WorldWideScience

Sample records for reaction analysis demonstrated

  1. Demonstration Project. Consumer reactions to peak prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    2006-06-01

    The purpose and aim of the project is to look at the risk of capacity shortage in the Swedish electricity supply system during excessively cold periods of weather. A risk that has increased in recent years. A growing number of analysts emphasize the importance of high spot prices actually leading to a reduction in demand. Through increased consumer sensitivity as regards pricing, the power system can be run safely with smaller generation reserves. In addition, market price fluctuation is estimated to become more stable and predictable. The purpose of the Demonstration Project is to demonstrate methods or business concepts that lead to the demand for electricity on a national level being reduced at times of high spot prices. The need for the measures to be profitable for the parties involved is an important starting point. A general problem associated with research and development projects is that the participants feel selected and special attention is paid them, hence they will make an extra effort to improve the results. We were aware of this fact when setting up the trials, which is why we introduced the trials as an offer from the electricity supplier to take part in a commercial assessment using a new price list. For this reason we concealed the marked research aim with Elforsk as a backer. Evaluating the results of questionnaires and detailed interviews does not give cause to suppose the results are in any way affected by such conditions. The conclusion of this project is that controlling load at the customer end is an economic alternative to the investment of new production resources

  2. Demonstration of a Non-Toxic Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Turpin, Alicia A.; Veith, Eric M.

    2007-01-01

    T:hree non-toxic demonstration reaction control engines (RCE) were successfully tested at the Aerojet Sacramento facility under a technology contract sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The goals of the NASA MSFC contract (NAS8-01109) were to develop and expand the technical maturity of a non-toxic, on-orbit auxiliary propulsion system (APS) thruster under the auspices of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The demonstration engine utilized Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Ethanol as propellants to produce 870 lbf thrust. The Aerojet RCE's were successfully acceptance tested over a broad range of operating conditions. Steady state tests evaluated engine response to varying chamber pressures and mixture ratios. In addition to the steady state tests, a variety of pulsing tests were conducted over a wide range of electrical pulse widths (EPW). Each EPW condition was also tested over a range of percent duty cycles (DC), and bit impulse and pulsing specific impulse were determined for each of these conditions. Subsequent to acceptance testing at Aerojet, these three engines were delivered to the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in April 2005 for incorporation into a cryogenic Auxiliary Propulsion System Test Bed (APSTB). The APSTB is a test article that will be utilized in an altitude test cell to simulate anticipated mission applications. The objectives of this APSTB testing included evaluation of engine performance over an extended duty cycle map of propellant pressure and temperature, as well as engine and system performance at typical mission duty cycles over extended periods of time. This paper provides acceptance test results and a status of the engine performance as part of the system level testing.

  3. Chemical Demonstrations with Consumer Chemicals: The Black and White Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    A color-change reaction is described in which two colorless solutions are combined to afford a black mixture. Two more colorless solutions are combined to afford a white mixture. The black and white mixtures are then combined to afford a clear, colorless solution. The reaction uses chemicals that are readily available on the retail market: vitamin C, tincture of iodine, vinegar, ammonia, bleach, Epsom salt, and laundry starch.

  4. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  5. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Xuan; Dempsey, William P; Goutsias, John

    2009-09-07

    Sensitivity analysis is an indispensable tool for studying the robustness and fragility properties of biochemical reaction systems as well as for designing optimal approaches for selective perturbation and intervention. Deterministic sensitivity analysis techniques, using derivatives of the system response, have been extensively used in the literature. However, these techniques suffer from several drawbacks, which must be carefully considered before using them in problems of systems biology. We develop here a probabilistic approach to sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems. The proposed technique employs a biophysically derived model for parameter fluctuations and, by using a recently suggested variance-based approach to sensitivity analysis [Saltelli et al., Chem. Rev. (Washington, D.C.) 105, 2811 (2005)], it leads to a powerful sensitivity analysis methodology for biochemical reaction systems. The approach presented in this paper addresses many problems associated with derivative-based sensitivity analysis techniques. Most importantly, it produces thermodynamically consistent sensitivity analysis results, can easily accommodate appreciable parameter variations, and allows for systematic investigation of high-order interaction effects. By employing a computational model of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade, we demonstrate that our approach is well suited for sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems and can produce a wealth of information about the sensitivity properties of such systems. The price to be paid, however, is a substantial increase in computational complexity over derivative-based techniques, which must be effectively addressed in order to make the proposed approach to sensitivity analysis more practical.

  6. Demonstration of physical phenomenas and scavenging activity from d-psicose and methionine maillard reaction products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arum Tiyas Suminar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction has been well understood as a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids to generate the Maillard reaction products (MRPs. This study is aimed to demonstrate the browning intensity, color development, spectra measurements, scavenging activity, and the correlation between browning intensity and scavenging activity of the MRPs generated from D-Psicose and Methionine (Psi-Met at 50℃. The browning intensity of MRPs was investigated based on the absorbance using spectrophotometer at 420 nm, the color development was observed using digital colorimeter to gained L*a*b* value then calculated as browning index, the spectra development was analyzed using spectrophotometer at 190 - 750 nm, and the scavenging activity was determined with ABTS method using spectrophotometer at 734 nm. The browning intensity, color development, and scavenging activity were improved along with the increase in heating process. Based on spectra analysis, MRPs from Psi-Met was initially detected at 21 h and Psi at 24 h of heating treatment, which indicating that Psi-Met have faster and better reaction than Psi during heating process. Positive non-linear and significant correlation between browning intensity and scavenging activity were assigned. This finding may provide beneficial information of D-psicose and MRPs to the next scientific research and to the food industries which applies MRPs in their products.

  7. Environmental analysis for pipeline gas demonstration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, L.H.

    1978-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented programs for encouraging the development and commercialization of coal-related technologies, which include coal gasification demonstration-scale activities. In support of commercialization activities the Environmental Analysis for Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plants has been prepared as a reference document to be used in evaluating potential environmental and socioeconomic effects from construction and operation of site- and process-specific projects. Effluents and associated impacts are identified for six coal gasification processes at three contrasting settings. In general, impacts from construction of a high-Btu gas demonstration plant are similar to those caused by the construction of any chemical plant of similar size. The operation of a high-Btu gas demonstration plant, however, has several unique aspects that differentiate it from other chemical plants. Offsite development (surface mining) and disposal of large quantities of waste solids constitute important sources of potential impact. In addition, air emissions require monitoring for trace metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, and other emissions. Potential biological impacts from long-term exposure to these emissions are unknown, and additional research and data analysis may be necessary to determine such effects. Possible effects of pollutants on vegetation and human populations are discussed. The occurrence of chemical contaminants in liquid effluents and the bioaccumulation of these contaminants in aquatic organisms may lead to adverse ecological impact. Socioeconomic impacts are similar to those from a chemical plant of equivalent size and are summarized and contrasted for the three surrogate sites.

  8. Demonstration sensitivity analysis for RADTRAN III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, K.S.; Reardon, P.C.

    1986-10-01

    A demonstration sensitivity analysis was performed to: quantify the relative importance of 37 variables to the total incident free dose; assess the elasticity of seven dose subgroups to those same variables; develop density distributions for accident dose to combinations of accident data under wide-ranging variations; show the relationship between accident consequences and probabilities of occurrence; and develop limits for the variability of probability consequence curves

  9. Selective amplification of T-cell receptor variable region species is demonstrable but not essential in early lesions of psoriasis vulgaris: analysis by anchored polymerase chain reaction and hypervariable region size spectratyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekony, M A; Holder, J E; Lee, A J; Horrocks, C; Eperon, I C; Camp, R D

    1997-07-01

    Several groups have investigated the role of T cells in the pathogenesis of psoriasis by determination of T-cell receptor (TCR) B-chain variable (V) region usage, both in chronic plaque (psoriasis vulgaris) and guttate forms, with various results. Because there are no data on TCR expression in early psoriasis vulgaris, when specific cellular immune events may be expected to be most pronounced, we have analyzed early lesions (less than 3 wk old) of ten patients, with highly reproducible results. We have developed a highly controlled anchored polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method in which TCR beta chain species are all amplified with the same primer pair and products are quantified by dot blot hybridization with BV family-specific oligonucleotide probes. Overexpression of certain TCR BV genes was observed in the majority of lesional biopsies, but in samples in which the expanded BV family formed more than 10% of total lesional BV (half of the samples analyzed), BV2 and BV6 predominated. The consistency of overexpression of these BV species between patients was much less than in previous studies of TCRBV usage in established chronic plaque psoriasis lesions. Complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size spectratyping demonstrated evidence for selective clonal T cell accumulation in less than half of the lesional samples showing BV expansion. These results indicate that selective amplification of TCRBV species occurs in early psoriasis vulgaris but is not essential to the pathogenic process and may be more important in the maintenance or expansion of chronic lesions.

  10. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-02-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiOx) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2-based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiOx-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology.

  11. A Dramatic Classroom Demonstration of Limiting Reagent Using the Vinegar and Sodium Hydrogen Carbonate Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artdej, Romklao; Thongpanchang, Tienthong

    2008-01-01

    This demonstration is designed to illustrate the concept of limiting reagent in a spectacular way. Via a series of experiments where the amount of vinegar is fixed and the amount of NaHCO[subscript 3] is gradually increased, the volume of CO[subscript 2] generated from the reaction varies corresponding to the amount of NaHCO[subscript 3] until it…

  12. Reliability demonstration test planning using bayesian analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandran, Senthil Kumar; Arul, John A.

    2003-01-01

    In Nuclear Power Plants, the reliability of all the safety systems is very critical from the safety viewpoint and it is very essential that the required reliability requirements be met while satisfying the design constraints. From practical experience, it is found that the reliability of complex systems such as Safety Rod Drive Mechanism is of the order of 10 -4 with an uncertainty factor of 10. To demonstrate the reliability of such systems is prohibitive in terms of cost and time as the number of tests needed is very large. The purpose of this paper is to develop a Bayesian reliability demonstrating testing procedure for exponentially distributed failure times with gamma prior distribution on the failure rate which can be easily and effectively used to demonstrate component/subsystem/system reliability conformance to stated requirements. The important questions addressed in this paper are: With zero failures, how long one should perform the tests and how many components are required to conclude with a given degree of confidence, that the component under test, meets the reliability requirement. The procedure is explained with an example. This procedure can also be extended to demonstrate with more number of failures. The approach presented is applicable for deriving test plans for demonstrating component failure rates of nuclear power plants, as the failure data for similar components are becoming available in existing plants elsewhere. The advantages of this procedure are the criterion upon which the procedure is based is simple and pertinent, the fitting of the prior distribution is an integral part of the procedure and is based on the use of information regarding two percentiles of this distribution and finally, the procedure is straightforward and easy to apply in practice. (author)

  13. Experimental and numerical reaction analysis on sodium-water chemical reaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Takata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Akira; Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. On the other hand, it has strong chemical reactivity with water vapor. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes. This process ends up damages on the heat transport equipment in the SFR. Therefore, the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of paramount importance for security reasons. This study aims to clarify the sodium-water reaction mechanisms using an elementary reaction analysis. A quasi one-dimensional flame model is applied to a sodium-water counter-flow reaction field. The analysis contains 25 elementary reactions, which consist of 17 H_2-O_2 and 8 Na-H_2O reactions. Temperature and species concentrations in the counter-flow reaction field were measured using laser diagnostics such as LIF and CARS. The main reaction in the experimental conditions is Na+H_2O → NaOH+H and OH is produced by H_2O+H → H_2+OH. It is demonstrated that the reaction model in this study well explains the structure of the sodium-water counter-flow diffusion flame. (author)

  14. A taxonomy of integral reaction path analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grcar, Joseph F.; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.

    2004-12-23

    W. C. Gardiner observed that achieving understanding through combustion modeling is limited by the ability to recognize the implications of what has been computed and to draw conclusions about the elementary steps underlying the reaction mechanism. This difficulty can be overcome in part by making better use of reaction path analysis in the context of multidimensional flame simulations. Following a survey of current practice, an integral reaction flux is formulated in terms of conserved scalars that can be calculated in a fully automated way. Conditional analyses are then introduced, and a taxonomy for bidirectional path analysis is explored. Many examples illustrate the resulting path analysis and uncover some new results about nonpremixed methane-air laminar jets.

  15. Demonstration and suppression of a radioresistant host-versus-graft reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfelder, S.; Roessler, R. v.; Ruppelt, W.

    1975-01-01

    The possibilities of suppressing and measuring a radioresistant host-versus-graft reaction are described. According to the authors, the host-versus-graft immune reaction may outlast whole-body irradiation at high doses. (BSC/AK) [de

  16. Specifications for surface reaction analysis apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoka, Yuden; Yoshigoe, Akitaka

    2001-03-01

    A surface reaction analysis apparatus was installed at the JAERI soft x-ray beamline in the SPring-8 as an experimental end-station for the study of surface chemistry. The apparatus is devoted to the study concerning the influence of translational kinetic energy of incident molecules to chemical reactions on solid surfaces with gas molecules. In order to achieve the research purpose, reactive molecular scattering experiments and photoemission spectroscopic measurements using synchrotron radiation are performed in that apparatus via a supersonic molecular beam generator, an electron energy analyzer and a quadrupole mass analyzer. The detail specifications for the apparatus are described in this report. (author)

  17. A Demonstration of Concrete Structural Health Monitoring Framework for Degradation due to Alkali-Silica Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Neal, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nath, Paromita [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bao, Yanqing [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Peter [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adams, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kosson, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This ongoing research project is seeking to develop a probabilistic framework for health diagnosis and prognosis of aging concrete structures in a nuclear power plant that is subjected to physical, chemical, environment, and mechanical degradation. The proposed framework consists of four elements: monitoring, data analytics, uncertainty quantification and prognosis. This report focuses on degradation caused by ASR (alkali-silica reaction). Controlled specimens were prepared to develop accelerated ASR degradation. Different monitoring techniques – thermography, digital image correlation (DIC), mechanical deformation measurements, nonlinear impact resonance acoustic spectroscopy (NIRAS), and vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) -- were used to detect the damage caused by ASR. Heterogeneous data from the multiple techniques was used for damage diagnosis and prognosis, and quantification of the associated uncertainty using a Bayesian network approach. Additionally, MapReduce technique has been demonstrated with synthetic data. This technique can be used in future to handle large amounts of observation data obtained from the online monitoring of realistic structures.

  18. Data Analysis for ARRA Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.

    2010-05-01

    Presentation about ARRA Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations, including an overview of the ARRE Fuel Cell Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's data analysis objectives, deployment composite data products, and planned analyses.

  19. Analysis of transfer reactions: determination of spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, N. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN), 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); The Andrzej So an Institute for Nuclear Studies, Dept. of Nuclear Reactions, Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-01

    An overview of the most popular models used for the analysis of direct reaction data is given, concentrating on practical aspects. The 4 following models (in order of increasing sophistication): the distorted wave born approximation (DWBA), the adiabatic model, the coupled channels born approximation, and the coupled reaction channels are briefly described. As a concrete example, the C{sup 12}(d,p)C{sup 13} reaction at an incident deuteron energy of 30 MeV is analysed with progressively more physically sophisticated models. The effect of the choice of the reaction model on the spectroscopic information extracted from the data is investigated and other sources of uncertainty in the derived spectroscopic factors are discussed. We have showed that the choice of the reaction model can significantly influence the nuclear structure information, particularly the spectroscopic factors or amplitudes but occasionally also the spin-parity, that we wish to extract from direct reaction data. We have also demonstrated that the DWBA can fail to give a satisfactory description of transfer data but when the tenets of the theory are fulfilled DWBA can work very well and will yield the same results as most sophisticated models. The use of global rather than fitted optical potentials can also lead to important differences in the extracted spectroscopic factors.

  20. Reaction kinetic analysis of reactor surveillance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiie, T., E-mail: yoshiie@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Kinomura, A. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    In the reactor pressure vessel surveillance data of a European-type pressurized water reactor (low-Cu steel), it was found that the concentration of matrix defects was very high, and a large number of precipitates existed. In this study, defect structure evolution obtained from surveillance data was simulated by reaction kinetic analysis using 15 rate equations. The saturation of precipitation and the growth of loops were simulated, but it was not possible to explain the increase in DBTT on the basis of the defect structures. The sub-grain boundary segregation of solutes was discussed for the origin of the DBTT increase.

  1. AEP Ohio gridSMART Demonstration Project Real-Time Pricing Demonstration Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.; Somani, Abhishek; Marinovici, Maria C.; Hammerstrom, Janelle L.

    2014-02-01

    This report contributes initial findings from an analysis of significant aspects of the gridSMART® Real-Time Pricing (RTP) – Double Auction demonstration project. Over the course of four years, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) worked with American Electric Power (AEP), Ohio and Battelle Memorial Institute to design, build, and operate an innovative system to engage residential consumers and their end-use resources in a participatory approach to electric system operations, an incentive-based approach that has the promise of providing greater efficiency under normal operating conditions and greater flexibility to react under situations of system stress. The material contained in this report supplements the findings documented by AEP Ohio in the main body of the gridSMART report. It delves into three main areas: impacts on system operations, impacts on households, and observations about the sensitivity of load to price changes.

  2. Analysis techniques for background rejection at the Majorana Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuestra, Clara [University of Washington; Rielage, Keith Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xu, Wenqin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goett, John Jerome III [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-11

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an ultra-low background, 40-kg modular HPGe detector array to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based 0νββ-decay searches that will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region, a major goal of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. The background rejection techniques to be applied to the data include cuts based on data reduction, pulse shape analysis, event coincidences, and time correlations. The Point Contact design of the DEMONSTRATOR's germanium detectors allows for significant reduction of gamma background.

  3. Analysis of Skylab IV fluid mechanic science demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, M. G.; Bourgeois, S. V.

    1975-01-01

    Several science demonstrations performed on Skylab III and IV were concerned with the behavior of fluid drops free floating in microgravity. These demonstrations, with large liquid drops, included the oscillation, rotation, impact and coalescence, and air injection into the drops. Rayleigh's analysis of the oscillation of spherical drops of a liquid predicts accurately the effect of size and surface tension on the frequency of vibrated water globules in the Skylab demonstration. However, damping occurred much faster than predicted by Lamb's or Scriven's analyses of the damping time for spherical drops. The impact demonstrations indicated that a minimum velocity is necessary to overcome surface forces and effect a coalescence, but a precise criterion for the coalescence of liquids in low g could not be determined.

  4. Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP

  5. Simultaneous demonstration of gelatinolytic activity, morphology, and immunohistochemical reaction using zymography film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanomata, Naoki; Hasebe, Takahiro; Moriya, Takuya; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2013-12-01

    In situ zymography has been used to assess gelatinolytic activity, which is mainly due to matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in cancer tissues. MMPs play an important role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Film in situ zymography (FIZ) enables the in situ evaluation of gelatinolytic activity with high reproducibility. In this article, we report a study of FIZ, in a case of breast cancer with an invasive carcinoma component showing clear gelatinolytic activity, and in a non-invasive carcinoma component showing little gelatinolytic activity. Immunohistochemistry on FIZ was also performed. The simultaneous detection of gelatinolytic activity and immunohistochemical reaction was established in a single film. Immunohistochemistry on FIZ may have good potential for the investigation of cancer microenvironment.

  6. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: ADSORPTION-INTEGRATED-REACTION (AIR2000) PROCESS, KSE, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Bulletin is a brief description of the AIR2000 technology developed by KSE, Inc., of Amherst, MA. The AIR2000 unit treats air streams containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The demonstration occurred at the Stamina Mills superfund site in North Smithfield, RI from Aug...

  7. Optimizing Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using Bayesian Experimental Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, Udo von; Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Gori, Silvio

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis with 3 He holds the promise to measure Deuterium depth profiles up to large depths. However, the extraction of the depth profile from the measured data is an ill-posed inversion problem. Here we demonstrate how Bayesian Experimental Design can be used to optimize the number of measurements as well as the measurement energies to maximize the information gain. Comparison of the inversion properties of the optimized design with standard settings reveals huge possible gains. Application of the posterior sampling method allows to optimize the experimental settings interactively during the measurement process.

  8. Post mitigation impact risk analysis for asteroid deflection demonstration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Hestroffer, Daniel; Thuillot, William; Bancelin, David; Cano, Juan L.; Cichocki, Filippo

    2015-08-01

    Even though mankind believes to have the capabilities to avert potentially disastrous asteroid impacts, only the realization of mitigation demonstration missions can validate this claim. Such a deflection demonstration attempt has to be cost effective, easy to validate, and safe in the sense that harmless asteroids must not be turned into potentially hazardous objects. Uncertainties in an asteroid's orbital and physical parameters as well as those additionally introduced during a mitigation attempt necessitate an in depth analysis of deflection mission designs in order to dispel planetary safety concerns. We present a post mitigation impact risk analysis of a list of potential kinetic impactor based deflection demonstration missions proposed in the framework of the NEOShield project. Our results confirm that mitigation induced uncertainties have a significant influence on the deflection outcome. Those cannot be neglected in post deflection impact risk studies. We show, furthermore, that deflection missions have to be assessed on an individual basis in order to ensure that asteroids are not inadvertently transported closer to the Earth at a later date. Finally, we present viable targets and mission designs for a kinetic impactor test to be launched between the years 2025 and 2032.

  9. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water reaction phenomena in support of chemical reaction model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2011-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule to the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. The results are used as the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by JAEA toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  10. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility's compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement

  11. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility's compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  12. Multilayer Network Analysis of Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Chen, Qu; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear reaction network is usually studied via precise calculation of differential equation sets, and much research interest has been focused on the characteristics of nuclides, such as half-life and size limit. In this paper, however, we adopt the methods from both multilayer and reaction networks, and obtain a distinctive view by mapping all the nuclear reactions in JINA REACLIB database into a directed network with 4 layers: neutron, proton, 4He and the remainder. The layer names correspond to reaction types decided by the currency particles consumed. This combined approach reveals that, in the remainder layer, the β-stability has high correlation with node degree difference and overlapping coefficient. Moreover, when reaction rates are considered as node strength, we find that, at lower temperatures, nuclide half-life scales reciprocally with its out-strength. The connection between physical properties and topological characteristics may help to explore the boundary of the nuclide chart.

  13. Stochastic analysis of complex reaction networks using binomial moment equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer

    2012-09-01

    The stochastic analysis of complex reaction networks is a difficult problem because the number of microscopic states in such systems increases exponentially with the number of reactive species. Direct integration of the master equation is thus infeasible and is most often replaced by Monte Carlo simulations. While Monte Carlo simulations are a highly effective tool, equation-based formulations are more amenable to analytical treatment and may provide deeper insight into the dynamics of the network. Here, we present a highly efficient equation-based method for the analysis of stochastic reaction networks. The method is based on the recently introduced binomial moment equations [Barzel and Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 150602 (2011)]. The binomial moments are linear combinations of the ordinary moments of the probability distribution function of the population sizes of the interacting species. They capture the essential combinatorics of the reaction processes reflecting their stoichiometric structure. This leads to a simple and transparent form of the equations, and allows a highly efficient and surprisingly simple truncation scheme. Unlike ordinary moment equations, in which the inclusion of high order moments is prohibitively complicated, the binomial moment equations can be easily constructed up to any desired order. The result is a set of equations that enables the stochastic analysis of complex reaction networks under a broad range of conditions. The number of equations is dramatically reduced from the exponential proliferation of the master equation to a polynomial (and often quadratic) dependence on the number of reactive species in the binomial moment equations. The aim of this paper is twofold: to present a complete derivation of the binomial moment equations; to demonstrate the applicability of the moment equations for a representative set of example networks, in which stochastic effects play an important role.

  14. Thermodynamically consistent Bayesian analysis of closed biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry from noisy time series measurements of molecular concentrations is an important step for building predictive models of cellular function. Inference techniques currently available in the literature may produce rate constant values that defy necessary constraints imposed by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. As a result, these techniques may lead to biochemical reaction systems whose concentration dynamics could not possibly occur in nature. Therefore, development of a thermodynamically consistent approach for estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system is highly desirable. Results We introduce a Bayesian analysis approach for computing thermodynamically consistent estimates of the rate constants of a closed biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry given experimental data. Our method employs an appropriately designed prior probability density function that effectively integrates fundamental biophysical and thermodynamic knowledge into the inference problem. Moreover, it takes into account experimental strategies for collecting informative observations of molecular concentrations through perturbations. The proposed method employs a maximization-expectation-maximization algorithm that provides thermodynamically feasible estimates of the rate constant values and computes appropriate measures of estimation accuracy. We demonstrate various aspects of the proposed method on synthetic data obtained by simulating a subset of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling pathway, and examine its robustness under conditions that violate key assumptions. Software, coded in MATLAB®, which implements all Bayesian analysis techniques discussed in this paper, is available free of charge at http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS%20lab/software.html. Conclusions Our approach provides an attractive statistical methodology for

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of dust sulphation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yongxiang; Jokilaakso, A.

    1997-12-31

    Sulphation reactions of metal oxides with SO{sub 2} and O. or SO{sub 3} play significant roles in sulphation roasting of sulphide and oxide minerals as well as in desulphurisation process of combustion gases. In metallurgical waste-heat boilers for sulphide smelting, the sulphation of the oxidic flue dust in the atmosphere containing sulphur oxides is an unavoidable process, and the sulphation reactions have to be guided in a controlled way in the proper parts of the gas handling equipment. In this report, some thermodynamic analyses were conducted for the oxide sulphation reactions in relation to sulphide smelting processes. The phase stability of Me-S-O systems especially for oxides - sulphates equilibrium was studied under different thermodynamic conditions of gas compositions and temperatures. The sulphate stability was analysed for an example of gas compositions in the copper flash smelter of Outokumpu Harjavalta Metals Oy, in relation to temperature. In the report, most of the information was from literature. Moreover, a number of thermodynamic computations were carried out with the HSC program, and the constructed phase stability diagrams were compared with those from the literature whenever possible. The maximum temperatures for stable sulphates under normal operating conditions of the waste-heat boilers in sulphide smelting processes were obtained. This report will serve as the basis for the kinetic studies of the sulphation reactions and the sulphation reaction modelling in pyrometallurgical processes. (orig.) SULA 2 Programme. 36 refs.

  16. Photosynthesis energy factory: analysis, synthesis, and demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    This quantitative assessment of the potential of a combined dry-land Energy Plantation, wood-fired power plant, and algae wastewater treatment system demonstrates the cost-effectiveness of recycling certain by-products and effluents from one subsystem to another. Designed to produce algae up to the limit of the amount of carbon in municipal wastewater, the algae pond provides a positive cash credit, resulting mainly from the wastewater treatment credit, which may be used to reduce the cost of the Photosynthesis Energy Factory (PEF)-generated electricity. The algae pond also produces fertilizer, which reduces the cost of the biomass produced on the Energy Plantation, and some gas. The cost of electricity was as low as 35 mills per kilowatt-hour for a typical municipally-owned PEF consisting of a 65-MWe power plant, a 144-acre algae pond, and a 33,000-acre Energy Plantation. Using only conventional or near-term technology, the most cost-effective algae pond for a PEF is the carbon-limited secondary treatment system. This system does not recycle CO/sub 2/ from the flue gas. Analysis of the Energy Plantation subsystem at 15 sites revealed that plantations of 24,000 to 36,000 acres produce biomass at the lowest cost per ton. The following sites are recommended for more detailed evaluation as potential demonstration sites: Pensacola, Florida; Jamestown, New York; Knoxville, Tennessee; Martinsville, Virginia, and Greenwood, South Carolina. A major possible extension of the PEF concept is to include the possibility for irrigation.

  17. Analysis of the consequences of 'thermite' reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorio, Daniel; Cincotta, Daniel O.; Camacho, Esteban F.; Bruno, Hernan R.; Boero, Norma L.

    1999-01-01

    The mixture of Al-U 3 O 8 is not in a state of chemical equilibrium, and at temperatures of between 850 degree C and 1000 degree C, it reacts exo thermally. This is known, in corresponding bibliography, as a 'Thermite reaction'. This mixture is used in the manufacturing of the plate-type fuel used in research reactors. It has been pointed out that the release of energy caused by this type of reactions might represent a risk in case of accidents in this type of reactor. Conclusions, in general, tend to indicate that no such risk exists, although no concrete assurance is given that this is the case, and this fact, therefore, leaves room for doubt. The objective of this paper is to provide an in-depth study of what happens to a fuel plate when it is subjected to thermite reaction. We will, furthermore, analyze the consequences of the release of energy generated by this type of reaction within the core of the reactor, clearly defining the problem for this type of fuel and this kind of reactor

  18. G-computation demonstration in causal mediation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Aolin; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has considerably advanced the definition, identification and estimation of controlled direct, and natural direct and indirect effects in causal mediation analysis. Despite the various estimation methods and statistical routines being developed, a unified approach for effect estimation under different effect decomposition scenarios is still needed for epidemiologic research. G-computation offers such unification and has been used for total effect and joint controlled direct effect estimation settings, involving different types of exposure and outcome variables. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of parametric g-computation in estimating various components of the total effect, including (1) natural direct and indirect effects, (2) standard and stochastic controlled direct effects, and (3) reference and mediated interaction effects, using Monte Carlo simulations in standard statistical software. For each study subject, we estimated their nested potential outcomes corresponding to the (mediated) effects of an intervention on the exposure wherein the mediator was allowed to attain the value it would have under a possible counterfactual exposure intervention, under a pre-specified distribution of the mediator independent of any causes, or under a fixed controlled value. A final regression of the potential outcome on the exposure intervention variable was used to compute point estimates and bootstrap was used to obtain confidence intervals. Through contrasting different potential outcomes, this analytical framework provides an intuitive way of estimating effects under the recently introduced 3- and 4-way effect decomposition. This framework can be extended to complex multivariable and longitudinal mediation settings

  19. An Attributional Analysis of Reactions to Negative Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Kaori

    1995-01-01

    Three studies examined observers' attributions and reactions to negative emotional displays, as well as expressers' expectations about others' reactions. Analysis revealed that people attribute others' negative emotions equally to situational factors and dispositions, whereas their own emotions are attributed to the situation more than to…

  20. Nonlinear analysis of a reaction-diffusion system: Amplitude equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15

    A reaction-diffusion system with a nonlinear diffusion term is considered. Based on nonlinear analysis, the amplitude equations are obtained in the cases of the Hopf and Turing instabilities in the system. Turing pattern-forming regions in the parameter space are determined for supercritical and subcritical instabilities in a two-component reaction-diffusion system.

  1. Analysis of partial and total inelasticities obtained from inclusive reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellandi, J.; Covolan, R.; Costa, C.G.; Montanha, J.; Mundim, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    An independent analysis of model for energetic dependence on inelasticity is presented, from experimental data of pp → c X (c = π +- , Κ +- , p +- ) type inclusive reactions. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Analysis by nuclear reactions and activations. A current bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujdoso, E.

    2001-01-01

    A current bibliography based on INIS Atomindex with 78 references on Analysis by nuclear reactions and activations has been prepared for year 1998. References are arranged by first authors' name. (N.T.)

  3. Stability Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion System Modeling Atherogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Ibragimov, Akif; Ritter, Laura; Walton, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a linear, asymptotic stability analysis for a reaction-diffusionconvection system modeling atherogenesis, the initiation of atherosclerosis, as an inflammatory instability. Motivated by the disease paradigm articulated by Ross

  4. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Pantazis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially) sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in "sloppy" systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of parameters over the

  5. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Arampatzis

    Full Text Available Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in "sloppy" systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of

  6. Demonstration of innovative techniques for work zone safety data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Based upon the results of the simulator data analysis, additional future research can be : identified to validate the driving simulator in terms of similarities with Ohio work zones. For : instance, the speeds observed in the simulator were greater f...

  7. Quantitative surface analysis using deuteron-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afarideh, Hossein

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique consists of looking at the energies of the reaction products which uniquely define the particular elements present in the sample and it analysis the yield/energy distribution to reveal depth profiles. A summary of the basic features of the nuclear reaction analysis technique is given, in particular emphasis is placed on quantitative light element determination using (d,p) and (d,alpha) reactions. The experimental apparatus is also described. Finally a set of (d,p) spectra for the elements Z=3 to Z=17 using 2 MeV incident deutrons is included together with example of more applications of the (d,alpha) spectra. (author)

  8. Global Inventory and Analysis of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, W.; Kumpavat, K.; Faasen, C.; Verheij, F.; Vaessen, P [DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    As the key enabler of a more sustainable, economical and reliable energy system, the development of smart grids has received a great deal of attention in recent times. In many countries around the world the benefits of such a system have begun to be investigated through a number of demonstration projects. With such a vast array of projects it can be difficult to keep track of changes, and to understand which best practices are currently available with regard to smart grids. This report aims to address these issues through providing a comprehensive outlook on the current status of smart grid projects worldwide.

  9. Demonstration study on shielding safety analysis code (8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamura, Sadashi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    Dose evaluation for direct radiation and skyshine from nuclear fuel facilities is one of the environment evaluation items. This evaluation is carried out by using some shielding calculation codes. Because of extremely few benchmark data of skyshine, the calculation has to be performed very conservatively. Therefore, the benchmark data of skyshine and the well-investigated code for skyshine would be necessary to carry out the rational evaluation of nuclear facilities. The purpose of this study is to obtain the benchmark data of skyshine and to investigate the calculation code for skyshine. In this fiscal year, the followings are investigated. (1) A {sup 3}He detector and some instruments are added to the former detection system to increase the detection sensitivity in pulsed neutron measurements. Using the new detection system, the skyshine of neutrons from 45 MeV LINAC facility are measured in the distance up to 350 m. (2) To estimate the spectrum of leakage neutron from the facility, {sup 3}He detector with moderators is constructed and the response functions of the detector are calculated using the MCNP simulation code. The leakage spectrum in the facility are measured and unfolded using the SAND-II code. (3) Using the EGS code and/or MCNP code, neutron yields by the photo-nuclear reaction in the lead target are calculated. Then, the neutron fluence at some points including the duct (from which neutrons leaks and is considered to be a skyshine source) is simulated by MCNP MONTE CARLO code. (4) In the distance up to 350 m from the facility, neutron fluence due to the skyshine process are calculated and compared with the experimental results. The comparison gives a fairly good agreement. (author)

  10. Isothermal reaction calorimetry as a tool for kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zogg, Andreas; Stoessel, Francis; Fischer, Ulrich; Hungerbuehler, Konrad

    2004-01-01

    Reaction calorimetry has found widespread application for thermal and kinetic analysis of chemical reactions in the context of thermal process safety as well as process development. This paper reviews the most important reaction calorimetric principles (heat-flow, heat-balance, power-compensation, and Peltier principle) and their applications in commercial or scientific devices. The discussion focuses on the different dynamic behavior of the main calorimetric principles during an isothermal reaction measurement. Examples of available reaction calorimeters are further compared considering their detection limit, time constant as well as temperature range. In a second part, different evaluation methods for the isothermally measured calorimetric data are reviewed and discussed. The methods will be compared, focusing especially on the fact that reaction calorimetric data always contains additional informations not directly related to the actual chemical reaction such as heat of mixing, heat of phase-transfer/change processes or simple measurement errors. Depending on the evaluation method applied such disturbances have a significant influence on the calculated reaction enthalpies or rate constants

  11. Numerical Analysis of Microwave Heating on Saponification Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kama; Jia, Kun

    2005-01-01

    Currently, microwave is widely used in chemical industry to accelerate chemical reactions. Saponification reaction has important applications in industry; some research results have shown that microwave heating can significantly accelerate the reaction [1]. But so far, no efficient method has been reported for the analysis of the heating process and design of an efficient reactor powered by microwave. In this paper, we present a method to study the microwave heating process on saponification reaction, where the reactant in a test tube is considered as a mixture of dilute solution. According to the preliminary measurement results, the effective permittivity of the mixture is approximately the permittivity of water, but the conductivity, which could change with the reaction, is derived from the reaction equation (RE). The electromagnetic field equation and reaction equation are coupled by the conductivity. Following that, the whole heating processes, which is described by Maxwell's equations, the reaction equation and heat transport equation (HTE), is analyzed by finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The temperature rising in the test tube are measured and compared with the computational results. Good agreement can be seen between the measured and calculated results.

  12. Ex-vacuo nuclear reaction analysis of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.R.; Doyle, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique for performing in-air d( 3 He, p) nuclear reaction analysis of deuterium using external 3 He ion beams ranging in energy from 0.3-2.0 MeV is presented. Variable on-target beam energies for the depth profiling of deuterium are obtained by varying the transmission distance of the external 3 He beam in air. The ex-vacuo nuclear reaction analysis (XNRA) apparatus is described, and unique aspects and limitations of in-air depth profiling of deuterium using the d( 3 He, p) reaction are discussed. Example analyses where XNRA has been used for the multidimensional measurement of deuterium in fusion reactor components are presented in order to illustrate the advantages of XNRA for deuterium. These advantages include nondestructive analysis of large targets, efficient depth profiling via variable air gap energy tuning, and rapid analysis of numerous samples in the absence of vacuum cycling. (orig.)

  13. Demonstration study on shielding safety analysis code (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamura, Sadashi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-03-01

    Dose evaluation for direct radiation and skyshine from nuclear fuel facilities is one of the environment evaluation items. This evaluation is carried out by using some shielding calculation codes. Because of extremely few benchmark data of skyshine, the calculation has to be performed very conservatively. Therefore, the benchmark data of skyshine and the well-investigated code for skyshine would be necessary to carry out the rational evaluation of nuclear facilities. The purpose of this steady is to obtain the benchmark data of skyshine and to investigate the calculation code for skyshine. In this fiscal year, the followings are investigated; (1) Construction and improvement of a pulsed radiation measurement system due to the gated counting method. (2) Using the system, carried out the radiation monitoring near and in the facility of 45 MeV Linear accelerator installed at Hokkaido University. (3) Simulation analysis of the photo-neutron production and the transport by using the EGS4 and MCNP code. (author)

  14. Geospatial analysis of food environment demonstrates associations with gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Maike K; Suter, Melissa A; Ballas, Jerasimos; Ramin, Susan M; Monga, Manju; Lee, Wesley; Hu, Min; Shope, Cindy D; Chesnokova, Arina; Krannich, Laura; Griffin, Emily N; Mastrobattista, Joan; Dildy, Gary A; Strehlow, Stacy L; Ramphul, Ryan; Hamilton, Winifred J; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of most common complications of pregnancy, with incidence rates varying by maternal age, race/ethnicity, obesity, parity, and family history. Given its increasing prevalence in recent decades, covariant environmental and sociodemographic factors may be additional determinants of GDM occurrence. We hypothesized that environmental risk factors, in particular measures of the food environment, may be a diabetes contributor. We employed geospatial modeling in a populous US county to characterize the association of the relative availability of fast food restaurants and supermarkets to GDM. Utilizing a perinatal database with >4900 encoded antenatal and outcome variables inclusive of ZIP code data, 8912 consecutive pregnancies were analyzed for correlations between GDM and food environment based on countywide food permit registration data. Linkage between pregnancies and food environment was achieved on the basis of validated 5-digit ZIP code data. The prevalence of supermarkets and fast food restaurants per 100,000 inhabitants for each ZIP code were gathered from publicly available food permit sources. To independently authenticate our findings with objective data, we measured hemoglobin A1c levels as a function of geospatial distribution of food environment in a matched subset (n = 80). Residence in neighborhoods with a high prevalence of fast food restaurants (fourth quartile) was significantly associated with an increased risk of developing GDM (relative to first quartile: adjusted odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.19). In multivariate analysis, this association held true after controlling for potential confounders (P = .002). Measurement of hemoglobin A1c levels in a matched subset were significantly increased in association with residence in a ZIP code with a higher fast food/supermarket ratio (n = 80, r = 0.251 P analysis, a relationship of food environment and risk for gestational diabetes was

  15. Structural parameter identifiability analysis for dynamic reaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidescu, Florin Paul; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2008-01-01

    method based on Lie derivatives. The proposed systematic two phase methodology is illustrated on a mass action based model for an enzymatically catalyzed reaction pathway network where only a limited set of variables is measured. The methodology clearly pinpoints the structurally identifiable parameters...... where for a given set of measured variables it is desirable to investigate which parameters may be estimated prior to spending computational effort on the actual estimation. This contribution addresses the structural parameter identifiability problem for the typical case of reaction network models....... The proposed analysis is performed in two phases. The first phase determines the structurally identifiable reaction rates based on reaction network stoichiometry. The second phase assesses the structural parameter identifiability of the specific kinetic rate expressions using a generating series expansion...

  16. Photosynthesis Is Widely Distributed among Proteobacteria as Demonstrated by the Phylogeny of PufLM Reaction Center Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes F. Imhoff

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different photosystems for performing bacteriochlorophyll-mediated photosynthetic energy conversion are employed in different bacterial phyla. Those bacteria employing a photosystem II type of photosynthetic apparatus include the phototrophic purple bacteria (Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonas and Chloroflexus with their photosynthetic relatives. The proteins of the photosynthetic reaction center PufL and PufM are essential components and are common to all bacteria with a type-II photosynthetic apparatus, including the anaerobic as well as the aerobic phototrophic Proteobacteria. Therefore, PufL and PufM proteins and their genes are perfect tools to evaluate the phylogeny of the photosynthetic apparatus and to study the diversity of the bacteria employing this photosystem in nature. Almost complete pufLM gene sequences and the derived protein sequences from 152 type strains and 45 additional strains of phototrophic Proteobacteria employing photosystem II were compared. The results give interesting and comprehensive insights into the phylogeny of the photosynthetic apparatus and clearly define Chromatiales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales as major groups distinct from other Alphaproteobacteria, from Betaproteobacteria and from Caulobacterales (Brevundimonas subvibrioides. A special relationship exists between the PufLM sequences of those bacteria employing bacteriochlorophyll b instead of bacteriochlorophyll a. A clear phylogenetic association of aerobic phototrophic purple bacteria to anaerobic purple bacteria according to their PufLM sequences is demonstrated indicating multiple evolutionary lines from anaerobic to aerobic phototrophic purple bacteria. The impact of pufLM gene sequences for studies on the environmental diversity of phototrophic bacteria is discussed and the possibility of their identification on the species level in environmental samples is pointed out.

  17. Using a CBL Unit, a Temperature Sensor, and a Graphing Calculator to Model the Kinetics of Consecutive First-Order Reactions as Safe In-Class Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Russo, Deborah A.; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.; Schuman, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of Calculator-Based Laboratory (CBL) technology, the graphing calculator, and the cooling and heating of water to model the behavior of consecutive first-order reactions is presented, where B is the reactant, I is the intermediate, and P is the product for an in-class demonstration. The activity demonstrates the spontaneous and consecutive…

  18. Nuclear reaction analysis of hydrogen in materials: Principals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanford, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis for hydrogen in materials is difficult by most traditional analytic methods. Because hydrogen has no Auger transitions, no X-ray transitions, does not neutron activate, and does not backscatter ions, it is invisible in analytical methods based on these effects. In addition, since hydrogen is a universal contaminant in vacuum systems, techniques based on mass spectrometry are difficult unless extreme measures are taken to reduce hydrogen backgrounds. Because of this situation, methods have been developed for analyzing for hydrogen in solid materials based on nuclear reactions between bombarding ions and hydrogen atoms (protons) in the samples. The nuclear reaction methods are now practiced at laboratories around the world. The basic principals of nuclear reaction analysis will be briefly presented. This method will be illustrated by applications to problems ranging from basic physics, to geology, to materials science, and to art history and archeology

  19. Analysis of trace gases at ppb levels by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindinger, W.; Hansel, A.

    1996-01-01

    A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) system has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of trace gas components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H 3 O + ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of medical information obtained by means of breath analysis, of environmental trace analysis, and examples in the field of food chemistry demonstrate the wide applicability of the method. (Authors)

  20. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ... in the nitrogen environment. Keywords. Surface reactivity ... sium (Na–K) compounds in the coating or core of the ..... Barkshire I R, Pruton M and Smith G C 1995 Appl. Sur.

  1. Improvement on reaction model for sodium-water reaction jet code and application analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itooka, Satoshi; Saito, Yoshinori; Okabe, Ayao; Fujimata, Kazuhiro; Murata, Shuuichi

    2000-03-01

    In selecting the reasonable DBL on steam generator (SG), it is necessary to improve analytical method for estimating the sodium temperature on failure propagation due to overheating. Improvement on sodium-water reaction (SWR) jet code (LEAP-JET ver.1.30) and application analysis to the water injection tests for confirmation of code propriety were performed. On the improvement of the code, a gas-liquid interface area density model was introduced to develop a chemical reaction model with a little dependence on calculation mesh size. The test calculation using the improved code (LEAP-JET ver.1.40) were carried out with conditions of the SWAT-3·Run-19 test and an actual scale SG. It is confirmed that the SWR jet behavior on the results and the influence to analysis result of a model are reasonable. For the application analysis to the water injection tests, water injection behavior and SWR jet behavior analyses on the new SWAT-1 (SWAT-1R) and SWAT-3 (SWAT-3R) tests were performed using the LEAP-BLOW code and the LEAP-JET code. In the application analysis of the LEAP-BLOW code, parameter survey study was performed. As the results, the condition of the injection nozzle diameter needed to simulate the water leak rate was confirmed. In the application analysis of the LEAP-JET code, temperature behavior of the SWR jet was investigated. (author)

  2. Multifractal scaling analysis of autopoisoning reactions over a rough surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, Ajay; Yan, Ching-Cher Sanders; Lee, S.-L.

    2003-01-01

    Decay type diffusion-limited reactions (DLR) over a rough surface generated by a random deposition model were performed. To study the effect of the decay profile on the reaction probability distribution (RPD), multifractal scaling analysis has been carried out. The dynamics of these autopoisoning reactions are controlled by the two parameters in the decay function, namely, the initial sticking probability (P ini ) of every site and the decay rate (m). The smaller the decay rate, the narrower is the range of α values in the α-f(α) multifractal spectrum. The results are compared with the earlier work of DLR over a surface of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). We also considered here the autopoisoning reactions over a smooth surface for comparing our results, which show clearly how the roughness affects the chemical reactions. The q-τ(q) multifractal curves for the smooth surface are linear whereas those for the rough surface are nonlinear. The range of α values in the case of a rough surface is wider than that of the smooth surface

  3. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  4. Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Phosphotransferase System. Functional Asymmetry in Enzyme I Subunits Demonstrated by Reaction with 3-Bromopyruvate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve-Duurkens, Ria ten; Robillard, George T.

    1984-01-01

    In the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport systems, enzyme I (EI) is responsible for the initial reaction step which is the transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphoenolpyruvate to a cytoplasmic phosphocarrier protein (HPr). The inactivation of enzyme I by the substrate

  5. A Fluorogenic Aromatic Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction for Demonstrating Normal-Phase Chromatography and Isolation of Nitrobenzoxadiazole Chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Jessie A.; Li, Matthew D.; Cairo, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    Normal-phase chromatography is an essential technique for monitoring chemical reactions, identifying the presence of specific components, as well as the purification of organic compounds. An experiment to facilitate the instruction and understanding of the concepts behind normal-phase chromatography at the introductory and intermediate…

  6. Hydrogen release from irradiated elastomers measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagielski, J., E-mail: jacek.jagielski@itme.edu.pl [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-926 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Ostaszewska, U. [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials & Dyes, Division of Elastomers & Rubber Technology, Harcerska 30, 05-820 Piastow (Poland); Bielinski, D.M. [Technical University of Lodz, Institute of Polymer & Dye Technology, Stefanowskiego 12/16, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Grambole, D. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf, PO Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Romaniec, M.; Jozwik, I.; Kozinski, R. [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-926 Warszawa (Poland); Kosinska, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    Ion irradiation appears as an interesting method of modification of elastomers, especially friction and wear properties. Main structural effect caused by heavy ions is a massive loss of hydrogen from the surface layer leading to its smoothening and shrinking. The paper presents the results of hydrogen release from various elastomers upon irradiation with H{sup +}, He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} studied by using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) method. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that the hydrogen release is controlled by inelastic collisions between ions and target electrons. The last part of the study was focused on preliminary analysis of mechanical properties of irradiated rubbers.

  7. Regression analysis of a chemical reaction fouling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasak, F.; Epstein, N.

    1996-01-01

    A previously reported mathematical model for the initial chemical reaction fouling of a heated tube is critically examined in the light of the experimental data for which it was developed. A regression analysis of the model with respect to that data shows that the reference point upon which the two adjustable parameters of the model were originally based was well chosen, albeit fortuitously. (author). 3 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  8. Practical lesson of Photosynthesis: A demonstration of Hill reaction in chloroplasts with energy dissipation by fluorescence upon photosystems uncoupling or inhibition by Diuron herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Ravara Viviani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During photosynthesis, the photochemical electron transfer process is easily demonstrated by the Hill reaction, where artificial electron acceptors are reduced by active chloroplasts suspensions in the presence of light.  However, the destiny of luminous energy absorbed by chlorophyll molecules in uncoupled or damaged photosystems is not usually demonstrated. Here we provide an adaptation of the classical Hill reaction using intact spinach chloroplasts, which includes the visualization of energy dissipation by fluorescence in lysed chloroplasts, and a dose/effect response in photosystems inhibited by the herbicide DCMU. This laboratory lesson, which is aimed to biochemistry and biophysics for undergraduate courses of Chemistry, Biological, Environmental and Agricultural Sciences, provides the basic photochemical principles using the classical Hill reaction, and photophysical principles through the visualization of energy dissipation by chlorophyll fluorescence,  improving the understanding of the photosynthetic process, and introducing the concept of fluorescence and its applications as bioanalytical tool to monitor photosynthesis in plants and vegetal ecosystems.

  9. Demonstrations of the Action and Reaction Law and the Energy Conservation Law Using Fine Spherical Plastic Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumaeni, A.; Tanaka, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Lee, Y. I.; Kurniawan, K. H.; Ishii, K.; Kagawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    Equipment for demonstrating Newton's third law and the energy conservation law in mechanics have successfully been constructed utilizing fine spherical plastic beads in place of metal ball bearings. To demonstrate Newton's third law, special magnetized Petri dishes were employed as objects, while to examine the energy conservation law, a…

  10. Fabricating Simple Wax Screen-Printing Paper-Based Analytical Devices to Demonstrate the Concept of Limiting Reagent in Acid- Base Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwong, Pithakpong; Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Chairam, Sanoe

    2018-01-01

    In this article, a low-cost, simple, and rapid fabrication of paper-based analytical devices (PADs) using a wax screen-printing method is reported here. The acid-base reaction is implemented in the simple PADs to demonstrate to students the chemistry concept of a limiting reagent. When a fixed concentration of base reacts with a gradually…

  11. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  12. Derivatization reactions in the gas—liquid chromatographic analysis of drugs in biological fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff, A.; Lingeman, H.

    1984-01-01

    Alkylation, acylation, silylation and other derivatization reactions applied to the gas chromatographic analysis of drugs in biological matrices are reviewed. Reaction conditions are discussed in relation to reaction mechanisms. Detector-oriented labelling of drugs, and derivatization with chiral

  13. System of gait analysis based on ground reaction force assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Vaverka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biomechanical analysis of gait employs various methods used in kinematic and kinetic analysis, EMG, and others. One of the most frequently used methods is kinetic analysis based on the assessment of the ground reaction forces (GRF recorded on two force plates. Objective: The aim of the study was to present a method of gait analysis based on the assessment of the GRF recorded during the stance phase of two steps. Methods: The GRF recorded with a force plate on one leg during stance phase has three components acting in directions: Fx - mediolateral, Fy - anteroposterior, and Fz - vertical. A custom-written MATLAB script was used for gait analysis in this study. This software displays instantaneous force data for both legs as Fx(t, Fy(t and Fz(t curves, automatically determines the extremes of functions and sets the visual markers defining the individual points of interest. Positions of these markers can be easily adjusted by the rater, which may be necessary if the GRF has an atypical pattern. The analysis is fully automated and analyzing one trial takes only 1-2 minutes. Results: The method allows quantification of temporal variables of the extremes of the Fx(t, Fy(t, Fz(t functions, durations of the braking and propulsive phase, duration of the double support phase, the magnitudes of reaction forces in extremes of measured functions, impulses of force, and indices of symmetry. The analysis results in a standardized set of 78 variables (temporal, force, indices of symmetry which can serve as a basis for further research and diagnostics. Conclusions: The resulting set of variable offers a wide choice for selecting a specific group of variables with consideration to a particular research topic. The advantage of this method is the standardization of the GRF analysis, low time requirements allowing rapid analysis of a large number of trials in a short time, and comparability of the variables obtained during different research measurements.

  14. TCE degradation in groundwater by chelators-assisted Fenton-like reaction of magnetite: Sand columns demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Daqing; Sun, Sheng-Peng; Wu, Zhangxiong; Wang, Na; Jin, Yaoyao; Dong, Weiyang; Chen, Xiao Dong; Ke, Qiang

    2018-03-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in sand columns has been investigated to evaluate the potential of chelates-enhanced Fenton-like reaction with magnetite as iron source for in situ treatment of TCE-contaminated groundwater. The results showed that successful degradation of TCE in sand columns was obtained by nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-assisted Fenton-like reaction of magnetite. Addition of ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) resulted in an inhibitory effect on TCE degradation in sand columns. Similar to EDDS, addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) also led to an inhibition of TCE degradation in sand column with small content of magnetite (0.5 w.t.%), but enhanced TCE degradation in sand column with high content of magnetite (7.0 w.t.%). Additionally, the presence of NTA, EDDS and EDTA greatly decreased H 2 O 2 uptake in sand columns due to the competition between chelates and H 2 O 2 for surface sites on magnetite (and sand). Furthermore, the presented results show that magnetite in sand columns remained stable in a long period operation of 230 days without significant loss of performance in terms of TCE degradation and H 2 O 2 uptake. Moreover, it was found that TCE was degraded mainly to formic acid and chloride ion, and the formation of chlorinated organic intermediates was minimal by this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Passivity analysis for uncertain BAM neural networks with time delays and reaction-diffusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianping; Xu, Shengyuan; Shen, Hao; Zhang, Baoyong

    2013-08-01

    This article deals with the problem of passivity analysis for delayed reaction-diffusion bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with weight uncertainties. By using a new integral inequality, we first present a passivity condition for the nominal networks, and then extend the result to the case with linear fractional weight uncertainties. The proposed conditions are expressed in terms of linear matrix inequalities, and thus can be checked easily. Examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  16. Status of CONRAD, a nuclear reaction analysis tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint Jean, C. de; Habert, B.; Litaize, O.; Noguere, G.; Suteau, C.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a software tool (CONRAD) was initiated at CEA/Cadarache to give answers to various problems arising in the data analysis of nuclear reactions. This tool is then characterized by the handling of uncertainties from experimental values to covariance matrices for multi-group cross sections. An object oriented design was chosen allowing an easy interface with graphical tool for input/output data and being a natural framework for innovative nuclear models (Fission). The major achieved developments are a data model for describing channels, nuclear reactions, nuclear models and processes with interface to classical data formats, theoretical calculations for the resolved resonance range (Reich-Moore) and unresolved resonance range (Hauser-Feshbach, Gilbert-Cameron,...) with nuclear model parameters adjustment on experimental data sets and a Monte Carlo method based on conditional probabilities developed to calculate properly covariance matrices. The on-going developments deal with the experimental data description (covariance matrices) and the graphical user interface. (authors)

  17. Comparing transfusion reaction rates for various plasma types: a systematic review and meta-analysis/regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadah, Nicholas H; van Hout, Fabienne M A; Schipperus, Martin R; le Cessie, Saskia; Middelburg, Rutger A; Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna C; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2017-09-01

    We estimated rates for common plasma-associated transfusion reactions and compared reported rates for various plasma types. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed articles that reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Random-effects pooled rates were calculated and compared between plasma types. Meta-regression was used to compare various plasma types with regard to their reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Forty-eight studies reported transfusion reaction rates for fresh-frozen plasma (FFP; mixed-sex and male-only), amotosalen INTERCEPT FFP, methylene blue-treated FFP, and solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma. Random-effects pooled average rates for FFP were: allergic reactions, 92/10 5 units transfused (95% confidence interval [CI], 46-184/10 5 units transfused); febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs), 12/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 7-22/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), 6/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1-30/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), 1.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1.2-2.7/10 5 units transfused); and anaphylactic reactions, 0.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 0-45.7/10 5 units transfused). Risk differences between plasma types were not significant for allergic reactions, TACO, or anaphylactic reactions. Methylene blue-treated FFP led to fewer FNHTRs than FFP (risk difference = -15.3 FNHTRs/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -24.7 to -7.1 reactions/10 5 units transfused); and male-only FFP led to fewer cases of TRALI than mixed-sex FFP (risk difference = -0.74 TRALI/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -2.42 to -0.42 injuries/10 5 units transfused). Meta-regression demonstrates that the rate of FNHTRs is lower for methylene blue-treated compared with FFP, and the rate of TRALI is lower for male-only than for mixed-sex FFP; whereas no significant differences are observed between plasma types for allergic reactions, TACO

  18. Students' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Incorporation of Demonstrations, Popular Media Videos, and Animations Concerning Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Students often struggle with learning complex chemistry concepts. In today's society with the advances in multimedia technology, educators have a variety of tools available to help students learn these concepts. These tools include demonstrations, videos in the popular media, and animations; referred to collectively as multimethods. With the…

  19. A Demonstrative Analysis of News Articles Using Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Randy Y. Briones

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to demonstrate Norman Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA framework by conducting internal and external level analyses on two online news articles that report on the Moro Islamic Liberation Front’s (MILF submission of its findings on the “Mamasapano Incident” that happened in the Philippines in 2015. In performing analyses using this framework, the social context and background for these texts, as well as the relationship between the internal discourse features and the external social practices and structures in which the texts were produced are thoroughly examined. As a result, it can be noted that from the texts’ internal discourse features, the news articles portray ideological and social distinctions among social actors such as the Philippine Senate, the SAF troopers, the MILF, the MILF fighters, and the civilians. Moreover, from the viewpoint of the texts as being external social practices, the texts maintain institutional identities as news reports, but they also reveal some evaluative stance as exemplified by the adjectival phrases that the writers employed. Having both the internal and external features examined, it can be said that the way these texts were written seems to portray power relations that exist between the Philippine government and the MILF. Key words: Critical Discourse Analysis, discourse analysis, news articles, social practices, social structures, power relations

  20. iADRs: towards online adverse drug reaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Yang; Li, He-Yi; Du, Jhih-Wei; Feng, Wen-Yu; Lo, Chiao-Feng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2012-12-01

    Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) is one of the most important issues in the assessment of drug safety. In fact, many adverse drug reactions are not discovered during limited pre-marketing clinical trials; instead, they are only observed after long term post-marketing surveillance of drug usage. In light of this, the detection of adverse drug reactions, as early as possible, is an important topic of research for the pharmaceutical industry. Recently, large numbers of adverse events and the development of data mining technology have motivated the development of statistical and data mining methods for the detection of ADRs. These stand-alone methods, with no integration into knowledge discovery systems, are tedious and inconvenient for users and the processes for exploration are time-consuming. This paper proposes an interactive system platform for the detection of ADRs. By integrating an ADR data warehouse and innovative data mining techniques, the proposed system not only supports OLAP style multidimensional analysis of ADRs, but also allows the interactive discovery of associations between drugs and symptoms, called a drug-ADR association rule, which can be further developed using other factors of interest to the user, such as demographic information. The experiments indicate that interesting and valuable drug-ADR association rules can be efficiently mined.

