the IR modes of the 9-keto and 10a-ester C=O of HA and HA- to be assigned. Comparison of the HA-/HA and QA-/QA spectra leads us to conclude that the QA-/QA IR signals in the spectral range above 1700 cm-1 are largely dominated by contributions from the electrostatic response of the 10a-ester C=O mode of HA upon QA photoreduction. A heterogeneity in the conformation of the 10a-ester C=O mode of HA in WT RCs, leading to three distinct populations of HA, appears to be related to differences in the hydrogen-bonding interactions between the carbonyls of ring V of HA and the RC protein. The possibility that this structural heterogeneity is related to the observed multiexponential kinetics of electron transfer and the implications for primary processes are discussed. The effect of 1H/2H exchange on the QA-/QA spectra of the WT and mutant RCs shows that neither Glu L104 nor any other exchangeable carboxylic residue changes appreciably its protonation state upon QA reduction.

  17. Probing the reaction mechanism of IspH protein by x-ray structure analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Gräwert, Tobias

    2009-12-28

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) represent the two central intermediates in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids. The recently discovereddeoxyxylulose 5-phosphate pathway generates a mixture of IPP and DMAPP in its final step by reductive dehydroxylation of 1-hydroxy-2-methyl- 2-butenyl 4-diphosphate. This conversion is catalyzed by IspH protein comprising a central iron-sulfur cluster as electron transfer cofactor in the active site. The five crystal structures of IspH in complex with substrate, converted substrate, products and PPi reported in this article provide unique insights into the mechanism of this enzyme. While IspH protein crystallizes with substrate bound to a [4Fe-4S] cluster, crystals of IspH in complex with IPP, DMAPP or inorganic pyrophosphate feature [3Fe-4S] clusters. The IspH:substrate complex reveals a hairpin conformation of the ligand with the C(1) hydroxyl group coordinated to the unique site in a [4Fe-4S] cluster of aconitase type. The resulting alkoxide complex is coupled to a hydrogen-bonding network, which serves as proton reservoir via a Thr167 proton relay. Prolonged x-ray irradiation leads to cleavage of the C(1)-O bond (initiated by reducing photo electrons). The data suggest a reaction mechanism involving a combination of Lewis-acid activation and proton coupled electron transfer. The resulting allyl radical intermediate can acquire a second electron via the iron-sulfur cluster. The reaction may be terminated by the transfer of a proton from the β-phosphate of the substrate to C(1) (affording DMAPP) or C(3) (affording IPP).

  18. Effect of pH and Water Structure on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction on platinum electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briega-Martos, Valentín; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at different pH values has been studied at platinum single crystal electrodes using the hanging meniscus rotating disk electrode (HMRDE) configuration. The use of NaF/HClO 4 mixtures allows investigating the reaction up to pH = 6 in solutions with enough buffering capacity and in the absence of anion specific adsorption. The analysis of the currents shows that the kinetic current density measured at 0.85 V for the Pt(111) electrode follows a volcano curve with the maximum located around pH = 9. This maximum activity for pH = 9 can be related to the effects of the electrode charge and/or water structure in the ORR. On the other hand, the catalytic activity for the other basal planes shows a monotonic behavior with a small dependence of the activity with pH. For stepped surfaces with (111) terraces, the behavior with pH changes gets closer to that of the Pt(111) surface as the terrace length increases. Additionally, the ORR curves show a dependence of the limiting diffusion current with pH. It is observed that the limiting current density diminishes as the pH increases in a potential region where hydrogen peroxide is readily reduced. These results suggest the existence of a bifurcation point in the mechanism previous to peroxide formation, in which OOH • is proposed as the bifurcation intermediate. The reduction of OOH • requires proton addition and would be more difficult at neutral pH values, justifying the diminution of the limiting currents.

  19. Heterogeneous Reaction of SO2 on Manganese Oxides: the Effect of Crystal Structure and Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiwei; Zhang, Jianghao; Ma, Qingxin; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2017-07-03

    Manganese oxides from anthropogenic sources can promote the formation of sulfate through catalytic oxidation of SO 2 . In this study, the kinetics of SO 2 reactions on MnO 2 with different morphologies (α, β, γ and δ) was investigated using flow tube reactor and in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Under dry conditions, the reactivity towards SO 2 uptake was highest on δ-MnO 2 but lowest on β-MnO 2 , with a geometric uptake coefficient (γ obs ) of (2.42 ± 0.13) ×10 -2 and a corrected uptake coefficient (γ c ) of (1.48 ± 0.21) ×10 -6 for the former while γ obs of (3.35 ± 0.43) ×10 -3 and γ c of (7.46 ± 2.97) ×10 -7 for the latter. Under wet conditions, the presence of water altered the chemical form of sulfate and was in favor for the heterogeneous oxidation of SO 2 . The maximum sulfate formation rate was reached at 25% RH and 45% for δ-MnO 2 and γ-MnO 2 , respectively, possibly due to their different crystal structures. The results suggest that morphologies and RH are important factors influencing the heterogeneous reaction of SO 2 on mineral aerosols, and that aqueous oxidation process involving transition metals of Mn might be a potential important pathway for SO 2 oxidation in the atmosphere.

  20. Computational investigation of kinetics of cross-linking reactions in proteins: importance in structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta; Kuntz, Irwin D

    2009-01-01

    The determination of protein structure using distance constraints is a new and promising field of study. One implementation involves attaching residues of a protein using a cross-linking agent, followed by protease digestion, analysis of the resulting peptides by mass spectroscopy, and finally sequence threading to detect the protein folds. In the present work, we carry out computational modeling of the kinetics of cross-linking reactions in proteins using the master equation approach. The rate constants of the cross-linking reactions are estimated using the pKas and the solvent-accessible surface areas of the residues involved. This model is tested with fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and cytochrome C. It is consistent with the initial experimental rate data for individual lysine residues for cytochrome C. Our model captures all observed cross-links for FGF and almost 90% of the observed cross-links for cytochrome C, although it also predicts cross-links that were not observed experimentally (false positives). However, the analysis of the false positive results is complicated by the fact that experimental detection of cross-links can be difficult and may depend on specific experimental conditions such as pH, ionic strength. Receiver operator characteristic plots showed that our model does a good job in predicting the observed cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that for cytochrome C, in general, the two lysines come closer for the observed cross-links as compared to the false positive ones. For FGF, no such clear pattern exists. The kinetic model and MD simulation can be used to study proposed cross-linking protocols.

  1. Probing the reaction mechanism of IspH protein by x-ray structure analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Grä wert, Tobias; Span, Ingrid; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Eppinger, Jö rg; Bacher, Adelbert; Groll, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) represent the two central intermediates in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids. The recently discovereddeoxyxylulose 5-phosphate pathway generates a mixture of IPP and DMAPP in its final step by reductive dehydroxylation of 1-hydroxy-2-methyl- 2-butenyl 4-diphosphate. This conversion is catalyzed by IspH protein comprising a central iron-sulfur cluster as electron transfer cofactor in the active site. The five crystal structures of IspH in complex with substrate, converted substrate, products and PPi reported in this article provide unique insights into the mechanism of this enzyme. While IspH protein crystallizes with substrate bound to a [4Fe-4S] cluster, crystals of IspH in complex with IPP, DMAPP or inorganic pyrophosphate feature [3Fe-4S] clusters. The IspH:substrate complex reveals a hairpin conformation of the ligand with the C(1) hydroxyl group coordinated to the unique site in a [4Fe-4S] cluster of aconitase type. The resulting alkoxide complex is coupled to a hydrogen-bonding network, which serves as proton reservoir via a Thr167 proton relay. Prolonged x-ray irradiation leads to cleavage of the C(1)-O bond (initiated by reducing photo electrons). The data suggest a reaction mechanism involving a combination of Lewis-acid activation and proton coupled electron transfer. The resulting allyl radical intermediate can acquire a second electron via the iron-sulfur cluster. The reaction may be terminated by the transfer of a proton from the β-phosphate of the substrate to C(1) (affording DMAPP) or C(3) (affording IPP).

  2. Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark A

    2013-03-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

  3. The importance of a hot-sequential mechanism in triplet-state formation by charge recombination in reaction centers of bacterial photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Mukai, K.; Sumi, H.

    2006-01-01

    In photosynthesis, pigment-excitation energies in the antenna system produced by light harvesting are transferred among antenna pigments toward the core antenna, where they are captured by the reaction center and initially fixed in the form of a charge separation. Primary charge separation between an oxidized special pair (P + ) and a reduced bacteriopheohytin (H - ) is occasionally intervened by recombination, and a spin-triplet state ( 3 P*) is formed on P in the bacterial reaction center. The 3 P* state is harmful to bio-organisms, inducing the formation of the highly damaging singlet oxygen species. Therefore, understanding the 3 P*-formation mechanism is important. The 3 P* formation is mediated by a state |m> of intermediate charge separation between P and the accessory chlorophyll, which is located between P and H. It will be shown theoretically in the present work that at room temperature, not only the mechanism of superexchange by quantum-mechanical virtual mediation at |m>, but also a hot-sequential mechanism contributes to the mediation. In the latter, although |m> is produced as a real state, the final state 3 P* is quickly formed during thermalization of phonons in the protein matrix in |m>. In the former, the final state is formed more quickly before dephasing-thermalization of phonons in |m>. 3 P* is unistep formed from the charge-separated state in the both mechanisms

  4. An examination of blood center structure and hospital customer satisfaction: what can centralized and decentralized blood centers learn from each other?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Robert; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2005-01-01

    The cost of blood and blood products has increased rapidly over the last several years while the supply of available blood donors has simultaneously decreased. Higher blood costs and donor shortages have put a strain on the relationship between blood suppliers and their hospital customers. This study examines the association between blood center centralization or decentralization and several aspects of hospital satisfaction. Centralized and decentralized blood centers have significant differences in various aspects of hospital customer satisfaction. Advantages and disadvantages of the two structures are discussed, as well as areas for future research.

  5. The structural biology center at the APS: an integrated user facility for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, G.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC) has developed and operates a sector (undulator and bending magnet) of the APS as a user facility for macromolecular crystallography. Crystallographically determined structures of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes with proteins, viruses, and complexes between macromolecules and small ligands have become of central importance in molecular and cellular biology. Major design goals were to make the extremely high brilliance of the APS available for brilliance limited studies, and to achieve a high throughput of less demanding studies, as well as optimization for MAS-phasing. Crystal samples will include extremely small crystals, crystals with large unit cells (viruses, ribosomes, etc.) and ensembles of closely similar crystal structures for drug design, protein engineering, etc. Data are recorded on a 3000x3000 pixel CCD-area detector (optionally on image plates). The x-ray optics of both beamlines has been designed to produce a highly demagnified image of the source in order to match the focal size with the sizes of the sample and the resolution element of the detector. Vertical focusing is achieved by a flat, cylindrically bent mirror. Horizontal focusing is achieved by sagitally bending the second crystal of the double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic fluxes of 1.3 * 10 13 ph/s into focal sizes of 0.08 mm (horizontal)x0.04 mm (vertical) FWHM (flux density 3.5 * 10 15 ph/s/mm 2 ) have been recorded.copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. A nucleobase-centered coarse-grained representation for structure prediction of RNA motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, Simón; Bottaro, Sandro; Bussi, Giovanni

    2018-02-28

    We introduce the SPlit-and-conQueR (SPQR) model, a coarse-grained (CG) representation of RNA designed for structure prediction and refinement. In our approach, the representation of a nucleotide consists of a point particle for the phosphate group and an anisotropic particle for the nucleoside. The interactions are, in principle, knowledge-based potentials inspired by the $\\mathcal {E}$SCORE function, a base-centered scoring function. However, a special treatment is given to base-pairing interactions and certain geometrical conformations which are lost in a raw knowledge-based model. This results in a representation able to describe planar canonical and non-canonical base pairs and base-phosphate interactions and to distinguish sugar puckers and glycosidic torsion conformations. The model is applied to the folding of several structures, including duplexes with internal loops of non-canonical base pairs, tetraloops, junctions and a pseudoknot. For the majority of these systems, experimental structures are correctly predicted at the level of individual contacts. We also propose a method for efficiently reintroducing atomistic detail from the CG representation.

  7. Simbios: an NIH national center for physics-based simulation of biological structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, Scott L; Ku, Joy P; Pande, Vijay S; Sherman, Michael A; Altman, Russ B

    2012-01-01

    Physics-based simulation provides a powerful framework for understanding biological form and function. Simulations can be used by biologists to study macromolecular assemblies and by clinicians to design treatments for diseases. Simulations help biomedical researchers understand the physical constraints on biological systems as they engineer novel drugs, synthetic tissues, medical devices, and surgical interventions. Although individual biomedical investigators make outstanding contributions to physics-based simulation, the field has been fragmented. Applications are typically limited to a single physical scale, and individual investigators usually must create their own software. These conditions created a major barrier to advancing simulation capabilities. In 2004, we established a National Center for Physics-Based Simulation of Biological Structures (Simbios) to help integrate the field and accelerate biomedical research. In 6 years, Simbios has become a vibrant national center, with collaborators in 16 states and eight countries. Simbios focuses on problems at both the molecular scale and the organismal level, with a long-term goal of uniting these in accurate multiscale simulations.

  8. Towards an unified microscopic approach of the description of the nuclear structure and reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Sy-Than

    2009-01-01

    interactions. We have thus examined the structures of the different zones of the inner crust, from the lowest densities up to densities close to the vicinity of half saturation density where the spherical assumption breaks down. 3. Nuclear reactions: Using the same effective interactions derived from the M3Y-type interactions we have performed a coupled channel analysis of (p,n) charge exchange reactions at 35 and 45 MeV incident energies on 48 Ca, 90 Zr, 120 Sn and 208 Pb targets leading to isobaric analog states. The form factors are either calculated microscopically by the convolution model, or evaluated from the global optical potential taken from the literature. We have first determined the component of the CDM3Y6 interaction which depends on the isovector density by using the microscopic optical potential of Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux, and then this was used for the folding model. Thus, we have been able to assess the validity of the component of CDM3Y6 which depends on the isovector density. (author)

  9. P-odd effects observed in the reactions with neutrons and isospin structure of weak nucleon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smotritskij, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Application of resonance phase for two quasi-stationary states with similar spin and unlike parity is shown to enable to coordinate the experimentally observed signed dependence of P-odd effects in neutron reactions with the theory. The developed approach enables to obtain information on isospin structure of a weak nucleon-nucleon interaction [ru

  10. A study of the structure of 162Dy through the (n,γ) and (n,e-) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, D.D.; Shi, Z.R.; Gelletly, W.; Borner, H.G.; Hoyler, F.; Schreckenbach, K.; van Isacker, P.

    1987-01-01

    The level structure below 2 MeV in 162 Dy has been investigated using the 161 Dy(n,γ) 162 Dy and 161 Dy(n,e - ) 162 Dy reactions. The results for the positive parity excitations are discussed within the framework of an Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA-2) calculation. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Probing the structure of unstable nuclei through the recoiled proton tagged knockout reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Y.; Cao, Z.; Jiang, D.

