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Sample records for reacting wall jet

  1. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    CERN Document Server

    Pouransari, Z; Johansson, A V

    2015-01-01

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooli...

  2. Quantitative visualization of the chemical reacting JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K.; Arata, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Madarame, H. [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    The sodium-water reaction should be precisely evaluated for the safety analysis of the sodium-cooled nuclear power plant. To evaluate these chemical reacting jet, the characteristics of the reaction and the mole fraction distributions of the reacting material should be known. In this study, to evaluate the basic characteristics, two fluid jet and chemical reacting jet was measured by the PIV and DELIF. The new dye pair for the dual emission LIF technique was proposed to measure the pH distribution. The Quinine for pH sensitive dye with blue emission and Rhodamine 6G for non-sensitive dye with orange emission, were excited by the third harmonic of Nd:YAG laser (355nm). The high accurate measurement could be achieved for the range of pH 4.0 to 5.5. The ammonia jet into acetic acid was measured using the proposed dye. The effectiveness of the present method was demonstrated. (author)

  3. Experimental investigation of a reacting transverse jet in a high pressure oscillating vitiated crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugger, Christopher A.

    near a pressure node of the 1st axial combustor mode, where the dominant flowfield fluctuations are a time-varying crossflow velocity. For the non-reacting jets, the nominal jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratio is 19. For the reacting jets, the nominal jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratio is 6. Two cross sectional planes parallel to the jet injection wall are investigated: 1 and 2.7 jet diameters from the jet injection wall. The combustor crossflow high frequency wall mounted pressure data is given for each test case. The velocity and OH-PLIF data is presented as instantaneous snapshots, time and phase averaged flowfields, modal decompositions using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Dynamic Mode Decomposition, and a jet cycle analysis relative to the crossflow acoustic cycle. Analysis of the five test cases shows that the jet cross sectional velocity and OH-PLIF dynamics display a multitude of dynamics. These are often organized into shear layer dynamics and wake dynamics, but are not mutually exclusive. For large unsteady crossflow velocity oscillations at the 1st axial combustor mode, both dynamics show strong organization at the unsteady crossflow frequency. Deciphering these dynamics is complicated by the fact that the ostensible jet response to the time-varying crossflow is a time-varying jet penetration. This drives the jet toward and away from the jet injection wall. These motions are perpendicular to the laser sheet and creates significant out-of-plane motions. The amplitude of crossflow unsteadiness appears to play a role in the sharpness of the wake dynamics. For the non-reacting cases, the wake dynamics are strong and dominant spectral features in the flowfield. For the reacting cases, the wake dynamics are spectrally distinct in the lower amplitude crossflow unsteadiness case, but a large unsteady amplitude crossflow appears to suppress the spectral bands in the frequency range corresponding to wake vortex dynamics.

  4. Experimental Vortex Identification and Characterization in Reacting Jets in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vedanth; Emerson, Ben; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Reacting jets in crossflow (JICF) is an important canonical flow field in combustion problems where there is strong coupling between heat release and the evolution of vortical structures. We use vortex identification studies to experimentally characterize the spatial evolution of vortex dynamics in a reacting JICF. A vortex identification algorithm was designed to operate on particle image velocimetry (PIV) data and its raw Mie scattering images. The algorithm uses the velocity fields to obtain comparisons between the strain rate and the rotation rate. Additionally, the algorithm uses the raw Mie scattering data to identify regions where the high acceleration at vortex cores has centrifuged seeding particles out of the vortex cores. Together, these methods are used to estimate the vortex location and circulation. Analysis was done on 10 kHz PIV data from a reacting JICF experiment, and the resulting vortex trajectory, and growth rate statistics are presented. Results are compared between non-reacting JICF and reacting studies performed with different jet density ratios and different levels of acoustic forcing. We observed how the density ratio, the frequency and amplitude of the acoustic forcing affected the vortex characteristics and growth rate.

  5. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  6. Wall jets created by single and twin high pressure jet impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P.; Wilson, M.

    1993-03-01

    An extensive experimental investigation into the nature of the wall jets produced by single and twin normal jet impingement has been undertaken. Wall jet velocity profiles have been recorded up to 70 jet diameters from the impingement point, at pressures representative of current VStol technology. The tests used fixed convergent nozzles, with nozzle height and spacing and jet pressure being varied. Single jet impingement displays a consistent effect of nozzle height on wall jet development. For twin jet cases a powerful reinforcement exists along the wall jet interaction plane. Remote from the interaction plane the wall jets are weaker than those produced by a single jet impingement.

  7. Characterization of Horizontally-Issuing Reacting Buoyant Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    aquatic discharges. Research into aquatic discharges has been conducted for decades. In 1982, Satyanarayana and Jaluria arranged a set of experiments... Satyanarayana , S., Jaluria, A. A Study of Laminar Buoyant Jets Discharged at an Inclination to the Vertical Buoyancy Force. International Journal of

  8. Wall conditioning of JET with the ITER-Like Wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douai, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Esser, H. G.; Joffrin, E.; Keenan, T.; Knipe, S.; Kogut, D.; Lomas, P. J.; Marsen, S.; Nunes, I.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R.A.; Shimada, M.; P. de Vries,

    2013-01-01

    The initial conditioning cycle of \\{JET\\} İLW\\} is analysed and compared with restart and operation in 2008 with a carbon dominated wall. Comparable water and oxygen decay times are observed during bake-out in both cases. Despite a 2 × 10−3 mbar l/s leak rate duri

  9. Effect of Jet Injection Angle and Number of Jets on Mixing and Emissions From a Reacting Crossflow at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.John, D.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The mixing of air jets into hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone is an important step in staged combustion. Often referred to as "quick quench," the mixing occurs with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. An experiment has been designed to simulate and study this process, and the effect of varying the entry angle (0 deg, 22.5 deg and 45 deg from normal) and number of the air jets (7, 9, and 11) into the main flow, while holding the jet-to-crossflow mass-low ratio, MR, and momentum-flux ratio, J, constant (MR = 2.5;J = 25). The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from orifices equally spaced around the perimeter. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture to a module containing air jet injection tubes that can be changed to vary orifice geometry. Species concentrations of O2, CO, CO2, NO(x) and HC were obtained one duct diameter upstream (in the rich zone), and primarily one duct radius downstream. From this information, penetration of the jet, the spatial extent of chemical reaction, mixing, and the optimum jet injection angle and number of jets can be deduced.

  10. An experimental and numerical study of confined non-reacting and reacting turbulent jets to facilitate homogeneous combustion in industrial furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Insu

    Confined non-reacting turbulent jets are ideal for recirculating the hot flue gas back into the furnace from an external exhaust duct. Such jets are also used inside the furnace to internally entrain and recirculate the hot flue gas to preheat and dilute the reactants. Both internal and external implementation of confined turbulent jets increase the furnace thermal efficiency. For external implementation, depending on the circumstances, the exhaust gas flow may be co- or counter-flow relative to the jet flow. Inside the furnaces, fuel and air jets are injected separately. To create a condition which can facilitate near homogeneous combustion, these jets have to first mix with the burned gas inside the furnace and simultaneously being heated and diluted prior to combustion. Clearly, the combustion pattern and emissions from reacting confined turbulent jets are affected by jet interactions, mixing and entrainment of hot flue gas. In this work, the flow and mixing characteristics of a non-reacting and reacting confined turbulent jet are investigated experimentally and numerically. This work consists of two parts: (i) A study of flow and mixing characteristics of non-reacting confined turbulent jets with co- or counter-flowing exhaust/flue gas. Here the axial and radial distributions of temperature, velocity and NO concentration (used as a tracer gas) were measured. FLUENT was used to numerically simulate the experimental results. This work provides the basic understanding of the flow and mixing characteristics of confined turbulent jets and develops some design considerations for recirculating flue gas back into the furnace as expressed by the recirculation zone and the stagnation locations. (ii) Numerical calculations of near homogeneous combustion are performed for the existing furnace. The exact geometry of the furnace in the lab is used and the real dimensional boundary conditions are considered. The parameters such as air nozzle diameter (dair), fuel nozzle

  11. Effect of the nature of vitiated crossflow on the flow-field of a transverse reacting jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Pratikash P.; Busari, Oluwatobi; Lucht, Robert P.; Laster, Walter R.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the nature of vitiated crossflow on the structure and dynamics of non-reacting/reacting transverse jets is investigated. In this study, the vitiated crossflow is produced either by a low-swirl burner (LSB) that adds a swirling component to the crossflow or a bluff-body burner (BBB) that produces a uniform crossflow. The jet fluid is injected through a contoured injector, which provides a top-hat velocity profile. The swirling crossflow exhibits considerable swirl at the point of injection of the transverse jet. Two component high-repetition-rate PIV measurements demonstrate the influence of a vitiated crossflow generated by a low-swirl/bluff-body burner on the near-wake flow-field of the jet. Measurements at a plane below the injection location of the jet indicate that there is a continuous entrainment of PIV particles in case of swirling crossflow. The time-averaged flow-field shows that the velocity field for reacting/non-reacting jets in the LSB crossflow exhibits higher velocity gradients, in the measurement plane along jet cross section, as compared to BBB crossflow. It is found that the vorticity magnitude is lower in case of jets in the BBB crossflow and there is a delay in the formation of the wake vortex structure. The conditional turbulent statistics of the jet flow-field in the two crossflows shows that there is a higher degree of intermittency related to the wake vortex structure in case of a BBB crossflow, which results in a non-Gaussian distribution of the turbulent statistics. The wake Strouhal number calculation shows the influence of the nature of crossflow on the rate of wake vortex shedding. The wake Strouhal number for the jets in BBB crossflow is found to be lower than for the LSB crossflow. A decrease in the wake Strouhal number is observed with an increase in the nozzle separation distance. There is an increase in the dilatation rate owing to heat release which results in higher wake Strouhal number for reacting jets as compared

  12. An experimental investigation of reacting and nonreacting coaxial jet mixing in a laboratory rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Stephen Alexander

    Coaxial jets are commonly used as injectors in propulsion and combustion devices due to both the simplicity of their geometry and the rapid mixing they provide. In liquid rocket engines it is common to use coaxial jets in the context of airblast atomization. However, interest exists in developing rocket engines using a full flow staged combustion cycle. In such a configuration both propellants are injected in the gaseous phase. In addition, gaseous coaxial jets have been identified as an ideal test case for the validation of the next generation of injector modeling tools. For these reasons an understanding of the fundamental phenomena which govern mixing in gaseous coaxial jets and the effect of combustion on these phenomena in coaxial jet diffusion flames is needed. A study was performed to better understand the scaling of the stoichiometric mixing length in reacting and nonreacting coaxial jets with velocity ratios greater than one and density ratios less than one. A facility was developed that incorporates a single shear coaxial injector in a laboratory rocket engine capable of ten atmospheres. Optical access allows the use of flame luminosity and laser diagnostic techniques such as Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). Stoichiometric mixing lengths (LS), which are defined as the distance along the centerline where the stoichiometric condition occurs, were measured using PLIF. Acetone was seeded into the center jet to provide direct PLIF measurement of the average and instantaneous mixture fraction fields for a range of momentum flux ratios for the nonreacting cases. For the coaxial jet diffusion flames, LS was measured from OH radical contours. For nonreacting cases the use of a nondimensional momentum flux ratio was found to collapse the mixing length data. The flame lengths of coaxial jet diffusion flames were also found to scale with the momentum flux ratio but different scaling constants are required which depended on the chemistry of the reaction. The

  13. Redistribution of metals on the JET vessel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenberg, J.; Behrisch, R.; Martinelli, A.P.; Coad, J.P.; De Kock, L.; Goodall, D.H.J.; McCracken, G.M.