  1. Thermogravimetric analysis of the beryllium/steam reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druyts, Frank E-mail: fdruyts@sckcen.be; Iseghem, Pierre van

    2000-11-01

    In view of the safety assessment of new fusion reactor designs, kinetic data are needed on the beryllium/steam reaction. Therefore, thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the reactivity of beryllium in steam as a function of temperature, irradiation history and porosity of the samples. To this purpose, reference unirradiated S-200 VHP beryllium samples were compared with specimens irradiated in the BR2 reactor up to fast neutron fluences (E>1 MeV) of respectively 1.6x10{sup 21} n cm{sup -2} (resulting in a helium content of 300 appm He and a theoretical density of 99.9%) and 4x10{sup 22} n cm{sup -2} (21000 appm He, 97.2% theoretical density). Kinetics were parabolic for all tested beryllium types at 600 deg. C. At 700 deg. C, kinetics were parabolic for the unirradiated and irradiated 99.9% dense beryllium, and accelerating/linear for the irradiated 97.2% material. At 800 deg. C, all samples showed accelerating/linear behaviour. There was no influence of porosity on the reaction rate of beryllium in steam within the limited investigated density range, except at 700 deg. C, where the measured reaction rate for the irradiated 97.2% dense samples is an order of magnitude higher than for the irradiated 99.9% dense specimens.

  2. Integrating reaction and analysis: investigation of higher-order reactions by cryogenic trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrollan Stockinger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for the investigation of a higher-order reaction by on-column reaction gas chromatography is presented. The reaction and the analytical separation are combined in a single experiment to investigate the Diels–Alder reaction of benzenediazonium-2-carboxylate as a benzyne precursor with various anthracene derivatives, i.e. anthracene, 9-bromoanthracene, 9-anthracenecarboxaldehyde and 9-anthracenemethanol. To overcome limitations of short reaction contact times at elevated temperatures a novel experimental setup was developed involving a cooling trap to achieve focusing and mixing of the reactants at a defined spot in a fused-silica capillary. This trap functions as a reactor within the separation column in the oven of a gas chromatograph. The reactants are sequentially injected to avoid undefined mixing in the injection port. An experimental protocol was developed with optimized injection intervals and cooling times to achieve sufficient conversions at short reaction times. Reaction products were rapidly identified by mass spectrometric detection. This new approach represents a practical procedure to investigate higher-order reactions at an analytical level and it simultaneously provides valuable information for the optimization of the reaction conditions.

  3. Global sensitivity analysis in stochastic simulators of uncertain reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Jimenez, M; Le Maître, O P; Knio, O M

    2016-12-28

    Stochastic models of chemical systems are often subjected to uncertainties in kinetic parameters in addition to the inherent random nature of their dynamics. Uncertainty quantification in such systems is generally achieved by means of sensitivity analyses in which one characterizes the variability with the uncertain kinetic parameters of the first statistical moments of model predictions. In this work, we propose an original global sensitivity analysis method where the parametric and inherent variability sources are both treated through Sobol's decomposition of the variance into contributions from arbitrary subset of uncertain parameters and stochastic reaction channels. The conceptual development only assumes that the inherent and parametric sources are independent, and considers the Poisson processes in the random-time-change representation of the state dynamics as the fundamental objects governing the inherent stochasticity. A sampling algorithm is proposed to perform the global sensitivity analysis, and to estimate the partial variances and sensitivity indices characterizing the importance of the various sources of variability and their interactions. The birth-death and Schlögl models are used to illustrate both the implementation of the algorithm and the richness of the proposed analysis method. The output of the proposed sensitivity analysis is also contrasted with a local derivative-based sensitivity analysis method classically used for this type of systems.

  4. Global sensitivity analysis in stochastic simulators of uncertain reaction networks

    KAUST Repository

    Navarro, María

    2016-12-26

    Stochastic models of chemical systems are often subjected to uncertainties in kinetic parameters in addition to the inherent random nature of their dynamics. Uncertainty quantification in such systems is generally achieved by means of sensitivity analyses in which one characterizes the variability with the uncertain kinetic parameters of the first statistical moments of model predictions. In this work, we propose an original global sensitivity analysis method where the parametric and inherent variability sources are both treated through Sobol’s decomposition of the variance into contributions from arbitrary subset of uncertain parameters and stochastic reaction channels. The conceptual development only assumes that the inherent and parametric sources are independent, and considers the Poisson processes in the random-time-change representation of the state dynamics as the fundamental objects governing the inherent stochasticity. A sampling algorithm is proposed to perform the global sensitivity analysis, and to estimate the partial variances and sensitivity indices characterizing the importance of the various sources of variability and their interactions. The birth-death and Schlögl models are used to illustrate both the implementation of the algorithm and the richness of the proposed analysis method. The output of the proposed sensitivity analysis is also contrasted with a local derivative-based sensitivity analysis method classically used for this type of systems.

  5. Reaction trajectory revealed by a joint analysis of protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Structural motions along a reaction pathway hold the secret about how a biological macromolecule functions. If each static structure were considered as a snapshot of the protein molecule in action, a large collection of structures would constitute a multidimensional conformational space of an enormous size. Here I present a joint analysis of hundreds of known structures of human hemoglobin in the Protein Data Bank. By applying singular value decomposition to distance matrices of these structures, I demonstrate that this large collection of structural snapshots, derived under a wide range of experimental conditions, arrange orderly along a reaction pathway. The structural motions along this extensive trajectory, including several helical transformations, arrive at a reverse engineered mechanism of the cooperative machinery (Ren, companion article), and shed light on pathological properties of the abnormal homotetrameric hemoglobins from α-thalassemia. This method of meta-analysis provides a general approach to structural dynamics based on static protein structures in this post genomics era.

  6. Reaction trajectory revealed by a joint analysis of protein data bank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Ren

    Full Text Available Structural motions along a reaction pathway hold the secret about how a biological macromolecule functions. If each static structure were considered as a snapshot of the protein molecule in action, a large collection of structures would constitute a multidimensional conformational space of an enormous size. Here I present a joint analysis of hundreds of known structures of human hemoglobin in the Protein Data Bank. By applying singular value decomposition to distance matrices of these structures, I demonstrate that this large collection of structural snapshots, derived under a wide range of experimental conditions, arrange orderly along a reaction pathway. The structural motions along this extensive trajectory, including several helical transformations, arrive at a reverse engineered mechanism of the cooperative machinery (Ren, companion article, and shed light on pathological properties of the abnormal homotetrameric hemoglobins from α-thalassemia. This method of meta-analysis provides a general approach to structural dynamics based on static protein structures in this post genomics era.

  7. Integrated corridor management initiative : demonstration phase evaluation - Dallas technical capability analysis test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents the test plan for conducting the Technical Capability Analysis for the United States : Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) evaluation of the Dallas U.S. 75 Integrated Corridor : Management (ICM) Initiative Demonstration. The ...

  8. Integrated corridor management initiative : demonstration phase evaluation, San Diego technical capability analysis test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This report presents the test plan for conducting the Technical Capability Analysis for the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) evaluation of the San Diego Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) Initiative Demonstration. The ICM proje...

  9. Enzymatic solubilisation and degradation of soybean fibre demonstrated by viscosity, fibre analysis and microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Jonas Laukkonen; Martens, Helle Juel; Pettersson, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a commercial multienzyme product obtained by fermentation from Aspergillus aculeatus on soybean and soybean meal was investigated using viscosity measurements, dietary fibre component analysis and different microscopy techniques utilizing histochemical dyes and antibody labelling....... The results obtained demonstrated a strong viscosity reducing effect of the enzyme preparation on soluble galactomannan and xyloglucan polysaccharides and in addition non-starch polysaccharide analysis demonstrated a notable solubilisation of all polysaccharide constituents. The degradation...

  10. Measurement of hydrogen in BCN films by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Haruyuki; Hirose, Yukio; Sasaki, Toshihiko [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Awazu, Kaoru [Industrial Research Inst., of Ishikawa, Kanazawa (Japan); Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    Hydrogen is a very common contaminant in carbon films. It can strongly influence on mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the films. The analysis of hydrogen is therefore a crucial problem produce the films with the properties required. Ion beam techniques using nuclear reactions are effective for the quantitative determination of hydrogen concentration. A specially designed spectrometer is employed for the detailed determination of hydrogen concentrations by detecting 4.43MeV {gamma}-rays from the resonant nuclear reactions {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, {alpha}{gamma}){sup 12}C at the 6.385MeV. In this study, the BCN films were formed on silicon substrate by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD), in which boron and carbon were deposited by electron beam heating of B{sub 4}C solid and nitrogen was supplied by ion implantation simultaneously. The concentrations of hydrogen in BCN films were measured using RNRA. The mechanical properties of BCN films were evaluated using an ultra-micro-hardness tester. It was confirmed that the hardness of BCN films increased with increasing the concentration of hydrogen. (author)

  11. Applications of Nuclear Reaction Analysis for Semiconductor Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Luncun

    2003-01-01

    Many thin film samples used in the semiconductor industry contain C, N and O. The detection limits and accuracy obtained by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) measurement are limited due to the small cross section values. High energy non-Rutherford backscattering is often used to enhance the sensitivities. But non-Rutherford cross section values are irregular and can not be calculated as normal Rutherford backscattering values. It is also difficult to find an appropriate energy window that for all these elements, and high-energy ions are needed. In this paper, the Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) method is used to simultaneously measure C, N and O. several applications in the semiconductor research, development, and manufacturing areas are presented

  12. Relation of expansion due to alkali silica reaction to the degree of reaction measured by SEM image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haha, M. Ben; Gallucci, E.; Guidoum, A.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy Image Analysis (SEM-IA) was used to quantify the degree of alkali silica reaction in affected microbars, mortar and concrete prisms. It was found that the degree of reaction gave a unique correlation with the macroscopic expansion for three different aggregates, stored at three temperatures and with two levels of alkali. The relationships found for the concretes and the mortars overlap when normalised by the aggregate content. This relationship seems to be linear up to a critical reaction degree which coincides with crack initiation within the reactive aggregates

  13. Stability Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion System Modeling Atherogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Ibragimov, Akif

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a linear, asymptotic stability analysis for a reaction-diffusionconvection system modeling atherogenesis, the initiation of atherosclerosis, as an inflammatory instability. Motivated by the disease paradigm articulated by Ross, atherogenesis is viewed as an inflammatory spiral with a positive feedback loop involving key cellular and chemical species interacting and reacting within the intimal layer of muscular arteries. The inflammatory spiral is initiated as an instability from a healthy state which is defined to be an equilibrium state devoid of certain key inflammatory markers. Disease initiation is studied through a linear, asymptotic stability analysis of a healthy equilibrium state. Various theorems are proved, giving conditions on system parameters guaranteeing stability of the health state, and a general framework is developed for constructing perturbations from a healthy state that exhibit blow-up, which are interpreted as corresponding to disease initiation. The analysis reveals key features that arterial geometry, antioxidant levels, and the source of inflammatory components (through coupled third-kind boundary conditions or through body sources) play in disease initiation. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  14. The development of a state-of-the-art experimental setup demonstrated by the investigation of fuel cell reactions in alkaline electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiberg, Gustav Karl Henrik

    2010-10-04

    The objectives of this work can be separated into three different topics: the design and development of a state-of-the art electrochemical experiment setup, which is then followed by two separate experimental studies in alkaline electrolyte. These studies demonstrate the capabilities of the experimental setup, and each focus on separate model catalysts. The first study investigated the influence of Pt oxide formation on the measured catalytic activity of FC relevant reactions on polycrystalline Pt in alkaline electrolyte. The second study focused on the characterisation of the ORR for a non-platinum catalyst, in this case Ag, by adapting the established thin-film RDE methodology employed for characterising Pt based electrocatalysts. A state-of-the-art electrochemical experimental setup comprises of a largely automated setup that allows meticulous control over experimental parameters such as potential, temperature, purging gas and solution convection. In order to realise such a setup, both experimental hardware and software were developed. In particular, a custom built analogue potentiostat optimised for single working electrode measurements was constructed. The potentiostat features R{sub sol}-compensation which can be monitored online due to its fully analogue design, allowing the precise current and potential relationship to be measured. In addition, the experimental throughput was enhanced by fabricating a modular add-on device, the MWE, which allows simultaneous electrochemical measurement on up to 8 parallel working electrodes. The MWE device is compatible with any single channel potentiostat, enhancing existing instrumentation. Several Teflon cells were designed for electrochemical investigations in acid and alkaline electrolytes, and were adapted to work using either the RDE or MWE. A gas changer was also assembled, which enabled computer controlled switching of electrolyte purge gas. Furthermore, in order to control the potentiostat and the accessory

  15. Modeling and analysis of liquid deuterium-water reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    This Presentation highlights the following: Overview of LD 2 -water reactions their connections to research reactors with cold sources; some key features and ingredients of vapor explosions in general; Examination of results of 1970 experiment at Grenoble Nuclear Research Center; Thermodynamic evaluations of energetics of explosive LD 2 -D 2 O reactions. This presentation concentrates only on the technical aspects of LD 2 /LH 2 - water reactions; it is not intended to draw/imply safety-related conclusions for research reactors

  16. Analysis of Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Reversible Bimolecular Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Lipková, Jana

    2011-01-01

    A class of Brownian dynamics algorithms for stochastic reaction-diffusion models which include reversible bimolecular reactions is presented and analyzed. The method is a generalization of the λ-bcȳ model for irreversible bimolecular reactions which was introduced in [R. Erban and S. J. Chapman, Phys. Biol., 6(2009), 046001]. The formulae relating the experimentally measurable quantities (reaction rate constants and diffusion constants) with the algorithm parameters are derived. The probability of geminate recombination is also investigated. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  17. Theoretical analysis of consecutive reactions in adiabatic stirred tank reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Byung Wook; Kim, Sun Il; Hong, Won Hae; Cha, Wol Suk; Kim, Soong Pyung; Kim, Jung Gyu

    1990-01-01

    By mathematical model for the case of the consecutive first-order exothermic reaction in an adiabatic CSTR, the effects of the system parameter i. e. relative residence time, heat of reaction and thermal sensitivity of reaction rate constant, on the concentration profile of the intermediate product of a consecutive reaction were obtained as follows. For fixed values of the ratio of the reaction rate constants t 1 / t 2 , the ratio of the correponding system parameter α where α>1 and the sensitivities of the reaction rate constants S1 and S2, the maximum value of the intermediate production dimensionless concentration increases with increase in the values of the relative energy parameter E1 and E2 and it decreases with a decrease in E1 and E2. For fixed values of the ratio of the reaction rate constants t 1 / t 2 , the ratio of the corresponding system parameter α where α 1 and t 2 and it increases with a decrease in S1 and S2. For fixed values of the ratio of the reaction rate constants t 1 / t 2 , the ratio of the corresponding system parameters α where α=1 and the relative energy parameters E1 and E2, the maximum value of the intermediate product dimensionless is constant with either increase or decrease in the sensitivities of the reaction rate constants S1 and S2. (Author)

  18. Modular verification of chemical reaction network encodings via serializability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Matthew R.; Stefanovic, Darko; Phillips, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reaction networks are a powerful means of specifying the intended behaviour of synthetic biochemical systems. A high-level formal specification, expressed as a chemical reaction network, may be compiled into a lower-level encoding, which can be directly implemented in wet chemistry and may itself be expressed as a chemical reaction network. Here we present conditions under which a lower-level encoding correctly emulates the sequential dynamics of a high-level chemical reaction network. We require that encodings are transactional, such that their execution is divided by a “commit reaction” that irreversibly separates the reactant-consuming phase of the encoding from the product-generating phase. We also impose restrictions on the sharing of species between reaction encodings, based on a notion of “extra tolerance”, which defines species that may be shared between encodings without enabling unwanted reactions. Our notion of correctness is serializability of interleaved reaction encodings, and if all reaction encodings satisfy our correctness properties then we can infer that the global dynamics of the system are correct. This allows us to infer correctness of any system constructed using verified encodings. As an example, we show how this approach may be used to verify two- and four-domain DNA strand displacement encodings of chemical reaction networks, and we generalize our result to the limit where the populations of helper species are unlimited. PMID:27325906

  19. Analysis of reaction products formed in the gas phase reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with atmospheric oxidants: Reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenar, I.; Martin, P.; Cabañas, B.; Salgado, S.; Martinez, E.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of reaction products for the reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with chlorine atoms (Cl) and OH and NO3 radicals has been carried out at the first time with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the tropospheric reactivity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with a Time of Flight detector (GC-TOFMS) were used to carry out the qualitative and/or quantitative analyses. Reaction products in gas and particulate phase were observed from the reactions of E,E-2,4- hexadienal with all oxidants. E/Z-Butenedial and maleic anhydride were the main products identified in gas phase. E-butenedial calculated molar yield ranging from 4 to 10%. A significant amount of multifunctional compounds (chloro and hydroxy carbonyls) was identified. These compounds could be formed in particulate phase explaining the ∼90% of unaccounted carbon in gas phase. The reaction with Cl atoms in the presence of NOx with a long reaction time gave Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN) as an additional product, which is known for being an important specie in the generation of the photochemical smog. Nitrated compounds were the major organic products from the reaction with the NO3 radical. Based on the identified products, the reaction mechanisms have been proposed. In these mechanisms a double bond addition of the atmospheric oxidant at C4/C5 of E,E-2,4-hexadienal is the first step for tropospheric degradation.

  20. Analysis of n+165Ho and 169Tm reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.; Philis, C.; Nagel, P.; Collin, M.

    1982-09-01

    Experimental data for neutron-induced reactions on 165 Ho and 169 Tm have been theoretically analyzed in preparation for calculations on the unstable isotopes of Tm. A set of deformed optical model parameters was determined from measurements of s- and p-wave neutron strength functions, total cross sections, elastic angular distributions, and 16-MeV proton scattering to the 165 Ho ground and first excited states. The parameters for the 165 Ho and 169 Tm nuclei were linked by means of an isospin term in the real and imaginary well depths, together with adjustment of the ν 2 and ν 4 deformation parameters based on systematics in this mass region. Transmission coefficients from this analysis were used in Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations of the 169 Tm(n,ν) cross section as well as the 169 Tm(n,2n) and (n,3n) cross sections to 23 MeV, after application of suitable preequilibrium corrections. The results of these calculations are in good agreement with most of the available experimental data on 165 Ho and 169 Tm

  1. Theoretical analysis of thermal molten metal-water reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalbe, W.

    1982-01-01

    In experiments with greater masses (kg-scale) two extreme cases had been oberved during the course of reaction when hot melt reacted with a vaporizable cooler liquid. Relatively mild hot interactions with slow pressure build-up and small pressure peak in the reaction volume often occurred but there were also some very violent reactions (steam explosions) where a remarkable portion of thermal energy had been transformed into mechanical energy with high pressure peaks. For the two types of reactions overall models for water as a coolant are developed here. Based on calculations and on comparisons with corresponding experiments it is shown that a relatively mild course of reaction can be explained by a fragmentation of the melt under following violent evaporation of the cooling medium. Pressures only with small reaction volumes up to the MPa range can be found in these reactions. The calculations, for example of Bird and Millington, showed a pressure maximum of 1 MPa after 170 ms of the start of the reaction; this agrees very well with the result of the experiment of 1.08 MPa. (orig./GL) [de

  2. Demonstration uncertainty/sensitivity analysis using the health and economic consequence model CRAC2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpert, D.J.; Iman, R.L.; Johnson, J.D.; Helton, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes a demonstration uncertainty/sensitivity analysis performed on the reactor accident consequence model CRAC2. The study was performed with uncertainty/sensitivity analysis techniques compiled as part of the MELCOR program. The principal objectives of the study were: 1) to demonstrate the use of the uncertainty/sensitivity analysis techniques on a health and economic consequence model, 2) to test the computer models which implement the techniques, 3) to identify possible difficulties in performing such an analysis, and 4) to explore alternative means of analyzing, displaying, and describing the results. Demonstration of the applicability of the techniques was the motivation for performing this study; thus, the results should not be taken as a definitive uncertainty analysis of health and economic consequences. Nevertheless, significant insights on health and economic consequence analysis can be drawn from the results of this type of study. Latin hypercube sampling (LHS), a modified Monte Carlo technique, was used in this study. LHS generates a multivariate input structure in which all the variables of interest are varied simultaneously and desired correlations between variables are preserved. LHS has been shown to produce estimates of output distribution functions that are comparable with results of larger random samples

  3. Measurement and analysis of $\\alpha$ particle induced reactions on yttrium

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, N L; Chintalapudi, S N

    2000-01-01

    Excitation functions for /sup 89/Y[( alpha ,3n); ( alpha ,4n); ( alpha , p3n); ( alpha , alpha n); ( alpha , alpha 2n)] reactions were measured up to 50 MeV using stacked foil activation technique and HPGe gamma ray spectroscopy method. The experimental data were compared with calculations considering equilibrium as well as preequilibrium reactions according to the hybrid model of Blann (ALICE/90). For ( alpha , xnyp) type of reactions, the precompound contributions are described by the model. There seems to be indications of direct inelastic scattering effects in ( alpha , alpha xn) type of reactions. To the best of our knowledge, the excitation functions for ( alpha ,4n), ( alpha , p3n), ( alpha , alpha n) and ( alpha , alpha 2n) reactions were measured for the first time. (23 refs).

  4. Measurement and analysis of alpha particle induced reactions on yttrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, N.L.; Gadkari, M.S. [Baroda Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics; Chintalapudi, S.N. [IUC-DAEF Calcutta Centre, Calcutta (India)

    2000-05-01

    Excitation functions for {sup 89}Y[({alpha},3n);({alpha},4n);({alpha},p3n);({alpha},{alpha}n);({alpha},{alpha}2n)] reactions were measured up to 50 MeV using stacked foil activation technique and HPGe gamma ray spectroscopy method. The experimental data were compared with calculations considering equilibrium as well as preequilibrium reactions according to the hybrid model of Blann (ALICE/90). For ({alpha},xnyp) type of reactions, the precompound contributions are described by the model. There seems to be indications of direct inelastic scattering effects in ({alpha},{alpha}xn) type of reactions. To the best of our knowledge, the excitation functions for ({alpha},4n), ({alpha},p3n), ({alpha},{alpha}n) and ({alpha},{alpha}2n) reactions were measured for the first time. (orig.)

  5. Experimental Demonstration and Theoretical Analysis of Slow Light in a Semiconductor Waveguide at GHz Frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Kjær, Rasmus; Poel, Mike van der

    2005-01-01

    Experimental demonstration and theoretical analysis of slow light in a semiconductor waveguide at GHz frequencies slow-down of light by a factor of two in a semiconductor waveguide at room temperature with a bandwidth of 16.7 GHz using the effect of coherent pulsations of the carrier density...

  6. Using Musical Intervals to Demonstrate Superposition of Waves and Fourier Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    What follows is a description of a demonstration of superposition of waves and Fourier analysis using a set of four tuning forks mounted on resonance boxes and oscilloscope software to create, capture and analyze the waveforms and Fourier spectra of musical intervals.

  7. Competing definitions: a public policy analysis of the federal recreational fee demonstration program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. E. More

    2003-01-01

    Problem definition theory specifies that however controls the definition of a problem is in a unique position to control debate over the issue, influence others, and determine the problem's place on the agenda. This paper uses a rhetorical analysis and a questionnaire survey of congressional aides to examine the federal Recreational Fee Demonstration Program....

  8. Feasibility and demonstration of a cloud-based RIID analysis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Michael C., E-mail: wrightmc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hertz, Kristin L.; Johnson, William C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Sword, Eric D.; Younkin, James R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A significant limitation in the operational utility of handheld and backpack radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) is the inability of their onboard algorithms to accurately and reliably identify the isotopic sources of the measured gamma-ray energy spectrum. A possible solution is to move the spectral analysis computations to an external device, the cloud, where significantly greater capabilities are available. The implementation and demonstration of a prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system have shown this type of system to be feasible with currently available communication and computational technology. A system study has shown that the potential user community could derive significant benefits from an appropriately implemented cloud-based analysis system and has identified the design and operational characteristics required by the users and stakeholders for such a system. A general description of the hardware and software necessary to implement reliable cloud-based analysis, the value of the cloud expressed by the user community, and the aspects of the cloud implemented in the demonstrations are discussed. - Highlights: • A prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system was implemented and demonstrated. • A cloud-based system was shown to be feasible with currently available technology. • A system study identified the operational characteristics required by the users. • The system study showed that the user community could derive significant benefit. • An architecture was defined for field testing by users in relevant environments.

  9. Feasibility and demonstration of a cloud-based RIID analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Michael C.; Hertz, Kristin L.; Johnson, William C.; Sword, Eric D.; Younkin, James R.; Sadler, Lorraine E.

    2015-01-01

    A significant limitation in the operational utility of handheld and backpack radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) is the inability of their onboard algorithms to accurately and reliably identify the isotopic sources of the measured gamma-ray energy spectrum. A possible solution is to move the spectral analysis computations to an external device, the cloud, where significantly greater capabilities are available. The implementation and demonstration of a prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system have shown this type of system to be feasible with currently available communication and computational technology. A system study has shown that the potential user community could derive significant benefits from an appropriately implemented cloud-based analysis system and has identified the design and operational characteristics required by the users and stakeholders for such a system. A general description of the hardware and software necessary to implement reliable cloud-based analysis, the value of the cloud expressed by the user community, and the aspects of the cloud implemented in the demonstrations are discussed. - Highlights: • A prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system was implemented and demonstrated. • A cloud-based system was shown to be feasible with currently available technology. • A system study identified the operational characteristics required by the users. • The system study showed that the user community could derive significant benefit. • An architecture was defined for field testing by users in relevant environments

  10. Analysis of reaction schemes using maximum rates of constituent steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motagamwala, Ali Hussain; Dumesic, James A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the steady-state kinetics of a chemical reaction can be analyzed analytically in terms of proposed reaction schemes composed of series of steps with stoichiometric numbers equal to unity by calculating the maximum rates of the constituent steps, rmax,i, assuming that all of the remaining steps are quasi-equilibrated. Analytical expressions can be derived in terms of rmax,i to calculate degrees of rate control for each step to determine the extent to which each step controls the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction. The values of rmax,i can be used to predict the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction, making it possible to estimate the observed reaction kinetics. This approach can be used for catalytic reactions to identify transition states and adsorbed species that are important in controlling catalyst performance, such that detailed calculations using electronic structure calculations (e.g., density functional theory) can be carried out for these species, whereas more approximate methods (e.g., scaling relations) are used for the remaining species. This approach to assess the feasibility of proposed reaction schemes is exact for reaction schemes where the stoichiometric coefficients of the constituent steps are equal to unity and the most abundant adsorbed species are in quasi-equilibrium with the gas phase and can be used in an approximate manner to probe the performance of more general reaction schemes, followed by more detailed analyses using full microkinetic models to determine the surface coverages by adsorbed species and the degrees of rate control of the elementary steps. PMID:27162366

  11. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for trace element detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Noll, K. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Ion beam induced nuclear reactions can be used to analyse trace element concentrations in materials. The method is especially suited for the detection of light contaminants in heavy matrices. (author) 3 figs., 2 refs.

  12. Analysis of charged particle induced reactions for beam monitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surendra Babu, K. [IOP, Academia Sinica, Taipe, Taiwan (China); Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Evaluation Laboratory, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mukherjee, S., E-mail: smukherjee_msuphy@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The reaction cross sections for different residual nuclides produced in the charged particle (p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}) induced reactions were calculated and compared with the existing experimental data which are important for beam monitoring and medical diagnostic applications. A detailed literature compilation and comparison were made on the available data sets for the above reactions. These calculations were carried out using the statistical model code TALYS up to 100 MeV, which contains Kalbach's latest systematic for the emission of complex particles and complex particle-induced reactions. All optical model calculations were performed by ECIS-03, which is built into TALYS. The level density, optical model potential parameters were adjusted to get the better description of experimental data. Various pre-equilibrium models were used in the present calculations with default parameters.

  13. Demonstration Analysis of Relationship Between R&D Investment and GDP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Bo-tang; LIU Bai-shan; CHEN Keng

    2005-01-01

    To reveal the quantitative relationship between research and development (R&D) investment and gross domestic product (GDP) in China, we have demonstrated and analyzed the relationship between R&D investment and science and technology (S&T) progress, and based on a mount of S&T statistical data, have proceeded demonstration research of the relationship between R&D investment and GDP in China with Solow and vector auto regression (VAR) models. Cubic curve fitting and cross-correlation analysis of them with SPSS have shown that there is a strong synchronic relationship between R&D investment and GDP.

  14. PA activity by using nuclear power plant safety demonstration and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Mitsuo; Kamimae, Rie

    1999-01-01

    INS/NUPEC presents one of Public acceptance (PA) methods for nuclear power in Japan, 'PA activity by using Nuclear Power Plant Safety Demonstration and Analysis', by using one of videos which is explained and analyzed accident events (Loss of Coolant Accident). Safety regulations of The National Government are strictly implemented in licensing at each of basic design and detailed design. To support safety regulation activities conducted by the National Government, INS/NLTPEC continuously implement Safety demonstration and analysis. With safety demonstration and analysis, made by assuming some abnormal conditions, what impacts could be produced by the assumed conditions are forecast based on specific design data on a given nuclear power plants. When analysis results compared with relevant decision criteria, the safety of nuclear power plants is confirmed. The decision criteria are designed to help judge if or not safety design of nuclear power plants is properly made. The decision criteria are set in the safety examination guidelines by taking sufficient safety allowance based on the latest technical knowledge obtained from a wide range of tests and safety studies. Safety demonstration and analysis is made by taking the procedure which are summarized in this presentation. In Japan, various PA (Public Acceptance) pamphlets and videos on nuclear energy have been published. But many of them focused on such topics as necessity or importance of nuclear energy, basic principles of nuclear power generation, etc., and a few described safety evaluation particularly of abnormal and accident events in accordance with the regulatory requirements. In this background, INS/NUPEC has been making efforts to prepare PA pamphlets and videos to explain the safety of nuclear power plants, to be simple and concrete enough, using various analytical computations for abnormal and accident events. In results, PA activity of INS/NUPEC is evaluated highly by the people

  15. MALDI MS-based Composition Analysis of the Polymerization Reaction of Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI) and Ethylene Glycol (EG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Lee, Yeon Jung; Kim, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an MS-based analysis method for monitoring changes in polymer composition during the polyaddition polymerization reaction of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and ethylene glycol (EG). The polymerization was monitored as a function of reaction time using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). The resulting series of polymer adducts terminated with various end-functional groups were precisely identified and the relative compositions of those series were estimated. A new MALDI MS data interpretation method was developed, consisting of a peak-resolving algorithm for overlapping peaks in MALDI MS spectra, a retrosynthetic analysis for the generation of reduced unit mass peaks, and a Gaussian fit-based selection of the most prominent polymer series among the reconstructed unit mass peaks. This method of data interpretation avoids errors originating from side reactions due to the presence of trace water in the reaction mixture or MALDI analysis. Quantitative changes in the relative compositions of the resulting polymer products were monitored as a function of reaction time. These results demonstrate that the mass data interpretation method described herein can be a powerful tool for estimating quantitative changes in the compositions of polymer products arising during a polymerization reaction.

  16. Quantitative analysis of skin reaction by reflectance spectrophotometer. Acute reaction following proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko.

    1994-01-01

    Acute reactions induced by proton irradiation were measured using a reflectance spectrophotometer, which is commonly used in the printing and textile industries. In this method, the skin color was expressed by three parameters, lightness (L * ), chroma (C * ) and hue (h). At first, in order to evaluate the accuracy of this spectrophotometer, the skin color of a normal volunteer was measured 100 times. The values of the three parameters for normal skin were as follows (mean values and standard deviation), L * : 68.64±0.29, C * : 19.08±0.13, h: 69.41±0.76. The standard deviations with regard to L * and h, were considered to be sufficiently small when compared with the changes of these parameters (prefix: Δ) in the irradiated sites (ΔL * * and h values significantly decreased with time, and the L * values were highly correlated with elapsed treatment days. The h values had a relatively low linear correlation compared with L * . The C * values had no trends as the treatment period was extended. Among these parameters, the L * values were the most valuable for assessment of proton-induced skin reactions, and it was suggested that the L * values measured with this spectrophotometer were a useful index for showing biological effects induced by proton irradiation. Further experiments are needed to apply this method to quantify the biological effects induced by other forms of ionizing radiation. (author)

  17. Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Brydger Van Otten

    2010-01-01

    Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using a wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury oxidation

  18. Supplement analysis 2 of environmental impacts resulting from modifications in the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project, located in western New York, has approximately 600,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in storage in underground tanks. While corrosion analysis has revealed that only limited tank degradation has taken place, the failure of these tanks could release HLW to the environment. Congress requires DOE to demonstrate the technology for removal and solidification of HLW. DOE issued the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) in 1982. The purpose of this second supplement analysis is to re-assess the 1982 Final Environmental Impact Statement's continued adequacy. This report provides the necessary and appropriate data for DOE to determine whether the environmental impacts presented by the ongoing refinements in the design, process, and operations of the Project are considered sufficiently bounded within the envelope of impacts presented in the FEIS and supporting documentation

  19. On the rejection-based algorithm for simulation and analysis of large-scale reaction networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research-University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Zunino, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.zunino@unitn.it [Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research-University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2015-06-28

    Stochastic simulation for in silico studies of large biochemical networks requires a great amount of computational time. We recently proposed a new exact simulation algorithm, called the rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)], to improve simulation performance by postponing and collapsing as much as possible the propensity updates. In this paper, we analyze the performance of this algorithm in detail, and improve it for simulating large-scale biochemical reaction networks. We also present a new algorithm, called simultaneous RSSA (SRSSA), which generates many independent trajectories simultaneously for the analysis of the biochemical behavior. SRSSA improves simulation performance by utilizing a single data structure across simulations to select reaction firings and forming trajectories. The memory requirement for building and storing the data structure is thus independent of the number of trajectories. The updating of the data structure when needed is performed collectively in a single operation across the simulations. The trajectories generated by SRSSA are exact and independent of each other by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We test our new improvement on real biological systems with a wide range of reaction networks to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency.

  20. Performance demonstration program plan for RCRA constituent analysis of solidified wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    Performance Demonstration Programs (PDPS) are designed to help ensure compliance with the Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The PDPs are intended for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) to assess and approve the laboratories and other measurement facilities supplying services for the characterization of WIPP TRU waste. The PDPs may also be used by CAO in qualifying laboratories proposing to supply additional analytical services that are required for other than waste characterization, such as WIPP site operations. The purpose of this PDP is to test laboratory performance for the analysis of solidified waste samples for TRU waste characterization. This performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated, solidified TRU waste according to the criteria established in this plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will address levels of regulatory concern and will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization samples. Analyses that are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples for the balance of this document

  1. Automatic simplification of systems of reaction-diffusion equations by a posteriori analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybank, Philip J; Whiteley, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    Many mathematical models in biology and physiology are represented by systems of nonlinear differential equations. In recent years these models have become increasingly complex in order to explain the enormous volume of data now available. A key role of modellers is to determine which components of the model have the greatest effect on a given observed behaviour. An approach for automatically fulfilling this role, based on a posteriori analysis, has recently been developed for nonlinear initial value ordinary differential equations [J.P. Whiteley, Model reduction using a posteriori analysis, Math. Biosci. 225 (2010) 44-52]. In this paper we extend this model reduction technique for application to both steady-state and time-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Exemplar problems drawn from biology are used to demonstrate the applicability of the technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bayesian inversion analysis of nonlinear dynamics in surface heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Toshiaki; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Okamoto, Atsushi; Hukushima, Koji

    2016-09-01

    It is essential to extract nonlinear dynamics from time-series data as an inverse problem in natural sciences. We propose a Bayesian statistical framework for extracting nonlinear dynamics of surface heterogeneous reactions from sparse and noisy observable data. Surface heterogeneous reactions are chemical reactions with conjugation of multiple phases, and they have the intrinsic nonlinearity of their dynamics caused by the effect of surface-area between different phases. We adapt a belief propagation method and an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to partial observation problem, in order to simultaneously estimate the time course of hidden variables and the kinetic parameters underlying dynamics. The proposed belief propagation method is performed by using sequential Monte Carlo algorithm in order to estimate nonlinear dynamical system. Using our proposed method, we show that the rate constants of dissolution and precipitation reactions, which are typical examples of surface heterogeneous reactions, as well as the temporal changes of solid reactants and products, were successfully estimated only from the observable temporal changes in the concentration of the dissolved intermediate product.

  3. Data analysis on work activities in dismantling of Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Kunio; Sukegawa, Takenori; Yanagihara, Satoshi

    1998-03-01

    The safe dismantling of a retired nuclear power plant was demonstrated by completion of dismantling activities for the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR), March, 1996, which had been conducted since 1986. This project was a flag ship project for dismantling of nuclear power plants in Japan, aiming at demonstrating an applicability of developed dismantling techniques in actual dismantling work, developing database on work activities as well as dismantling of components and structures. Various data on dismantling activities were therefore systematically collected and these were accumulated on computer files to build the decommissioning database; dismantling activities were characterized by analyzing the data. The data analysis resulted in producing general forms such as unit activity factors, for example, manpower need per unit weight of component to be dismantled, and simple arithmetic forms for forecasting of project management data to be applied to planning another dismantling project through the evaluation for general use of the analyzed data. The results of data analysis could be usefully applied to planning of future decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan. This report describes the data collection and analysis on the JPDR dismantling activities. (author)

  4. Complementing approaches to demonstrate chlorinated solvent biodegradation in a complex pollution plume: mass balance, PCR and compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Courbet Christelle; Rivière Agnès; Jeannottat Simon; Rinaldi Sandro; Hunkeler Daniel; Bendjoudi Hocine; De Marsily Ghislain

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the use of different complementing methods (mass balance polymerase chain reaction assays and compound specific stable isotope analysis) to demonstrate the existence and effectiveness of biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in an alluvial aquifer. The solvent contaminated site is an old chemical factory located in an alluvial plain in France. As most of the chlorinated contaminants currently found in the groundwater at this site were produced by local industries at vario...

  5. Can Technical Analysis Signals Detect Price Reactions Around Earnings Announcement?: Evidence from Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Dedhy Sulistiawan; Jogiyanto Hartono

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether technical analysis signals can detect price reactions before and after earnings announcement dates in Indonesian stock market. Earnings announcements produce reactions, both before and after the announcements. Informed investors may use private information before earnings announcements (Christophe, Ferri and Angel, 2004; Porter, 1992). Using technical analysis signals, this study expects that retail investors (uninformed investors) can detect preannouncements react...

  6. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) transuranic performance demonstration program sample packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccoy, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Transuranic Performance Demonstration Program (TPDP) sample packaging is used to transport highway route controlled quantities of weapons grade (WG) plutonium samples from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) to the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility and back. The purpose of these shipments is to test the nondestructive assay equipment in the WRAP facility as part of the Nondestructive Waste Assay PDP. The PDP is part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) National TRU Program managed by the U. S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office, Carlsbad, New Mexico. Details of this program are found in CAO-94-1045, Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay for the TRU Waste Characterization Program (CAO 1994); INEL-96/0129, Design of Benign Matrix Drums for the Non-Destructive Assay Performance Demonstration Program for the National TRU Program (INEL 1996a); and INEL-96/0245, Design of Phase 1 Radioactive Working Reference Materials for the Nondestructive Assay Performance Demonstration Program for the National TRU Program (INEL 1996b). Other program documentation is maintained by the national TRU program and each DOE site participating in the program. This safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the TRU PDP sample packaging meets the onsite transportation safety requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for an onsite Transportation Hazard Indicator (THI) 2 packaging. This SARP, however, does not include evaluation of any operations within the PFP or WRAP facilities, including handling, maintenance, storage, or operating requirements, except as they apply directly to transportation between the gate of PFP and the gate of the WRAP facility. All other activities are subject to the requirements of the facility safety analysis reports (FSAR) of the PFP or WRAP facility and requirements of the PDP

  7. Demonstration of a software design and statistical analysis methodology with application to patient outcomes data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Charles; Conners, Steve; Warren, Christopher; Miller, Robert; Court, Laurence; Popple, Richard

    2013-11-01

    With emergence of clinical outcomes databases as tools utilized routinely within institutions, comes need for software tools to support automated statistical analysis of these large data sets and intrainstitutional exchange from independent federated databases to support data pooling. In this paper, the authors present a design approach and analysis methodology that addresses both issues. A software application was constructed to automate analysis of patient outcomes data using a wide range of statistical metrics, by combining use of C#.Net and R code. The accuracy and speed of the code was evaluated using benchmark data sets. The approach provides data needed to evaluate combinations of statistical measurements for ability to identify patterns of interest in the data. Through application of the tools to a benchmark data set for dose-response threshold and to SBRT lung data sets, an algorithm was developed that uses receiver operator characteristic curves to identify a threshold value and combines use of contingency tables, Fisher exact tests, Welch t-tests, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to filter the large data set to identify values demonstrating dose-response. Kullback-Leibler divergences were used to provide additional confirmation. The work demonstrates the viability of the design approach and the software tool for analysis of large data sets.

  8. Feasibility and demonstration of a cloud-based RIID analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael C.; Hertz, Kristin L.; Johnson, William C.; Sword, Eric D.; Younkin, James R.; Sadler, Lorraine E.

    2015-06-01

    A significant limitation in the operational utility of handheld and backpack radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) is the inability of their onboard algorithms to accurately and reliably identify the isotopic sources of the measured gamma-ray energy spectrum. A possible solution is to move the spectral analysis computations to an external device, the cloud, where significantly greater capabilities are available. The implementation and demonstration of a prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system have shown this type of system to be feasible with currently available communication and computational technology. A system study has shown that the potential user community could derive significant benefits from an appropriately implemented cloud-based analysis system and has identified the design and operational characteristics required by the users and stakeholders for such a system. A general description of the hardware and software necessary to implement reliable cloud-based analysis, the value of the cloud expressed by the user community, and the aspects of the cloud implemented in the demonstrations are discussed.

  9. Constant rate thermal analysis of a dehydrogenation reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perejon, A.; Perez-Maqueda, L. A.; Sanchez-Jimenez, P.E.; Criado, J. M.; Murafa, Nataliya; Šubrt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 84 (2016), s. 81454-81460 ISSN 2046-2069 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : solid-state reaction s * hydrogen storage properties * milled magnesium hydride Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  10. Analysis of Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions at a Tertiary Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    drug reactions (ADRs) reported at Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, India. Methods: A prospective ... cost of ADRs was calculated on the basis of hospital expenditure per patient and the amount spent by patients ... drug control mechanisms, patient education regarding self-medication and maintenance of prescription records.

  11. Community College Recruitment: An Analysis of Applicant Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Paul A.; Kjorlien, Chad L.

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) conduct an empirical examination of applicant reactions to faculty jobs described in recruitment advertisements for business faculty vacancies at community colleges; and (2) assess factors that potentially impact applicant decisions to apply for and pursue position vacancies. The results of this study have…

  12. On-line Analysis of Catalytic Reaction Products Using a High-Pressure Tandem Micro-reactor GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Kim, Young-Min; Hosaka, Akihiko; Watanabe, Chuichi; Teramae, Norio; Ohtani, Hajime; Kim, Seungdo; Park, Young-Kwon; Wang, Kaige; Freeman, Robert R

    2017-01-01

    When a GC/MS system is coupled with a pressurized reactor, the separation efficiency and the retention time are directly affected by the reactor pressure. To keep the GC column flow rate constant irrespective of the reaction pressure, a restrictor capillary tube and an open split interface are attached between the GC injection port and the head of a GC separation column. The capability of the attached modules is demonstrated for the on-line GC/MS analysis of catalytic reaction products of a bio-oil model sample (guaiacol), produced under a pressure of 1 to 3 MPa.

  13. Demonstration of risk-based decision analysis in remedial alternative selection and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.K.; Duffield, G.M.; Massmann, J.W.; Freeze, R.A.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    This study demonstrates the use of risk-based decision analysis (Massmann and Freeze 1987a, 1987b) in the selection and design of an engineering alternative for groundwater remediation at a waste site at the Savannah River Site, a US Department of Energy facility in South Carolina. The investigation focuses on the remediation and closure of the H-Area Seepage Basins, an inactive disposal site that formerly received effluent water from a nearby production facility. A previous study by Duffield et al. (1992), which used risk-based decision analysis to screen a number of ground-water remediation alternatives under consideration for this site, indicated that the most attractive remedial option is ground-water extraction by wells coupled with surface water discharge of treated effluent. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the iterative use of risk-based decision analysis throughout the design of a particular remedial alternative. In this study, we consider the interaction between two episodes of aquifer testing over a 6-year period and the refinement of a remedial extraction well system design. Using a three-dimensional ground-water flow model, this study employs (1) geostatistics and Monte Carlo techniques to simulate hydraulic conductivity as a stochastic process and (2) Bayesian updating and conditional simulation to investigate multiple phases of aquifer testing. In our evaluation of a remedial alternative, we compute probabilistic costs associated with the failure of an alternative to completely capture a simulated contaminant plume. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of risk-based decision analysis as a tool for improving the design of a remedial alternative through the course of phased data collection at a remedial site

  14. Tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer demonstration sampling and analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) is the primary document describing field and laboratory activities and requirements for the tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer (CP) demonstration. It is written in accordance with Hanford Tank Initiative Tank 241-AX-104 Upper Vadose Zone Demonstration Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999). This technology demonstration, to be conducted at tank 241-AX-104, is being performed by the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) Project as a part of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval Program (EM-30) and the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) Tanks Focus Area. Sample results obtained as part of this demonstration will provide additional information for subsequent revisions to the Retrieval Performance Evaluation (RPE) report (Jacobs 1998). The RPE Report is the result of an evaluation of a single tank farm (AX Tank Farm) used as the basis for demonstrating a methodology for developing the data and analyses necessary to support making tank waste retrieval decisions within the context of tank farm closure requirements. The RPE includes a study of vadose zone contaminant transport mechanisms, including analysis of projected tank leak characteristics, hydrogeologic characteristics of tank farm soils, and the observed distribution of contaminants in the vadose zone in the tank farms. With limited characterization information available, large uncertainties exist as to the nature and extent of contaminants that may exist in the upper vadose zone in the AX Tank Farm. Traditionally, data has been collected from soils in the vadose zone through the installation of boreholes and wells. Soil samples are collected as the bore hole is advanced and samples are screened on site and/or sent to a laboratory for analysis. Some in-situ geophysical methods of contaminant analysis can be used to evaluate radionuclide levels in the soils adjacent to an existing borehole. However, geophysical methods require compensation for well

  15. Analysis of operational records in the bituminization demonstration facility. Investigation of the cause of fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, A.; Sano, Y.; Yoneya, M.; Koyama, T.

    1997-12-01

    Operational records in the bituminization demonstration facility in 97-M46-1 campaign were analyzed in order to investigate the cause of fire. Operational records which are different from ordinary level in this campaign are drum weight, temperature at 7th zone and extruder torque. So we investigated past campaign data about these records. The results are as follows. 1) In some campaigns, drum weight was lighter, temperature at 7th zone higher, and torque higher. 2) When drum weight is lighter, temperature at 7th zone becomes relatively higher. 3) In the case that higher temperature was measured at 7th zone, drum weight was sometimes less than the past average. 4) When the extruder's torque increases, it sometimes influences drum weight and temperature at 7th zone. The maximum of salt and bitumen became hotter from 28B. As the heat source, both frictional resistance and exothermic chemical reaction can be considered. Frictional resistance came out with increase of the torque. So we checked some operational parameters to investigate what increases the torque. Feed rate of waste solution is related with the torque increase. The other parameters are not related with it. Now we can not specify any causes of the torque increase from 27B, the feed rate of waste solution is however possible to be one of the causes. (author)

  16. Preliminary analysis of West Valley Waste Removal System equipment development and mock demonstration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janicek, G.P.

    1981-06-01

    This report defines seven areas requiring further investigation to develop and demonstrate a safe and viable West Valley Waste Removal System. These areas of endeavor are discussed in terms of their minimum facility requirements. It is concluded that utilizing separated specific facilities at different points in time is of a greater advantage than an exact duplication of the West Valley tanks. Savannah River Plant's full-scale, full-circle and half-circle tanks, and their twelfth scale model tank would all be useful to varying degrees but would require modifications. Hanford's proposed full-size mock tank would be useful, but is not seriously considered because its construction may not coincide with West Valley needs. Costs of modifying existing facilities and/or constructing new facilities are assessed in terms of their benefit to the equipment development and mock demonstration. Six facilities were identified for further analysis which would benefit development of waste removal equipment

  17. Design, demonstration and analysis of a modified wavelength-correlating receiver for incoherent OCDMA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heng; Qiu, Kun; Wang, Leyang

    2011-03-28

    A novel wavelength-correlating receiver for incoherent Optical Code Division Multiple Access (OCDMA) system is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. Enabled by the wavelength conversion based scheme, the proposed receiver can support various code types including one-dimensional optical codes and time-spreading/wavelength-hopping two dimensional codes. Also, a synchronous detection scheme with time-to- wavelength based code acquisition is proposed, by which code acquisition time can be substantially reduced. Moreover, a novel data-validation methodology based on all-optical pulse-width monitoring is introduced for the wavelength-correlating receiver. Experimental demonstration of the new proposed receiver is presented and low bit error rate data-receiving is achieved without optical hard limiting and electronic power thresholding. For the first time, a detailed theoretical performance analysis specialized for the wavelength-correlating receiver is presented. Numerical results show that the overall performance of the proposed receiver prevails over conventional OCDMA receivers.

  18. Policy Analysis Screening System (PASS) demonstration: sample queries and terminal instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-10-16

    This document contains the input and output for the Policy Analysis Screening System (PASS) demonstration. This demonstration is stored on a portable disk at the Environmental Impacts Division. Sample queries presented here include: (1) how to use PASS; (2) estimated 1995 energy consumption from Mid-Range Energy-Forecasting System (MEFS) data base; (3) pollution projections from Strategic Environmental Assessment System (SEAS) data base; (4) diesel auto regulations; (5) diesel auto health effects; (6) oil shale health and safety measures; (7) water pollution effects of SRC; (8) acid rainfall from Energy Environmental Statistics (EES) data base; 1990 EIA electric generation by fuel type; sulfate concentrations by Federal region; forecast of 1995 SO/sub 2/ emissions in Region III; and estimated electrical generating capacity in California to 1990. The file name for each query is included.

  19. Advanced reactor passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia J.; Grelle, Austin

    2017-01-01

    Many advanced reactor designs rely on passive systems to fulfill safety functions during accident sequences. These systems depend heavily on boundary conditions to induce a motive force, meaning the system can fail to operate as intended because of deviations in boundary conditions, rather than as the result of physical failures. Furthermore, passive systems may operate in intermediate or degraded modes. These factors make passive system operation difficult to characterize within a traditional probabilistic framework that only recognizes discrete operating modes and does not allow for the explicit consideration of time-dependent boundary conditions. Argonne National Laboratory has been examining various methodologies for assessing passive system reliability within a probabilistic risk assessment for a station blackout event at an advanced small modular reactor. This paper provides an overview of a passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event. Considering an earthquake with the possibility of site flooding, the analysis focuses on the behavior of the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System following potential physical damage and system flooding. The assessment approach seeks to combine mechanistic and simulation-based methods to leverage the benefits of the simulation-based approach without the need to substantially deviate from conventional probabilistic risk assessment techniques. Although this study is presented as only an example analysis, the results appear to demonstrate a high level of reliability of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (and the reactor system in general) for the postulated transient event

  20. Advanced Reactor Passive System Reliability Demonstration Analysis for an External Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Bucknor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Many advanced reactor designs rely on passive systems to fulfill safety functions during accident sequences. These systems depend heavily on boundary conditions to induce a motive force, meaning the system can fail to operate as intended because of deviations in boundary conditions, rather than as the result of physical failures. Furthermore, passive systems may operate in intermediate or degraded modes. These factors make passive system operation difficult to characterize within a traditional probabilistic framework that only recognizes discrete operating modes and does not allow for the explicit consideration of time-dependent boundary conditions. Argonne National Laboratory has been examining various methodologies for assessing passive system reliability within a probabilistic risk assessment for a station blackout event at an advanced small modular reactor. This paper provides an overview of a passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event. Considering an earthquake with the possibility of site flooding, the analysis focuses on the behavior of the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System following potential physical damage and system flooding. The assessment approach seeks to combine mechanistic and simulation-based methods to leverage the benefits of the simulation-based approach without the need to substantially deviate from conventional probabilistic risk assessment techniques. Although this study is presented as only an example analysis, the results appear to demonstrate a high level of reliability of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (and the reactor system in general for the postulated transient event.

  1. Advanced reactor passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia J.; Grelle, Austin [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Many advanced reactor designs rely on passive systems to fulfill safety functions during accident sequences. These systems depend heavily on boundary conditions to induce a motive force, meaning the system can fail to operate as intended because of deviations in boundary conditions, rather than as the result of physical failures. Furthermore, passive systems may operate in intermediate or degraded modes. These factors make passive system operation difficult to characterize within a traditional probabilistic framework that only recognizes discrete operating modes and does not allow for the explicit consideration of time-dependent boundary conditions. Argonne National Laboratory has been examining various methodologies for assessing passive system reliability within a probabilistic risk assessment for a station blackout event at an advanced small modular reactor. This paper provides an overview of a passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event. Considering an earthquake with the possibility of site flooding, the analysis focuses on the behavior of the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System following potential physical damage and system flooding. The assessment approach seeks to combine mechanistic and simulation-based methods to leverage the benefits of the simulation-based approach without the need to substantially deviate from conventional probabilistic risk assessment techniques. Although this study is presented as only an example analysis, the results appear to demonstrate a high level of reliability of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (and the reactor system in general) for the postulated transient event.

  2. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for RCRA Constituent Analysis of Solidified Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents distributes test samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals in solid matrices. Each distribution of test samples is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department. The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the RCRA PDP. Participating laboratories demonstrate acceptable performance by successfully analyzing single-blind performance evaluation samples (subsequently referred to as PDP samples) according to the criteria established in this plan. PDP samples are used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). The concentrations of analytes in the PDP samples address levels of regulatory concern and encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in waste characterization samples. The WIPP requires analyses of homogeneous solid wastes to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples. Participating laboratories must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for WIPP samples.

  3. AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration and Tests Data Management Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOUGLAS, D.G.

    2000-02-22

    This document provides a plan for the analysis of the data collected during the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration and Tests. This document was prepared after a review of the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Plan (Revision 4) [1] and other materials. The plan emphasizes a structured and well-ordered approach towards handling and examining the data. This plan presumes that the data will be collected and organized into a unified body of data, well annotated and bearing the date and time of each record. The analysis of this data will follow a methodical series of steps that are focused on well-defined objectives. Section 2 of this plan describes how the data analysis will proceed from the real-time monitoring of some of the key sensor data to the final analysis of the three-dimensional distribution of suspended solids. This section also identifies the various sensors or sensor systems and associates them with the various functions they serve during the test program. Section 3 provides an overview of the objectives of the AZ-101 test program and describes the data that will be analyzed to support that test. The objectives are: (1) to demonstrate that the mixer pumps can be operated within the operating requirements; (2) to demonstrate that the mixer pumps can mobilize the sludge in sufficient quantities to provide feed to the private contractor facility, and (3) to determine if the in-tank instrumentation is sufficient to monitor sludge mobilization and mixer pump operation. Section 3 also describes the interim analysis that organizes the data during the test, so the analysis can be more readily accomplished. Section 4 describes the spatial orientation of the various sensors in the tank. This section is useful in visualizing the relationship of the Sensors in terms of their location in the tank and how the data from these sensors may be related to the data from other sensors. Section 5 provides a summary of the various analyses that will be performed on the data during the test

  4. AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration and Tests: Data Management (Analysis) Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides a plan for the analysis of the data collected during the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration and Tests. This document was prepared after a review of the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Plan (Revision 4) [1] and other materials. The plan emphasizes a structured and well-ordered approach towards handling and examining the data. This plan presumes that the data will be collected and organized into a unified body of data, well annotated and bearing the date and time of each record. The analysis of this data will follow a methodical series of steps that are focused on well-defined objectives. Section 2 of this plan describes how the data analysis will proceed from the real-time monitoring of some of the key sensor data to the final analysis of the three-dimensional distribution of suspended solids. This section also identifies the various sensors or sensor systems and associates them with the various functions they serve during the test program. Section 3 provides an overview of the objectives of the AZ-101 test program and describes the data that will be analyzed to support that test. The objectives are: (1) to demonstrate that the mixer pumps can be operated within the operating requirements; (2) to demonstrate that the mixer pumps can mobilize the sludge in sufficient quantities to provide feed to the private contractor facility, and (3) to determine if the in-tank instrumentation is sufficient to monitor sludge mobilization and mixer pump operation. Section 3 also describes the interim analysis that organizes the data during the test, so the analysis can be more readily accomplished. Section 4 describes the spatial orientation of the various sensors in the tank. This section is useful in visualizing the relationship of the Sensors in terms of their location in the tank and how the data from these sensors may be related to the data from other sensors. Section 5 provides a summary of the various analyses that will be performed on the data during the test

  5. Bayesian analysis of heat pipe life test data for reliability demonstration testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, R.J.; Martz, H.F.

    1985-01-01

    The demonstration testing duration requirements to establish a quantitative measure of assurance of expected lifetime for heat pipes was determined. The heat pipes are candidate devices for transporting heat generated in a nuclear reactor core to thermoelectric converters for use as a space-based electric power plant. A Bayesian analysis technique is employed, utilizing a limited Delphi survey, and a geometric mean accelerated test criterion involving heat pipe power (P) and temperature (T). Resulting calculations indicate considerable test savings can be achieved by employing the method, but development testing to determine heat pipe failure mechanisms should not be circumvented

  6. Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter description report. INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration System Analysis project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Morneau, R.A.; Rudin, M.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1992-05-01

    A formal methodology has been developed for identifying technology gaps and assessing innovative or postulated technologies for inclusion in proposed Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) remediation systems. Called the Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter, the methodology provides a formalized selection process where technologies and systems are rated and assessments made based on performance measures, and regulatory and technical requirements. The results are auditable, and can be validated with field data. This analysis methodology will be applied to the remedial action of transuranic contaminated waste pits and trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  7. Formation kinetics of gemfibrozil chlorination reaction products: analysis and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkosek, Wendy H; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-07-01

    Aqueous chlorination kinetics of the lipid regulator gemfibrozil and the formation of reaction products were investigated in deionized water over the pH range 3 to 9, and in two wastewater matrices. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil was found to be highly dependent on pH. No statistically significant degradation of gemfibrozil was observed at pH values greater than 7. Gemfibrozil oxidation between pH 4 and 7 was best represented by first order kinetics. At pH 3, formation of three reaction products was observed. 4'-C1Gem was the only reaction product formed from pH 4-7 and was modeled with zero order kinetics. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil in two wastewater matrices followed second order kinetics. 4'-C1Gem was only formed in wastewater with pH below 7. Deionized water rate kinetic models were applied to two wastewater effluents with gemfibrozil concentrations reported in literature in order to calculate potential mass loading rates of 4'C1Gem to the receiving water.