    2010-01-01

    Recoiled proton tagged knockout reaction experiments were carried-out for 8 He at 82,5 MeV/u in RIKEN and for 6 He at 65 MeV/u in Lanzhou. The very preliminary results for the distinguish of the reaction mechanism are presented and compared to the kinematics calculation. (authors)

  12. On the Mathematical Structure of Balanced Chemical Reaction Networks Governed by Mass Action Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaft, Arjan van der; Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent progress on the interplay between graph theory, dynamics, and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics. For reaction networks possessing a thermodynamic equilibrium we derive a compact formulation exhibiting at the

  13. Structural integrity of callosal midbody influences intermanual transfer in a motor reaction-time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Roccatagliata, Luca; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Bove, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Training one hand on a motor task results in performance improvements in the other hand, also when stimuli are randomly presented (nonspecific transfer). Corpus callosum (CC) is the main structure involved in interhemispheric information transfer; CC pathology occurs in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and is related to altered performance of tasks requiring interhemispheric transfer of sensorimotor information. To investigate the role of CC in nonspecific transfer during a pure motor reaction-time task, we combined motor behavior with diffusion tensor imaging analysis in PwMS. Twenty-two PwMS and 10 controls, all right-handed, were asked to respond to random stimuli with appropriate finger opposition movements with the right (learning) and then the left (transfer) hand. PwMS were able to improve motor performance reducing response times with practice with a trend similar to controls and preserved the ability to transfer the acquired motor information from the learning to the transfer hand. A higher variability in the transfer process, indicated by a significantly larger standard deviation of mean nonspecific transfer, was found in the PwMS group with respect to the control group, suggesting the presence of subtle impairments in interhemispheric communication in some patients. Then, we correlated the amount of nonspecific transfer with mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values, indicative of microstructural damage, obtained in five CC subregions identified on PwMS's FA maps. A significant correlation was found only in the subregion including posterior midbody (Pearson's r = 0.74, P = 0.003), which thus seems to be essential for the interhemispheric transfer of information related to pure sensorimotor tasks. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Separate photosensitizers mediate degradation of the 32-kDa photosystem II reaction center protein in the visible and UV spectral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Gaba, V.; Canaani, O.; Malkin, S.; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M.

    1989-01-01

    A component of the photosystem II reaction center, the 32-kDa protein, is rapidly turned over in the light. The mechanism of its light-dependent metabolism is largely unknown. We quantified the rate of 32-kDa protein degradation over a broad spectral range (UV, visible, and far red). The quantum yield for degradation was highest in the UVB (280-320 nm) region. Spectral evidence demonstrates two distinctly different photosensitizers for 32-kDa protein degradation. The data implicate the bulk photosynthetic pigments (primarily chlorophyll) in the visible and far red regions, and plastoquinone (in one or more of its redox states) in the UV region. A significant portion of 32-kDa protein degradation in sunlight is attributed to UVB irradiance

  15. Aborted germinal center reactions and B cell memory by follicular T cells specific for a B cell receptor V region peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Ryan A; Snyder, Christopher M; St Clair, James; Wysocki, Lawrence J

    2011-07-01

    A fundamental problem in immunoregulation is how CD4(+) T cells react to immunogenic peptides derived from the V region of the BCR that are created by somatic mechanisms, presented in MHC II, and amplified to abundance by B cell clonal expansion during immunity. BCR neo Ags open a potentially dangerous avenue of T cell help in violation of the principle of linked Ag recognition. To analyze this issue, we developed a murine adoptive transfer model using paired donor B cells and CD4 T cells specific for a BCR-derived peptide. BCR peptide-specific T cells aborted ongoing germinal center reactions and impeded the secondary immune response. Instead, they induced the B cells to differentiate into short-lived extrafollicular plasmablasts that secreted modest quantities of Ig. These results uncover an immunoregulatory process that restricts the memory pathway to B cells that communicate with CD4 T cells via exogenous foreign Ag.

  16. A symphony of regulations centered on p63 to control development of ectoderm-derived structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, Luisa; Costanzo, Antonio; Merlo, Giorgio R

    2011-01-01

    The p53-related transcription factor p63 is critically important for basic cellular functions during development of the ectoderm and derived structure and tissues, including skin, limb, palate, and hair. On the one side, p63 is required to sustain the proliferation of keratinocyte progenitors, while on the other side it is required for cell stratification, commitment to differentiate, cell adhesion, and epithelial-mesenchymal signaling. Molecules that are components or regulators of the p63 pathway(s) are rapidly being identified, and it comes with no surprise that alterations in the p63 pathway lead to congenital conditions in which the skin and other ectoderm-derived structures are affected. In this paper, we summarize the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular regulations centered on p63, derived from the comprehension of p63-linked human diseases and the corresponding animal models, as well as from cellular models and high-throughput molecular approaches. We point out common themes and features, that allow to speculate on the possible role of p63 downstream events and their potential exploitation in future attempts to correct the congenital defect in preclinical studies.

  17. Synthesis of 2-monoacylglycerols and structured triacylglycerols rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids by enzyme catalyzed reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Esteban, Luis; Martín, Lorena; Jiménez, María José; Hita, Estrella; Castillo, Beatriz; González, Pedro A; Robles, Alfonso

    2012-08-10

    This paper studies the synthesis of structured triacylglycerols (STAGs) by a four-step process: (i) obtaining 2-monoacylglycerols (2-MAGs) by alcoholysis of cod liver oil with several alcohols, catalyzed by lipases Novozym 435, from Candida antartica and DF, from Rhizopus oryzae, (ii) purification of 2-MAGs, (iii) formation of STAGs by esterification of 2-MAGs with caprylic acid catalyzed by lipase DF, from R. oryzae, and (iv) purification of these STAGs. For the alcoholysis of cod liver oil, absolute ethanol, ethanol 96% (v/v) and 1-butanol were compared; the conditions with ethanol 96% were then optimized and 2-MAG yields of around 54-57% were attained using Novozym 435. In these 2-MAGs, DHA accounted for 24-31% of total fatty acids. In the operational conditions this lipase maintained a stable level of activity over at least 11 uses. These results were compared with those obtained with lipase DF, which deactivated after only three uses. The alcoholysis of cod liver oil and ethanol 96% catalyzed by Novozym 435 was scaled up by multiplying the reactant amounts 100-fold and maintaining the intensity of treatment constant (IOT=3g lipase h/g oil). In these conditions, the 2-MAG yield attained was about 67%; these 2-MAGs contained 36.6% DHA. The synthesized 2-MAGs were separated and purified from the alcoholysis reaction products by solvent extraction using solvents of low toxicity (ethanol and hexane); 2-MAG recovery yield and purity of the target product were approximately 96.4% and 83.9%, respectively. These 2-MAGs were transformed to STAGs using the optimal conditions obtained in a previous work. After synthesis and purification, 93% pure STAGs were obtained, containing 38% DHA at sn-2 position and 60% caprylic acid (CA) at sn-1,3 positions (of total fatty acids at these positions), i.e. the major TAG is the STAG with the structure CA-DHA-CA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influences of the molecular fuel structure on combustion reactions towards soot precursors in selected alkane and alkene flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwe, Lena; Moshammer, Kai; Hansen, Nils; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2018-04-25

    In this study, we experimentally investigate the high-temperature oxidation kinetics of n-pentane, 1-pentene and 2-methyl-2-butene (2M2B) in a combustion environment using flame-sampling molecular beam mass spectrometry. The selected C5 fuels are prototypes for linear and branched, saturated and unsaturated fuel components, featuring different C-C and C-H bond structures. It is shown that the formation tendency of species, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), yielded through mass growth reactions increases drastically in the sequence n-pentane fuel-dependent reaction sequences of the gas-phase combustion mechanism that provide explanations for the observed difference in the PAH formation tendency. First, we investigate the fuel-structure-dependent formation of small hydrocarbon species that are yielded as intermediate species during the fuel decomposition, because these species are at the origin of the subsequent mass growth reaction pathways. Second, we review typical PAH formation reactions inspecting repetitive growth sequences in dependence of the molecular fuel structure. Third, we discuss how differences in the intermediate species pool influence the formation reactions of key aromatic ring species that are important for the PAH growth process underlying soot formation. As a main result it was found that for the fuels featuring a C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond, the chemistry of their allylic fuel radicals and their decomposition products strongly influences the combination reactions to the initially formed aromatic ring species and as a consequence, the PAH formation tendency.

  19. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  20. Readiness for the Patient-Centered Medical Home: structural capabilities of Massachusetts primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; Safran, Dana G; Coltin, Kathryn L; Dresser, Marguerite; Schneider, Eric C

    2009-02-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), a popular model for primary care reorganization, includes several structural capabilities intended to enhance quality of care. The extent to which different types of primary care practices have adopted these capabilities has not been previously studied. To measure the prevalence of recommended structural capabilities among primary care practices and to determine whether prevalence varies among practices of different size (number of physicians) and administrative affiliation with networks of practices. Cross-sectional analysis. One physician chosen at random from each of 412 primary care practices in Massachusetts was surveyed about practice capabilities during 2007. Practice size and network affiliation were obtained from an existing database. Presence of 13 structural capabilities representing 4 domains relevant to quality: patient assistance and reminders, culture of quality, enhanced access, and electronic health records (EHRs). Three hundred eight (75%) physicians responded, representing practices with a median size of 4 physicians (range 2-74). Among these practices, 64% were affiliated with 1 of 9 networks. The prevalence of surveyed capabilities ranged from 24% to 88%. Larger practice size was associated with higher prevalence for 9 of the 13 capabilities spanning all 4 domains (P < 0.05). Network affiliation was associated with higher prevalence of 5 capabilities (P < 0.05) in 3 domains. Associations were not substantively altered by statistical adjustment for other practice characteristics. Larger and network-affiliated primary care practices are more likely than smaller, non-affiliated practices to have adopted several recommended capabilities. In order to achieve PCMH designation, smaller non-affiliated practices may require the greatest investments.

  1. Directed surfaces structures and interfaces for enhanced electrocatalyst activity, selectivity, and stability for energy conversion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Shriram Center

    2016-04-20

    In this project, we have employed a systematic approach to develop active, selective, and stable catalyst materials for important electrochemical reactions involving energy conversion. In particular, we have focused our attention on developing active catalyst materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). HER: We have synthesized and investigated several highly active and acid stable non-precious metal HER catalysts, including: [Mo3S13]2- nanoclusters (Nature Chemistry, 2014) and molybdenum phosphosulfide (MoP|S) (Angewandte Chemie, 2014). We have also aimed to engineer these catalyst formulations in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for fundamental studies of water electrolysis at high current densities, approximately 1 A/cm2 (ChemSusChem, 2015). We furthermore investigated transition metal phosphide (TMP) catalysts for HER by a combined experimental–theoretical approach (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). By synthesizing different TMPs and comparing experimentally determined HER activities with the hydrogen adsorption free energies, ΔGH, calculated by density functional theory, we showed that the TMPs follow a volcano relationship for the HER. Using our combined experimental–theoretical model, we predicted that the mixed metal TMP, Fe0.5Co0.5P, should have a near-optimal ΔGH. We synthesized several mixtures of Co and Fe phosphides alloys and confirmed that Fe0.5Co0.5P exhibits the highest HER activity of the investigated TMPs (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). The understanding gained as to how to improve catalytic activity for the HER, particularly for non-precious metal materials, is important to DOE targets for sustainable H2 production. OER: We have developed a SrIrO3/IrOx catalyst for acidic conditions (submitted, 2016). The Sr

  2. AFM Imaging of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Mediated Signal Transmission Between two DNA Origami Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmig, Sarah Wendelbo; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-01-01

    transfer between two connected DNA nanostructures, using the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). Two sets of metastable DNA hairpins - of which one is immobilized in specific points along tracks on DNA origami structures - are polymerized to form a continuous DNA duplex, which is visible using atomic force...... microscopy (AFM). Upon addition of a designed initiator, the initiation signal is efficiently transferred >200 nm from a specific location on one origami structure to an end point on another origami structure. The system shows no significant loss of signal when crossing from one nanostructure to another...

  3. Surface Properties of Titanium dioxide and its Structural Modifications by Reactions with Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpegamage, Sandamali

    Surfaces of metal oxides play a vital role in many technologically important applications. The surfaces of titanium dioxide, in particular, show quite promising properties that can be utilized in solid-state gas sensing and photocatalysis applications. In the first part of this dissertation we investigate these properties of TiO2 surfaces through a vigorous surface scientific approach. In the second part, we investigate the possibilities of modifying the TiO2 surfaces by depositing multi-component transition metal oxide monolayers so that the properties of bare TiO2 surface can be influenced in a beneficial way. For instance, via formation of new surface sites or cations that have different valance states, the chemisorption and catalytic properties can be modified. We use sophisticated experimental surface science techniques that are compatible with ultra-high vacuum technology for surface characterization. All the experimental results, except for the photocatalysis experiments, were compared to and verified by supporting DFT-based theoretical results produced by our theory collaborators. TiO2 based solid-state gas sensors have been used before for detecting trace amounts of explosives such as 2,4-dinitrololuene (DNT), a toxic decomposition product of the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) that have very low vapor pressure. However, the adsorption, desorption and reaction mechanism were not well- understood. Here, we investigate 2,4-DNT adsorption on rutile-TiO2(110) surface in order to gain insight about these mechanisms in an atomistic level and we propose an efficient way of desorbing DNT from the surface through UV-light induced photoreactions. TiO2 exists in different polymorphs and the photocatalytic activity differs from one polymorph to another. Rutile and anatase are the most famous forms of TiO2 in photocatalysis and anatase is known to show higher activity than rutile. The photoactivity also varies depending on the surface orientation for the same

  4. Unifying principles in homodimeric type I photosynthetic reaction centers: properties of PscB and the FA, FB and FX iron-sulfur clusters in green sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H

    2008-12-01

    The photosynthetic reaction center from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum (CbRC) was solubilized from membranes using Triton X-100 and isolated by sucrose density ultra-centrifugation. The CbRC complexes were subsequently treated with 0.5 M NaCl and ultrafiltered over a 100 kDa cutoff membrane. The resulting CbRC cores did not exhibit the low-temperature EPR resonances from FA- and FB- and were unable to reduce NADP+. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometric analysis showed that the PscB subunit, which harbors the FA and FB clusters, had become dissociated, and was now present in the filtrate. Attempts to rebind PscB onto CbRC cores were unsuccessful. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that recombinant PscB contains a heterogeneous mixture of [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and other types of Fe/S clusters tentatively identified as [2Fe-2S]2+,1+ clusters and rubredoxin-like Fe3+,2+ centers, and that the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ clusters which were present were degraded at high ionic strength. Quantitative analysis confirmed that the amount of iron and sulfide in the recombinant protein was sub-stoichiometric. A heme-staining assay indicated that cytochrome c551 remained firmly attached to the CbRC cores. Low-temperature EPR spectroscopy of photoaccumulated CbRC complexes and CbRC cores showed resonances between g=5.4 and 4.4 assigned to a S=3/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster and at g=1.77 assigned to a S=1/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster, both from FX-. These results unify the properties of the acceptor side of the Type I homodimeric reaction centers found in green sulfur bacteria and heliobacteria: in both, the FA and FB iron-sulfur clusters are present on a salt-dissociable subunit, and FX is present as an interpolypeptide [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster with a significant population in a S=3/2 ground spin state.

  5. Effect of deformation on structure and reaction of Al isotopes using relativistic mean field densities in Glauber model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, R. N.; Sharma, Mahesh K.; Panigrahi, M.; Patra, S. K.

    2018-06-01

    We have examined the ground state properties of Al isotopes towards the proton rich side from A = 22 to 28 using the well known relativistic mean field (RMF) formalism with NLSH parameter set. The calculated results are compared with the predictions of finite range droplet model and experimental data. The calculation is extended to estimate the reaction cross section for ^{22-28}Al as projectiles with ^{12}C as target. The incident energy of the projectiles are taken as 950 MeV/nucleon, for both spherical and deformed RMF densities as inputs in the Glauber model approximation. Further investigation of enhanced values of total reaction cross section for ^{23}Al and ^{24}Al in comparison to rest of the isotopes indicates the proton skin structure of these isotopes. Specifically, the large value of root mean square radius and total reaction cross section of ^{23}Al could not be ruled out the formation of proton halo.

  6. Search for the signature of a halo structure in the p(6He,6Li)n reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina-Gil, M.D.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Mittig, W.; Casandjian, J.M.; Chartier, M.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Fekou-Youmbi, V.; Blumenfeld, Y.; and others.