    1987-02-01

    Wall long term samples (LTS) which were exposed during the 1984 and 1985 operational periods of JET have been investigated by means of surface analysis techniques. The results indicate that deposition of wall material (Fe, Cr, Ni) and its distribution on the vessel wall were strongly affected by wall erosion on bellows protection plates during unstable discharge phases. Erosion sources and deposition sinks are spatially correlated indicating that most of the eroded material is deposited close to its source.

  14. Computation of Non-Equilibrium Chemically Reacting Hypersonic Flow from a Cartesian Mesh with Near Wall Viscous Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid solution methodology has been developed to solve chemically reacting laminar hypersonic flow in chemical Non-equilibrium and thermal equilibrium, by a Cartesian mesh based hybrid solution methodology, which uses an unstructured prism layer solution near the wall and a Cartesian mesh solution away from the wall. The unstructured prism layer for near wall solution is obtained from the normal projection of wall panels of the Cartesian mesh and are stitched with the outer Cartesian mesh. The solver, developed based on this approach when compared with other chemically reacting CFD codes and limited experimental results show good comparison. This procedure has a good potential to handle near-wall resolution for chemically reacting flows with a Cartesian mesh for complex geometries as well.

  15. LIF Measurement of Interacting Gas Jet Flow with Plane Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, A.; Kurihara, S.; Yamazaki, S.; Ota, M.; Maeno, K.

    2011-05-01

    Discharging rarefied gas jets in low-pressure conditions are interesting and important phenomena from an engineering point of view. For example they relate to the attitude control of the space satellite, or the semiconductor technology. The jets, however, deform to the complicated shapes by interacting with solid walls. In this paper we have performed the experiments the flow visualization as a first step by applying the LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) method on the jet-wall interaction. Jet is spouting out from a φ1.0 mm circular hole into the low pressure air chamber, impinging on a flat plate. The LIF visualization of interacting rarefied gas jet is carried out by using the iodine (I2) tracer and argon ion laser.

  16. Characteristics of a bubble jet near a vertical wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG A-man; YAO Xiong-liang; LI Jia

    2008-01-01

    A numerical model of a coupled bubble jet and wall was built on the assumption of potential flow and calculated by the boundary integral method. A three-dimensional computing program was then developed. Starting with the basic phenomenon of the interaction between a bubble and a wall, the dynamics of bubbles near rigid walls were studied systematically with the program. Calculated results agreed well with experimental results. The relationship between the Bjerknes effect of a wall and characteristic parameters was then studied and the calculated results of various cases were compared and discussed with the Blake criterion based on the Kelvin-impulse theory. Our analyses show that the angle of the jet's direction and the pressure on the rigid wall have a close relationship with collapse force and the bubble's characteristic parameters. From this, the application range of Blake criterion can be determined. This paper aims to provide a basis for future research on the dynamics of bubbles near a wall.

  17. Enhanced heat sink with geometry induced wall-jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Md. Mahamudul, E-mail: sohel0991@gmail.com; Tikadar, Amitav; Bari, Fazlul; Morshed, A. K. M. M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000. Bangladesh (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    Mini-channels embedded in solid matrix have already proven to be a very efficient way of electronic cooling. Traditional mini-channel heat sinks consist of single layer of parallel channels. Although mini-channel heat sink can achieve very high heat flux, its pumping requirement for circulating liquid through the channel increase very sharply as the flow velocity increases. The pumping requirements of the heat sink can be reduced by increasing its performance. In this paper a novel approach to increase the thermal performance of the mini-channel heat sink is proposed through geometry induced wall jet which is a passive technique. Geometric irregularities along the channel length causes abrupt pressure change between the channels which causes cross flow through the interconnections thus one channel faces suction and other channel jet action. This suction and jet action disrupts boundary layer causing enhanced heat transfer performance. A CFD model has been developed using commercially available software package FLUENT to evaluate the technique. A parametric study of the velocities and the effect of the position of the wall-jets have been performed. Significant reduction in thermal resistance has been observed for wall-jets, it is also observed that this reduction in thermal resistance is dependent on the position and shape of the wall jet.

  18. Colliding wall-jets on a cylindrical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesař, Václav; Peszynski, Kazimierz

    2015-05-01

    Paper discusses aerodynamics and potential engineering applications of an unusual and in literature practically unknown fluid flow configuration, with two wall-jets attached to a cylindrical surface so that they collide head-on and by mutual conjunction generate a single jet directed away from the wall. Applications are envisaged in pneumatic sensors, particularly those operating at low Reynolds numbers. Performed experimental investigation, combined with numerical flowfield computations, revealed several interesting aspects. The most interesting among them is the discovery of symmetry-breaking existence of three different stable flow regimes. This opens a possibility for fluidic tristable amplifiers and systems operating with ternary logic.

  19. Isotope exchange by Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wauters, T., E-mail: t.wauters@fz-juelich.de [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Douai, D.; Kogut, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lyssoivan, A. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Belonohy, E. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Blackman, T. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Crombé, K. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Drenik, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Graham, M. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Loarer, T. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lomas, P.L.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Oberkofler, M. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Philipps, V. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Plyusnin, V. [IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2015-08-15

    The isotopic exchange efficiencies of JET Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) discharges produced at ITER half and full field conditions are compared for JET carbon (C) and ITER like wall (ILW). Besides an improved isotope exchange rate on the ILW providing cleaner plasma faster, the main advantage compared to C-wall is a reduction of the ratio of retained discharge gas to removed fuel. Complementing experimental data with discharge modeling shows that long pulses with high (∼240 kW coupled) ICRF power maximizes the wall isotope removal per ICWC pulse. In the pressure range 1–7.5 × 10{sup −3} Pa, this removal reduces with increasing discharge pressure. As most of the wall-released isotopes are evacuated by vacuum pumps in the post discharge phase, duty cycle optimization studies for ICWC on JET-ILW need further consideration. The accessible reservoir by H{sub 2}-ICWC at ITER half field conditions on the JET-ILW preloaded by D{sub 2} tokamak operation is estimated to be 7.3 × 10{sup 22} hydrogenic atoms, and may be exchanged within 400 s of cumulated ICWC discharge time.

  20. Operation of JET with an ITER-like Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Lorne, E-mail: Lorne.Horton@jet.uk [EFDA-CSU Culham, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • JET has entered the second phase of operation with an ITER-like Wall. • Boundaries of safe plasma operation are being explored. • Studies have focused on material migration and erosion, disruptions and runaway electron beams, and optimisation of plasma and divertor performance. • Strong influence of the wall material on plasma performance but with significant scope for optimisation. - Abstract: The JET Programme in Support of ITER has entered its second phase, in which the boundaries for safe plasma operation with an ITER-like Wall are being explored. A key element of these studies is the benchmarking of the codes that are being used for ITER to predict plasma–wall interactions and, more generally, the influence of wall material on plasma performance and regimes of operation. Studies have focused on material migration and erosion, disruptions and runaway electron beams, and optimisation of plasma and divertor performance. In addition, a dedicated tungsten divertor melt experiment was carried out and provided key information for the ITER decision to begin operation with an all-W divertor. Initial results underline the strong influence that the wall material has on plasma performance and regimes of operation but show that there is significant scope for optimisation by careful discharge design. The future JET programme will concentrate on completing this optimisation and demonstrating the resulting performance in deuterium–tritium plasmas, thus providing the best possible preparation of ITER operation.

  1. Deformation of a Thin Film by a Wall Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Naima; Al-Housseiny, Talal; Stone, Howard

    2012-11-01

    A variety of industrial processes such as jet stripping or jet wiping involve a high speed stream of gas flowing over a liquid film. In this work, we model this kind of situation by considering a thin viscous liquid film, over which a high Reynolds number laminar wall jet (or Glauert jet) is flowing. We study the shape of the thin liquid film, which is deformed due to the shear stress induced by a jet of a low-viscosity fluid. The mechanics of the jet, which is modeled by boundary-layer theory, is coupled to the mechanics of the thin film, which includes the influence of surface tension and buoyancy. We describe the unsteady shape of the film using the lubrication description to derive a nonlinear PDE that is coupled to the Glauert jet via interfacial stresses. For the steady state, we obtain analytical solutions in different asymptotic regimes. We compare our theoretical findings to numerical simulations conducted with the finite volume solver FLUENT.

  2. Simulations of Turbulent Momentum and Scalar Transport in Non-Reacting Confined Swirling Coaxial Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of confined three-dimensional coaxial water jets. The objectives are to validate the newly proposed nonlinear turbulence models of momentum and scalar transport, and to evaluate the newly introduced scalar APDF and DWFDF equation along with its Eulerian implementation in the National Combustion Code (NCC). Simulations conducted include the steady RANS, the unsteady RANS (URANS), and the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS); both without and with invoking the APDF or DWFDF equation. When the APDF (ensemble averaged probability density function) or DWFDF (density weighted filtered density function) equation is invoked, the simulations are of a hybrid nature, i.e., the transport equations of energy and species are replaced by the APDF or DWFDF equation. Results of simulations are compared with the available experimental data. Some positive impacts of the nonlinear turbulence models and the Eulerian scalar APDF and DWFDF approach are observed.

  3. Stability of the resistive wall mode in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, I T; Gimblett, C G; Gryaznevich, M P; Hender, T C; Howell, D F; Liu, Y Q; Pinches, S D [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ian.chapman@ukaea.org.uk

    2009-05-15

    The kinetic effects influencing the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM) are investigated by applying a drift kinetic code to calculate the change in the potential energy of the mode in the presence of thermal and energetic particles. The analysis is carried out for typical JET high-{beta} plasmas. It is found that the strongest kinetic damping of the RWM arises due to mode resonance with the precession motion of the trapped thermal particles. The stability of the RWM in JET plasmas is also probed by using active MHD spectroscopy. The frequency spectrum of the plasma response to oscillating externally applied fields has been measured and fitted to parameter models in order to infer the stability of the RWM. A new model retaining information about the plasma response is presented to describe the resonant field amplification in the presence of a stable RWM.

  4. Variation of Transition Characteristics in a Wall Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-Francoise Scibilia

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of a laminar wall jet submitted to different configurations have been experimentally explored in order to obtain a better knowledge of transition modifications.In fact different parameters can accelerate or delay the transition using a smooth or rough surface, heated or not, submitted to vibrations or not. In this study, significant effects can be noticed. It has been possible to measure the beginning of growth rates of disturbance amplitude using a wind tunnel and comparing the results with the linear stability theory.

  5. Influence of orifice-to-wall distance on synthetic jet vortex ring simpinging on a fixed wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Yang; FENG; LiHao

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to investigate the influence of the orifice-to-wall distance on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging on a fixed wall. Both evolutions of vortical structures and statistical characteristics of flow fields at different orifice-to-wall distances are presented. It is found that different orifice-to-wall distances have different effects in terms of the vortex strength and impinging speed when the vortex rings are approaching the wall. The secondary vortex ring can be observed within the shear layer only when the dimensionless orifice-to-wall distance is close to or less than the dimensionless stroke length. Consequently, an appropriate orifice-to-wall distance plays a vital role in the sense of impingement effect. The statistical analysis of the flow field indicates that a wall jet forms after impingement, while both the decay rate of the maximum radial velocity and the spreading rate of the half-width decrease with the increasing orifice-to-wall distance. The non-dimensional wall jet velocity profiles at different orifice-to-wall distances all exhibit self-similar behaviors, which is consistent with the theoretical solution of the laminar wall jet.

  6. Hydrogen and deuterium retention in wall samples of JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrisch, R.; Ehrenberg, J.; Wielunski, M.; Martinelli, A.P.; Bergsaker, H.; Emmoth, B.; De Kock, L.; Coad, J.P.

    1987-02-01

    The amounts of H and D trapped in the surface layers of samples made out of C, Ni, Inconel and Si, installed at the vessel walls of JET and removed after the 1984 and 1985 periods of operation were measured. After the 1984 operation period the D concentration in carbon probes was of the order of 5x10/sup 19/m/sup 2/, while the hydrogen was about a factor of 40 higher. This can be attributed to a final glow discharge cleaning in hydrogen at the end of the operation period. After the 1984 period of operation the amounts of deuterium and hydrogen were nearly equal at about 5x10/sup 21/m/sup 2/. A comparison of the amounts of deuterium and hydrogen with the amount of carbon deposition on the Inconel wall samples shows a ratio of about 0.3 to 0.4 (H+D) per C-atom. The hydrogen concentrations trapped in the vessel wall correspond to more than 100 times the amount of hydrogen isotopes in the plasma during a discharge.