  8. Automatized Assessment of Protective Group Reactivity: A Step Toward Big Reaction Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Arkadii I; Madzhidov, Timur I; Klimchuk, Olga; Nugmanov, Ramil I; Antipin, Igor S; Varnek, Alexandre

    2016-11-28

    We report a new method to assess protective groups (PGs) reactivity as a function of reaction conditions (catalyst, solvent) using raw reaction data. It is based on an intuitive similarity principle for chemical reactions: similar reactions proceed under similar conditions. Technically, reaction similarity can be assessed using the Condensed Graph of Reaction (CGR) approach representing an ensemble of reactants and products as a single molecular graph, i.e., as a pseudomolecule for which molecular descriptors or fingerprints can be calculated. CGR-based in-house tools were used to process data for 142,111 catalytic hydrogenation reactions extracted from the Reaxys database. Our results reveal some contradictions with famous Greene's Reactivity Charts based on manual expert analysis. Models developed in this study show high accuracy (ca. 90%) for predicting optimal experimental conditions of protective group deprotection.

  9. Improving Your Exploratory Factor Analysis for Ordinal Data: A Demonstration Using FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Baglin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Exploratory factor analysis (EFA methods are used extensively in the field of assessment and evaluation. Due to EFA's widespread use, common methods and practices have come under close scrutiny. A substantial body of literature has been compiled highlighting problems with many of the methods and practices used in EFA, and, in response, many guidelines have been proposed with the aim to improve application. Unfortunately, implementing recommended EFA practices has been restricted by the range of options available in commercial statistical packages and, perhaps, due to an absence of clear, practical - how-to' demonstrations. Consequently, this article describes the application of methods recommended to get the most out of your EFA. The article focuses on dealing with the common situation of analysing ordinal data as derived from Likert-type scales. These methods are demonstrated using the free, stand-alone, easy-to-use and powerful EFA package FACTOR (http://psico.fcep.urv.es/utilitats/factor/, Lorenzo-Seva & Ferrando, 2006. The demonstration applies the recommended techniques using an accompanying dataset, based on the Big 5 personality test. The outcomes obtained by the EFA using the recommended procedures through FACTOR are compared to the default techniques currently available in SPSS.

  10. Statistical analysis of activation and reaction energies with quasi-variational coupled-cluster theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joshua A.; Knowles, Peter J.

    2018-06-01

    The performance of quasi-variational coupled-cluster (QV) theory applied to the calculation of activation and reaction energies has been investigated. A statistical analysis of results obtained for six different sets of reactions has been carried out, and the results have been compared to those from standard single-reference methods. In general, the QV methods lead to increased activation energies and larger absolute reaction energies compared to those obtained with traditional coupled-cluster theory.

  11. Dose Volume Histogram analysis for rectum and urethral reaction of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Takeshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinically relevant parameters for rectum and urethral reaction using DVH (dose volume histogram) in carbon ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer. In this year, we studied the urinary reaction mainly. 35 patients with prostate cancer were treated with carbon ion beams between June 1995 and December 1997. The applied dose was escalated from 54.0 GyE to 72.0 GyE in fixed 20 fractions. Clinical urinary reaction and rectum reaction were reviewed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system for acute reactions, RTOG/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) scoring system for late reactions. Taking the ROI (region of interest) for DVH of urethra, we used surrogate one that was derived from the observation of MR images. 35 patients were analyzed for acute urinary reaction and 34 for late urinary reaction in the study of this year. DVH analysis suggested difference among the grades for acute and late reactions. These analysis appears to be a useful tool for predicting the urinary reactions. (author)

  12. Analysis of Return and Forward Links from STARS' Flight Demonstration 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based Telemetry And Range Safety (STARS) is a Kennedy Space Center (KSC) led proof-of-concept demonstration, which utilizes NASA's space network of Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) as a pathway for launch and mission related information streams. Flight Demonstration 1 concluded on July 15,2003 with the seventh flight of a Low Power Transmitter (LPT) a Command and Data Handler (C&DH), a twelve channel GPS receiver and associated power supplies and amplifiers. The equipment flew on NASA's F-I5 aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base in California. During this NASA-ASEE Faculty Fellowship, the author participated in the collection and analysis of data from the seven flights comprising Flight Demonstration 1. Specifically, the author examined the forward and return links bit energy E(sub B) (in Watt-seconds) divided by the ambient radio frequency noise N(sub 0) (in Watts / Hertz). E(sub b)/N(sub 0) is commonly thought of as a signal-to-noise parameter, which characterizes a particular received radio frequency (RF) link. Outputs from the data analysis include the construction of time lines for all flights, production of graphs of range safety values for all seven flights, histograms of range safety E(sub b)/N(sub 0) values in five dB increments, calculation of associated averages and standard deviations, production of graphs of range user E(sub b)/N(sub 0) values for the all flights, production of graphs of AGC's and E(sub b)/N(sub 0) estimates for flight 1, recorded onboard, transmitted directly to the launch head and transmitted through TDRS. The data and graphs are being used to draw conclusions related to a lower than expected signal strength seen in the range safety return link.

  13. Multi-shot analysis of the gamma reaction history diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, D. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Church, J. A.; Stoeffl, W.; Herrmann, H. W.

    2012-01-01

    The gamma reaction history diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility has the capability to determine a number of important performance metrics for cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions: the fusion burn width, bang time and yield, as well as the areal density of the compressed ablator. Extracting those values from the measured γ rays of an implosion, requires accounting for a γ-ray background in addition to the impulse response function of the instrument. To address these complications, we have constructed a model of the γ-ray signal, and are developing a simultaneous multi-shot fitting routine to constrain its parameter space.

  14. Paterno`-Bu¨chi Reaction as a Demonstration of Chemical Kinetics and Synthetic Photochemistry Using a Light Emitting Diode Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew P.; Agger, Jonathan; Wong, Lu Shin

    2015-01-01

    The Paterno`-Bu¨chi photocycloaddition reaction is used as the basis for physical-organic final-year undergraduate laboratory experiments designed to emphasize the multidisciplinary approach to modern-day chemical practice. These reactions are performed using commercially available LED-based light sources, which offer a convenient and safe tool…

  15. Analysis of reaction products of food contaminants and ingredients: bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) in canned foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulier, Leon; Bradley, Emma L; Bas, Richard C; Verhoeckx, Kitty C M; Driffield, Malcolm; Harmer, Nick; Castle, Laurence

    2010-04-28

    Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) is an epoxide that is used as a starting substance in the manufacture of can coatings for food-contact applications. Following migration from the can coating into food, BADGE levels decay and new reaction products are formed by reaction with food ingredients. The significant decay of BADGE was demonstrated by liquid chromatographic (LC) analysis of foodstuffs, that is, tuna, apple puree, and beer, spiked with BADGE before processing and storage. Life-science inspired analytical approaches were successfully applied to study the reactions of BADGE with food ingredients, for example, amino acids and sugars. An improved mass balance of BADGE was achieved by selective detection of reaction products of BADGE with low molecular weight food components, using a successful combination of stable isotopes of BADGE and analysis by LC coupled to fluorescence detection (FLD) and high-resolution mass spectrometric (MS) detection. Furthermore, proteomics approaches showed that BADGE also reacts with peptides (from protein digests in model systems) and with proteins in foods. The predominant reaction center for amino acids, peptides, and proteins was cysteine.

  16. Parallel replica dynamics method for bistable stochastic reaction networks: Simulation and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Plecháč, Petr

    2017-12-01

    Stochastic reaction networks that exhibit bistable behavior are common in systems biology, materials science, and catalysis. Sampling of stationary distributions is crucial for understanding and characterizing the long-time dynamics of bistable stochastic dynamical systems. However, simulations are often hindered by the insufficient sampling of rare transitions between the two metastable regions. In this paper, we apply the parallel replica method for a continuous time Markov chain in order to improve sampling of the stationary distribution in bistable stochastic reaction networks. The proposed method uses parallel computing to accelerate the sampling of rare transitions. Furthermore, it can be combined with the path-space information bounds for parametric sensitivity analysis. With the proposed methodology, we study three bistable biological networks: the Schlögl model, the genetic switch network, and the enzymatic futile cycle network. We demonstrate the algorithmic speedup achieved in these numerical benchmarks. More significant acceleration is expected when multi-core or graphics processing unit computer architectures and programming tools such as CUDA are employed.

  17. Parallel replica dynamics method for bistable stochastic reaction networks: Simulation and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Plecháč, Petr

    2017-12-21

    Stochastic reaction networks that exhibit bistable behavior are common in systems biology, materials science, and catalysis. Sampling of stationary distributions is crucial for understanding and characterizing the long-time dynamics of bistable stochastic dynamical systems. However, simulations are often hindered by the insufficient sampling of rare transitions between the two metastable regions. In this paper, we apply the parallel replica method for a continuous time Markov chain in order to improve sampling of the stationary distribution in bistable stochastic reaction networks. The proposed method uses parallel computing to accelerate the sampling of rare transitions. Furthermore, it can be combined with the path-space information bounds for parametric sensitivity analysis. With the proposed methodology, we study three bistable biological networks: the Schlögl model, the genetic switch network, and the enzymatic futile cycle network. We demonstrate the algorithmic speedup achieved in these numerical benchmarks. More significant acceleration is expected when multi-core or graphics processing unit computer architectures and programming tools such as CUDA are employed.

  18. Analysis of reaction and transport processes in zinc air batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This book contains a novel combination of experimental and model-based investigations, elucidating the complex processes inside zinc air batteries. The work presented helps to answer which battery composition and which air-composition should be adjusted to maintain stable and efficient charge/discharge cycling. In detail, electrochemical investigations and X-ray transmission tomography are applied on button cell zinc air batteries and in-house set-ups. Moreover, model-based investigations of the battery anode and the impact of relative humidity, active operation, carbon dioxide and oxygen on zinc air battery operation are presented. The techniques used in this work complement each other well and yield an unprecedented understanding of zinc air batteries. The methods applied are adaptable and can potentially be applied to gain further understanding of other metal air batteries. Contents Introduction on Zinc Air Batteries Characterizing Reaction and Transport Processes Identifying Factors for Long-Term Stable O...

  19. Demonstration of Mobile Auto-GPS for Large Scale Human Mobility Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanont, Teerayut; Witayangkurn, Apichon; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2013-04-01

    The greater affordability of digital devices and advancement of positioning and tracking capabilities have presided over today's age of geospatial Big Data. Besides, the emergences of massive mobile location data and rapidly increase in computational capabilities open up new opportunities for modeling of large-scale urban dynamics. In this research, we demonstrate the new type of mobile location data called "Auto-GPS" and its potential use cases for urban applications. More than one million Auto-GPS mobile phone users in Japan have been observed nationwide in a completely anonymous form for over an entire year from August 2010 to July 2011 for this analysis. A spate of natural disasters and other emergencies during the past few years has prompted new interest in how mobile location data can help enhance our security, especially in urban areas which are highly vulnerable to these impacts. New insights gleaned from mining the Auto-GPS data suggest a number of promising directions of modeling human movement during a large-scale crisis. We question how people react under critical situation and how their movement changes during severe disasters. Our results demonstrate a case of major earthquake and explain how people who live in Tokyo Metropolitan and vicinity area behave and return home after the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011.

  20. Bayesian probability analysis: a prospective demonstration of its clinical utility in diagnosing coronary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detrano, R.; Yiannikas, J.; Salcedo, E.E.; Rincon, G.; Go, R.T.; Williams, G.; Leatherman, J.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred fifty-four patients referred for coronary arteriography were prospectively studied with stress electrocardiography, stress thallium scintigraphy, cine fluoroscopy (for coronary calcifications), and coronary angiography. Pretest probabilities of coronary disease were determined based on age, sex, and type of chest pain. These and pooled literature values for the conditional probabilities of test results based on disease state were used in Bayes theorem to calculate posttest probabilities of disease. The results of the three noninvasive tests were compared for statistical independence, a necessary condition for their simultaneous use in Bayes theorem. The test results were found to demonstrate pairwise independence in patients with and those without disease. Some dependencies that were observed between the test results and the clinical variables of age and sex were not sufficient to invalidate application of the theorem. Sixty-eight of the study patients had at least one major coronary artery obstruction of greater than 50%. When these patients were divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-probability subgroups according to their pretest probabilities, noninvasive test results analyzed by Bayesian probability analysis appropriately advanced 17 of them by at least one probability subgroup while only seven were moved backward. Of the 76 patients without disease, 34 were appropriately moved into a lower probability subgroup while 10 were incorrectly moved up. We conclude that posttest probabilities calculated from Bayes theorem more accurately classified patients with and without disease than did pretest probabilities, thus demonstrating the utility of the theorem in this application

  1. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is a powerful technique for the evaluation of flux control within biochemical pathways. Its foundation is the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients (FCCs). On the basis of a thermokinetic description of reaction rates it is here shown...... that the elasticity coefficients can be calculated directly from the pool levels of metabolites at steady state. The only requirement is that one thermodynamic parameter be known, namely the reaction affinity at the intercept of the tangent in the inflection point of the curve of reaction rate against reaction...... of the thermokinetic description of reaction rates to include the influence of effecters. Here the reaction rate is written as a linear function of the logarithm of the metabolite concentrations. With this type of rate function it is shown that the approach of Delgado and Liao [Biochem. J. (1992) 282, 919-927] can...

  2. Generic Model-Based Tailor-Made Design and Analysis of Biphasic Reaction Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata

    systems have a broad range of application, such as the manufacture of petroleum based chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and agro-bio products. Major considerations in the design and analysis of biphasic reaction systems are physical and chemical equilibria, kinetic mechanisms, and reaction rates. The primary...... contribution of this thesis is the development of a systematic modelling framework for the biphasic reaction system. The developed framework consists of three modules describing phase equilibria, reactions and mass transfer, and material balances of such processes. Correlative and predictive thermodynamic......Biphasic reaction systems are composed of immiscible aqueous and organic liquid phases where reactants, products, and catalysts are partitioned. These biphasic conditions point to novel synthesis paths, higher yields, and faster reactions, as well as facilitate product separation. The biphasic...

  3. Dynamical structure analysis of crystalline-state reaction and elucidation of chemical reactivity in crystalline environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    It was found that a chiral alkyl group bonded to the cobalt atom in a cobalt complex crystal was racemized with retention of the single crystal form on exposure to visible light. Such reactions, which are called crystalline-state reactions, have been found in a variety of cobalt complex crystals. The concept of reaction cavity was introduced to explain the reaction rate quantitatively and the chirality of the photo-product. The new diffractometers and detectors were made for rapid data collection. The reaction mechanism was also elucidated using neutron diffraction analysis. The unstable reaction intermediates were analyzed using cryo-trapping method. The excited-state structures were obtained at the equilibrium state between ground and excited states. (author)

  4. [Adverse reaction caused by rabies vaccine in China: a Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X R; Wu, Z G; Zhang, W S

    2017-06-10

    Objective: To conduct a Meta-analysis on the rate of adverse reaction related to rabies vaccine, so as to provide reference for rabies vaccine immunization in China. Methods: We electronically searched databases including CNKI, VIP information resource integration service platform, WanFang Data, CBM, PubMed and The Cochrane Library, to collect studies on Chinese people who had received full rabies vaccination and recording all the adverse reactions, from January 2000 to July 2016. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were strictly followed. Meta-analysis for the adverse reaction rate was performed using the R software. Results: A total of 29 related papers had met the inclusion criteria, with no publication bias noticed. A total number of 11 020 cases had adverse reactions, among all the 94 222 respondents, with an incidence of adverse reactions as 1.04 % -47.78 % . The overall incidence rate of adverse reaction was 9.82 % (95 %CI : 7.58 % -12.72 % ). A combined local adverse reaction rate appeared as 12.05 % (95 % CI : 9.26 % -15.69 % ). The systemic adverse reaction rate was 9.06 % (95 %CI : 7.07 % -11.61 % ). The overall adverse reaction rate on aqueous vaccine was 32.39 % (95 %CI : 21.88 % -47.94 % ). Combined adverse reaction rate of freeze dried vaccine appeared as 8.65 % (95 %CI : 4.54 % -16.51 % ). Significant differences were seen between both groups ( P rabies vaccination was higher than the systemic adverse reaction rate. The adverse reaction rate of aqueous rabies vaccine was higher than that of freeze dried rabies vaccine. Our results suggested that the aqueous vaccine should gradually be eliminated.

  5. Analysis of ion implanted doped insulators by nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheith, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear resonance reaction an6520750JOalysis (NRA), using a proton beam at 1350 KeV, and the complementary rutherford backscattering, using a 1.8 MeV helium beam, techniques were utilized to investigate the level of impurities and the influencs of structural defects created by an 40 Ar + beam irradation induced in single crysttalline pure, and 10 and 20 mole % Eu doped, CaF 2 targets. The energetic proton, helium and argon beams were all supplied from the Uniersity of Jordan Van De Graaff accelerator, JOVAC. The depth distribuation of intrinsic defecta altered by the radiation damage was determined, using the resonance(p,α reaction at 1350 KeV resulting, from the halogen with proton beams of incident energies above resonance. Results are compared with transport of ions in matter calculations (TRIM), using the computer code 'TRIM-89'. Results indicate that the influence of doping alters tje crystal structure by pbserving a Ca-surfaace rich layer. The Ca enrichment is explained based on the defect model of trivalent Eu occupying the divalent substitutional places of the Ca atoms. The extra positive charge is linked to a negative one available on the the neighbouring F in order to preserve charge neutrality. The Ar irradiation results on the other hand revealed that the low level Eu doping stabilizes hte crystal better than the higher doping level. Chanages in the Eu signal from uniformly even distribution to an enhancement below the surface art a depth that is correlated with the mean and straggling values of the Ar impurrity distribution, is observed. This is consistant with the calculated Ar impurity distributions in which the 250 KeV Ar irradiation results in narrow distributions gradient of defects, possibly by a radiation enhanced diffusion mechanism. Preferential sputtering of the halogen, being the lightest element in the matrix, was alos noted. Surface topographic changes due to formation of large complexes and cracks are found to distort a large volume of

  6. Vertical ground reaction force analysis during gait with unstable shoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Pereira

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction Footwear is no longer just an accessory but also a protection for the musculoskeletal system, and its most important characteristic is comfort.Objectives This study aims to identify and to analyze the vertical ground reaction force in barefoot women and women with unstable shoes.Methodology Five women aged 25 ± 4 years old and mass of 50 ± 7 kg participated in this study. An AMTI force plate was used for data acquisition. The 10 trials for each situation were considered valid where the subject approached the platform with the right foot and at the speed of 4 km/h ± 5%. The instable shoe of this study is used in the practice of physical activity.Results The results showed that the first peak force was higher for the footwear situation, about 5% and significant differences between the barefoot and footwear situation. This significant difference was in the first and second peaks force and in the time of the second peak.Conclusion The values showed that the footwear absorbs approximately 45% of the impact during gait.

  7. Critical analysis: use of polymerase chain reaction to diagnose leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviane Granero Maltempe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Leprosy is a neglected tropical disease and an important public health problem, especially in developing countries. It is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which has a predilection for the skin and peripheral nerves. Although it has low sensitivity, slit-skin smear (SSS remains the conventional auxiliary laboratory technique for the clinical diagnosis of leprosy. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is a molecular biology technique that holds promise as a simple and sensitive diagnostic tool. In the present study, the performance of two PCR methods, using different targets, PCR-LP and PCR-P, were compared with SSS with regard to leprosy diagnosis in a reference laboratory. M. leprae DNA was extracted from 106 lymph samples of 40 patients who had clinical suspicion of leprosy. The samples were subjected to both PCR techniques and SSS. Amplification of the human b-globin gene was used as PCR inhibitor control. The specificity of both PCR techniques was 100%, and sensitivity was 0.007 and 0.015 µg/ml for PCR-LP and PCR-P, respectively. No significant difference was found between either the PCR-LP or PCR-P results and SSS results (p > 0.05. Although PCR is not yet a replacement for SSS in the diagnosis of leprosy, this technique may be used as an efficient auxiliary tool for early detection of the disease, especially in endemic regions. This strategy may also be useful in cases in which SSS results are negative (e.g., in paucibacillary patients and cases in which skin biopsy cannot be performed.

  8. Analysis of reaction cross-section production in neutron induced fission reactions on uranium isotope using computer code COMPLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asres, Yihunie Hibstie; Mathuthu, Manny; Birhane, Marelgn Derso

    2018-04-22

    This study provides current evidence about cross-section production processes in the theoretical and experimental results of neutron induced reaction of uranium isotope on projectile energy range of 1-100 MeV in order to improve the reliability of nuclear stimulation. In such fission reactions of 235 U within nuclear reactors, much amount of energy would be released as a product that able to satisfy the needs of energy to the world wide without polluting processes as compared to other sources. The main objective of this work is to transform a related knowledge in the neutron-induced fission reactions on 235 U through describing, analyzing and interpreting the theoretical results of the cross sections obtained from computer code COMPLET by comparing with the experimental data obtained from EXFOR. The cross section value of 235 U(n,2n) 234 U, 235 U(n,3n) 233 U, 235 U(n,γ) 236 U, 235 U(n,f) are obtained using computer code COMPLET and the corresponding experimental values were browsed by EXFOR, IAEA. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR Data Bank. Computer code COMPLET has been used for the analysis with the same set of input parameters and the graphs were plotted by the help of spreadsheet & Origin-8 software. The quantification of uncertainties stemming from both experimental data and computer code calculation plays a significant role in the final evaluated results. The calculated results for total cross sections were compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR in the literature, and good agreement was found between the experimental and theoretical data. This comparison of the calculated data was analyzed and interpreted with tabulation and graphical descriptions, and the results were briefly discussed within the text of this research work. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Cell lineage analysis demonstrates an endodermal origin of the distal urethra and perineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Ashley W; Harfe, Brian D; Cohn, Martin J

    2008-06-01

    Congenital malformations of anorectal and genitourinary (collectively, anogenital) organs occur at a high frequency in humans, however the lineage of cells that gives rise to anogenital organs remains poorly understood. The penile urethra has been reported to develop from two cell populations, with the proximal urethra developing from endoderm and the distal urethra forming from an apical ectodermal invagination, however this has never been tested by direct analysis of cell lineage. During gut development, endodermal cells express Sonic hedgehog (Shh), which is required for normal patterning of digestive and genitourinary organs. We have taken advantage of the properties of Shh expression to genetically label and follow the fate of posterior gut endoderm during anogenital development. We report that the entire urethra, including the distal (glandar) region, is derived from endoderm. Cloacal endoderm also gives rise to the epithelial linings of the bladder, rectum and anterior region of the anus. Surprisingly, the lineage map also revealed an endodermal origin of the perineum, which is the first demonstration that endoderm differentiates into skin. In addition, we fate mapped genital tubercle ectoderm and show that it makes no detectable contribution to the urethra. In males, formation of the urethral tube involves septation of the urethral plate by continued growth of the urorectal septum. Analysis of cell lineage following disruption of androgen signaling revealed that the urethral plate of flutamide-treated males does not undergo this septation event. Instead, urethral plate cells persist to the ventral margin of the tubercle, mimicking the pattern seen in females. Based on these spatial and temporal fate maps, we present a new model for anogenital development and suggest that disruptions at specific developmental time points can account for the association between anorectal and genitourinary defects.

  10. Demonstration uncertainty/sensitivity analysis using the health and economic consequence model CRAC2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpert, D.J.; Iman, R.L.; Johnson, J.D.; Helton, J.C.

    1984-12-01

    The techniques for performing uncertainty/sensitivity analyses compiled as part of the MELCOR program appear to be well suited for use with a health and economic consequence model. Two replicate samples of size 50 gave essentially identical results, indicating that for this case, a Latin hypercube sample of size 50 seems adequate to represent the distribution of results. Though the intent of this study was a demonstration of uncertainty/sensitivity analysis techniques, a number of insights relevant to health and economic consequence modeling can be gleaned: uncertainties in early deaths are significantly greater than uncertainties in latent cancer deaths; though the magnitude of the source term is the largest source of variation in estimated distributions of early deaths, a number of additional parameters are also important; even with the release fractions for a full SST1, one quarter of the CRAC2 runs gave no early deaths; and comparison of the estimates of mean early deaths for a full SST1 release in this study with those of recent point estimates for similar conditions indicates that the recent estimates may be significant overestimations of early deaths. Estimates of latent cancer deaths, however, are roughly comparable. An analysis of the type described here can provide insights in a number of areas. First, the variability in the results gives an indication of the potential uncertainty associated with the calculations. Second, the sensitivity of the results to assumptions about the input variables can be determined. Research efforts can then be concentrated on reducing the uncertainty in the variables which are the largest contributors to uncertainty in results

  11. Design and analysis of electrical energy storage demonstration projects on UK distribution networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.F.; Wade, N.S.; Jiang, T.; Taylor, P.C.; Hashiesh, F.; Michel, M.; Miller, D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Results of an EES system demonstration project carried out in the UK. • Approaches to the design of trials for EES and observation on their application. • A formalised methodology for analysis of smart grids trials. • Validated models of energy storage. • Capability of EES to connect larger quantities of heat pumps and PV is evaluated. - Abstract: The UK government’s CO 2 emissions targets will require electrification of much of the country’s infrastructure with low carbon technologies such as photovoltaic panels, electric vehicles and heat pumps. The large scale proliferation of these technologies will necessitate major changes to the planning and operation of distribution networks. Distribution network operators are trialling electrical energy storage (EES) across their networks to increase their understanding of the contribution that it can make to enable the expected paradigm shift in generation and consumption of electricity. In order to evaluate a range of applications for EES, including voltage control and power flow management, installations have taken place at various distribution network locations and voltage levels. This article reports on trial design approaches and their application to a UK trial of an EES system to ensure broad applicability of the results. Results from these trials of an EES system, low carbon technologies and trial distribution networks are used to develop validated power system models. These models are used to evaluate, using a formalised methodology, the impact that EES could have on the design and operation of future distribution networks

  12. From demonstration to deployment: An economic analysis of support policies for carbon capture and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahé, Max; Heidug, Wolf; Ward, John; Smale, Robin

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that an integrated policy architecture consisting of multiple policy phases and economic instruments is needed to support the development of carbon capture and storage (CCS) from its present demonstration phase to full-scale deployment. Building on an analysis of the different types of policy instruments to correct market failures specific to CCS in its various stages of development, we suggest a way to combine these into an integrated policy architecture. This policy architecture adapts to the need of a maturing technology, meets the requirement of policymakers to maintain flexibility to respond to changing circumstances while providing investors with the policy certainty that is needed to encourage private sector investment. This combination of flexibility and predictability is achieved through the use of ‘policy gateways’ which explicitly define rules and criteria for when and how policy settings will change. Our findings extend to bioenergy-based CCS applications (BECCS), which could potentially achieve negative emissions. We argue that within a framework of correcting the carbon externality, the added environmental benefits of BECCS should be reflected in an extra incentive. - Highlights: • Sensible aim of current climate policy: secure option of future CCS deployment. • But policy makers require flexibility while private investors require predictability. • Integrating CCS policy into an overall policy architecture can overcome this antinomy. • We describe the key features of a good policy architecture and give an example

  13. Development of LEAP-JET code for sodium-water reaction analysis. Validation by sodium-water reaction tests (SWAT-1R)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Hiroshi; Hamada, Hirotsugu

    2004-03-01

    The sodium-water reaction event in an FBR steam generator (SG) has influence on the safety, economical efficiency, etc. of the plant, so that the selection of design base leak (DBL) of the SG is considered as one of the important matters. The clarification of the sodium-water reaction phenomenon and the development of an analysis model are necessary to estimate the sodium-water reaction event with high accuracy and rationality in selecting the DBL. The reaction jet model is pointed out as a part of the necessary improvements to evaluate the overheating tube rupture of large SGs, since the behavior of overheating tube rupture is largely affected by the reaction jet conditions outside the tube. Therefore, LEAP-JET has been developed as an analysis code for the simulation of sodium-water reactions. This document shows the validation of the LEAP-JET code by the Sodium-Water Reaction Test (SWAT-1R). The following results have been obtained: (1) The reaction rate constant, K, is estimated at between 0.001≤K≤0.1 from the LEAP-JET analysis of the SWAT-1R data. (2) The analytical results on the high-temperature region and the behaviors of reaction consumption (Na, H 2 O) and products (H 2 , NaOH, Na 2 O) are considered to be physically reasonable. (3) The LEAP-JET analysis shows the tendency of overestimation in the maximum temperature and temperature distribution of the reaction jet. (4) In the LEAP-JET analysis, the numerical calculation becomes unstably, especially in the mesh containing quite small sodium mass. Therefore, it is necessary to modify the computational algorism to stabilize it and obtain the optimum value of K in sodium-water reactions. (author)

  14. Free Energy Contribution Analysis Using Response Kernel Approximation: Insights into the Acylation Reaction of a Beta-Lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Toshio; Ando, Kanta; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta; Koseki, Shiro

    2016-09-08

    A widely applicable free energy contribution analysis (FECA) method based on the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approximation using response kernel approaches has been proposed to investigate the influences of environmental residues and/or atoms in the QM region on the free energy profile. This method can evaluate atomic contributions to the free energy along the reaction path including polarization effects on the QM region within a dramatically reduced computational time. The rate-limiting step in the deactivation of the β-lactam antibiotic cefalotin (CLS) by β-lactamase was studied using this method. The experimentally observed activation barrier was successfully reproduced by free energy perturbation calculations along the optimized reaction path that involved activation by the carboxylate moiety in CLS. It was found that the free energy profile in the QM region was slightly higher than the isolated energy and that two residues, Lys67 and Lys315, as well as water molecules deeply influenced the QM atoms associated with the bond alternation reaction in the acyl-enzyme intermediate. These facts suggested that the surrounding residues are favorable for the reactant complex and prevent the intermediate from being too stabilized to proceed to the following deacylation reaction. We have demonstrated that the free energy contribution analysis should be a useful method to investigate enzyme catalysis and to facilitate intelligent molecular design.

  15. Analysis of diffusivity of the oscillating reaction components in a microreactor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Šafranko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When performing oscillating reactions, periodical changes in the concentrations of reactants, intermediaries, and products take place. Due to the mentioned periodical changes of the concentrations, the information about the diffusivity of the components included into oscillating reactions is very important for the control of the oscillating reactions. Non-linear dynamics makes oscillating reactions very interesting for analysis in different reactor systems. In this paper, the analysis of diffusivity of the oscillating reaction components was performed in a microreactor, with the aim of identifying the limiting component. The geometry of the microreactor microchannel and a well defined flow profile ensure optimal conditions for the diffusion phenomena analysis, because diffusion profiles in a microreactor depend only on the residence time. In this paper, the analysis of diffusivity of the oscillating reaction components was performed in a microreactor equipped with 2 Y-shape inlets and 2 Y-shape outlets, with active volume of V = 4 μL at different residence times.

  16. TRAWA, a transient analysis code for water reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajamaeki, M.

    1976-06-01

    TRAWA is a transient analysis code for water reactors. It solves the two-group neutron diffusion equations simultaneously with the heat conduction equations and the two-phase hydraulic equations for one or more channels. At most one-dimensional submodels are used. Neither thermal nor hydraulic mixing appear between channels. Doppler, coolant density, coolant temperature, and soluble poison density feedbacks due to the thermohydraulics of the channels are described by using polynomial expansions for the group constants. The hydraulic circuit outside the reactor core consists of by-pass channel and risers with two-phase flow and of pump lines with incompressible flow. Nontrivial implicit methods are employed in the discretization of the equations to allow for sparse spatial mesh and flexible choice of time steps. Various transients can be calculated by applying external disturbances. The code is extensively supplied by input and output capabilities. TRAWA is written in FORTRAN V for UNIVAC 1108 computer. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the analysis of polymerase chain reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduzio, Hélène; Ezan, Eric; Fenaille, François

    2010-12-30

    We have investigated the potential and robustness of the off-line coupling of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), for further applications in the screening of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This was based on recently reported data demonstrating that anion-exchange solid-phase extraction was the most efficient technique for efficiently desalting PCR products, with a recovery of ∼70%. Results showed that this purification approach efficiently removes almost all the chemicals commonly added to PCR buffers. ESI-MS analysis of a model 114-bp PCR product performed on the LTQ-Orbitrap instrument demonstrated that detection limits in the nM range along with an average mass measurement uncertainty of 9.15 ± 7.11 ppm can be routinely obtained using an external calibration. The PCR/ESI-MS platform was able to detect just a few copies of a targeted oligonucleotide. However, it was shown that if two PCR products are present in a mixture in a ratio higher than 10 to 1, the lower abundance one might not be reproducibly detected. Applications to SNPs demonstrated that an LTQ-Orbitrap with a resolution of 30 000 (at m/z 400) easily identified a single (A ↔ G) switch, i.e. a 16 Da difference, in binary mixtures of ∼ 35 kDa PCR products. Complementary experiments also showed that the combination of endonucleases and ESI-MS could be used to confirm base composition and sequence, and thus to screen for unknown polymorphisms in specific sequences. For example, a single (T ↔ A) switch (9 Da mass difference) was successfully identified in a 114-bp PCR product. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Phase 1 Characterization sampling and analysis plan West Valley demonstration project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. L. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-06-30

    The Phase 1 Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan (CSAP) provides details about environmental data collection that will be taking place to support Phase 1 decommissioning activities described in the Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan for the West Valley Demonstration Project, Revision 2 (Phase I DP; DOE 2009). The four primary purposes of CSAP data collection are: (1) pre-design data collection, (2) remedial support, (3) post-remediation status documentation, and (4) Phase 2 decision-making support. Data collection to support these four main objectives is organized into two distinct data collection efforts. The first is data collection that will take place prior to the initiation of significant Phase 1 decommissioning activities (e.g., the Waste Management Area [WMA] 1 and WMA 2 excavations). The second is data collection that will occur during and immediately after environmental remediation in support of remediation activities. Both data collection efforts have a set of well-defined objectives that encompass the data needs of the four main CSAP data collection purposes detailed in the CSAP. The main body of the CSAP describes the overall data collection strategies that will be used to satisfy data collection objectives. The details of pre-remediation data collection are organized by WMA. The CSAP contains an appendix for each WMA that describes the details of WMA-specific pre-remediation data collection activities. The CSAP is intended to expand upon the data collection requirements identified in the Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan. The CSAP is intended to tightly integrate with the Phase 1 Final Status Survey Plan (FSSP). Data collection described by the CSAP is consistent with the FSSP where appropriate and to the extent possible.

  19. Evaluation of reactor induced (n,p) reactions for activation analysis of titanium in geological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa Garcia, R; Cohen, I M [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1984-05-01

    The possibilities of reactor induced (n,p) reactions as a tool for neutron activation analysis of titanium in geological samples are discussed. The interference of calcium and scandium is experimentally evaluated. Results for Ti, Ca and Sc in GSP-1 and PCC-1 standard rocks are presented. Based on the experimental values, it is concluded that the /sup 47/Ti(n,p)/sup 47/Sc reaction is the most favourable for titanium determination. 11 refs.

  20. A Systematic Approach for the Design and Analysis of Reaction-Separation Systems with Recycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Jimenez, Edgar Ramirez

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for a systematic model-based analysis and the results obtained from it for an integrated design and analysis of reaction-separation systems with recycle. The methodology (systematic approach) consists of three stages where stage 1 identifies the limiting values...

  1. Group Analysis of Free Convection Flow of a Magnetic Nanofluid with Chemical Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Jashim Uddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics viscous incompressible free convective boundary layer flow of an electrically conducting, chemically reacting nanofluid from a convectively heated permeable vertical surface is presented. Scaling group of transformations is used in the governing equations and the boundary conditions to determine absolute invariants. A third-order ordinary differential equation which corresponds to momentum conservation and two second-order ordinary differential equations which correspond to energy and nanoparticle volume fraction (species conservation are derived. Our (group analysis indicates that, for the similarity solution, the convective heat transfer coefficient and mass transfer velocity are proportional to x-1/4 whilst the reaction rate is proportional to x-1/2, where x is the axial distance from the leading edge of the plate. The effects of the relevant controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle volume fraction are examined. The accuracy of the technique we have used was tested by performing comparisons with the results of published work and the results were found to be in good agreement. The present computations indicate that the flow is accelerated and temperature enhanced whereas nanoparticle volume fractions are decreased with increasing order of chemical reaction. Furthermore the flow is strongly decelerated, whereas the nanoparticle volume fraction and temperature are enhanced with increasing magnetic field parameter. Increasing convection-conduction parameter increases velocity and temperatures but has a weak influence on nanoparticle volume fraction distribution. The present study demonstrates the thermal enhancement achieved with nanofluids and also magnetic fields and is of relevance to nanomaterials processing.

  2. Regulatory analysis of the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program has been developed to identify, demonstrate, test, and evaluate technologies that will provide alternatives to the current underground storage tank remediation program. The UST-ID Program is a national program that consists of five participating US Department of Energy (DOE) sites where technologies can be developed an ultimately demonstrated. Once these technologies are demonstrated, the UST-ID Program will transfer the developed technology system to industry (governmental or industrial) for application or back to Research and Development for further evaluation and modification, as necessary. In order to ensure that the UST-ID Program proceeds without interruption, it will be necessary to identify regulatory requirements along with associated permitting and notification requirements early in the technology development process. This document serves as a baseline for identifying certain federal and state regulatory requirements that may impact the UST-ID Program and the demonstration of any identified technologies

  3. Development of blow down and sodium-water reaction jet analysis codes-Validation by sodium-water reaction tests (SWAT-1R)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Seino; Akikazu Kurihara; Isao Ono; Koji Jitsu

    2005-01-01

    Blow down analysis code (LEAP-BLOW) and sodium-water reaction jet analysis code (LEAP-JET) have been developed in order to improve the evaluation method on sodium-water reaction event in the steam generator (SG) of a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR). The validation analyses by these two codes were carried out using the data of Sodium-Water Reaction Test (SWAT-1R). The following main results have been obtained through this validation: (1) The calculational results by LEAP-BLOW such as internal pressure and water flow rate show good agreement with the results of the SWAT- 1R test. (2) The LEAP-JET code can qualitatively simulate the behavior of sodium-water reaction. However, it is found that the code has tendency to overestimate the maximum temperature of the reaction jet. (authors)

  4. Photonically wired spacecraft panels: an economic analysis and demonstrator for telecommunication satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, Philipp; Hurni, Andreas; Ziegler, Bent; Panopoulou, Aikaterini; Lemke, Norbert; Costa, Ivo; Pereira, Celeste

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present the design of smart satellite panels with integrated optical fibers for sensing and data communication. The project starts with a detailed analysis of the system needs and ends with a demonstrator breadboard showing the full performance during and after environmental tests such as vibrations and temperature. Future science missions will need higher bandwidth in the Gbit/s range for intra-satellite communications, so the step from electrical transmission media towards fiber-optical media is the logical next step to cope with future requirements. In addition, the fibers can be used to monitor temperatures directly underneath satellite payloads which will reduce the integration effort in a later phase. For temperature monitoring so called fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are written in special radiation tolerant fibers, which reflection wavelength allows a direct link to temperature at the grating position. A read-out system for FBGs to use within satellite applications is currently under development at OHB. For this study, first the environmental requirements for the panels are derived and in a second stage the functional requirements are defined. To define the functional requirements a telecommunication satellite platform, in the case here the Small-GEO series from OHB, has been taken as baseline. Based on the configuration of temperature sensors, communication lines and electrical signaling a possible replacement by fiber-optical technology was defined and traded w.r.t. its economic benefit. It has been pointed out that the replacement of temperature sensors will reduce harness mass, but the great benefit is seen here in the reduction of assembly effort. Once the satellite panel is manufactured, the temperature sensors are already implemented at certain positions. Another point for mass savings which has pointed out is the replacement of the high-voltage or high- current high power commands (HPC) by fiber optics. Replacing some of the several

  5. Numerical Analysis Of Hooke Jeeves-Runge Kutta To Determine Reaction Rate Equation In Pyrrole Polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawan, Indra; Sulistyo, Harry; Rochmad

    2001-01-01

    The numerical analysis of Hooke Jeeves Methods combined with Runge Kutta Methods is used to determine the exact model of reaction rate equation of pyrrole polymerization. Chemical polymerization of pyrrole was conducted with FeCI 3 / pyrrole solution at concentration ratio of 1.62 mole / mole and 2.18 mole / mole with varrying temperature of 28, 40, 50, and 60 o C. FeCl 3 acts as an oxidation agent to form pyrrole cation that will polymerize. The numerical analysis was done to examine the exact model of reaction rate equation which is derived from reaction equation of initiation, propagation, and termination. From its numerical analysis, it is found that the pyrrole polymerization follows third order of pyrrole cation concentration

  6. Sequential-Injection Analysis: Principles, Instrument Construction, and Demonstration by a Simple Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, A.; Tzanavaras, P. D.; Themelis, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The sequential-injection analysis (SIA) is an approach to sample handling that enables the automation of manual wet-chemistry procedures in a rapid, precise and efficient manner. The experiments using SIA fits well in the course of Instrumental Chemical Analysis and especially in the section of Automatic Methods of analysis provided by chemistry…

  7. Determination and theoretical analysis of the differential cross sections of the 2H(d,p) reaction at energies and detection angles suitable for NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paneta, V.; Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Gastis, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Vlastou, R.; Kontos, A.; Mayer, M.; Misaelides, P.; Perdikakis, G.

    2014-01-01

    The accurate determination of deuteron depth profile presents a strong analytical challenge for all the principal IBA (Ion Beam Analysis) techniques. As far as NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) is concerned, the 2 H(d,p) reaction, seems to be a promising candidate, especially in the case of complex matrices, or for the study of deep-implanted deuteron layers. In the present work differential cross-section values for the 2 H(d,p) reaction have been determined at 140, 160 and 170 degrees, for E d (lab) = 900-1600 keV, with an energy step of 50 keV, using a well-characterized, thin C:D target deposited on a polished Si wafer. The detection system consisted of 3 silicon surface barrier (SSB) detectors (thickness of 1000 μm) placed at a distance of about 11-13 cm from the target, at the appropriate angles. The experimental results were analyzed using the R-matrix calculations code AZURE. The results, in graphical and tabular form, will soon be available to the scientific community through IBANDL

  8. Automated selected reaction monitoring data analysis workflow for large-scale targeted proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surinova, Silvia; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Chang, Ching-Yun; Espona, Lucia; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2013-08-01

    Targeted proteomics based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry is commonly used for accurate and reproducible quantification of protein analytes in complex biological mixtures. Strictly hypothesis-driven, SRM assays quantify each targeted protein by collecting measurements on its peptide fragment ions, called transitions. To achieve sensitive and accurate quantitative results, experimental design and data analysis must consistently account for the variability of the quantified transitions. This consistency is especially important in large experiments, which increasingly require profiling up to hundreds of proteins over hundreds of samples. Here we describe a robust and automated workflow for the analysis of large quantitative SRM data sets that integrates data processing, statistical protein identification and quantification, and dissemination of the results. The integrated workflow combines three software tools: mProphet for peptide identification via probabilistic scoring; SRMstats for protein significance analysis with linear mixed-effect models; and PASSEL, a public repository for storage, retrieval and query of SRM data. The input requirements for the protocol are files with SRM traces in mzXML format, and a file with a list of transitions in a text tab-separated format. The protocol is especially suited for data with heavy isotope-labeled peptide internal standards. We demonstrate the protocol on a clinical data set in which the abundances of 35 biomarker candidates were profiled in 83 blood plasma samples of subjects with ovarian cancer or benign ovarian tumors. The time frame to realize the protocol is 1-2 weeks, depending on the number of replicates used in the experiment.

  9. Multidimensional analysis of collective sidewards flow in Au on Au reactions between 100 and 1050 A MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienold, T.; Fan, Z.G.; Hartnack, C.

    1994-11-01

    An excitation function of the Au on Au reaction from 100 to 1050 A MeV was measured using the FOPI-facility at GSI Darmstadt. Nuclear charge (Z≤15) and velocity of the product were detected with full azimuthal acceptance at laboratory angles 1 ≤Θ lab ≤30 . For the first time an analysis is presented which combines the azimuthally asymmetric part of the transverse flow (sidewards flow), stopping and the associated collision geometry. In comparison to microscopic transport model calculations we demonstrate the relevance of this method for the extraction of the nuclear equation of state. (orig.)

  10. Automated Microfluidic Platform for Serial Polymerase Chain Reaction and High-Resolution Melting Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weidong; Bean, Brian; Corey, Scott; Coursey, Johnathan S; Hasson, Kenton C; Inoue, Hiroshi; Isano, Taisuke; Kanderian, Sami; Lane, Ben; Liang, Hongye; Murphy, Brian; Owen, Greg; Shinoda, Nobuhiko; Zeng, Shulin; Knight, Ivor T

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an automated genetic analyzer for human sample testing based on microfluidic rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). The integrated DNA microfluidic cartridge was used on a platform designed with a robotic pipettor system that works by sequentially picking up different test solutions from a 384-well plate, mixing them in the tips, and delivering mixed fluids to the DNA cartridge. A novel image feedback flow control system based on a Canon 5D Mark II digital camera was developed for controlling fluid movement through a complex microfluidic branching network without the use of valves. The same camera was used for measuring the high-resolution melt curve of DNA amplicons that were generated in the microfluidic chip. Owing to fast heating and cooling as well as sensitive temperature measurement in the microfluidic channels, the time frame for PCR and HRMA was dramatically reduced from hours to minutes. Preliminary testing results demonstrated that rapid serial PCR and HRMA are possible while still achieving high data quality that is suitable for human sample testing. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Partial wave analysis of the 18O(p,α0)15N reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, L.W.J.; Spicer, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    A partial wave analysis of the differential cross sections for the 18 O(p,α 0 ) 15 N reaction has been carried out applying the formalism of Blatt and Biedenharn (1952), made specific for this reaction. The differential cross sections, measured at 200 keV intervals from 6.6 to 10.4 MeV bombarding energy, were subjected to least-squares fitting to this specific analytic expression. Two resonances were given by the analysis, the 19 F states being at 14.71+-0.07 MeV (1/2 - ) and 14.80 + 0.07 MeV (1/2) +

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis demonstrate the chromate reduction ability of a novel chromate reductase gene from Serratia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peng; Tan, Xiaoqing; Wu, Ying; Bai, Qunhua; Jia, Yan; Xiao, Hong

    2015-03-01

    The ChrT gene encodes a chromate reductase enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of Cr(VI). The chromate reductase is also known as flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase (FMN_red). The aim of the present study was to clone the full-length ChrT DNA from Serratia sp. CQMUS2 and analyze the deduced amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure. The putative ChrT gene fragment of Serratia sp. CQMUS2 was isolated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), according to the known FMN_red gene sequence from Serratia sp. AS13. The flanking sequences of the ChrT gene were obtained by high efficiency TAIL-PCR, while the full-length gene of ChrT was cloned in Escherichia coli for subsequent sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of ChrT was submitted onto GenBank under the accession number, KF211434. Sequence analysis of the gene and amino acids was conducted using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, and open reading frame (ORF) analysis was performed using ORF Finder software. The ChrT gene was found to be an ORF of 567 bp that encodes a 188-amino acid enzyme with a calculated molecular weight of 20.4 kDa. In addition, the ChrT protein was hypothesized to be an NADPH-dependent FMN_red and a member of the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. The amino acid sequence of ChrT showed high sequence similarity to the FMN reductase genes of Klebsiella pneumonia and Raoultella ornithinolytica , which belong to the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. Furthermore, ChrT was shown to have a 85.6% similarity to the three-dimensional structure of Escherichia coli ChrR, sharing four common enzyme active sites for chromate reduction. Therefore, ChrT gene cloning and protein structure determination demonstrated the ability of the gene for chromate reduction. The results of the present study provide a basis for further studies on ChrT gene expression and protein function.

  13. Cloning and sequence analysis demonstrate the chromate reduction ability of a novel chromate reductase gene from Serratia sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    DENG, PENG; TAN, XIAOQING; WU, YING; BAI, QUNHUA; JIA, YAN; XIAO, HONG

    2015-01-01

    The ChrT gene encodes a chromate reductase enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of Cr(VI). The chromate reductase is also known as flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase (FMN_red). The aim of the present study was to clone the full-length ChrT DNA from Serratia sp. CQMUS2 and analyze the deduced amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure. The putative ChrT gene fragment of Serratia sp. CQMUS2 was isolated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), according to the known FMN_red gene sequence from Serratia sp. AS13. The flanking sequences of the ChrT gene were obtained by high efficiency TAIL-PCR, while the full-length gene of ChrT was cloned in Escherichia coli for subsequent sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of ChrT was submitted onto GenBank under the accession number, KF211434. Sequence analysis of the gene and amino acids was conducted using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, and open reading frame (ORF) analysis was performed using ORF Finder software. The ChrT gene was found to be an ORF of 567 bp that encodes a 188-amino acid enzyme with a calculated molecular weight of 20.4 kDa. In addition, the ChrT protein was hypothesized to be an NADPH-dependent FMN_red and a member of the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. The amino acid sequence of ChrT showed high sequence similarity to the FMN reductase genes of Klebsiella pneumonia and Raoultella ornithinolytica, which belong to the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. Furthermore, ChrT was shown to have a 85.6% similarity to the three-dimensional structure of Escherichia coli ChrR, sharing four common enzyme active sites for chromate reduction. Therefore, ChrT gene cloning and protein structure determination demonstrated the ability of the gene for chromate reduction. The results of the present study provide a basis for further studies on ChrT gene expression and protein function. PMID:25667630

  14. SDP_mharwit_1: Demonstration of HIFI Linear Polarization Analysis of Spectral Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwit, M.

    2010-03-01

    We propose to observe the polarization of the 621 GHz water vapor maser in VY Canis Majoris to demonstrate the capability of HIFI to make polarization observations of Far-Infrared/Submillimeter spectral lines. The proposed Demonstration Phase would: - Show that HIFI is capable of interesting linear polarization measurements of spectral lines; - Test out the highest spectral resolving power to sort out closely spaced Doppler components; - Determine whether the relative intensities predicted by Neufeld and Melnick are correct; - Record the degree and direction of linear polarization for the closely-Doppler shifted peaks.

  15. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  16. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CORREIA, RION BRATTIG; LI, LANG; ROCHA, LUIS M.

    2015-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this “Bibliome”, the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products—including cannabis—which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015. We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that

  17. Meta-analysis to obtain a scale of psychological reaction after perinatal loss: focus on miscarriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annsofie Adolfsson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Annsofie Adolfsson1,21School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, SwedenAbstract: Pregnancy has different meanings to different women depending upon their circumstances. A number of qualitative studies have described the experience of miscarriage by women who had desired to carry their pregnancy to full term. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify a scale of psychological reaction to miscarriage. Meta-analysis is a quantitative approach for reviewing articles from scientific journals through statistical analysis of findings from individual studies. In this review, a meta-analytic method was used to identify and analyze psychological reactions in women who have suffered a miscarriage. Different reactions to stress associated with the period following miscarriage were identified. The depression reaction had the highest average, weighted, unbiased estimate of effect (d+ = 0.99 and was frequently associated with the experience of perinatal loss. Psychiatric morbidity was found after miscarriage in 27% of cases by a diagnostic interview ten days after miscarriage. The grief reaction had a medium d+ of 0.56 in the studies included. However, grief after miscarriage differed from other types of grief after perinatal loss because the parents had no focus for their grief. The guilt is greater after miscarriage than after other types of perinatal loss. Measurement of the stress reaction and anxiety reaction seems to be difficult in the included studies, as evidenced by a low d+ (0.17 and 0.16, respectively. It has been recommended that grief after perinatal loss be measured by an adapted instrument called the Perinatal Grief Scale Short Version.Keywords: psychological, perinatal loss, pregnancy, depression 

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Reading Programs: A Demonstration with Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Fiona M.; Kieffer, Michael J.; Shand, Robert; Pan, Yilin; Cheng, Henan; Levin, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the value of cost-effectiveness analysis for evaluation and decision making with respect to educational programs and discuss its application to early reading interventions. We describe the conditions for a rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis and illustrate the challenges of applying the method in practice, providing examples of programs…

  19. A Cost Analysis Plan for the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foch, Craig B.

    The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Project (NPDDP) delivers school-based preventive dental care to approximately 14,000 children in ten United States cities. The program, begun in 1976, is to be conducted over a six and one-half year period. The costing definitions and allocation rules to be used in the project are the principal…

  20. Design, development, and demonstration of a fully LabVIEW controlled in situ electrochemical Fourier transform infrared setup combined with a wall-jet electrode to investigate the electrochemical interface of nanoparticulate electrocatalysts under reaction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesselberger, Markus; Ashton, Sean J; Wiberg, Gustav K H; Arenz, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    We present a detailed description of the construction of an in situ electrochemical ATR-FTIR setup combined with a wall-jet electrode to investigate the electrocatalytic properties of nanoparticulate catalysts in situ under controlled mass transport conditions. The presented setup allows the electrochemical interface to be probed in combination with the simultaneous determination of reaction rates. At the same time, the high level of automation allows it to be used as a standard tool in electrocatalysis research. The performance of the setup was demonstrated by probing the oxygen reduction reaction on a platinum black catalyst in sulfuric electrolyte.

  1. Mass-Producible 2D-MoS2-Impregnated Screen-Printed Electrodes That Demonstrate Efficient Electrocatalysis toward the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Smith, Graham C; Banks, Craig E

    2017-07-12

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (2D-MoS 2 ) screen-printed electrodes (2D-MoS 2 -SPEs) have been designed, fabricated, and evaluated toward the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) within acidic aqueous media. A screen-printable ink has been developed that allows for the tailoring of the 2D-MoS 2 content/mass used in the fabrication of the 2D-MoS 2 -SPEs, which critically affects the observed ORR performance. In comparison to the graphite SPEs (G-SPEs), the 2D-MoS 2 -SPEs are shown to exhibit an electrocatalytic behavior toward the ORR which is found, critically, to be reliant upon the percentage mass incorporation of 2D-MoS 2 in the 2D-MoS 2 -SPEs; a greater percentage mass of 2D-MoS 2 incorporated into the 2D-MoS 2 -SPEs results in a significantly less electronegative ORR onset potential and a greater signal output (current density). Using optimally fabricated 2D-MoS 2 -SPEs, an ORR onset and a peak current of approximately +0.16 V [vs saturated calomel electrode (SCE)] and -1.62 mA cm -2 , respectively, are observed, which exceeds the -0.53 V (vs SCE) and -635 μA cm -2 performance of unmodified G-SPEs, indicating an electrocatalytic response toward the ORR utilizing the 2D-MoS 2 -SPEs. An investigation of the underlying electrochemical reaction mechanism of the ORR within acidic aqueous solutions reveals that the reaction proceeds via a direct four-electron process for all of the 2D-MoS 2 -SPE variants studied herein, where oxygen is electrochemically favorably reduced to water. The fabricated 2D-MoS 2 -SPEs are found to exhibit no degradation in the observed achievable current over the course of 1000 repeat scans. The production of such inks and the resultant mass-producible 2D-MoS 2 -SPEs mitigates the need to modify post hoc an electrode via the drop-casting technique that has been previously shown to result in a loss of achievable current over the course of 1000 repeat scans. The 2D-MoS 2 -SPEs designed, fabricated, and tested herein could

  2. Widely applicable MATLAB routines for automated analysis of saccadic reaction times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Jukka M; Forssman, Linda; Kaatiala, Jussi; Yrttiaho, Santeri; Wass, Sam

    2015-06-01

    Saccadic reaction time (SRT) is a widely used dependent variable in eye-tracking studies of human cognition and its disorders. SRTs are also frequently measured in studies with special populations, such as infants and young children, who are limited in their ability to follow verbal instructions and remain in a stable position over time. In this article, we describe a library of MATLAB routines (Mathworks, Natick, MA) that are designed to (1) enable completely automated implementation of SRT analysis for multiple data sets and (2) cope with the unique challenges of analyzing SRTs from eye-tracking data collected from poorly cooperating participants. The library includes preprocessing and SRT analysis routines. The preprocessing routines (i.e., moving median filter and interpolation) are designed to remove technical artifacts and missing samples from raw eye-tracking data. The SRTs are detected by a simple algorithm that identifies the last point of gaze in the area of interest, but, critically, the extracted SRTs are further subjected to a number of postanalysis verification checks to exclude values contaminated by artifacts. Example analyses of data from 5- to 11-month-old infants demonstrated that SRTs extracted with the proposed routines were in high agreement with SRTs obtained manually from video records, robust against potential sources of artifact, and exhibited moderate to high test-retest stability. We propose that the present library has wide utility in standardizing and automating SRT-based cognitive testing in various populations. The MATLAB routines are open source and can be downloaded from http://www.uta.fi/med/icl/methods.html .

  3. Predictors of chronic ankle instability: Analysis of peroneal reaction time, dynamic balance and isokinetic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Guzmán, Rafael; Jiménez, Fernando; Abián-Vicén, Javier

    2018-05-01

    Previous studies have reported the factors contributing to chronic ankle instability, which could lead to more effective treatments. However, factors such as the reflex response and ankle muscle strength have not been taken into account in previous investigations. Fifty recreational athletes with chronic ankle instability and 55 healthy controls were recruited. Peroneal reaction time in response to sudden inversion, isokinetic evertor muscle strength and dynamic balance with the Star Excursion Balance Test and the Biodex Stability System were measured. The relationship between the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and performance on each test was assessed and a backward multiple linear regression analysis was conducted. Participants with chronic ankle instability showed prolonged peroneal reaction time, poor performance in the Biodex Stability System and decreased reach distance in the Star Excursion Balance Test. No significant differences were found in eversion and inversion peak torque. Moderate correlations were found between the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and the peroneal reaction time and performance on the Star Excursion Balance Test. Peroneus brevis reaction time and the posteromedial and lateral directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test accounted for 36% of the variance in the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Dynamic balance deficits and delayed peroneal reaction time are present in participants with chronic ankle instability. Peroneus brevis reaction time and the posteromedial and lateral directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test were the main contributing factors to the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score. No clear strength impairments were reported in unstable ankles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Component Analysis of Sweet BV and Clinical Trial on Antibody Titer and Allergic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Rok, Kwon

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The aim of this study was to observe prevention of allergic reactions of Sweet Bee Venom (removing enzyme components from Bee Venom. Methods : Content analysis of Sweet Bee Venom and Bee Venom was rendered using HPLC method and characterization of Anti-Sweet Bee Venom in Rabbit Serum. Clinical observation was conducted for inducement of allergic responses to Sweet BV. Results : 1. Analyzing melittin content using HPLC, Sweet BV contained 34.9% more melittin than Bee venom pharmacopuncture at same concentration. 2. Observing chromatogram of HPLC, removal of the enzyme was successfully rendered on Sweet BV. 3. The anti-serum of Sweet BV showed high titers against melittin and bee venom and relatively low titer against phospholipase A2. 4. After conducting approximately 3,000 cases of Sweet BV administration, not a single case of generalized anaphylatic reaction occurred in clinical observation. 5. Mild compared to the bee venom pharmacopuncture, Sweet BV showed some acute hypersensitive reactions of edema, itchiness, and aching locally. 6. Sweet BV was administered on six patients with previous history of suffering from generalized acute hypersensitive reactions with the bee venom. None of the patients showed allergic reactions with Sweet BV, suggesting it can effectively prevent anaphylatic shock which may occur after the bee venom pharmacopuncture procedure. Conclusion : Summarizing above results, Sweet Bee Venom appears to be an effective measurement against allergic reactions from the bee venom pharmacopuncture especially against anaphylatic shock.