    1995-01-01

    The elastic scattering p( 6 He, 6 He)p and charge exchange reaction p( 6 He, 6 Li)n have been measured in reverse kinematics with a secondary 6 He beam. The angular distributions for these reactions were obtained. In the case of the charge exchange reaction, the ratio of the cross section for the Gamow-Teller transition to the ground state, and for the Fermi transition to the isobaric analog state is a measure of the relative strength of the two components of the exchange interaction. This ratio is found compatible with existing systematics for stable T=1 nuclei, and no clear signature of a halo structure was found in the present data. (author)

  7. Influence of Mn and Co on structural and morphological characteristics of ZnO synthesized by combustion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torquato, R.A.; Costa, C.F.M.; Kiminami, R.H.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of doping of 0.2 mol of Mn and Co on structural and morphological characteristics of ZnO synthesized by combustion reaction. During the synthesis was the measurement of temperature and time of the combustion flame. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, particle size distribution and nitrogen adsorption (BET). The maximum temperature the reactions were 428 deg C and 436 deg C, reaction time, and 115 and 0 seconds for the samples doped with Mn and Co, respectively. The XRD data showed that for both impurities were formed only ZnO phase. For Co were formed secondary phase CoO. The crystallite size and surface area were 18 nm and 22 nm, and 52 and 38 m2/g for ZnO doped with Mn and Co, respectively. (author)

  8. Financial viability of perinatal centers in the longer term, taking legislative requirements into account. An examination of the cost-revenue structure of a Level I perinatal center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Michael P; Kraml, Florian; Wagner, Stefanie; Hack, Carolin C; Schulze, Christine; Faschingbauer, Florian; Winkler, Mathias; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Debate is currently taking place over minimum case numbers for the care of premature infants and neonates in Germany. As a result of the Federal Joint Committee (Gemeinsamer Bundesauschuss, G-BA) guidelines for the quality of structures, processes, and results, requiring high levels of staffing resources, Level I perinatal centers are increasingly becoming the focus for health-economics questions, specifically, debating whether Level I structures are financially viable. Using a multistep contribution margin analysis, the operating results for the Obstetrics Section at the University Perinatal Center of Franconia (Universitäts-Perinatalzentrum Franken) were calculated for the year 2009. Costs arising per diagnosis-related group (DRG) (separated into variable costs and fixed costs) and the corresponding revenue generated were compared for 4,194 in-patients and neonates, as well as for 3,126 patients in the outpatient ultrasound and pregnancy clinics. With a positive operating result of € 374,874.81, a Level I perinatal center on the whole initially appears to be financially viable, from the obstetrics point of view (excluding neonatology), with a high bed occupancy rate and a profitable case mix. By contrast, the costs of prenatal diagnostics, with a negative contribution margin II of € 50,313, cannot be covered. A total of 79.4% of DRG case numbers were distributed to five DRGs, all of which were associated with pregnancies and neonates with the lowest risk profiles. A Level I perinatal center is currently capable of covering its costs. However, the cost-revenue ratio is fragile due to the high requirements for staffing resources and numerous economic, social, and regional influencing factors.

  9. Structural transition in lanthanum gallate and transformation of the fine structure of the EPR spectrum of a Gd3+ impurity center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazhenin, V. A.; Guseva, V. B.; Fokin, A. V.; Potapov, A. P.; Artyomov, M. Yu.

    2011-04-01

    Abrupt changes in resonance positions, hysteretic temperature behavior, and coexistence of phases, which indicate a first-order phase transition, have been revealed from measurements of temperature dependences of the EPR spectra of Gd3+ and Mn4+ centers in the vicinity of the structural transition of lanthanum gallate. The transformation of monoclinic Gd3+ centers into trigonal Gd3+ centers upon the phase transition has been used to estimate the adequacy of two approximations of the superposition model for parameters of the zero-field splitting of the ground state.

  10. Synthesis of ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Influence of reaction time on structural, morphological and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirabadizadeh, Ahmad; Salighe, Zohre; Sarhaddi, Reza, E-mail: reza.sarhaddi@birjand.ac.ir; Lotfollahi, Zahra

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • The crystallite and particle size of cobalt ferrite can be controlled effectively by reaction time. • The ferrofluids have lower values of saturation magnetization and coercivity as compared to nanoparticles. • By increasing the size of nanoparticles, the narrower and sharper spikes of ferrofluids are formed. - Abstract: In this work, for first time the ferrofluids based on the cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation method at different reaction times (0.5–6.5 h). Crystal structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids based on the nanoparticles were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized at different reaction times indicated that all samples are single phase in accordance with inverse cubic spinel structure with space group Fd-3m, and no impurity phase was observed. By increasing the reaction time to 3.5 h, the lattice parameter and the average crystallites size increased and then afterwards decreased by increasing the reaction time. The microscopic studies indicated the formation of nanosized particles with nearly spherical in shape, whereas the average particle size for all samples is found to be less than 50 nm. The results of VSM also showed that the saturation magnetization and coercivity field of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids were influenced by reaction time, whereas the ferrofluids have lower values of magnetic parameters than that of nanoparticles.

  11. Seismic refraction data constrain along-axis structure of the Mid-Cayman spreading center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Harding, J.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC) is an ultraslow (15 mm/yr) spreading ridge between the Caribbean and North American plates. From north to south the MCSC is just ~140 km long, as it is bounded to the north by the Oriente transform fault, and to the south by the Swan Islands and Walton fault systems. The neovolcanic zone is characterized by an axial valley with depths to 6000 m, and a few off-axis bathymetric highs that can be as shallow as 2000 m. The role of tectonic and magmatic processes in the creation of this bathymetric relief is not yet understood. In the 2015 CaySEIS experiment, a collaboration between German, US and UK scientists, we gathered ocean-bottom seismic refraction data along five lines across and parallel to the MCSC to determine its crustal structure. We here present the tomographic analysis of marine seismic refractions recorded along the spreading axis. The presence of thin crust here shows that the bathymetric relief of the MCSC is at least in part isostatically compensated. Much of the older ultraslow spread crust on the flanks of the MCSC may not have accreted along the deep axial valley, but it may instead have formed by exhumation of gabbros along extensional faults in the adjacent seafloor.

  12. Building the Nonuniversity, Tertiary Care Center Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery Practice: Structural and Financial Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Erin H; Siddiqui, Imran; Vrochides, Dionisios; Iannitti, David A; Martinie, John B; Rorabaugh, Lauren; Jeyarajah, D Rohan; Swan, Ryan Z

    2016-12-01

    Early in their careers, many new surgeons lack the background and experience to understand essential components needed to build a surgical practice. Surgical resident education is often devoid of specific instruction on the business of medicine and practice management. In particular, hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HPB) surgeons require many key components to build a successful practice secondary to significant interdisciplinary coordination and a scope of complex surgery, which spans challenging benign and malignant disease processes. In the following, we describe the required clinical and financial components for developing a successful HPB surgery practice in the nonuniversity tertiary care center. We discuss significant financial considerations for understanding community need and hospital investment, contract establishment, billing, and coding. We summarize the structural elements and key personnel necessary for establishing an effectual HPB surgical team. This article provides useful, essential information for a new HPB surgeon looking to establish a surgical practice. It also provides insight for health-care administrators as to the value an HPB surgeon can bring to a hospital or health-care system.

  13. Effect of Reaction Temperature on Structure, Appearance and Bonding Type of Functionalized Graphene Oxide Modified P-Phenylene Diamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Juan Sun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, graphene oxides with different functionalization degrees were prepared by a facile one-step hydrothermal reflux method at various reaction temperatures using graphene oxide (GO as starting material and p-phenylenediamine (PPD as the modifier. The effects of reaction temperature on structure, appearance and bonding type of the obtained materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that when the reaction temperature was 10–70 °C, the GO reacted with PPD through non-covalent ionic bonds (–COO−H3+N–R and hydrogen bonds (C–OH…H2N–X. When the reaction temperature reached 90 °C, the GO was functionalized with PPD through covalent bonds of C–N. The crystal structure of products became more ordered and regular, and the interlayer spacing (d value and surface roughness increased as the temperature increased. Furthermore, the results suggested that PPD was grafted on the surface of GO through covalent bonding by first attacking the carboxyl groups and then the epoxy groups of GO.

  14. Low-lying states and structure of the exotic 8He via direct reactions on the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaza, F.; Lapoux, V.; Keeley, N.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Beaumel, D.; Becheva, E.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Delaunay, F.; Drouart, A.; Gillibert, A.; Giot, L.; Khan, E.; Nalpas, L.; Pakou, A.; Pollacco, E.; Raabe, R.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Rusek, K.; Scarpaci, J.-A.; Sida, J.-L.; Stepantsov, S.; Wolski, R.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the light exotic nucleus 8 He was investigated using direct reactions of the 8 He SPIRAL beam on a proton-rich target. The (p,p') scattering to the 2 1 + state, the (p,d) 7 He and (p,t) 6 He transfer reactions, were measured at the energy E lab =15.7 A.MeV. The light charged particles (p,d,t) were detected in the MUST Si-strip telescope array. The excitation spectrum of 8 He was extracted from the (p,p') reaction. Above the known 2 1 + excited state at 3.6 MeV, a second resonance was found around 5.4 MeV. The cross sections were analyzed within the coupled-reaction channels framework, using microscopic potentials. It is inferred that the 8 He ground state has a more complex neutron-skin structure than suggested by previous α+4n models assuming a pure (1p 3/2 ) 4 configuration

  15. Structural analysis of CuO / CeO2-based catalytic materials intended for PROX reaction: Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neiva, L.S.; Simoes, A.N.; Bispo, A.; Ribeiro, M.A.; Gama, L.

    2011-01-01

    This work relates the synthesis process of CuO/CeO 2 catalytic materials by a combustion reaction method as well as it introduces a structural analysis of the developed material, this structural analysis had as main focus to evaluate the influence of the doping substance (CuO) when being incorporated in the hostess matrix structure that is CeO 2 . The CuO/CeO catalytic materials developed in this work are destined to preferential oxidation of CO reaction (PROX). The developed materials were characterized by XRD, SEM and textural complete analysis by the BET method. According to the results, the CuO incorporation changed crystallinity of the structure of the catalytic materials. On the other hand, the morphologic and textural characteristics did not showed significant differences regarding the presence of the doping substance (CuO) in the structure of the developed materials. The porosity of the structures of the developed catalytic materials belongs to the type macroporous. (author)

  16. Dynamic transition in the structure of an energetic crystal during chemical reactions at shock front prior to detonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; van Duin, Adri C T; Goddard, William A

    2007-10-05

    Mechanical stimuli in energetic materials initiate chemical reactions at shock fronts prior to detonation. Shock sensitivity measurements provide widely varying results, and quantum-mechanical calculations are unable to handle systems large enough to describe shock structure. Recent developments in reactive force-field molecular dynamics (ReaxFF-MD) combined with advances in parallel computing have paved the way to accurately simulate reaction pathways along with the structure of shock fronts. Our multimillion-atom ReaxFF-MD simulations of l,3,5-trinitro-l,3,5-triazine (RDX) reveal that detonation is preceded by a transition from a diffuse shock front with well-ordered molecular dipoles behind it to a disordered dipole distribution behind a sharp front.

  17. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report, September 1, 1995 - August 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The research program of this group addresses three areas of nuclear physics: (1) nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) nuclear reactions with emphasis on the interface between structure and reactions; (3) development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. Research with their collaborators responsible for the data analysis is also included very briefly in this report. Significant progress has been made in all the areas of their research program during the past year. The lists of publications and invited talks are given in Chapter 6. In the past 3 years the authors published 10 letters, 4 rapid communications and 7 full papers. Seven full papers have also been submitted. In addition, 12 invited talks have been delivered in professional conferences. In this report the authors highlight their accomplishments and advances in the three areas of their effort

  18. An Optimized Elasto-Plastic Subgrade Reaction For Modeling The Response Of A Nonlinear Foundation For A Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Richard Paul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Geotechnical and structural engineers are faced with a difficult task when their designs interact with each other. For complex projects, this is more the norm than the exception. In order to help bridge that gap, a method for modeling the behavior of a foundation using a simple elasto-plastic subgrade reaction was developed. The method uses an optimization technique to position 4-6 springs along a pile foundation to produce similar load deflection characteristics that were modeled by more sophisticated geotechnical finite element software. The methodology uses an Excel spreadsheet for accepting user input and delivering an optimized subgrade spring stiffness, yield, and position along the pile. In this way, the behavior developed from the geotechnical software can be transferred to the structural analysis software. The optimization is achieved through the solver add-in within Excel. Additionally, a beam on a nonlinear elastic foundation model is used to compute deflections of the optimized subgrade reaction configuration.

  19. Reaction of acyclic enaminones with methoxymethylene meldrum's acid: synthetic and structural implications

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha,Silvio; Silva,Viviane C. da; Napolitano,Hamilton B.; Lariucci,Carlito; Vencato,Ivo

    2003-01-01

    The reaction of acyclic enaminones with methoxymethylene Meldrum's acid afforded N-adduct and/or C-adduct of enaminones in moderate to good yields. The regiochemistry of this reaction depends on the N-amino substituent of the enaminone. The C-adduct is a precursor to 2-pyridones. X-ray analysis of two N-adducts were investigated and the Z-s-Z configuration assigned. A reação de enaminonas com o derivado metoximetilênico do ácido de Meldrum forneceu N-adutos e/ou C-adutos das enaminonas, em...

  20. Intramolecular didehydro-Diels-Alder reaction and its impact on the structure-function properties of environmentally sensitive fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummond, Kay M; Kocsis, Laura S

    2015-08-18

    Reaction discovery plays a vital role in accessing new chemical entities and materials possessing important function.1 In this Account, we delineate our reaction discovery program regarding the [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of styrene-ynes. In particular, we highlight our studies that lead to the realization of the diverging reaction mechanisms of the intramolecular didehydro-Diels-Alder (IMDDA) reaction to afford dihydronaphthalene and naphthalene products. Formation of the former involves an intermolecular hydrogen atom abstraction and isomerization, whereas the latter is formed via an unexpected elimination of H2. Forming aromatic compounds by a unimolecular elimination of H2 offers an environmentally benign alternative to typical oxidation protocols. We also include in this Account ongoing work focused on expanding the scope of this reaction, mainly its application to the preparation of cyclopenta[b]naphthalenes. Finally, we showcase the synthetic utility of the IMDDA reaction by preparing novel environmentally sensitive fluorophores. The choice to follow this path was largely influenced by the impact this reaction could have on our understanding of the structure-function relationships of these molecular sensors by taking advantage of a de novo construction and functionalization of the aromatic portion of these compounds. We were also inspired by the fact that, despite the advances that have been made in the construction of small molecule fluorophores, access to rationally designed fluorescent probes or sensors possessing varied and tuned photophysical, spectral, and chemical properties are still needed. To this end, we report our studies to correlate fluorophore structure with photophysical property relationships for a series of solvatochromic PRODAN analogs and viscosity-sensitive cyanoacrylate analogs. The versatility of this de novo strategy for fluorophore synthesis was demonstrated by showing that a number of functional groups could be installed at

  1. Center for computation and visualization of geometric structures. [Annual], Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-12

    The mission of the Center is to establish a unified environment promoting research, education, and software and tool development. The work is centered on computing, interpreted in a broad sense to include the relevant theory, development of algorithms, and actual implementation. The research aspects of the Center are focused on geometry; correspondingly the computational aspects are focused on three (and higher) dimensional visualization. The educational aspects are likewise centered on computing and focused on geometry. A broader term than education is `communication` which encompasses the challenge of explaining to the world current research in mathematics, and specifically geometry.

  2. The effect of nuclear structure in the emission of reaction products in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... Abstract. Study of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) and light charged particles (LCPs) emis- sion has been carried out for a few reactions involving α-cluster and non-α-cluster systems to see how the emission processes are affected by nuclear clustering. Li, Be, B and α-particles have been studied from ...

  3. Theoretical studies in nuclear reaction and nuclear structure. Progress report, August 1, 1977--July 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, W.M.; Redish, E.F.