  7. Improved Confinement in JET High {beta} Plasmas with an ITER-Like Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Challis, C D; Beurskens, M; Buratti, P; Delabie, E; Drewelow, P; Frassinetti, L; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N; Hobirk, J; Joffrin, E; Keeling, D; King, D B; Maggi, C F; Mailloux, J; Marchetto, C; McDonald, D; Nunes, I; Pucella, G; Saarelma, S; Simpson, J

    2015-01-01

    The replacement of the JET carbon wall (C-wall) by a Be/W ITER-like wall (ILW) has affected the plasma energy confinement. To investigate this, experiments have been performed with both the C-wall and ILW to vary the heating power over a wide range for plasmas with different shapes.

  8. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN WALL JET AND OFFSET JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-wei; HUAI Wen-xin; HAN Jie

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between a plane wall jet and a parallel offset jet is studied through the Large Eddy Simulation (LES).In order to compare with the related experimental data,the offset ratio is set to be 1.0 and the Reynolds number Re is 1.0×104 with respect to the jet height L and the exit velocity U0.The Finite Volume Method (FVM) with orthogonal-mesh (6.17±106 nodes) is used to discretize governing equations.The large eddies are obtained directly,while the small eddies are simulated by using the Dynamic Smagorinsky-Lily Model (DSLM) and the Dynamic Kinetic energy Subgrid-scale Model (DKSM).Comparisons between computational results and experimental data show that the DKSM is especially effective in predicting the mean stream-wise velocity,the half-width of the velocity and the decay of the maximum velocity.The variations of the mean stream-wise velocity and the turbulent intensity at several positions are also obtained,and their distributions agree well with the measurements.The further analysis of dilute characteristics focuses on the tracer concentration,such as the distributions of the concentration (i.e.,C / C0 or C/Cm ),the boundary layer thickness δc and the half-width of the concentration bc,the decay of the maximum concentration ( Cm / Co) along the downstream direction.The turbulence mechanism is also analyzed in some aspects,such as the coherent structure,the correlation function and the Probability Density Function (PDF) of the fluctuating velocity.The results show that the interaction between the two jets is strong near the jet exit and they are fully merged after a certain distance.

  9. Universality of the ion flux to the JET outer wall

    CERN Document Server

    Walkden, N R; Militello, F; Lipschultz, B; Matthews, G; Guillemaut, C; Harrison, J; Moulton, D; Contributors, JET

    2016-01-01

    Universality in the ion flux to the JET outer-wall is observed in outerwall limiter mounted Langmuir probe (OLP) time-series across a large range of plasma current and line-averaged density during Ohmically heated horizontal target L-mode plasmas. The mean, M, and the standard deviation, sigma, of the ion-saturation current measured by the OLP show systematic variation with plasma current and density. Both increase as either plasma current decreases and/or density increases. Upon renormalization, achieved by subtraction of M and rescaling by sigma, the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of each signal collapse approximately onto a single curve. The shape of the curve deviates from a distribution in the tail of the PDF and is better described by a log-normal distribution. The collapse occurs over 4 decades of the ordinate which, given the wide parameter space over which the data spans, is a strong indication of universality.

  10. Experimental investigation of a plane wall jet subjected to an external lateral flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffel, Ahmed; Moureh, Jean; Harion, Jean-Luc; Russeil, Serge

    2015-05-01

    The present work aims to experimentally investigate the aerodynamic behavior of a wall jet subjected to external lateral stream by means of time-resolved PIV measurement technique. The experiments are performed on a reduced-scale model representing a generic configuration of a refrigerated display cabinet by focusing on the near-field region ( x/ e < 10) where strong interactions are expected between the jet core, wall boundary and external lateral stream. Comparisons of experimental data obtained with and without external perturbation make it possible to quantify the effect of the perturbation on the time-averaged wall jet characteristics such as airflow patterns, velocity profiles, maximum velocity decay, half-width jet growth, jet entrainment, RMS velocities and coherent structures as well as those related to the development of instabilities. Temporal PIV visualizations have allowed gaining insight on the effect of external lateral perturbation at the outer edge of the jet on the topology of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices that dominate the early stages of wall jet transition process and play a relevant role on the jet entrainment inwards. Special attention was paid to bring new knowledge of the flow physics related to mutual interactions between outer and inner layer of the wall jet after the break-up of vortex filaments in the braid region due to the external perturbation.

  11. A Semi-Implicit, Fourier-Galerkin/B-Spline Collocation Approach for DNS of Compressible, Reacting, Wall-Bounded Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Topalian, Victor; Malaya, Nick; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations appropriate for efficient DNS of compressible, reacting, wall-bounded flows is developed and applied. The spatial discretization uses a Fourier-Galerkin/B-spline collocation approach. Because of the algebraic complexity of the constitutive models involved, a flux-based approach is used where the viscous terms are evaluated using repeated application of the first derivative operator. In such an approach, a filter is required to achieve appropriate dissipation at high wavenumbers. We formulate a new filter source operator based on the viscous operator. Temporal discretization is achieved using the SMR91 hybrid implicit/explicit scheme. The linear implicit operator is chosen to eliminate wall-normal acoustics from the CFL constraint while also decoupling the species equations from the remaining flow equations, which minimizes the cost of the required linear algebra. Results will be shown for a mildly supersonic, multispecies boundary layer case inspired by the flow over the ablating surface of a space capsule entering Earth's atmosphere. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  12. Reacting to "Reacting"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Amanda

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the author's experiences as a student participating in a general education program called "Reacting to the Past," in which college students play elaborate games set at pivotal moments in the past, their roles informed by great texts. She found that the experience of reenacting pivotal historical moments produced an intensely…

  13. A Single Parameter to Characterize Wall Shear Stress Developed from an Underexpanded Axisymmetric Impinging Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, Patrick; Murali, Harikrishnan

    2016-11-01

    Wall shear stress is characterized for underexpanded axisymmetric impinging jets for the application of aerodynamic particle resuspension from a surface. Analysis of the flow field and the wall shear stress resulted from normally impinging axisymmetric jets is conducted using Computational Fluid Dynamics. A normally impinging jet is modeled with a constant area nozzle, while varying height to diameter ratio (H/D) and inlet pressures. Schlieren photography is used to visualize the density gradient of the flow field for validation of the CFD. The Dimensionless Jet Parameter (DJP) is developed to describe flow regimes and characterize the shear stress. The DJP is defined as being proportional to the jet pressure ratio divided by the H/D ratio squared. Maximum wall shear stress is examined as a function of DJP with three distinct regimes: (i) subsonic impingement (DJP2). Due to the jet energy dissipation in shock structures, which become a dominant dissipation mechanism in the supersonic impingement regime, wall shear stress is limited to a finite value. Additionally, formation of shock structures in the wall flow were observed for DJP>2 resulting in difficulties with dimensionless analysis. In the subsonic impingement and transitional regimes equations as a function of the DJP are obtained for the maximum wall shear stress magnitude, maximum shear stress location, and shear stress decay. Using these relationships wall shear stress can be predicted at all locations along the impingement surface.

  14. On the wall jet from the ring crevice of an internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Green, R.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Numerical simulations and experiments of the jetting of gases from the ring crevices of a laboratory engine shortly after exhaust valve opening showed an unanticipated radial flow of the crevice gases into the main combustion chamber. We report well-resolved numerical simulations of a wall jet that show that this radial motion is driven by vorticity generation in the wall boundary layer and at the corner of the piston crown.

  15. Modelling of the wall jet in a direct injection diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desantes, J.M.; Lapuerta, M.; Salavert, J.M. (Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (ES). Dept. Maquinas y Motores Termicos)

    1992-01-01

    As a part of a phenomenological model, a method for simulating the wall/jet interaction in a direct injection diesel engine is proposed. The method is based on the application of the momentum conservation equation in the different directions in which the wall jet is spread, and takes into account both the interaction with the combustion chamber geometry and with swirl. It takes as initial conditions the results of calculating the free jet, which is divided into packages. The predictions provide good agreement with those by other researchers. (author).

  16. Global and pedestal confinement in JET with a Be/W metallic wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Saarelma, S.; Alper, B.; Angioni, C.; Bilkova, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Brezinsek, S.; Buratti, P.; Calabro, G.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Giovannozzi, E.; Groth, M.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Leyland, M. J.; Lomas, P.; de la Luna, E.; Kempenaars, M.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C.; Mantica, P.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Neu, R.; Nunes, I.; Osborne, T.; Rimini, F.; Scannell, R.; Solano, E. R.; Snyder, P. B.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; de Vries, Peter; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2014-04-01

    Type I ELMy H-mode operation in JET with the ITER-like Be/W wall (JET-ILW) generally occurs at lower pedestal pressures compared to those with the full carbon wall (JET-C). The pedestal density is similar but the pedestal temperature where type I ELMs occur is reduced and below to the so-called critical type I-type III transition temperature reported in JET-C experiments. Furthermore, the confinement factor H98(y,2) in type I ELMy H-mode baseline plasmas is generally lower in JET-ILW compared to JET-C at low power fractions Ploss/Pthr,08 Pthr,08 the L-H power threshold from Martin et al 2008 (J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 123 012033)). Higher power fractions have thus far not been achieved in the baseline plasmas. At Ploss/Pthr,08 > 2, the confinement in JET-ILW hybrid plasmas is similar to that in JET-C. A reduction in pedestal pressure is the main reason for the reduced confinement in JET-ILW baseline ELMy H-mode plasmas where typically H98(y,2) = 0.8 is obtained, compared to H98(y,2) = 1.0 in JET-C. In JET-ILW hybrid plasmas a similarly reduced pedestal pressure is compensated by an increased peaking of the core pressure profile resulting in H98(y,2) ⩽ 1.25. The pedestal stability has significantly changed in high triangularity baseline plasmas where the confinement loss is also most apparent. Applying the same stability analysis for JET-C and JET-ILW, the measured pedestal in JET-ILW is stable with respect to the calculated peeling-ballooning stability limit and the ELM collapse time has increased to 2 ms from typically 200 µs in JET-C. This indicates that changes in the pedestal stability may have contributed to the reduced pedestal confinement in JET-ILW plasmas. A comparison of EPED1 pedestal pressure prediction with JET-ILW experimental data in over 500 JET-C and JET-ILW baseline and hybrid plasmas shows a good agreement with 0.8 < (measured pped)/(predicted pped,EPED) < 1.2, but that the role of triangularity is generally weaker in the JET-ILW experimental data

  17. From free jets to clinging wall jets: The influence of a horizontal boundary on a horizontally forced buoyant jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, H. C.; Hunt, G. R.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the incompressible turbulent jet formed when buoyant fluid is steadily ejected horizontally from a circular source into an otherwise quiescent uniform environment. As our primary focus, we introduce a horizontal boundary beneath the source. For sufficiently small separations, the jet attaches and clings to the boundary, herein the "clinging jet," before, farther downstream, the jet is pulled away from the boundary by the buoyancy force. For larger source-boundary separations, the buoyant jet is free to rise under the action of the buoyancy force, herein the "free jet." Based on measurements of saline jets in freshwater surroundings we deduce the conditions required for a jet to cling. We present a data set that spans a broad range of source conditions for the variation in volume flux (indicative of entrainment), jet perimeter, and jet centerline for both "clinging" and "free" jets. For source Froude numbers Fr0≥12 the data collapse when scaled, displaying universal behaviors for both clinging and free jets. Our results for the variation in the volume flux across horizontal planes, π Qjet , show that within a few jet lengths of the source, π Qjet for the clinging jet exceeds that of a free jet with identical source conditions. However, when examined in a coordinate following the jet centerline π Qjet for free jets is greater. Finally, we propose a new parametrization for an existing integral model which agrees well with our experimental data as well as with data from other studies. Our findings offer the potential to tailor the dilution of horizontal buoyant jets by altering the distance at which they are released from a boundary.