  5. Dynamic Simulation, Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of a Demonstration Scale Lignocellulosic Enzymatic Hydrolysis Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Sin, Gürkan

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a lignocellulosic enzymatic hydrolysis model considering both model and feed parameters as sources of uncertainty. The dynamic model is parametrized for accommodating various types of biomass, and different enzymatic complexes...

  6. An analysis of the demonstration projects for renewable energy application buildings in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xingmin; Ren, Hong; Wu, Yong; Kong, Deping

    2013-01-01

    During the 2006–2008 period, there were 386 demonstration projects for renewable energy application buildings (REAB) organised by Chinese government, with a total area of approximately 40,420,000 m 2 . By the end of 2011, the vast majority of these projects had been completed and had passed the final acceptance. This paper analyses the measures taken by the Chinese government, including economic incentive mechanisms, organising agencies, application and evaluation systems, online monitoring platforms, acceptance inspections, assessment systems, standard criteria and so forth. This paper then evaluates the policy effects. The paper shows that there has been a satisfactory effect in the development of the REAB market, mobilising the enthusiasm of the government, equipment manufacturers and scientific research institutions, and promoting energy conservation. In addition, this paper analyses the suitability of different technological types in different climatic zones, which provides further guidance for the development of the REAB. Finally, based on the analyses of the problems met in the implementation of the demonstration projects, this paper proposes some policy suggestions concerning standard criteria, technological development, project management, incentive mechanisms and so on, to promote the development of the REAB more effectively in the future in China. - Highlights: • The policy measures to promote the development of renewable energy application buildings in China. • Evaluation of the demonstration policy effects in the market development and other aspects. • Analyses of the regional applicability for renewable energy application buildings in China. • Analyses of problems met in the implementation of the demonstration projects. • Put forward some policy suggestions on standard, technology, management, etc

  7. Technology demonstration: geostatistical and hydrologic analysis of salt areas. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, P.G.; Oberlander, P.L.; Rice, W.A.; Devary, J.L.; Nelson, R.W.; Tucker, P.E.

    1982-09-01

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) requested Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to: (1) use geostatistical analyses to evaluate the adequacy of hydrologic data from three salt regions, each of which contains a potential nuclear waste repository site; and (2) demonstrate a methodology that allows quantification of the value of additional data collection. The three regions examined are the Paradox Basin in Utah, the Permian Basin in Texas, and the Mississippi Study Area. Additional and new data became available to ONWI during and following these analyses; therefore, this report must be considered a methodology demonstration here would apply as illustrated had the complete data sets been available. A combination of geostatistical and hydrologic analyses was used for this demonstration. Geostatistical analyses provided an optimal estimate of the potentiometric surface from the available data, a measure of the uncertainty of that estimate, and a means for selecting and evaluating the location of future data. The hydrologic analyses included the calculation of transmissivities, flow paths, travel times, and ground-water flow rates from hypothetical repository sites. Simulation techniques were used to evaluate the effect of optimally located future data on the potentiometric surface, flow lines, travel times, and flow rates. Data availability, quality, quantity, and conformance with model assumptions differed in each of the salt areas. Report highlights for the three locations are given

  8. ANALYSIS OF A POSSIBLE REDUCTION IN ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN WATER ELECTROLYSIS REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel George POPESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It was experimentally observed that the electrolysis reaction continues a short period of time - time torelax c - after the cell power supply is interrupted. This paper presents an analysis of transient phenomenaoccurring and pr opose technical solutions

  9. Bifurcation Analysis of Gene Propagation Model Governed by Reaction-Diffusion Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guichen Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical analysis of the attractor bifurcation for gene propagation model governed by reaction-diffusion equations. We investigate the dynamical transition problems of the model under the homogeneous boundary conditions. By using the dynamical transition theory, we give a complete characterization of the bifurcated objects in terms of the biological parameters of the problem.

  10. Modelling and simulation of a transketolase mediated reaction: Sensitivity analysis of kinetic parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayar, N.A.; Chen, B.H.; Lye, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have used a proposed mathematical model, describing the carbon-carbon bond format ion reaction between beta-hydroxypyruvate and glycolaldehyde to synthesise L-erythrulose, catalysed by the enzyme transketolase, for the analysis of the sensitivity of the process to its kinetic...

  11. Assumption-free analysis of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakers, Christian; Ruijter, Jan M.; Deprez, Ronald H. Lekanne; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Quantification of mRNAs using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by monitoring the product formation with the fluorescent dye SYBR Green I is being extensively used in neurosciences, developmental biology, and medical diagnostics. Most PCR data analysis procedures assume that the PCR

  12. On the graph and systems analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks with mass action kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Schaft, Arjan van der

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent progresses on the interplay between the graph theory and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics by reformulating it using the graph knowledge of the underlying networks. Based on this formulation, we

  13. Software news and update PyFrag - Streamlining your reaction path analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeist, W.-J.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    The PyFrag program (released as PyFrag2007.01) is a "wrap-around" for the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) package and facilitates the extension of the fragment analysis method implemented in ADF along an entire potential energy surface. The purpose is to make analyses of reaction paths and other

  14. Sedation for pediatric radiological procedures: analysis of potential causes of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karian, V.E.; Burrows, P.E.; Connor, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, D. [Dept. of Biostatistics, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Mason, K.P. [Dept. of Anesthesiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Background. Sedation for diagnostic imaging and interventional radiologic procedures in pediatrics has greatly increased over the past decade. With appropriate patient selection and monitoring, serious adverse effects are infrequent, but failure to sedate and paradoxical reactions do occur. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine, among patients undergoing sedation for radiologic procedures, the incidence of sedation failure and paradoxical reaction to pentobarbital and to identify potentially correctable causes. Materials and methods. Records of 1665 patients who were sedated in the radiology department from 1 November 1997 to 1 July 1998 were reviewed. Patients failing sedation or experiencing paradoxical reaction were compared with respect to sex, age group, diagnosis, scan type, time of day, NPO status, use of IV contrast and type of sedation agent using the Fisher exact test, Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Student t-test, and logistic regression. Results. Data analysis revealed a sedation failure rate of 1 % and paradoxical reaction rate of 1.2 %. Stepwise multiple logistic regression revealed that the only significant independent multivariate predictor of failure was the need for the administration of a combination of pentobarbital, fentanyl, and midazolam IV. Conclusion. The low rate of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions to pentobarbital was near optimal and probably cannot be improved with the currently available sedatives. (orig.)

  15. Sedation for pediatric radiological procedures: analysis of potential causes of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karian, V.E.; Burrows, P.E.; Connor, L.; Zurakowski, D.; Mason, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Background. Sedation for diagnostic imaging and interventional radiologic procedures in pediatrics has greatly increased over the past decade. With appropriate patient selection and monitoring, serious adverse effects are infrequent, but failure to sedate and paradoxical reactions do occur. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine, among patients undergoing sedation for radiologic procedures, the incidence of sedation failure and paradoxical reaction to pentobarbital and to identify potentially correctable causes. Materials and methods. Records of 1665 patients who were sedated in the radiology department from 1 November 1997 to 1 July 1998 were reviewed. Patients failing sedation or experiencing paradoxical reaction were compared with respect to sex, age group, diagnosis, scan type, time of day, NPO status, use of IV contrast and type of sedation agent using the Fisher exact test, Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Student t-test, and logistic regression. Results. Data analysis revealed a sedation failure rate of 1 % and paradoxical reaction rate of 1.2 %. Stepwise multiple logistic regression revealed that the only significant independent multivariate predictor of failure was the need for the administration of a combination of pentobarbital, fentanyl, and midazolam IV. Conclusion. The low rate of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions to pentobarbital was near optimal and probably cannot be improved with the currently available sedatives. (orig.)

  16. Large-leak sodium-water reaction analysis for steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakano, K; Shindo, Y; Hori, M

    1975-07-01

    The guillotine rupture of 4 tubes is assumed as a design basis regarding the large-leak sodium-water reaction in the system of the MONJU steam generator. Three kinds of analyses were performed with the view to showing the integrity of the steam generator system on the reaction. The first one is the analysis of the initial pressure spike, assuming the initial guillotine rupture of 1 tube. The analysis was performed by utilizing one-dimensional sphere-cylinder model code SWAC-7 and two-dimensional axisymmetric code PISCES 2DL. The second one is the analysis of the secondary peak pressure and its propagation in the system, assuming the instantaneous guillotine rupture of 4 tubes. The third one is the analysis of the dynamic deformation of the steam generator shell. The integrity of the steam generator system was shown by the analyses. (author)

  17. Large-leak sodium-water reaction analysis for steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakano, K.; Shindo, Y.; Hori, M.

    1975-01-01

    The guillotine rupture of 4 tubes is assumed as a design basis regarding the large-leak sodium-water reaction in the system of the MONJU steam generator. Three kinds of analyses were performed with the view to showing the integrity of the steam generator system on the reaction. The first one is the analysis of the initial pressure spike, assuming the initial guillotine rupture of 1 tube. The analysis was performed by utilizing one-dimensional sphere-cylinder model code SWAC-7 and two-dimensional axisymmetric code PISCES 2DL. The second one is the analysis of the secondary peak pressure and its propagation in the system, assuming the instantaneous guillotine rupture of 4 tubes. The third one is the analysis of the dynamic deformation of the steam generator shell. The integrity of the steam generator system was shown by the analyses. (author)

  18. Applications of nuclear reaction analysis for determining hydrogen and deuterium distribution in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altstetter, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ion beams for materials analysis has made a successful transition from the domain of the particle physicist to that of the materials scientist. The subcategory of this field, nuclear reaction analysis, is just now undergoing the transition, particularly in applications to hydrogen in materials. The materials scientist must locate the nearest accelerator, because now he will find that using it can solve mysteries that do not yield to other techniques. 9 figures

  19. Demonstration of uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for PWR fuel performance with BISON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Zou, Ling; Burns, Douglas; Ladd, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    BISON is an advanced fuels performance code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory and is the code of choice for fuels performance by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Program. An approach to uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis with BISON was developed and a new toolkit was created. A PWR fuel rod model was developed and simulated by BISON, and uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis were performed with eighteen uncertain input parameters. The maximum fuel temperature and gap conductance were selected as the figures of merit (FOM). Pearson, Spearman, and partial correlation coefficients were considered for all of the figures of merit in sensitivity analysis. (author)

  20. Demonstration of Uncertainty Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis for PWR Fuel Performance with BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Ladd, Jacob; Zhao, Haihua; Zou, Ling; Burns, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    BISON is an advanced fuels performance code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory and is the code of choice for fuels performance by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Program. An approach to uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis with BISON was developed and a new toolkit was created. A PWR fuel rod model was developed and simulated by BISON, and uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis were performed with eighteen uncertain input parameters. The maximum fuel temperature and gap conductance were selected as the figures of merit (FOM). Pearson, Spearman, and partial correlation coefficients were considered for all of the figures of merit in sensitivity analysis.

  1. Ion beam analysis - development and application of nuclear reaction analysis methods, in particular at a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeland, K.A.

    1996-11-01

    This thesis treats the development of Ion Beam Analysis methods, principally for the analysis of light elements at a nuclear microprobe. The light elements in this context are defined as having an atomic number less than approx. 13. The work reported is to a large extent based on multiparameter methods. Several signals are recorded simultaneously, and the data can be effectively analyzed to reveal structures that can not be observed through one-parameter collection. The different techniques are combined in a new set-up at the Lund Nuclear Microprobe. The various detectors for reaction products are arranged in such a way that they can be used for the simultaneous analysis of hydrogen, lithium, boron and fluorine together with traditional PIXE analysis and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy as well as photon-tagged Nuclear Reaction Analysis. 48 refs

  2. Analysis of toroidal vacuum vessels for use in demonstration sized tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbert, M.E.

    1978-07-01

    The vacuum vessel component of the tokamak fusion reactor is the subject of this study. The main objective of this paper was to provide guidance for the structural design of a thin wall externally pressurized toroidal vacuum vessel. The analyses are based on the available state-of-the-art analytical methods. The shortcomings of these analytical methods necessitated approximations and assumptions to be made throughout the study. A principal result of the study has been the identification of a viable vacuum vessel design for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR) and The Next Step (TNS) Reactor

  3. A comparison of approximation techniques for variance-based sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitivity analysis is an indispensable tool for the analysis of complex systems. In a recent paper, we have introduced a thermodynamically consistent variance-based sensitivity analysis approach for studying the robustness and fragility properties of biochemical reaction systems under uncertainty in the standard chemical potentials of the activated complexes of the reactions and the standard chemical potentials of the molecular species. In that approach, key sensitivity indices were estimated by Monte Carlo sampling, which is computationally very demanding and impractical for large biochemical reaction systems. Computationally efficient algorithms are needed to make variance-based sensitivity analysis applicable to realistic cellular networks, modeled by biochemical reaction systems that consist of a large number of reactions and molecular species. Results We present four techniques, derivative approximation (DA, polynomial approximation (PA, Gauss-Hermite integration (GHI, and orthonormal Hermite approximation (OHA, for analytically approximating the variance-based sensitivity indices associated with a biochemical reaction system. By using a well-known model of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade as a case study, we numerically compare the approximation quality of these techniques against traditional Monte Carlo sampling. Our results indicate that, although DA is computationally the most attractive technique, special care should be exercised when using it for sensitivity analysis, since it may only be accurate at low levels of uncertainty. On the other hand, PA, GHI, and OHA are computationally more demanding than DA but can work well at high levels of uncertainty. GHI results in a slightly better accuracy than PA, but it is more difficult to implement. OHA produces the most accurate approximation results and can be implemented in a straightforward manner. It turns out that the computational cost of the

  4. Use of deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for quantitative surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.C.B.; Earwaker, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of the basic features of nuclear reaction analysis is given; particular emphasis is placed on quantitative light element determination using (d,p) and (d,α) reactions. The experimental apparatus is also described, with reference to the 3MV Dynamitron accelerator at the University of Birmingham Radiation Centre. Finally, a set of standard (d, p) spectra for the elements Z=3 to Z=17, using 2 MeV incident deuterons, is included together with examples of the more useful of the (d,α) spectra. (orig.)

  5. Phylogenomic analysis demonstrates a pattern of rare and ancient horizontal gene transfer between plants and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Soanes, Darren M; Foster, Peter G; Leonard, Guy; Thornton, Christopher R; Talbot, Nicholas J

    2009-07-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) describes the transmission of genetic material across species boundaries and is an important evolutionary phenomenon in the ancestry of many microbes. The role of HGT in plant evolutionary history is, however, largely unexplored. Here, we compare the genomes of six plant species with those of 159 prokaryotic and eukaryotic species and identify 1689 genes that show the highest similarity to corresponding genes from fungi. We constructed a phylogeny for all 1689 genes identified and all homolog groups available from the rice (Oryza sativa) genome (3177 gene families) and used these to define 14 candidate plant-fungi HGT events. Comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of these 14 data sets, using methods that account for site rate heterogeneity, demonstrated support for nine HGT events, demonstrating an infrequent pattern of HGT between plants and fungi. Five HGTs were fungi-to-plant transfers and four were plant-to-fungi HGTs. None of the fungal-to-plant HGTs involved angiosperm recipients. These results alter the current view of organismal barriers to HGT, suggesting that phagotrophy, the consumption of a whole cell by another, is not necessarily a prerequisite for HGT between eukaryotes. Putative functional annotation of the HGT candidate genes suggests that two fungi-to-plant transfers have added phenotypes important for life in a soil environment. Our study suggests that genetic exchange between plants and fungi is exceedingly rare, particularly among the angiosperms, but has occurred during their evolutionary history and added important metabolic traits to plant lineages.

  6. Core physics analysis in support of the FNR HEU-LEU demonstration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losey, David C.; Brown, Forrest B.; Martin, William R.; Lee, John C.

    1983-01-01

    A core neutronics analysis has been undertaken to assess the impact of low-enrichment fuel on the performance and utilization of the FNR As part of this analytic effort a computer code system has been assembled which will be of general use in analyzing research reactors with MTR-type fuel. The code system has been extensively tested and verified in calculations for the present high enrichment core. The analysis presented here compares the high-and-low enrichment fuels in batch and equilibrium core configurations which model the actual FNR operating conditions. The two fuels are compared for cycle length, fuel burnup, and flux and power distributions, as well as for the reactivity effects which are important in assessing the impact of LEU fuel on reactor shutdown margin. (author)

  7. Core physics analysis in support of the FNR HEU-LEU demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losey, David C; Brown, Forrest B; Martin, William R; Lee, John C [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan (United States)

    1983-08-01

    A core neutronics analysis has been undertaken to assess the impact of low-enrichment fuel on the performance and utilization of the FNR As part of this analytic effort a computer code system has been assembled which will be of general use in analyzing research reactors with MTR-type fuel. The code system has been extensively tested and verified in calculations for the present high enrichment core. The analysis presented here compares the high-and-low enrichment fuels in batch and equilibrium core configurations which model the actual FNR operating conditions. The two fuels are compared for cycle length, fuel burnup, and flux and power distributions, as well as for the reactivity effects which are important in assessing the impact of LEU fuel on reactor shutdown margin. (author)

  8. The Ford Nuclear Reactor demonstration project for the evaluation and analysis of low enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, W.; King, J.S.; Lee, J.C.; Martin, W.R.; Wehe, D.K.

    1991-07-01

    The whole-core LEU fuel demonstration project at the University of Michigan was begun in 1979 as part of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program at Argonne National Laboratory. An LEU fuel design was selected which would produce minimum perturbations in the neutronic, operations, and safety characteristics of the 2-MW Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR). Initial criticality with a full LEU core on December 8, 1981, was followed by low- and full-power testing of the fresh LEU core, transitional operation with mixed HEU-LEU configurations, and establishment of full LEU equilibrium core operation. The transition from the HEU to the LEU configurations was achieved with negligible impact on experimental utilization and safe operation of the reactor. 78 refs., 74 figs., 84 tabs

  9. Operating experience, measurements, and analysis of the LEU whole core demonstration at the FNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weha, D.K.; Drumm, C.R.; King, J.S.; Martin, W.R.; Lee, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 2-MW Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan is serving as the demonstration reactor for the MTR-type low enrichment (LEU) fuel for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor program. Operational experience gained through six months of LEU core operation and seven months of mixed HEU-LEU core operation is presented. Subcadmium flux measurements performed with rhodium self-powered neutron detectors and iron wire activations are compared with calculations. Measured reactivity parameters are compared for HEU and LEU cores. Finally, the benchmark calculations for several HEU, LEU, and mixed HEU-LEU FNR cores and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) benchmark problem are presented. (author)

  10. Analysis of occludin trafficking, demonstrating continuous endocytosis, degradation, recycling and biosynthetic secretory trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Fletcher

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs link adjacent cells and are critical for maintenance of apical-basolateral polarity in epithelial monolayers. The TJ protein occludin functions in disparate processes, including wound healing and Hepatitis C Virus infection. Little is known about steady-state occludin trafficking into and out of the plasma membrane. Therefore, we determined the mechanisms responsible for occludin turnover in confluent Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial monolayers. Using various biotin-based trafficking assays we observed continuous and rapid endocytosis of plasma membrane localised occludin (the majority internalised within 30 minutes. By 120 minutes a significant reduction in internalised occludin was observed. Inhibition of lysosomal function attenuated the reduction in occludin signal post-endocytosis and promoted co-localisation with the late endocytic system. Using a similar method we demonstrated that ∼20% of internalised occludin was transported back to the cell surface. Consistent with these findings, significant co-localisation between internalised occludin and recycling endosomal compartments was observed. We then quantified the extent to which occludin synthesis and transport to the plasma membrane contributes to plasma membrane occludin homeostasis, identifying inhibition of protein synthesis led to decreased plasma membrane localised occludin. Significant co-localisation between occludin and the biosynthetic secretory pathway was demonstrated. Thus, under steady-state conditions occludin undergoes turnover via a continuous cycle of endocytosis, recycling and degradation, with degradation compensated for by biosynthetic exocytic trafficking. We developed a mathematical model to describe the endocytosis, recycling and degradation of occludin, utilising experimental data to provide quantitative estimates for the rates of these processes.

  11. Successful Completion of FY18/Q1 ASC L2 Milestone 6355: Electrical Analysis Calibration Workflow Capability Demonstration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copps, Kevin D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Sandia Analysis Workbench (SAW) project has developed and deployed a production capability for SIERRA computational mechanics analysis workflows. However, the electrical analysis workflow capability requirements have only been demonstrated in early prototype states, with no real capability deployed for analysts’ use. This milestone aims to improve the electrical analysis workflow capability (via SAW and related tools) and deploy it for ongoing use. We propose to focus on a QASPR electrical analysis calibration workflow use case. We will include a number of new capabilities (versus today’s SAW), such as: 1) support for the XYCE code workflow component, 2) data management coupled to electrical workflow, 3) human-in-theloop workflow capability, and 4) electrical analysis workflow capability deployed on the restricted (and possibly classified) network at Sandia. While far from the complete set of capabilities required for electrical analysis workflow over the long term, this is a substantial first step toward full production support for the electrical analysts.

  12. Molecular-dynamics analysis of mobile helium cluster reactions near surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios, E-mail: maroudas@ecs.umass.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-9303 (United States); Hammond, Karl D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the reactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}, 4 ≤ n ≤ 7) near low-Miller-index tungsten (W) surfaces, aiming at a fundamental understanding of the near-surface dynamics of helium-carrying species in plasma-exposed tungsten. These small mobile helium clusters are attracted to the surface and migrate to the surface by Fickian diffusion and drift due to the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation (TM) and cluster dissociation reactions are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. TM produces W adatoms and immobile complexes of helium clusters surrounding W vacancies located within the lattice planes at a short distance from the surface. These reactions are identified and characterized in detail based on the analysis of a large number of molecular-dynamics trajectories for each such mobile cluster near W(100), W(110), and W(111) surfaces. TM is found to be the dominant cluster reaction for all cluster and surface combinations, except for the He{sub 4} and He{sub 5} clusters near W(100) where cluster partial dissociation following TM dominates. We find that there exists a critical cluster size, n = 4 near W(100) and W(111) and n = 5 near W(110), beyond which the formation of multiple W adatoms and vacancies in the TM reactions is observed. The identified cluster reactions are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in the plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatom populations, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content, which are expected to influence the amount of hydrogen re-cycling and tritium retention in fusion tokamaks.

  13. Simplified method of ''push-pull'' test data analysis for determining in situ reaction rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, R.; Schroth, M.H.; Istok, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The single-well, ''''push-pull'''' test method is useful for obtaining information on a wide variety of aquifer physical, chemical, and microbiological characteristics. A push-pull test consists of the pulse-type injection of a prepared test solution into a single monitoring well followed by the extraction of the test solution/ground water mixture from the same well. The test solution contains a conservative tracer and one or more reactants selected to investigate a particular process. During the extraction phase, the concentrations of tracer, reactants, and possible reaction products are measured to obtain breakthrough curves for all solutes. This paper presents a simplified method of data analysis that can be used to estimate a first-order reaction rate coefficient from these breakthrough curves. Rate coefficients are obtained by fitting a regression line to a plot of normalized concentrations versus elapsed time, requiring no knowledge of aquifer porosity, dispersivity, or hydraulic conductivity. A semi-analytical solution to the advective-dispersion equation is derived and used in a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a homogeneous, confined aquifer with a fully-penetrating injection/extraction well and varying porosity, dispersivity, test duration, and reaction rate. A numerical flow and transport code (SUTRA) is used to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a heterogeneous, unconfined aquifer with a partially penetrating well. In all cases the simplified method provides accurate estimates of reaction rate coefficients; estimation errors ranged from 0.1 to 8.9% with most errors less than 5%

  14. Analysis of agility, reaction time and balance variables at badminton players aged 9-14 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seydi Ahmet Ağaoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was investigated agility, static and dynamic balance and reaction time variables of badminton players aged between 9-14 and relate with among variables. Material and Methods: In Samsun, 19 males (sport age, 3.42±1.64 years and 12 females (3.00±1.28 years active badminton players were voluntarily participated in who are in 9-14 ages range. Agility was measured by “T” test, CSMI-Tecnobody Pk-252 isokinetic balance system measuring instrument was used to test static balance and dynamic balance and Mozart Lafayette reaction measuring instrument was used to test visual and auditory reaction times of players. Spearman correlation analysis was applied so as to correlation analysis. The level of significance was taken as p<0.05. Results: For female athletes, a positive relation was determined between the agility and the perimeter (mm used (r=0.727; p<0.01 through the static balance measure double foot and eyes are open. For male athletes, a positive relation was determined between the visual reaction time and the perimeter (mm used (r=0.725; p<0.01 through the static balance measure dominant foot and eyes are open. For male and female athletes were not found any correlation between reaction time and dynamic balance. Conclusion: It was determined that audio (ears and visual (eyes reaction time was effective on balance. While badminton players are closed eyes, audio sensors are more influence on balance test through measure dominant foot.

  15. ALOHA—Astronomical Light Optical Hybrid Analysis - From experimental demonstrations to a MIR instrument proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, L.; Darré, P.; Szemendera, L.; Gomes, J. T.; Baudoin, R.; Ceus, D.; Brustlein, S.; Delage, L.; Grossard, L.; Reynaud, F.

    2018-04-01

    This paper gives an overview of the Astronomical Light Optical Hybrid Analysis (ALOHA) project dedicated to investigate a new method for high resolution imaging in mid infrared astronomy. This proposal aims to use a non-linear frequency conversion process to shift the thermal infrared radiation to a shorter wavelength domain compatible with proven technology such as guided optics and detectors. After a description of the principle, we summarise the evolution of our study from the high flux seminal experiments to the latest results in the photon counting regime.

  16. Interfacing Dielectric-Loaded Plasmonic and Silicon Photonic Waveguides: Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsilipakos, O.; Pitilakis, A.; Yioultsis, T. V.

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical analysis of end-fire coupling between dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton and rib/wire silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides is presented. Simulations are based on the 3-D vector finite element method. The geometrical parameters of the interface are varied...... in order to identify the ones leading to optimum performance, i.e., maximum coupling efficiency. Fabrication tolerances about the optimum parameter values are also assessed. In addition, the effect of a longitudinal metallic stripe gap on coupling efficiency is quantified, since such gaps have been...

  17. Demonstration of Emulator-Based Bayesian Calibration of Safety Analysis Codes: Theory and Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Yurko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available System codes for simulation of safety performance of nuclear plants may contain parameters whose values are not known very accurately. New information from tests or operating experience is incorporated into safety codes by a process known as calibration, which reduces uncertainty in the output of the code and thereby improves its support for decision-making. The work reported here implements several improvements on classic calibration techniques afforded by modern analysis techniques. The key innovation has come from development of code surrogate model (or code emulator construction and prediction algorithms. Use of a fast emulator makes the calibration processes used here with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling feasible. This work uses Gaussian Process (GP based emulators, which have been used previously to emulate computer codes in the nuclear field. The present work describes the formulation of an emulator that incorporates GPs into a factor analysis-type or pattern recognition-type model. This “function factorization” Gaussian Process (FFGP model allows overcoming limitations present in standard GP emulators, thereby improving both accuracy and speed of the emulator-based calibration process. Calibration of a friction-factor example using a Method of Manufactured Solution is performed to illustrate key properties of the FFGP based process.

  18. An organisational analysis of the implementation of telecare and telehealth: the whole systems demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate organisational factors influencing the implementation challenges of redesigning services for people with long term conditions in three locations in England, using remote care (telehealth and telecare). Methods Case-studies of three sites forming the UK Department of Health’s Whole Systems Demonstrator (WSD) Programme. Qualitative research techniques were used to obtain data from various sources, including semi-structured interviews, observation of meetings over the course programme and prior to its launch, and document review. Participants were managers and practitioners involved in the implementation of remote care services. Results The implementation of remote care was nested within a large pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT), which formed a core element of the WSD programme. To produce robust benefits evidence, many aspect of the trial design could not be easily adapted to local circumstances. While remote care was successfully rolled-out, wider implementation lessons and levels of organisational learning across the sites were hindered by the requirements of the RCT. Conclusions The implementation of a complex innovation such as remote care requires it to organically evolve, be responsive and adaptable to the local health and social care system, driven by support from front-line staff and management. This need for evolution was not always aligned with the imperative to gather robust benefits evidence. This tension needs to be resolved if government ambitions for the evidence-based scaling-up of remote care are to be realised. PMID:23153014

  19. An organisational analysis of the implementation of telecare and telehealth: the whole systems demonstrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Jane; Chrysanthaki, Theopisti; Barlow, James; Knapp, Martin; Rogers, Anne; Sanders, Caroline; Bower, Peter; Bowen, Robert; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Bardsley, Martin; Newman, Stanton

    2012-11-15

    To investigate organisational factors influencing the implementation challenges of redesigning services for people with long term conditions in three locations in England, using remote care (telehealth and telecare). Case-studies of three sites forming the UK Department of Health's Whole Systems Demonstrator (WSD) Programme. Qualitative research techniques were used to obtain data from various sources, including semi-structured interviews, observation of meetings over the course programme and prior to its launch, and document review. Participants were managers and practitioners involved in the implementation of remote care services. The implementation of remote care was nested within a large pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT), which formed a core element of the WSD programme. To produce robust benefits evidence, many aspect of the trial design could not be easily adapted to local circumstances. While remote care was successfully rolled-out, wider implementation lessons and levels of organisational learning across the sites were hindered by the requirements of the RCT. The implementation of a complex innovation such as remote care requires it to organically evolve, be responsive and adaptable to the local health and social care system, driven by support from front-line staff and management. This need for evolution was not always aligned with the imperative to gather robust benefits evidence. This tension needs to be resolved if government ambitions for the evidence-based scaling-up of remote care are to be realised.

  20. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study of bamboo waste treated by Echinodontium taxodii using a modified three-parallel-reactions model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbo; Liu, Fang; Ke, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of pretreatment with Echinodontium taxodii on thermal decomposition characteristics and kinetics of bamboo wastes was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed fungal pretreatment can enhance the thermal degradation of bamboo. The negative effect of extractives in bamboo on the thermal decomposition can be decreased by the pretreatment. A modified three-parallel-reactions model based on isolated lignin was firstly proposed to study pyrolysis kinetics of bamboo lignocellulose. Kinetic analysis showed that with increasing pretreatment time fungal delignification was enhanced to transform the lignin component with high activation energy into that with low activation energy and raise the cellulose content in bamboo, making the thermal decomposition easier. These results demonstrated fungal pretreatment provided a potential way to improve thermal conversion efficiency of bamboo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Coupled-reaction-channel analysis of the (d,6Li) reaction on 24Mg and 26Mg to low-lying states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelert, W.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental spectroscopic factors of the alpha-transfer reaction on nuclei of the sd-shell show rather strong inconsistencies and scatter much more strongly than explainable by the quoted errors. The poorer the quality of agreement between experimental and theoretical angular distribution shapes, the more inconsistent the comparison of spectroscopic factors either between different experiments or between theory and experiment. In view of the strong deformation of nuclei in the lower part of the sd-shell, higher-order reaction mechanisms are expected. A coupled-reaction-channel analysis for the transitions to the 0 + , 2 + , and 4 + states of the ground-state bands in 20 Ne and 22 Ne excited via the (d, 6 Li) reaction yields good agreement between experimental and theoretical angular distribution shapes as well as spectroscopic information. (orig.)

  2. Preliminary hazard analysis for the Brayton Isotope Ground Demonstration System (including vacuum test chamber)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.G.

    1975-01-01

    The Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA) of the BIPS-GDS is a tabular summary of hazards and undesired events which may lead to system damage or failure and/or hazard to personnel. The PHA reviews the GDS as it is envisioned to operate in the Vacuum Test Chamber (VTC) of the GDS Test Facility. The VTC and other equipment which will comprise the test facility are presently in an early stage of preliminary design and will undoubtedly undergo numerous changes before the design is frozen. The PHA and the FMECA to follow are intended to aid the design effort by identifying areas of concern which are critical to the safety and reliability of the BIPS-GDS and test facility

  3. Functional improvement after carotid endarterectomy: demonstrated by gait analysis and acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Kim, G. E.; Yoo, J. Y.; Kim, D. G.; Moon, D. H.

    2005-01-01

    Scientific documentation of neurologic improvement following carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has not been established. The purpose of this prospective study is to investigate whether CEA performed for the internal carotid artery flow lesion improves gait and cerebrovascular hemodynamic status in patients with gait disturbance. We prospectively performed pre- and postCEA gait analysis and acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT (Acz-SPECT) with Tc-99m ECD in 91 patients (M/F: 81/10, mean age: 64.1 y) who had gait disturbance before receiving CEA. Gait performance was assessed using a Vicon 370 motion analyzer. The gait improvement after CEA was correlated to cerebrovascular hemodynamic change as well as symptom duration. 12 hemiparetic stroke patients (M/F=9/3, mean age: 51 y) who did not receive CEA as a control underwent gait analysis twice in a week interval to evaluate whether repeat testing of gait performance shows learning effect. Of 91 patients, 73 (80%) patients showed gait improvement (change of gait speed > 10%) and 42 (46%) showed marked improvement (change of gait speed > 20%), but no improvement was observed in control group at repeat test. Post-operative cerebrovascular hemodynamic improvement was noted in 49 (54%) of 91 patients. There was marked gait improvement in patients group with cerebrovascular hemodynamic improvement compared to no change group (p<0.05). Marked gait improvement and cerebrovascular hemodynamic improvement were noted in 53% and 61% of the patient who had less than 3 month history of symptom compared to 31% and 24% of the patients who had longer than 3 months, respectively (p<0.05). Marked gait improvement was obtained in patients who had improvement of cerebrovascular hemodynamic status on Acz-SPECT after CEA. These results suggest functional improvement such as gait can result from the improved perfusion of misery perfusion area, which is viable for a longer period compared to literatures previously reported

  4. A numerical analysis and experimental demonstration of a low degradation conductive bridge resistive memory device

    KAUST Repository

    Berco, Dan

    2017-10-23

    This study investigates a low degradation metal-ion conductive bridge RAM (CBRAM) structure. The structure is based on placing a diffusion blocking layer (DBL) between the device\\'s top electrode (TE) and the resistive switching layer (RSL), unlike conventional CBRAMs, where the TE serves as a supply reservoir for metallic species diffusing into the RSL to form a conductive filament (CF) and is kept in direct contact with the RSL. The properties of a conventional CBRAM structure (Cu/HfO2/TiN), having a Cu TE, 10 nm HfO2 RSL, and a TiN bottom electrode, are compared with a 2 nm TaN DBL incorporating structure (Cu/TaN/HfO2/TiN) for 103 programming and erase simulation cycles. The low and high resistive state values for each cycle are calculated and the analysis reveals that adding the DBL yields lower degradation. In addition, the 2D distribution plots of oxygen vacancies, O ions, and Cu species within the RSL indicate that oxidation occurring in the DBL-RSL interface results in the formation of a sub-stoichiometric tantalum oxynitride with higher blocking capabilities that suppresses further Cu insertion beyond an initial CF formation phase, as well as CF lateral widening during cycling. The higher endurance of the structure with DBL may thus be attributed to the relatively low amount of Cu migrating into the RSL during the initial CF formation. Furthermore, this isomorphic CF displays similar cycling behavior to neural ionic channels. The results of numerical analysis show a good match to experimental measurements of similar device structures as well

  5. A numerical analysis and experimental demonstration of a low degradation conductive bridge resistive memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berco, Dan; Chand, Umesh; Fariborzi, Hossein

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates a low degradation metal-ion conductive bridge RAM (CBRAM) structure. The structure is based on placing a diffusion blocking layer (DBL) between the device's top electrode (TE) and the resistive switching layer (RSL), unlike conventional CBRAMs, where the TE serves as a supply reservoir for metallic species diffusing into the RSL to form a conductive filament (CF) and is kept in direct contact with the RSL. The properties of a conventional CBRAM structure (Cu/HfO2/TiN), having a Cu TE, 10 nm HfO2 RSL, and a TiN bottom electrode, are compared with a 2 nm TaN DBL incorporating structure (Cu/TaN/HfO2/TiN) for 103 programming and erase simulation cycles. The low and high resistive state values for each cycle are calculated and the analysis reveals that adding the DBL yields lower degradation. In addition, the 2D distribution plots of oxygen vacancies, O ions, and Cu species within the RSL indicate that oxidation occurring in the DBL-RSL interface results in the formation of a sub-stoichiometric tantalum oxynitride with higher blocking capabilities that suppresses further Cu insertion beyond an initial CF formation phase, as well as CF lateral widening during cycling. The higher endurance of the structure with DBL may thus be attributed to the relatively low amount of Cu migrating into the RSL during the initial CF formation. Furthermore, this isomorphic CF displays similar cycling behavior to neural ionic channels. The results of numerical analysis show a good match to experimental measurements of similar device structures as well.

  6. A numerical analysis and experimental demonstration of a low degradation conductive bridge resistive memory device

    KAUST Repository

    Berco, Dan; Chand, Umesh; Fariborzi, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates a low degradation metal-ion conductive bridge RAM (CBRAM) structure. The structure is based on placing a diffusion blocking layer (DBL) between the device's top electrode (TE) and the resistive switching layer (RSL), unlike conventional CBRAMs, where the TE serves as a supply reservoir for metallic species diffusing into the RSL to form a conductive filament (CF) and is kept in direct contact with the RSL. The properties of a conventional CBRAM structure (Cu/HfO2/TiN), having a Cu TE, 10 nm HfO2 RSL, and a TiN bottom electrode, are compared with a 2 nm TaN DBL incorporating structure (Cu/TaN/HfO2/TiN) for 103 programming and erase simulation cycles. The low and high resistive state values for each cycle are calculated and the analysis reveals that adding the DBL yields lower degradation. In addition, the 2D distribution plots of oxygen vacancies, O ions, and Cu species within the RSL indicate that oxidation occurring in the DBL-RSL interface results in the formation of a sub-stoichiometric tantalum oxynitride with higher blocking capabilities that suppresses further Cu insertion beyond an initial CF formation phase, as well as CF lateral widening during cycling. The higher endurance of the structure with DBL may thus be attributed to the relatively low amount of Cu migrating into the RSL during the initial CF formation. Furthermore, this isomorphic CF displays similar cycling behavior to neural ionic channels. The results of numerical analysis show a good match to experimental measurements of similar device structures as well

  7. The Recreational Fee Demonstration Program on the national forests: and updated analysis of public attitudes and beliefs, 1996-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; David P. Fan

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes trends in favorable and unfavorable attitudes toward the Recreational Fee Demonstration Program (RFDP) in the national forests, updating an earlier study using computer content analysis of the public debate. About 65 percent of the attitudes toward the RFDP were favorable, comparable to the findings of survey research.

  8. Body electrical loss analysis (BELA in the assessment of visceral fat: a demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blomqvist Kim H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body electrical loss analysis (BELA is a new non-invasive way to assess visceral fat depot size through the use of electromagnetism. BELA has worked well in phantom measurements, but the technology is not yet fully validated. Methods Ten volunteers (5 men and 5 women, age: 22-60 y, BMI: 21-30 kg/m2, waist circumference: 73-108 cm were measured with the BELA instrument and with cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at the navel level, navel +5 cm and navel -5 cm. The BELA signal was compared with visceral and subcutaneous fat areas calculated from the MR images. Results The BELA signal did not correlate with subcutaneous fat area at any level, but correlated significantly with visceral fat area at the navel level and navel +5 cm. The correlation was best at level of navel +5 cm (R2 = 0.74, P 2, LOOCV = 40.1 cm2, where SEE is the standard error of the estimate and LOOCV is the root mean squared error of leave-one-out style cross-validation. The average estimate of repeatability of the BELA signal observed through the study was ±9.6 %. One of the volunteers had an exceptionally large amount of visceral fat, which was underestimated by BELA. Conclusions The correlation of the BELA signal with the visceral but not with the subcutaneous fat area as measured by MRI is promising. The lack of correlation with the subcutaneous fat suggests that subcutaneous fat has a minor influence to the BELA signal. Further research will show if it is possible to develop a reliable low-cost method for the assessment of visceral fat either using BELA only or combining it, for example, with bioelectrical impedance measurement. The combination of these measurements may help assessing visceral fat in a large scale of body composition. Before large-scale clinical testing and ROC analysis, the initial BELA instrumentation requires improvements. The accuracy of the present equipment is not sufficient for such new technology.

  9. Analysis of Monolith Cores from an Engineering Scale Demonstration of a Prospective Cast Stone Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C. L.; Cozzi, A. D.; Hill, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    The primary disposition path of Low Activity Waste (LAW) at the DOE Hanford Site is vitrification. A cementitious waste form is one of the alternatives being considered for the supplemental immobilization of the LAW that will not be treated by the primary vitrification facility. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has been directed to generate and collect data on cementitious or pozzolanic waste forms such as Cast Stone. This report documents the coring and leach testing of monolithic samples cored from an engineering-scale demonstration (ES Demo) with non-radioactive simulants. The ES Demo was performed at SRNL in October of 2013 using the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft. diameter x 3.25 ft. high container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average LAW composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. In 2014 core samples originally obtained approximately six months after filling the ES Demo were tested along with bench scale molded samples that were collected during the original pour. A latter set of core samples were obtained in late March of 2015, eighteen months after completion of the original ES Demo. Core samples were obtained using a 2'' diameter x 11'' long coring bit. The ES Demo was sampled in three different regions consisting of an outer ring, a middle ring and an inner core zone. Cores from these three lateral zones were further segregated into upper, middle and lower vertical segments. Monolithic core samples were tested using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1315, which is designed to provide mass

  10. Analysis of Canis mitochondrial DNA demonstrates high concordance between the control region and ATPase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Bradley N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic studies of wild Canis species have relied heavily on the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR to infer species relationships and evolutionary lineages. Previous analyses of the CR provided evidence for a North American evolved eastern wolf (C. lycaon, that is more closely related to red wolves (C. rufus and coyotes (C. latrans than grey wolves (C. lupus. Eastern wolf origins, however, continue to be questioned. Therefore, we analyzed mtDNA from 89 wolves and coyotes across North America and Eurasia at 347 base pairs (bp of the CR and 1067 bp that included the ATPase6 and ATPase8 genes. Phylogenies and divergence estimates were used to clarify the evolutionary history of eastern wolves, and regional comparisons of nonsynonomous to synonomous substitutions (dN/dS at the ATPase6 and ATPase8 genes were used to elucidate the potential role of selection in shaping mtDNA geographic distribution. Results We found high concordance across analyses between the mtDNA regions studied. Both had a high percentage of variable sites (CR = 14.6%; ATP = 9.7% and both phylogenies clustered eastern wolf haplotypes monophyletically within a North American evolved lineage apart from coyotes. Divergence estimates suggest the putative red wolf sequence is more closely related to coyotes (DxyCR = 0.01982 ± 0.00494 SD; DxyATP = 0.00332 ± 0.00097 SD than the eastern wolf sequences (DxyCR = 0.03047 ± 0.00664 SD; DxyATP = 0.00931 ± 0.00205 SD. Neutrality tests on both genes were indicative of the population expansion of coyotes across eastern North America, and dN/dS ratios suggest a possible role for purifying selection in the evolution of North American lineages. dN/dS ratios were higher in European evolved lineages from northern climates compared to North American evolved lineages from temperate regions, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions These results demonstrate high concordance between coding

  11. Parametric sensitivity analysis for biochemical reaction networks based on pathwise information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, Yannis; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2013-10-22

    Stochastic modeling and simulation provide powerful predictive methods for the intrinsic understanding of fundamental mechanisms in complex biochemical networks. Typically, such mathematical models involve networks of coupled jump stochastic processes with a large number of parameters that need to be suitably calibrated against experimental data. In this direction, the parameter sensitivity analysis of reaction networks is an essential mathematical and computational tool, yielding information regarding the robustness and the identifiability of model parameters. However, existing sensitivity analysis approaches such as variants of the finite difference method can have an overwhelming computational cost in models with a high-dimensional parameter space. We develop a sensitivity analysis methodology suitable for complex stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters. The proposed approach is based on Information Theory methods and relies on the quantification of information loss due to parameter perturbations between time-series distributions. For this reason, we need to work on path-space, i.e., the set consisting of all stochastic trajectories, hence the proposed approach is referred to as "pathwise". The pathwise sensitivity analysis method is realized by employing the rigorously-derived Relative Entropy Rate, which is directly computable from the propensity functions. A key aspect of the method is that an associated pathwise Fisher Information Matrix (FIM) is defined, which in turn constitutes a gradient-free approach to quantifying parameter sensitivities. The structure of the FIM turns out to be block-diagonal, revealing hidden parameter dependencies and sensitivities in reaction networks. As a gradient-free method, the proposed sensitivity analysis provides a significant advantage when dealing with complex stochastic systems with a large number of parameters. In addition, the knowledge of the structure of the FIM can allow to efficiently address

  12. Scenarios for Benefits Analysis of Energy Research, Development,Demonstration and Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-09-07

    For at least the last decade, evaluation of the benefits of research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RD3) by the U.S. Department of Energy has been conducted using deterministic forecasts that unrealistically presume we can precisely foresee our future 10, 25,or even 50 years hence. This effort tries, in a modest way, to begin a process of recognition that the reality of our energy future is rather one rife with uncertainty. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) and Fossil Energy (FE) for their RD3 benefits evaluation. In order to begin scoping out the uncertainty in these deterministic forecasts, EE and FE designed two futures that differ significantly from the basic NEMS forecast. A High Fuel Price Scenario and a Carbon Cap Scenario were envisioned to forecast alternative futures and the associated benefits. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) implemented these scenarios into its version of NEMS,NEMS-LBNL, in late 2004, and the Energy Information Agency created six scenarios for FE in early 2005. The creation and implementation of the EE-FE scenarios are explained in this report. Both a Carbon Cap Scenario and a High Fuel Price Scenarios were implemented into the NEMS-LBNL. EIA subsequently modeled similar scenarios using NEMS. While the EIA and LBNL implementations were in some ways rather different, their forecasts do not significantly diverge. Compared to the Reference Scenario, the High Fuel Price Scenario reduces energy consumption by 4 percent in 2025, while in the EIA fuel price scenario (known as Scenario 4) reduction from its corresponding reference scenario (known as Scenario 0) in 2025 is marginal. Nonetheless, the 4 percent demand reduction does not lead to other cascading effects that would significantly differentiate the two scenarios. The LBNL and EIA carbon scenarios were mostly identical. The only major

  13. Periodic precipitation a microcomputer analysis of transport and reaction processes in diffusion media, with software development

    CERN Document Server

    Henisch, H K

    1991-01-01

    Containing illustrations, worked examples, graphs and tables, this book deals with periodic precipitation (also known as Liesegang Ring formation) in terms of mathematical models and their logical consequences, and is entirely concerned with microcomputer analysis and software development. Three distinctive periodic precipitation mechanisms are included: binary diffusion-reaction; solubility modulation, and competitive particle growth. The book provides didactic illustrations of a valuable investigational procedure, in the form of hypothetical experimentation by microcomputer. The development

  14. Component Analysis of Sweet BV and Clinical Trial on Antibody Titer and Allergic Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ki Rok, Kwon; Suk Ho, Choi; Bae Chun Cha

    2006-01-01

    Objectives : The aim of this study was to observe prevention of allergic reactions of Sweet Bee Venom (removing enzyme components from Bee Venom). Methods : Content analysis of Sweet Bee Venom and Bee Venom was rendered using HPLC method and characterization of Anti-Sweet Bee Venom in Rabbit Serum. Clinical observation was conducted for inducement of allergic responses to Sweet BV. Results : 1. Analyzing melittin content using HPLC, Sweet BV contained 34.9% more melittin than Bee venom ...

  15. FINANCIAL MARKET REACTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS IN THE BREWING INDUSTRY: AN EVENT STUDY ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Heyder, Matthias; Ebneth, Oliver; Theuvsen, Ludwig

    2008-01-01

    Cross-border acquisitions have been the growing trend in recent years in the world brewing industry, giving brewers the opportunity to enhance their degree of internationalization and market share remarkably. This study employs event study analysis to examine 31 mergers and acquisitions among leading European brewing groups. Differences regarding financial market reactions can be determined within the European peer group. Managerial implications as well as future research propositions conclud...

  16. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa [RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen UR, PO Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Kok, Theo M. de [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Delft, Joost H.M. van, E-mail: j.vandelft@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Lommen, Arjen [RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen UR, PO Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Someren, Eugene P. van [Research Group Microbiology and Systems Biology, TNO, PO Box 360 3700 AJ Zeist (Netherlands); Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M. [RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen UR, PO Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Stierum, Rob H. [Research Group Microbiology and Systems Biology, TNO, PO Box 360 3700 AJ Zeist (Netherlands); Kleinjans, Jos C.S. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques

  17. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Kok, Theo M. de; Delft, Joost H.M. van; Lommen, Arjen; Someren, Eugene P. van; Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M.; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Stierum, Rob H.; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques outperformed

  18. [Text mining, a method for computer-assisted analysis of scientific texts, demonstrated by an analysis of author networks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, P; Dullweber, F; Unglaub, F; Spies, C K

    2014-06-01

    Searching for relevant publications is becoming more difficult with the increasing number of scientific articles. Text mining as a specific form of computer-based data analysis may be helpful in this context. Highlighting relations between authors and finding relevant publications concerning a specific subject using text analysis programs are illustrated graphically by 2 performed examples. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Simultaneous Nuclear Reaction Analysis of Boron and Phosphorus in Thin Borophosphosilicate Glass Films Using (α,p) Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    A method combining (α,p) NRA and ellipsometry has been developed for measuring the Boron and Phosphorus content of borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) used for interlevel dielectrics in integrated circuits. Yields from the 31 P(α,p 0 ) 34 S (Q = 0.63 MeV) and 10 B(α,p 0 ) 13 C (Q = 4.06 MeV) reactions are coupled with ellipsometry thickness measurements to calculate the average atomic percent of B and P in the film. Due to the relatively low Q value of the 31 P(α,p 0 ) 34 S reaction and the thickness range of the glass films (le 1.2 micrometers) they analyze, fairly high energy alpha particles, and Mylar range foils on the detector are required. Alpha energy, detector angle and range foil thickness were determined by reaction yields and the need to separate the yield peaks of interest from competing (α,p) reactions and backscattered alphas. They have determined that 6.0 MeV incident alphas with a detector angle of 135degree and about 100 micrometers of Mylar range foil are optimum for the system. The yield for the 10 B(α,p 0 ) 13 C reaction is quite constant in the energy range of interest (approximately 5.8 to 6 MeV) but the yield for the 31 P(α,p 0 ) 34 S is not. Consequently, a simple conversion from standard BPSG reference samples (independently quantified by ICP mass spectrometry) is adequate to calculate a film's %B content. The %P calculation is more complex, involving a three-dimensional fit of the P yield data and measured film thickness to the film %P content. This fit is based upon yield data from a matrix of standard film samples. The technique is sensitive to 0.1% with an accuracy of ±3 to ±10% depending on the sample. This measurement method is used routinely at Sandia National Laboratories in support of their fabrication process lines

  20. Quantitative and Selective Analysis of Feline Growth Related Proteins Using Parallel Reaction Monitoring High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mårten Sundberg

    Full Text Available Today immunoassays are widely used in veterinary medicine, but lack of species specific assays often necessitates the use of assays developed for human applications. Mass spectrometry (MS is an attractive alternative due to high specificity and versatility, allowing for species-independent analysis. Targeted MS-based quantification methods are valuable complements to large scale shotgun analysis. A method referred to as parallel reaction monitoring (PRM, implemented on Orbitrap MS, has lately been presented as an excellent alternative to more traditional selected reaction monitoring/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM methods. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF-system is not well described in the cat but there are indications of important differences between cats and humans. In feline medicine IGF-I is mainly analyzed for diagnosis of growth hormone disorders but also for research, while the other proteins in the IGF-system are not routinely analyzed within clinical practice. Here, a PRM method for quantification of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF binding protein (BP -3 and IGFBP-5 in feline serum is presented. Selective quantification was supported by the use of a newly launched internal standard named QPrEST™. Homology searches demonstrated the possibility to use this standard of human origin for quantification of the targeted feline proteins. Excellent quantitative sensitivity at the attomol/μL (pM level and selectivity were obtained. As the presented approach is very generic we show that high resolution mass spectrometry in combination with PRM and QPrEST™ internal standards is a versatile tool for protein quantitation across multispecies.

  1. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal analysis experiment for elucidating sodium-water chemical reaction mechanism in steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the mechanism of the sodium-water surface reaction in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors, kinetic study of the sodium (Na)-sodium hydroxide (NaOH) reaction has been carried out by using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) technique. The parameters, including melting points of Na and NaOH, phase transition temperature of NaOH, Na-NaOH reaction temperature, and decomposition temperature of sodium hydride (NaH) have been identified from DTA curves. Based on the measured reaction temperature, rate constant of sodium monoxide (Na 2 O) generation was obtained. Thermal analysis results indicated that Na 2 O generation at the secondary overall reaction should be considered during the sodium-water reaction. (author)

  3. Analysis of the effects of reaction parameters upon the molecular weight of an aromatic poly(hydrazide) through experimental design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Dominique; Pinto, Jose Carlos; Borges, Cristiano P.; Nunes, Suzana P.

    2001-01-01

    Samples of an aromatic poly(hydrazide) were synthesized through low temperature solution polycondensation reactions. Monomers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and thermal analysis. The polymer material was characterized by intrinsic viscosity measurements and by NMR. The thermal behavior of the polymer samples was studied by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The effect of various factors that influence the course of the polymerization reaction, such as concentration of monomer and electrolyte (LiCl) in the reaction medium, purity of the monomers, reaction temperature and reaction time, were investigated. Reaction conditions were then optimized in order to allow the preparation of high molecular weight polymer resins. Values of intrinsic viscosity obtained for the poly(hydrazide) in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone were as high as 1.51 dL/g. (author)

  4. Demonstration of a modelling-based multi-criteria decision analysis procedure for prioritisation of occupational risks from manufactured nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristozov, Danail; Zabeo, Alex; Alstrup Jensen, Keld; Gottardo, Stefania; Isigonis, Panagiotis; Maccalman, Laura; Critto, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Several tools to facilitate the risk assessment and management of manufactured nanomaterials (MN) have been developed. Most of them require input data on physicochemical properties, toxicity and scenario-specific exposure information. However, such data are yet not readily available, and tools that can handle data gaps in a structured way to ensure transparent risk analysis for industrial and regulatory decision making are needed. This paper proposes such a quantitative risk prioritisation tool, based on a multi-criteria decision analysis algorithm, which combines advanced exposure and dose-response modelling to calculate margins of exposure (MoE) for a number of MN in order to rank their occupational risks. We demonstrated the tool in a number of workplace exposure scenarios (ES) involving the production and handling of nanoscale titanium dioxide, zinc oxide (ZnO), silver and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The results of this application demonstrated that bag/bin filling, manual un/loading and dumping of large amounts of dry powders led to high emissions, which resulted in high risk associated with these ES. The ZnO MN revealed considerable hazard potential in vivo, which significantly influenced the risk prioritisation results. In order to study how variations in the input data affect our results, we performed probabilistic Monte Carlo sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, which demonstrated that the performance of the proposed model is stable against changes in the exposure and hazard input variables.

  5. Analysis of the fuel influence in obtaining HAp by combustion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, T.L.; Leite, A.M.D.; Viana, K.M.S.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new materials for biomedical applications has led to investigation of the calcium phosphate bioceramics, and in particular hydroxyapatite (HAp), being a material similar to bone tissue, with excellent biocompatibility and high osteoconduction, enabling bone regeneration which allows the use at implants and prostheses. The synthesis of the nanometric HAp by combustion reaction enables obtaining the nanometric HAp with a more similar structure biological apatite as possible. This work aims to synthesize HAp by combustion reaction using two different routes of synthesis, first, using urea as fuel and the second using glycine, after this, evaluate the influence of fuels used in the microstructure of the hydroxyapatite obtained. The HAp obtained was characterized by: XRD, FTIR and SEM. Through analysis of the results, there is the synthesis conditions used that glycine has performed more favorable to obtaining HAp. (author)

  6. Prediction of Support Reaction Forces of ITA via Response Spectrum Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jin Sung; Jeong, Joon Ho; Lee, Sang Jin; Oh, Jin Ho; Lee, Jong Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The irradiation targets are transferred along pipes between TTS (Target Transfer Station) and ITA (Irradiation Tube Assembly) by hydraulic forces. The ITA corresponds to the vertical guide tube for irradiation targets inside a reactor, and it penetrates the reactor structure. Because the ITA is classified into seismic category II, its structural integrity must be evaluated by the seismic analysis. To approach more realistic problem, the interaction between the ITA and the reactor structure must be considered. However, this paper is focused on the preliminary analysis, and it is simplified that only the response of the ITA caused by earthquake affects the reactor structure. The response of the ITA is predicted by the spectrum response analysis based on the FDRS (Floor Design Response Spectra) of KJRR. Finally, the reaction forces corresponding to the load transfer into the reactor structure are estimated by using ANSYS. In this study, the reaction forces due to the earthquake are estimated by the response spectrum analysis. For the saving computational time and resource required, the FE model with beam element is constructed, and it is confirmed that the accuracy of the solution is acceptable by comparing the results of the solid model.