    1978-01-01

    The research program covers four major areas of nuclear theory: reaction theory including both few-body and many-body systems, intermediate energy reactions including nucleon-nucleon processes, pion physics, and nuclear dynamics. In many-body reaction theory the major achievement has been the development of a unitary and connected Hamiltonian formulation adapted to approximate calculations which include 3-body channels. A new analysis of isobaric analog states attracts high resolution data parameters which characterize these states and provide information about the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The multiple-scattering analysis of approximately GeV proton-nucleus scattering has been validated by agreement in absolute magnitude with new experimental data, and contributions of a nucleon isobar were identified. The Banerjee-Cammarata dynamical theory of the pion-nucleon interaction has been found to satisfy several independent tests of dispersion relations as well as predicting experimental phase shifts. In nuclear dynamics a new S-matrix theory of time-dependent Hartree-Fock promises to provide a new approach to heavy-ion reactions. A list of publications is included

  4. A theoretical study on the structure dependence of the steam methane reforming reaction by rhodium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootel, van P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Steam methane reforming is an important industrial reaction for the conversion of methane with steam to synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Hydrogen is used in many applications, e.g. for hydrogenation purposes. It is also used for the production of bulk chemicals such as

  5. Structure of the Λ (1405 ) and the K-d →π Σ n reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Shota; Ikeda, Yoichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    The Λ (1405 ) resonance production reaction is investigated within the framework of the coupled-channels Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas (AGS) equations. We perform full three-body calculations for the K ¯N N -π Y N amplitudes on the physical real energy axis and investigate how the signature of the Λ (1405 ) appears in the cross sections of the K-d →π Σ n reactions, also in view of the planned E31 experiment at J-PARC. Two types of meson-baryon interaction models are considered: an energy-dependent interaction based on chiral S U (3 ) effective field theory, and an energy-independent version that has been used repeatedly in phenomenological approaches. These two models have different off-shell properties that imply correspondingly different behavior in the three-body system. We investigate how these features show up in differential cross sections of K-d →π Σ n reactions. Characteristic patterns distinguishing between the two models are found in the invariant mass spectrum of the final π Σ state. The K-d →π Σ n reaction, with different (π±Σ∓ and π0Σ0 ) charge combinations in the final state, is thus demonstrated to be a useful tool for investigating the subthreshold behavior of the K ¯N interaction.

  6. The effect of nuclear structure in the emission of reaction products in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... It has been found that the yields of the fully energy damped fragments for all the above reactions are in conformity with the respective statistical model predictions. The time-scales of various deep inelastic fragment emissions have been extracted from the angular distribution data. The angular momentum ...

  7. Gross resonance-like structure of the complete fusion excitation function for the 16O + 28Si reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Jiwen; Zheng Pingzi; Liu Guoxing

    1993-01-01

    The complete fusion excitation function for the 16 O + 28 Si reaction is measured in the incident energy range from 50 to 90 MeV with step of 1.0 MeV using a position sensitive ΔE-E telescope system. The striking gross resonance-like structure is observed when E c.m. c.m. 34.5, 38.5 and 43.0 MeV respectively. The structure vanishes gradually when E c.m. > 46.0 MeV

  8. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  9. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey Bryant

    2008-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  10. Effect of alkali–silica reaction on the shear strength of reinforced concrete structural members. A numerical and statistical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saouma, Victor E.; Hariri-Ardebili, Mohammad Amin [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Le Pape, Yann, E-mail: lepapeym@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Balaji, Rajagopalan [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Alkali–silica reaction (ASR) affects reinforced structures shear strength. • Statistical analysis indicates large scattering of post-ASR strength losses/gains. • Competitive structural and materials mechanisms affect the residual shear strength. - Abstract: The residual structural shear resistance of concrete members without shear reinforcement and subject to alkali–aggregate reaction (ASR) is investigated by finite element analysis. A parametric numerical study of 648 analyses considering various structural members’ geometries, boundary conditions, ASR-induced losses of materials properties, ASR expansions and reinforcement ratios is conducted. As a result of competitive mechanisms (e.g., ASR-induced prestressing caused by the longitudinal reinforcement) and loss of concrete materials properties, important scatter in terms of gain or loss of shear strength is observed: about 50% of the studied configurations lead to a degradation of structural performance. The range of variation in terms of post-ASR shear resistance is extremely scattered, in particular, when ASR results in out-of-plane expansion only. Influencing factors are derived by two methods: (i) visual inspection of boxplots and probability distributions, and (ii) information criteria within multiple-linear regression analysis.

  11. Aromatic residues located close to the active center are essential for the catalytic reaction of flap endonuclease-1 from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Eriko; Abe, Junko; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-04-16

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN-1) possessing 5'-flap endonuclease and 5'-->3' exonuclease activity plays important roles in DNA replication and repair. In this study, the kinetic parameters of mutants at highly conserved aromatic residues, Tyr33, Phe35, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279, in the vicinity of the catalytic centers of FEN-1 were examined. The substitution of these aromatic residues with alanine led to a large reduction in kcat values, although these mutants retained Km values similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. Notably, the kcat of Y33A and F79A decreased 333-fold and 71-fold, respectively, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. The aromatic residues Tyr33 and Phe79, and the aromatic cluster Phe278-Phe279 mainly contributed to the recognition of the substrates without the 3' projection of the upstream strand (the nick, 5'-recess-end, single-flap, and pseudo-Y substrates) for the both exo- and endo-activities, but played minor roles in recognizing the substrates with the 3' projection (the double flap substrate and the nick substrate with the 3' projection). The replacement of Tyr33, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279, with non-charged aromatic residues, but not with aliphatic hydrophobic residues, recovered the kcat values almost fully for the substrates without the 3' projection of the upstream strand, suggesting that the aromatic groups of Tyr33, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279 might be involved in the catalytic reaction, probably via multiple stacking interactions with nucleotide bases. The stacking interactions of Tyr33 and Phe79 might play important roles in fixing the template strand and the downstream strand, respectively, in close proximity to the active center to achieve the productive transient state leading to the hydrolysis.

  12. Design and prototyping of self-centering optical single-mode fiber alignment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Gao, Fei; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The European Commission’s goal of providing each European household with at least a 30 Mb s −1 Internet connection by 2020 would be facilitated by a widespread deployment of fibre-to-the-home, which would in turn be sped up by the development of connector essential components, such as high-precision alignment features. Currently, the performance of state-of-the-art physical contact optical fiber connectors is limited by the tolerance on the cladding of standard telecom-grade single-mode fiber (SMF), which is typically smaller than  ±1 μ m. We propose to overcome this limit by developing micro-spring-based self-centering alignment structures (SCAS) for SMF-connectors. We design these alignment structures with robustness and low-cost replication in mind, allowing for large-scale deployment. Both theoretical and finite element analysis (FEA) models are used to determine the optimal dimensions of the beams of which the micro-springs of the SCAS are comprised. Two topologies of the SCAS, consisting of three and four micro-springs respectively, are investigated for two materials: polysulfone (PSU) and polyetherimide (PEI). These materials hold great potential for high-performance fiber connectors while being compatible with low-cost production and with the harsh environmental operation conditions of those connectors. The theory and FEA agree well (<3% difference) for a simple micro-spring. When including a pedestal on the micro-spring (to bring it further away from the fiber) and for shorter spring lengths the agreement worsens. This is due to spring compression effects not being taken into account in our theoretical model. Prototypes are successfully fabricated using deep proton writing and subsequently characterized. The controlled insertion of an SMF in the SCAS is investigated and we determine that a force of 0.11 N is required. The fiber insertion also causes an out-of-plane deformation of the micro-springs in the SCAS of about 7 μ m, which is no

  13. ANALYSIS OF PROPERTY STRUCTURE OF MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC CONSULTATIVE CENTERS IN VARNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubomira Koeva-Dimitrova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The production and financial performance of one company depend on the size of its assets and the aptness of the assets� proportion. The aim of this article is urged to make an external analysis of the asset structure of medical diagnostic and consultative centers (DCC in Varna and on this basis to draw conclusions regarding their property structure. Subject of the study is the annual financial statements, published in the Commercial Register, of all 9 in number DCCs that are registered in Varna. The names of DCC's are encoded with numbers from 1 to 9, with numbers from 1 to 7 are 6 DCCs, owned by the Municipality of Varna, one of them is a subsidiary of staterun hospital, with number 8 and 9 are private DCC's. Subject of the study are the assets and their proportion in the studied hospitals. The study covers 7 years - from year 2008 to year 2014. In the study are calculated and compared the indicators for intensity of the property as well as the relative share of the fixed assets obtained as an average value of the relative shares of all nine in number hospitals for the entire studied period. The following important conclusions have been made: 1 The average relative share of fixed assets of Varna DCCs for the period 2008 � 2014 is 56.85%. 2 The proportion of FA calculated only for municipal DCC's (average value is significantly higher - 72.75% compared to the overall average of 56.85%. 3 Private hospitals invest a lot less money in fixed assets than the municipal ones. 4 Since 2013 there is a slight increase of FA share in the private and the state-run DCC, and a slight decrease in the municipal ones (71.93. 5 The creation of an online database comprising of average indicators of the financial and property status of Bulgarian companies is essential and necessary condition for improving their competitiveness by providing reliable, accurate and usable information for comparison.

  14. Replication of self-centering optical fiber alignment structures using hot embossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebraert, Evert; Wissmann, Markus; Barié, Nicole; Guttmann, Markus; Schneider, Marc; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    With the demand for broadband connectivity on the rise due to various services like video-on-demand and cloud computing becoming more popular, the need for better connectivity infrastructure is high. The only future- proof option to supply this infrastructure is to deploy "fiber to the home" (FTTH) networks. One of the main difficulties with the deployment of FTTH is the vast amount of single-mode fiber (SMF) connections that need to be made. Hence there is a strong need for components which enable high performance, robust and easy-to- use SMF connectors. Since large-scale deployment is the goal, these components should be mass-producible at low cost. We discuss a rapid prototyping process on the basis of hot embossing replication of a self-centering alignment system (SCAS) based on three micro-springs, which can position a SMF independently of its diameter. This is beneficial since there is a fabrication tolerance of up to +/-1 μm on a standard G.652 SMF's diameter that can lead to losses if the outer diameter is used as a reference for alignment. The SCAS is first prototyped with deep proton writing (DPW) in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) after which it is glued to a copper substrate with an adhesive. Using an electroforming process, a nickel block is grown over the PMMA prototype followed by mechanical finishing to fabricate a structured nickel mould insert. Even though the mould insert shows non- ideal and rounded features it is used to create PMMA replicas of the SCAS by means of hot embossing. The SCAS possesses a central opening in which a bare SMF can be clamped, which is designed with a diameter of 121 μm. PMMA replicas are dimensionally characterized using a multisensor coordinate measurement machine and show a central opening diameter of 128.3 +/- 2.8 μm. This should be compared to the central opening diameter of the DPW prototype used for mould formation which was measured to be 120.5 μm. This shows that the electroforming and subsequent replication

  15. Nuclear data services of the Nuclear Data Centers Network available at the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Data Centers Network provides low and medium energy nuclear reaction data to users around the world. Online retrievals are available through the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center, the Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, and the IAEA Nuclear Data Section from these extensive bibliographic, experimental data, and evaluated data files. In addition to nuclear reaction data, the various databases also provide nuclear structure and decay data, and other information of interest to users. The WorldWideWeb sites at the National Nuclear Data Center and the NEA Data Bank provide access to some of the Centers' files. (orig.)

  16. Level structure of 60Ni from the 58Ni(α,2p#betta#) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.U.; Morand, C.; Azgui, F.

    1982-03-01

    The 60 Ni nucleus has been studied via the 58 Ni (α, 2p#betta#) reaction at Esub(α)=32 MeV using in-beam #betta# spectroscopy techniques. High-spin states up to 10 MeV excitation have been established. Among the 5 branches depopulating the Yrast Jsup(π)=7 - state, has been found an E3 transition down to the 4 + state. Comparison with direct reaction results leads to assign very probably the [#betta#fsub(5/2),#betta#gsub(9/2)] 7 - configuration to the Jsup(π)=7 - Yrast state at 5349 keV. Other high-spin states might be accounted for by the breaking of the 56 Ni core

  17. Fe/MCM-41 sylilated catalyst: structural changes determination during the Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengoa, J. F.; Fellenz, N. A.; Cagnoli, M. V.; Cano, L. A.; Gallegos, N. G.; Alvarez, A. M.; Marchetti, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Two Fe/MCM-41 systems, one of them sylilated, were obtained to be used as catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch reaction. They have more than 90% of the iron species located inside the support channels, leading to a narrow crystal size distribution accessible to reactive gases. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, N 2 adsorption, Moessbauer spectroscopy and Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy. Moessbauer spectroscopy allowed us to demonstrate that the catalytic active species were the same in both catalysts. The only difference between them was the surface hydrophobicity, which decreases the 'water gas shift reaction' in the sylilated catalyst. Besides, this solid is more active for hydrocarbon production, with a lower methane yield.

  18. Emergent structures in reaction-advection-diffusion systems on a sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andrew L.; Burton, Abigail M.; Fadai, Nabil T.; Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate unusual effects due to the addition of advection into a two-species reaction-diffusion system on the sphere. We find that advection introduces emergent behavior due to an interplay of the traditional Turing patterning mechanisms with the compact geometry of the sphere. Unidirectional advection within the Turing space of the reaction-diffusion system causes patterns to be generated at one point of the sphere, and transported to the antipodal point where they are destroyed. We illustrate these effects numerically and deduce conditions for Turing instabilities on local projections to understand the mechanisms behind these behaviors. We compare this behavior to planar advection which is shown to only transport patterns across the domain. Analogous transport results seem to hold for the sphere under azimuthal transport or away from the antipodal points in unidirectional flow regimes.

  19. Structure of states in 12Be via the 11Be( d,p) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanungo, R.; Gallant, A. T.; Uchida, M.; Andreoiu, C.; Austin, R. A. E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Ball, G. C.; Becker, J. A.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Brown, B. A.; Buchmann, L.; Colosimo, S. J.; Clark, R. M.; Cline, D.; Cross, D. S.; Dare, H.; Davids, B.; Drake, T. E.; Djongolov, M.; Finlay, P.; Galinski, N.; Garrett, P. E.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Green, K. L.; Grist, S.; Hackman, G.; Harkness, L. J.; Hayes, A. B.; Howell, D.; Hurst, A. M.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Leach, K. G.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Oxley, D.; Pearson, C. J.; Pietras, B.; Phillips, A. A.; Rigby, S. V.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, M. A.; Shotter, A. C.; Sumitharachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Tanihata, I.; Triambak, S.; Unsworth, C.; Williams, S. J.; Walden, P.; Wong, J.; Wu, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The s-wave neutron fraction of the 0 levels in 12Be has been investigated for the first time through the 11Be(d,p) transfer reaction using a 5 A MeV11Be beam at TRIUMF, Canada. The reaction populated all the known bound states of 12Be. The ground state s-wave spectroscopic factor was determined to be 0.28-0.07+0.03 while that for the long-lived 02+ excited state was 0.73-0.40+0.27. This observation, together with the smaller effective separation energy indicates enhanced probability for an extended density tail beyond the 10Be core for the 02+ excited state compared to the ground state.

  20. Contribution to the structure study of mercury isotopes with the (p,d) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grafeuille, S.

    1985-10-01

    The mercury isotopes were studied by means of the two pick-up reactions (p,d) and (p,t). Enriched targets of 204 Hg, 202 Hg, 201 Hg, 200 Hg, 199 Hg, 198 Hg and 196 Hg were bombarded by a 25 MeV proton beam from the Orsay MP tandem accelerator. Emitted particles were analyzed by a split-pole magnetic spectrometer. We present all the results (nearly 150 states) of the analysis of the (p,d) reactions. Our (p,d) and (p,t) study show new discontinuities around 200 Hg in systematics of mercury isotopes. Part of the results are compared to the U(5) limits of Interacting Bosons (and Fermions) Models. The light nuclei can be considered reasonably described but this could be somewhat fortuitous. (71 refs) [fr

  1. Polarization phenomena in knock-out reactions and the structure of the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolybasov, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    Basic picture is given for polarization phenomena in quasi-free processes. It can be used as simple and universal starting point for polarization investigations. The generalization of Treiman-Yang test serves for the identification of the reaction mechanism. The expressions for above-mentioned characteristics show the way to obtain new information on D-wave deuteron function and thereby to refine tensor terms of N N-potential [ru

  2. Structure of 78Ge from the 76Ge(t,p)78Ge reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardouin, D.; Lebrun, C.; Guilbault, F.; Remaud, B.; Vergnes, M.N.; Rotbard, G.; Kumar, K.