  18. Jet grouting for a groundwater cutoff wall in difficult glacial soil deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, R.F.; Pepe, F. Jr. [Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, New York, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Jet grouting is being used as part of a groundwater cutoff wall system in a major New York City subway construction project to limit drawdowns in an adjacent PCB contamination plume. A circular test shaft of jet grout columns was conducted during the design phase to obtain wall installation parameters. The test program also included shaft wall mapping, and measurements of; inflows, piezometric levels, ground heave and temperature, and jet grout hydraulic conductivity. An axisymmetric finite element method groundwater model was established to back calculate the in-situ hydraulic conductivities of both the surrounding glacial soils and the jet grout walls by matching observed inflows and piezometric levels. The model also verified the use of packer permeability test as a tool in the field to evaluate the hydraulic conductivities of jet grout columns. Both the test program and analytic studies indicated that adjustments to the construction procedures would be required to obtain lower hydraulic conductivities of the jet grout walls for construction. A comparison is made with the conductivities estimated from the test program/analytic studies with those from the present construction.

  19. Results of the JET real-time disruption predictor in the ITER-like wall campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Jesús, E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Madrid (Spain); Dormido-Canto, Sebastián [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid (Spain); López, Juan M. [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, CAEND UPM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Murari, Andrea [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM/ENEA per la Fusione, Padua (Italy); Ramírez, Jesús M. [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid (Spain); Moreno, Raúl [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Madrid (Spain); Ruiz, Mariano [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, CAEND UPM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Alves, Diogo [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear – Laboratório Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Felton, Robert [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Center, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •JET real-time disruption predictor with metallic wall 991 discharges analyzed. •Predictor training has been carried out with JET C wall data. •Success, false alarm and missed alarm rates are 98.4%, 0.9% and 1.6%, respectively. •Alarms are triggered in average 426 ms before the disruption. -- Abstract: The impact of disruptions in JET became even more important with the replacement of the previous Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) wall with a more fragile full metal ITER-like wall (ILW). The development of robust disruption mitigation systems is crucial for JET (and also for ITER). Moreover, a reliable real-time (RT) disruption predictor is a pre-requisite to any mitigation method. The Advance Predictor Of DISruptions (APODIS) has been installed in the JET Real-Time Data Network (RTDN) for the RT recognition of disruptions. The predictor operates with the new ILW but it has been trained only with discharges belonging to campaigns with the CFC wall. 7 real-time signals are used to characterize the plasma status (disruptive or non-disruptive) at regular intervals of 32 ms. After the first 3 JET ILW campaigns (991 discharges), the success rate of the predictor is 98.36% (alarms are triggered in average 426 ms before the disruptions). The false alarm and missed alarm rates are 0.92% and 1.64%.

  20. Interaction between a laminar starting immersed micro-jet and a parallel wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaleiro, Juan Martin; Laborde, Cecilia; Artana, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we study the starting transient of an immersed micro-jet in close vicinity to a solid wall parallel to its axis. The experiments concern laminar jets (Re long distances away from the tip allowing for a similarity analysis. The self-similar behavior of the starting jet has been studied in terms of the frontline position with time. A symmetric and a wall dominated regime could be identified. The starting jet in the wall type regime, and in the symmetric regime as well, develops a self-similar behavior that has a relative rapid loss of memory of the preceding condition of the flow. Scaling for both regimes are those that correspond to viscous dominated flows.

  1. Overview of experimental preparation for the ITER-Like Wall at JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezinsek, S.; Fundamenski, W.; Eich, T.; Coad, J. P.; Giroud, C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Joffrin, E.; Krieger, K.; McCormick, K.; Lehnen, M.; Loarer, T.; de la Luna, E.; Maddison, G.; Matthews, G. F.; Mertens, P.; Nunes, I.; Philipps, V.; Riccardo, V.; Rubel, M.; Stamp, M. F.; Tsalas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments in JET with carbon-based plasma-facing components have been carried out in preparation of the ITER-Like Wall with beryllium main chamber and full tungsten divertor. The preparatory work was twofold: (i) development of techniques, which ensure safe operation with the new wall and (ii) pro

  2. Residual carbon content in the initial ITER-Like Wall experiments at JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezinsek, S.; Jachmich, S.; Stamp, M. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Coenen, J. W.; Krieger, K.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Philipps, V.; S. Grünhagen,; Smith, R.; van Rooij, G. J.; Ivanova, D.; Matthews, G. F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The residual carbon content and carbon edge flux in JET have been assessed by three independent diagnostic techniques after start of plasma operation with the ITER-Like Wall (ILW) with beryllium first wall and tungsten divertor: (i) in-situ measurements with optical spectroscopy on low

  3. Beryllium plasma-facing components for the ITER-like wall project at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M J; Sundelin, P [Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Association Euratom-VR (Sweden); Bailescu, V [Nuclear Fuel Plant, Pitesti (Romania); Coad, J P; Matthews, G F; Pedrick, L; Riccardo, V; Villedieu, E [Culham Science Centre, Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Hirai, T; Linke, J [IEF-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association Euratom-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Likonen, J [VTT, Association Euratom-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Lungu, C P [NILPRP, Association Euratom-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: rubel@kth.se

    2008-03-15

    ITER-Like Wall Project has been launched at the JET tokamak in order to study a tokamak operation with beryllium components on the main chamber wall and tungsten in the divertor. To perform this first comprehensive test of both materials in a thermonuclear fusion environment, a broad program has been undertaken to develop plasma-facing components and assess their performance under high power loads. The paper provides a concise report on scientific and technical issues in the development of a beryllium first wall at JET.

  4. Spray-Wall Impingement of Diesel-CNG Dual Fuel Jet using Schlieren Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Mhadi Abaker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas is a low cost fuel with high availability in nature. However, it cannot be used by itself in conventional diesel engines due to its low flame speed and high ignition temperature. The addition of a secondary fuel to enhance the mixture formation and combustion process facilitate its wider use as an alternative fuel. An experimental study was performed to investigate the diesel-CNG dual fuel jet-wall impingement. A constant volume optical chamber was designed to facilitate maximum optical access for the study of the jet-wall impingement at different injection pressures, temperatures and injector-wall distances. The bottom plate of the test rig was made of aluminum (piston material and it was heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. An injector driver was used to control the single-hole nozzle diesel injector combined with a natural gas injector. The injection timing of both injectors was synchronized with a camera trigger. The jet-wall impingement of diesel and diesel-CNG dual fuel jets was recorded with a high speed camera using Schlieren imaging technique and associated image processing software. The measurements of the jet radial penetration were higher in diesel-CNG dual fuel while the jet height travel along were higher in the case of diesel single fuel.

  5. Review of literature on local scour under plane turbulent wall jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Mohammad; Ahmad, Zulfequar

    2016-10-01

    Stability of hydraulic structures is threatened by persistent scour downstream of the apron, which renders their foundations exposed. Jets issuing under the sluice gate are turbulent enough to cause significant scour. Extensive study of the jets is, therefore, necessary in order to understand the underlying hydraulics and provide remedial measures. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the investigations on local scour caused by wall jets is presented, including both the classical as well as the prevalent approach. Various aspects of the scour under wall jets have been explained, including the process of scouring, different parameters affecting the maximum scour depth, analysis of flow characteristics within the scour hole and on the apron, time variation of scour depth, rate of sediment removal, and scour depth estimation formulae.

  6. Experimental Investigation on Space-dispersed Double-wall Jet Combustion System for DI Diesel Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭鹏江; 高希彦

    2012-01-01

    A space-dispersed double-wall jet combustion system was developed by adopting the wall-guiding spray method and the stratification theory.The experimental test was carried out to optimize the structural parameters of the diesel-engine combustion system,including chamber structure,swirl ratio of cylinder head,included angle of jet orifice,number and diameter of jet orifice,fuel injection pressure and timing.The effect of double-wall jet combustion system on combustion and engine performance was tested to obtain the best performance indexes,and the double-wall jet combustion system was compared to the prototype.The results show that NOx is reduced from 712 PPm to 487 PPm at 2 100 r/min,and from 593 PPm to 369 PPm at 3 000 r/min,which are reduced by 31.6% and 37.7%,respectively.The smoke intensity was reduced form 3.67 BSU to 2.1 BSU,and the oil consumption was reduced from 240.5 g/(kW·h) to 225.4 g/(kW·h),which was decreased by 6.3% at low speed.The pressure in the cylinder was obviously reduced from 115 bar to 108 bar,which was reduced by 6%.

  7. Critical Heat Flux in forced Convective Boiling with a Wall Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王迅

    2004-01-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) in the forced convective boiling with a wall jet has been investigated.The experiments of CHF with a wall jet have been performed over a wide range of ρl/ρg=6.6-1 603 and ΔTsub=0-60 K.The mechanism on CHF is discussed and a CHF model based on heat balance in sublayer can provide a good clue for analyzing and deriving CHF.Finally,a generalized correlation is presented, which can predict CHF for saturated and subcooled conditions.

  8. Current status of the JET ITER-like Wall Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, G F; Edwards, P; Greuner, H; Loving, A; Maier, H; Mertens, Ph; Philipps, V; Riccardo, V; Rubel, M; Ruset, C; Scmidt, A; Villedieu, E [JET-EFDA Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gfm@jet.uk

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an overview of the status and relevant technical issues for the ITER-like Wall Project with emphasis on progress since the 11th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications.

  9. Heat Transfer in a Forced Wall Jet on a heated Rough Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-FrancoiseScibilia

    2000-01-01

    In this paper,an experimental investigation of a laminar wall jet in the presence of a heated wall with stationary particles on its surface,is reproted.The wall jet was submitted to external acoustic vibration amplifying the coherent structures appearing in the laminar region.A wind tunnel was used at very low Reynolds number,Mean velocity and turbulence intensity were measured by a constant temperature anemometer .Measurements were taken in the transition and turbulent regions.Embedded particles were outside the vissous sublayer and it was observed that their presence modifies significantly the flow characteristics in particular the boundary layer is thickened.This study can bring a better understanding of the structure of a flow when it is heated and forced on a rough wall.

  10. Very Large Eddy Simulations of a Jet-A Spray Reacting Flow in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar DWFDF Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the very large eddy simulations (VLES) of a Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method, in which DWFDF is defined as the density weighted time filtered fine grained probability density function. The flow field is calculated by using the time filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations (TFNS) with nonlinear subscale turbulence models, and when the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method is invoked, the energy and species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of DWFDF. A nonlinear subscale model for closing the convection term of the Eulerian scalar DWFDF equation is used and will be briefly described in this paper. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method in both improving the simulation quality and maintaining economic computing cost are observed.

  11. Comparing a k-ε Model and the v2-f Model in a 3D Isothermal Wall Jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Lars; Nielsen, Peter V.

    In this work the flows in a three-dimensional wall jet and in a fully developed plane channel are computed.......In this work the flows in a three-dimensional wall jet and in a fully developed plane channel are computed....

  12. Plasma operation with an all metal first-wall: Comparison of an ITER-like wall with a carbon wall in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, G. F.; Jet Efda Contributors; ASDEX-Upgrade Team

    2013-07-01

    Installation of the ITER-like Wall (ILW) in JET, has allowed a direct comparison of operation with all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) to an all metal beryllium/tungsten first-wall under otherwise nearly identical conditions. The JET results are compared with experience from ASDEX-Upgrade where there was a gradual change to a full tungsten first-wall over an extended period. The scope of this review ranges from experience with machine conditioning, impurities and breakdown to material migration, fuel retention, disruptions, impact on operational space, energy confinement and compatibility with impurity seeding. Significant changes are reported, not only in the physics directly related to plasma-surface interactions but also to the main plasma which is strongly affected in unexpected ways, impacting many aspects of tokamak operation.