  7. Lab-on-a-chip based total-phosphorus analysis device utilizing a photocatalytic reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dong Geon; Jung, Daewoong; Kong, Seong Ho

    2018-02-01

    A lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for total phosphorus (TP) analysis was fabricated for water quality monitoring. Many commercially available TP analysis systems used to estimate water quality have good sensitivity and accuracy. However, these systems also have many disadvantages such as bulky size, complex pretreatment processes, and high cost, which limit their application. In particular, conventional TP analysis systems require an indispensable pretreatment step, in which the fluidic analyte is heated to 120 °C for 30 min to release the dissolved phosphate, because many phosphates are soluble in water at a standard temperature and pressure. In addition, this pretreatment process requires elevated pressures of up to 1.1 kg cm-2 in order to prevent the evaporation of the heated analyte. Because of these limiting conditions required by the pretreatment processes used in conventional systems, it is difficult to miniaturize TP analysis systems. In this study, we employed a photocatalytic reaction in the pretreatment process. The reaction was carried out by illuminating a photocatalytic titanium dioxide (TiO2) surface formed in a microfluidic channel with ultraviolet (UV) light. This pretreatment process does not require elevated temperatures and pressures. By applying this simplified, photocatalytic-reaction-based pretreatment process to a TP analysis system, greater degrees of freedom are conferred to the design and fabrication of LOC devices for TP monitoring. The fabricated LOC device presented in this paper was characterized by measuring the TP concentration of an unknown sample, and comparing the results with those measured by a conventional TP analysis system. The TP concentrations of the unknown sample measured by the proposed LOC device and the conventional TP analysis system were 0.018 mgP/25 mL and 0.019 mgP/25 mL, respectively. The experimental results revealed that the proposed LOC device had a performance comparable to the conventional bulky TP analysis

  8. Reactivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction: Distortion-Interaction Analysis along the Reaction Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingzi; Osuna, Sílvia; Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Qi, Xiaotian; Liu, Song; Houk, Kendall N; Lan, Yu

    2016-08-26

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition is one of the most powerful tools for the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Density functional theory at the B3-LYP level of theory has been used to investigate the reactivity of different-diameter SWCNTs (4-9,5) in Diels-Alder reactions with 1,3-butadiene; the reactivity was found to decrease with increasing SWCNT diameter. Distortion/interaction analysis along the whole reaction pathway was found to be a better way to explore the reactivity of this type of reaction. The difference in interaction energy along the reaction pathway is larger than that of the corresponding distortion energy. However, the distortion energy plots for these reactions show the same trend. Therefore, the formation of the transition state can be determined from the interaction energy. A lower interaction energy leads to an earlier transition state, which indicates a lower activation energy. The computational results also indicate that the original distortion of the SWCNTs leads to an increase in the reactivity of the SWCNTs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Mammography image quality and evidence based practice: Analysis of the demonstration of the inframammary angle in the digital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuur, Kelly; Webb, Jodi; Poulos, Ann; Nielsen, Sharon; Robinson, Wayne

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the clinical rates of the demonstration of the inframammary angle (IMA) on the mediolateral oblique (MLO) view of the breast on digital mammograms and to compare the outcomes with current accreditation standards for compliance. Relationships between the IMA, age, the posterior nipple line (PNL) and compressed breast thickness will be identified and the study outcomes validated using appropriate analyses of inter-reader and inter-rater reliability and variability. Differences in left versus right data were also investigated. A quantitative retrospective study of 2270 randomly selected paired digital mammograms performed by BreastScreen NSW was undertaken. Data was collected by direct measurement and visual analysis. Intra-class correlation analyses were used to evaluate inter- and intra-rater reliability. The IMA was demonstrated on 52.4% of individual and 42.6% of paired mammograms. A linear relationship was found between the posterior nipple line (PNL) and age (p-value PNL was predicted to increase by 0.48 mm for every one year increment in age. The odds of demonstrating the IMA reduced by 2% for every one year increase in age (p-value = 0.001); are 0.4% higher for every 1 mm increase in PNL (p-value = 0.001) and 1.6% lower for every 1 mm increase in compressed breast thickness, (p-valuePNL while there was 100% agreement for the demonstration of the IMA. Analysis of the demonstration of the IMA indicates clinically achievable rates (42.6%) well below that required for compliance (50%-75%) to known worldwide accreditation standards for screening mammography. These standards should be aligned to the reported evidence base. Visualisation of the IMA is impacted negatively by increasing age and compressed breast thickness but positively by breast size (PNL). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Compositional analysis of silicon nitride films on Si and GaAs by backscattering spectrometry and nuclear resonance reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Raju, V.S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the application of proton and α-backscattering spectrometry for the determination of atomic ratio of Si to N in 1100-5000 A silicon nitride films on Si and GaAs. The conventional α-Rutherford backscattering spectrometry is suitable for the analysis of films on Si; it is rather inadequate for films on GaAs due to higher background from the substrate. It is shown that these films can be analysed by 14 N(α,α) 14 N scattering with 3.5 MeV α-particles. Proton elastic scattering with enhanced cross sections for 28 Si(p,p) 28 Si and 14 N(p,p) 14 N scatterings, is also suitable for analysing films on GaAs. However, the analysis of films on Si by this technique is difficult due to interferences between the signals of Si from the film and the substrate. In addition, the hydrogen content in films is determined by 1 H( 19 F,αγ) 16 O nuclear reaction analysis using the resonance at 6.4 MeV. The combination of backscattering spectrometry with nuclear reaction analysis provides compositional analysis of ternary Si 1-(x+y) N x H y films

  11. The reaction π-p → π-π-π+p: Development of the analysis methods and selected results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchikov, D.

    2016-01-01

    We present the description of the analysis methods and results of applying them to the exclusive diffractive reaction π-p → π-π-π+p of 50 . 106 events measured with COMPASS detector. The large statistics of π-π-π+ events enables the two-dimensional partial-wave analysis independently in 100 bins of m(3π) with 0.5 < m(3π) < 2.5 GeV/c2 and in 11 intervals of squared momentum transfer with 0.1 < t' < 1 GeV2/c2. The partial-wave analysis sub-density matrix is the subject to further mass-dependent fits describing the data in terms of resonances in 3π system and coherent background contributions. The novel approach of extracting JPC = 0++(π+π-)S isobar amplitudes as model-free functions, different for several JPC 3π states, is used. It demonstrates the presence of processes π(1800) → f0(980)π and π(1800) → f0(1500)π as well as π2(1880) → f0(980)π and new narrow signal a1(1420) → f0(980)π, without any established shapes used for (π+π-)S isobars. The presented analysis is subject to further development and refinements which currently take place.

  12. Hydrogen incorporation and radiation induced dynamics in metal-oxide-silicon structures. A study using nuclear reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briere, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    Resonant nuclear reaction analysis, using the 1 H( 15 N, αγ) 12 C reaction at 6.4 MeV, has been successfully applied to the investigation of hydrogen incorporation and radiation induced migration in metal-oxide-silicon structures. A preliminary study of the influence of processing parameters on the H content of thermal oxides, with and without gate material present, has been performed. It is found that the dominant source of hydrogen in Al gate devices and dry oxides is often contamination, likely in the form of adsorbed water vapor, formed upon exposure to room air after removal from the oxidation furnace. Concentrations of hydrogen in the bulk oxide as high as 3 10 20 cm -3 (Al gate), and as low as 1 10 18 cm -3 (poly Si-gate) have been observed. Hydrogen accumulation at the Si-SiO 2 interface has been reproducibly demonstrated for as-oxidized samples, as well as for oxides exposed to H 2 containing atmospheres during subsequent thermal processing. The migration of hydrogen, from the bulk oxide to the silicon-oxide interface during NRA, has been observed and intensively investigated. A direct correlation between the hydrogen content of the bulk oxide and the radiation generated oxide charges and interface states is presented. These data provide strong support for the important role of hydrogen in determining the radiation sensitivity of electronic devices. (orig.)

  13. SWAAM-LT: The long-term, sodium/water reaction analysis method computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.W.; Chung, H.H.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Tanabe, H.

    1993-01-01

    The SWAAM-LT Code, developed for analysis of long-term effects of sodium/water reactions, is discussed. The theoretical formulation of the code is described, including the introduction of system matrices for ease of computer programming as a general system code. Also, some typical results of the code predictions for available large scale tests are presented. Test data for the steam generator design with the cover-gas feature and without the cover-gas feature are available and analyzed. The capabilities and limitations of the code are then discussed in light of the comparison between the code prediction and the test data

  14. Numerical analysis of MHD Carreau fluid flow over a stretching cylinder with homogenous-heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imad; Ullah, Shafquat; Malik, M. Y.; Hussain, Arif

    2018-06-01

    The current analysis concentrates on the numerical solution of MHD Carreau fluid flow over a stretching cylinder under the influences of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions. Modelled non-linear partial differential equations are converted into ordinary differential equations by using suitable transformations. The resulting system of equations is solved with the aid of shooting algorithm supported by fifth order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. The impact of non-dimensional governing parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are comprehensively delineated with the help of graphs and tables.

  15. Two reactions method for accurate analysis by irradiation with charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, K.; Sastri, C.S.; Valladon, M.; Borderie, B.; Debrun, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    In the average stopping power method the formula error itself was negligible but systematic errors could be introduced by the stopping power data used in this formula. A method directly derived from the average stopping power method, but based on the use of two nuclear reactions, is described here. This method has a negligible formula error and does not require the use of any stopping power or range data: accurate and 'self-consistent' analysis by irradiation with charged particles is then possible. (Auth.)

  16. Diagnostic value of polymerase chain reaction analysis of skin biopsies in purpura fulminans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, Caroline; Vlassova, Natalia; Sarlangue, Jean; Brissaud, Olivier; Léauté-Labrèze, Christine; Boralevi, Franck

    2013-01-01

    Even though prompt diagnosis and treatment of purpura fulminans (PF) is essential to reduce mortality, early administration of antibiotics may preclude identification of the causative agent by standard bacterial cultures and thus render definitive diagnosis impossible. Here we present a case of an infant with PF and negative bacterial cultures for whom polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of a cutaneous biopsy specimen obtained 4 days after initiation of antibiotics identified the genomic sequence of Neisseria meningitidis genogroup C. When bacterial cultures fail to provide useful information, PCR of skin biopsy specimens can be a valuable diagnostic tool in PF. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Consequence analysis of IWTS metal water reactions (Fauske and Associates report 99-35)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The report describes the consequences of postulated thermally unstable conditions in the IWTS knock out pot. The consequence analysis shows that both the knock out pot and particulate bed will stay intact, and that releases will be minor. Reaction rate limitations prevent knock out pot pressure and/or temperature from even approaching values that would threaten structural integrity. Source term calculations based on a particle bed with a homogeneous mixture of metal and oxide particles yield a release above the K Basin pool of about 12 grams

  18. Studies of photonuclear reactions and photon activation analysis in the giant dipole resonance region using microtrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duc Thiep; Nguyen Van Do; Nguyen Khac Thi; Truong Thi An; Nguyen Ngoc Son

    2004-01-01

    Microtrons are accelerators of electrons and are simultaneous source of Bremsstrahlung photon flux and fission neutrons. In 1982, a microtron of seventeen trajectories Microtron MT - 17 was put into operation at the National Institute of Physics of Vietnam. Though very modest, microtrons are very useful for developing countries such as Vietnam in both fundamental and applied physics research. During the recent years by using the above mentioned MT - 17 and microtrons from other institutes we have carried out different investigation. In this report we present some results obtained in the studies of photonuclear reactions and photon activation analysis in the giant dipole resonance region. (author)

  19. A decision analysis framework to support long-term planning for nuclear fuel cycle technology research, development, demonstration and deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowder, A.G.; Machiels, A.J.; Dykes, A.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    To address challenges and gaps in nuclear fuel cycle option assessment and to support research, develop and demonstration programs oriented toward commercial deployment, EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) is seeking to develop and maintain an independent analysis and assessment capability by building a suite of assessment tools based on a platform of software, simplified relationships, and explicit decision-making and evaluation guidelines. As a demonstration of the decision-support framework, EPRI examines a relatively near-term fuel cycle option, i.e., use of reactor-grade mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) in U.S. light water reactors. The results appear as a list of significant concerns (like cooling of spent fuels, criticality risk...) that have to be taken into account for the final decision

  20. Clinical features of severe wasp sting patients with dominantly toxic reaction: analysis of 1091 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihong Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Massive wasp stings have been greatly underestimated and have not been systematically studied. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical features and treatment strategies of severe wasp stings. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A multicenter retrospective study was undertaken in 35 hospitals and medical centers including 12 tertiary care hospitals and 23 secondary care hospitals in the Hubei Province, China. The detailed clinical data of 1091 hospitalized wasp sting patients were investigated. Over three-fourths (76.9% of the cases had 10 or more stings and the in-hospital mortality of patients was 5.1%. Forty-eight patients died of organ injury following toxic reactions to the stings, whereas six died from anaphylactic shock. The in-hospital mortality in patients with >10 stings was higher than that of ≤10 stings (5.2% vs. 1.0%, p = 0.02. Acute kidney injury (AKI was seen in 21.0% patients and most patients required blood purification therapy. Rhabdomyolysis was seen in 24.1% patients, hemolysis in 19.2% patients, liver injury in 30.1% patients, and coagulopathy in 22.5% patients. Regression analysis revealed that high creatinine level, shock, oliguria, and anemia were risk factors for death. Blood purification therapy was beneficial for patients with ≥20 stings and delayed hospital admission of patients (≥4 hours after sting. CONCLUSIONS: In China, most patients with multiple wasp stings presented with toxic reactions and multiple organ dysfunction caused by the venom rather than an anaphylactic reaction. AKI is the prominent clinical manifestation of wasp stings with toxic reaction. High creatinine levels, shock, oliguria, and anemia were risk factors for death.

  1. Demonstration of anticoagulation patient self-testing feasibility at an Indian Health Service facility: A case series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schupbach RR

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anticoagulation patient self-testing (PST represents an alternative approach to warfarin monitoring by enabling patients to use coagulometers to test their international normalized ratio (INR values. PST offers several advantages that potentially improve warfarin management. Objective: To describe implementation and associated performance of a PST demonstration program at an Indian Health Service (IHS facility. Methods: A non-consecutive case series analysis of patients from a pharmacy-managed PST demonstration program was performed at an IHS facility in Oklahoma between July 2008 and February 2009.Results: Mean time in therapeutic range (TTR for the seven patients showed a small, absolute increase during the twelve weeks of PST compared to the twelve weeks prior to PST. Four of the seven patients had an increase in TTR during the twelve week course of PST compared to their baseline TTR. Three of four patients with increased TTR in the final eight week period of PST achieved a TTR of 100%. Of the three patients who experienced a decrease in TTR after initiating self-testing, two initially presented with a TTR of 100% prior to PST and one patient had a TTR of 100% for the final eight weeks of PST. The two patients not achieving a TTR of 100% during the twelve week PST period demonstrated an increase in TTR following the first four weeks of PST. Conclusion: Although anticoagulation guidelines now emphasize patient self-management (PSM only, optimal PST remains an integral process in PSM delivery. In the patients studied, the results of this analysis suggest that PST at the IHS facility provided a convenient, alternative method for management of chronic warfarin therapy for qualified patients. More than half of the patients demonstrated improvement in TTR. Although there is a learning curve immediately following PST initiation, the mean TTR for the entire PST period increased modestly when compared to the time period prior to PST.

  2. A Methodological Demonstration of Set-theoretical Approach to Social Media Maturity Models Using Necessary Condition Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2016-01-01

    Despite being widely accepted and applied across research domains, maturity models have been criticized for lacking academic rigor, especially methodologically rigorous and empirically grounded or tested maturity models are quite rare. Attempting to close this gap, we adopt a set-theoretic approach...... and evaluate some of arguments presented by previous conceptual focused social media maturity models....... by applying the Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA) technique to derive maturity stages and stage boundaries conditions. The ontology is to view stages (boundaries) in maturity models as a collection of necessary condition. Using social media maturity data, we demonstrate the strength of our approach...

  3. Analysis of nuclear reaction products and materials; Preliminary treatment of uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soedyartomo.

    1976-01-01

    Pre-treatment of samples is necessary to be done in order to achieve the efficient steps and accurate results of uranium analysis. The pre-treatment is particularly affected by the type of sample, the uranium concentration predicated in the sample, and the uranium analytical method which will be applied. A brief discussion about the pre-treatment of uranium analysis in the uranium ore processing and the reprocessing of spent fuel is given. (author)

  4. Single cell analysis demonstrating somatic mosaicism involving 11p in a patient with paternal isodisomy and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, F.Z.; McCaskill, C.; Subramanian, S. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) is characterized by numerous growth abnormalities including exomphalos, macroglossia, gigantism, and hemihypertrophy or hemihyperplasia. The {open_quotes}BWS gene{close_quotes} appears to be maternally repressed and is suspected to function as a growth factor or regulator of somatic growth, since activation of this gene through a variety of mechanisms appears to result in somatic overgrowth and tumor development. Mosaic paternal isodisomy of 11p has been observed previously by others in patients with BWS by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. The interpretation of these results was primarily based on the intensities of the hybridization signals for the different alleles. In our study, we demonstrate somatic mosaicism directly through PCR and single cell analysis. Peripheral blood was obtained from a patient with BWS and initial genomic DNA analysis by PCR was suggestive of somatic mosaicism for paternal isodisomy of 11p. Through micromanipulation, single cells were isolated and subjected to primer extention preamplification. Locus-specific microsatellite marker analyses by PCR were performed to determine the chromosome 11 origins in the preamplified individual cells. Two populations of cells were detected, a population of cells with normal biparental inheritance and a population of cells with paternal isodisomy of 11p and biparental disomy of 11q. Using the powerful approach of single cell analysis, the detected somatic mosaicism provides evidence for a mitotic recombinational event that has resulted in loss of the maternal 11p region and gain of a second copy of paternal 11p in some cells. The direct demonstration of mosaicism may explain the variable phenotypes and hemihypertrophy often observed in BWS.

  5. Effects of alpha-amylase reaction mechanisms on analysis of resistant-starch contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Samuel A; Ai, Yongfeng; Chang, Fengdan; Jane, Jay-lin

    2015-01-22

    This study aimed to understand differences in the resistant starch (RS) contents of native and modified starches obtained using two standard methods of RS content analysis: AOAC Method 991.43 and 2002.02. The largest differences were observed in native potato starch, cross-linked wheat distarch phosphate, and high-amylose corn starch stearic-acid complex (RS5) between using AOAC Method 991.43 with Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase (BL) and AOAC Method 2002.02 with porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA). To determine possible reasons for these differences, we hydrolyzed raw-starch granules with BL and PPA with equal activity at pH 6.9 and 37°C for up to 84 h and observed the starch granules displayed distinct morphological differences after the hydrolysis. Starches hydrolyzed by BL showed erosion on the surface of the granules; those hydrolyzed by PPA showed pitting on granule surfaces. These results suggested that enzyme reaction mechanisms, including the sizes of the binding sites and the reaction patterns of the two enzymes, contributed to the differences in the RS contents obtained using different methods of RS analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Compositional analysis of sulfated polysaccharides from sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) released by autolysis reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shuang; Wu, Sufeng; Ai, Chunqing; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Zhenjun; Cao, Chunyang; Yang, Jingfeng; Wen, Chengrong

    2018-07-15

    Autolysis is not only a major reason for postharvest quality deterioration of sea cucumber, but also a promising alternative for exogenous protease to produce peptides or polysaccharides. However, little has been known about the effects of autolysis on bioactive polysaccharides of sea cucumber. Concerning the quality and safety of sea cucumber products involved autolysis reaction, the present study focused on the chemical composition of sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) released by autolysis reaction. Chemical analysis indicated that after 3-day autolysis 63% of sulfated polysaccharides were liberated but with protein chains at their reducing ends. Then the composition of SP obtained by autolysis (A-SP) was compared with that of total SPs (T-SP) via a series of analysis techniques, including FTIR, 1 H NMR, HPLC and mass spectroscopy. As indicated by the results, fucan to fucosylated chondroitin sulfate ratio was found high in A-SP compared to T-SP, fucan with a lower molecular weight was the major fraction in A-SP, and the di-sulfated Fuc residue observed in T-SP was absent in A-SP. To conclude, A-SP differed greatly from T-SP in the chemical composition, suggesting possible changes on their bioactivities. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Applications of the photo-nuclear reaction data for activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odsuren, M.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Turbold, A.; Davaa, S.; Baatarkhuu, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the relative method of activation analysis by continuum wide spectrum gamma-rays the same isotope is usually used for standard reference element and sample material in connection with different dependence of the reaction cross sections on the irradiation beam energy. But, in practice suitable isotopes for reference element are not always available. So, in this paper, we suggest a new method for photo-activation analysis in which is used the correction factor. This factor takes into account the difference in the photo-nuclear reaction cross section dependence on the gamma-ray energy for standard reference isotope and sample elements. The correction factor is determined by three methods of experimental, theoretical and TALYS evaluation. Pure metal foils of Au, Cu and Mo were irradiated by bremsstrahlung gamma-rays on the electron cyclic accelerator Microtron MT-22 at the Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia. Gamma spectra of the activated metal foils were measured by HP-Ge detector to obtain element contents in the samples. It was shown that experimental results with correction factors are satisfactorily in agreement with real values of the element contents in the samples

  8. Analysis of the potential geochemical reactions in the Enceladus' hydrothermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Cabañas, A. K.; Flandes, A.

    2017-12-01

    Enceladus is the sixth largest moon of Saturn and differs from its other moons, because of its cryovolcanic geysers that emanate from its south pole. The instruments of the Cassini spacecraft reveal different compounds in the gases and the dust of the geysers, such as salts (sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate and/or sodium carbonate), as well as silica traces (Postberg et al., 2008, 2009) that could be the result of a hydrothermal environment (Hsu et al., 2014, Sekine et al., 2014). By means of a thermodynamic analysis, we propose and evaluate potential geochemical reactions that could happen from the interaction between the nucleus surface and the inner ocean of Enceladus. These reactions may well lead to the origin of the compounds found in the geysers. From this analysis, we propose that, at least, two minerals must be present in the condritic nucleus of Enceladus: olivines (fayalite and fosterite) and feldspar (orthoclase and albite). Subsequently, taking as reference the hydrothermal processes that take place on Earth, we propose the different stages of a potential hydrothermal scenario for Enceladus.

  9. Thermodynamic stability of elementary chemical reactions proceeding at finite rates revisited using Lyapunov function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burande, Chandrakant S.; Bhalekar, Anil A.

    2005-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of a few representative elementary chemical reactions proceeding at finite rates has been investigated using the recently proposed thermodynamic Lyapunov function and following the steps of Lyapunov's second method (also termed as the direct method) of stability of motion. The thermodynamic Lyapunov function; L s , used herein is the excess rate of entropy production in the thermodynamic perturbation space, which thereby inherits the dictates of the second law of thermodynamics. This Lyapunov function is not the same as the excess entropy rate that one encounters in thermodynamic (irreversible) literature. The model chemical conversions studied in this presentation are A+B→v x X and A+B↔ν x X. For the sake of simplicity, the thermal effects of chemical reactions have been considered as not adding to the perturbation as our main aim was to demonstrate how one should use systematically the proposed thermodynamic Lyapunov function following the steps of Lyapunov's second method of stability of motion. The domains of thermodynamic stability under the constantly acting small disturbances, thermodynamic asymptotic stability and thermodynamic instability in these model systems get established

  10. Magnetic Analysis of a Single-Aperture 11T Nb3Sn Demonstrator Dipole for LHC Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchmann, B. [CERN; Karppinen, M. [CERN; Kashikhin, V. [Fermilab; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC collimation system foresees additional collimators to be installed in the dispersion suppressor areas around points 2, 3, and 7. The necessary longitudinal space for the collimators could be provided by replacing some 8.33-T 15-m-long NbTi LHC main dipoles with shorter 11-T Nb3Sn dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems. To demonstrate this possibility, in 2011 Fermilab and CERN started a joint R&D program with the goal of building a 5.5-m-long tw in-aperture dipole prototype suitable for installation in the LHC by 2014. The first step of this program is the development of a 2-m-long single-aperture demonstration dipole with the nominal field of 11 T at the LHC nominal current of ~11.85 kA and 60-m m bore with ~20% margin. This paper presents the results of magnetic analysis of the single-aperture Nb3Sn demonstrator dipole for the LHC collimation system upgrade.

  11. Product differentiation by analysis of DNA melting curves during the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ririe, K M; Rasmussen, R P; Wittwer, C T

    1997-02-15

    A microvolume fluorometer integrated with a thermal cycler was used to acquire DNA melting curves during polymerase chain reaction by fluorescence monitoring of the double-stranded DNA specific dye SYBR Green I. Plotting fluorescence as a function of temperature as the thermal cycler heats through the dissociation temperature of the product gives a DNA melting curve. The shape and position of this DNA melting curve are functions of the GC/AT ratio, length, and sequence and can be used to differentiate amplification products separated by less than 2 degrees C in melting temperature. Desired products can be distinguished from undesirable products, in many cases eliminating the need for gel electrophoresis. Analysis of melting curves can extend the dynamic range of initial template quantification when amplification is monitored with double-stranded DNA specific dyes. Complete amplification and analysis of products can be performed in less than 15 min.

  12. A Micro Polymerase Chain Reaction Module for Integrated and Portable DNA Analysis Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Morganti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the design, fabrication, and thermal characterization of a disposable miniaturized Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR module that will be integrated in a portable and fast DNA analysis system. It is composed of two independent parts: a silicon substrate with embedded heater and thermometers and a PDMS (PolyDiMethylSiloxane chamber reactor as disposable element; the contact between the two parts is assured by a mechanical clamping obtained using a Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier (PLCC. This PLCC is also useful, avoid the PCR mix evaporation during the thermal cycles. Finite Element Analysis was used to evaluate the thermal requirements of the device. The thermal behaviour of the device was characterized revealing that the temperature can be controlled with a precision of ±0.5°C. Different concentrations of carbon nanopowder were mixed to the PDMS curing agent in order to increase the PDMS thermal conductivity and so the temperature control accuracy.

  13. Theoretical considerations of Flow Injection Analysis in the Absence of Chemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism of flow injection analysis (FIA) is assumed to be simple dissusion and the response of the detector is included in a model description that provide information about the shape of the FIA peak in terms of, basically, five parameters. Two of the five parameters are associa...... that any deviation from the features of the present model and the results of a tentative chemical reaction with one of the test compounds, is related to chemical kinetics.......The fundamental mechanism of flow injection analysis (FIA) is assumed to be simple dissusion and the response of the detector is included in a model description that provide information about the shape of the FIA peak in terms of, basically, five parameters. Two of the five parameters...

  14. A coupled model of transport-reaction-mechanics with trapping. Part I - Small strain analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, A.; McMeeking, R.; Grazioli, D.; Magri, M.

    2018-05-01

    A fully coupled model for mass and heat transport, mechanics, and chemical reactions with trapping is proposed. It is rooted in non-equilibrium rational thermodynamics and assumes that displacements and strains are small. Balance laws for mass, linear and angular momentum, energy, and entropy are stated. Thermodynamic restrictions are identified, based on an additive strain decomposition and on the definition of the Helmholtz free energy. Constitutive theory and chemical kinetics are studied in order to finally write the governing equations for the multi-physics problem. The field equations are solved numerically with the finite element method, stemming from a three-fields variational formulation. Three case-studies on vacancies redistribution in metals, hydrogen embrittlement, and the charge-discharge of active particles in Li-ion batteries demonstrate the features and the potential of the proposed model.

  15. Experimental investigation of solid sodium-water reaction: tests results and phenomenological analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daudin, K.; Beauchamp, F.; Proust, C.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium-Water Reaction (SWR) is an issue one has to be capable to deal with for the next generation of nuclear reactors (SFR for GEN IV). The background of these experiments is the improvement of safety demonstration regarding SWR in an open volume. This experimental campaign is conducted at the CEA Cadarache inside a cylindrical reactor filled with inert gas. The sodium is inside a loading pot and water comes into contact by immersion. SWR and its physical effects are followed by different pressure and temperature sensors. The results show a limit to the overpressure increasing sodium mass. Global assessment of physical effects of SWR contributes to put forward the relative nature of phenomena with geometric configuration, and the importance of scale effects. (authors)

  16. α -induced reactions on 115In: Cross section measurements and statistical model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Mohr, P.; Török, Zs.; Huszánk, R.; Gyürky, Gy.; Fülöp, Zs.

    2018-05-01

    Background: α -nucleus optical potentials are basic ingredients of statistical model calculations used in nucleosynthesis simulations. While the nucleon+nucleus optical potential is fairly well known, for the α +nucleus optical potential several different parameter sets exist and large deviations, reaching sometimes even an order of magnitude, are found between the cross section predictions calculated using different parameter sets. Purpose: A measurement of the radiative α -capture and the α -induced reaction cross sections on the nucleus 115In at low energies allows a stringent test of statistical model predictions. Since experimental data are scarce in this mass region, this measurement can be an important input to test the global applicability of α +nucleus optical model potentials and further ingredients of the statistical model. Methods: The reaction cross sections were measured by means of the activation method. The produced activities were determined by off-line detection of the γ rays and characteristic x rays emitted during the electron capture decay of the produced Sb isotopes. The 115In(α ,γ )119Sb and 115In(α ,n )Sb118m reaction cross sections were measured between Ec .m .=8.83 and 15.58 MeV, and the 115In(α ,n )Sb118g reaction was studied between Ec .m .=11.10 and 15.58 MeV. The theoretical analysis was performed within the statistical model. Results: The simultaneous measurement of the (α ,γ ) and (α ,n ) cross sections allowed us to determine a best-fit combination of all parameters for the statistical model. The α +nucleus optical potential is identified as the most important input for the statistical model. The best fit is obtained for the new Atomki-V1 potential, and good reproduction of the experimental data is also achieved for the first version of the Demetriou potentials and the simple McFadden-Satchler potential. The nucleon optical potential, the γ -ray strength function, and the level density parametrization are also

  17. Derivation of the reduced reaction mechanisms of ozone depletion events in the Arctic spring by using concentration sensitivity analysis and principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ozone depletion events (ODEs in the springtime Arctic have been investigated since the 1980s. It is found that the depletion of ozone is highly associated with an auto-catalytic reaction cycle, which involves mostly the bromine-containing compounds. Moreover, bromide stored in various substrates in the Arctic such as the underlying surface covered by ice and snow can be also activated by the absorbed HOBr. Subsequently, this leads to an explosive increase of the bromine amount in the troposphere, which is called the “bromine explosion mechanism”. In the present study, a reaction scheme representing the chemistry of ozone depletion and halogen release is processed with two different mechanism reduction approaches, namely, the concentration sensitivity analysis and the principal component analysis. In the concentration sensitivity analysis, the interdependence of the mixing ratios of ozone and principal bromine species on the rate of each reaction in the ODE mechanism is identified. Furthermore, the most influential reactions in different time periods of ODEs are also revealed. By removing 11 reactions with the maximum absolute values of sensitivities lower than 10 %, a reduced reaction mechanism of ODEs is derived. The onsets of each time period of ODEs in simulations using the original reaction mechanism and the reduced reaction mechanism are identical while the maximum deviation of the mixing ratio of principal bromine species between different mechanisms is found to be less than 1 %. By performing the principal component analysis on an array of the sensitivity matrices, the dependence of a particular species concentration on a combination of the reaction rates in the mechanism is revealed. Redundant reactions are indicated by principal components corresponding to small eigenvalues and insignificant elements in principal components with large eigenvalues. Through this investigation, aside from the 11 reactions identified as

  18. Intrinsic bacterial biodegradation of petroleum contamination demonstrated in situ using natural abundance, molecular-level 14C analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, G.F.; Nelson, R.K.; Kile, B.M.; Reddy, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Natural abundance, molecular-level C 14 analysis was combined with comprehensive gas chromatography (GC x GC) to investigate, in situ, the role of intrinsic biodegradation in the loss of petroleum hydrocarbons from the rocky, inter-tidal zone impacted by the Bouchard 120 oil spill. GC x GC analysis indicated accelerated losses of n-alkane components of the residual petroleum hydrocarbons between day 40 and day 50 after the spill. 14 C analysis of bacterial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) from the impacted zone on day 44 showed that the polyunsaturated fatty acids attributed to the photoautotrophic component of the microbial community had the same ( 14 C as the local dissolved inorganic carbon (DIG), indicating that this DIG was their carbon source. In contrast there was significant (C depletion in the saturated and mono-unsaturated PLFA indicating incorporation of petroleum carbon. This correlation between the observed accelerated n-alkane losses and microbial incorporation of (C-depleted carbon directly demonstrated, in situ, that intrinsic biodegradation was affecting the petroleum. Since the majority of organic contaminants originate from petroleum feed-stocks, in situ molecular-level 14 C analysis of microbial PLFA can provide insights into the occurrence and pathways of biodegradation of a wide range of organic contaminants. (Author)

  19. Uranium analysis in urine by inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejnik, John W. [Northern Michigan University, Chemistry Department, Marquette, MI (United States); Todorov, Todor I.; Mullick, Florabel G.; Centeno, Jose A. [Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Division of Biophysical Toxicology, Washington, DC (United States); Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A. [University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Urine uranium concentrations are the best biological indicator for identifying exposure to depleted uranium (DU). Internal exposure to DU causes an increased amount of urine uranium and a decreased ratio of {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U in urine samples, resulting in measurements that vary between 0.00725 and 0.002 (i.e., natural and depleted uranium's {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios, respectively). A method based on inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry (ICP-DRC-MS) was utilized to identify DU in urine by measuring the quantity of total U and the {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratio. The quantitative analysis was achieved using {sup 233}U as an internal standard. The analysis was performed both with and without the reaction gas oxygen. The reaction gas converted ionized {sup 235}U{sup +} and {sup 238}U{sup +} into {sup 235}UO{sub 2}{sup +} (m/z=267) and {sup 238}UO{sub 2}{sup +} (m/z=270). This conversion was determined to be over 90% efficient. A polyatomic interference at m/z 234.8 was successfully removed from the {sup 235}U signal under either DRC operating conditions (with or without oxygen as a reaction gas). The method was validated with 15 urine samples of known uranium compositions. The method detection limit for quantification was determined to be 0.1 pg U mL{sup -1} urine and an average coefficient of variation (CV) of 1-2% within the sample measurements. The method detection limit for determining {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratio was 3.0 pg U mL{sup -1} urine. An additional 21 patient samples were analyzed with no information about medical history. The measured {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratio within the urine samples correctly identified the presence or absence of internal DU exposure in all 21 patients. (orig.)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  2. In vitro antibacterial analysis of phenoloxidase reaction products from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingwei; Zhou, Zunchun; Dong, Ying; Cong, Cong; Guan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Bai; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Bei; Yang, Aifu; Gao, Shan; Sun, Hongjuan

    2014-08-01

    Three phenoloxidases (POs) of Apostichopus japonicus, AjPOs (AjPO1, AjPO2 and AjPO3), were partially purified from the coelomocytes with an electrophoretic method, and then employed for the in vitro antibacterial analysis. Using L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) as a substrate, AjPO1 and AjPO2-derived compounds inhibited the growth of Vibrio splendidus and Staphylococcus aureus, while AjPO3-derived compounds only inhibited the growth of V. splendidus. When dopamine was used as a substrate, AjPO1 and AjPO3-derived compounds inhibited the growth of V. splendidus and Vibrio harveyi, while AjPO2-derived compounds only inhibited the growth of V. splendidus. Moreover, AjPO1-derived compounds showed stronger inhibition in V. harveyi than AjPO3-derived compounds did. However, all of the three AjPO reaction products showed no inhibitions on the growth of Pseudoalteromonas nigrifaciens, Shewanella baltica, Micrococcus lysodeikticus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Nocardiopsis sp. with L-DOPA or dopamine as a substrate. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation of V. harveyi treated by AjPOs and dopamine showed that AjPO1-derived compounds resulted in massive bacteriolysis, AjPO2-derived compounds caused no obvious alteration on bacterial morphology, and AjPO3-derived compounds increased the ratio of spheroidal bacteria. All these results suggested that AjPO reaction products derived by L-DOPA and dopamine had different but limited antibacterial spectrum, and the different antibacterial effects observed among three AjPOs resulted from the different reaction products generated by AjPOs with the same substrate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional data analysis on ground reaction force of military load carriage increment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Wan Rozita Wan; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Analysis of ground reaction force on military load carriage is done through functional data analysis (FDA) statistical technique. The main objective of the research is to investigate the effect of 10% load increment and to find the maximum suitable load for the Malaysian military. Ten military soldiers age 31 ± 6.2 years, weigh 71.6 ± 10.4 kg and height of 166.3 ± 5.9 cm carrying different military load range from 0% body weight (BW) up to 40% BW participated in an experiment to gather the GRF and kinematic data using Vicon Motion Analysis System, Kirstler force plates and thirty nine body markers. The analysis is conducted in sagittal, medial lateral and anterior posterior planes. The results show that 10% BW load increment has an effect when heel strike and toe-off for all the three planes analyzed with P-value less than 0.001 at 0.05 significant levels. FDA proves to be one of the best statistical techniques in analyzing the functional data. It has the ability to handle filtering, smoothing and curve aligning according to curve features and points of interest.

  4. Outcome of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis in 100 suspected cases of infectious uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharel Sitaula, Ranju; Janani, M K; Madhavan, H N; Biswas, Jyotirmay

    2018-01-10

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis is an important tool in the diagnosis of infectious uveitis. A retrospective, interventional study of PCR analysis of ocular fluid in suspected infectious uveitis cases between January 2014 to July 2016 was done. Nested, real-time and broad range PCR was performed for detection of the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, herpes virus family, Chikungunya virus, Toxoplasma gondii, fungus, eubacterium and propionibacterium acne. Total of 100 cases included, mean age was 39.2 ± 15.4 years. Uveitis was unilateral in 82% and granulomatous in 40%. Mean visual acuity at the initial visit and final visit was 0.73 logMar and 0.63 logMar respectively. PCR analysis confirmed the clinical diagnosis in 70.1% patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PCR analysis was 90.2%, 93.9%, 93.9% and 90.2% respectively. The quantitative value of real-time M. tb. Positive PCR ranged from 32c/ml to 2722 c/ml. PCR assay is an accurate technique with high sensitivity and specificity to diagnose the DNA genome in infectious uveitis.

  5. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin, E-mail: ntp@dlmu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid–solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, Mg(OH){sub 2} peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface. - Graphical abstract: There was existence of a peeling-off process in the gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) MgO hydration system. - Highlights: • Magnesium oxide hydration in gas–liquid–solid system was investigated. • The experimental data in three-phase system could be fitted well by two models. • The morphology analysis suggested that there was existence of a peel-off process.

  6. Vibratory Reaction Unit for the Rapid Analysis of Proteins and Glycochains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukie Sasakura

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A protein digestion system using immobilized enzymes for protein identification and glycochain analyses has been developed, and a vibration reaction unit for micro-scale sample convection on an enzyme-immobilized solid surface was constructed. BSA as a model substrate was digested by this unit, and was successfully identified by mass spectrometry (MS analyses. Compared to the conventional liquid-phase digestion, the reaction unit increased the number of matched peptides from 9 to 26, protein score from 455 to 1247, and sequence coverage from 21% to 48%. Glycopeptidase F (NGF, an enzyme that cleaves N-glycans from glycoproteins, was also immobilized and used to remove the glycochains from human immunoglobulin G (IgG. Trypsin and NGF were immobilized on the same solid surface and used to remove glycochains from IgG in single-step. Glycochains were labeled with fluorescent reagent and analyzed by HPLC. Several peaks corresponding to the glycochains of IgG were detected. These results suggested that the single-step digestion system, by immobilized multiple enzymes (trypsin and NGF would be effective for the rapid structural analysis of glycoproteins.Abbreviations: BSA: bovine serum albumin; MS: mass spectrometry; NGF: glycopeptidase F; IgG: immunoglobulin G; PTM: post-translational modification; HPLC: high-performance liquid chromatography; PBS: phosphate-buffered saline; EDTA: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; DTT: dithiothreitol; RT: retention time; ABOE: p-aminobenzoic acid octyl ester; PDMS: polydimethylsiloxane; ArgC: endoprotease Arginine C.

  7. Analysis of acoustic data from UK sodium/water reaction test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, R.; Mcknight, J.A.; Airey, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes acoustic measurements made during a number of sodium/water reaction experiments in the UK. The tests have included water and steam injections through both realistic (fatigue crack) defects and machined orifices and have covered a range of experimental conditions including those appropriate to the inlet and outlet regions of the EFR steam generators. Injection rates were typically in the range 0.1 to 30 g/s. Where possible, gas injections were also included in the test programme for comparison, since it is anticipated that a practical SGU acoustic leak detection system would include a facility for gas injections to allow system calibration, and to confirm transmission properties within the SGU. The test sections were instrumented with accelerometers on waveguides and in some cases included an under-sodium microphone situated about 300mm above the reaction zone. Tape recordings were made during the tests and used for detailed analysis off-line, although an audible output from one of the acoustic channels was used to monitor the progress of the injections and provide information for the rig operators. A comparison of the signal amplitudes measured during the experiments with typical reactor background noise was made and an estimate of the detection sensitivity of an acoustic monitoring system was deduced. 3 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  8. Redox reaction characteristics of riboflavin: a fluorescence spectroelectrochemical analysis and density functional theory calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Jie-Jie; Lu, Rui; Qian, Chen; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-08-01

    Riboflavin (RF), the primary redox active component of flavin, is involved in many redox processes in biogeochemical systems. Despite of its wide distribution and important roles in environmental remediation, its redox behaviors and reaction mechanisms in hydrophobic sites remain unclear yet. In this study, spectroelectrochemical analysis and density functional theory (DFT) calculation were integrated to explore the redox behaviors of RF in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which was used to create a hydrophobic environment. Specifically, cyclic voltafluorometry (CVF) and derivative cyclic voltafluorometry (DCVF) were employed to track the RF concentration changing profiles. It was found that the reduction contained a series of proton-coupled electron transfers dependent of potential driving force. In addition to the electron transfer-chemical reaction-electron transfer process, a disproportionation (DISP1) process was also identified to be involved in the reduction. The redox potential and free energy of each step obtained from the DFT calculations further confirmed the mechanisms proposed based on the experimental results. The combination of experimental and theoretical approaches yields a deep insight into the characteristics of RF in environmental remediation and better understanding about the proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement and analysis of cross sections for (p,x) reactions on natural molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challan, M. B.; Comsan, M.N.H.; Abou-Zeid, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Excitation functions (EFs) for the reactions n atMo(p,x) 92m Nb, and n atMo(p,x) 94 , 95m , 95g , 96 m, +g , 99m Tc up to 18 MeV from threshold have been measured employing the stacked foil activation technique, and using high resolution HPGe gamma spectrometry. Utilizing the simultaneous measurement of the excitation function of n atCu(p,x) 62 Zn, n atCu(p,x) 63 Zn, n atCu(p,x) 65 Zn, and n atTi(p,x) 48 V monitor reactions. The theoretical analysis of the EFs has been done using both the semi-classical as well as quantum mechanical codes which include compound nucleus and pre-equilibrium (PE) emission into consideration. In general, theoretical calculations agree well with the experimental data. Effect of various free parameters used in the calculations has also been discussed. A significant contribution of pre-equilibrium component has been observed at these energies

  10. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study on the chlorination of uranium oxide by gas-solid reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.; Park, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    In order to determine the operating condition of an uranium chlorination process with U 3 O 8 -C-Cl 2 system, the experimental conditions have been evaluated preliminarily by the thermochemical analysis and experimentally confirmed in this study. The dry-type chlorination of U 3 O 8 occurs as irreversible and exothermic reaction and produces many kinds of chloride compounds such as UCl 3 , UCl 4 , UCl 5 , and UCl 6 in the air and humidity controlled argon environment. Taking account of Gibbs free energy and vapor pressure for various chloride compounds, the proper temperature range of chlorination appears to be 863 to 953 K in aspects of increasing reaction rate and the yield of nonvolatile product. In the course of the experimental confirmation the powder of U 3 O 8 is perfectly converted into uranium chlorides within 4 hours above 863 K, and then the maximum fraction of uranium chloride remaining in the reactor is about 30% of total conversion mass. (author)

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of multi-subunit tethering complexes demonstrates an ancient pan-eukaryotic complement and sculpting in Apicomplexa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christen M Klinger

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa are obligate intracellular parasites that cause tremendous disease burden world-wide. They utilize a set of specialized secretory organelles in their invasive process that require delivery of components for their biogenesis and function, yet the precise mechanisms underpinning such processes remain unclear. One set of potentially important components is the multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs, factors increasingly implicated in all aspects of vesicle-target interactions. Prompted by the results of previous studies indicating a loss of membrane trafficking factors in Apicomplexa, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of MTC conservation. Building on knowledge of the ancient presence of most MTC proteins, we demonstrate the near complete retention of MTCs in the newly available genomes for Guillardiatheta and Bigelowiellanatans. The latter is a key taxonomic sampling point as a basal sister taxa to the group including Apicomplexa. We also demonstrate an ancient origin of the CORVET complex subunits Vps8 and Vps3, as well as the TRAPPII subunit Tca17. Having established that the lineage leading to Apicomplexa did at one point possess the complete eukaryotic complement of MTC components, we undertook a deeper taxonomic investigation in twelve apicomplexan genomes. We observed excellent conservation of the VpsC core of the HOPS and CORVET complexes, as well as the core TRAPP subunits, but sparse conservation of TRAPPII, COG, Dsl1, and HOPS/CORVET-specific subunits. However, those subunits that we did identify appear to be expressed with similar patterns to the fully conserved MTC proteins, suggesting that they may function as minimal complexes or with analogous partners. Strikingly, we failed to identify any subunits of the exocyst complex in all twelve apicomplexan genomes, as well as the dinoflagellate Perkinsus marinus. Overall, we demonstrate reduction of MTCs in Apicomplexa and their ancestors, consistent with modification during

  12. Analysis of Corrosion Residues Collected from the Aluminum Basket Rails of the High-Burnup Demonstration Cask.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    On September, 2015, an inspection was performed on the TN-32B cask that will be used for the high-burnup demonstration project. During the survey, wooden cribbing that had been placed within the cask eleven years earlier to prevent shifting of the basket during transport was removed, revealing two areas of residue on the aluminum basket rails, where they had contacted the cribbing. The residue appeared to be a corrosion product, and concerns were raised that similar attack could exist at more difficult-to-inspect locations in the canister. Accordingly, when the canister was reopened, samples of the residue were collected for analysis. This report presents the results of that assessment, which determined that the corrosion was due to the presence of the cribbing. The corrosion was associated with fungal material, and fungal activity likely contributed to an aggressive chemical environment. Once the cask has been cleaned, there will be no risk of further corrosion.

  13. Acidic preparations of lysed platelets upregulate proliferative pathways in osteoblast-like cells as demonstrated by genome-wide microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlström, Ola; Linder, Cecilia Halling; Ansell, Anna; Kalén, Anders; Söderström, Mats; Magnusson, Per

    2011-01-01

    Platelets contain numerous growth factors essential for wound and fracture healing. We investigated the gene expression in human osteoblast-like cells stimulated with lysed platelets prepared in acidic, neutral, or alkaline buffers. Lysed platelets prepared in buffers at pH 5.4, 7.4, and 7.9, were added after neutralization to hFOB 1.19 cells. Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip 7G Scanner. Biometric, cluster, and pathway analyses were performed with GeneSpring GX. Biometric analyses demonstrated that 53 genes were differentially regulated (p ≤ 0.005, ≥2-fold increase). Pathway analysis revealed 10 significant pathways of which eight are common ones regulating bone formation and cancer growth. Eleven genes were selected for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the microarray analysis of the lysed platelets prepared in the pH 5.4 experiments. In conclusion, acidic preparations of lysed platelet concentrates release factors essential for cell proliferation and particularly cell metabolism under hypoxic conditions. The genetic response from these factors was dominated by genes associated with the same pathways observed in bone formation and cancer growth. Activation of TGF-β in the acidic preparation could be a stimulatory key factor of cell proliferation. These results support the hypothesis that acidification of platelets modifies the stimulatory response of mesenchymal cells in vitro, which is analogous with the observed milieu of a low pH present in wound and fracture sites, as well as in growing tumors.

  14. Performance analysis of an optical self-interference cancellation system with a directly modulated laser-based demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinghong; Zhang, Yunhao; Huang, Lin; Xiao, Shilin

    2018-02-20

    In this paper, two main performance indices of the optical self-interference cancellation (OSIC) system are theoretically analyzed: cancellation bandwidth and depth. Delay deviation is investigated to be the determining factor of cancellation bandwidth, based on which the bandwidth advantage of the OSIC system over electrical schemes is also proven theoretically. Cancellation depth in the narrowband is mostly influenced by attenuation and delay-adjusting deviation, while in the broadband case, the performance is mostly limited by frequency-dependent amplitude and phase mismatch. The cancellation performance analysis is suitable for most linear modulation-demodulation OSIC systems, including the directly modulated laser (DML)-based OSIC system verified experimentally in this paper. The cancellation model is well demonstrated by the agreement between experimental cancellation results and predicted performance. For over-the-air demonstration with the employment of antennas, broadband cancellation within 450 MHz bandwidth of 22 dB and 25 dB is achieved at 900 MHz and 2.4 GHz, respectively. In addition, orthogonal frequency division multiplexing signals are employed to show in-band full-duplex transmission with good performance by the DML-based OSIC system, with successful suppression of self-interference and recovery of the signal of interest.

  15. Cintichem modified process - {sup 99}Mo precipitation step: application of statistical analysis tools over the reaction parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodoro, Rodrigo; Dias, Carla R.B.R.; Osso Junior, Joao A., E-mail: jaosso@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandez Nunez, Eutimio Gustavo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EP/USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2011-07-01

    Precipitation of {sup 99}Mo by {alpha}-benzoin oxime ({alpha}-Bz) is a standard precipitation method for molybdenum due the high selectivity of this agent. Nowadays, statistical analysis tools have been employed in analytical systems to prove its efficiency and feasibility. IPEN has a project aiming the production of {sup 99}Mo by the fission of {sup 235}U route. The processing uses as the first step the precipitation of {sup 99}Mo with {alpha}-Bz. This precipitation step involves many key reaction parameters. The aim of this work is based on the development of the already known acidic route to produce {sup 99}Mo as well as the optimization of the reactional parameters applying statistical tools. In order to simulate {sup 99}Mo precipitation, the study was conducted in acidic media using HNO{sub 3}, {alpha}Bz as precipitant agent and NaOH /1%H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as dissolver solution. Then, a Mo carrier, KMnO{sub 4} solutions and {sup 99}Mo tracer were added to the reaction flask. The reactional parameters ({alpha}-Bz/Mo ratio, Mo carrier, reaction time and temperature, and cooling reaction time before filtration) were evaluated under a fractional factorial design of resolution V. The best values of each reactional parameter were determined by a response surface statistical planning. The precipitation and recovery yields of {sup 99}Mo were measured using HPGe detector. Statistical analysis from experimental data suggested that the reactional parameters {alpha}-Bz/Mo ratio, reaction time and temperature have a significant impact on {sup 99}Mo precipitation. Optimization statistical planning showed that higher {alpha}Bz/Mo ratios, room temperature, and lower reaction time lead to higher {sup 99}Mo yields. (author)

  16. Exogenous reference gene normalization for real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis under dynamic endogenous transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Stephen; Gallaher, Zachary; Czaja, Krzysztof

    2012-05-15

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is widely used to investigate transcriptional changes following experimental manipulations to the nervous system. Despite the widespread utilization of qPCR, the interpretation of results is marred by the lack of a suitable reference gene due to the dynamic nature of endogenous transcription. To address this inherent deficiency, we investigated the use of an exogenous spike-in mRNA, luciferase, as an internal reference gene for the 2(-∆∆Ct) normalization method. To induce dynamic transcription, we systemically administered capsaicin, a neurotoxin selective for C-type sensory neurons expressing the TRPV-1 receptor, to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. We later isolated nodose ganglia for qPCR analysis with the reference being either exogenous luciferase mRNA or the commonly used endogenous reference β-III tubulin. The exogenous luciferase mRNA reference clearly demonstrated the dynamic expression of the endogenous reference. Furthermore, variability of the endogenous reference would lead to misinterpretation of other genes of interest. In conclusion, traditional reference genes are often unstable under physiologically normal situations, and certainly unstable following the damage to the nervous system. The use of exogenous spike-in reference provides a consistent and easily implemented alternative for the analysis of qPCR data.

  17. Global Handwashing Day 2012: a qualitative content analysis of Chinese social media reaction to a health promotion event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai; Cai, Jingxian; Hao, Yi; Ying, Yuchen; Chan, Benedict Shing Bun; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Fu, King-Wa

    2015-01-01

    Global Handwashing Day (GHD) is a handwashing promotion campaign organized by the Global Public-Private Partnership of Handwashing with Soap. In China, it has been promoted by the Chinese public health authorities, international organizations and multinational corporations through various channels including social media such as Sina Weibo, the leading Chinese microblogging site similar to Twitter. The objective of this study is to qualitatively assess Chinese social media users' reactions to a health promotion campaign using Global Handwashing Day (GHD) 2012 as an example. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of 552 Weibo posts generated on GHD 2012 by Weibo users with 1000 or more followers with the Chinese keyword for "handwashing." We categorized the Weibo posts into groups by keywords that frequently appeared in the data set. These groups were either exact reposts of an original post, or they conveyed similar information. We observed the interconnections between traditional media and social media in handwashing promotion. Social media were found to serve as amplifiers of contents provided by traditional media. We observed the contextualization of global hygiene messages in a unique national social media market in China. Our study showed that social media and traditional media are two interconnected arms of the GHD campaign in China. Our analysis demonstrated that public health campaigns in China can be evaluated using social media data. The themes and topics identified in this study will help public health practitioners evaluate future social media handwashing promotion campaigns.

  18. A mathematical analysis of Prx2-STAT3 disulfide exchange rate constants for a bimolecular reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Troy F; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2018-03-22

    Appreciation of peroxiredoxins as the major regulators of H 2 O 2 concentrations in human cells has led to a new understanding of redox signaling. In addition to their status as the primary reducers of H 2 O 2 to water, the oxidized peroxiredoxin byproduct of this reaction has recently been shown capable of participation in H 2 O 2 -mediated signaling pathways through disulfide exchange reactions with the transcription factor STAT3. The dynamics of peroxidase-transcription factor disulfide exchange reactions have not yet been considered in detail with respect to how these reactions fit into the larger network of competing reactions in human cells. In this study, we used a kinetic model of oxidation and reduction reactions related to H 2 O 2 metabolism in the cytosol of human cells to study the dynamics of peroxiredoxin-2 mediated oxidation of the redox-regulated transcription factor STAT3. In combination with previously reported experimental data, the model was used to estimate the rate coefficient of a biomolecular reaction between Prx2 and STAT3 for two sets of assumptions that constitute lower and upper bound cases. Using these estimates, we calculated the relative rates of the reaction of oxidized peroxiredoxin-2 and STAT3 and other competing reactions in the cytosol. These calculations revealed that peroxiredoxin-2-mediated oxidation of STAT3 likely occurs at a much slower rate than competing reactions in the cytosol. This analysis suggests the existence of more complex mechanisms, potentially involving currently unknown protein-protein recognition partners, which facilitate disulfide exchange reactions between peroxiredoxin-2 and STAT3. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Positron annihilation investigation and nuclear reaction analysis of helium and oxygen-implanted zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grynszpan, R.I.; Saude, S.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.

    2005-01-01

    Since irradiation affects in-service properties of zirconia, we investigated the fluence dependence on production and thermal stability of defects induced by helium and oxygen-ion implantation in single crystals of yttria-fully-stabilized zirconia. In either case, depth profiling by slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) detects a distribution of vacancy-type defects peaking at 60% of the projected ion range R p . Owing to the saturation of positron-trapping occurring for low fluences, which depends on the ion mass, we could estimate a critical size of clusters ranging from 0.4 to 1.6 nm. The lack of SPIS-evidence of an open-volume excess at R p is explained by the presence of over-pressurized gas bubbles. This assumption is confirmed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis of 3 He concentration profiles, which shows that helium remains partly trapped at R p , even after annealing above 400 o C

  20. MetaFluxNet: the management of metabolic reaction information and quantitative metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yup; Yun, Hongsoek; Park, Sunwon; Lee, Sang Yup

    2003-11-01

    MetaFluxNet is a program package for managing information on the metabolic reaction network and for quantitatively analyzing metabolic fluxes in an interactive and customized way. It allows users to interpret and examine metabolic behavior in response to genetic and/or environmental modifications. As a result, quantitative in silico simulations of metabolic pathways can be carried out to understand the metabolic status and to design the metabolic engineering strategies. The main features of the program include a well-developed model construction environment, user-friendly interface for metabolic flux analysis (MFA), comparative MFA of strains having different genotypes under various environmental conditions, and automated pathway layout creation. http://mbel.kaist.ac.kr/ A manual for MetaFluxNet is available as PDF file.

  1. Analysis of the width correlation in 54Fe(nγ)55Fe reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knat'ko, V.A.; Shimanovich, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    To find out structural effects manifesting themselves in the form of correlation between widths of different channels of γ decay of levels and violation of Porter-Thomas distribution, calculated are partial widths of levels for 20 high-energy γ transitions in the 54 Fe(nγ) 55 Fe reaction. Calculations are carried out for widths in relation to γ transitions on 8 low p levels of 55 Fe, for 100 sets of partial γ widths (20 widths in a set). Results of analysis of theoretical values of partial γ widths of s resonances are presented in the form of the table. Results, obtained, show that consideration of contributions into γ decay of one-particle-vibrational configurations improve the accordance with experimental data, in comparison with calculations according to the model of valent capture. It is concluded that properties of γ widths of 55 Fe resonances, calculated in studied model, agree satisfactorily with properties of experimental γ widths [ru

  2. Analysis of insulation material deterioration under the LOCA simulated environment on the basis of reaction kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Sohei; Kusama, Yasuo; Ito, Masayuki; Yagi, Toshiaki; Yoshikawa, Masato (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma. Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment)

    1982-12-01

    In the type test of the electric cables installed in reactor containment vessels, it is considerably difficult to perform the testing over a year once in a while to simulate the accidental environment containing radiation and high temperature steam. Two requirements which seem to be more realistic as compared with the above mentioned testing method are inconsistent with each other. To solve this problem, a general rule of deterioration or the expression by an equation is necessary, which enables the extrapolation to show that a short term testing stands on the safety side. The authors have tried to numerically analyze the change of mechanical characteristics of ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) and Hypalon which are, important as the materials for PH cables (fire-retardant, EP rubber-insulated, chlorosulfonated polyethylene-sheathed cable), in a complex environment of radiation, steam and chemical spray simulating PWR LOCA conditions. In this report, a method is proposed to analyze and estimate the properties by the regression analysis technique on the basis of reaction kinetics, and the analyzed results are described in the order of experiment, analysis method and the results and consideration. The deterioration of the elongation P = e/esub(o) of EPR and Hypalon in the above described complex environment can be represented by the equation - dP/dt = KPsup(n). The exponent n varied in the cases when air is contained or not in that environment, suggesting that the different reactions are dominant in both conditions, respectively. For EPR, n was close to 2 if air was not contained and close to 1 if air was contained in the system.

  3. Development of fast reactor containment safety analysis code, CONTAIN-LMR. (3) Improvement of sodium-concrete reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Munemichi; Doi, Daisuke; Seino, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    A computer code, CONTAIN-LMR, is an integrated analysis tool to predict the consequence of severe accident in a liquid metal fast reactor. Because a sodium-concrete reaction behavior is one of the most important phenomena in the accident, a Sodium-Limestone Concrete Ablation Model (SLAM) has been developed and installed into the original CONTAIN code at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the U.S. The SLAM treats chemical reaction kinetics between the sodium and the concrete compositions mechanistically using a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer (B/L) and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region, the application is limited to the reaction between sodium and limestone concrete. In order to apply SLAM to the reaction between sodium and siliceous concrete which is an ordinary structural concrete in Japan, the chemical reaction kinetics model has been improved to consider the new chemical reactions between sodium and silicon dioxide. The improved model was validated to analyze a series of sodium-concrete experiments which were conducted in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). It has been found that relatively good agreement between calculation and experimental results is obtained and the CONTAIN-LMR code has been validated with regard to the sodium-concrete reaction phenomena. (author)

  4. Shielding design study of the demonstration fast breeder reactor. 2. Shielding design on the basis of the JASPER analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Zenro; Tabayashi, Masao; Handa, Hiroyuki; Iida, Masaaki; Takemura, Morio

    2000-01-01

    Conceptual shielding design has been performed for the Demonstration Fast Breeder Reactor (DFBR) to achieve further optimization and reduction of the plant construction cost. The design took into account its implications in overall plant configuration such as reduction of shields in the core, adoption of fission gas plenum in the lower portion of fuel assemblies, and adoption of gas expansion modules. Shielding criteria applied for the design are to secure fast neutron fluence on in-vessel structures as well as responses of the nuclear instrumentation system and to restrict secondary sodium activation. The design utilized the cross sections and the one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport codes, whose verification had been performed by the JASPER experiment analysis. Correction factors yielded by the JASPER analysis were applied to the design calculations to obtain design values with improved accuracy. Design margins, which are defined by the ratios of the design criteria to the design values, were more than two for all shielding issues of interest, showing the adequacy of the shielding design of the DFBR. (author)

  5. Weaving the native web: using social network analysis to demonstrate the value of a minority career development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Dedra; Dick, Rhonda Wiegman

    2011-06-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native scientists are consistently among the most underrepresented minority groups in health research. The authors used social network analysis (SNA) to evaluate the Native Investigator Development Program (NIDP), a career development program for junior Native researchers established as a collaboration between the University of Washington and the University of Colorado Denver. The study focused on 29 trainees and mentors who participated in the NIDP. Data were collected on manuscripts and grant proposals produced by participants from 1998 to 2007. Information on authorship of manuscripts and collaborations on grant applications was used to conduct social network analyses with three measures of centrality and one measure of network reach. Both visual and quantitative analyses were performed. Participants in the NIDP collaborated on 106 manuscripts and 83 grant applications. Although three highly connected individuals, with critical and central roles in the program, accounted for much of the richness of the network, both current core faculty and "graduates" of the program were heavily involved in collaborations on manuscripts and grants. This study's innovative application of SNA demonstrates that collaborative relationships can be an important outcome of career development programs for minority investigators and that an analysis of these relationships can provide a more complete assessment of the value of such programs.