    1978-01-01

    The 76 Ge(t,p) 78 Ge reaction has been performed at a bombarding energy of 17 MeV. Thirteen excited states below 3 MeV excitation are reported with Jsup(π) values obtained by comparison to DWBA analysis. A comparison to a dynamical deformation theory is made and the results suggest 78 Ge is a transitional nucleus nearing spherical shape due to the proximity of the N-50 closed shell

  3. Reaction of hydrazine hydrate with oxalic acid: synthesis and crystal structure of dihydrazinium oxalate

    OpenAIRE

    Selvakumar, Rajendran; Premkumar, Thathan; Manivannan, Vadivelu; Saravanan, Kaliannan; Govindarajan, Subbiah

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of oxalic acid with hydrazine hydrate (in appropriate mole ratio) forms the dihydrazinium oxalate under specific experimental condition. The title compound is a molecular salt containing two discrete hydrazinium cations and an oxalate anion. The oxalate anion is perfectly planar and there is a crystallographic centre of symmetry in the middle of the C-C bond. The C-O bond distances are almost equal indicating the presence of resonance in the oxalate ion. The crystal packing is st...

  4. Event structures of neutrino-induced reactions in the scintillation detector KARMEN-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupp, F.

    1986-01-01

    For the simulation of neutrino-induced reactions in the scintillation detector KARMEN-1 a Monte Carlo program was developed. This program allows the simulation of the detection reactions of the neutrino reactions possible at the spallation neutron source ISIS at the Rutherford Appleton Lab., as well as the detection of neutrino oscillations ν μ → ν e respectively anti ν μ → anti ν e and the inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering. By means of test measurements on prototype detectors the specific parameters for the simulation were determined. From the calculations the detection probabilities of the reactions could be determined. Thereby realistic cuts on the data were regarded which are necessary to the background reduction. From the many single results the good energy resolution for 15-eV gammas from the decay of the 12 C nucleus excited in an inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering should be mentioned. Regarding the passive material necessary for the construction of the detector results averaged over the whole detector an energy resolution of 15.0%. For the examination of the assumptions which enter the Monte Carlo simulation as well for the fitting of the parameters to realistic conditions in the KARMEN experiment measurements on the test module were performed. These measurements confirmed the space-dependent light-yield function used in the calculations. Simultaneously on the test module the energy resolition could be determined: σ = 12.3%/√E(Mev) for the sum of the signals from both module ends. A similar resolution is also to be expected for the modules of the large detector because they differ only in details from the test module. (orig.) [de

  5. Further evidence for jet structure in large transverse momentum reactions from rapidity correlations and associated multiplicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, J.; Ranft, G.

    1976-10-01

    Using the hard collision model and a simple parametrisation for jet fragmentation expressions for same side and opposite side two-particle correlations and multiplicities associated with large transverse momentum trigger particles are derived. Recent data on rapidity correlations and associated multiplicities can be well understood in such a model. This result is interpreted as further evidence for the presence of jets in large transverse momentum reactions. (author)

  6. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic reaction studies, because of their capability to microscopically probe nuclear structure, are still of considerable interest in heavy-ion reactions. The recent progress in understanding various aspects of the reaction mechanism make this aim appear closer. The relation between microscopic and macroscopic behavior, as suggested, for example, by the single proton transfer data to individual final states or averaged excitation energy intervals, needs to be explored. It seems particularly useful to extend measurements to higher incident energies, to explore and understand nuclear structure aspects up to the limit of the energy range where they are important

  7. Service line structure and decision-maker attention in three health systems: Implications for patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Christopher J; Clark, Jonathan R; Gray, Barbara; Brannon, Diane; Parker, Victoria

    2017-06-15

    Scholars have noted a disconnect between the level at which structure is typically examined (the organization) and the level at which the relevant coordination takes place (service delivery). Accordingly, our understanding of the role structure plays in care coordination is limited. In this article, we explore service line structure, with an aim of advancing our understanding of the role service line structure plays in producing coordinated, patient-centered care. We do so by giving special attention to the cognitive roots of patient-centeredness. Our exploratory study relied on comparative case studies of the breast cancer service lines in three health systems. Nonprobability discriminative snowball sampling was used to identify the final sample of key informants. We employed a grounded approach to analyzing and interpreting the data. We found substantial variation across the three service lines in terms of their structure. We also found corresponding variation across the three case sites in terms of where informant attention was primarily focused in the process of coordinating care. Drawing on the attention-based view of the firm, our results draw a clear connection between structural characteristics and the dominant focus of attention (operational tactics, provider roles and relationships, or patient needs and engagement) in health care service lines. Our exploratory results suggest that service line structures influence attention in two ways: (a) by regulating the type and intensity of the problems facing service line participants and (b) by encouraging (or discouraging) a shared purpose around patient needs. Patient-centered attention-a precursor to coordinated, patient-centered care-depends on the internal choices organizations make around service line structure. Moreover, a key task for organizational and service line leaders is to structure service lines to create a context that minimizes distractions and enables care providers to focus their attention on

  8. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalavi, Sima; Simmons, Andrew; Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Barker, Gareth J; Reinders, AAT Simone

    2012-01-01

    Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in multi-center studies, we present data from a study in which we aimed to optimize a set of volumetric MRI-protocols to define a protocol giving data that are consistent and reproducible across two centers and over time. Optimization was achieved based on data quality and quantitative measures, in our case using FreeSurfer and Voxel Based Morphometry approaches. Our approach consisted of a series of five comparisons. Firstly, a single-center dataset was collected, using a range of candidate pulse-sequences and parameters chosen on the basis of previous literature. Based on initial results, a number of minor changes were implemented to optimize the pulse-sequences, and a second single-center dataset was collected. FreeSurfer data quality measures were compared between datasets in order to determine the best performing sequence(s), which were taken forward to the next stage of testing. We subsequently acquired short-term and long-term two-center reproducibility data, and quantitative measures were again assessed to determine the protocol with the highest reproducibility across centers. Effects of a scanner software and hardware upgrade on the reproducibility of the protocols at one of the centers were also evaluated. Assessing the quality measures from the first two datasets allowed us to define artefact-free protocols, all with high image quality as assessed by FreeSurfer. Comparing the quantitative test and retest measures, we found high within-center reproducibility for all protocols, but lower

  9. Catecholase activity of dicopper(II)-bispidine complexes: stabilities and structures of intermediates, kinetics and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Karin; Comba, Peter; Daubinet, André; Fuchs, Alexander; Wadepohl, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism for the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (dtbc) with dioxygen to the corresponding quinone (dtbq), catalyzed by bispidine-dicopper complexes (bispidines are various mono- and dinucleating derivatives of 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane with bis-tertiary-amine-bispyridyl or bis-tertiary-amine-trispyridyl donor sets), is proposed on the basis of (1) the stoichiometry of the reaction as well as the stabilities and structures [X-ray, density functional theory (B3LYP, TZV)] of the bispidine-dicopper(II)-3,4,5,6-tetrachlorcatechol intermediates, (2) formation kinetics and structures (molecular mechanics, MOMEC) of the end-on peroxo-dicopper(II) complexes and (3) kinetics of the stoichiometric (anaerobic) and catalytic (aerobic) copper-complex-assisted oxidation of dtbc. This involves (1) the oxidation of the dicopper(I) complexes with dioxygen to the corresponding end-on peroxo-dicopper(II) complexes, (2) coordination of dtbc as a bridging ligand upon liberation of H(2)O(2) and (3) intramolecular electron transfer to produce dtbq, which is liberated, and the dicopper(I) catalyst. Although the bispidine complexes have reactivities comparable to those of recently published catalysts with macrocyclic ligands, which seem to reproduce the enzyme-catalyzed process in various reaction sequences, a strikingly different oxidation mechanism is derived from the bispidine-dicopper-catalyzed reaction.

  10. Study of structures associated with the large angle production of π+-, K+-, P and antiP with high transverse momentum in proton-proton reactions at the CERN collision rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeneuve de Janti, Philippe.

    1980-10-01

    Data are analyzed from ISR-410/413 at 53 GeV energy in the center of mass. An attempt is made to find out wether correlations are present in the events and especially wether a jet structure can be associated with the production of triggering particle. A cluster particle structure is then investigated in the azimuthal hemisphere opposite the trigger by an original event-by-event analysis method. Certain properties of high longitudinal momentum particle systems (so-called 'spectator systems') are examined. Whenever possible the results obtained are compared with: a) predictions of hard collision models of components, b) effects already observed in low Psub(T) reactions, c) results of a Monte Carlo simulation of inelastic pp reactions containing no explicit dynamic mechanism and used to estimate the contribution of purely kinematic stresses of the effects observed [fr

  11. Structure of Hordeum vulgare NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase 2. Unwinding the reaction mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine Groth; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine

    2009-01-01

    to the active form. Here, the first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, HvNTR2 from Hordeum vulgare (barley), is presented, which is also the first structure of a monocot plant NTR. The structure was determined at 2.6 A resolution and refined to an R (cryst) of 19.0% and an R (free) of 23.8%. The dimeric protein...

  12. Predicting behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia with pattern classification in multi-center structural MRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meyer

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that MRI, a widespread imaging technology, can individually identify bvFTD with high accuracy in multi-center imaging data, paving the road to personalized diagnostic approaches in the future.

  13. The Effects of Information Technology on Library and Documentation Centers: A Review of Social, Structural, Managerial and Functional Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Kurulgan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the context of protecting academic and cultural heritage, the purpose of libraries and information and documentation centers is to research, document, and archive and to transfer to future generations, domestically and internationally, a society ’s culture. This study examines the structural, functional and administrative innovations that have resulted from the implementation of information technology (IT in libraries since the 1990 ’s. The study also mentions how IT can be used in an efficient way in libraries and information and documentation centers.

  14. Underground structure pattern and multi AO reaction with step feed concept for upgrading an large wastewater treatment plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi; Zhang, Jie; Li, Dong

    2018-03-01

    A large wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) could not meet the new demand of urban environment and the need of reclaimed water in China, using a US treatment technology. Thus a multi AO reaction process (Anaerobic/oxic/anoxic/oxic/anoxic/oxic) WWTP with underground structure was proposed to carry out the upgrade project. Four main new technologies were applied: (1) multi AO reaction with step feed technology; (2) deodorization; (3) new energy-saving technology such as water resource heat pump and optical fiber lighting system; (4) dependable old WWTP’s water quality support measurement during new WWTP’s construction. After construction, upgrading WWTP had saved two thirds land occupation, increased 80% treatment capacity and improved effluent standard by more than two times. Moreover, it had become a benchmark of an ecological negative capital changing to a positive capital.

  15. Calculations of Excitation Functions of Some Structural Fusion Materials for ( n, t) Reactions up to 50 MeV Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel, E.; Durgu, C.; Aktı, N. N.; Okuducu, Ş.

    2010-06-01

    Fusion serves an inexhaustible energy for humankind. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, the working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross sections is of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n, t) reactions for some structural fusion materials such as 27Al, 51V, 52Cr, 55Mn, and 56Fe have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27Al( n, t)25Mg, 51V( n, t)49Ti, 52Cr( n, t)50V, 55Mn( n, t)53Cr and 56Fe( n, t)54Mn reactions have been carried out up to 50 MeV incident neutron energy. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the new evaluated the geometry dependent hybrid model, hybrid model and the cascade exciton model. Equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, we have calculated ( n, t) reaction cross-sections by using new evaluated semi-empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  16. Diels-Alder reactions in confined spaces: the influence of catalyst structure and the nature of active sites for the retro-Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantín, Ángel; Gomez, M Victoria; de la Hoz, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition between cyclopentadiene and p -benzoquinone has been studied in the confined space of a pure silica zeolite Beta and the impact on reaction rate due to the concentration effect within the pore and diffusion limitations are discussed. Introduction of Lewis or Brønsted acid sites on the walls of the zeolite strongly increases the reaction rate. However, contrary to what occurs with mesoporous molecular sieves (MCM-41), Beta zeolite does not catalyse the retro-Diels-Alder reaction, resulting in a highly selective catalyst for the cycloaddition reaction.

  17. Insights into the carboxyltransferase reaction of pyruvate carboxylase from the structures of bound product and intermediate analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzan, Adam D.; St. Maurice, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the MgATP- and bicarbonate-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in central metabolism. The carboxyltransferase (CT) domain of PC catalyzes the transfer of a carboxyl group from carboxybiotin to the accepting substrate, pyruvate. It has been hypothesized that the reactive enolpyruvate intermediate is stabilized through a bidentate interaction with the metal ion in the CT domain active site. Whereas bidentate ligands are commonly observed in enzymes catalyzing reactions proceeding through an enolpyruvate intermediate, no bidentate interaction has yet been observed in the CT domain of PC. Here, we report three X-ray crystal structures of the Rhizobium etli PC CT domain with the bound inhibitors oxalate, 3-hydroxypyruvate, and 3-bromopyruvate. Oxalate, a stereoelectronic mimic of the enolpyruvate intermediate, does not interact directly with the metal ion. Instead, oxalate is buried in a pocket formed by several positively charged amino acid residues and the metal ion. Furthermore, both 3-hydroxypyruvate and 3-bromopyruvate, analogs of the reaction product oxaloacetate, bind in an identical manner to oxalate suggesting that the substrate maintains its orientation in the active site throughout catalysis. Together, these structures indicate that the substrates, products and intermediates in the PC-catalyzed reaction are not oriented in the active site as previously assumed. The absence of a bidentate interaction with the active site metal appears to be a unique mechanistic feature among the small group of biotin-dependent enzymes that act on α-keto acid substrates. PMID:24157795

  18. Structure of the excited states of {sup 11}Be reached through the reaction d({sup 10}Be,p){sup 11}Be; Structure des etats du {sup 11}Be excites par la reaction d({sup 10}Be,p){sup 11}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaunay, F

    2003-10-01

    The one-neutron transfer reaction d({sup 10}Be,p){sup 11}Be has been studied at 32 A.MeV at GANIL with a {sup 10}Be secondary beam. Protons were detected by the silicon strip array MUST. The ground state and excited states of {sup 11}Be at 0.32, 1.78 and 3.41 MeV were populated, demonstrating the feasibility of transfer reactions induced by radioactive beams leading to bound and unbound states. A DWBA (distorted wave born approximation) analysis indicates for the 3.41 MeV state spin and parity 3/2{sup +} or 5/2{sup +} and a spectroscopic factor of 0.18 or 0.11, respectively. A broad structure centered at 10 MeV is also observed and corresponds to transfer to the 1d sub-shells. If one assumes that only the 1d3/2 orbital contributes to this structure, the splitting of the 1d neutron states in {sup 11}Be is estimated to be 6.3 MeV. Using a 2-particle-RPA (random phase approximation) model, we have shown that neutron-neutron correlations play an important role in the inversion between the 2s1/2 and 1p1/2 neutron states in {sup 11}Be. (author)

  19. Vibronic coupling in ionized organic molecules. Structural distortions and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, F.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Ionized organic molecules (radical cations, RC) are prone to undergo vibronic coupling whenever there is a relatively small energy gap ( 2v point group of the neutral parent molecule by twisting at the olefinic π bond to the lower C 2 symmetry in the RC (Chem. Eur. J. 2002, 8, 1074). These experiments clearly revealed a double minimum in the potential energy surface along the a 2 torsional mode. This is in accord with the coupling of the 2 B 1 and 2 B 2 Born-Oppenheimer states in C 2v symmetry, this mixing of the 2 B 1 π-ionized ground state and the 2 B 2 δ-ionized excited state being facilitated by the low (∼ 1.0 eV) gap between these states, as estimated from photoelectron spectroscopy. Turning to the second class of RC where unimolecular rearrangement reactions are promoted by vibronic interaction, several cases have emerged where the rearrangement would not be expected if it were based only on the ground-state properties of the RC. It was found (Chem. Phy. Lett. 1988, 143, 521) that the ethylene oxide RC undergoes C-C ring opening to the oxallyl species despite the fact that the ground state corresponds to ionization from the nonbonding oxygen π lone-pair orbital. The reaction develops excited-state character as a result of the vibronic mixing so that the activation barrier to ring opening is lowered. We will discuss the unusual rearrangements of the bicyclo[1.1.1.]pentane and [1.1.1]propellane RC from a similar perspective, emphasis being placed on the decisive role of symmetry in predicting the course of these rearrangements. We illustrate how this approach can reconcile conflicting considerations on some of the 'unexpected' reaction pathways followed by highly strained organic RC

  20. Structure of 26Al studied by one - nucleon transfer reaction 27Al(d,t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The excited states of 26Al have been produced and studied using 27Al(d,t reaction with 25 MeV deuteron as projectile. Optical model potential parameters were extracted from the measured elastic scattering angular distribution. Zero range distorted wave Born approximation analysis for the ground and 0.223 MeV states of 26Al have been done. The spectroscopic factors calculated for these states are found to be in good agreement with the previously reported values.