  13. Beryllium migration and evolution of first wall surface composition in the JET ILW configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieger, K.; Brezinsek, S.; M. Reinelt,; Lisgo, S. W.; Coenen, J. W.; Jachmich, S.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; van Rooij, G. J.; Stamp, M.; O. van Hoey,; Ivanova, D.; Loarer, T.; Philipps, V.

    2013-01-01

    Material migration and the resulting evolution of plasma facing surfaces were studied at the beginning of the JET ILW campaign using the singular opportunity of well-defined initial conditions with virgin Be and W wall components. In a sequence of identical Ohmically heated discharges the evolution

  14. Overview of the JET results with the ITER-like wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanelli, F.; Madsen, Jens; Naulin, Volker;

    2013-01-01

    Following the completion in May 2011 of the shutdown for the installation of the beryllium wall and the tungsten divertor, the first set of JET campaigns have addressed the investigation of the retention properties and the development of operational scenarios with the new plasma-facing materials....

  15. Current status of the JET ITER-like Wall Project

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, G. F.; Edwards, P; H. Greuner; Loving, A.; Maier, H; Mertens, Ph; Philipps, V.; Riccardo, V.; Rubel, Marek J.; Ruset, C.; Scmidt, A.; Villedieu, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the status and relevant technical issues for the ITER-like Wall Project with emphasis on progress since the 11th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications. QC 20101118

  16. Contributions of the wall boundary layer to the formation of the counter-rotating vortex pair in transverse jets

    KAUST Repository

    SCHLEGEL, FABRICE

    2011-04-08

    Using high-resolution 3-D vortex simulations, this study seeks a mechanistic understanding of vorticity dynamics in transverse jets at a finite Reynolds number. A full no-slip boundary condition, rigorously formulated in terms of vorticity generation along the channel wall, captures unsteady interactions between the wall boundary layer and the jet - in particular, the separation of the wall boundary layer and its transport into the interior. For comparison, we also implement a reduced boundary condition that suppresses the separation of the wall boundary layer away from the jet nozzle. By contrasting results obtained with these two boundary conditions, we characterize near-field vortical structures formed as the wall boundary layer separates on the backside of the jet. Using various Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics, it is demonstrated that several near-wall vortical structures are formed as the wall boundary layer separates. The counter-rotating vortex pair, manifested by the presence of vortices aligned with the jet trajectory, is initiated closer to the jet exit. Moreover tornado-like wall-normal vortices originate from the separation of spanwise vorticity in the wall boundary layer at the side of the jet and from the entrainment of streamwise wall vortices in the recirculation zone on the lee side. These tornado-like vortices are absent in the case where separation is suppressed. Tornado-like vortices merge with counter-rotating vorticity originating in the jet shear layer, significantly increasing wall-normal circulation and causing deeper jet penetration into the crossflow stream. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  17. Analysis of the effect of impact of near-wall acoustic bubble collapse micro-jet on Al 1060.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linzheng; Zhu, Xijing

    2017-05-01

    The bubble collapse near a wall will generate strong micro-jet in a liquid environment under ultrasonic field. To explore the effect of the impact of near-wall acoustic bubble collapse micro-jet on an aluminum 1060 sheet, the cavitation threshold formula and micro-jet velocity formula were first proposed. Then the Johnson-Cook rate correlation material constitutive model was considered, and a three-dimensional fluid-solid coupling model of micro-jet impact on a wall was established and analyzed. Finally, to validate the model, ultrasonic cavitation test and inversion analysis based on the theory of spherical indentation test were conducted. The results show that cavitation occurs significantly in the liquid under ultrasonic field, as the applied ultrasonic pressure amplitude is much larger than liquid cavitation threshold. Micro pits appear on the material surface under the impact of micro-jet. Pit depth is determined by both micro-jet velocity and micro-jet diameter, and increases with their increase. Pit diameter is mainly related to the micro-jet diameter and dp/dj≈0.95-1.2, while pit's diameter-to-depth ratio is mainly negatively correlated with the micro-jet velocity. Wall pressure distribution is mostly symmetric and its maximum appears on the edge of micro-jet impingement. Obviously, the greater the micro-jet velocity is, the greater the wall pressure is. Micro pits formed after the impact of micro-jet on aluminum 1060 surface were assessed by ultrasonic cavitation test. Inversion analysis results indicate that equivalent stress, equivalent strain of the pit and impact strength, and velocity of the micro-jet are closely related with pit's diameter-to-depth ratio. For the pit's diameter-to-depth ratio of 16-68, the corresponding micro-jet velocity calculated is 310-370m/s. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The JET ITER-like wall experiment: First results and lessons for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Lorne, E-mail: Lorne.Horton@jet.efda.org [EFDA-CSU Culham, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► JET has recently completed the installation of an ITER-like wall. ► Important operational aspects have changed with the new wall. ► Initial experiments have confirmed the expected low fuel retention. ► Disruption dynamics have change dramatically. ► Development of wall-compatible, ITER-relevant regimes of operation has begun. -- Abstract: The JET programme is strongly focused on preparations for ITER construction and exploitation. To this end, a major programme of machine enhancements has recently been completed, including a new ITER-like wall, in which the plasma-facing armour in the main vacuum chamber is beryllium while that in the divertor is tungsten—the same combination of plasma-facing materials foreseen for ITER. The goal of the initial experimental campaigns is to fully characterise operation with the new wall, concentrating in particular on plasma-material interactions, and to make direct comparisons of plasma performance with the previous, carbon wall. This is being done in a progressive manner, with the input power and plasma performance being increased in combination with the commissioning of a comprehensive new real-time protection system. Progress achieved during the first set of experimental campaigns with the new wall, which took place from September 2011 to July 2012, is reported.

  19. Influence of Wall Position on Flow Characteristics of an Impinging Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Tiwari,

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study intends physical insight into heterogeneous phenomena of efflux from a small opening impinging on a surface. The work aims at understanding the role of wall location and orientation on flow characteristics of an impinging jet. Experiments were performed on an existing cascade tunnel with flow ejected at a velocity of 37 m/s from a small opening of (30 cm × 9 cm and corresponding flow features were analyzed. Results show that outside the core region, the flow experiences a monotonic reduction with increase in distance along streamline and radial direction. The orientation of wall is more efficient in bringing substantial change when placed closer to the exit (low velocity losses. The wall orientation primarily governs the chances of strong flow deflection or back flow losses. Wall placed far away from exit results in diminishing returns with a critical value beyond which the flow characteristics become insensitive of wall orientation.

  20. A new visible spectroscopy diagnostic for the JET ITER-like wall main chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, C F; Brezinsek, S; Stamp, M F; Griph, S; Heesterman, P; Hogben, C; Horton, A; Meigs, A; Morlock, C; Studholme, W; Zastrow, K-D

    2012-10-01

    In preparation for ITER, JET has been upgraded with a new ITER-like wall (ILW), whereby the main plasma facing components, previously of carbon, have been replaced by mainly Be in the main chamber and W in the divertor. As part of the many diagnostic enhancements, a new, survey, visible spectroscopy diagnostic has been installed for the characterization of the ILW. An array of eight lines-of-sight (LOS) view radially one of the two JET neutral beam shine through areas (W coated carbon fibre composite tiles) at the inner wall. In addition, one vertical LOS views the solid W tile at the outer divertor. The light emitted from the plasma is coupled to a series of compact overview spectrometers, with overall wavelength range of 380-960 nm and to one high resolution Echelle overview spectrometer covering the wavelength range 365-720 nm. The new survey diagnostic has been absolutely calibrated in situ by means of a radiometric light source placed inside the JET vessel in front of the whole optical path and operated by remote handling. The diagnostic is operated in every JET discharge, routinely monitoring photon fluxes from intrinsic and extrinsic impurities (e.g., Be, C, W, N, and Ne), molecules (e.g., BeD, D(2), ND) and main chamber and divertor recycling (typically Dα, Dβ, and Dγ). The paper presents a technical description of the diagnostic and first measurements during JET discharges.

  1. Insights derived from CFD studies on the evolution of planar wall jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate that a simple and cost-effective 2D Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulation approach can often be efficiently used in industrial design applications. We simplified the designing approach of a racetrack jet dryer to a problem involving the streamwise evolution of an offset wall jet. We compared our simple 2D RANS simulations with experiments and large eddy simulation (LES, and were encouraged to see that our simplified approach produced a better correlation with the experiments compared to LES, which is expected to be much more accurate (even though computationally orders of magnitude more expensive. We conclude that under certain circumstances a simple 2D approach can lead to a dependable solution. Additionally, we used the results from these simulations to enhance our understanding of the evolution of offset wall jets. The insights derived from these simulations suggest the existence of scaling parameters that can express offset wall jets as a family of self-similar flows.

  2. L-H power threshold studies in JET with Be/W and C wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, C. F.; Delabie, E.; Biewer, T. M.; Groth, M.; Hawkes, N. C.; Lehnen, M.; de la Luna, E.; McCormick, K.; Reux, C.; Rimini, F.; Solano, E. R.; Andrew, Y.; Bourdelle, C.; Bobkov, V.; Brix, M.; Calabro, G.; Czarnecka, A.; Flanagan, J.; Lerche, E.; Marsen, S.; Nunes, I.; Van Eester, D.; Stamp, M. F.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-02-01

    A comparison of the L-H power threshold (Pthr) in JET with all carbon, JET-C, and beryllium/tungsten wall (the ITER-like choice), JET-ILW, has been carried out in experiments with slow input power ramps and matched plasma shapes, divertor configuration and IP/BT pairs. The low density dependence of the L-H power threshold, namely an increase below a minimum density ne,min, which was first observed in JET with the MkII-GB divertor and C wall and subsequently not observed with the current MkII-HD geometry, is observed again with JET-ILW. At plasma densities above ne,min, Pthr is reduced by ˜30%, and by ˜40% when the radiation from the bulk plasma is subtracted (Psep), with JET-ILW compared to JET-C. At the L-H transition the electron temperature at the edge, where the pedestal later develops, is also lower with JET-ILW, for a given edge density. With JET-ILW the minimum density is found to increase roughly linearly with magnetic field, n_{e,min} \\sim B_{T}^{4/5} , while the power threshold at the minimum density scales as P_{sep,\\min} \\sim B_{T}^{5/2} . The H-mode power threshold in JET-ILW is found to be sensitive both to variations in main plasma shape (Psep decreases with increasing lower triangularity and increases with upper triangularity) and in divertor configuration. When the data are recast in terms of Psep and Zeff or subdivertor neutral pressure a linear correlation is found, pointing to a possible role of Zeff and/or subdivertor neutral pressure in the L-H transition physics. Depending on the chosen divertor configuration, Pthr can be up to a factor of two lower than the ITPA scaling law for densities above ne,min. A shallow edge radial electric field well is observed at the L-H transition. The edge impurity ion poloidal velocity remains low, close to its L-mode values, ⩽5 km s-1 ± 2-3 km s-1, at the L-H transition and throughout the H-mode phase, with no measureable increase within the experimental uncertainties. The edge toroidal rotation

  3. Chemically reacting micropolar fluid flow and heat transfer between expanding or contracting walls with ion slip, Soret and Dufour effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odelu Ojjela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the Hall and ion slip currents on an incompressible free convective flow, heat and mass transfer of a micropolar fluid in a porous medium between expanding or contracting walls with chemical reaction, Soret and Dufour effects. Assume that the walls are moving with a time dependent rate of the distance and the fluid is injecting or sucking with an absolute velocity. The walls are maintained at constant but different temperatures and concentrations. The governing partial differential equations are reduced into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations and then the resultant equations are solved numerically by quasilinearization technique. The results are analyzed for velocity components, microrotation, temperature and concentration with respect to different fluid and geometric parameters and presented in the form of graphs. It is noticed that with the increase in chemical reaction, Hall and ion slip parameters the temperature of the fluid is enhanced whereas the concentration is decreased. Also for the Newtonian fluid, the numerical values of axial velocity are compared with the existing literature and are found to be in good agreement.