  6. Possibility of analysis using RBS, PIXE and nuclear reaction on the electrostatic Pelletron accelerator 5SDH-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen The Nghia; Bui Van Loat; Le Hong Khiem

    2011-01-01

    The electrostatic Pelletron accelerator 5SDH-2 is installing at Hanoi University of Sciences. This accelerator will be the first tandem electrostatic accelerator installed in Vietnam. The schematic structure, principle of operation of the machine and its application for analysis using Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS), Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) will be presented. (author)

  7. Analysis of the nucleon-nucleus reactions by the quantum molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Satoshi; Niita, Koji; Maruyama, Toshiki; Fukahori, Tokio; Takada, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Akira

    1995-01-01

    The quantum molecular dynamics + statistical decay model has been applied to analyze the nucleon-induced nuclear reactions in the energy range from 50 to 3 GeV in order to verify its applicability to light-ion induced nuclear reactions. It was found that the present approach could give a quantitative description of various cross sections such as (p,p'), (p,n), (n,p) reactions from a wide range of targets and also target-like isotope production cross sections from p+Fe reaction, showing its basic ability as a tool for the study of intermediate energy nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluation. (author)

  8. Test analysis and research on static choice reaction ability of commercial vehicle drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingchao; Wei, Lang; Qiao, Jie; Tian, Shun; Wang, Shengchang

    2017-03-01

    Drivers' choice reaction ability has a certain relation with safe driving. It has important significance to research its influence on traffic safety. Firstly, the paper uses a choice reaction detector developed by research group to detect drivers' choice reaction ability of commercial vehicles, and gets 2641 effective samples. Then by using mathematical statistics method, the paper founds that average reaction time from accident group has no difference with non-accident group, and then introduces a variance rate of reaction time as a new index to replace it. The result shows that the test index choice reaction errors and variance rate of reaction time have positive correlations with accidents. Finally, according to testing results of the detector, the paper formulates a detection threshold with four levels for helping transportation companies to assess commercial vehicles drivers.

  9. Global reaction to the recent outbreaks of Zika virus: Insights from a Big Data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucchi, Cecilia; Paganino, Chiara; Barberis, Ilaria; Martini, Mariano; Sticchi, Laura; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco; Ansaldi, Filippo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Orsi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Objective The recent spreading of Zika virus represents an emerging global health threat. As such, it is attracting public interest worldwide, generating a great amount of related Internet searches and social media interactions. The aim of this research was to understand Zika-related digital behavior throughout the epidemic spreading and to assess its consistence with real-world epidemiological data, using a behavioral informatics and analytics approach. Methods In this study, the global web-interest and reaction to the recently occurred outbreaks of the Zika Virus were analyzed in terms of tweets and Google Trends (GT), Google News, YouTube, and Wikipedia search queries. These data streams were mined from 1st January 2004 to 31st October 2016, with a focus on the period November 2015—October 2016. This analysis was complemented with the use of epidemiological data. Spearman’s correlation was performed to correlate all Zika-related data. Moreover, a multivariate regression was performed using Zika-related search queries as a dependent variable, and epidemiological data, number of inhabitants in 2015 and Human Development Index as predictor variables. Results Overall 3,864,395 tweets, 284,903 accesses to Wikipedia pages dedicated to the Zika virus were analyzed during the study period. All web-data sources showed that the main spike of researches and interactions occurred in February 2016 with a second peak in August 2016. All novel data streams-related activities increased markedly during the epidemic period with respect to pre-epidemic period when no web activity was detected. Correlations between data from all these web platforms resulted very high and statistically significant. The countries in which web searches were particularly concentrated are mainly from Central and South Americas. The majority of queries concerned the symptoms of the Zika virus, its vector of transmission, and its possible effect to babies, including microcephaly. No statistically

  10. Global reaction to the recent outbreaks of Zika virus: Insights from a Big Data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Alicino, Cristiano; Trucchi, Cecilia; Paganino, Chiara; Barberis, Ilaria; Martini, Mariano; Sticchi, Laura; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco; Ansaldi, Filippo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Orsi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The recent spreading of Zika virus represents an emerging global health threat. As such, it is attracting public interest worldwide, generating a great amount of related Internet searches and social media interactions. The aim of this research was to understand Zika-related digital behavior throughout the epidemic spreading and to assess its consistence with real-world epidemiological data, using a behavioral informatics and analytics approach. In this study, the global web-interest and reaction to the recently occurred outbreaks of the Zika Virus were analyzed in terms of tweets and Google Trends (GT), Google News, YouTube, and Wikipedia search queries. These data streams were mined from 1st January 2004 to 31st October 2016, with a focus on the period November 2015-October 2016. This analysis was complemented with the use of epidemiological data. Spearman's correlation was performed to correlate all Zika-related data. Moreover, a multivariate regression was performed using Zika-related search queries as a dependent variable, and epidemiological data, number of inhabitants in 2015 and Human Development Index as predictor variables. Overall 3,864,395 tweets, 284,903 accesses to Wikipedia pages dedicated to the Zika virus were analyzed during the study period. All web-data sources showed that the main spike of researches and interactions occurred in February 2016 with a second peak in August 2016. All novel data streams-related activities increased markedly during the epidemic period with respect to pre-epidemic period when no web activity was detected. Correlations between data from all these web platforms resulted very high and statistically significant. The countries in which web searches were particularly concentrated are mainly from Central and South Americas. The majority of queries concerned the symptoms of the Zika virus, its vector of transmission, and its possible effect to babies, including microcephaly. No statistically significant correlation was found

  11. Global reaction to the recent outbreaks of Zika virus: Insights from a Big Data analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Luigi Bragazzi

    Full Text Available The recent spreading of Zika virus represents an emerging global health threat. As such, it is attracting public interest worldwide, generating a great amount of related Internet searches and social media interactions. The aim of this research was to understand Zika-related digital behavior throughout the epidemic spreading and to assess its consistence with real-world epidemiological data, using a behavioral informatics and analytics approach.In this study, the global web-interest and reaction to the recently occurred outbreaks of the Zika Virus were analyzed in terms of tweets and Google Trends (GT, Google News, YouTube, and Wikipedia search queries. These data streams were mined from 1st January 2004 to 31st October 2016, with a focus on the period November 2015-October 2016. This analysis was complemented with the use of epidemiological data. Spearman's correlation was performed to correlate all Zika-related data. Moreover, a multivariate regression was performed using Zika-related search queries as a dependent variable, and epidemiological data, number of inhabitants in 2015 and Human Development Index as predictor variables.Overall 3,864,395 tweets, 284,903 accesses to Wikipedia pages dedicated to the Zika virus were analyzed during the study period. All web-data sources showed that the main spike of researches and interactions occurred in February 2016 with a second peak in August 2016. All novel data streams-related activities increased markedly during the epidemic period with respect to pre-epidemic period when no web activity was detected. Correlations between data from all these web platforms resulted very high and statistically significant. The countries in which web searches were particularly concentrated are mainly from Central and South Americas. The majority of queries concerned the symptoms of the Zika virus, its vector of transmission, and its possible effect to babies, including microcephaly. No statistically significant

  12. Applications of computer simulation, nuclear reactions and elastic scattering to surface analysis of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco de Carvalho, J. A.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article involves computer simulation and surface analysis by nuclear techniques, which are non-destructive. Both the “energy method of analysis” for nuclear reactions and elastic scattering are used. Energy spectra are computer simulated and compared with experimental data, giving target composition and concentration profile information. The method is successfully applied to thick flat targets of graphite, quartz and sapphire and targets containing thin films of aluminium oxide. Depth profiles of 12C and 16O nuclei are determined using (d,p and (d,α deuteron induced reactions. Rutherford and resonance elastic scattering of (4He+ ions are also used.

    Este artículo trata de simulación por ordenador y del análisis de superficies mediante técnicas nucleares, que son no destructivas. Se usa el “método de análisis en energia” para reacciones nucleares, así como el de difusión elástica. Se simulan en ordenador espectros en energía que se comparan com datos experimentales, de lo que resulta la obención de información sobre la composición y los perfiles de concentración de la muestra. Este método se aplica con éxito em muestras espesas y planas de grafito, cuarzo y zafiro y muestras conteniendo películas finas de óxido de aluminio. Se calculan perfiles en profundidad de núcleos de 12C y de 16O a través de reacciones (d,p y (d,α inducidas por deuterones. Se utiliza también la difusión elástica de iones (4He+, tanto a Rutherford como resonante.

  13. Reduction and Analysis of Low Temperature Shift Heterogeneous Catalyst for Water Gas Reaction in Ammonia Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zečević, N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain additional quantities of hydrogen after the reforming reactions of natural gas and protect the ammonia synthesis catalyst, it is crucial to achieve and maintain maximum possible activity, selectivity and stability of the low temperature shift catalyst for conversion of water gas reaction during its lifetime. Whereas the heterogeneous catalyst comes in oxidized form, it is of the utmost importance to conduct the reduction procedure properly. The proper reduction procedure and continuous analysis of its performance would ensure the required activity, selectivity and stability throughout the catalyst’s service time. For the proper reduction procedure ofthe low temperature shift catalyst, in addition to process equipment, also necessary is a reliable and realistic system for temperature measurements, which will be effective for monitoring the exothermal temperature curves through all catalyst bed layers. For efficiency evaluation of low shift temperature catalyst reduction and its optimization, it is necessary to determine at regular time intervals the temperature approach to equilibrium and temperature profiles of individual layers by means of "S" and "die off" temperature exothermal curves. Based on the obtained data, the optimum inlet temperature could be determined, in order to maximally extend the service life of the heterogeneous catalyst as much as possible, and achieve the optimum equilibrium for conversion of the water gas. This paper presents the methodology for in situ reduction of the low temperature shift heterogeneous catalyst and the developed system for monitoring its individual layers to achieve the minimum possible content of carbon monoxide at the exit of the reactor. The developed system for temperature monitoring through heterogeneous catalyst layers provides the proper procedure for reduction and adjustment of optimum process working conditions for the catalyst by the continuous increase of reactor inlet

  14. Specific solvent effect on lumazine photophysics: A combined fluorescence and intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyon, N. Shaemningwar; Gashnga, Pynsakhiat Miki; Phukan, Smritakshi; Mitra, Sivaprasad, E-mail: smitra@nehu.ac.in

    2013-06-27

    Highlights: • Correlation of lumazine photophysics with multiparametric Kamlet–Taft equation. • Solvent basicity (β) contributes maximum towards the hydrogen bonding (HB) effect. • HB interaction occurs at N1 and N3 proton in S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} state, respectively. • IRC calculation for different tautomerization processes both in S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} states. • Process related to riboflavin biosynthesis is thermodynamically feasible. - Abstract: The photophysical properties and tautomerization behavior of neutral lumazine were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and density functional theory calculation. A quantitative estimation of the contributions from different solvatochromic parameters, like solvent polarizibility (π{sup ∗}), hydrogen bond donation (α) and hydrogen bond accepting (β) ability of the solvent, was made using linear free energy relationships based on the Kamlet–Taft equation. The analysis reveals that the hydrogen bond acceptance ability of the solvent is the most important parameter characterizing the excited state behavior of lumazine. Theoretical calculations result predict an extensive charge redistribution of lumazine upon excitation corresponding to the N3 and N1 proton dissociation sites by solvents in the ground and excited states, respectively. Comparison of S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} state potential energy curves constructed for several water mediated tautomerization processes by intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis of lumazine-H{sub 2}O cluster shows that (3,2) and (1,8) hydrogen migrations are the most favorable processes upon excitation.

  15. A moment-convergence method for stochastic analysis of biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiajun; Nie, Qing; Zhou, Tianshou

    2016-05-21

    Traditional moment-closure methods need to assume that high-order cumulants of a probability distribution approximate to zero. However, this strong assumption is not satisfied for many biochemical reaction networks. Here, we introduce convergent moments (defined in mathematics as the coefficients in the Taylor expansion of the probability-generating function at some point) to overcome this drawback of the moment-closure methods. As such, we develop a new analysis method for stochastic chemical kinetics. This method provides an accurate approximation for the master probability equation (MPE). In particular, the connection between low-order convergent moments and rate constants can be more easily derived in terms of explicit and analytical forms, allowing insights that would be difficult to obtain through direct simulation or manipulation of the MPE. In addition, it provides an accurate and efficient way to compute steady-state or transient probability distribution, avoiding the algorithmic difficulty associated with stiffness of the MPE due to large differences in sizes of rate constants. Applications of the method to several systems reveal nontrivial stochastic mechanisms of gene expression dynamics, e.g., intrinsic fluctuations can induce transient bimodality and amplify transient signals, and slow switching between promoter states can increase fluctuations in spatially heterogeneous signals. The overall approach has broad applications in modeling, analysis, and computation of complex biochemical networks with intrinsic noise.

  16. Hybrid Semantic Analysis for Mapping Adverse Drug Reaction Mentions in Tweets to Medical Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadzadeh, Ehsan; Sarker, Abeed; Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2017-01-01

    Social networks, such as Twitter, have become important sources for active monitoring of user-reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Automatic extraction of ADR information can be crucial for healthcare providers, drug manufacturers, and consumers. However, because of the non-standard nature of social media language, automatically extracted ADR mentions need to be mapped to standard forms before they can be used by operational pharmacovigilance systems. We propose a modular natural language processing pipeline for mapping (normalizing) colloquial mentions of ADRs to their corresponding standardized identifiers. We seek to accomplish this task and enable customization of the pipeline so that distinct unlabeled free text resources can be incorporated to use the system for other normalization tasks. Our approach, which we call Hybrid Semantic Analysis (HSA), sequentially employs rule-based and semantic matching algorithms for mapping user-generated mentions to concept IDs in the Unified Medical Language System vocabulary. The semantic matching component of HSA is adaptive in nature and uses a regression model to combine various measures of semantic relatedness and resources to optimize normalization performance on the selected data source. On a publicly available corpus, our normalization method achieves 0.502 recall and 0.823 precision (F-measure: 0.624). Our proposed method outperforms a baseline based on latent semantic analysis and another that uses MetaMap.

  17. A moment-convergence method for stochastic analysis of biochemical reaction networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiajun [School of Mathematics and Computational Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Nie, Qing [Department of Mathematics, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Zhou, Tianshou, E-mail: mcszhtsh@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Mathematics and Computational Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Computational Science and School of Mathematics and Computational Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2016-05-21

    Traditional moment-closure methods need to assume that high-order cumulants of a probability distribution approximate to zero. However, this strong assumption is not satisfied for many biochemical reaction networks. Here, we introduce convergent moments (defined in mathematics as the coefficients in the Taylor expansion of the probability-generating function at some point) to overcome this drawback of the moment-closure methods. As such, we develop a new analysis method for stochastic chemical kinetics. This method provides an accurate approximation for the master probability equation (MPE). In particular, the connection between low-order convergent moments and rate constants can be more easily derived in terms of explicit and analytical forms, allowing insights that would be difficult to obtain through direct simulation or manipulation of the MPE. In addition, it provides an accurate and efficient way to compute steady-state or transient probability distribution, avoiding the algorithmic difficulty associated with stiffness of the MPE due to large differences in sizes of rate constants. Applications of the method to several systems reveal nontrivial stochastic mechanisms of gene expression dynamics, e.g., intrinsic fluctuations can induce transient bimodality and amplify transient signals, and slow switching between promoter states can increase fluctuations in spatially heterogeneous signals. The overall approach has broad applications in modeling, analysis, and computation of complex biochemical networks with intrinsic noise.

  18. Analysis of hepcidin expression: in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction from paraffin sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraoka, Yuhki; Sawada, Tokihiko; Shiraki, Takayuki; Park, Kyunghwa; Sakurai, Yuhichiro; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Kubota, Keiichi

    2012-07-28

    To establish methods for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for hepcidin using RNAs isolated from paraffin-embedded sections and in situ hybridization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Total RNA from paraffin-embedded sections was isolated from 68 paraffin-embedded samples of HCC. Samples came from 54 male and 14 female patients with a mean age of 66.8 ± 7.8 years. Quantitative PCR was performed. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization for hepcidin were also performed. Quantitative PCR for hepcidin using RNAs isolated from paraffin-embedded sections of HCC was performed successfully. The expression level of hepcidin mRNA in cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in non-cancer tissues. A method of in situ hybridization for hepcidin was established successfully, and this demonstrated that hepcidin mRNA was expressed in non-cancerous tissue but absent in cancerous tissue. We have established novel methods for quantitative PCR for hepcidin using RNAs isolated from paraffin-embedded sections and in situ hybridization of HCC.

  19. Quantification of Hydrogen Concentrations in Surface and Interface Layers and Bulk Materials through Depth Profiling with Nuclear Reaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Markus; Ohno, Satoshi; Ogura, Shohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-29

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C reaction is a highly effective method of depth profiling that quantitatively and non-destructively reveals the hydrogen density distribution at surfaces, at interfaces, and in the volume of solid materials with high depth resolution. The technique applies a (15)N ion beam of 6.385 MeV provided by an electrostatic accelerator and specifically detects the (1)H isotope in depths up to about 2 μm from the target surface. Surface H coverages are measured with a sensitivity in the order of ~10(13) cm(-2) (~1% of a typical atomic monolayer density) and H volume concentrations with a detection limit of ~10(18) cm(-3) (~100 at. ppm). The near-surface depth resolution is 2-5 nm for surface-normal (15)N ion incidence onto the target and can be enhanced to values below 1 nm for very flat targets by adopting a surface-grazing incidence geometry. The method is versatile and readily applied to any high vacuum compatible homogeneous material with a smooth surface (no pores). Electrically conductive targets usually tolerate the ion beam irradiation with negligible degradation. Hydrogen quantitation and correct depth analysis require knowledge of the elementary composition (besides hydrogen) and mass density of the target material. Especially in combination with ultra-high vacuum methods for in-situ target preparation and characterization, (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C NRA is ideally suited for hydrogen analysis at atomically controlled surfaces and nanostructured interfaces. We exemplarily demonstrate here the application of (15)N NRA at the MALT Tandem accelerator facility of the University of Tokyo to (1) quantitatively measure the surface coverage and the bulk concentration of hydrogen in the near-surface region of a H2 exposed Pd(110) single crystal, and (2) to determine the depth location and layer density of hydrogen near the interfaces of thin SiO2 films on Si(100).

  20. Scaling analysis in modeling transport and reaction processes a systematic approach to model building and the art of approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, William B

    2007-01-01

    This book is unique as the first effort to expound on the subject of systematic scaling analysis. Not written for a specific discipline, the book targets any reader interested in transport phenomena and reaction processes. The book is logically divided into chapters on the use of systematic scaling analysis in fluid dynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and reaction processes. An integrating chapter is included that considers more complex problems involving combined transport phenomena. Each chapter includes several problems that are explained in considerable detail. These are followed by several worked examples for which the general outline for the scaling is given. Each chapter also includes many practice problems. This book is based on recognizing the value of systematic scaling analysis as a pedagogical method for teaching transport and reaction processes and as a research tool for developing and solving models and in designing experiments. Thus, the book can serve as both a textbook and a reference boo...

  1. The browning value changes and spectral analysis on the Maillard reaction product from glucose and methionine model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baarri, A. N.; Legowo, A. M.; Widayat

    2018-01-01

    D-glucose has been understood to provide the various effect on the reactivity in Maillard reaction resulting in the changes in physical performance of food product. Therefore this research was done to analyse physical appearance of Maillard reaction product made of D-glucose and methionine as a model system. The changes in browning value and spectral analysis model system were determined. The glucose-methionine model system was produced through the heating treatment at 50°C and RH 70% for 24 hours. The data were collected for every three hour using spectrophotometer. As result, browning value was elevated with the increase of heating time and remarkably high if compare to the D-glucose only. Furthermore, the spectral analysis showed that methionine turned the pattern of peak appearance. As conclusion, methionine raised the browning value and changed the pattern of spectral analysis in Maillard reaction model system.

  2. Biomass pyrolysis and combustion integral and differential reaction heats with temperatures using thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiacheng; Igathinathane, C; Yu, Manlu; Pothula, Anand Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Integral reaction heats of switchgrass, big bluestem, and corn stalks were determined using thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC). Iso-conversion differential reaction heats using TGA/DSC pyrolysis and combustion of biomass were not available, despite reports available on heats required and released. A concept of iso-conversion differential reaction heats was used to determine the differential reaction heats of each thermal characteristics segment of these materials. Results showed that the integral reaction heats were endothermic from 30 to 700°C for pyrolysis of switchgrass and big bluestem, but they were exothermic for corn stalks prior to 587°C. However, the integral reaction heats for combustion of the materials followed an endothermic to exothermic transition. The differential reaction heats of switchgrass pyrolysis were predominantly endothermic in the fraction of mass loss (0.0536-0.975), and were exothermic for corn stalks (0.0885-0.850) and big bluestem (0.736-0.919). Study results provided better insight into biomass thermal mechanism. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Performance analysis for bounded persistent disturbances in PD/PID-controlled robotic systems with its experimental demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Hur, Sung-Moon; Oh, Yonghwan

    2018-03-01

    This paper is concerned with performance analysis of proportional-derivative/proportional-integral-derivative (PD/PID) controller for bounded persistent disturbances in a robotic manipulator. Even though the notion of input-to-state stability (ISS) has been widely used to deal with the effect of disturbances in control of a robotic manipulator, the corresponding studies cannot be directly applied to the treatment of persistent disturbances occurred in robotic manipulators. This is because the conventional studies relevant to ISS consider the H∞ performance for robotic systems, which is confined to the treatment of decaying disturbances, i.e. the disturbances those in the L2 space. To deal with the effect of persistent disturbances in robotic systems, we first provide a new treatment of ISS in the L∞ sense because bounded persistent disturbances should be intrinsically regarded as elements of the L∞ space. We next derive state-space representations of trajectory tracking control in the robotic systems which allow us to define the problem formulations more clearly. We then propose a novel control law that has a PD/PID control form, by which the trajectory tracking system satisfies the reformulated ISS. Furthermore, we can obtain a theoretical argument about the L∞ gain from the disturbance to the regulated output through the proposed control law. Finally, experimental studies for a typical 3-degrees of freedom robotic manipulator are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method introduced in this paper.

  4. PIERO ontology for analysis of biochemical transformations: effective implementation of reaction information in the IUBMB enzyme list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotera, Masaaki; Nishimura, Yosuke; Nakagawa, Zen-ichi; Muto, Ai; Moriya, Yuki; Okamoto, Shinobu; Kawashima, Shuichi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2014-12-01

    Genomics is faced with the issue of many partially annotated putative enzyme-encoding genes for which activities have not yet been verified, while metabolomics is faced with the issue of many putative enzyme reactions for which full equations have not been verified. Knowledge of enzymes has been collected by IUBMB, and has been made public as the Enzyme List. To date, however, the terminology of the Enzyme List has not been assessed comprehensively by bioinformatics studies. Instead, most of the bioinformatics studies simply use the identifiers of the enzymes, i.e. the Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers. We investigated the actual usage of terminology throughout the Enzyme List, and demonstrated that the partial characteristics of reactions cannot be retrieved by simply using EC numbers. Thus, we developed a novel ontology, named PIERO, for annotating biochemical transformations as follows. First, the terminology describing enzymatic reactions was retrieved from the Enzyme List, and was grouped into those related to overall reactions and biochemical transformations. Consequently, these terms were mapped onto the actual transformations taken from enzymatic reaction equations. This ontology was linked to Gene Ontology (GO) and EC numbers, allowing the extraction of common partial reaction characteristics from given sets of orthologous genes and the elucidation of possible enzymes from the given transformations. Further future development of the PIERO ontology should enhance the Enzyme List to promote the integration of genomics and metabolomics.

  5. Evaluation of reference gene suitability for quantitative expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in the mandibular condyle of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Xue, Yang; Zhou, Hongzhi; Li, Shouhong; Zhang, Zongmin; Hou, Rui; Ding, Yuxiang; Hu, Kaijin

    2015-10-01

    Reference genes are commonly used as a reliable approach to normalize the results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and to reduce errors in the relative quantification of gene expression. Suitable reference genes belonging to numerous functional classes have been identified for various types of species and tissue. However, little is currently known regarding the most suitable reference genes for bone, specifically for the sheep mandibular condyle. Sheep are important for the study of human bone diseases, particularly for temporomandibular diseases. The present study aimed to identify a set of reference genes suitable for the normalization of qPCR data from the mandibular condyle of sheep. A total of 12 reference genes belonging to various functional classes were selected, and the expression stability of the reference genes was determined in both the normal and fractured area of the sheep mandibular condyle. RefFinder, which integrates the following currently available computational algorithms: geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and the comparative ΔCt method, was used to compare and rank the candidate reference genes. The results obtained from the four methods demonstrated a similar trend: RPL19, ACTB, and PGK1 were the most stably expressed reference genes in the sheep mandibular condyle. As determined by RefFinder comprehensive analysis, the results of the present study suggested that RPL19 is the most suitable reference gene for studies associated with the sheep mandibular condyle. In addition, ACTB and PGK1 may be considered suitable alternatives.

  6. Adverse reactions analysis and prevention of antiseptic drug in the obstetrics and gynecology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongli; Bo, Qing; Zhang, Ying; He, Jing

    2018-05-01

    Antimicrobial agents are widely used in gynecologic inflammation and surgical period, so as to cure some infectious diseases, reduce the chance of surgical incision infection, but at the same time, there are many adverse reactions. The use of nursing interventions in obstetrics and gynecology can significantly reduce the adverse drug reactions in the treatment. The results showed that the incidence of adverse reactions in the observation group was 8.8%, while that in the control group was 15.6%. The incidence of adverse reactions in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). The results showed that the nursing intervention in obstetrics and gynecology could reduce the adverse drug reactions. In a word, the nursing intervention of obstetrics and gynecology can greatly reduce the adverse reaction of antibiotics and has certain application value. It is worth popularizing in clinical practice.

  7. Numerical analysis for Darcy-Forchheimer flow in presence of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ijaz Khan

    Full Text Available A mathematical study is presented to investigate the influences of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions in local similar flow caused by stretching sheet with a non-linear velocity and variable thickness. Porous medium effects are characterized by using Darcy-Forchheimer porous-media. A simple isothermal model of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions is used. The multiphysical boundary value problem is dictated by ten thermophysical parameters: ratio of mass diffusion coefficients, Prandtl number, local inertia coefficient parameter, inverse Darcy number, shape parameter, surface thickness parameter, Hartman number, Homogeneous heat reaction, strength of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Schmidt number. Resulting systems are computed by Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Different shapes of velocity are noticed for n > 1 and n < 1. Keywords: Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions, Non Darcy porous medium, Variable sheet thickness, Homogeneous heat reaction with stoichiometric coefficient, Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method

  8. Analysis of a Buchwald-Hartwig amination: reaction for pharmaceutical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik

    The Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction is widely used in the production of N-arylated amines in the pharmaceutical industry. The reaction is betweenan aryl halogen and a primary or secondary amine in the presence of a base and a homogeneous catalyst giving the desired N-arylated amine. Due to mild...... is to increase the understanding of the chem­ical reaction mechanisms and kinetics for the Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction. Also, to develop methods for application of these mechanisms and kinetics to optimize and scale up an organic synthesis to an industrial phar­maceutical production. The Buchwald...

  9. Analysis of a Buckwald-Hartwig amination: reaction for pharmaceutical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    The Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction is widely used in the production of N-arylated amines in the pharmaceutical industry. The reaction is betweenan aryl halogen and a primary or secondary amine in the presence of a base and a homogeneous catalyst giving the desired N-arylated amine. Due to mild...... is to increase the understanding of the chem­ical reaction mechanisms and kinetics for the Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction. Also, to develop methods for application of these mechanisms and kinetics to optimize and scale up an organic synthesis to an industrial phar­maceutical production. The Buchwald...

  10. Chaos control in the cerium-catalyzed Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction using recurrence quantification analysis measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatoorehchi, Hooman; Zarghami, Reza; Abolghasemi, Hossein; Rach, Randolph

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Theoretical and experimental chaos control for the Belousov–Zhabotinsky-CSTR system. •Application of recurrence analysis quantification for chaos control by feedback loops. •Optimization of determinism and recurrence rate as RQA-based measures. •Accurate solution of the Montanator model by the multi-stage Adomian decomposition method. -- Abstract: Chaos control in the Belousov–Zhabotinsky-CSTR system was investigated theoretically and experimentally by reconstructing the phase space of the cerium (IV) ions concentration time series and then optimizing recurrence quantification analysis measures. The devised feedback loop acting on the reactor inlet flow rate was able to experimentally suppress chaos and drive the system to an almost predictable state with approximately 93% determinism. Similar theoretical results have also been demonstrated in numerical simulations using the four-variable Montanator model as solved by the multistage Adomian decomposition method

  11. Analysis of colorectal cancer and polyp for presence herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus DNA sequences by polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Mehrabani khasraghi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years, it was demonstrated that there is a clear association between the complicated course of colorectal cancer (CRC and the presence of herpes viruses. Despite a great number of published reports, the exact pathogenic role of herpes viruses remains unclear in these patients. The purpose of this study is to explore the prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV and cytomegalovirus (CMV in patients with CRC and polyp in comparison with healthy subjects using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Methods: In this case-control study, 15 biopsies of patients with CRC and 20 colorectal polyp sample were selected. From each patient, two tissue samples were obtained: one sample from malignant tissue, and the other from normal colorectal tissue in an area located 15 cm away from the malignant tissue. Furthermore, 35 samples from healthy people as controls were selected. After DNA extraction, PCR was used to determine HSV and CMV genomes by specific primers. A statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Results: Five CRC patients (33.3% had HSV DNA detected in both the malignant and the matched normal tissue. Five CRC patients (33.3% and seven polyp patients (35.0% had CMV DNA detected in both the malignant and the matched normal tissue. HSV DNA was found in 20% and CMV DNA in 37.1% of samples from healthy people as a control group. Thus, no significant association was observed between the prevalence of HSV and CMV, and an incidence of CRC and polyps according to the location of the samples as compared with the control group. Conclusion: The findings demonstrated that there is no direct molecular evidence to support the association between HSV and CMV and human colorectal malignancies. However, the results from this study do not exclude a possible oncogenic role of these viruses in the neoplastic development of colon cells.

  12. Kinetics Analysis of Synthesis Reaction of Struvite With Air-Flow Continous Vertical Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edahwati, L.; Sutiyono, S.; Muryanto, S.; Jamari, J.; Bayuseno, dan A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Kinetics reaction is a knowledge about a rate of chemical reaction. The differential of the reaction rate can be determined from the reactant material or the formed material. The reaction mechanism of a reactor may include a stage of reaction occurring sequentially during the process of converting the reactants into products. In the determination of reaction kinetics, the order of reaction and the rate constant reaction must be recognized. This study was carried out using air as a stirrer as a medium in the vertical reactor for crystallization of struvite. Stirring is one of the important aspects in struvite crystallization process. Struvite crystals or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrates (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) is commonly formed in reversible reactions and can be generated as an orthorhombic crystal. Air is selected as a stirrer on the existing flow pattern in the reactor determining the reaction kinetics of the crystal from the solution. The experimental study was conducted by mixing an equimolar solution of 0.03 M NH4OH, MgCl2 and H3PO4 with a ratio of 1: 1: 1. The crystallization process of the mixed solution was observed in an inside reactor at the flow rate ranges of 16-38 ml/min and the temperature of 30°C was selected in the study. The air inlet rate was kept constant at 0.25 liters/min. The pH solution was adjusted to be 8, 9 and 10 by dropping wisely of 1 N KOH solution. The crystallization kinetics was examined until the steady state of the reaction was reached. The precipitates were filtered and dried at a temperature for subsequent material characterization, including Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and XRD (X-Ray diffraction) method. The results show that higher flow rate leads to less mass of struvite.

  13. Unbiased proteomics analysis demonstrates significant variability in mucosal immune factor expression depending on the site and method of collection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenzie M Birse

    Full Text Available Female genital tract secretions are commonly sampled by lavage of the ectocervix and vaginal vault or via a sponge inserted into the endocervix for evaluating inflammation status and immune factors critical for HIV microbicide and vaccine studies. This study uses a proteomics approach to comprehensively compare the efficacy of these methods, which sample from different compartments of the female genital tract, for the collection of immune factors. Matching sponge and lavage samples were collected from 10 healthy women and were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Data was analyzed by a combination of differential protein expression analysis, hierarchical clustering and pathway analysis. Of the 385 proteins identified, endocervical sponge samples collected nearly twice as many unique proteins as cervicovaginal lavage (111 vs. 61 with 55% of proteins common to both (213. Each method/site identified 73 unique proteins that have roles in host immunity according to their gene ontology. Sponge samples enriched for specific inflammation pathways including acute phase response proteins (p = 3.37×10(-24 and LXR/RXR immune activation pathways (p = 8.82×10(-22 while the role IL-17A in psoriasis pathway (p = 5.98×10(-4 and the complement system pathway (p = 3.91×10(-3 were enriched in lavage samples. Many host defense factors were differentially enriched (p<0.05 between sites including known/potential antimicrobial factors (n = 21, S100 proteins (n = 9, and immune regulatory factors such as serpins (n = 7. Immunoglobulins (n = 6 were collected at comparable levels in abundance in each site although 25% of those identified were unique to sponge samples. This study demonstrates significant differences in types and quantities of immune factors and inflammation pathways collected by each sampling technique. Therefore, clinical studies that measure mucosal immune activation or factors assessing HIV transmission should utilize

  14. [Incidence rate of adverse reaction/event by Qingkailing injection: a Meta-analysis of single rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Chun-ling; Xie, Yan-ming; Li, Ming-quan; Wang, Lian-xin; Liao, Xing

    2015-12-01

    To systematically review the incidence rate of adverse drug reaction/event by Qingkailing injection. Such databases as the PubMed, EMbase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, VIP WanFang data and CBM were searched by computer from foundation to July 30, 2015. Two reviewers independently screened literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted data and cross check data. Then, Meta-analysis was performed by using the R 3.2.0 software, subgroup sensitivity analysis was performed based on age, mode of medicine, observation time and research quality. Sixty-three studies involving 9,793 patients with Qingkailing injection were included, 367 cases of adverse reactions/events were reported in total. The incidence rate of adverse reaction in skin and mucosa group was 2% [95% CI (0.02; 0.03)]; the digestive system adverse reaction was 6% [95% CI(0.05; 0.07); the injection site adverse reaction was 4% [95% CI (0.02; 0.07)]. In the digestive system as the main types of adverse reactions/events, incidence of children and adults were 4.6% [0.021 1; 0.097 7] and 6.9% [0.053 5; 0.089 8], respectively. Adverse reactions to skin and mucous membrane damage as the main performance/event type, the observation time > 7 days and ≤ 7 days incidence of 3% [0.012 9; 0.068 3] and 1.9% [0.007 8; 0.046 1], respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that different types of adverse reactions, combination in the incidence of adverse reactions/events were higher than that of single drug, the difference was statistically significant (P reactions occur, and clinical rational drug use, such as combination, age and other fators, and the influence factors vary in different populations. Therefore, clinical doctors for children and the elderly use special care was required for a clear and open spirit injection, the implementation of individualized medication.

  15. Market reaction to grouping equities in stock markets: An empirical analysis on Borsa Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Yildiz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to investigate the market reaction to stock grouping announcements in Borsa Istanbul which requires stocks to be classified into groups “A”, “B” and “C” according to their market capitalization and floating rates. By utilizing event study analysis, our results suggest that grouping announcements have significant effect on stock prices and trading volume. The event day positive (negative relationship between abnormal return and volume for the upgraded (downgraded stocks supports the downward sloping demand curve hypothesis. Moreover, findings also suggest that stocks which are upgraded to Group A are exposed to more attention which is in line with the attention hypothesis. The reverse is valid for the downgraded firms. We find no evidence of price reversals and long-term symmetrical liquidity effect which lead us to reject price pressure and liquidity hypotheses. Finally, we reach controversial evidence for the information hypothesis. Keywords: Equity grouping, Regulation, Price and volume effects, Jel Classification: G11, G12, G14

  16. Impacts of heterogeneous reactions to atmospheric peroxides: Observations and budget analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Mengru; Chen, Zhongming; Shen, Hengqing; Li, Huan; Wu, Huihui; Wang, Yin

    2018-06-01

    Atmospheric peroxides play important roles in atmospheric chemistry, acting as reactive oxidants and reservoirs of HOX and ROX radicals. Field measurements of atmospheric peroxides were conducted over urban Beijing from 2015 to 2016, including dust storm days, haze days and different seasons. We employed a box model based on RACM2 mechanism to conduct concentration simulation and budget analysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and peroxyacetic acid (PAA). In this study, heterogeneous reaction is found to be a significant sink for atmospheric H2O2 and PAA in urban Beijing. Here, we recommend a suitable uptake coefficient formula considering the water effect for model research of peroxides. It is found that H2O2 and PAA unexpectedly maintained considerable concentrations on haze days, even higher than that on non-haze days. This phenomenon is mainly ascribed to relatively high levels of volatile organic compounds and ozone on haze days. In addition, high levels of water vapor in pollution episode can promote not only the heterogeneous uptake to aerosol phase but also the production of H2O2. Atmospheric PAA formation is suggested to be sensitive to alkenes and NOX in urban Beijing. In particular, with the help of peroxides, sulfate formation rate from heterogeneous uptake could increase by ∼4 times on haze days, indicating the potential effect of peroxides on enhancement of aerosol oxidative property and secondary sulfate formation.

  17. Reporting patterns of adverse drug reactions over recent years in China: analysis from publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-jing; Ye, Xiao-fei; Wang, Xing-xing; Wang, Jing; Shi, Wen-tao; Gao, Qing-bin; Zhang, Tian-yi; Xu, Jin-fang; Zhu, Tian-tian; He, Jia

    2015-02-01

    The goal of this study was to clarify the reporting patterns of self-reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in China. A variety of sources were searched, including the official website of China FDA, the national center for ADR monitoring center, publications from PubMed, and so on. We retrieved the relevant information and made descriptive and comparative analysis from the year 2009 to 2013. The ADR reporting numbers were 638,996, 692,904, 852,799, 1,200,000 and 1,317,000 from 2009 to 2013, respectively. Healthcare professionals contributed significantly, and their proportion always exceeded 80% before 2012. The average report per million inhabitants has increased from 479 to 983 from 2009 to 2013. However, the proportion of new or serious report was always below 25%. The reports mainly concern anti-infective agents and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), especially TCM injection. The proportion of ADR reports in geriatric patients has increased for 4 consecutive years. ADR report numbers and reporting rates in China are on the rise. However, the proportion of new or serious reports as well as the proportion of reports contributed by consumers and pharmaceutical companies are still quite low. More attention should be paid to the elderly, anti-infective agents and TCM, especially TCM injections.

  18. DFT analysis of the reaction paths of formaldehyde decomposition on silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Alejandro; Haynes, Brian S

    2009-07-16

    Periodic density functional theory is used to study the dehydrogenation of formaldehyde (CH(2)O) on the Ag(111) surface and in the presence of adsorbed oxygen or hydroxyl species. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of elementary surface reactions have been determined. The dehydrogenation of CH(2)O on clean Ag(111) is thermodynamically and kinetically unfavorable. In particular, the activation energy for the first C-H bond scission of adsorbed CH(2)O (25.8 kcal mol(-1)) greatly exceeds the desorption energy for molecular CH(2)O (2.5 kcal mol(-1)). Surface oxygen promotes the destruction of CH(2)O through the formation of CH(2)O(2), which readily decomposes to CHO(2) and then in turn to CO(2) and adsorbed hydrogen. Analysis of site selectivity shows that CH(2)O(2), CHO(2), and CHO are strongly bound to the surface through the bridge sites, whereas CO and CO(2) are weakly adsorbed with no strong preference for a particular surface site. Dissociation of CO and CO(2) on the Ag(111) surface is highly activated and therefore unfavorable with respect to their molecular desorption.

  19. Fission mode analysis of the reaction 237Np(n,f) - possibilities and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegler, P.

    1996-01-01

    Fission fragment properties for the reaction 237 Np(n,f) have been measured at the Van de Graaff Laboratory of the IRMM. Using a double gridded ionization chamber the mass, kinetic energy and the angular distribution for both fission fragments could be determined simultaneously for an incident neutron energy range from E n =0.3 MeV upto E n =5.5 MeV. Complete datasets have been acquired for 13 different neutron energies covering sub barrier fission as well as fission in the plateau region. A detailed analysis of the fragment distributions and the respective momenta has been carried out, checking the coherence against the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. The consideration of multi-modal fission offers an improved possibility for the description of the fragment distributions backed up by theoretical calculations on the basis of the multi-model random-neck rupture model of Brosa, Grossmann and Mueller. The changes of the fission fragment properties under investigation are completely described and an interpretation of the findings is presented. (author)

  20. Deuterium depth profiling in JT-60U W-shaped divertor tiles by nuclear reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Ochiai, K.; Masaki, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Kutsukake, C.; Arai, T.; Nishitani, T.; Miya, N.

    2006-01-01

    Deuterium concentrations and depth profiles in plasma-facing graphite tiles used in the divertor of JAERI Tokamak-60 Upgrade (JT-60U) were investigated by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The highest deuterium concentration of D/ 12 C of 0.053 was found in the outer dome wing tile, where the deuterium accumulated probably through the deuterium-carbon co-deposition. In the outer and inner divertor target tiles, the D/ 12 C data were lower than 0.006. Additionally, the maximum (H + D)/ 12 C in the dome top tile was estimated to be 0.023 from the results of NRA and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Orbit following Monte-Carlo (OFMC) simulation showed energetic deuterons caused by neutral beam injections (NBI) were implanted into the dome region with high heat flux. Furthermore, the surface temperature and conditions such as deposition and erosion significantly influenced the accumulation process of deuterium. The deuterium depth profile, scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation and OFMC simulation indicated the deuterium was considered to accumulate through three processes: the deuterium-carbon co-deposition, the implantation of energetic deuterons and the deuterium diffusion into the bulk

  1. Kinetic analysis of the reactions of hypobromous acid with protein components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    available for HOBr. In this study, rate constants for reaction of HOBr with protein components have been determined. The second-order rate constants (22 degrees C, pH 7.4) for reaction with protein sites vary by 8 orders of magnitude and decrease in the order Cys > Trp approximately Met approximately His...

  2. Venom immunotherapy for preventing allergic reactions to insect stings : a systematic review and health economic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyle, R.; Elremeli, M.; Cherry, M.; Oude Elberink, J.N.G.; Bulsara, M.; Mahon, J.; Daniels, M.; Hockenhull, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Venom immunotherapy (VIT) is commonly used for preventing further allergic reactions to insect stings in people who have had a sting reaction. The efficacy and safety of this treatment has not previously been assessed by a high-quality systematic review. Objectives To assess the effects

  3. Ene-ene-yne Reactions: Activation Strain Analysis and Role of Aromaticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, I.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.; Cossío, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    The trend in reactivity of the thermal cycloisomerization reactions of 1,3-hexadien-5-ynes, A=B-C=D-E≡F, were explored and analyzed by using density functional theory at the M06-2X/def2-TZVPP level. These reactions proceed through formally aromatic transition states to form a bent-allene

  4. Compilation and R-matrix analysis of Big Bang nuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre; Adahchour, Abderrahim; Angulo, Carmen; Coc, Alain; Vangioni-Flam, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    We use the R-matrix theory to fit low-energy data on nuclear reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Special attention is paid to the rate uncertainties which are evaluated on statistical grounds. We provide S factors and reaction rates in tabular and graphical formats

  5. Nanoscale studies of cement chemistry with 15N resonance reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey S.; Livingston, Richard A.; Rolfs, Claus; Becker, Hans-Werner; Kubsky, Stefan; Spillane, Timothy; Castellote, Marta; Viedma, Paloma G. de

    2005-01-01

    Analyses of materials with ion beams have proven to be a valuable technique for describing the spatial distributions of specific elements in host materials. We have applied this technique using the 15 N(p, αγ) 12 C reaction to study the time dependence of the chemical reactions involved in the curing of cement. By using the Dynamitron Tandem accelerator at the Ruhr Universitaet, Bochum, Germany, we have been able to achieve a few nanometer spatial resolution at the surface of cement grains and to study the hydrogen distributions to a depth of about 2 μm. By applying a technique for stopping the chemical reactions at arbitrary times, the time dependence of the chemical reactions involving specific components of cement can be investigated. In addition, the effects of additives on the chemical reactions have been studied, as have materials that are components of concrete

  6. Nanoscale studies of cement chemistry with {sup 15}N resonance reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey S. [University of Connecticut, Department of Physics, Unit 3046, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States)]. E-mail: schweitz@phys.uconn.edu; Livingston, Richard A. [Federal Highway Administration, HRDI-05, 6300 Georgetown Pike McLean, VA 22101 (United States); Rolfs, Claus [Institut fuer Physik mit Ionenstrahlen, Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum Universitaetsstr. 150, Gebaeude NB 3, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Becker, Hans-Werner [Institut fuer Physik mit Ionenstrahlen, Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum Universitaetsstr. 150, Gebaeude NB 3, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Kubsky, Stefan [Institut fuer Physik mit Ionenstrahlen, Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum Universitaetsstr. 150, Gebaeude NB 3, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Spillane, Timothy [University of Connecticut, Department of Physics, Unit 3046, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States); Castellote, Marta [Institute of Construction Science ' Eduardo Torroja' (CSIC), Serrano Galvache no. 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Viedma, Paloma G. de [Institute of Construction Science ' Eduardo Torroja' (CSIC), Serrano Galvache no. 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-12-15

    Analyses of materials with ion beams have proven to be a valuable technique for describing the spatial distributions of specific elements in host materials. We have applied this technique using the {sup 15}N(p, {alpha}{gamma}){sup 12}C reaction to study the time dependence of the chemical reactions involved in the curing of cement. By using the Dynamitron Tandem accelerator at the Ruhr Universitaet, Bochum, Germany, we have been able to achieve a few nanometer spatial resolution at the surface of cement grains and to study the hydrogen distributions to a depth of about 2 {mu}m. By applying a technique for stopping the chemical reactions at arbitrary times, the time dependence of the chemical reactions involving specific components of cement can be investigated. In addition, the effects of additives on the chemical reactions have been studied, as have materials that are components of concrete.

  7. Computer aided design, analysis and experimental investigation of membrane assisted batch reaction-separation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitkowski, Piotr Tomasz; Buchaly, Carsten; Kreis, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Membrane assisted batch reaction operation offers an interesting option for equilibrium limited reaction systems in chemical and biochemical manufacturing by selective removal of one of the products and thereby increasing the product yield. The design of such hybrid systems need to take into acco......Membrane assisted batch reaction operation offers an interesting option for equilibrium limited reaction systems in chemical and biochemical manufacturing by selective removal of one of the products and thereby increasing the product yield. The design of such hybrid systems need to take...... into account the performance of each constituent element and the optimisation of the design must take into consideration their interdependency. In this paper use of a membrane, to assist in the synthesis of propyl-propionate is investigated through the use of a hybrid process design framework, which consists...... and separation functionalities and to design/analyse the hybrid scheme. The generated hybrid scheme has been validated through experiments involving an esterification reaction....

  8. The Quality of Clinical Information in Adverse Drug Reaction Reports by Patients and Healthcare Professionals: A Retrospective Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfes, Leàn; van Hunsel, Florence; van der Linden, Laura; Taxis, Katja; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    2017-07-01

    Clinical information is needed to assess the causal relationship between a drug and an adverse drug reaction (ADR) in a reliable way. Little is known about the level of relevant clinical information about the ADRs reported by patients. The aim was to determine to what extent patients report relevant clinical information about an ADR compared with their healthcare professional. A retrospective analysis of all ADR reports on the same case, i.e., cases with a report from both the patient and the patient's healthcare professional, selected from the database of the Dutch Pharmacovigilance Center Lareb, was conducted. The extent to which relevant clinical information was reported was assessed by trained pharmacovigilance assessors, using a structured tool. The following four domains were assessed: ADR, chronology, suspected drug, and patient characteristics. For each domain, the proportion of reported information in relation to information deemed relevant was calculated. An average score of all relevant domains was determined and categorized as poorly (≤45%), moderately (from 46 to 74%) or well (≥75%) reported. Data were analyzed using a paired sample t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. A total of 197 cases were included. In 107 cases (54.3%), patients and healthcare professionals reported a similar level of clinical information. Statistical analysis demonstrated no overall differences between the groups (p = 0.126). In a unique study of cases of ADRs reported by patients and healthcare professionals, we found that patients report clinical information at a similar level as their healthcare professional. For an optimal pharmacovigilance, both healthcare professionals and patient should be encouraged to report.

  9. Depressurization accident analysis of MPBR by PBRSIM with chemical reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Hee Cheon; Kadak, A. C.

    2002-01-01

    The simple model for natural circulation is implemented into PBR S IM to provide air inlet velocity from the containment air space. For the friction and form loss only the pebble region is considered conservatively modeling laminar flow through a packed bed. For the chemical reaction model of PBR S IM the oxidation rate is determined as the minimum value of three mechanisms estimated at each time step: oxygen mass flow rate entering the bottom of the reflector, oxidation rate by kinetics, and oxygen mass flow rate arriving at the graphite surface by diffusion. Oxygen mass flux arriving at the graphite surface by diffusion is estimated based on energy-mass analogy. Two types of exothermic chemical reaction are considered: (C + zO 2 → xCO + yCO 2 ) and (2CO + O 2 2CO 2 ). The heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reaction rates by kinetics are determined by INEEL and Bruno correlations, respectively. The instantaneous depressurization accident of MPBR is simulated using PBR S IM with chemical model. The air inlet velocity is initially rapidly dropped within 10 hr and reaches a saturation value of about 1.5cm/s. The oxidation rate by the diffusion process becomes lower than that by the chemical kinetics above 600K. The maximum pebble bed temperatures without and with chemical reaction reach the peak values of 1560 and 1617 .deg. C at 80 hr and 92 hr, respectively. As the averaged temperatures in the bottom reflector and the pebble bed regions increase with time, (C+1/2O2 ->CO) reaction becomes dominant over (C+O 2 →CO 2 ) reaction. Also, the CO generated by (C+1/2O 2 →CO) reaction will be consumed by (2CO+O 2 →2CO 2 ) reaction and the energy homogeneously generated by this CO depletion reaction becomes dominant over the heterogeneous reaction

  10. Investigation of structural properties associated with alkali-silica reaction by means of macro- and micro-structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Xiangyin; Fournier, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    Structural properties associated with alkali-silica reaction were systematically investigated by means of macro-structural accelerated mortar prism expansion levels testing, combined with micro-structural analysis. One part of this study is to determine the reactivity of the aggregate by means of accelerated mortar bar tests, and also to evaluate perlite aggregate constituents, especially the presence of deleterious components and find main causes of the alkali-silica reaction, which was based on the petrographic studies by optical microscope and the implication of X-ray diffraction on the aggregate. Results implied that the aggregate was highly alkali-silica reactive and the main micro-crystalline quartz-intermediate character and matrix that is mainly composed of chalcedony are potentially suitable for alkali-silica reaction. The other part is to study the long-term effect of lithium salts against alkali-silica reaction by testing accelerated mortar prism expansion levels. The macro-structural results were also consistent with the micro-structural mechanisms of alkali-silica reaction of mortar prisms containing this aggregate and the effect of chemical admixtures by means of the methods of scanning electron microscope-X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was indicated by these techniques that lithium salts, which were introduced into concrete containing reactive aggregate at the mixing stage, suppressed the alkali-silica reaction by producing non-expansive crystalline materials

  11. Measurement and analysis of the reaction π-p→π-π+n at 63 GeV incident momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, S.C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The measurement and analysis of the reaction π - p→π - π + n at 63.2 GeV incident momentum is described. The aim of the experiment was to measure the s-dependence of the production mechanism and to search for high spin resonances in the ππ system. (Auth.)

  12. Analysis of gas absorption to a thin liquid film in the presence of a zero-order chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed theoretical analysis of the process of gas absorption to a thin liquid film adjacent to a horizontal rotating disk. The film is formed by the impingement of a controlled liquid jet at the center of the disk and subsequent radial spreading of liquid along the disk. The chemical reaction between the gas and the liquid film can be expressed as a zero-order homogeneous reaction. The process was modeled by establishing equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and species concentration and solving them analytically. A scaling analysis was used to determine dominant transport processes. Appropriate boundary conditions were used to solve these equations to develop expressions for the local concentration of gas across the thickness of the film and distributions of film height, bulk concentration, and Sherwood number along the radius of the disk. The partial differential equation for species concentration was solved using the separation of variables technique along with the Duhamel's theorem and the final analytical solution was expressed using confluent hypergeometric functions. Tables for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are presented for a number of reaction rate constants. A parametric study was performed using Reynolds number, Ekman number, and dimensionless reaction rate as parameters. At all radial locations, Sherwood number increased with Reynolds number (flow rate) as well as Ekman number (rate of rotation). The enhancement of mass transfer due to chemical reaction was found to be small when compared to the case of no reaction (pure absorption), but the enhancement factor was very significant when compared to pure absorption in a stagnant liquid film. The zero-order reaction processes considered in the present investigation included the absorption of oxygen in aqueous alkaline solutions of sodiumdithionite and rhodium complex catalyzed carbonylation of methanol. Present analytical results were compared to previous theoretical

  13. Analysis of fluorine by nuclear reactions and applications to human dental enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroobants, J.; Bodart, F.; Deconninck, G.; Demortier, G.; Nicolas, G.

    Nuclear reactions induced on Fluorine by low energy protons are investigated, thick target excitation yield curves and tables for 19 F(p,p'γ) 19 F and 19 F(p,αγ) 16 O reactions are given between 0.3 and 2.5 MeV. Interferences from other nuclear reactions, detection limits and sensitivity for Fluorine detection are investigated. After a wide investigation of the repartition of Fluorine in tooth enamel it is concluded that there is an equilibrium of the concentrations between tooth and saliva which is rapidly restored after the perturbation introduced by the external treatments. (author)

  14. Detailed analysis of allergic cutaneous reactions to spinal cord stimulator devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhry ZA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Zeshan Ahmed Chaudhry,1 Umer Najib,2 Zahid H Bajwa,3 W Carl Jacobs,4 Javed Sheikh,5 Thomas T Simopoulos61Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Robert C Byrd Health Sciences Center of West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA; 3Boston Headache Institute, Waltham, MA, USA; 4Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 5Department of Medicine, Allergy and Immunology, 6Department of Anesthesia, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brookline, MA, USAAbstract: The use of spinal cord stimulation (SCS devices to treat chronic, refractory neuropathic pain continues to expand in application. While device-related complications have been well described, inflammatory reactions to the components of these devices remain underreported. In contrast, hypersensitivity reactions associated with other implanted therapies, such as endovascular and cardiac rhythm devices, have been detailed. The purpose of this case series is to describe the clinical presentation and course of inflammatory reactions as well as the histology of these reactions. All patients required removal of the entire device after developing inflammatory reactions over a time course of 1–3 months. Two patients developed a foreign body reaction in the lead insertion wound as well as at the implantable pulse generator site, with histology positive for giant cells. One patient developed an inflammatory dermatitis on the flank and abdomen that resolved with topical hydrocortisone. “In vivo” testing with a lead extension fragment placed in the buttock resulted in a negative reaction followed by successful reimplantation of an SCS device. Inflammatory reactions to SCS devices can manifest as contact dermatitis, granuloma formation, or foreign body reactions with giant cell formation. Tissue diagnosis is essential, and

  15. Collection of human reaction times and supporting health related data for analysis of cognitive and physical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Brůha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Smoking, excessive drinking, overeating and physical inactivity are well-established risk factors decreasing human physical performance. Moreover, epidemiological work has identified modifiable lifestyle factors, such as poor diet and physical and cognitive inactivity that are associated with the risk of reduced cognitive performance. Definition, collection and annotation of human reaction times and suitable health related data and metadata provides researchers with a necessary source for further analysis of human physical and cognitive performance. The collection of human reaction times and supporting health related data was obtained from two groups comprising together 349 people of all ages - the visitors of the Days of Science and Technology 2016 held on the Pilsen central square and members of the Mensa Czech Republic visiting the neuroinformatics lab at the University of West Bohemia. Each provided dataset contains a complete or partial set of data obtained from the following measurements: hands and legs reaction times, color vision, spirometry, electrocardiography, blood pressure, blood glucose, body proportions and flexibility. It also provides a sufficient set of metadata (age, gender and summary of the participant's current life style and health to allow researchers to perform further analysis. This article has two main aims. The first aim is to provide a well annotated collection of human reaction times and health related data that is suitable for further analysis of lifestyle and human cognitive and physical performance. This data collection is complemented with a preliminarily statistical evaluation. The second aim is to present a procedure of efficient acquisition of human reaction times and supporting health related data in non-lab and lab conditions. Keywords: Reaction time, Health related data, Cognitive and physical performance, Chronic disease, Data acquisition, Data collection, Software for data collection

  16. Demonstration of statistical approaches to identify component's ageing by operational data analysis-A case study for the ageing PSA network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionov, Andrei; Atwood, Corwin L.; Kirchsteiger, Christian; Patrik, Milan

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents some results of a case study on 'Demonstration of statistical approaches to identify the component's ageing by operational data analysis', which was done in the frame of the EC JRC Ageing PSA Network. Several techniques: visual evaluation, nonparametric and parametric hypothesis tests, were proposed and applied in order to demonstrate the capacity, advantages and limitations of statistical approaches to identify the component's ageing by operational data analysis. Engineering considerations are out of the scope of the present study

  17. Study on reaction mechanism by analysis of kinetic energy spectra of light particles and formation of final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Nasirov, A. K.; Anastasi, A.; Curciarello, F.; Fazio, G.

    2018-05-01

    The sensitivity of reaction mechanism in the formation of compound nucleus (CN) by the analysis of kinetic energy spectra of light particles and of reaction products are shown. The dependence of the P CN fusion probability of reactants and W sur survival probability of CN against fission at its deexcitation on the mass and charge symmetries in the entrance channel of heavy-ion collisions, as well as on the neutron numbers is discussed. The possibility of conducting a complex program of investigations of the complete fusion by reliable ways depends on the detailed and refined methods of experimental and theoretical analyses.

  18. Multipole decomposition analysis of the 27Al, 90Zr, 208Pb(p, n) reactions at 295 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, T.; Greenfield, M.B.; Koori, N.; Okihana, A.; Hatanaka, K.