  1. Electron spin interactions in chemistry and biology fundamentals, methods, reactions mechanisms, magnetic phenomena, structure investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Likhtenshtein, Gertz

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the versatile and pivotal role of electron spin interactions in nature. It provides the background, methodologies and tools for basic areas related to spin interactions, such as spin chemistry and biology, electron transfer, light energy conversion, photochemistry, radical reactions, magneto-chemistry and magneto-biology. The book also includes an overview of designing advanced magnetic materials, optical and spintronic devices and photo catalysts. This monograph appeals to scientists and graduate students working in the areas related to spin interactions physics, biophysics, chemistry and chemical engineering.

  2. Reactions and single-particle structure of nuclei near the drip lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.G.; Sherrill, B.M.

    2001-01-01

    The techniques that have allowed the study of reactions of nuclei situated at or near the neutron or proton drip line are described. Nuclei situated just inside the drip line have low nucleon separation energies and, at most, a few bound states. If the angular momentum in addition is small, large halo states are formed where the wave function of the valency nucleon extends far beyond the nuclear radius. We begin with examples of the properties of nuclear halos and of their study in radioactive-beam experiments. We then turn to the continuum states existing above the particle threshold and also discuss the possibility of exciting them from the halo states in processes that may be thought of as 'collateral damage'. Finally, we show that the experience from studies of halo states has pointed to knockout reactions as a new way to perform spectroscopic studies of more deeply bound non-halo states. Examples are given of measurements of l values and spectroscopic factors

  3. Role of Electronic Structure In Ion Band State Theory of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott

    2004-03-01

    The Nuts and Bolts of our Ion Band State (IBS) theory of low energy nuclear reactions (LENR's) in palladium-deuteride (PdD) and palladium-hydride (PdH) are the electrons that hold together or tear apart the bonds (or lack of bonds) between deuterons (d's) or protons (p's) and the host material. In PdDx and PdH_x, this bonding is strongly correlated with loading: in ambient loading conditions (x< 0. 6), the bonding in hibits IBS occupation. As x arrow 1, slight increases and decreases in loading can lead to vibrations (which have conventionally been thought to occur from phonons) that can induce potential losses or increases of p/d. Naive assumptions about phonons fail to include these losses and increases. These effects can occur because neither H or D has core electrons and because in either PdD or PdH, the electrons near the Fermi Energy have negligible overlap with the nucleus of either D or H. I use these ideas to develop a formal justification, based on a generalization of conventional band theory (Scott Chubb, "Semi-Classical Conduction of Charged and Neutral Particles in Finite Lattices," 2004 March Meeting."), for the idea that occupation of IBS's can occur and that this can lead to nuclear reactions.

  4. Structural characterization and optical properties of Eu"2"+ and Dy"2"+ doped Sr_2SiO_4 phosphor by solid state reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Durga; Verma, Mohan L.; Upma; Patel, R.P.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoluminescence, SEM, FTIR Divalent dysprosium and europium doped strontium silicate (Sr_2SiO_4) phosphors were synthesized with the high-temperature solid-state reaction technique. The obtained phosphor was well characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopy and thermoluminescence. The crystal structure of the prepared phosphor has an orthorhombic structure with space group Pnma. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM), agglomerations of particles were observed due to the high temperature synthesis process. The chemical composition of the sintered Sr_2SiO_4:Dy"2"+ and Sr_2SiO_4: Eu"2"+ phosphor was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The UV-VIS analysis can be thought as a good quality check for the optical behavior of materials. The Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirms the present elements in phosphor. Thermoluminescence study was carried out for the phosphor with UV irradiation show one glow peak. The trapping parameters associated with the prominent glow peak of Sr_2SiO_4:Dy"2"+ and Sr_2SiO_4:Eu"2"+ are calculated using Chen's glow curve method. The release of holes/electrons from defect centers at the characteristic trap site initiates the luminescence process in this material. (author)

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of solid-phase reactions of formation of yttrium ferrite with garnet structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashchenko, V P; Yakushevskaya, F T; Chalyi, V P

    1977-04-01

    The perovskite phase is formed in the process of ferrogarnet formation both from the mixture of Y and Fe oxides and from mutually precipitated carbonates. The amount of the perovskite phase decreases with increasing duration of annealing. The process of the ferritoformation in the investigated systems can be presented as isovalent cationic substitution on the basis of the crystalline structure of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with the formation of the perovskite structure. When the Fe concentration in orthoferrite increases, the phase with a garnet structure is formed.

  6. Orion Crew Module / Service Module Structural Weight and Center of Gravity Simulator and Vehicle Motion Simulator Hoist Structure for Orion Service Module Umbilical Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Peter A.; Haddock, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    An Orion Crew Module Service Module Structural Weight and Center of Gravity Simulator and a Vehicle Motion Simulator Hoist Structure for Orion Service Module Umbilical Testing were designed during a summer 2014 internship in Kennedy Space Centers Structures and Mechanisms Design Branch. The simulator is a structure that supports ballast, which will be integrated into an existing Orion mock-up to simulate the mass properties of the Exploration Mission-1 flight vehicle in both fueled and unfueled states. The simulator mimics these configurations through the use of approximately 40,000 lbf of steel and water ballast, and a steel support structure. Draining four water tanks, which house the water ballast, transitions the simulator from the fueled to unfueled mass properties. The Ground Systems Development and Operations organization will utilize the simulator to verify and validate equipment used to maneuver and transport the Orion spacecraft in its fueled and unfueled configurations. The second design comprises a cantilevered tripod hoist structure that provides the capability to position a large Orion Service Module Umbilical in proximity to the Vehicle Motion Simulator. The Ground Systems Development and Operations organization will utilize the Vehicle Motion Simulator, with the hoist structure attached, to test the Orion Service Module Umbilical for proper operation prior to installation on the Mobile Launcher. Overall, these two designs provide NASA engineers viable concepts worthy of fabricating and placing into service to prepare for the launch of Orion in 2017.

  7. Micro structured reactors for synthesis/decomposition of hazardous chemicals. Challenging prospects for micro structured reaction architectures (4)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebrov, E.V.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    A review. This paper completes a series of four publications dealing with the different aspects of the applications of micro reactor technol. This article focuses on the application of micro structured reactors in the processes for synthesis/decompn. of hazardous chems., such as unsym.

  8. Structure of the neutron-rich lithium isotopes in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalova, O.V.; Galakhmatova, B.S.; Romanovskij, E.A.; Shitikova, K.V.; Burov, V.V.; Rzyanin, M.V.; Miller, H.G.; Yen, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    The structure properties, for factors, angular distributions and interaction cross sections of Li neutron-rich isotopes have been analyzed in the unified way. A good qualitative agreement with the experiment data was obtained. 20 refs.; 11 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Structural and electrochemical study of the reaction of lithium with silicon nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Candace K.; Ruffo, Riccardo; Hong, Seung Sae; Huggins, Robert A.; Cui, Yi

    2009-01-01

    The structural transformations of silicon nanowires when cycled against lithium were evaluated using electrochemical potential spectroscopy and galvanostatic cycling. During the charge, the nanowires alloy with lithium to form an amorphous Lix

  10. The photon structure function and hard scattering in two-photon reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolanoski, H.

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes experimental results obtained by the CELLO, JADE, PLUTO and TASSO collaborations on the following topics: the structure function of the photon; hard scattering and jet production and exclusive hadron pair production. (orig.)

  11. Modeling the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. VII. Full simulation of the intervalence hole-transfer absorption spectrum of the special-pair radical cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Hush, Noel S.

    2003-01-01

    reaction centers from photosystems I, II, etc., facilitating a deeper understanding of the role of the special pair in initiating primary charge separation during photosynthesis

  12. Seeded Reaction Waves in Composites: Fast Structure Transforming Materials that Respond to Energetic Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    change in the structure of the capsule system . The temperatures at which the capsules undergo transformation are in accordance with the results in DSC...Structure- Transforming Materials that Respond to Energetic Stimuli Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00014-13-1-0170 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd...encapsulated super- cooled fluids into a polymer matrix allows for rapid changes in mechanical properties. Frontal polymerization within a microvascular

  13. Merging first principle structure studies and few-body reaction formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, R.; Cravo, E.; Arriaga, A.; Wiringa, R.; Deltuva, A.; Diego, R.

    2018-02-01

    Calculations for nucleon knockout from a 7Li beam due to the collision with a proton target at 400 MeV/u are shown based on ab initio Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) and conventional shell-model nuclear structure approaches to describe the relative motion between the knockout particle and the heavy fragment of the projectile. Structure effects on the total cross section are shown.

  14. Investigation of safety margin for turbine generator foundation affected by Alkali Silica reaction based on non-linear structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, H.; Asai, Y.; Hosokawa, T.; Sekimoto, H.; Sato, K.; Oshima, R.; Takiguchi, K.; Masuda, Y.; Nishiguchi, I.

    2005-01-01

    A turbine generator foundation is a reinforced concrete structure having a table deck and columns to support equipments. After operation of the plant, the expansion of the table deck in turbine longitudinal axis has been observed. By investigation of concrete material properties, it was found that the expansion has been caused by alkali-silica reaction. This study has been performed to evaluate the safety allowance of strength capacity of the turbine generator foundation by nonlinear analysis using beam element model with elongation, rebar strain and material properties data which have been measured for almost 30 years in actual foundation. (authors)

  15. A cell for extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of oxygen sensitive products of redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furenlid, L.R.; Renner, M.W.; Fajer, J.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a cell suitable for extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of oxygen and/or water sensitive products of redox reactions. The cell utilizes aluminized Mylar windows that are transparent to x rays, provide low gas permeability, and allow vacuum to be maintained in the cell. The windows are attached to the glassware with an epoxy that resists attack by common organic solvents. Additional side arms allow multiple spectroscopic probes of the same sample under anaerobic and anhydrous conditions

  16. Synthesis, Crystal Structures and Properties of Ferrocenyl Bis-Amide Derivatives Yielded via the Ugi Four-Component Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei; Shao, Guang-Kui; Huang, Dan-Dan; Lv, Xue-Xin; Guo, Dian-Shun

    2017-05-04

    Ten ferrocenyl bis-amide derivatives were successfully synthesized via the Ugi four-component reaction by treating ferrocenecarboxylic acid with diverse aldehydes, amines, and isocyanides in methanol solution. Their chemical structures were fully characterized by IR, NMR, HR-MS, and X-ray diffraction analyses. They feature unique molecular morphologies and create a 14-membered ring motif in the centro-symmetric dimers generated in the solid state. Moreover, the electrochemical behavior of these ferrocenyl bis-amides was assessed by cyclic voltammetry.

  17. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicinethrough Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mungall, Chris J.; Misra,Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute,Christopher G.; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2006-01-23

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (http://bioontology.org) is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists funded by the NIH Roadmap to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are: (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so that scientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data, (3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation, integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated tools and theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and (4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify, evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to the biomedical community. The Center is working toward these objectives by providing tools to develop ontologies and to annotate experimental data, and by developing resources to integrate and relate existing ontologies as well as by creating repositories of biomedical data that are annotated using those ontologies. The Center is providing training workshops in ontology design, development, and usage, and is also pursuing research in ontology evaluation, quality, and use of ontologies to promote scientific discovery. Through the research activities within the Center, collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedical community, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in the e-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution, data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing, and understand human disease.

  18. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Goulding, Celia W., E-mail: celia.goulding@uci.edu [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); UC Irvine, 2302 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  19. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  20. Organizational structure and operation of defense/aerospace information centers in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, H. E.; Lushina, L. N.

    1983-01-01

    U.S. Government aerospace and defense information centers are addressed. DTIC and NASA are described in terms of their history, operational authority, information services provided, user community, sources of information collected, efforts under way to improve services, and external agreements regarding the exchange of documents and/or data bases. Contents show how DTIC and NASA provide aerospace/defense information services in support of U.S. research and development efforts. In a general introduction, the importance of scientific and technical information and the need for information centers to acquire, handle, and disseminate it are stressed.

  1. Manipulating the Energetics and Rates of Electron Transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus Reaction Centers with Asymmetric Pigment Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faries, Kaitlyn M. [Department; Dylla, Nicholas P. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Hanson, Deborah K. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Holten, Dewey [Department; Laible, Philip D. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Kirmaier, Christine [Department

    2017-07-17

    Seemingly redundant parallel pathways for electron transfer (ET), composed of identical sets of cofactors, are a cornerstone feature of photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) involved in light-energy conversion. In native bacterial RCs, both A and B branches house one bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and one bacteriopheophytin (BPh), but the A branch is used exclusively. Described herein are the results-obtained for two Rhodobacter capsulatus RCs with an unnaturally high degree of cofactor asymmetry, two BPh on the RC's B side and two BChl on the A side. These pigment changes derive, respectively, from the His(M180)Leu mutation [a BPh ((Phi(B)) replaces the B-side BChl (BB)], and the Leu(M212)His mutation [a BChl (beta(A))) replaces the A-side BPh (H-A)]. Additionally, Tyr(M208)Phe was employed to disfavor ET to the A branch; in one mutant, Val(M131)Glu creates a hydrogen bond to H-B to enhance ET to H-B. In both Phi(B) mutants, the decay kinetics of the excited primary ET donor (P*) resolve three populations with lifetimes of similar to 9 ps (50-60%), similar to 40 ps (10-20%), and similar to 200 ps (20-30%), with P+Phi(-)(B) formed predominantly from the 9 ps fraction. The 50-60% yield of P+Phi(B)- is the highest yet observed for a Phi(B)-containing RC. The results provide insight into factors needed for efficient multistep ET.

  2. Nuclear structure effects on heavy-ion reactions with microscopic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vo-Phuoc K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-consistent mean-field Hartree–Fock (HF theory, both static and time-dependent (TDHF versions, is used to study static and dynamic properties of fusion reactions between even 40–54Ca isotopes and 116Sn. The bare nucleus-nucleus potential, calculated with the frozen HF approach, is affected by the groundstate density of the nuclei. However, once dynamical effects are included, as in TDHF, the static effects on the barrier are essentially washed out. Dynamic properties of the nuclei, including low-lying vibrational modes, are calculated with TDHF and selectively used in coupled-channels calculations to identify which modes have the most effect on the TDHF fusion threshold. Vibrations cannot fully explain the difference between the static HF and TDHF fusion barriers trend so other dynamical effects such as transfer are considered.