  4. Characteristics of premixed flames stabilized in an axisymmetric curved-wall jet burner with tip modification

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daejoong

    2009-11-10

    The stabilization characteristics of premixed flames in an axisymmetric curved-wall jet burner have been experimentally investigated. This burner utilized the Coanda effect on top of a burner tip. The initially spherical burner tip was modified to a flat tip and a concave tip in order to improve flame stabilization by providing enough space for flow recirculation above the burner tip region. The flow characteristics have been visualized using a schlieren technique. Small-scale turbulence structure has been observed mainly in the interaction jet region (located downstream of the recirculation region) for large jet velocity (Reynolds number >11,500). An appreciable amount of air entrainment was exhibited from the half-angle of the jet spread, approximately 20. The averaged planar laser-induced fluorescence images of the flames for this large velocity demonstrated that the strong signal of OH radicals, representing reaction zones, existed in the recirculation zone, while it was weak in the interaction jet region due to intermittency and local extinction by the generation of small scale turbulence. The OH radical signals strengthened again in the merged jet region (downstream of the interaction jet region). In extreme cases of Reynolds number over 19,000, a unique flame exhibiting OH radicals only in the recirculation zone was observed for the concave tip. The flame stabilization has been mapped by varying jet velocity and equivalence ratio, and the result showed that the stabilization characteristics were improved appreciably from the initial spherical tip design, especially for rich mixtures. The flow fields measured by a laser Doppler velocimetry confirmed the existence of recirculation zone and the expansion of the recirculation zones for the modified tips. The temperature profile measured by a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy exhibited an intermittent nature, especially near the recirculation zone.

  5. Mixing characteristics of a transverse jet injection into supersonic crossflows through an expansion wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoyang; Wang, Zhenguo; Wang, Hongbo; Sun, Mingbo

    2016-12-01

    Mixing characteristics of a transverse jet injection into supersonic crossflows through an expansion plate are investigated using large eddy simulation (LES), where the expansion effects on the mixing are analyzed emphatically by comparing to the flat-plate counterpart. An adaptive central-upwind weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme along with multi-threaded and multi-process MPI/OpenMP parallel is adopted to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the calculations. Progressive mesh refinement study is performed to assess the grid resolution and solution convergence. Statistic results obtained are compared to the experimental data and recently performed classical numerical simulation, which validates the reliability of the present LES codes. Firstly, the jet mixing mechanisms in the flowfield with expansion plate are revealed. It indicates that the large-scale vortices in the windward side of jet plume induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability contribute to the mixing in the near-field, while the entrainment by the counter-rotating vortices and molecular diffusion dominate the mixing process in the far-field. Furthermore, the effects of wall expansion on the flow and mixing characteristics are discussed. The boundary layer across the expansion corner is relaminarized and the profiles of streamwise velocity are distinctly changed. Then the separation region ahead of jet plume is more close to the wall, and the breaking process of large-scale vortices in the windward side of jet plume starts earlier. However, the favorable pressure gradient generated by wall expansion reduces the mixing efficiency and brings a greater total pressure loss.

  6. Flow pulsation in the near-wall layer of impinging jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesař, V.

    2013-04-01

    Pulsation of impinging jets promises to become a useful way towards achieving the highest possible rate of passive scalar convective transport between fluid and a wall. Author investigated experimentally steady and pulsated impingement by hot-wire anemometer traversing along a radial line at a small height above the impingement wall. The data have shown two conspicuous local maxima of fluctuation intensity. In an attempt to reach understanding of these phenomena, numerical flowfield computations were also made, fitted to the experimental conditions. Despite simplification (isotropic handling of unsteadiness, eddies computed as Reynolds-type phase averages) the synergetic approach (experiment & computation) revealed interesting correlation and resulted in useful interpretations of the old problem of the off-axis extremes - and also brings new views on their behaviour in the pulsating jet case.

  7. First nitrogen-seeding experiments in JET with the ITER-like Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkofler, M., E-mail: martin.oberkofler@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Douai, D. [CEA Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance, Cedex (France); Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.W. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, IEK-4, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Dittmar, T. [Center for Energy Research, University of California–San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., San Diego, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Drenik, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Romanelli, S.G. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E. [CEA Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance, Cedex (France); McCormick, K. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brix, M. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Calabro, G. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi 45 FRASCATI-Roma (Italy); Clever, M. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, IEK-4, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Giroud, C. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Kruezi, U. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, IEK-4, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Lawson, K. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Linsmeier, Ch. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-07-15

    In this contribution we present results from the first N{sub 2} seeding experiments in JET performed after installation of the ITER-like Wall. Gas balance measurements for seeded L-mode discharges indicate very strong N{sub 2} retention as well as a potential increase in D{sub 2} retention. The possible influence of ammonia production on this apparent retention is discussed. Plasma parameters and impurity content were monitored throughout the seeded discharges as well as during subsequent clean-up discharges. These experiments give first insight into phenomena related to the use of nitrogen as seeding gas in JET with the ITER-like Wall, such as ammonia production and nitrogen legacy.

  8. Development of divertor tungsten coatings for the JET ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, G. F.; Coad, P.; Greuner, H.; Hill, M.; Hirai, T.; Likonen, J.; Maier, H.; Mayer, M.; Neu, R.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R.; Riccardo, V.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2009-06-01

    The main objectives of the JET ITER-like Wall Project are to provide a beryllium main wall and tungsten divertor with at least a 4 year lifetime to allow full evaluation of the materials and related plasma scenarios for ITER. Tungsten coatings will be used over most of the divertor area and this paper describes the latest developments in the coating technology and an analysis of the implications for the coating lifetime and machine operation. Both steady state and transient heat loads are assessed.

  9. Laminar Wall Jet Flow and Heat Transfer over a Shallow Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, P Maheandera; Padmanaban, K P

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the detailed simulation of two-dimensional incompressible laminar wall jet flow over a shallow cavity. The flow characteristics of wall jet with respect to aspect ratio (AR), step length (X u), and Reynolds number (Re) of the shallow cavity are expressed. For higher accuracy, third-order discretization is applied for momentum equation which is solved using QUICK scheme with SIMPLE algorithm for pressure-velocity coupling. Low Reynolds numbers 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 600 are assigned for simulation. Results are presented for streamline contour, velocity contour, and vorticity formation at wall and also velocity profiles are reported. The detailed study of vortex formation on shallow cavity region is presented for various AR, X u , and Re conditions which led to key findings as Re increases and vortex formation moves from leading edge to trailing edge of the wall. Distance between vortices increases when the step length (X u) increases. When Re increases, the maximum temperature contour distributions take place in shallow cavity region and highest convection heat transfer is obtained in heated walls. The finite volume code (FLUENT) is used for solving Navier-Stokes equations and GAMBIT for modeling and meshing.

  10. Laminar Wall Jet Flow and Heat Transfer over a Shallow Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Maheandera Prabu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the detailed simulation of two-dimensional incompressible laminar wall jet flow over a shallow cavity. The flow characteristics of wall jet with respect to aspect ratio (AR, step length (Xu, and Reynolds number (Re of the shallow cavity are expressed. For higher accuracy, third-order discretization is applied for momentum equation which is solved using QUICK scheme with SIMPLE algorithm for pressure-velocity coupling. Low Reynolds numbers 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 600 are assigned for simulation. Results are presented for streamline contour, velocity contour, and vorticity formation at wall and also velocity profiles are reported. The detailed study of vortex formation on shallow cavity region is presented for various AR, Xu, and Re conditions which led to key findings as Re increases and vortex formation moves from leading edge to trailing edge of the wall. Distance between vortices increases when the step length (Xu increases. When Re increases, the maximum temperature contour distributions take place in shallow cavity region and highest convection heat transfer is obtained in heated walls. The finite volume code (FLUENT is used for solving Navier-Stokes equations and GAMBIT for modeling and meshing.

  11. Ignition, Flame Structure and Near-Wall Burning in Transverse Hydrogen Jets in Supersonic Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Mirko; Godfrey Mungal, M.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2010-11-01

    The work aims at investigating near-wall ignition and flame structure in transverse underexpanded hydrogen jets in high-enthalpy supersonic crossflows generated in an expansion tube. Crossflow conditions are held fixed at M=2.4, p=40 kPa and T 1400 K, while jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios J in the range 0.3-5.0 are considered. Schlieren and OH^* chemiluminescence imaging are used to characterize flow structure, ignition and flame penetration, while the instantaneous reaction zone is identified with planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH on side- and plan-view planes. The upstream separation length is found to scale as J^0.44D (D jet diameter). Similarly, the ignition point xig strongly depends on J: xig tends to a limiting value of ˜22D as J->0, and the flame is anchored in the upstream recirculation region and lee-side of the jet for J>3. Flame penetration is well described by the traditional form k(x/DJ)^m where both k and m are found to depend on J but these parameters reach a limiting value of k 1 and m 0.3 for J>2. The roles of the unsteady bow shock, the separation and recirculation regions on the near-wall ignition, stabilization and mixing at large J are discussed.

  12. Measurement of Turbulence Energy Balance in a Two-Dimensional Wall Jet along a Plane Surface

    OpenAIRE

    藤沢, 延行; 白井, 紘行

    1987-01-01

    The sructure of turbulence in a wall jet along a plane surface is investigated by measuring the balance of turbulence energy. With the aid of a hot-wire anemometer system, convection velocities of small-scale turbulent motion are measured as well as other time-averaged flow properties and turbulence characteristics. It is found that the convection velocity of small-scale turbulence deviates significantly from the mean flow velocity, that is, Taylor's hypothesis is not valid for the present wa...

  13. ICRF heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A.; Monakhov, I.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V.; Drewelow, P.; Pütterich, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [IEK-4, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ (Germany); Campergue, A-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Czarnecka, A. [Association Euratom-IPPLM, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Klepper, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, ERM-KMS, Brussels (Belgium); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); Mlynar, J. [Association EURATOM-IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall material on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation was assessed and also the properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF were studied. No substantial change of the antenna coupling resistance was observed with the ILW as compared with the carbon wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas quantified using Infra-Red (IR) thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing) are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can well reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. Some experimental facts indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions; the W content is also increased in ICRF-heated limiter plasmas; and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong and long lasting reduction of the impurity level. The ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 20%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating efficiency; The ICRF power can be deposited at plasma centre and the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core could be observed.

  14. Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P., E-mail: philippe.jacquet@ccfe.ac.uk; Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Meigs, A.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V.; Devaux, S.; Drewelow, P.; Pütterich, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Czarnecka, A. [Association Euratom-IPPLM, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, ERM-KMS, Brussels (Belgium); Mayoral, M.-L. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [IEK-4, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Campergue, A.-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Klepper, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); and others

    2014-06-15

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall materials on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation is assessed and some important properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF are highlighted. A ∼ 20% reduction of the antenna coupling resistance is observed with the ILW as compared with the JET carbon (JET-C) wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas, quantified using Infra-Red thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing), are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. The location of the tungsten ICRF specific source could not be identified but some experimental observations indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: for example, the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions, and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong reduction of the impurity level. In L-mode plasmas, the ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 15%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating performance; the power is typically deposited at the plasma centre while the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma bulk. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas has started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core has been observed.