    1996-01-01

    Differential cross sections at θ lab between 0 and 15 and the polarization transfer D NN at zero degrees for the 27 Al, 90 Zr, 208 Pb(p,n) reactions are measured at a bombarding energy of 295 MeV. A multipole decomposition (MD) technique is applied to extract L=0, L=1, and L≥2 contributions to the cross sections. The summed Gamow-Teller strength B(GT) is compared with shell-model calculations for the 27 Al(p,n) and 90 Zr(p,n) reactions. The usefulness of the polarization transfer observable in the MD analysis is discussed. (orig.)

  19. A Theoretical Analysis of the Reaction Between Ethyl and Molecular Oxygen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, James A; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Robertson, Struan H

    2000-01-01

    Using a combination of electronic-structure theory, variational transition-state theory, and solutions to the time-dependent master equation, we have studied the kinetics of the reaction between ethyl...

  20. Prediction of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Reaction Wheel Assembly Angular Momentum Using Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHart, Russell

    2017-01-01

    This study determines the feasibility of creating a tool that can accurately predict Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) reaction wheel assembly (RWA) angular momentum, weeks or even months into the future. LRO is a three-axis stabilized spacecraft that was launched on June 18, 2009. While typically nadir-pointing, LRO conducts many types of slews to enable novel science collection. Momentum unloads have historically been performed approximately once every two weeks with the goal of maintaining system total angular momentum below 70 Nms; however flight experience shows the models developed before launch are overly conservative, with many momentum unloads being performed before system angular momentum surpasses 50 Nms. A more accurate model of RWA angular momentum growth would improve momentum unload scheduling and decrease the frequency of these unloads. Since some LRO instruments must be deactivated during momentum unloads and in the case of one instrument, decontaminated for 24 hours there after a decrease in the frequency of unloads increases science collection. This study develops a new model to predict LRO RWA angular momentum. Regression analysis of data from October 2014 to October 2015 was used to develop relationships between solar beta angle, slew specifications, and RWA angular momentum growth. The resulting model predicts RWA angular momentum using input solar beta angle and mission schedule data. This model was used to predict RWA angular momentum from October 2013 to October 2014. Predictions agree well with telemetry; of the 23 momentum unloads performed from October 2013 to October 2014, the mean and median magnitude of the RWA total angular momentum prediction error at the time of the momentum unloads were 3.7 and 2.7 Nms, respectively. The magnitude of the largest RWA total angular momentum prediction error was 10.6 Nms. Development of a tool that uses the models presented herein is currently underway.

  1. An analysis of serious adverse drug reactions at a tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal Prajapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the various aspects of serious adverse drug reactions (serious ADRs such as clinical presentation, causality, severity, and preventability occurring in a hospital setting. Materials and Methods: All serious ADRs reported from January 2010 to May 2015 at ADR Monitoring Centre, Department of Pharmacology, B. J. Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, were selected as per the World health Organization -Uppsala Monitoring Center (WHO-UMC criteria. A retrospective analysis was carried out for clinical presentation, causality (as per the WHO-UMC scale and Naranjo′s algorithm, severity (Hartwig and Siegel scale, and preventability (Schumock and Thornton criteria. Results: Out of 2977 ADRs reported, 375 were serious in nature. The most common clinical presentation involved was skin and appendageal disorders (71, 18.9%. The common causal drug group was antitubercular (129, 34.4% followed by antiretroviral (76, 20.3% agents. The criteria for the majority of serious ADRs were intervention to prevent permanent impairment or damage (164, 43.7% followed by hospitalization (158, 42.1%. Majority of the serious ADRs were continuing (191, 50.9% at the time of reporting, few recovered (101, 26.9%, and two were fatal. The majority of serious ADRs were categorized as possible (182, 48.8% followed by probable (173, 46.1% in nature. Conclusion: Antitubercular, antiretroviral, and antimicrobial drugs were the most common causal drug groups for serious ADRs. This calls for robust ADR monitoring system and education of patients and prescribers for identification and effective management.

  2. Cobalt sulfide thin films: Chemical growth, reaction kinetics and microstructural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamble, S.S. [Thin Film and Solar Studies Research Laboratory, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India); Sikora, Andrzej [Electrotechnical Institute, Division of Electrotechnology and Materials Science, ul. M Skłodowskiej-Curie 55/61, 50-369 Wroclaw (Poland); Pawar, S.T. [Thin Film and Solar Studies Research Laboratory, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India); Maldar, N.N. [Polymer Chemistry Department, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India); Deshmukh, L.P., E-mail: laldeshmukh@gmail.com [Thin Film and Solar Studies Research Laboratory, Solapur University, Solapur 413 255, M.S. (India)

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • CoS thin films were deposited from an aqueous alkaline bath. • The CoS thin films are polycrystalline with hexagonal crystal structure. • Microstructure consists of multifaceted webbed network of elongated CoS crystallites. • MFM images revealed presence of magnetic regions mimicking surface topography. • Influence of the complexing agents is also stressed by the bandgap measurements. - Abstract: CoS thin films were successfully deposited from an aqueous alkaline bath containing ammonia and TEA as the complexing agents. Under the pre-optimized conditions (temperature = 80 ± 0.5 °C, speed of the substrate rotation = 65 ± 2 rpm and deposition period = 90 min), ammonia and TEA quantities in the reaction bath were found to play a decisive role in the final product yield. Highly uniform, dark sea-green colored and tightly adherent deposits were obtained at our experimental conditions. As-obtained CoS thin films were polycrystalline in nature with hexagonal class of crystal system as derived from the X-ray diffraction analysis. Complex multifaceted webbed network of as-grown CoS crystals elongated and threaded into each other were observed through a scanning electron microscope. Atomic force micrographs revealed collapsing of the hillocks and filling of the valleys triggering decrease in the RMS roughness for increased TEA and NH{sub 3} quantities. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was employed to study surface topography in terms of magnetic mapping. MFM images highlighted the existence of the magnetic clusters imitating topography. Broad absorption edge with high absorption coefficient (α ≈ 10{sup 4} cm{sup −1}) was observed for as-grown CoS thin films. Determined values of the optical bandgaps revealed influence of complexing environment on the final product.

  3. Perspectives on Queer Music Therapy: A Qualitative Analysis of Music Therapists' Reactions to Radically Inclusive Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggan, Catherine E; Grzanka, Patrick R; Bain, Candice L

    2018-01-13

    The queer music therapy model was designed by Bain, Grzanka, and Crowe in 2016 as a novel therapeutic approach to affirm and empower LGBTQ+ identity through music. No data have been generated on how this model might actually be implemented, or the strengths and limitations of the model according to music therapy professionals. The purpose of this study was to build on Bain and colleagues' work by collecting music therapists' perspectives on queer music therapy and using these data to critically evaluate the model. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with twelve music therapists who identify as LGBTQ+ or have experience working with LGBTQ+ clients. Participants were prompted to discuss their music therapy backgrounds, experiences with LGBTQ+ clients, and reactions to the queer music therapy model. Interviews were analyzed using a critical discourse analysis approach. The qualitative findings revealed major strengths of the queer music therapy model and ways in which it could be improved by attending to: (a) the structural limitations of the music therapy discipline, including the demographic composition of the field and lack of critical perspectives in music therapy training; and (b) intersectional considerations of ageism and ableism within diverse LGBTQ+ populations. Queer music therapy has positive implications for future work with LGBTQ+ individuals, but it must more substantively integrate intersectionality theory to serve a diverse range of LGBTQ+ clients. Further, it must critically attend to the structural limitations of the music therapy discipline itself. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of American Music Therapy Association. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Analysis of a nuclear backscattering and reaction data by the method of convolution integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.B.

    1979-02-01

    A quantitative description of nuclear backscattering and reaction processes is made. Various formulas pertinent to nuclear microanalysis are assembled in a manner useful for experimental application. Convolution integrals relating profiles of atoms in a metal substrate to the nuclear reaction spectra obtained in the laboratory are described and computed. Energy straggling and multiple scattering are explicitly included and shown to be important. Examples of the application of the method to simple backscattering, oxide films, and implanted gas are discussed. 7 figures, 1 table

  5. Analysis of π+p→π0(eta)Δ++ and related reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Fazal-e-Aleem; Rafique, Muhammad

    1984-01-01

    The differential and integrated cross sections and density matrix elements for the reactions π + p→ π 0 (eta)Δ ++ and the reactions π - p→π - Δ + , K + p→K 0 Δ ++ and K - n→K-bar 0 Δ - which are related to them by SU(2) and SU(3) are fitted by using a simple Regge pole model with phenomenological residue functions. (author)

  6. Development of analysis model for mid and long-term effects of sodium water reaction event in LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Seong O; Kim, Yeon Sik; Kim, Eui Kwang; Wi, Myung Hwan

    2002-04-01

    The Sodium-Water Reaction(SWR) is important in the design consideration of a LMR steam generator. To develop the analysis code for long-term effects of SWR, investigation on the characteristics of various SWR analysis code and the assessment of an analysis model for long term effects were performed. In an event of SWR, pressure spikes of wave propagation occur at its initial stage and last for a very short time, and then bulk motion of fluid and reaction products is progressed and lasts for a long time. In a case SWR occurs, a number of hydrogen bubbles produced and sodium is entrained into the bubbles through the gas-liquid bubble interfaces by evaporation or diffusion. The partial pressure of the sodium in a hydrogen bubble is determined as a function of the bubble size, temperature, and pressure, and is rapidly decreased as its size increased. From this, it can be considered that the bulk motion in the later phase of SWR is an axial motion caused by expansion of a single-phase hydrogen gas bubble produced by a reaction in the vicinity of the leak site. Through this investigation, a preliminary simple analysis model for long-term effects of SWR was set up and sensitivity study using the system design parameters such as pressure and temperature of IHTS for KALIMER was performed. Also, a simpler analysis model using the cover gas pressure change related to the production of a hydrogen bubble in a steam generator was developed from the analyses results. These simple analysis models of the reaction site and the pressure behavior with hydrogen production can be used to develop the mid and long-term analysis code for SWR in the KALIMER steam generator design

  7. Complementing approaches to demonstrate chlorinated solvent biodegradation in a complex pollution plume: Mass balance, PCR and compound-specific stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbet, Christelle; Rivière, Agnès; Jeannottat, Simon; Rinaldi, Sandro; Hunkeler, Daniel; Bendjoudi, Hocine; de Marsily, Ghislain

    2011-11-01

    This work describes the use of different complementing methods (mass balance, polymerase chain reaction assays and compound-specific stable isotope analysis) to demonstrate the existence and effectiveness of biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in an alluvial aquifer. The solvent-contaminated site is an old chemical factory located in an alluvial plain in France. As most of the chlorinated contaminants currently found in the groundwater at this site were produced by local industries at various times in the past, it is not enough to analyze chlorinated solvent concentrations along a flow path to convincingly demonstrate biodegradation. Moreover, only a few data were initially available to characterize the geochemical conditions at this site, which were apparently complex at the source zone due to (i) the presence of a steady oxygen supply to the groundwater by irrigation canal losses and river infiltration and (ii) an alkaline pH higher than 10 due to former underground lime disposal. A demonstration of the existence of biodegradation processes was however required by the regulatory authority within a timeframe that did not allow a full geochemical characterization of such a complex site. Thus a combination of different fast methods was used to obtain a proof of the biodegradation occurrence. First, a mass balance analysis was performed which revealed the existence of a strong natural attenuation process (biodegradation, volatilization or dilution), despite the huge uncertainty on these calculations. Second, a good agreement was found between carbon isotopic measurements and PCR assays (based on 16S RNA gene sequences and functional genes), which clearly indicated reductive dechlorination of different hydrocarbons (Tetrachloroethene—PCE-, Trichloroethene—TCE-, 1,2- cisDichloroethene— cis-1,2-DCE-, 1,2- transDichloroethene— trans-1,2-DCE-, 1,1-Dichloroethene—1,1-DCE-, and Vinyl Chloride—VC) to ethene. According to these carbon isotope measurements

  8. Determination of transport and reaction swarm coefficients from the analysis of complex transient pulses from the pulsed Townsend experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekstein, A; De Urquijo, J; Rodríguez-Luna, J C; Juárez, A M; Ducasse, O

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper the interpretation and analysis of transient pulses from a pulsed Townsend experiment by solving the continuity equations of the charged carriers (electrons and ions) involved in the avalanche. The set of second order partial differential equations is solved by SIMAV, a simulator designed specifically for the pulsed Townsend avalanche. Complex situations involving processes such as electron detachment, ion-molecule reactions, Penning ionization and secondary electron emission from ion impact at the cathode, virtually impossible to solve analytically, are discussed here to illustrate the capability of the simulator to help explain the various reaction processes involved in the avalanche, and also to derive some of the transport and reaction coefficients.

  9. 389 Allergic Reactions to Local Anesthetics: Detection by Skin Tests and Subcutaneous Provocation. Analysis of 160 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcanjo, Luiz; Gonçalves Tavares, Tania Maria; Delcourt, Nathalia; Baroni, Juliana; Rios, João; Rios, José Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Background Adverse reactions to local anesthetics (LA) are frequent and often referred to as allergic. Although immune-mediated reactions are rare, it should be investigated for suspected cases. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of positive skin test to these drugs in patients with a suspected history of allergic reactions and describe the main socio-demographic characteristics of these individuals. Methods Retrospective study of medical records of patients attended at Policlínica Geral do Rio de Janeiro Allergic Clinic, between 2008 and 2011. The parameters evaluated were the test indication and the patient ages and gender. The drug tested was that the patient had a history of suspicion. Patients underwent skin prick and intradermal tests and subcutaneous provocation. Descriptive statistical analysis of the data was performed. Results It was performed 160 tests (125 female). Three of this total was excluded due to inconclusive results. In women, the highest proportion of tests was in the age group from 41 to 60 years (43%), while in males the higher concentration was at a youngest age group: 21 to 40 years (41%). The most common indication (103 cases, 65%) for the tests was a previous suspected anaphylactic reaction by LA. Seven of 157 tests had a positive result (4.4%), 6 of them occurred in women (4.8%). Only one test resulted in a type of anaphylactic reaction response (0.67%). All patients who presented positive response to the test had a history of per-anesthetic reaction that suggested an immune-mediated mechanism. Conclusions In patients with a history of previous reaction to local anesthetics, the skin tests with these drugs have a key role in the prevention of anaphylaxis, and on guidance for adequate anesthetic procedures.

  10. Comprehensive genetic analysis of early host body reactions to the bioactive and bio-inert porous scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomo Ehashi

    Full Text Available To design scaffolds for tissue regeneration, details of the host body reaction to the scaffolds must be studied. Host body reactions have been investigated mainly by immunohistological observations for a long time. Despite of recent dramatic development in genetic analysis technologies, genetically comprehensive changes in host body reactions are hardly studied. There is no information about host body reactions that can predict successful tissue regeneration in the future. In the present study, porous polyethylene scaffolds were coated with bioactive collagen or bio-inert poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate (PMB and were implanted subcutaneously and compared the host body reaction to those substrates by normalizing the result using control non-coat polyethylene scaffold. The comprehensive analyses of early host body reactions to the scaffolds were carried out using a DNA microarray assay. Within numerous genes which were expressed differently among these scaffolds, particular genes related to inflammation, wound healing, and angiogenesis were focused upon. Interleukin (IL-1β and IL-10 are important cytokines in tissue responses to biomaterials because IL-1β promotes both inflammation and wound healing and IL-10 suppresses both of them. IL-1β was up-regulated in the collagen-coated scaffold. Collagen-specifically up-regulated genes contained both M1- and M2-macrophage-related genes. Marked vessel formation in the collagen-coated scaffold was occurred in accordance with the up-regulation of many angiogenesis-inducible factors. The DNA microarray assay provided global information regarding the host body reaction. Interestingly, several up-regulated genes were detected even on the very bio-inert PMB-coated surfaces and those genes include inflammation-suppressive and wound healing-suppressive IL-10, suggesting that not only active tissue response but also the inert response may relates to these genetic

  11. Comprehensive Genetic Analysis of Early Host Body Reactions to the Bioactive and Bio-Inert Porous Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehashi, Tomo; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Minowa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    To design scaffolds for tissue regeneration, details of the host body reaction to the scaffolds must be studied. Host body reactions have been investigated mainly by immunohistological observations for a long time. Despite of recent dramatic development in genetic analysis technologies, genetically comprehensive changes in host body reactions are hardly studied. There is no information about host body reactions that can predict successful tissue regeneration in the future. In the present study, porous polyethylene scaffolds were coated with bioactive collagen or bio-inert poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB) and were implanted subcutaneously and compared the host body reaction to those substrates by normalizing the result using control non-coat polyethylene scaffold. The comprehensive analyses of early host body reactions to the scaffolds were carried out using a DNA microarray assay. Within numerous genes which were expressed differently among these scaffolds, particular genes related to inflammation, wound healing, and angiogenesis were focused upon. Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 are important cytokines in tissue responses to biomaterials because IL-1β promotes both inflammation and wound healing and IL-10 suppresses both of them. IL-1β was up-regulated in the collagen-coated scaffold. Collagen-specifically up-regulated genes contained both M1- and M2-macrophage-related genes. Marked vessel formation in the collagen-coated scaffold was occurred in accordance with the up-regulation of many angiogenesis-inducible factors. The DNA microarray assay provided global information regarding the host body reaction. Interestingly, several up-regulated genes were detected even on the very bio-inert PMB-coated surfaces and those genes include inflammation-suppressive and wound healing-suppressive IL-10, suggesting that not only active tissue response but also the inert response may relates to these genetic regulations. PMID:24454803

  12. Numerical analysis of the in-well vapor-stripping system demonstration at Edwards Air Force Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.D.; Gilmore, T.J.

    1996-10-01

    Numerical simulations, with the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator, were applied to the field demonstration of an in-well vapor-stripping system at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), near Mojave, California. The demonstration field site on the Edwards AFB was previously contaminated from traversing groundwater that was contained a varied composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which primarily includes trichloroethylene (TCE). Contaminant TCE originated from surface basin that had been used to collect runoff during the cleaning of experimental rocket powered planes in the 1960s and 1970s. This report documents those simulations and associated numerical analyses. A companion report documents the in- well vapor-stripping demonstration from a field perspective

  13. DOE FY 2010 Budget Request and Recovery Act Funding for Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment: Analysis and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Bunn, Matthew

    2009-06-01

    short-term. Energy storage may play a crucial role in the future of the power and transportation systems, which together consume two thirds of primary energy in the United States. A recent National Academy of Science report recommended carrying out detailed scenario assessments of the penetration of unconventional fuels from coal and coal and biomass with CCS. And the research plan provided for nuclear fission does not justify spending as many funds as were requested. The proposed funding for FY 2010 and the resources from ARRA, however, do not guarantee that the United States will finally enjoy the predictable and consistent publicly-funded energy technology innovation effort that it needs. The Obama administration must put in place a comprehensive energy technology innovation strategy that will ensure that an expanded ERD3 effort is both sustainable and efficient. This commission would be charged with, inter alia, developing a strategy that optimizes the integration of the various stages of innovation (research, development, demonstration, early deployment), as well as integrates efforts across technology areas. The database upon which this analysis is based may be downloaded in Excel format at: http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/publication/19119/ .

  14. Clonal heterogeneity of small-cell anaplastic carcinoma of the lung demonstrated by flow-cytometric DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindeløv, L L; Hansen, H H; Christensen, I J

    1980-01-01

    Flow-cytometric DNA analysis yields information on ploidy and proliferative characteristics of a cell population. The analysis was implemented on small-cell anaplastic carcinoma of the lung using a rapid detergent technique for the preparation of fine-needle aspirates for DNA determination and a ...

  15. Barely Started and Already Left behind: A Descriptive Analysis of the Mathematics Ability Demonstrated by Young Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritzer, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined young deaf children's early informal/formal mathematical knowledge as measured by the Test of Early Mathematics Ability (TEMA-3). Findings from this study suggest that prior to the onset of formal schooling, young deaf children might already demonstrate evidence of academic delays. Of these 28 participants (4-6 years of age),…

  16. Demonstration and quantification of the redistribution and oxidation of carbon monoxide in the human body by tracer analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Sawano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have confirmed the role of endogenous carbon monoxide (CO gas as a signal transmitter. However, CO is considered an intracellular transmitter, as no studies have demonstrated the redistribution of CO from the blood to tissue cells. Tracer analyses of 13 CO 2 production following 13 CO gas inhalation demonstrated that CO is oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO 2 in the body and that CO oxidation does not occur in the circulation. However, these results could not clearly demonstrate the redistribution of CO, because oxidation may have occurred in the airway epithelium. The objective of this study, therefore, was to definitively demonstrate and quantify the redistribution and oxidation of CO using time-course analyses of CO and 13 CO 2 production following 13 CO-hemoglobin infusion. The subject was infused with 0.45 L of 13 CO-saturated autologous blood. Exhaled gas was collected intermittently for 36 hours for measurement of minute volumes of CO/CO 2 exhalation and determination of the 13 CO 2 / 12 CO 2 ratio. 13 CO 2 production significantly increased from 3 to 28 hours, peaking at 8 hours. Of the infused CO, 81% was exhaled as CO and 2.6% as 13 CO 2 . Identical time courses of 13 CO 2 production following 13 CO-hemoglobin infusion and 13 CO inhalation refute the hypothesis that CO is oxidized in the airway epithelium and clearly demonstrate the redistribution of CO from the blood to the tissues. Quantitative analyses have revealed that 19% of CO in the circulating blood is redistributed to tissue cells, whereas 2.6% is oxidized there. Overall, these results suggest that CO functions as a systemic signal transmitter.

  17. Quantitative analysis of total starch content in wheat flour by reaction headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Gong, Yi-Xian; Yu, Kong-Xian

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposed a new reaction headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) method for efficiently quantifying the total starch content in wheat flours. A certain weight of wheat flour was oxidized by potassium dichromate in an acidic condition in a sealed headspace vial. The results show that the starch in wheat flour can be completely transferred to carbon dioxide at the given conditions (at 100 °C for 40 min) and the total starch content in wheat flour sample can be indirectly quantified by detecting the CO 2 formed from the oxidation reaction. The data showed that the relative standard deviation of the reaction HS-GC method in the precision test was less than 3.06%, and the relative differences between the new method and the reference method (titration method) were no more than 8.90%. The new reaction HS-GC method is automated, accurate, and can be a reliable tool for determining the total starch content in wheat flours in both laboratory and industrial applications. Graphical abstract The total starch content in wheat flour can be indirectly quantified by the GC detection of the CO 2 formed from the oxidation reaction between wheat flour and potassium dichromate in an acidic condition.

  18. Public reactions to e-cigarette regulations on Twitter: a text mining analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Allison J; Wilcox, Gary B; Tuttle, Hannah M; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Pikowski, Jessica

    2017-12-01

    In May 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a final rule that deemed e-cigarettes to be within their regulatory authority as a tobacco product. News and opinions about the regulation were shared on social media platforms, such as Twitter, which can play an important role in shaping the public's attitudes. We analysed information shared on Twitter for insights into initial public reactions. A text mining approach was used to uncover important topics among reactions to the e-cigarette regulations on Twitter. SAS Text Miner V.12.1 software was used for descriptive text mining to uncover the primary topics from tweets collected from May 1 to May 17 2016 using NUVI software to gather the data. A total of nine topics were generated. These topics reveal initial reactions to whether the FDA's e-cigarette regulations will benefit or harm public health, how the regulations will impact the emerging e-cigarette market and efforts to share the news. The topics were dominated by negative or mixed reactions. In the days following the FDA's announcement of the new deeming regulations, the public reaction on Twitter was largely negative. Public health advocates should consider using social media outlets to better communicate the policy's intentions, reach and potential impact for public good to create a more balanced conversation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Synthesis by the Pechini method and reaction combustion for the preparation of TiO2: a comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, E.P.; Ribeiro, P.C.; Freitas, N.L.; Lira, H.L.; Costa, A.C.F.M. da; Kiminami, R.H.G.A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare TiO 2 powder by Pechini and combustion reaction methods. A comparative analysis between the structural and morphological results obtained by the two methods was investigated. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffractions (XRD), infrared analysis, nitrogen adsorption (BET) and particle size distribution. The results from XRD show that the powders prepared by Pechini method and by combustion reaction using aniline as fuel, present anatase as major phase and traces of rutile phase. The values of crystallite size and surface area from BET were: 30 e 44 nm; 6.2 e 4.4 m 2 /g, for the powders prepared by Pechini and combustion reaction, respectively. The values of particle size were: 21.9 e 5.3 μm, for the powders prepared by Pechini and combustion reaction, respectively. The Pechini method was more suitable to obtain powders with irregular agglomerates, in the block shape with particles bonded softly and small crystallite size. (author)

  20. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor development demonstrates that onset of secondary metabolism coincides with hyphae differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manteca, Angel; Sanchez, Jesus; Jung, Hye Ryung

    2010-01-01

    mycelial stages: an early compartmentalized vegetative mycelium (first mycelium, MI), and a multinucleated reproductive mycelium (second mycelium, MII), arising after PCD processes. In the present study, we made a detailed proteomic analysis of the distinct developmental stages of solid confluent...... Streptomyces coelicolor cultures using iTRAQ labelling and LC-MS/MS. A new experimental approach was developed to obtain homogeneous samples at each developmental stage (temporal protein analysis) and also to obtain membrane and cytosolic protein fractions (spatial protein analysis). A total of 345 proteins...

  1. Quantum-chemical analysis of formation reactions of Со2+ complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor F. Vargalyuk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of quantum chemical calculations results (GAMESS, density functional theory, B3LYP method as to coordination compounds of Co2+ions with H2O, NH3, OH–, F–, Cl–, Br–, I–, CN–, Ac–, Ak– generally given by [Co(H2O6–nLn]2+nx, it has been demonstrated that within the selected series of ligands, there is no correlation between the amount of energy of monosubstituted cobalt aqua complexes formation(∆Е and pK1,just like between the effective nuclear charge of the central atom (z*Со and pK1. According to the behavior of ∆Е and z*Со,we identified two groups of ligands. The first group (OH–, F–, Ac–, Ak–, CN–, NH3 demonstrates logical ∆Е decrease caused by the growth of z*Со. On the contrary, the second group (Cl–, Br–, I– demonstrates ∆Е increase caused by the growth of z*Со. This phenomenon is explained by the change in electronegativity and polarizability of donor atoms in groups and periods of the periodic table. It is established that linear correlations given by lgK = A + B·z*Со can be actualized only for complexes having ligands with similar donor atoms. Referring to the literature on stepwise complex formation of hydroxide, amine and chloride cobalt complexes in combination with z*Со calculations results, we determined A and B constants of lgK, z*Со-correlations for the atoms of oxygen (30.2, –17.7; nitrogen (125.4, –69.9 and chlorine (–6.3, 5.8. The existence of the detected correlation series enables us to lean on lgK,z*М–dependence parameters for the fixed donor atom and to determine Kn values for various complexes with complex-based ligands using calculations and z*М data. This applies to complexes having central atoms of the same nature as well as simple monodentate ligands. The mentioned approach was used to calculate the stability constants for acrylate cobalt complexes (lgK1 = 1.2 и lgК2 = 4.3, which are not covered in literature.

  2. The analysis of B, C, N, and O by nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debras, G.; Deconninck, G.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear reactions induced on light elements by lower energy deuterons are investigated. Differential cross section for 10 B(d,α 0 ) 8 Be, 10 B(d,α 1 ) 8 Be, 12 C(d,p 0 ) 13 C, 14 N(d,α 1 ) 12 C, 16 O(d,p 0 ) 17 O, 16 O(d,p 1 ) 17 O and 16 O(d,α 0 ) 14 N reactions are measured between 0.5 and 3 MeV at an observation angle of 135 0 with respect to the incident beam. Possible application of these reactions to the measurement of surface concentration is considered. Special emphasis was given on nitrogen determination in order to study nitrogen concentration in industrial glasses. Surface nitrogen repartition on glass, origin of nitrogen, influence of oxidizing and reducing conditions and glass structure are discussed. (author)

  3. Analysis of adverse reactions and complications of Graves' disease after thyroid arteries embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Wenquan; Chen Wei; Yang Jianyong; Xiao Haipeng; Huang Yonghui; Li Jiaping; Guo Wenbo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyse the adverse reactions and complications of Graves' disease after thyroid arteries embolization. Methods: 41 patients of Graves' disease underwent interventional embolization have been analysed with its adverse reactions and complications. Polyvinyl alcohol or bletilla microspheres and micro-coils were used in these patients. Results: Laryngopharyngeal and neck pain occurred in all patients. T 3 and T 4 increased in 3 days to one week after the procedure. Thirty of them showed fever. Dystopia embolism happened in two cases with one of transitory hypoparathyroidism. No hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism or hoarseness occur during long term follow up. Conclusions: The adverse reactions and complications of Graves disease after thyroid arteries embolization may occur. Some of them are preventable and curable

  4. Analysis of (3He, t) charge exchange reactions at 140 AMeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Pardeep; Zegers, R.G.T.; Danielewicz, Pawel; Noji, S.; Kim, B.T.; Sakai, H.

    2014-01-01

    The spin-isospin response in nuclei has been studied widely through ( 3 He, t) and (t, 3 He) charge-exchange reactions wherein a proton (neutron) transforms into a neutron (proton), which in turn changes the isospin, ΔT=1, of the nuclei participating in the reaction, either with or without spin transfer. The Gamow-Teller transitions are used to obtain the weak transition strength in the excitation-energy regions inaccessible through β-decay. The strengths deduced using charge exchange experiments provide stringent tests for nuclear structure calculations and serve as inputs for variety of applications in which weak transition strengths play a role. In this context, we explore here the ( 3 He,t) charge-exchange reaction at 140 MeV/u on 18 O, 26 Mg, 58,60,62, 64 Ni, 90 Zr, 118,120 Sn and 208 Pb targets, within the theoretical framework of distorted wave impulse approximation

  5. Comparative Analysis of the $^{178m2}$Hf Yield at Reactions with Different Projectiles

    CERN Document Server

    Karamian, S A

    2004-01-01

    The long-lived high-spin $^{178m2}$Hf $K$-isomer can be produced in nuclear reactions with different projectiles. The reaction yields and cross-sections have been measured in the series of experiments and the results are now overviewed. The systematics of isomer-to-ground state ratios are drawn and real production capabilities are estimated for the best reactions. Such a summary is relevant to the significance of the isomer studies both for the nuclear-science knowledge and for possible applications. Potential isomer applications have been earlier stressed in popular publications with probably overestimated expectations. The real possibilities are restricted in part by the production yield and by other shortcomings as well.

  6. Worldwide withdrawal of medicinal products because of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onakpoya, Igho J; Heneghan, Carl J; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2016-07-01

    We have systematically identified medicinal products withdrawn worldwide because of adverse drug reactions, assessed the level of evidence used for making the withdrawal decisions, and explored the patterns of withdrawals over time. We searched PubMed, the WHO database of withdrawn products, and selected texts. We included products that were withdrawn after launch from 1950 onwards, excluding non-human and over-the-counter medicines. We assessed the levels of evidence on which withdrawals were based using the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. Of 353 medicinal products withdrawn from any country, only 40 were withdrawn worldwide. Anecdotal reports were cited as evidence for withdrawal in 30 (75%) and deaths occurred in 27 (68%). Hepatic, cardiac, and nervous system toxicity accounted for over 60% of withdrawals. In 28 cases, the first withdrawal was initiated by the manufacturer. The median interval between the first report of an adverse drug reaction that led to withdrawal and the first withdrawal was 1 year (range 0-43 years). Worldwide withdrawals occurred within 1 year after the first withdrawal in any country. In conclusion, the time it takes for drugs to be withdrawn worldwide after reports of adverse drug reactions has shortened over time. However, there are inconsistencies in current withdrawal procedures when adverse drug reactions are suspected. A uniform method for establishing worldwide withdrawal of approved medicinal products when adverse drug reactions are suspected should be developed, to facilitate global withdrawals. Rapid synthesis of the evidence on harms should be a priority when serious adverse reactions are suspected.

  7. The analysis of stress reactions ana coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Dong Han; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Gil Yong; Son, Mi Suk

    2001-01-01

    This study is performed to encourage cancer patients to identify, relieve and effectively overcome the stress caused by radiotherapy, by analyzing stress reactions and coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress due to radiotherapy. The study group was composed of 85 cancer patients of the age 20 or higher who were undergoing radiotherapy in four hospitals located in Seoul and Kyonggi-do. The survey questionnaire was used, which had 161 questions inquiring respondents of general status, perceived stress, stress reactions and coping patterns. The surveyed data were analyzed by a SAS program, which employed descriptive statistics. Pearson Correlation Coefficient, t-test, ANOVA and Stepwised Multiple Regression. The stress perception and reaction rates were low in cancer patients comparing to patients of the other study. In the coping patterns. the problem-focused coping patterns were significantly higher than emotion-focused coping patterns. The statistically meaningful differences were observed in the stress perception and reactions depending on the time of diagnosis and perceived health level. As for the problem-focused coping patterns, significant differences were found depending on age, marital status, education, income and the number of family members as well as perceived health level of patients. The level of perceived stress and that of stress reactions was found to have positively significant correlation(r=.764, p<.001) while the perceived stress and the problem-focused coping patterns was correlated negatively (r=-.288, p<.01). The stress reactions and the problem-focused coping patterns was found to have negatively significant correlation(r=-.289, p<.01). The problem-focused coping behavior, which cooperated with doctors, technologists, nurses and families of cancer patients, is advisable for the cancer patients to overcome uncertainty and uneasiness by effectively release the stress.

  8. The analysis of stress reactions ana coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Dong Han; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Gil Yong; Son, Mi Suk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Bundang CHA General Hospital, College of Medicine, Pochon CHA University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    This study is performed to encourage cancer patients to identify, relieve and effectively overcome the stress caused by radiotherapy, by analyzing stress reactions and coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress due to radiotherapy. The study group was composed of 85 cancer patients of the age 20 or higher who were undergoing radiotherapy in four hospitals located in Seoul and Kyonggi-do. The survey questionnaire was used, which had 161 questions inquiring respondents of general status, perceived stress, stress reactions and coping patterns. The surveyed data were analyzed by a SAS program, which employed descriptive statistics. Pearson Correlation Coefficient, t-test, ANOVA and Stepwised Multiple Regression. The stress perception and reaction rates were low in cancer patients comparing to patients of the other study. In the coping patterns. the problem-focused coping patterns were significantly higher than emotion-focused coping patterns. The statistically meaningful differences were observed in the stress perception and reactions depending on the time of diagnosis and perceived health level. As for the problem-focused coping patterns, significant differences were found depending on age, marital status, education, income and the number of family members as well as perceived health level of patients. The level of perceived stress and that of stress reactions was found to have positively significant correlation(r=.764, p<.001) while the perceived stress and the problem-focused coping patterns was correlated negatively (r=-.288, p<.01). The stress reactions and the problem-focused coping patterns was found to have negatively significant correlation(r=-.289, p<.01). The problem-focused coping behavior, which cooperated with doctors, technologists, nurses and families of cancer patients, is advisable for the cancer patients to overcome uncertainty and uneasiness by effectively release the stress.

  9. Determination of 18O by prompt nuclear reaction analysis: application for measurement of microsamples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, S.D.; Cohen, D.; Katsaros, A.; Tom, J.; Owen, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the routine determination of 18 O concentrations in microsamples of biological fluids. The method utilizes the prompt nuclear reaction 18 O(p,α 0 ) 15 N, and 846-keV protons from a 3-MeV Van de Graaff Accelerator are focused on ∼2,000-Angstroem-thick Ta 2 O 5 targets prepared by anodic oxidation from 50-μl samples of water distilled from blood or other biological fluids. The broad cross section of the resonance peak for this nuclear reaction (47 keV) ensures high yields, especially at small reaction angles, and the high-energy α particles produced by the reaction (4 MeV) are readily separated from scattered protons by the use of an aluminized Mylar foil of suitable thickness. Background levels of 18 O (0.204 atom%) can be detected with run times of ∼5-8 min, and the sensitivity of the method is of the order of 0.05 atom%. Experimental error due to sample preparation was found to be 1.7%, and counting errors were close to theoretical limits so that total error was of the order of 2.5%. Duplicate samples were analyzed by use of the 18 O(p,α 0 ) 15 N reaction at Lucas Heights, Australia and the 18 O(p,n) 18 F reaction at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the agreement was excellent (y = 1.0123x - 0.0123, r = 0.991, P < 0.001). The theoretical limitations and the general applicability of the method in biological studies designed to estimate the rate of metabolism of free-ranging animals are also discussed. 24 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  10. Structural analysis of closure cap barriers: A pre-test study for the Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Chung; Pelfrey, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project (BMDP) is a field demonstration study to determine the construction/installation requirements, permeability, and subsidence performance characteristics of a composite barrier. The composite barrier will consist of on-site sandy-clay blanketed by a bentonite mat and a flexible High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner (also called flexible membrane liner). Construction of one control test pad and three bentonite test pads are planned. The control test pad will be used to establish baseline data. Underneath the composite clay cap is a four feet thick loose sand layer in which cavities will be created by evacuation of sand. The present work provides a mathematical model for the BMDP. The mathematical model will be used to simulate the mechanical and structural responses of the composite clay cap during the testing processes. Based upon engineering experience and technical references, a set of nominal soil parameters have been selected

  11. Effects of Prophylactic Ankle Supports on Vertical Ground Reaction Force During Landing: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Niu, Tienan Feng, Lejun Wang, Chenghua Jiang, Ming Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been much debate on how prophylactic ankle supports (PASs may influence the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF during landing. Therefore, the primary aims of this meta-analysis were to systematically review and synthesize the effect of PASs on vGRF, and to understand how PASs affect vGRF peaks (F1, F2 and the time from initial contact to peak loading (T1, T2 during landing. Several key databases, including Scopus, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline, Ovid, Web of Science, and the Physical Activity Index, were used for identifying relevant studies published in English since inception to April 1, 2015. The computerized literature search and cross-referencing the citation list of the articles yielded 3,993 articles. Criteria for inclusion required that 1 the study was conducted on healthy adults; 2 the subject number and trial number were known; 3 the subjects performed landing with and without PAS; 4 the landing movement was in the sagittal plane; 5 the comparable vGRF parameters were reported; and 6 the F1 and F2 must be normalized to the subject’s body weight. After the removal of duplicates and irrelevant articles, 6, 6, 15 and 11 studies were respectively pooled for outcomes of F1, T1, F2 and T2. This study found a significantly increased F2 (.03 BW, 95% CI: .001, .05 and decreased T1 (-1.24 ms, 95% CI: -1.77, -.71 and T2 (-3.74 ms, 95% CI: -4.83, -2.65 with the use of a PAS. F1 was not significantly influenced by the PAS. Heterogeneity was present in some results, but there was no evidence of publication bias for any outcome. These changes represented deterioration in the buffering characteristics of the joint. An ideal PAS design should limit the excessive joint motion of ankle inversion, while allowing a normal range of motion, especially in the sagittal plane.

  12. Design and Demonstration of Automated Data Analysis Algorithms for Ultrasonic Inspection of Complex Composite Panels with Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    all of the ADA called indications into three groups: true positives (TP), missed calls (MC) and false calls (FC). Note, an indication position error...data review burden and improve the reliability of the ultrasonic inspection of large composite structures, automated data analysis ( ADA ) algorithms...thickness and backwall C-scan images. 15. SUBJECT TERMS automated data analysis ( ADA ) algorithms; time-of-flight indications; backwall amplitude dropout

  13. Comparative analysis of species-based specificity in Sr 90 and Cs 137 accumulation demonstrated by ligneous plant forest communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinovich, B.S.; Vlasov, V.K.; Sak, M.M.; Golushko, R.M.; Afmogenov, A.M.; Kirykhin, O.V.

    2004-01-01

    The authors provided field-proven study of Sr 90 and Cs 137 absorption activity demonstrated by Pinus silvestris L.; Piceae abies (L.) Roth.; Quercus rubra L.; Acer platanoides L.; Betula pendula Roth.; Tilia cordata Mill, under identical habitat conditions. The above plants were examined after 5-year growth period on radionuclide-contaminated soil. To a great extent, such parameters as radionuclide accumulation in experimental plants and accumulation activity were determined by the plants' bio-ecological properties. (Authors)

  14. Stability analysis of impulsive fuzzy cellular neural networks with distributed delays and reaction-diffusion terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuoan; Li Kelin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a class of impulsive fuzzy cellular neural networks with distributed delays and reaction-diffusion terms. By employing the delay differential inequality with impulsive initial conditions and M-matrix theory, we find some sufficient conditions ensuring the existence, uniqueness and global exponential stability of equilibrium point for impulsive fuzzy cellular neural networks with distributed delays and reaction-diffusion terms. In particular, the estimate of the exponential converging index is also provided, which depends on the system parameters. An example is given to show the effectiveness of the results obtained here.

  15. Asymptotic analysis of reaction-diffusion-advection problems: Fronts with periodic motion and blow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedov, Nikolay

    2017-02-01

    This is an extended variant of the paper presented at MURPHYS-HSFS 2016 conference in Barcelona. We discuss further development of the asymptotic method of differential inequalities to investigate existence and stability of sharp internal layers (fronts) for nonlinear singularly perturbed periodic parabolic problems and initial boundary value problems with blow-up of fronts for reaction-diffusion-advection equations. In particular, we consider periodic solutions with internal layer in the case of balanced reaction. For the initial boundary value problems we prove the existence of fronts and give their asymptotic approximation including the new case of blowing-up fronts. This case we illustrate by the generalised Burgers equation.

  16. Microbiological analysis of common preservatives used in food items and demonstration of their in vitro anti-bacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohora Sultana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify the microorganisms contaminating the common preservatives used in food as well as to detect their in vitro anti-bacterial traits. Methods: A total of 9 preservatives were subjected to conventional cultural and biochemical methods for microbial enumeration. Anti-bacterial activities were demonstrated through the agar well diffusion method. Results: All samples were found to be contaminated with bacteria up to 105 CFU/g and with the fungal flora within a range of 1 01-1 02 CFU/g. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were demonstrated in most of the samples. Sodium sulfite and citric acid possessed the strongest anti-bacterial trait against all of the test bacteria. Acetic acid exhibited activity against 6 out of 8 test bacteria while vinegar exhibited the activity against 4 bacteria. Activity of salt was demonstrated only against Listeria spp. and Bacillus spp., while activity of sugar and honey was found only against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp., respectively. Conclusions: According to the current investigation, sodium sulfite and citric acid samples were found to be satisfactory preservatives both in terms of microbiological criteria and their antibacterial traits.

  17. Experimental and numerical analysis of the combustor for a cogeneration system based on the aluminum/water reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milani, Massimo; Montorsi, Luca; Paltrinieri, Fabrizio; Stefani, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum reaction with water is studied as a technology for hydrogen production. • A test rig is developed for the analysis of aluminum/water reaction. • The system is the core component of a cogeneration plant for hydrogen/power production. • The interaction of liquid aluminum jet and water steam stream is investigated. • The main capabilities of the injection system are assessed. - Abstract: The paper focuses on the design of the experimental apparatus aimed at analyzing the performance of the combustion chamber of a cogeneration system based on the reaction of liquid aluminum and water steam. The cogeneration system exploits the heat released by the oxidation of aluminum with water for super-heating the vapor of a steam cycle and simultaneously producing hydrogen. The only by-product is alumina, which in a closed loop can be recycled back and transformed again into aluminum. Therefore, aluminum is used as an energy carrier to transport the energy from the alumina reduction plant to the location of the proposed system. The water is also used in a closed loop since the amount of water produced employing the hydrogen obtained by the proposed system corresponds to the oxidizing water for the Al/H 2 O reaction. This study investigates the combustor where the liquid aluminum–steam reaction takes place. In particular, the design of the combustion chamber and the interaction between the liquid aluminum jet and the water steam flow are evaluated using a numerical and an experimental approach. The test rig is specifically designed for the analysis of the liquid aluminum injection in a slightly super-heated steam stream. The first experiments are carried out to verify the correct behavior of the test rig. Thermography is employed to qualitatively assess the steam entrainment of the liquid aluminum jet. Finally, the experimental measurements are compared with the multi-dimension multi-phase flow simulations in order to estimate the influence of

  18. An attributional analysis of reactions to poverty: the political ideology of the giver and the perceived morality of the receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Bernard; Osborne, Danny; Rudolph, Udo

    2011-05-01

    An attributional analysis of reactions to poverty is presented. The article begins by discussing the perceived causes of poverty and their taxonomic properties (locus, stability, and controllability). One antecedent of causal beliefs, political ideology, is then examined in detail, followed by a review of the effects of causal beliefs on emotions and behavior. It is contended that helping the poor is a moral issue, but the moral evaluation concerns the targeted recipient of aid rather than the potential help giver. Persons perceived as responsible for their plight, a dominant construal for conservatives, elicit anger and neglect. In contrast, those seen as not responsible for their financial hardship, an outlook predominantly endorsed by liberals, arouse sympathy and help giving. Sympathy is the most important proximal determinant of aid. This analysis is extended to reactions to achievement failure, abortion, and rape. Policy implications are also examined.

  19. Combined steam and carbon dioxide reforming of methane and side reactions: Thermodynamic equilibrium analysis and experimental application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Won-Jun; Jeong, Dae-Woon; Shim, Jae-Oh; Kim, Hak-Min; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Son, In Hyuk; Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Selected variables have a significant influence on yields of synthesis gas. • (CO_2 + H_2O)/CH_4 affects the temperature which can achieve the maximum conversion. • Coke is formed at low temperatures even with excess oxidizing agent. • The occurrence of RWGS becomes critical in real chemical reactions. • Equilibrium conversions are maintained for 500 h without detectable deactivation. - Abstract: Thermodynamic equilibrium analysis of the combined steam and carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CSCRM) and side reactions was performed using total Gibbs free energy minimization. The effects of (CO_2 + H_2O)/CH_4 ratio (0.9–2.9), CO_2:H_2O ratio (3:1–1:3), and temperature (500–1000 °C) on the equilibrium conversions, yields, coke yield, and H_2/CO ratio were investigated. A (CO_2 + H_2O)/CH_4 ratio greater than 1.2, a CO_2:H_2O ratio of 1:2.1, and a temperature of at least 850 °C are preferable reaction conditions for the synthesis gas preparation in the gas to liquid process. Simulated conditions were applied to the CSCRM reaction and the experimental data were compared with the thermodynamic equilibrium results. The thermodynamic equilibrium results were mostly consistent with the experimental data, but the reverse water gas shift reaction rapidly occurred in the real chemical reaction and under excess oxidizing agent conditions. In addition, a long-term stability test (under simulated conditions) showed that the equilibrium conversion was maintained for 500 h and that the coke formation on the used catalyst was not observed.

  20. Kinematical analysis of the data from three-particle reactions by statistical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, J.; Nocken, U.

    1976-01-01

    A statistical procedure to unfold the kinematics of coincidence spectra from three-particle reactions is presented which is used to protect the coincidence events on the kinematical curve. The width of the projection intervals automatically matches the experimental resolution.. The method is characterized by its consistency thus also permitting a reasonable projection of sum-coincidences. (Auth.)

  1. NRABASE 2.0. Charged-particle nuclear reaction data for ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurbich, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    For 30 targets between H-1 and Ag-109, differential cross sections for reactions induced by protons, deuterons, He-3 and alpha particles are given in tabular and graphical form. The data were compiled from original experimental references. The database was developed under a research contract with the IAEA Physics Section and is available on diskette from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  2. Quantitative analysis of oxygen depth distribution by means of deuteron reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyumin, A.N.; Eremin, V.K.; Konnikov, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    Experimentally are investigated and realized possibilities for using the reaction for quantitative determination of the depth profiles of the oxygen distribution in HTSC structures in layers up to 10 4 A. It is concluded that in the near-surface layers when profiling the oxygen content is achieved the spatial resolution of 150 A

  3. Design, Testing and Kinetic Analysis of Bulky Monodentate Phosphorus Ligands in the Mizoroki-Heck Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodds, Deborah L.; Boele, Maarten D. K.; van Strijdonck, Gino P. F.; de Vries, Johannes G.; van Leeuwen, Piet W. N. M.; Kamer, Paul C. J.

    A series of new monodentate phosphane ligands 2 have been evaluated in the MizorokiHeck arylation reaction of iodobenzene and styrene and compared with our previously reported ligands, 1, 3 and 4. The concept of rational ligand design is discussed, and we describe how the performance of this new

  4. Analysis of coupled mass transfer and sol-gel reaction in a two-phase system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijns, H.J.; Huinink, H.P.; Pel, L.; Zitha, P.L.J.

    2006-01-01

    The coupled mass transfer and chemical reactions of a gel-forming compound in a two-phase system were studied in detail. Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate (TMOS) is often used as a precursor in sol-gel chemistry to produce silica gels in aqueous systems. TMOS can also be mixed with many hydrocarbons

  5. Measurement and analysis of reaction rate distributions of cores with spectrum shifter region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Shigekazu; Shiroya, Seiji; Unesaki, Hironobu; Takeda, Toshikazu; Aizawa, Otohiko; Kanda, Keiji.

    1995-01-01

    A study for the neutronic characteristics of the spectrum-controlled neutron irradiation fields using various reflector materials was performed. Spectrum shifter regions were constructed in the upper reflector region of the solid moderated core (B-Core) of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). Beryllium, graphite and aluminum were selected as the loading materials for the spectrum shifter. Two tight-pitch lattice cores with different moderator-to-fuel volume ratio (V m /V f ) of 0.97 and 0.65 have been used. Axial reaction rate distributions of gold, nickel and indium wires were measured, and the spectrum index was defined as the Cd ratio of the gold wire and the ratio of gold reaction rate to nickel reaction rate. Using the conventional design calculation procedure, the experimental and calculated reaction rate and spectrum index show several disagreements. Detailed treatment of the neutron streaming effect, heterogeneous cell structure and depression factor are shown to be necessary for improving the agreement between experimental and calculated values. (author)

  6. An Analysis of Undergraduate General Chemistry Students' Misconceptions of the Submicroscopic Level of Precipitation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Resa M.; Barrera, Juliet H.; Mohamed, Saheed C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how 21 college-level general chemistry students, who had received instruction that emphasized the symbolic level of ionic equations, explained their submicroscopic-level understanding of precipitation reactions. Students' explanations expressed through drawings and semistructured interviews revealed the nature of the…

  7. Genotype by environment interaction for litter size in pigs as quantified by reaction norms analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, P W; Su, G

    2008-01-01

    A Bayesian procedure was used to estimate linear reaction norms (i.e. individual G × E plots) on 297 518 litter size records of 121 104 sows, daughters of 2040 sires, recorded on 144 farms in North and Latin America, Europe, Asia and Australia. The method allowed for simultaneous estimation of al...

  8. Reaction theory for analysis of nuclear giant resonances production and decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foglia, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The existence of mixing parameters connected to the different decay forms of the giant resonances was theoretically justified, and their energy dependence determined as well using a reaction theory which treats in a consistent manner the giant multipolar resonances formation and their different decay modes. (L.C.J.A.)

  9. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  10. Toxicological analysis of limonene reaction products using an in vitro exposure system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stacey E.; Khurshid, Shahana S.; Meade, B. Jean; Lukomska, Ewa; Wells, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations suggest a link between exposure to indoor air chemicals and adverse health effects. Consumer products contain reactive chemicals which can form secondary pollutants which may contribute to these effects. The reaction of limonene and ozone is a well characterized example of this type of indoor air chemistry. The studies described here characterize an in vitro model using an epithelial cell line (A549) or differentiated epithelial tissue (MucilAir™). The model is used to investigate adverse effects following exposure to combinations of limonene and ozone. In A549 cells, exposure to both the parent compounds and reaction products resulted in alterations in inflammatory cytokine production. A one hour exposure to limonene + ozone resulted in decreased proliferation when compared to cells exposed to limonene alone. Repeated dose exposures of limonene or limonene + ozone were conducted on MucilAir™ tissue. No change in proliferation was observed but increases in cytokine production were observed for both the parent compounds and reaction products. Factors such as exposure duration, chemical concentration, and sampling time point were identified to influence result outcome. These findings suggest that exposure to reaction products may produce more severe effects compared to the parent compound. PMID:23220291

  11. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Analysis of Barium-140 From Fission Dosimeters

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes two procedures for the measurement of reaction rates by determining the amount of the fission product 140Ba produced by the non-threshold reactions 235U(n,f), 241Am(n,f), and 239Pu(n,f), and by the threshold reactions 238U(n,f), 237Np(n,f), and 232Th(n,f). 1.2 These reactions produce many fission products, among which is 140Ba, having a half-life of 12.752 days. 140Ba emits gamma rays of several energies; however, these are not easily detected in the presence of other fission products. Competing activity from other fission products requires that a chemical separation be employed or that the 140Ba activity be determined indirectly by counting its daughter product 140La. This test method describes both procedure (a), the nondestructive determination of 140Ba by the direct counting of 140La several days after irradiation, and procedure (b), the chemical separation of 140Ba and the subsequent counting of 140Ba or its daughter 140La. 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission neutron fl...

  12. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. A bonding evolution theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Sensato, Fabricio R; Andrés, Juan; Longo, Elson

    2014-08-07

    In this research, a comprehensive theoretical investigation has been conducted on oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. The joint use of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool to analyze the evolution of chemical events along a reaction pathway. The progress of the reaction has been monitored by structural stability domains from ELF topology while the changes between them are controlled by turning points derived from CT which reveal that the reaction mechanism can be separated in several steps: first, a rupture of the peroxo O1-O2 bond, then a rearrangement of lone pairs of the sulfur atom occurs and subsequently the formation of S-O1 bond. The OAT process involving the oxidation of sulfides and sulfoxides is found to be an asynchronous process where O1-O2 bond breaking and S-O1 bond formation processes do not occur simultaneously. Nucleophilic/electrophilic characters of both dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfoxide, respectively, are sufficiently described by our results, which hold the key to unprecedented insight into the mapping of electrons that compose the bonds while the bonds change.

  13. Analysis of adverse reactions and complications of transcatheter uterine artery embolization (TUAE) for uterine fibroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoming; Luo Pengfei; Du Juan; Zuo Yuewei; Hu Xiaoping; Hong Danhua; Lin Huahuan; Li Gaowen; Liu Suyun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the adverse reactions and complications as well as their preventive and therapeutic measures of TUAE for uterine fibroids. Methods: One hundred and eighty-two patients with uterine fibroids were treated by TUAE. Bilateral uterine arteries were embolized using lipiodol-pingyangmycin emulsion (LPE), together with Gelfoam particles. All patients were hospitalized for 3 to 10 days after TUAE and were followed up for 1 to 24 months to observe the adverse reactions and complications. Results: Adverse reactions of TUAE included postembolization syndrome ( n 182); urinary irritation ( n = 24), and hyporrhea of vagina ( n = 25 ) . Complications of TUAE included expelling of necrotic fibroids per vagina ( n = 5 ); urinary retention ( n = 10); urinary tract infection ( n = 1 ); ulcer of labia minora ( n = 1 ); ecchymosis and ulceration on buttock ( n = 1), and secondary infection of chocolate cyst of ovary. ( n = 1 ). All the above-mentioned side effects of TUAE recovered to normal after expectant or especial treatment without any sequels left. Conclusion: The adverse reactions of TUAE are reversible and the complications of TUAE are preventable and curable

  14. Analysis of the consequences of 'thermite' reaction; Analisis sobre las consecuencias de la reaccion 'termita'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorio, Daniel; Cincotta, Daniel O; Camacho, Esteban F; Bruno, Hernan R; Boero, Norma L [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes

    1999-07-01

    The mixture of Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} is not in a state of chemical equilibrium, and at temperatures of between 850 degree C and 1000 degree C, it reacts exo thermally. This is known, in corresponding bibliography, as a 'Thermite reaction'. This mixture is used in the manufacturing of the plate-type fuel used in research reactors. It has been pointed out that the release of energy caused by this type of reactions might represent a risk in case of accidents in this type of reactor. Conclusions, in general, tend to indicate that no such risk exists, although no concrete assurance is given that this is the case, and this fact, therefore, leaves room for doubt. The objective of this paper is to provide an in-depth study of what happens to a fuel plate when it is subjected to thermite reaction. We will, furthermore, analyze the consequences of the release of energy generated by this type of reaction within the core of the reactor, clearly defining the problem for this type of fuel and this kind of reactor.

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the reaction between biological catecholamines and chlorinated methylperoxy radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimić, Dušan S.; Milenković, Dejan A.; Marković, Jasmina M. Dimitrić; Marković, Zoran S.

    2018-05-01

    The antiradical potency of catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, L-DOPA), metabolites of dopamine (homovanillic acid, 3-methoxytyramine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) and catechol towards substituted methylperoxy radicals is investigated. The thermodynamic parameters, together with the kinetic approach, are used to determine the most probable mechanism of action. The natural bond orbital and quantum theory of atoms in molecules are utilised to explain the highest reactivity of trichloromethylperoxy radical. The preferred mechanism is dependent both on the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters . The number of chlorine atoms on radical, the presence of intra-molecular hydrogen bond and number of hydroxy groups attached to the aromatic ring significantly influence the mechanism. The results suggest that sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) is the most probable for reaction with methylperoxy and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) for reaction with trichloromethylperoxy radicals, with a gradual transition between SPLET and HAT for other two radicals. Due to the significant deprotonation of molecules containing the carboxyl group, the respective anions are also investigated. The HAT and SPLET mechanisms are highly competitive in reaction with MP radical, while the dominant mechanism towards chlorinated radicals is HAT. The reactions in methanol and benzene are also discussed.

  16. Consistent analysis of peripheral reaction channels and fusion for the 16,18O+58Ni systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, J.J.S.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Lubian, J.; Chamon, L.C.; Pereira, D.; Anjos, R.M.; Rossi, E.S.; Silva, C.P.; Alvarez, M.A.G.; Nobre, G.P.A.; Gasques, L.R.

    2005-01-01

    We have measured elastic scattering and peripheral reaction channel cross sections for the 16,18 O+ 58 Ni systems at ELab=46 MeV. The data were analyzed through extensive coupled-channel calculations. It was investigated the consistency of the present analysis with a previous one at sub-barrier energies. Experimental fusion cross sections for these systems are also compared with the corresponding predictions of the coupled-channel calculations

  17. Multipolarity analysis for 14C high-energy resonance populated by (18O,16O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E.; Bonaccorso, A.; Fortunato, L.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The 12 C( 18 O, 16 O) 14 C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition

  18. Detection and RFLP Analysis of Canine Parvovirus (CPV) DNA by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in a Dog

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZKUL, Aykut

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the detection of canine parvovirus (CPV) in a fecal sample from a dog with enteritis was performed for the first time using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in Turkey. The final PCR product was analyzed using the restriction fragment length polymorphysm (RFLP) technique. RFLP analysis using Apa LI and Eco RV restriction endonucleases revealed homology in the nucleotide sequence in at least the VP2 coding region of the virus DNAs detected in the fecal specimen and prepared fr...

  19. Proteome analysis demonstrates profound alterations in human dendritic cell nature by TX527, an analogue of vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, G. B.; van Etten, E.; Lage, K.

    2009-01-01

    Structural analogues of vitamin D have been put forward as therapeutic agents able to exploit the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D, without its undesired calcemic side effects. We have demonstrated that TX527 affects dendritic cell (DC) maturation in vitro, resulting in the generation...... of a tolerogenic cell. In the present study, we aimed to explore the global protein changes induced by the analogue in immature DC (iDC) and mature human DC and to correlate them with alterations in DC morphology and function. Human CD14(+) monocytes were differentiated toward iDC or mature DCs, in the presence...