  3. Morphologic and structural characterization of the CoFe2O4 synthesized by combustion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.S.; Sousa, J.-P.L.M.L.; Vieira, D.A.; Lira, H.L.; Costa, A.C.F.M.; Sasaki, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    CoFe 2 O 4 powders were synthesized by combustion reaction using glycine as fuel, aiming obtaining nanosized and monophase powders. Thus, different conditions of external heating during the synthesis were investigated. The powders were prepared according to the propellants and explosives theory, using glycine as fuel in the stoichiometric proportion (Φe = 1). During the synthesis the flame temperature and time were measured. The resulting powders were characterized by X-rays diffraction and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that the condition in which the synthesis was realized it influences in the combustion flame temperature and time and contributes for the obtainment of powders with majority phase without secondary phases. Crystallite size varied of 33 to 50 nm. All powders presented morphology constituted by soft agglomerated formed by nanoparticles. (author). (author)

  4. Alcohol-to-acid ratio and substrate concentration affect product structure in chain elongation reactions initiated by unacclimatized inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhao; Lü, Fan; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether the ratio of ethanol to acetate affects yield and product structure in chain elongation initiated by unacclimatized mixed cultures. The effect of varying the substrate concentration, while maintaining the same ratio of alcohol to acid, was also investigated. With a high substrate concentration, an alcohol to acid ratio >2:1 provided sufficient electron donor capacity for the chain elongation reaction. With an ethanol to acetate ratio of 3:1 (300mM total carbon), the highest n-caproate concentration (3033±98mg/L) was achieved during the stable phase of the reaction. A lower substrate concentration (150mM total carbon) gave a lower yield of products and led to reduced carbon transformation efficiency compared with other reaction conditions. The use of unacclimatized inoculum in chain elongation can produce significant amounts of odd-carbon-number carboxylates as a result of protein hydrolysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Calculation of Transactinide Homolog Isotope Production Reactions Possible with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, K.J.; Shaughnessy, D.A.; Gostic, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The LLNL heavy element group has been investigating the chemical properties of the heaviest elements over the past several years. The properties of the transactinides (elements with Z > 103) are often unknown due to their low production rates and short half-lives, which require lengthy cyclotron irradiations in order to make enough atoms for statistically significant evaluations of their chemistry. In addition, automated chemical methods are often required to perform consistent and rapid chemical separations on the order of minutes for the duration of the experiment, which can last from weeks to months. Separation methods can include extraction chromatography, liquid-liquid extraction, or gas-phase chromatography. Before a lengthy transactinide experiment can be performed at an accelerator, a large amount of preparatory work must be done both to ensure the successful application of the chosen chemical system to the transactinide chemistry problem being addressed, and to evaluate the behavior of the lighter elemental homologs in the same chemical system. Since transactinide chemistry is literally performed on one single atom, its chemical properties cannot be determined from bulk chemical matrices, but instead must be inferred from the behavior of the lighter elements that occur in its chemical group and in those of its neighboring elements. By first studying the lighter group homologs in a particular chemical system, when the same system is applied to the transactinide element under investigation, its decay properties can be directly compared to those of the homologues, thereby allowing an inference of its own chemistry. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes a 1 MV Tandem accelerator, capable of accelerating light ions such as protons to energies of roughly 15 MeV. By using the CAMS beamline, tracers of transactinide homolog elements can be produced both for development of chemical systems and

  6. Calculation of Transactinide Homolog Isotope Production Reactions Possible with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, K J; Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M

    2011-11-29

    The LLNL heavy element group has been investigating the chemical properties of the heaviest elements over the past several years. The properties of the transactinides (elements with Z > 103) are often unknown due to their low production rates and short half-lives, which require lengthy cyclotron irradiations in order to make enough atoms for statistically significant evaluations of their chemistry. In addition, automated chemical methods are often required to perform consistent and rapid chemical separations on the order of minutes for the duration of the experiment, which can last from weeks to months. Separation methods can include extraction chromatography, liquid-liquid extraction, or gas-phase chromatography. Before a lengthy transactinide experiment can be performed at an accelerator, a large amount of preparatory work must be done both to ensure the successful application of the chosen chemical system to the transactinide chemistry problem being addressed, and to evaluate the behavior of the lighter elemental homologs in the same chemical system. Since transactinide chemistry is literally performed on one single atom, its chemical properties cannot be determined from bulk chemical matrices, but instead must be inferred from the behavior of the lighter elements that occur in its chemical group and in those of its neighboring elements. By first studying the lighter group homologs in a particular chemical system, when the same system is applied to the transactinide element under investigation, its decay properties can be directly compared to those of the homologues, thereby allowing an inference of its own chemistry. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes a 1 MV Tandem accelerator, capable of accelerating light ions such as protons to energies of roughly 15 MeV. By using the CAMS beamline, tracers of transactinide homolog elements can be produced both for development of chemical systems and

  7. Structure of choline oxidase in complex with the reaction product glycine betaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Francesca; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Weber, Irene T; Gadda, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Choline oxidase from Arthrobacter globiformis, which is involved in the biosynthesis of glycine betaine from choline, has been extensively characterized in its mechanistic and structural properties. Despite the knowledge gained on the enzyme, the details of substrate access to the active site are not fully understood. The `loop-and-lid' mechanism described for the glucose-methanol-choline enzyme superfamily has not been confirmed for choline oxidase. Instead, a hydrophobic cluster on the solvent-accessible surface of the enzyme has been proposed by molecular dynamics to control substrate access to the active site. Here, the crystal structure of the enzyme was solved in complex with glycine betaine at pH 6.0 at 1.95 Å resolution, allowing a structural description of the ligand-enzyme interactions in the active site. This structure is the first of choline oxidase in complex with a physiologically relevant ligand. The protein structures with and without ligand are virtually identical, with the exception of a loop at the dimer interface, which assumes two distinct conformations. The different conformations of loop 250-255 define different accessibilities of the proposed active-site entrance delimited by the hydrophobic cluster on the other subunit of the dimer, suggesting a role in regulating substrate access to the active site.

  8. International conference: Features of nuclear excitation states and mechanisms of nuclear reactions. 51. Meeting on nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear structure. The book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Results of the LI Meeting on Nuclear Spectroscopy and Nuclear Structure are presented. Properties of excited states of atomic nuclei and mechanisms of nuclear reactions are considered. Studies on the theory of nucleus and fundamental interactions pertinent to experimental study of nuclei properties and mechanisms of nuclear reactions, technique and methods of experiment, application of nuclear-physical method, are provided [ru

  9. Effect of Drying Conditions on the Catalytic Performance, Structure, and Reaction Rates over the Fe-Co-Mn/MgO Catalyst for Production of Light Olefins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Abdouss

    2018-01-01

    How to Cite: Abdouss, M., Arsalanfar, M., Mirzaei, N., Zamani, Y. (2018. Effect of Drying Conditions on the Catalytic Performance, Structure, and Reaction Rates over the Fe-Co-Mn/MgO Catalyst for Production of Light Olefins. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 97-112 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.13.1.1222.97-112

  10. Free energies for degradation reactions of 1,2,3-trichloropropane from ab initio electronic structure theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylaska, Eric J; Glaesemann, Kurt R; Felmy, Andrew R; Vasiliu, Monica; Dixon, David A; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2010-11-25

    Electronic structure methods were used to calculate the gas and aqueous phase reaction energies for reductive dechlorination (i.e., hydrogenolysis), reductive β-elimination, dehydrochlorination, and nucleophilic substitution by OH− of 1,2,3-trichloropropane. The thermochemical properties ΔH(f)°(298.15 K), S°(298.15 K, 1 bar), and ΔG(S)(298.15 K, 1 bar) were calculated by using ab initio electronic structure calculations, isodesmic reactions schemes, gas-phase entropy estimates, and continuum solvation models for 1,2,3-trichloropropane and several likely degradation products: CH3−CHCl−CH2Cl, CH2Cl−CH2−CH2Cl, C•H2−CHCl−CH2Cl, CH2Cl−C•H−CH2Cl, CH2═CCl−CH2Cl, cis-CHCl═CH−CH2Cl, trans-CHCl═CH−CH2Cl, CH2═CH−CH2Cl, CH2Cl−CHCl−CH2OH, CH2Cl−CHOH−CH2Cl, CH2═CCl−CH2OH, CH2═COH−CH2Cl, cis-CHOH═CH−CH2Cl, trans-CHOH═CH−CH2Cl, CH(═O)−CH2−CH2Cl, and CH3−C(═O)−CH2Cl. On the basis of these thermochemical estimates, together with a Fe(II)/Fe(III) chemical equilibrium model for natural reducing environments, all of the reactions studied were predicted to be very favorable in the standard state and under a wide range of pH conditions. The most favorable reaction was reductive β-elimination (ΔG(rxn)° ≈ −32 kcal/mol), followed closely by reductive dechlorination (ΔG(rxn)° ≈ −27 kcal/mol), dehydrochlorination (ΔG(rxn)° ≈ −27 kcal/mol), and nucleophilic substitution by OH− (ΔG(rxn)° ≈ −25 kcal/mol). For both reduction reactions studied, it was found that the first electron-transfer step, yielding the intermediate C•H2−CHCl−CH2Cl and the CH2Cl−C•H−CH2Cl species, was not favorable in the standard state (ΔG(rxn)° ≈ +15 kcal/mol) and was predicted to occur only at relatively high pH values. This result suggests that reduction by natural attenuation is unlikely.

  11. Influence of chromium ions on the color center formation in crystals with garnet structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurov, M.Kh.; Zharikov, E.V.; Laptev, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The in fluence of chromium ions on the color center formation in crystals of yttrium-aluminium garnet, gadolinium-gallium garnet, gadolinium-scandium-gallium garnet, and yttrium-scandium-gallium garnet is studied. In addition to basic activator ions these crystals were coactivated also by chromium ions with two wide bands of fundamental absorption within the range of pump tube radiation with maximas close to 450 and 650 nm. The color centers for γ-irradiated samples were observed at 300 K by measuring the adsorption spectra within the 300-800 nm range. Temperature of destruction of the charge trapping sites was determined by the method of thermoluminescence measuring in the 100-500 K temperature range. Detection of recombination center luminescence was accomplished within the 200-1600 nm wavelength range. Chromium ions are found to hinder the formation of color centers as a result of γ-irradiation at room and higher temperatures within the wavelength range over 300 nm; i.e. Cr 3+ ions increase radiation resistance of all the investigated crystals

  12. Structure of neodymium di-2-ethylhexylphosphate and reactions with gaseous ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifonov, Yu.I.; Legin, E.K.; Suglobov, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    Solid neodymium di-(2-ethylhexylphosphate) (NdA 3 ) absorbs gaseous ammonia reversibly. The NH 3 uptake has been measured as a function of partial pressure. The adsorption is accompanied by change in the electronic absorption spectrum of Nd 3+ and in the vibrational spectrum of the phosphoryl groups. Powder-pattern indexing has given the unit cell of NdA 3 , and a structure model is proposed. It is suggested that the ammonia is absorbed by the formation of interstitial solutions involving cavity filling in the NDa 3 structure

  13. Structural integration of separation and reaction systems: I. Integration of stage-wise processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Milan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural integration of separation processes, using multifunctional equipment, has been studied on four stage-wise liquid-liquid separations extraction, absorption, distillation, adsorption and on some combinations of these processes. It was shown for stage - wise processes that the ultimate aim of equipment integration is 3-way integration (by components by steps and by stages and that membrane multiphase contactors present concerning the equipment optimal solutions in many cases. First, by using partially integrated equipment and, later by developing fully integrated systems it was experimentally confirmed that structural 3-way integration produces much higher degrees of component separations and component enrichments in compact and safe equipment.

  14. Influence of the external heating type in the morphological and structural characteristics of alumina powder prepared by combustion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordeiro, V.V.; Freitas, N.L.; Viana, K.M.S.; Dias, G.; Costa, A.C.F.M.; Lira, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of the external heating in the morphological and structural characteristics of the alumina powder prepared by combustion reaction. It was evaluated different types of external heating: muffle oven, microwave oven and ceramic plate with electrical spiral resistance. The powders were prepared according to the propellants and explosives theory, using urea in the stoichiometric proportion (Φe = 1). During the synthesis parameters such as flame combustion time and temperature were measured. The structural and morphological characteristics of the powders were evaluate by XRD, particle size distribution, SEM and nitrogen adsorption (BET). The results showed the production of a-alumina as unique phase and formed by agglomerates with irregular plate shape of thin particles for all studied conditions. The powders prepared by electrical oven presented small particle size, with narrow agglomerates size distribution. (author)

  15. Probing the electronic structure of redox species and direct determination of intrinsic reorganization energies of electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    An experimental technique capable of directly determining the intrinsic reorganization energies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions is described. Appropriate solution phase redox species are prepared in the gas phase using electrospray ionization and probed using photodetachment spectroscopy. Five metal complex anions involved in the Fe 2+ -Fe 3+ redox couple are investigated and the intramolecular reorganization energies are measured directly from spectral features due to removing the most loosely bound 3d electron from the Fe(II)-complexes. The photodetachment spectra also yield electronic structure information about the Fe 2+ -Fe 3+ redox couple and provide a common electronic structure origin for the reducing capability of the Fe(II)-complexes, the most common redox reagents. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  16. Structures in 20O from the 14C(7Li, p) reaction at 44 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlen, H.G.; Oertzen, W. von; Kokalova, T.; Wheldon, C.; Milin, M.; Dorsch, T.; Kruecken, R.; Faestermann, T.; Mahgoub, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.F.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the multi-nucleon transfer reaction 14 C( 7 Li, p) at E Lab ( 7 Li) = 44 MeV populating states of the neutron-rich oxygen isotope 20 O. The experiments have been performed at the Munich Tandem accelerator using the high-resolution Q3D magnetic spectrometer, with an overall energy resolution of 45keV. States were populated up to 20MeV excitation energy -65 states have been identified in the analysis, among which 42 are new. Rotational bands are proposed in terms of underlying intrinsic reflection-asymmetric cluster and prolate molecular structures (namely 14 C x 2n x α) as parity doublet bands. A rectangular oblate structure is suggested for some very narrow states at high excitation energies. (orig.)

  17. Effect of ordering of PtCu₃ nanoparticle structure on the activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodnik, Nejc; Jeyabharathi, Chinnaiah; Meier, Josef C; Kostka, Alexander; Phani, Kanala L; Rečnik, Aleksander; Bele, Marjan; Hočevar, Stanko; Gaberšček, Miran; Mayrhofer, Karl J J

    2014-07-21

    In this study the performance enhancement effect of structural ordering for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is systematically studied. Two samples of PtCu3 nanoparticles embedded on a graphitic carbon support are carefully prepared with identical initial composition, particle dispersion and size distribution, yet with different degrees of structural ordering. Thus we can eliminate all coinciding effects and unambiguously relate the improved activity of the ORR and more importantly the enhanced stability to the ordered nanostructure. Interestingly, the electrochemically induced morphological changes are common to both ordered and disordered samples. The observed effect could have a groundbreaking impact on the future directions in the rational design of active and stable platinum alloyed ORR catalysts.

  18. EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindquist, W. Brent; Jones, Keith W.; Um, Wooyong; Rockhold, mark; Peters, Catherine A.; Celia, Michael A.

    2013-02-15

    This project addressed the scaling of geochemical reactions to core and field scales, and the interrelationship between reaction rates and flow in porous media. We targeted reactive transport problems relevant to the Hanford site - specifically the reaction of highly caustic, radioactive waste solutions with subsurface sediments, and the immobilization of 90Sr and 129I through mineral incorporation and passive flow blockage, respectively. We addressed the correlation of results for pore-scale fluid-soil interaction with field-scale fluid flow, with the specific goals of (i) predicting attenuation of radionuclide concentration; (ii) estimating changes in flow rates through changes of soil permeabilities; and (iii) estimating effective reaction rates. In supplemental work, we also simulated reactive transport systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. As a whole, this research generated a better understanding of reactive transport in porous media, and resulted in more accurate methods for reaction rate upscaling and improved prediction of permeability evolution. These scientific advancements will ultimately lead to better tools for management and remediation of DOE’s legacy waste problems. We established three key issues of reactive flow upscaling, and organized this project in three corresponding thrust areas. 1) Reactive flow experiments. The combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation alters pore network structure and the subsequent flow velocities, thereby creating a complex interaction between reaction and transport. To examine this phenomenon, we conducted controlled laboratory experimentation using reactive flow-through columns. Results and Key Findings: Four reactive column experiments (S1, S3, S4, S5) have been completed in which simulated tank waste leachage (STWL) was reacted with pure quartz sand, with and without Aluminum. The STWL is a caustic solution that dissolves quartz. Because Al is a necessary element in the formation of

  19. Computer simulation of the formation of tweed and modulated structures in decomposition reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Morris, J.W. Jr.; Khachaturyan, A.G.