  15. Numerical simulation of liquid-layer breakup on a moving wall due to an impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Taejong; Moon, Hojoon; You, Donghyun; Kim, Dokyun; Ovsyannikov, Andrey

    2014-11-01

    Jet wiping, which is a hydrodynamic method for controlling the liquid film thickness in coating processes, is constrained by a rather violent film instability called splashing. The instability is characterized by the ejection of droplets from the runback flow and results in an explosion of the film. The splashing phenomenon degrades the final coating quality. In the present research, a volume-of-fluid (VOF)-based method, which is developed at Cascade Technologies, is employed to simulate the air-liquid multiphase flow dynamics. The present numerical method is based on an unstructured-grid unsplit geometric VOF scheme and guarantees strict conservation of mass of two-phase flow, The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements such as the liquid-film thickness before and after the jet wiping, wall pressure and shear stress distributions. The trajectories of liquid droplets due to the fluid motion entrained by the gas-jet operation, are also qualitatively compared with experimental visualization. Physical phenomena observed during the liquid-layer breakup due to an impinging jet is characterized in order to develop ideas for controlling the liquid-layer instability and resulting splash generation and propagation. Supported by the Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699, the Brain Korea 21+ program, POSCO, and 2014 CTR Summer Program.

  16. Design, manufacture and initial operation of the beryllium components of the JET ITER-like wall

    CERN Document Server

    Riccardo, V; Matthews, G F; Nunes, I; Thompson, V; Villedieu, E; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the JET ITER-like Wall Project was to provide JET with the plasma facing material combination now selected for the DT phase of ITER (bulk beryllium main chamber limiters and a full tungsten divertor) and, in conjunction with the upgraded neutral beam heating system, to achieve ITER relevant conditions. The design of the bulk Be plasma facing components had to be compatible with increased heating power and pulse length, as well as to reuse the existing tile supports originally designed to cope with disruption loads from carbon based tiles and be installed by remote handling. Risk reduction measures (prototypes, jigs, etc) were implemented to maximize efficiency during the shutdown. However, a large number of clashes with existing components not fully captured by the configuration model occurred. Restarting the plasma on the ITER-like Wall proved much easier than for the carbon wall and no deconditioning by disruptions was observed. Disruptions have been more threatening than expected due to the redu...

  17. Plasma isotopic change over experiments in JET under Carbon and ITER-Like Wall conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loarer, T., E-mail: thierry.loarer@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Brezinsek, S.; Philipps, V. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Romanelli-Gruenhagen, S. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Alves, D.; Carvalho, I. [IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, IST Lisboa (Portugal); Douai, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Esser, H.G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Felton, R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Frigione, D. [ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Kruezi, U. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Reux, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Smith, R.; Stamp, M.F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Vartanian, S. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    Starting with a wall loaded by H{sub 2}, change over experiments from H{sub 2} to D{sub 2} have been carried out in JET-ILW. A series of 13 repetitive pulses (cumulating 215 s in divertor configuration) have been performed under conditions of: I{sub p} = 2.0 MA, B{sub T} = 2.4 T, 〈n{sub e}〉 = 4.5 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3} with a constant gas injection of 3.0 × 10{sup 21} D s{sup −1} and 0.5 MW of auxiliary heating by ICRH in L-mode. Gas balance analysis shows that the total amount of H removed from the wall is in the range of 3 × 10{sup 22} D compared to 2 × 10{sup 23} D for JET-C. This is consistent with the faster decay of the H plasma concentration and the drop of the retention also by a similar factor when removing all the carbon components. Isotopic plasma wall changeover is also demonstrated to allow for removal of some D/T from the device. However, since plasma change over also contributes to long-term retention by codeposition, in ITER, change over in between each discharge might not be effective to reduce the fuel retention on the long-term.

  18. Global erosion and deposition patterns in JET with the ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron-Wiechec, A., E-mail: aleksandra.baron-wiechec@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Widdowson, A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Alves, E. [Instituto Superior Técnico, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Ayres, C.F. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Barradas, N.P. [Instituto Superior Técnico, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Brezinsek, S. [Association EURATOM-Forschungszentrum Jülich, IPP, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Coad, J.P. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Catarino, N. [Instituto Superior Técnico, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Heinola, K. [Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Likonen, J. [Association EURATOM-TEKES, VTT, PO Box 1000, 02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Matthews, G.F. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Petersson, P.; Rubel, M. [Royal Institute of Technology, Assoc. EURATOM-VR, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Renterghem, W. van; Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK-CEN, The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-08-15

    A set of Be and W tiles removed after the first ITER-like wall campaigns (JET-ILW) from 2011 to 2012 has been analysed. The results indicate that the primary erosion site is in the main chamber (Be) as in previous carbon campaigns (JET-C). In particular the limiters tiles near the mid-plane are eroded probably during the limiter phases of discharges. W is found at low concentrations on all plasma-facing surfaces of the vessel indicating deposition via plasma transport initially from the W divertor and from main chamber W-coated tiles; there are also traces of Mo (used as an interlayer for these coatings). Deposited films in the inner divertor have a layered structure, and every layer is dominated by Be with some W and O content.

  19. Overview of the JET ITER-like Wall, First Results and Scientific Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Guy; JET-EFDA Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The ITER-like Wall (ILW) is the first integrated tokamak experiment with a beryllium main chamber wall and tungsten divertor as foreseen for the activated operational phase of ITER: The ILW will study plasma-wall interaction (PWI) processes (material erosion, material mixing etc.), and the compatibility of the ITER materials with low fuel retention and high power operation. Replacement of the JET CFC first wall by solid Be limiters, and a combination of bulk W and W-coated CFC divertor tiles was performed by remote handling and completed in May 2011 in parallel with a neutral beam heating upgrade to 35 MW and enhancement of diagnostic capabilities. Mitigation of the power and energy loads in the divertor to acceptable levels at high power plasma performance will require high-density plasmas and radiative cooling via impurity seeding. Experiments were carried out with the carbon wall in preparation for the ILW to operate plasmas within ILW limits and provide reference plasmas for key physics studies. Although first plasma is scheduled for mid-August, the scientific programme in support of ITER will start earlier with machine conditioning. In this paper, an overview of the ILW, first results and the outlook for the scientific programme will be presented.

  20. Synthesis of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Using a Double-Slit Curved Wall-Jet Burner

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Mohamed

    2016-05-04

    A novel double-slit curved wall-jet (DS-CWJ) burner was proposed and utilized for flame synthesis. This burner was comprised of double curved wall-jet nozzles with coaxial slits; the inner slit was for the delivery of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) precursor while the outer one was to supply premixed fuel/air mixture of ethylene (C2H4) or propane (C3H8). This configuration enabled rapid mixing between the precursor and reactants along the curved surface and inside the recirculation zone of the burner. Particle growth of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles and their phases was investigated with varying equivalence ratio and Reynolds number. Flow field and flame structure were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) techniques, respectively. The nanoparticles were characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) for surface area analysis. The flow field consisted of a wall-jet region leading to a recirculation zone, an interaction jet region, followed by a merged-jet region. The DS-CWJ burner revealed appreciable mixing characteristics between the precursor and combustion gases near the nozzle regions, with a slight increase in the axial velocity due to the precursor injection. The precursor supply had a negligible effect on the flame structure. The burner produced a reasonably uniform size (13–18 nm) nanoparticles with a high BET surface area (>100 m2/g). The phase of TiO2 nanoparticles was mainly dependent on the equivalence ratio and fuel type, which impact flame height, heat release rate, and high temperature residence time of the precursor vapor. For ethylene flames, the anatase content increased with the equivalence ratio, whereas it decreased in the case of propane flames. The synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles exhibited high crystallinity and the anatase phase was dominant at high equivalence

  1. Power deposition modelling of the ITER-like wall beryllium tiles at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaouss, M.; Mitteau, R.; Villedieu, E.; Riccardo, V.; Lomas, P.; Vizvary, Z.; Portafaix, C.; Ferrand, L.; Thomas, P.; Nunes, I.; de Vries, P.; Chappuis, P.; Stephan, Y.

    2009-06-01

    A precise geometric method is used to calculate the power deposition on the future JET ITER-Like Wall beryllium tiles with particular emphasis on the internal edge loads. If over-heated surfaces are identified, these can be modified before the machining or failing that actively monitored during operations. This paper presents the methodology applied to the assessment of the main chamber beryllium limiters. The detailed analysis of one limiter is described. The conclusion of this study is that operation will not be limited by edges exposed to plasma convective loads.

  2. Experimental investigation of influence of Reynolds number on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; He, GuoSheng; Kulkarni, Varun; Wang, JinJun

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry was employed to study the effect of Reynolds number ( Re sj) on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall. Four Reynolds numbers ranging from 166 to 664 were investigated for comparison while other parameters were kept constant. It is found that the Reynolds number has a significant impact on the spatial evolution of near-wall vortical structures of the impinging synthetic jet. Velocity triple decomposition reveals that periodic Reynolds shear stresses produced by both impinging and secondary vortex rings agree well with a four-quadrant-type distribution rule, and the random velocity fluctuations are strengthened as Re sj increases. For radial wall jet, radial velocity profiles exhibit a self-similar behavior for all Re sj, and this self-similar profile gradually deviates from the laminar solution as Re sj is increased. In particular, the self-similar profile for low Re sj (166) coincides with the laminar solution indicating that periodic velocity fluctuations produced by vortex rings have little effect on the velocity profile of the laminar wall jet. This also provides evidence that the impinging synthetic jet is more effective in mixing than the continuous jet for the laminar flow. For the high Re sj, the mean skin friction coefficient has a slower decay rate after reaching peak, and the radial momentum flux has a higher value at locations far away from the impingement region, both of these can be attributed to the enhanced random fluctuations.

  3. Comparison of scrape-off layer transport in inner and outer wall limited JET plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C., E-mail: csilva@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica Lisboa (Portugal); Arnoux, G.; Devaux, S. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Frigione, D. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla fusione, CR Frascati, Roma (Italy); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Otakaari 4, 02015 Espoo (Finland); Horacek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Lomas, P.J. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Matthews, G. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-07-15

    The JET scrape-off layer has been characterized with a reciprocating probe in inner wall, IW, and outer wall, OW, limited plasmas. Broad SOL profiles are observed for IW limited plasmas with power e-folding length substantially larger (by a factor of ∼5–7.5) than in OW limited plasmas. The properties of the fluctuations in the SOL parameters indicate larger turbulent transport for IW limited plasmas. The striking differences observed between IW and OW limited plasmas on the power e-folding length, parallel flow, turbulent transport as well as the characteristics of the fluctuations support the existence of a poloidally localized region of enhanced radial transport near the outboard midplane. The dependence of the SOL power e-folding length on the main plasma parameters was also investigated for IW limited plasmas and a modest negative dependence on both the plasma current and the line-averaged density found.

  4. The influence of walls on jet propagation and ignition under diesel engine conditions. Einfluss von Waenden auf Strahlausbreitung und Zuendverhalten unter dieselmotorischen Bedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Huanxin.

    1991-08-01

    This research on the influence of walls on jet propagation and ingnition behaviour of a diesel jet was carried out in a pressure chamber with different wall inserts. By using two-side schlieren optics and other optical measuring methods it was possible to identify jet characteristics, especially locations of ignition and ingition delays in the injection jet precisely and to analyse them statistically. Wall temperature, wall spacing, impact angle, chamber air temperature and chamber pressure, injection pressure and injection quantity were vaired within the range important for a diesel engine. (orig./HW).

  5. Blow-off characteristics of turbulent premixed flames in curved-wall Jet Burner

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-08-02

    This study concerns the flame dynamics of a curved-wall jet (CWJ) stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches blow-off conditions. Time resolved OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) delineated reaction zone contours and simultaneously stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) quantified the turbulent flow field features. Ethylene/air flames were stabilized in CWJ burner to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff. For stably burning flames far from blowoff, flames are characterized with a recirculation zone (RZ) upstream for flame stabilization followed by an intense turbulent interaction jet (IJ) and merged-jet regions downstream; the flame front counterparts the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, as the velocity of reactants increases, high local stretch rates exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously resulting in localized flame extinction along the IJ region. As Reynolds number (Re) increases, flames become shorter and are entrained by larger amounts of cold reactants. The increased strain rates together with heat loss effects result in further fragmentation of the flame, eventually leading to the complete quenching of the flame. This is explained in terms of local turbulent Karlovitz stretch factor (K) and principal flow strain rates associated with C contours. Hydrogen addition and increasing the RZ size lessen the tendency of flames to be locally extinguished.