  20. Sodium modulates opioid receptors through a membrane component different from G-proteins. Demonstration by target size analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, S.; Costa, T.; Herz, A.

    1988-01-01

    The target size for opioid receptor binding was studied after manipulations known to affect the interactions between receptor and GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins). Addition of GTP or its analogs to the binding reaction, exposure of intact cells to pertussis toxin prior to irradiation, or treatment of irradiated membranes with N-ethylmaleimide did not change the target size (approximately equal to 100 kDa) for opioid receptors in NG 108-15 cells and rat brain. These data suggest that the 100-kDa species does not include an active subunit of a G-protein or alternatively that GTP does not promote the dissociation of the receptor-G-protein complex. The presence of Na+ (100 mM) in the radioligand binding assay induced a biphasic decay curve for agonist binding and a flattening of the monoexponential decay curve for a partial agonist. In both cases the effect was explained by an irradiation-induced loss of the low affinity state of the opioid receptor produced by the addition of Na+. This suggests that an allosteric inhibitor that mediates the effect of sodium on the receptor is destroyed at low doses of irradiation, leaving receptors which are no longer regulated by sodium. The effect of Na+ on target size was slightly increased by the simultaneous addition of GTP but was not altered by pertussis toxin treatment. Thus, the sodium unit is distinct from G-proteins and may represent a new component of the opioid receptor complex. Assuming a simple bimolecular model of one Na+ unit/receptor, the size of this inhibitor can be measured as 168 kDa

  1. Mediation Analysis Demonstrates That Trans-eQTLs Are Often Explained by Cis-Mediation: A Genome-Wide Analysis among 1,800 South Asians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brandon L.; Tong, Lin; Chen, Lin S.; Rahaman, Ronald; Argos, Maria; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Esko, Tonu; Zaman, Rakibuz; Islam, Tariqul; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Baron, John A.; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of human genes are regulated by genetic variation near the transcribed sequence (cis-eQTL, expression quantitative trait locus), and many cis-eQTLs have implications for human disease. Less is known regarding the effects of genetic variation on expression of distant genes (trans-eQTLs) and their biological mechanisms. In this work, we use genome-wide data on SNPs and array-based expression measures from mononuclear cells obtained from a population-based cohort of 1,799 Bangladeshi individuals to characterize cis- and trans-eQTLs and determine if observed trans-eQTL associations are mediated by expression of transcripts in cis with the SNPs showing trans-association, using Sobel tests of mediation. We observed 434 independent trans-eQTL associations at a false-discovery rate of 0.05, and 189 of these trans-eQTLs were also cis-eQTLs (enrichment Pmediator based on Sobel Pmediation signals in two European cohorts, and while only 7 trans-eQTL associations were present in one or both cohorts, 6 showed evidence of cis-mediation. Analyses of simulated data show that complete mediation will be observed as partial mediation in the presence of mediator measurement error or imperfect LD between measured and causal variants. Our data demonstrates that trans-associations can become significantly stronger or switch directions after adjusting for a potential mediator. Using simulated data, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is expected in the presence of strong cis-trans confounding and when the measured cis-transcript is correlated with the true (unmeasured) mediator. In conclusion, by applying mediation analysis to eQTL data, we show that a substantial fraction of observed trans-eQTL associations can be explained by cis-mediation. Future studies should focus on understanding the mechanisms underlying widespread cis-mediation and their relevance to disease biology, as well as using mediation analysis to improve eQTL discovery. PMID:25474530

  2. Demonstrations of Agency in Contemporary International Children's Literature: An Exploratory Critical Content Analysis across Personal, Social, and Cultural Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Janelle B.

    2015-01-01

    International children's literature has the potential to create global experiences and cultural insights for young people confronted with limited and biased images of the world offered by media. The current inquiry was designed to explore, through a critical content analysis approach, international children's literature in which characters…

  3. Improved analysis of long-term monitoring data demonstrates marked regional declines of bat populations in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Ingersoll; Brent J. Sewall; Sybill K. Amelon

    2013-01-01

    Bats are diverse and ecologically important, but are also subject to a suite of severe threats. Evidence for localized bat mortality from these threats is well-documented in some cases, but long-term changes in regional populations of bats remain poorly understood. Bat hibernation surveys provide an opportunity to improve understanding, but analysis is complicated by...

  4. Synthesis and Computational Studies Demonstrate the Utility of an Intramolecular Styryl Diels-Alder Reaction and Di-t-butylhydroxytoluene Assisted [1,3]-Shift to Construct Anticancer dl-Deoxypodophyllotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Diana I; Rencher, Benjamin D; Kwon, Doo-Hyun; Smith, Stacey J; Ess, Daniel H; Andrus, Merritt B

    2018-02-16

    Deoxypodophyllotoxin is a secondary metabolite lignan possessing potent anticancer activity with potential as a precursor for known anticancer drugs, but its use is limited by scarcity from natural sources. We here report the total synthesis of racemic deoxypodophyllotoxin in seven steps using an intramolecular styryl Diels-Alder reaction strategy uniquely suited to assemble the deoxypodophyllotoxin core. Density functional theory was used to analyze concerted, polar, and singlet-open-shell diradical reaction pathways, which identified a low-energy concerted [4 + 2] Diels-Alder pathway followed by a faster di-t-butylhydroxytoluene assisted [1,3]-formal hydrogen shift.

  5. Sensitive inexpensive spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric analysis of ezogabine, levetiracetam and topiramate in tablet formulations using Hantzsch condensation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, F. A.; El-Yazbi, A. F.; Wagih, M. M.; Barary, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    Two highly sensitive, simple and selective spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric assays have been investigated for the analysis of ezogabine, levetiracetam and topiramate in their pure and in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The suggested methods depend on the condensation of the primary amino-groups in the three drugs with acetylacetone and formaldehyde according to Hantzsch reaction yielding highly fluorescent yellow colored dihydropyridine derivatives. The reaction products of ezogabine, levetiracetam and topiramate were measured spectrophotometrically at 418, 390 and 380 nm or spectrofluorimetrically at λem/ex of 495/425 nm, 490/415 nm and 488/410 nm, respectively. Various experimental conditions have been carefully studied to maximize the reaction yield. At the optimum reaction conditions, the calibration curves were rectilinear over the concentration ranges of 8-25, 60-180 and 80-200 μg/mL spectrophotometrically and 0.02-0.2, 0.2-1.2 and 0.2-1.5 μg/mL spectrofluorimetrically for ezogabine, levetiracetam and topiramate, respectively with good correlation coefficients. The suggested methods were applied successfully for the analysis of ezogabine, levetiracetam and topiramate in their commercial tablets with high percentage recoveries and negligible interference from various excipients in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The results were statistically analyzed and showed the absence of any significant difference between both developed and published methods. The procedures were validated and evaluated by the ICH guidelines revealing good reproducibility and accuracy. Therefore, the two proposed methods may be considered of high interest for practical and reliable analysis of ezogabine, levetiracetam and topiramate in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  6. Detecting potential adverse reactions of sulpiride in schizophrenic patients by prescription sequence symmetry analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Chia-Cheng Lai

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous studies have demonstrated sulpiride to be significantly more effective than haloperidol, risperidone and olanzapine in schizophrenic treatment; however, only limited information is available on the potential risks associated with sulpiride treatment. This study attempts to provide information on the potential risks of sulpiride treatment of schizophrenia, especially with regard to unexpected adverse effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with schizophrenia aged 18 and older, newly prescribed with a single antipsychotic medication from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan in the period from 2003 to 2010 were included. A within-subject comparison method, prescription sequence symmetry analysis (PSSA was employed to efficiently identify potential causal relationships while controlling for potential selection bias. RESULTS: A total of 5,750 patients, with a mean age of 39, approximately half of whom were male, constituted the study cohort. The PSSA found that sulpiride was associated with EPS (adjusted SR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.46-2.06 and hyperprolactinemia (12.04; 1.59-91.2. In comparison, EPS caused by haloperidol has a magnitude of 1.99 when analyzed with PSSA, and hyperprolactinemia caused by amisulpride has a magnitude of 8.05, respectively. Another finding was the unexpected increase in the use of stomatological corticosteroids, emollient laxatives, dermatological preparations of corticosteroids, quinolone antibacterials, and topical products for joint and muscular pain, after initiation of sulpiride treatment. CONCLUSIONS: We found sulpiride to be associated with an increased risk of EPS and hyperprolactinemia, and the potential risk could be as high as that induced by haloperidol and amisulpride, respectively. Additionally, our study provides grounds for future investigations into the associations between sulpiride and the increased use of additional drugs for managing adverse effects, including

  7. Stability analysis of non-autonomous reaction-diffusion systems: the effects of growing domains

    KAUST Repository

    Madzvamuse, Anotida; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Maini, Philip K.

    2009-01-01

    By using asymptotic theory, we generalise the Turing diffusively-driven instability conditions for reaction-diffusion systems with slow, isotropic domain growth. There are two fundamental biological differences between the Turing conditions on fixed and growing domains, namely: (i) we need not enforce cross nor pure kinetic conditions and (ii) the restriction to activator-inhibitor kinetics to induce pattern formation on a growing biological system is no longer a requirement. Our theoretical findings are confirmed and reinforced by numerical simulations for the special cases of isotropic linear, exponential and logistic growth profiles. In particular we illustrate an example of a reaction-diffusion system which cannot exhibit a diffusively-driven instability on a fixed domain but is unstable in the presence of slow growth. © Springer-Verlag 2009.

  8. Analysis for mass distribution of proton-induced reactions in intermediate energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao Yu Heng

    2002-01-01

    The mass and charge distribution of residual products produced in the spallation reactions needs to be studied, because it can provide useful information for the disposal of nuclear waste and residual radioactivity generated by the spallation neutron target system. In present work, the Many State Dynamical Model (MSDM) is based on the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM). The authors use it to investigate the mass distribution of Nb, Au and Pb proton-induced reactions in energy range from 100 MeV to 3 GeV. The agreement between the MSDM simulations and the measured data is good in this energy range, and deviations mainly show up in the mass range of 90 - 150 for the high energy proton incident upon Au and Pb

  9. The Analysis of the Adverse Reaction of Traditional Chinese Medicine Tumor Bone Marrow Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhenzhen; Fang, Xiaoyan; Miao, Mingsan

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid increase of cancer patients, chemotherapy is the main method for the clinical treatment of cancer, but also in the treatment of the adverse reactions--bone marrow suppression is often a serious infection caused by patients after chemotherapy and the important cause of mortality. Chinese medicine has obvious advantages in the prevention and treatment of bone marrow depression after chemotherapy. According to tumor bone marrow suppression after chemotherapy of etiology and pathogenesis of traditional Chinese medicine and China national knowledge internet nearly 10 years of traditional Chinese medicine in the prevention and control of the status of clinical and laboratory research of tumor bone marrow suppression, the author analyzed and summarized its characteristics, so as to provide the basis for treating bone marrow suppression of drug research and development, and promote small adverse reactions of the development and utilization of natural medicine and its preparations.

  10. Stability analysis of non-autonomous reaction-diffusion systems: the effects of growing domains

    KAUST Repository

    Madzvamuse, Anotida

    2009-08-29

    By using asymptotic theory, we generalise the Turing diffusively-driven instability conditions for reaction-diffusion systems with slow, isotropic domain growth. There are two fundamental biological differences between the Turing conditions on fixed and growing domains, namely: (i) we need not enforce cross nor pure kinetic conditions and (ii) the restriction to activator-inhibitor kinetics to induce pattern formation on a growing biological system is no longer a requirement. Our theoretical findings are confirmed and reinforced by numerical simulations for the special cases of isotropic linear, exponential and logistic growth profiles. In particular we illustrate an example of a reaction-diffusion system which cannot exhibit a diffusively-driven instability on a fixed domain but is unstable in the presence of slow growth. © Springer-Verlag 2009.

  11. An analysis of ZEEP reaction rate measurements using the iterative five group scheme of METHUSELAH I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F R; Askew, J R [Technical Assessments and Services Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-02-15

    The five group iterative scheme of METHUSELAH I has been used to provide estimates of reaction rates for comparison with measurements in a number of loop experiments in ZEEP. Theory and experiment show good agreement for individual fission rate distributions and for the Pu-239/U-235 reaction rate ratios. Estimates of Lu/Mn ratios are in reasonable agreement with measurements in the H{sub 2}O cores, but become progressively less satisfactory as the D{sub 2}O content of the coolant is increased. It is concluded that for assessment calculations, the introduction of an iterative five group scheme improves the representation of thermal spectra in pressure tube reactor lattices. (author)

  12. Nonlinear electromechanical modelling and dynamical behavior analysis of a satellite reaction wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghalari, Alireza; Shahravi, Morteza

    2017-12-01

    The present research addresses the satellite reaction wheel (RW) nonlinear electromechanical coupling dynamics including dynamic eccentricity of brushless dc (BLDC) motor and gyroscopic effects, as well as dry friction of shaft-bearing joints (relative small slip) and bearing friction. In contrast to other studies, the rotational velocity of the flywheel is considered to be controllable, so it is possible to study the reaction wheel dynamical behavior in acceleration stages. The RW is modeled as a three-phases BLDC motor as well as flywheel with unbalances on a rigid shaft and flexible bearings. Improved Lagrangian dynamics for electromechanical systems is used to obtain the mathematical model of the system. The developed model can properly describe electromechanical nonlinear coupled dynamical behavior of the satellite RW. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the presented approach.

  13. Kudi: A free open-source python library for the analysis of properties along reaction paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    With increasing computational capabilities, an ever growing amount of data is generated in computational chemistry that contains a vast amount of chemically relevant information. It is therefore imperative to create new computational tools in order to process and extract this data in a sensible way. Kudi is an open source library that aids in the extraction of chemical properties from reaction paths. The straightforward structure of Kudi makes it easy to use for users and allows for effortless implementation of new capabilities, and extension to any quantum chemistry package. A use case for Kudi is shown for the tautomerization reaction of formic acid. Kudi is available free of charge at www.github.com/stvogt/kudi.

  14. Practical approaches to the ESI-MS analysis of catalytic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, Lars P E; Stoddard, Rhonda L; McIndoe, J Scott

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a soft ionization technique commonly coupled with liquid or gas chromatography for the identification of compounds in a one-time view of a mixture (for example, the resulting mixture generated by a synthesis). Over the past decade, Scott McIndoe and his research group at the University of Victoria have developed various methodologies to enhance the ability of ESI-MS to continuously monitor catalytic reactions as they proceed. The power, sensitivity and large dynamic range of ESI-MS have allowed for the refinement of several homogenous catalytic mechanisms and could potentially be applied to a wide range of reactions (catalytic or otherwise) for the determination of their mechanistic pathways. In this special feature article, some of the key challenges encountered and the adaptations employed to counter them are briefly reviewed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A Parallel Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometric Method for Analysis of Potential CSF Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Sjödin, Simon; Simonsen, Anja Hviid

    2018-01-01

    SCOPE: The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (PRM-MS) assay consisting of a panel of potential protein biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Thirteen proteins were selected based on their association with neurode......SCOPE: The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (PRM-MS) assay consisting of a panel of potential protein biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Thirteen proteins were selected based on their association...... with neurodegenerative diseases and involvement in synaptic function, secretory vesicle function, or innate immune system. CSF samples were digested and two to three peptides per protein were quantified using stable isotope-labeled peptide standards. RESULTS: Coefficients of variation were generally below 15%. Clinical...

  16. Analysis of Milk Production Traits in Early Lactation Using a Reaction Norm Model with Unknown Covariates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdi Shariati, Mohammad; Su, Guosheng; Madsen, Per

    2007-01-01

    The reaction norm model is becoming a popular approach to study genotype x environment interaction (GxE), especially when there is a continuum of environmental effects. These effects are typically unknown, and an approximation that is used in the literature is to replace them by the phenotypic...... means of each environment. It has been shown that this method results in poor inferences and that a more satisfactory alternative is to infer environmental effects jointly with the other parameters of the model. Such a reaction norm model with unknown covariates and heterogeneous residual variances...... across herds was fitted to milk, protein, and fat yield of first-lactation Danish Holstein cows to investigate the presence of GxE. Data included 188,502 first test-day records from 299 herds and 3,775 herd-years in a time period ranging from 1991 to 2003. Variance components and breeding values were...

  17. Optical interconnects for in-plane high-speed signal distribution at 10 Gb/s: Analysis and demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yin-Jung

    With decreasing transistor size, increasing chip speed, and larger numbers of processors in a system, the performance of a module/system is being limited by the off-chip and off-module bandwidth-distance products. Optical links have moved from fiber-based long distance communications to the cabinet level of 1m--100m, and recently to the backplane-level (10cm--1m). Board-level inter-chip parallel optical interconnects have been demonstrated recently by researchers from Intel, IBM, Fujitsu, NTT and a few research groups in universities. However, the board-level signal/clock distribution function using optical interconnects, the lightwave circuits, the system design, a practically convenient integration scheme committed to the implementation of a system prototype have not been explored or carefully investigated. In this dissertation, the development of a board-level 1 x 4 optical-to-electrical signal distribution at 10Gb/s is presented. In contrast to other prototypes demonstrating board-level parallel optical interconnects that have been drawing much attention for the past decade, the optical link design for the high-speed signal broadcasting is even more complicated and the pitch between receivers could be varying as opposed to fixed-pitch design that has been widely-used in the parallel optical interconnects. New challenges for the board-level high-speed signal broadcasting include, but are not limited to, a new optical link design, a lightwave circuit as a distribution network, and a novel integration scheme that can be a complete radical departure from the traditional assembly method. One of the key building blocks in the lightwave circuit is the distribution network in which a 1 x 4 multimode interference (MMI) splitter is employed. MMI devices operating at high data rates are important in board-level optical interconnects and need to be characterized in the application of board-level signal broadcasting. To determine the speed limitations of MMI devices, the

  18. Synthesis of superheavy elements: Uncertainty analysis to improve the predictive power of reaction models

    OpenAIRE

    Lu , H.; Boilley , D.; Abe , Y.; Shen , C.

    2016-01-01

    13 pages, 13 figures, submitted for publication in PRC; International audience; Background: Synthesis of super-heavy elements is performed by heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions. However , fusion is known to be hindered with respect to what can be observed with lighter ions. Thus some delicate ambiguities remain on the fusion mechanism that eventually lead to severe discrepancies in the calculated formation probabilities coming from different fusion models. Purpose: In the present work, we...

  19. Analysis of Reaction Times and Aerobic Capacities of Soccer Players According to Their Playing Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Cengiz; Karakoc, Onder; Taskin, Mine; Dural, Murat

    2016-01-01

    70 soccer players in Gaziantep amateur league voluntarily participated in this study, (average of their ages 19,17±1,34years, average of their heights 181,28±5,06 cm, average of their body weights 76,75±4,43 kg and average of their sports experiences 3,78±0,95 years) to analyze visual and auditory reaction times and aerobic capacities of amateur…

  20. Analysis of the Sodium-Water Reaction Phenomena by Small Water/Steam Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J-Y; Kim, T-J; Kim, J-M; Kim, B-H; Park, N-C

    2006-01-01

    One of the important problems to be solved in the design and construction of a sodium cooled fast reactor is to confirm the safety and reliability of the steam generator which transfers the heat from the sodium to the water. Sodium-water reaction events may occur when material faults such as a pinhole or cracks occur in the heat transfer tube wall. When such a leak occurs, evaporating water or superheated steam enters through a small leak into the sodium. The surface of this steam jet reacts with the surrounding sodium. Due to turbulence, sodium and particles of the reaction products are drawn at a high velocity into the jet. Impingement of these particles on an adjacent tube is followed by a combined process of a corrosion and erosion which results in a local weakening of the affected tube. If there is no reliable detection available in time, wastage will ultimately result in an additional leak in the adjacent tube. Therefore, it is very significant to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks

  1. Analysis of the 7Be (P, γ) 8B reaction at extremely low energies within the modified two-body potential approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanetullaev, A.; Igamov, S.B.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Obtaining the extremely low energy cross sections for the reaction 7 Be(p,γ ) 8 B is of great interest for a reliable estimation of the rate of this reaction, which is crucial for an accurate determination of the solar neutrino flux. At present, in current literature, there is a rather wide spread in estimation of this rate (see, for instance, Ref. [1] and references therein). In this work, the modified two-body potential approach for analysis of the astrophysical S- factor S(E) for the peripheral direct radiative capture 7 Be(p,γ ) 8 B reaction of astrophysical interest is applied, in which the additional conditions of verification of the peripheral character of the reaction under consideration are formulated. The method involves the information on the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay 8 B → 7 Be+p and allows one to exclude the model dependence of the calculated direct astrophysical S-factor S(E) on the geometric parameters (radius r 0 and diffuseness a) of the adopted Woods-Saxon potential, which is usually used for calculations both for the two-body ( 7 Be+p)-bound state and for the 7 Be p -scattering state. The rather precise experimental astrophysical S-factor, S exp (E), in the energy range 100 7 Be(p,γ ) 8 B reaction, measured recently by the authors of Ref. [1] is used for the analysis. It is demonstrated that at extremely low energies this reaction is strongly peripheral and the measured S exp (E) can be used as an independent source of getting the information about the ANC. The new information about values of the ANC is obtained with an estimation of the weighted mean errors for them, which involves both the experimental errors of the S exp (E), and uncertainty of the method not exceeding 4%. The extracted value of the ANC is equal to C 2 =C 2 1/2 +C 2 3/2 =5.68± 0.15 fm -1 , where the indices show the value total angular momentum of the proton in the (p+ 7 Be)-bound state of 8 B. It was also demonstrated

  2. Immunohistochemical Analysis Using Antipodocalyxin Monoclonal Antibody PcMab-47 Demonstrates Podocalyxin Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Shunsuke; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-10-01

    Podocalyxin is a CD34-related type I transmembrane protein that is highly glycosylated with N-glycan, O-glycan, and keratan sulfate. Podocalyxin was originally found in the podocytes of rat kidney and is reportedly expressed in many types of tumors, including brain tumors, colorectal cancers, and breast cancers. Overexpression of podocalyxin is an independent predictor of progression, metastasis, and poor outcome. We recently immunized mice with recombinant human podocalyxin, which was produced using LN229 glioblastoma cells, and produced a novel antipodocalyxin monoclonal antibody (mAb), PcMab-47, which reacts with endogenous podocalyxin-expressing cancer cell lines and normal cell lines independent of glycosylation in Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical analyses. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical analysis against oral cancers using PcMab-47. PcMab-47-stained oral squamous cell carcinoma cells in a cytoplasmic pattern and detected 26/38 (68.4%) of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells on tissue microarrays. These results indicate that PcMab-47 is useful in detecting podocalyxin of oral cancers for immunohistochemical analysis.

  3. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of metagenome sequence from high-temperature archaeal habitats demonstrate linkages between metabolic potential and geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Inskeep

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP provide an unparalled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (~40-45 Mbase Sanger sequencing per site was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G+C content and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH. These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high temperature systems of YNP.

  4. Kinetics analysis for development of a rate constant estimation model for ultrasonic degradation reaction of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Tomoki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound has been used as an advanced oxidation method for wastewater treatment. Sonochemical degradation of organic compounds in aqueous solution occurs by pyrolysis and/or reaction with hydroxyl radicals. Moreover, kinetics of sonochemical degradation has been proposed. However, the effect of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate has not been investigated. In our previous study, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate of methylene blue was proposed. In this study, sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was performed at various frequencies. Apparent degradation rate constant was evaluated assuming that sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was a first-order reaction. Specifically, we focused on effects of ultrasonic frequency and power on rate constant, and the applicability of our proposed model was demonstrated. Using this approach, maximum sonochemical degradation rate was observed at 490 kHz, which agrees with a previous investigation into the effect of frequency on the sonochemical efficiency value evaluated by KI oxidation dosimetry. Degradation rate increased with ultrasonic power at every frequency. It was also observed that threshold power must be reached for the degradation reaction to progress. The initial methylene blue concentration and the apparent degradation rate constant have a relation of an inverse proportion. Our proposed model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant using ultrasonic power and sonochemical efficiency value can apply to this study which extended the frequency and initial concentration range. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis investigation of CO-O2 and CO-NO reactions over a commercial automotive catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oukaci, R.; Blackmond, D.G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.; Gallaher, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA) is used to study two model reactions, CO oxidation and CO-NO reactions, on a typical formulation of a three-way auto-catalyst. Under steady-state conditions, abrupt switches in the isotopic composition of CO ( 12 C 16 O/ 13 C 18 O) were carried out to produce isotopic transients in both labeled reactants and products. Along with the determination of the average surface lifetimes and concentrations of reaction intermediates, an analysis of the transient responses along the carbon reaction pathway indicated that the distribution of active sites for the formation of CO 2 was bimodal for both reactions. Furthermore, relatively few surface sites contributed to the overall reaction rate

  6. Neutronic analysis of the European reference design of the water cooled lithium lead blanket for a DEMOnstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrizzi, L.

    1994-01-01

    Water cooled lithium lead blankets, using liquid Pb-17Li eutectic both as breeder and neutron multiplier material, and martensitic steel as structural material, represent one of the four families under development in the European DEMO blanket programme. Two concepts were proposed, both reaching tritium breeding self-sufficiency: the 'box-shaped' and the 'cylindrical modules'. Also to this scope a new concept has been defined: 'the single box'. A neutronic analysis of the 'single box' is presented. A full 3-D model including the whole assembly and many of the reactor details (divertors, holes, gaps) has been defined, together with a 3-D neutron source. A tritium breeding ration (TBR) value of 1.19 confirms the tritium breeding self-sufficiency of the design. Selected power densities, calculated for the different materials and zones, are here presented. Some shielding capability considerations with respect to the toroidal field coil system are presented too. (author) 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Specific inhibition of p97/VCP ATPase and kinetic analysis demonstrate interaction between D1 and D2 ATPase domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tsui-Fen; Bulfer, Stacie L; Weihl, Conrad C; Li, Kelin; Lis, Lev G; Walters, Michael A; Schoenen, Frank J; Lin, Henry J; Deshaies, Raymond J; Arkin, Michelle R

    2014-07-29

    The p97 AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities), also called VCP (valosin-containing protein), is an important therapeutic target for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. p97 forms a hexamer composed of two AAA domains (D1 and D2) that form two stacked rings and an N-terminal domain that binds numerous cofactor proteins. The interplay between the three domains in p97 is complex, and a deeper biochemical understanding is needed in order to design selective p97 inhibitors as therapeutic agents. It is clear that the D2 ATPase domain hydrolyzes ATP in vitro, but whether D1 contributes to ATPase activity is controversial. Here, we use Walker A and B mutants to demonstrate that D1 is capable of hydrolyzing ATP and show for the first time that nucleotide binding in the D2 domain increases the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of D1 ATP hydrolysis 280-fold, by increasing kcat 7-fold and decreasing Km about 40-fold. We further show that an ND1 construct lacking D2 but including the linker between D1 and D2 is catalytically active, resolving a conflict in the literature. Applying enzymatic observations to small-molecule inhibitors, we show that four p97 inhibitors (DBeQ, ML240, ML241, and NMS-873) have differential responses to Walker A and B mutations, to disease-causing IBMPFD mutations, and to the presence of the N domain binding cofactor protein p47. These differential effects provide the first evidence that p97 cofactors and disease mutations can alter p97 inhibitor potency and suggest the possibility of developing context-dependent inhibitors of p97. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement and analysis of double-differential neutron emission spectra in (P,N) and (α,N) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.; Mehta, M.K.

    1988-05-01

    The second IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting on Measurement and Analysis of Double-Differential Neutron Emission Spectra in (p,n) and (α,n) Reactions was convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna during 8-10 February, 1988. The main objectives of the Co-ordinated Research Project for which this meeting was held are (i) to extract systematic information about nuclear level densities as a function of excitation energy by analysing the neutron emission spectra from (p,n) and (α,n) reactions on properly selected targets and bombarding energy range, and (ii) to parametrize this information into appropriate phenomenological models to enable reliable extrapolation for general use of level density information in basic and applied nuclear physics related problems. Detailed conclusions and recommendations, together with a summary of the programme during 1988/1989 are attached in the Appendices

  9. An integrated one-chip-sensor system for microRNA quantitative analysis based on digital droplet polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukuda, Masahiko; Wiederkehr, Rodrigo Sergio; Cai, Qing; Majeed, Bivragh; Fiorini, Paolo; Stakenborg, Tim; Matsuno, Toshinobu

    2016-04-01

    A silicon microfluidic chip was developed for microRNA (miRNA) quantitative analysis. It performs sequentially reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction in a digital droplet format. Individual processes take place on different cavities, and reagent and sample mixing is carried out on a chip, prior to entering each compartment. The droplets are generated on a T-junction channel before the polymerase chain reaction step. Also, a miniaturized fluorescence detector was developed, based on an optical pick-up head of digital versatile disc (DVD) and a micro-photomultiplier tube. The chip integrated in the detection system was tested using synthetic miRNA with known concentrations, ranging from 300 to 3,000 templates/µL. Results proved the functionality of the system.

  10. An Optimized Elasto-Plastic Subgrade Reaction For Modeling The Response Of A Nonlinear Foundation For A Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Richard Paul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Geotechnical and structural engineers are faced with a difficult task when their designs interact with each other. For complex projects, this is more the norm than the exception. In order to help bridge that gap, a method for modeling the behavior of a foundation using a simple elasto-plastic subgrade reaction was developed. The method uses an optimization technique to position 4-6 springs along a pile foundation to produce similar load deflection characteristics that were modeled by more sophisticated geotechnical finite element software. The methodology uses an Excel spreadsheet for accepting user input and delivering an optimized subgrade spring stiffness, yield, and position along the pile. In this way, the behavior developed from the geotechnical software can be transferred to the structural analysis software. The optimization is achieved through the solver add-in within Excel. Additionally, a beam on a nonlinear elastic foundation model is used to compute deflections of the optimized subgrade reaction configuration.

  11. Architectural analysis and intraoperative measurements demonstrate the unique design of the multifidus muscle for lumbar spine stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Samuel R; Kim, Choll W; Eng, Carolyn M; Gottschalk, Lionel J; Tomiya, Akihito; Garfin, Steven R; Lieber, Richard L

    2009-01-01

    a low fiber length-to-muscle length ratio) demonstrates that the multifidus muscle is uniquely designed as a stabilizer to produce large forces. Furthermore, multifidus sarcomeres are positioned on the ascending portion of the length-tension curve, allowing the muscle to become stronger as the spine assumes a forward-leaning posture.

  12. Isotopic Analysis of Fingernails as a USGS Open House Demonstration of the Use of Stable Isotopes in Foodweb Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Choy, D.

    2011-12-01

    The USGS Isotope Tracers Project uses stable isotopes and tritium to add a unique dimension of chemical information to a wide range of environmental investigations. The use and application of isotopes is usually an unfamiliar and even esoteric topic to the general public. Therefore during three USGS open house events, as a public outreach effort, we demonstrated the use of stable isotopes by analyzing nitrogen and carbon isotopes from very small fragments of fingernail from willing participants. We titled the exhibit "You Are What You Eat". The results from all participants were plotted on a graph indicating the general influence of different food groups on the composition of body tissues as represented by fingernails. All participants were assigned a number and no personal-identification information was collected. A subset of participants provided us with an estimate of the number of days a week various foods were eaten and if they were vegetarians, vegans or non-vegetarians. Volunteers from our research group were on hand to explain and discuss fundamental concepts such as how foods attain their isotopic composition, the difference between C3 and C4 plants, the effects of assimilation, trophic enrichment, and the various uses of stable isotopes in environmental studies. The results of the fingernail analyses showed the variation of the range of isotopic compositions among about 400 people at each event, the distinct influence of C4 plants (mainly corn and cane sugar) on our carbon isotopic composition, and the isotopic differences between vegetarians and non vegetarians among other details (http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/projects/fingernails/). A poll of visitors attending the open house event in 2006 indicated that "You Are What You Eat" was among the most popular exhibits. Following the first two open house events we were contacted by a group of researchers from Brazil who had completed a very similar study. Our collaboration resulted in a publication in

  13. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for diagnosing infectious mononucleosis in pediatric patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sha-Yi; Yang, Jing-Wei; Shao, Jing-Bo; Liao, Xue-Lian; Lu, Zheng-Hua; Jiang, Hui

    2016-05-01

    In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the diagnostic role of Epstein-Barr virus deoxyribonucleic acid detection and quantitation in the serum of pediatric and young adult patients with infectious mononucleosis. The primary outcome of this meta-analysis was the sensitivity and specificity of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and quantitation using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching for articles that were published through September 24, 2014 in the following databases: Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. The following keywords were used for the search: "Epstein-Barr virus," "infectious mononucleosis," "children/young adults/infant/pediatric," and "polymerase chain reaction or PCR." Three were included in this analysis. We found that for detection by PCR, the pooled sensitivity for detecting EBV DNA was 77% (95%CI, 66-86%) and the pooled specificity for was 98% (95%CI, 93-100%). Our findings indicate that this PCR-based assay has high specificity and good sensitivity for detecting of EBV DNA, indicating it may useful for identifying patients with infectious mononucleosis. This assay may also be helpful to identify young athletic patients or highly physically active pediatric patients who are at risk for a splenic rupture due to acute infectious mononucleosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Analysis of Native-Like Proteins and Protein Complexes Using Cation to Anion Proton Transfer Reactions (CAPTR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Bush, Matthew F.

    2015-12-01

    Mass spectra of native-like protein complexes often exhibit narrow charge-state distributions, broad peaks, and contributions from multiple, coexisting species. These factors can make it challenging to interpret those spectra, particularly for mixtures with significant heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate the use of ion/ion proton transfer reactions to reduce the charge states of m/ z-selected, native-like ions of proteins and protein complexes, a technique that we refer to as cation to anion proton transfer reactions (CAPTR). We then demonstrate that CAPTR can increase the accuracy of charge state assignments and the resolution of interfering species in native mass spectrometry. The CAPTR product ion spectra for pyruvate kinase exhibit ~30 peaks and enable unambiguous determination of the charge state of each peak, whereas the corresponding precursor spectra exhibit ~6 peaks and the assigned charge states have an uncertainty of ±3%. 15+ bovine serum albumin and 21+ yeast enolase dimer both appear near m/ z 4450 and are completely unresolved in a mixture. After a single CAPTR event, the resulting product ions are baseline resolved. The separation of the product ions increases dramatically after each subsequent CAPTR event; 12 events resulted in a 3000-fold improvement in separation relative to the precursor ions. Finally, we introduce a framework for interpreting and predicting the figures of merit for CAPTR experiments. More generally, these results suggest that CAPTR strongly complements other mass spectrometry tools for analyzing proteins and protein complexes, particularly those in mixtures.

  15. Development of the SPIKE code for analysis of the sodium-water reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Tai; Park, Jin Ho; Choi, Jong Hyeun; Kim, Tae Joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-08-01

    In the secondary loop of liquid metal reactors, including SG, water leak into sodium causes the sudden increase of pressure by the H{sub 2} and heat generated from reaction. At few miliseconds after leak, a sharp and short-lived increase of pressure is generated and its propagation depends on the acoustic constraint characteristics of secondary loop. As increasing leak amount of water, another pressure increase is caused by H{sub 2} and its transients depends on the resistance of pressure opening system, such as rupture disc. For prediction of the transients of initial spike pressure, a code of SPIKE was developed. The code was based on the following simplifications and assumptions: combination of total and half release of H{sub 2} rate, spherical shape of H{sub 2} bubble, compressible and Newtonian fluid for sodium. The program was built in FOTRAN language and consisted of 5 modules. Several sample calculations were performed to test the code and to determine the scale down factor of experimental facilities for experimental verification of the code: parameter study of the variables in chemical reaction model, comparison study with results calculated by superposition methods for simple piping structures, comparison study with results calculated by previous researchers, and calculation for KALIMER models of various size. With these calculation results, the generally predicted phenomena of sodium water reaction can be explained and the calculated ones by SPIKE code were well agreed with the previous study. And the scale down factor can be determined. (author). 88 refs., 99 figs., 39 tabs.

  16. Chimeric analysis of EGFP and DsRed2 transgenic mice demonstrates polyclonal maintenance of pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Je-Young; Siswanto, Antoni; Harimoto, Kenichi; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi

    2013-06-01

    The pancreatic islet is an assembly of specific endocrine cells. There are many conflicting reports regarding whether the acinus develops from single or multiple progenitor cells. This study investigated the development and maintenance clonality of the pancreatic acinus and duct using a chimeric analysis with EGFP and DsRed2 transgenic mice. Chimeric mice (G-R mice) were obtained by the aggregation method, using 8-cell stage embryos from EGFP and DsRed2 transgenic mice. The islets from the G-R mice were chimeric and mosaic, consisting of either EGFP- or DsRed2-positive populations, as in previous reports. On the other hand, most acini developed from either EGFP or DsRed2 origin, but some were chimeric. Interestingly, these chimeric acini were clearly separated into two-color regions and were not mosaic. Some large intralobular pancreatic ducts consisting of more than 10 cells were found to be chimeric, but no small ducts made up of less than 9 cells were chimeric. Our histological observations suggest that the pancreatic acinus polyclonally and directionally is maintained by multiple progenitor cells. Pancreatic large ducts also seem to develop polyclonally and might result from the assembly of small ducts that develop from a single origin. These findings provide useful information for further understanding pancreatic maintenance.

  17. In situ demonstration and characteristic analysis of the protease components from marine bacteria using substrate immersing zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Yang, XingHao; Huang, JiaFeng; Wu, RiBang; Wu, CuiLing; He, HaiLun; Li, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Zymography is a widely used technique for the study of proteolytic activities on the basis of protein substrate degradation. In this study, substrate immersing zymography was used in analyzing proteolysis of extracellular proteases. Instead of being added directly into a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel, the substrates were added into the immersing solution after electrophoresis. Substrate immersing zymography could accurately determine the molecular weight of trypsin, and band intensities were linearly related to the amount of protease. The diversity of extracellular proteases produced by different marine bacteria was analyzed by substrate immersing zymography, and large variations of proteolysis were evidenced. The proteolytic activity of Pseudoalteromonas strains was more complicated than that of other strains. Five Pseudoalteromonas strains and five Vibrio strains were further analyzed by substrate immersing zymography with different substrates (casein and gelatin), and multiple caseinolytic and gelatinolytic profiles were detected. The extracellular proteolytic profiles of Pseudoalteromonas strains exhibited a large intraspecific variation. Molecular weight (Mw) of the main protease secreted by Vibrio was 35 kDa. Additionally, the time-related change trends of the activities of extracellular proteases produced by Pseudoalteromonas sp. SJN2 were analyzed by substrate immersing zymography. These results implied the potential application of substrate immersing zymography for the analysis of the diversity of bacterial extracellular proteases.

  18. Analysis of (d,n) reactions via the Dirac DWBA with finite range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Eric; McNeil, J. A.

    2004-10-01

    The Distorted-wave Born Approximation (DWBA) is used to calculate differential cross sections of low-energy deuteron stripping reactions. The implementation makes use of Dirac phenomenological potentials with an exact treatment of finite-range effects. The mutual interaction of these effects upon the resulting calculations will be presented. In addition, we use our finite-range implementation to study the effect on the cross sections due to the model dependence of the internal deuteron wave function. Specifically, we examine this effect using the internal deuteron wave functions generated with the Reid soft-core, Bonn, and Argonne-V18 potentials.

  19. [Neurophysiological analysis of the development of endocrine and hypertensive reactions in long-term emotional stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiragova, M G; Arkhangel'skaia, M I; Polyntsev, Iu V; Vorontsov, V I

    1985-08-01

    A study was made of the effect of chronic emotional stress on the formation of hypertension in animals. This was shown to be related to dynamic changes in the function of the CNS, particularly in the hypothalamic apparatus of the neuroendocrine control. The above changes played a role in the formation of hypertensive vascular reactions accompanied by a high hormonal secretion of the adrenal cortex and thyroid. During stabilization of high arterial blood pressure at the late stages of the "after-effect", the hormonal secretion returns to normal.

  20. Nuclear reaction analysis of hydrogen in amorphous silicon and silicon carbide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guivarc'h, A.; Le Contellec, M.; Richard, J.; Ligeon, E.; Fontenille, J.; Danielou, R.

    1980-01-01

    The 1 H( 11 B, α)αα nuclear reaction is used to determine the H content and the density of amorphous semiconductor Si 1 -sub(x)Csub(x)H 2 and SiHsub(z) thin films. Rutherford backscattering is used to determine the x values and infrared transmission to study the hydrogen bonds. We have observed a transfer or/and a release of hydrogen under bombardment by various ions and we show that this last effect must be taken into account for a correct determination of the hydrogen content. An attempt is made to correlate the hydrogen release with electronic and nuclear energy losses. (orig.)

  1. Stability test and analysis of the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Subsystem thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applewhite, John; Hurlbert, Eric; Krohn, Douglas; Arndt, Scott; Clark, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The results are reported of a test program conducted on the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Subsystem thruster in order to investigate the effects of trapped helium bubbles and saturated propellants on stability, determine if thruster-to-thruster stability variations are significant, and determine stability under STS-representative conditions. It is concluded that the thruster design is highly reliable in flight and that burn-through has not occurred. Significantly unstable thrusters are screened out, and wire wrap is found to protect against chamber burn-throughs and to provide a fail-safe thruster for this situation.

  2. Detection of submonolayer oxygen-18 on a gold surface by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L S; Kenny, M J; Wieczorek, L [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1994-12-31

    A gold substrate is the preferred solid surface for formation of an organic self-assembled monolayer ( SAM ). Device fabrication process may require the gold film to be exposed to photolithographic processing and plasma treatment prior to molecular assembly. It has been observed that oxygen plasma treatment prevents the formation of SAMs; however, subsequent treatment with an argon plasma allows assembly of the organic monolayers. To understand the mechanisms involved, a plasma containing 98% {sup 18}O was used and the film surface was analysed using the {sup 18}O (p,{alpha}){sup 15}N nuclear reaction. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  3. Measurement and analysis of excitation functions in (α,np) reactions on 128,130Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.P.; Sankaracharyulu, M.G.V.; Ansari, M.A.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H.D.

    1992-02-01

    Excitation functions for the reactions 128 Te(α,np) 130 I, 130 Te(α,np) 132 I and 130 Te(α,np) 132m I have been measured using stacked foil technique and have also been calculated using statistical model with and without the inclusion of pre-equilibrium emission. As expected, inclusion of pre-equilibrium emission in compound nucleus calculations agree well with the experimental excitation functions. The pre-equilibrium fraction has been found to be energy and target mass number dependent. (author). 37 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Optimization of phase analysis of refractory alloys in the gas-ion-reaction chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenkamp, H.J.; Hoven, H.; Koizlik, K.; Nickel, H.

    1980-04-01

    Reactor components outside the core which are under high thermal and mechanical stresses are made from refractory alloys. For basic research and for quality control, these materials are investigated by metallography, which is an independent group of characterization procedures as well as basis for many other methods. An important way of increasing the information about a material yielded by metallography is the expansions of phase contrast, in particular the phase contrasting in the gas-ion-reaction chamber. In this paper, the experimental procedure is described and the process of optimizing the procedure with respect to the Ni- and Fe-based refractory alloys examined in the IRW is discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Linear regression analysis of potentiometric titration data for asymmetric redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mar'yanov, B.M.; Gavrilenko, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    A statistical method of processing the curves of potentiometric titration for homogeneous asymmetric redox reactions has been suggested. The method was tested using a model titrimetric system Mohr's salt-K 2 Cr 2 O 7 and was employed for Te determination in an individual solution, semiconductor alloy and CdTe ceramics. Random error of the equivalence point evaluation by the data of a specific titration of 0.1-0.01 M solutions does not exceed 0.3% in case of titration of 0.001 M solutions it increases up to 1.2%. The value of s r varies from 0.0006 to 0.007

  6. Detection of submonolayer oxygen-18 on a gold surface by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Kenny, M.J.; Wieczorek, L. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1993-12-31

    A gold substrate is the preferred solid surface for formation of an organic self-assembled monolayer ( SAM ). Device fabrication process may require the gold film to be exposed to photolithographic processing and plasma treatment prior to molecular assembly. It has been observed that oxygen plasma treatment prevents the formation of SAMs; however, subsequent treatment with an argon plasma allows assembly of the organic monolayers. To understand the mechanisms involved, a plasma containing 98% {sup 18}O was used and the film surface was analysed using the {sup 18}O (p,{alpha}){sup 15}N nuclear reaction. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  7. Analysis of discrete reaction-diffusion equations for autocatalysis and continuum diffusion equations for transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chi-Jen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyze both the spatiotemporal behavior of: (A) non-linear “reaction” models utilizing (discrete) reaction-diffusion equations; and (B) spatial transport problems on surfaces and in nanopores utilizing the relevant (continuum) diffusion or Fokker-Planck equations. Thus, there are some common themes in these studies, as they all involve partial differential equations or their discrete analogues which incorporate a description of diffusion-type processes. However, there are also some qualitative differences, as shall be discussed below.

  8. Neutron-induced complex reaction analysis with 3D nuclear track simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Palfalvi, J.K.; Akatov, Yu.; Arevalo, O.; Greaves, E.D.; Nemeth, P.; Palacios, D.; Szabo, J.; Eoerdoegh, I.

    2005-01-01

    Complex (multiple) etched tracks are analysed through digitised images and 3D simulation by a purpose-built algorithm. From a binary track image an unfolding procedure is followed to generate a 3D track model, from which several track parameters are estimated. The method presented here allows the deposited energy, that originated from particle fragmentation or carbon spallation by means of induced tracks in commercially available PADC detectors, to be estimated. Results of evaluated nuclear tracks related to 12 C (n,3αn ' ) reaction are presented here. The detectors were exposed on the ISS in 2001

  9. Preliminary Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) of the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Ground Demonstration System. Report 76-311965

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.G.

    1976-01-01

    A Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) has been made of the Brayton Isotope Power System Ground Demonstration System (BIPS-GDS). Details of the analysis are discussed. The BIPS Flight System was recently analyzed in an AIRPHX report. Since the results of the Flight System FMECA are directly applicable to the BIPS to be tested in the GDS mode, the contents of the earlier FMECA have not been repeated in this current analysis. The BIPS-FS FMECA has been reviewed and determined to be essentially current

  10. Making the invisible visible: bioelectrical impedance analysis demonstrates unfavourable body composition in rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijn, N P C; van Tuyl, L H D; Bultink, I E M; Lems, W F; Earthman, C P; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M A E

    2014-01-01

    To examine differences between the assessment of body composition by body mass index (BMI) and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The body composition of RA patients was assessed during their visit to the outpatient department of a Dutch academic hospital using BMI, fat-free mass index (FFMI), and fat mass index (FMI). FFMI and FMI were determined by single-frequency BIA. Sixty-five consecutive RA patients (83% women, mean age 58 years, median disease duration 7 years) with moderately active disease [mean Disease Activity Score using 28 joint counts (DAS28) = 3.40; mean Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Index (RADAI) score = 3.49] and moderate disability [mean Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score = 0.87] were included. Based on BMI, 2% of our study population were underweight, 45% had a healthy body composition, and 54% were overweight or obese. Based on BIA, 18% of the patients showed a low FFMI and 74% had a high or very high FMI. Low FFMI was found in 44% of the women with a normal BMI, and high FMI was found in 40% of the women and 75% of the men with a normal BMI. A high frequency of unfavourable body composition, predominantly reduced FFMI and elevated FMI, was found in a cohort of RA patients with moderately active disease, turning BMI into an unreliable method for assessment of body composition in RA. BIA, however, might be the preferred method to assess FFMI and FMI in RA patients in clinical practice, as it is easy to use and relatively inexpensive.

  11. Analysis of hepatic transcriptome demonstrates altered lipid metabolism following Lactobacillus johnsonii BS15 prevention in chickens with subclinical necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xiaodan; Zeng, Dong; Wang, Hesong; Ni, Xueqin; Lai, Jing; Liu, Lei; Khalique, Abdul; Pan, Kangcheng; Jing, Bo

    2018-04-20

    Subclinical necrotic enteritis (SNE) widely outbreaks in chickens which inflicted growth-slowing, causing enormous social and economic burdens. To better understand the molecular underpinnings of SNE on lipid metabolism and explore novel preventative strategies against SNE, we studied the regulatory mechanism of a potential probiotic, Lactobacillus johnsonii BS15 on the lipid metabolism pathways involved in chickens with SNE. One hundred eighty one-day-old chickens were randomly divided into three groups and arranged with basal diet (control and SNE group). Added with BS15 (1 × 10 6  cfu/g) or Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) liquid medium for 28 days. The hepatic gene expression of each group was then measured using high-throughput analysis methods (RNA-Seq). Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to detect the expression changes of the related genes. The results showed that there are eleven lipid metabolic pathways were found during the prevention of BS15 treatment in SNE chickens by RNA-Seq, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway and arachidonic acid metabolism. BS15 notably facilitated the expressions of fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2), acyl-CoA synthetase bubblegum family member 1 (ACSBG1), perilipin 1 (PLIN1) and perilipin 2 (PLIN2), which were involved in PPAR signaling pathway of SNE chickens. Besides, suppression of phospholipase A2 group IVA (PLA2G4A) in arachidonic acid metabolism was observed in SNE chickens after BS15 prevention. The expression patterns of FABP2, ACSBG1, PLIN1, PLIN2 and PLA24G in qRT-PCR validation were consistent with RNA-Seq results. These findings indicate that SNE may affect the hepatic lipid metabolism of chickens. Meanwhile, BS15 pretreatment may provide a prospective natural prophylaxis strategy against SNE through improving the PPAR signaling pathway and arachidonic acid metabolism.

  12. Coop-Seq Analysis Demonstrates that Sox2 Evokes Latent Specificities in the DNA Recognition by Pax6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Caizhen; Malik, Vikas; Chang, Yiming Kenny; Veerapandian, Veeramohan; Srivastava, Yogesh; Huang, Yong-Heng; Hou, Linlin; Cojocaru, Vlad; Stormo, Gary D; Jauch, Ralf

    2017-11-24

    Sox2 and Pax6 co-regulate genes in neural lineages and the lens by forming a ternary complex likely facilitated allosterically through DNA. We used the quantitative and scalable cooperativity-by-sequencing (Coop-seq) approach to interrogate Sox2/Pax6 dimerization on a DNA library where five positions of the Pax6 half-site were randomized yielding 1024 cooperativity factors. Consensus positions normally required for the high-affinity DNA binding by Pax6 need to be mutated for effective dimerization with Sox2. Out of the five randomized bases, a 5' thymidine is present in most of the top ranking elements. However, this thymidine maps to a region outside of the Pax half site and is not expected to directly interact with Pax6 in known binding modes suggesting structural reconfigurations. Re-analysis of ChIP-seq data identified several genomic regions where the cooperativity promoting sequence pattern is co-bound by Sox2 and Pax6. A highly conserved Sox2/Pax6 bound site near the Sprouty2 locus was verified to promote cooperative dimerization designating Sprouty2 as a potential target reliant on Sox2/Pax6 cooperativity in several neural cell types. Collectively, the functional interplay of Sox2 and Pax6 demands the relaxation of high-affinity binding sites and is enabled by alternative DNA sequences. We conclude that this binding mode evolved to warrant that a subset of target genes is only regulated in the presence of suitable partner factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Alternative diagnostic strategies for coronary artery disease in women: demonstration of the usefulness and efficiency of probability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, J.A.; Wijns, W.; Vanbutsele, R.J.; Robert, A.; De Coster, P.; Brasseur, L.A.; Beckers, C.; Detry, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Alternative strategies using conditional probability analysis for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) were examined in 93 infarct-free women presenting with chest pain. Another group of 42 consecutive female patients was prospectively analyzed. For this latter group, the physician had access to the pretest and posttest probability of CAD before coronary angiography. These 135 women all underwent stress electrocardiographic, thallium scintigraphic, and coronary angiographic examination. The pretest and posttest probabilities of coronary disease were derived from a computerized Bayesian algorithm. Probability estimates were calculated by the four following hypothetical strategies: SO, in which history, including risk factors, was considered; S1, in which history and stress electrocardiographic results were considered; S2, in which history and stress electrocardiographic and stress thallium scintigraphic results were considered; and S3, in which history and stress electrocardiographic results were used, but in which stress scintigraphic results were considered only if the poststress probability of CAD was between 10% and 90%, i.e., if a sufficient level of diagnostic certainty could not be obtained with the electrocardiographic results alone. The strategies were compared with respect to accuracy with the coronary angiogram as the standard. For both groups of women, S2 and S3 were found to be the most accurate in predicting the presence or absence of coronary disease (p less than .05). However, it was found with use of S3 that more than one-third of the thallium scintigrams could have been avoided without loss of accuracy. It was also found that diagnostic catheterization performed to exclude CAD as a diagnosis could have been avoided in half of the patients without loss of accuracy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. A Magnetic Circuit Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkooy, John; Lowe, June

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration designed to illustrate Faraday's, Ampere's, and Lenz's laws and to reinforce the concepts through the analysis of a two-loop magnetic circuit. Can be made dramatic and challenging for sophisticated students but is suitable for an introductory course in electricity and magnetism. (JRH)

  15. Mathematical analysis and numerical simulation of patterns in fractional and classical reaction-diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owolabi, Kolade M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine pattern formation in the sub— and super-diffusive scenarios and compare it with that of classical or standard diffusive processes in two-component fractional reaction-diffusion systems that modeled a predator-prey dynamics. The focus of the work concentrates on the use of two separate mathematical techniques, we formulate a Fourier spectral discretization method as an efficient alternative technique to solve fractional reaction-diffusion problems in higher-dimensional space, and later advance the resulting systems of ODEs in time with the adaptive exponential time-differencing solver. Obviously, the fractional Fourier approach is able to achieve spectral convergence up to machine precision regardless of the fractional order α, owing to the fact that our approach is able to give full diagonal representation of the fractional operator. The complexity of the dynamics in this system is theoretically discussed and graphically displayed with some examples and numerical simulations in one, two and three dimensions.

  16. Development of automatic nuclear emulsion plate analysis system and its application to elementary particle reactions, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushida, Noriyuki; Otani, Masashi; Kumazaki, Noriyasu

    1984-01-01

    This system is composed of precise coordinate measuring apparatuses, a stage controller and various peripherals, employing NOVA 4/C as the host computer. The analyzed results are given as the output to a printer or an XY plotter. The data required for experiment, sent from Nagoya University and others, are received by the host computer through an acoustic coupler, and stored in floppy disks. This paper contains simple explanation on the monitor for the events which occur immediately after the on-line measurement ''MTF 1'', the XY plotter and the acoustic coupler, which hold important position in the system in spite of low cost, due to the development of useful program, as those were not described in the previous paper. The three-dimensional reconstruction of tracks and various errors, corrective processing and analytical processing after corrective processing as off-line processing are also described. In addition, the application of the system was made to the E-531 neutrino experiment in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which attempted to measure the life of the charm particles generated in neutrino reaction with a composite equipment composed of nuclear plates and various counters. First, the outline of the equipment, next, the location of neutrino reaction and the surveillance of charm particle decay using MTF program as the analyzing method at the target, and thirdly, the emulsion-counter data fitting are explained, respectively. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%

  18. Bridge mediated two-electron transfer reactions: Analysis of stepwise and concerted pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; May, V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of nonadiabatic donor (D)-acceptor (A) two-electron transfer (TET) mediated by a single regular bridge (B) is developed. The presence of different intermediate two-electron states connecting the reactant state D -- BA with the product state DBA -- results in complex multiexponential kinetics. The conditions are discussed at which a reduction to two-exponential as well as single-exponential kinetics becomes possible. For the latter case the rate K TET is calculated, which describes the bridge-mediated reaction as an effective two-electron D-A transfer. In the limit of small populations of the intermediate TET states D - B - A, DB -- A, D - BA - , and DB - A - , K TET is obtained as a sum of the rates K TET (step) and K TET (sup) . The first rate describes stepwise TET originated by transitions of a single electron. It starts at D -- BA and reaches DBA -- via the intermediate state D - BA - . These transitions cover contributions from sequential as well as superexchange reactions all including reduced bridge states. In contrast, a specific two-electron superexchange mechanism from D -- BA to DBA -- defines K TET (sup) . An analytic dependence of K TET (step) and K TET (sup) on the number of bridging units is presented and different regimes of D-A TET are studied

  19. Quantitative analysis of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene expression in human tumors by polymerase chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noonan, K.E.; Beck, C.; Holzmayer, T.A.; Chin, J.E.; Roninson, I.B.; Wunder, J.S.; Andrulis, I.L.; Gazdar, A.F.; Willman, C.L.; Griffith, B.; Von Hoff, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    The resistance of tumor cells ot chemotheraprutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in bitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severalfold increase in cellular drug resistance, MDR1 expression levels are close to the limits of detection by conventional assays. MDR1 expression has been frequently observed in human tumors after chemotherapy and in some but not all types of clinically refactory tumors untreated with chemotherapeutic drugs. The authors have devised a highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clincal samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction. They have used this assay to measure MDR1 gene expression in MDR cell lines and >300 normal tissues, tumor-derived cell lines, and clinical specimens of untreated tumors of the types in which MDR1 expression was rarely observed by standard assays. Low levels of MDR1 expression were found by polymerase chain reaction in most solid tumors and leukemias tested. The frequency of samples without detectable MDR1 expression varied among different types of tumors; MDR1-negative samples were ost common among tumor types known to be relatively responsive to chemotherapy

  20. Immunohistochemical analysis of mechanoreceptors in the human posterior cruciate ligament: a demonstration of its proprioceptive role and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle, M E; Harwin, S F; Maestro, A; Murcia, A; Vega, J A

    1998-12-01

    Although long-term studies report successful results with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), performed with or without posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retention, controversy exists as to which is preferable in regard to patient outcome and satisfaction. The possible proprioceptive role of the PCL may account for a more normal feeling of the arthroplasty. Although the PCL has been examined using various histological techniques, immunohistochemical techniques are the most sensitive for neural elements. Therefore an immunohistochemical study was designed to determine the patterns of innervation, the morphological types of the proprioceptors, and their immunohistochemical profile. During TKA, samples were obtained from 22 osteoarthritic PCLs and subjected to immunohistochemical analysis with mouse monoclonal antibodies against neurofilament protein (NFP), S100 protein (S100P), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), and vimentin (all present in neuromechanoreceptors). Three normal PCLs from cadaveric specimens were also obtained and analyzed for comparison. Five types of sensory corpuscles were observed in both the normal and the arthritic PCLs: simple lamellar, Pacini-like, Ruffini, Krause-like, and morphologically unclassified. Their structure included a central axon, inner core, and capsule in lamellar and Pacini corpuscles and variable intracorpuscular axons and periaxonal cells in the Ruffini and Krause-like corpuscles. The immunohistochemical profile showed the central axon to have NFP immunoreactivity, periaxonal cells to have S100P and vimentin immunoreactivity, and the capsule to have EMA and vimentin immunoreactivity. Nerve fibers and free nerve endings displayed NFP and S100P immunoreactivity. The immunohistochemical profile of the PCL sensory corpuscles is almost identical to that of cutaneous sensory corpuscles. Some prior histological studies of the PCL reported Golgi-like mechanoreceptors, and others found encapsulated corpuscles but no Golgi-like structures