    1979-03-01

    A model of coarsening in a heterogeneous cubic alloy with cubic or tetragonal precipitates is proposed. According to the model the coarsening is controlled by the relaxation of the elastic strain energy. The computer simulation of coarsening demonstrates good agreement with electron microscopic observation of the structure and diffraction pattern

  20. Hydrotalcites: relation between structural features, basicity and activity in the Wittig reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sychev, M.V.; Prihod'ko, R.V.; Erdmann, K.; Mangel, A.; Santen, van R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Carbonate hydrotalcitrs (HTls) were prepared by coprecipitation of metal nitrate salts and Na2CO3. The structural features of noncalcined, calcined and reconstructed materials were characterized by XRD, Al-27 MAS NMR, AAS and N-2 adsorption. If was shown that reconstruction of the calcined HTls due

  1. Hierarchically structured catalysts for cascade and selective steam reforming/hydrodeoxygenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Rainbolt, James; Kovarik, Libor; Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Yong

    2015-12-04

    We report a hierarchically structured catalyst with steam reforming and hydrodeoxygenation functionalities being deposited in the micropores and macropores, respectively. The catalyst is highly efficient to upgrade the pyrolysis vapors of pine forest product residual, resulting in a dramatically decreased acid content and increased hydrocarbon yield without external H2 supply.

  2. Computer simulation of the formation of ''tweed'' and modulated structures in decomposition reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Morris, J.W. Jr.; Khachaturyan, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    A model of coarsening in a heterogeneous cubic alloy with cubic or tetragonal precipitates is proposed. According to the model the coarsening is controlled by the relaxation of the elastic strain energy. The computer simulation of coarsening demonstrates good agreement with electron microscopic observation of the structure and diffraction pattern

  3. Production of specific structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification: optimization of the reaction by response surface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Skands, Anja Rebecca Havegaard; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Rapeseed oil and capric acid were interesterified in solvent-free media catalyzed by Lipozyme IM (Rhizomucor miehei) to produce specific-structured lipids (SSLs). The process was optimized by response surface design concerning the effects of acyl migration and the by-products of diacylglycerols...

  4. Evaluation of concrete structures affected by alkali-silica reaction and delayed ettringite formation - part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This report details the results of a comprehensive research project aimed at evaluating the potential use of : non-destructive testing (NDT) to assess structures affected by ASR and/or DEF. This project was a : collaborative effort between the Univer...

  5. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  6. Asymmetrical distorted structure, dynamics, and reactions of the silacyclohexane and related radical cations: ESR and ab-initio MO study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaguchi, Kenji; Shiotani, Masaru; Ishikawa, Mitsuo

    1995-01-01

    The σ-type radical cations generated by one electron oxidation of the saturated hydrocarbon have been attracted much attention because of their fundamental importance as primary reactant species in radiation chemistry. Our studies on σ-type radical cations were recently extended to the silacyclohexane (cSiC5), silacyclopentane (cSiC4), and silacyclobutane (cSiC3) radical cations. Their electronic structure, dynamics, and reactions were investigated by means of low temperature matrix isolation ESR technique combined with ionizing radiation (γ-rays from 60 Co). In the preceding paper, the 1-methylsilacyclohexane (1-Me-cSiC5) radical cation has been found to take an asymmetrically distorted C 1 structure with one of two Si-C bonds elongated in which the unpaired electron mainly resides ( 2 A in C 1 ). This conclusion was based on the 4.2 K ESR spectra of radical cations of selectively deuteriated and/or methylsubstituted silacyclohexanes, i.e., cSiC5-2,2,6,6-d 4 + , 1-Me-cSiC5 + , 1-Me-cSiC5-2,2-d 2 + , 1-Me-cSiC5-2,2,6,6-d 4 + , 1,1-Me 2 -cSiC5 + , and 4,4-Me 2 -cSiC5 + , in a frozen CF 3 -cC 6 F 11 matrix. Here we report further experimental and theoretical results on 1-methylsilacyclohexane radical cation, especially on the ab initio MO results and matrix effects on the structural distortion, as well as thermal reactions of the radical cations. The results will make it clear that the distorted C 1 structure of the 1-Me-cSiC5 + is the intrinsic nature at the ground electronic state. (J.P.N.)

  7. Effects of some inhibitors of protein synthesis on the chloroplast fine structure, CO2 fixation and the Hill reaction activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Więckowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study concerning the effects of chloramphenicol (100 μg ml-1, actidione (10 μg ml-1, 5-bromouracil (190 μg ml-1, actinomycin D (30 μg ml-1 and DL-ethionine (800 μg ml-1 on the chloroplast fine structure, 14CO2 incorporation and the Hill reaction activity was the subject of the experiments presented in this paper. The experiments were conducted on bean seedlings under the conditions when chlorophyll accumulation was inhibited only partially. The results obtained indicate that chloromphenicol is responsible for the reduction of the number of grana per section of plastid and for the formation of numerous vesicles in the stroma. In the presence of actidione, actinomycin D or DL-ethionine the lamellae are poorly differentiated into .stroma and granum regions and there occur disturbances in the typical orientation of lamellae within chloroplasts. Only in the presence of 5-bromouracil the development of chloroplast structure resemble that in control plants. A comparison of the results obtained with those published earlier (Więckowski et al., 1974; Ficek and Więckowski, 1974 shows that such processes as assimilatory pigment accumulation, the rate of CO2 fixation, the Hill reaction activity, and the development of lamellar system are suppressed in a different extent by the inhibitors used.

  8. 4D Biofabrication of Branching Multicellular Structures: A Morphogenesis Simulation Based on Turing’s Reaction-Diffusion Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolu; Yang, Hao

    2017-12-01

    The recently emerged four-dimensional (4D) biofabrication technique aims to create dynamic three-dimensional (3D) biological structures that can transform their shapes or functionalities with time when an external stimulus is imposed or when cell postprinting self-assembly occurs. The evolution of 3D pattern of branching geometry via self-assembly of cells is critical for 4D biofabrication of artificial organs or tissues with branched geometry. However, it is still unclear that how the formation and evolution of these branching pattern are biologically encoded. We study the 4D fabrication of lung branching structures utilizing a simulation model on the reaction-diffusion mechanism, which is established using partial differential equations of four variables, describing the reaction and diffusion process of morphogens with time during the development process of lung branching. The simulation results present the forming process of 3D branching pattern, and also interpret the behaviors of side branching and tip splitting as the stalk growing, through 3D visualization of numerical simulation.

  9. Structures and reaction pathways of the molybdenum centres of sulfite-oxidizing enzymes by pulsed EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enemark, John H; Astashkin, Andrei V; Raitsimring, Arnold M

    2008-12-01

    SOEs (sulfite-oxidizing enzymes) are physiologically vital and occur in all forms of life. During the catalytic cycle, the five-co-ordinate square pyramidal oxo-molybdenum active site passes through the Mo(V) state, and intimate details of the structure can be obtained from variable frequency pulsed EPR spectroscopy through the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interactions of nearby magnetic nuclei. By employing variable spectrometer operational frequencies, it is possible to optimize the measurement conditions for difficult quadrupolar nuclei of interest (e.g. (17)O, (33)S, (35)Cl and (37)Cl) and to simplify the interpretation of the spectra. Isotopically labelled model Mo(V) compounds provide further insight into the electronic and geometric structures and chemical reactions of the enzymes. Recently, blocked forms of SOEs having co-ordinated sulfate, the reaction product, were detected using (33)S (I=3/2) labelling. This blocking of product release is a possible contributor to fatal human sulfite oxidase deficiency in young children.

  10. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of σ(700)-meson exchange in γγ→ππ processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the γΝ-Δ transition; pion photoproduction and the γΝ-Δ amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson's theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p(rvec γ, π o ) reaction; multipole analyses and photo-decay couplings at intermediate energies; compton scattering off the proton; connections between compton scattering and pion photoproduction in the delta region; single-pion electroproduction and the transverse one-half and scalar helicity transition form factors; relativistic effects, QCD mixing angles, and Ν → Νγ and Δ → γΝ transition form factors; electroproduction studies of the Ν → Δ transition at bates and CEBAF

  11. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M. [eds.

    1992-10-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of {sigma}(700)-meson exchange in {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} transition; pion photoproduction and the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson`s theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p({rvec {gamma}}, {pi}{sup o}) reaction; multipole analyses and photo-decay couplings at intermediate energies; compton scattering off the proton; connections between compton scattering and pion photoproduction in the delta region; single-pion electroproduction and the transverse one-half and scalar helicity transition form factors; relativistic effects, QCD mixing angles, and {Nu} {yields} {Nu}{gamma} and {Delta} {yields} {gamma}{Nu} transition form factors; electroproduction studies of the {Nu} {yields} {Delta} transition at bates and CEBAF.

  12. Synthesis and structures of Al–Ti nanoparticles by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tong; Zhang Tongwen; Zhu Mu; Qin Chenggong

    2012-01-01

    Three kinds of Al–Ti nanoparticles (7.7, 27.8, and 42.6 at.% Ti) have been prepared from Al–65, Al–85, and Al–88 at.% Ti master alloys by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction, with average particle sizes of 30, 25, and 80 nm, respectively. The higher evaporation rate of Al than Ti resulted in the low Ti contents in the nanoparticles than those in the master alloys. Microscopy observation revealed that the primary nanoparticles are spherical in shape, and occur as chain aggregates of several individual nanoparticles due to the faster collision rate than the coalescence rate. All the Al–Ti nanoparticles contain amorphous alumina layers of about 2–3 nm in thickness surrounding the crystalline core. AlTi intermetallic nanoparticles were successfully produced for Al–27.8 at.% Ti, with a single crystal of AlTi in one chain aggregate. The composite nanoparticles of Al together with some Al 3 Ti phases are prepared for Al–7.7 at.% Ti, with each phase in the individual particle of one chain aggregate. The composite nanoparticles of AlTi with some AlTi 3 were produced for Al–42.6 at.% Ti, with each phase in the individual particle of one chain aggregate. The formation mechanism of Al–Ti nanoparticles was interpreted in terms of phase transition and the effect of hydrogen.

  13. Designing Optimal Organizational Structures for Combat Information Centers in the Next Generation of Navy Ships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paley, Michael J; Levchuk, Yuri N; Serfaty, Daniel; MacMillan, Jean

    1999-01-01

    .... Over the years, research in organizational decision making has demonstrated that a strong functional dependency exists between the specific structure of a task environment and the resulting optimal...

  14. Structural incorporation of Neptunyl(V) into Calcite: Interfacial Reactions and Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Heberling, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this experimental work the calcite-water interface is characterized by means of zetapotential and surface diffraction measurements. Based on the experimental results a new Basic Stern Surface Complexation model for calcite is developed. Neptunyl(V) adsorption at the calcite surface and incorporation into the calcite structure is studied by batch type adsorption- and mixed flow reactor experiments. Adsorption and incorporation species of Neptunyl are investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy.

  15. Investigation of the halo structure of exotic nuclei by direct reactions in inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhof, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Neutron-rich light nuclei near or at the neutron drip line have attracted much attention in recent years since there is clear evidence that they reveal a qualitatively new type of nuclear structure, namely an extended distribution of valence neutrons surrounding a compact nuclear core. A brief overview is given on this halo phenomenon, and on the various methods, which gave first evidence for, and qualitative confirmation of our present picture on halo nuclei

  16. Capturing Structural Snapshots during Photochemical Reactions with Ultrafast Raman Spectroscopy: From Materials Transformation to Biosensor Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chong; Tang, Longteng; Oscar, Breland G; Chen, Cheng

    2018-06-21

    Chemistry studies the composition, structure, properties, and transformation of matter. A mechanistic understanding of the pertinent processes is required to translate fundamental knowledge into practical applications. The current development of ultrafast Raman as a powerful time-resolved vibrational technique, particularly femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), has shed light on the structure-energy-function relationships of various photosensitive systems. This Perspective reviews recent work incorporating optical innovations, including the broad-band up-converted multicolor array (BUMA) into a tunable FSRS setup, and demonstrates its resolving power to watch metal speciation and photolysis, leading to high-quality thin films, and fluorescence modulation of chimeric protein biosensors for calcium ion imaging. We discuss advantages of performing FSRS in the mixed time-frequency domain and present strategies to delineate mechanisms by tracking low-frequency modes and systematically modifying chemical structures with specific functional groups. These unique insights at the chemical-bond level have started to enable the rational design and precise control of functional molecular machines in optical, materials, energy, and life sciences.

  17. The enzymes of biotin dependent CO2 metabolism: What structures reveal about their reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Grover L; Holden, Hazel M; Maurice, Martin St

    2012-01-01

    Biotin is the major cofactor involved in carbon dioxide metabolism. Indeed, biotin-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in nature and are involved in a myriad of metabolic processes including fatty acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The cofactor, itself, is composed of a ureido ring, a tetrahydrothiophene ring, and a valeric acid side chain. It is the ureido ring that functions as the CO2 carrier. A complete understanding of biotin-dependent enzymes is critically important for translational research in light of the fact that some of these enzymes serve as targets for anti-obesity agents, antibiotics, and herbicides. Prior to 1990, however, there was a dearth of information regarding the molecular architectures of biotin-dependent enzymes. In recent years there has been an explosion in the number of three-dimensional structures reported for these proteins. Here we review our current understanding of the structures and functions of biotin-dependent enzymes. In addition, we provide a critical analysis of what these structures have and have not revealed about biotin-dependent catalysis. PMID:22969052

  18. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    OpenAIRE

    Chalavi Sima; Simmons Andrew; Dijkstra Hildebrand; Barker Gareth J; Reinders AAT Simone

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in ...

  19. Oxidation reaction of ferrocytochrome C by ferricyanide as a probe to effects of alcohols on structure and reactivity of the protein. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilan, Y.; Shafferman, A.

    1977-05-01

    Results are reported on the effect of ethanol on the oxidation of ferrocytochrome c by ferricyanide and its cumulative effect with pH and temperature, on structure and spectra of cytochrome c. It is concluded that low concentrations of alcohols which do not change dramatically the structure and physical properties of cytochrome c, but produce changes in the structure of water, cause small changes in the structure of the protein. This is manifested by the shift in the pKa, and also in the retardation of the redox reactions. This indicates that water molecules participate in the reaction complex of cytochrome c with its redox substrates. (DLC)

  20. Ab-initio structure determination of novel strontium-containing layered silicate AES-18 synthesized using mechanochemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Takuji [AIST Tohoku, Sendai (Japan). Research Center for Compact Chemical System; Ideta, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Katsutoshi [Kitakyushu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Environmental Engineering

    2013-07-01

    A new strontium-containing layered silicate, alkaline earth-containing silicate (AES)-18 [chemical composition: Si{sub 16}O{sub 24}(OH){sub 16} . {Sr(OH)_2}{sub 8} . (KOH){sub 2}], was synthesized utilizing a mechanochemical reaction in which an admixture of strontium hydroxide, which unfavorably precipitates in conventional syntheses, and a fumed silica (Aerosil) was allowed to react in the solid phase. The crystal structure of AES-18 was elucidated by the charge-flipping method using powder X-ray diffraction data, and the obtained structure was refined by a combination with the Rietveld method and the maximum entropy method (MEM). The structure analyses showed a tetragonal symmetry with a = 0.912738(3) nm, c = 1.628120(8) nm, and the space group P4{sub 2}/mnc. Two silicate layers composed of Q{sup 3} local structure [(-SiO){sub 3}Si-OH], 7-coordinated Sr{sup 2+} cations, and K{sup +} cations were included in a unit cell, and a Sr{sub 4}(OH){sub 17} cluster was formed between adjacent silicate layers. The framework topology of AES-18 containing 4- and 8-Si-membered rings was similar to that of paracelsian.