  6. Comparative analysis of core heat transport of JET high density H-mode plasmas in carbon wall and ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Tae; Romanelli, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Koskela, T.; Conboy, J.; Giroud, C.; Maddison, G.; Joffrin, E.; contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    A consistent deterioration of global confinement in H-mode experiments has been observed in JET [1] following the replacement of all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) with an all metal (‘ITER-like’) wall (ILW). This has been correlated to the observed degradation of the pedestal confinement, as lower electron temperature (Te) values are routinely measured at the top of the edge barrier region. A comparative investigation of core heat transport in JET-ILW and JET-CW (carbon wall) discharges has been performed, to assess whether core confinement has also been affected by the wall change. The results presented here have been obtained by analysing a set of discharges consisting of high density JET-ILW H-mode plasmas and comparing them against their counterpart discharges in JET-CW having similar global operational parameters. The set contains 10 baseline ({βN}=1.5∼ 2 ) discharge-pairs with 2.7 T toroidal magnetic field, 2.5 MA plasma current, and 14 to 17 MW of neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Based on a Te profile analysis using high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) data, the Te profile peaking (i.e. core Te (ρ = 0.3) / edge Te (ρ = 0.7)) is found to be similar, and weakly dependent on edge Te, for both JET-ILW and JET-CW discharges. When ILW discharges are seeded with N2, core and edge Te both increase to maintain a similar peaking factor. The change in core confinement is addressed with interpretative TRANSP simulations. It is found that JET-ILW H-mode plasmas have higher NBI power deposition to electrons and lower NBI power deposition to ions as compared to the JET-CW counterparts. This is an effect of the lower electron temperature at the top of the pedestal. As a result, the core electron energy confinement time is reduced in JET-ILW discharges, but the core ion energy confinement time is not decreased. Overall, the core energy confinement is found to be the same in the JET-ILW discharges compared to the JET-CW counterparts.

  7. CHARACTERISTICS OF CORRELATION AND SPECTRUM BETWEEN WALL FLUCTUATING PRESSURE AND FLUCTUATING VELOCITY OF IMPING-ING JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The correlation, the spectrum and the turbu-lent scale between wall fluctuating pressure and fluctuating ve-locity, on the bed of plunging pool under the action of single and twin impinging jet, are investigated in the paper by using 2-D LDA and the dynamic pressure scanning system of multi-ple points. It is found that the cross correlation between the horizontal fluctuating velocity and the fluctuating pressure of twin jet is bigger than that of sinlge jet, and the spectrum be-tween horizontal fluctuating velocity and fluctuating pressure obviously has approximately dominant frequency. The rela-tionship between the fluctuation pressure coefficient on wall and the turbulent intensity near the wall can be described with logarithmic curve.

  8. Impact and mitigation of disruptions with the ITER-like wall in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnen, M.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Flanagan, J.; Gerasimov, S. N.; Hartmann, N.; Hender, T. C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kiptily, V.; Kruezi, U.; Matthews, G. F.; Morris, J.; Plyusnin, V. V.; Reux, C.; Riccardo, V.; Sieglin, B.; de Vries, P. C.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2013-09-01

    Disruptions are a critical issue for ITER because of the high thermal and magnetic energies that are released on short timescales, which results in extreme forces and heat loads. The choice of material of the plasma-facing components (PFCs) can have significant impact on the loads that arise during a disruption. With the ITER-like wall (ILW) in JET made of beryllium in the main chamber and tungsten in the divertor, the main finding is a low fraction of radiation. This has dropped significantly with the ILW from 50-100% of the total energy being dissipated during disruptions in CFC wall plasmas, to less than 50% on average and down to just 10% for vertical displacement events (VDEs). All other changes in disruption properties and loads are consequences of this low radiation: long current quenches (CQs), high vessel forces caused by halo currents and toroidal current asymmetries as well as severe heat loads. Temperatures close to the melting limit have been locally observed on upper first wall structures during deliberate VDE and even at plasma currents as low as 1.5 MA and thermal energy of about 1.5 MJ only. A high radiation fraction can be regained by massive injection of a mixture of 10% Ar with 90% D2. This accelerates the CQ thus reducing the halo current and sideways impulse. The temperature of PFCs stays below 400 °C. MGI is now a mandatory tool to mitigate disruptions in closed-loop operation for currents at and above 2.5 MA in JET.

  9. An improved method to evaluate the ideal no-wall beta limit from resonant field amplification measurements in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yueqiang; Chapman, I T; Saarelma, S; Gryaznevich, M P; Hender, T C; Howell, D F, E-mail: yueqiang.liu@ukaea.org.u [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Modelling the low-n, low frequency resonant field amplification (RFA) effects for JET plasmas, using the MHD code MARS-F, offers explanations to one of the recent observations made in experiments, namely a mismatch between the measured RFA threshold and the predicted no-wall beta limit according to ideal MHD calculations. The mismatch is minimized by applying a new way of determining the RFA threshold, based on evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the RFA amplitude as a function of the normalized plasma pressure. This improved method is shown, at least in theory, to be robust in predicting the no-wall beta limit for JET plasmas.

  10. A protection system for the JET ITER-like wall based on imaging diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, G; Devaux, S; Alves, D; Balboa, I; Balorin, C; Balshaw, N; Beldishevski, M; Carvalho, P; Clever, M; Cramp, S; de Pablos, J-L; de la Cal, E; Falie, D; Garcia-Sanchez, P; Felton, R; Gervaise, V; Goodyear, A; Horton, A; Jachmich, S; Huber, A; Jouve, M; Kinna, D; Kruezi, U; Manzanares, A; Martin, V; McCullen, P; Moncada, V; Obrejan, K; Patel, K; Lomas, P J; Neto, A; Rimini, F; Ruset, C; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Sieglin, B; Soleto, A; Stamp, M; Stephen, A; Thomas, P D; Valcárcel, D F; Williams, J; Wilson, J; Zastrow, K-D

    2012-10-01

    The new JET ITER-like wall (made of beryllium and tungsten) is more fragile than the former carbon fiber composite wall and requires active protection to prevent excessive heat loads on the plasma facing components (PFC). Analog CCD cameras operating in the near infrared wavelength are used to measure surface temperature of the PFCs. Region of interest (ROI) analysis is performed in real time and the maximum temperature measured in each ROI is sent to the vessel thermal map. The protection of the ITER-like wall system started in October 2011 and has already successfully led to a safe landing of the plasma when hot spots were observed on the Be main chamber PFCs. Divertor protection is more of a challenge due to dust deposits that often generate false hot spots. In this contribution we describe the camera, data capture and real time processing systems. We discuss the calibration strategy for the temperature measurements with cross validation with thermal IR cameras and bi-color pyrometers. Most importantly, we demonstrate that a protection system based on CCD cameras can work and show examples of hot spot detections that stop the plasma pulse. The limits of such a design and the associated constraints on the operations are also presented.

  11. Upgrade of the infrared camera diagnostics for the JET ITER-like wall divertor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa, I; Arnoux, G; Eich, T; Sieglin, B; Devaux, S; Zeidner, W; Morlock, C; Kruezi, U; Sergienko, G; Kinna, D; Thomas, P D; Rack, M

    2012-10-01

    For the new ITER-like wall at JET, two new infrared diagnostics (KL9B, KL3B) have been installed. These diagnostics can operate between 3.5 and 5 μm and up to sampling frequencies of ∼20 kHz. KL9B and KL3B image the horizontal and vertical tiles of the divertor. The divertor tiles are tungsten coated carbon fiber composite except the central tile which is bulk tungsten and consists of lamella segments. The thermal emission between lamellae affects the surface temperature measurement and therefore KL9A has been upgraded to achieve a higher spatial resolution (by a factor of 2). A technical description of KL9A, KL9B, and KL3B and cross correlation with a near infrared camera and a two-color pyrometer is presented.

  12. 2D tritium distribution on tungsten tiles used in JET ITER-like wall project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Y., E-mail: hatano@ctg.u-toyama.ac.jp [University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Widdowson, A.; Bekris, N.; Ayres, C.; Baron-Wiechec, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Likonen, J.; Koivuranta, S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Association EURATOM-Tekes, P.O. Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Ikonen, J. [University of Helsinki, Association EURATOM-Tekes, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Yumizuru, K. [University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Post-mortem measurements of 2-dimensional tritium (T) distribution using an imaging plate (IP) technique were performed for tungsten (W) divertor tiles (W-coated CFC) used in JET-ITER like wall (ILW) project. The observed T distributions were clearly inhomogeneous, and there were band-like regions with high T concentrations that extended in the toroidal direction on tiles 1, 3, 4 and 6. The concentrations of T in the band-like regions were higher by an order of magnitude than the concentrations in other parts. The inhomogeneous T distributions were explained by non-uniform co-deposition with other elements such as beryllium. The concentrations of T on the outboard vertical tiles (tiles 7 and 8) were low and relatively uniform in comparison with other tiles.

  13. Tungsten transport and sources control in JET ITER-like wall H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N., E-mail: nicolas.fedorczak@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jlich, Assoc EURATOM-FZJ, Jlich (Germany); Devynck, P.; Dumont, R.; Goniche, M.; Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Luna, E. de la [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maddison, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Matthews, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nunes, I. [Istituto de plasmas e fusao nuclear, Lisboa (Portugal); Rimini, F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Solano, E.R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, NCSR Demokritos 153 10, Attica (Greece); Vries, P. de [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    A set of discharges performed with the JET ITER-like wall is investigated with respect to control capabilities on tungsten sources and transport. In attached divertor regimes, increasing fueling by gas puff results in higher divertor recycling ion flux, lower divertor tungsten source, higher ELM frequency and lower core plasma radiation, dominated by tungsten ions. Both pedestal flushing by ELMs and divertor screening (including redeposition) are possibly responsible. For specific scenarios, kicks in plasma vertical position can be employed to increase the ELM frequency, which results in slightly lower core radiation. The application of ion cyclotron radio frequency heating at the very center of the plasma is efficient to increase the core electron temperature gradient and flatten electron density profile, resulting in a significantly lower central tungsten peaking. Beryllium evaporation in the main chamber did not reduce the local divertor tungsten source whereas core radiation was reduced by approximately 50%.

  14. Simulation with the COREDIV code of JET discharges with the ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telesca, G., E-mail: g.telesca@fz-juelich.de [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Gent (Belgium); Zagorski, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, EURATOM/IPPLM Association, Warsaw (Poland); Brezinsek, S. [IEK-4, FZ Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, TEC, Jülich (Germany); Brix, M.; Flanagan, J. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Ivanova-Stanik, I. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, EURATOM/IPPLM Association, Warsaw (Poland); Lehnen, M. [IEK-4, FZ Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, TEC, Jülich (Germany); Stamp, M. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Van Oost, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Gent (Belgium)

    2013-07-15

    ICRF heated L-mode pulses of JET with the new ITER like wall are simulated for the first time with the transport code COREDIV. The model, which couples self-consistently the core with the SOL as well as the main plasma with impurities, outputs, from a limited number of inputs as the heating power, the average density and the confinement time, the core temperatures and densities profiles, the effective ion charge Z{sub eff}, the power radiated, the W fluxes and concentration and the plasma parameters on the divertor. Due to the slab geometry of the SOL, the Be flux cannot be calculated self-consistently, but it is given as an input, according to spectroscopic measurements in the divertor. Comparison of simulations with experimental data both of the core and of the SOL is generally satisfactorily, with the exception of Z{sub eff}, possibly due to radiofrequency-specific effects, which are not accounted for in the model.

  15. Studies of wall shear and mass transfer in a large scale model of neonatal high-frequency jet ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, W J; Gerjarusek, S; Scherer, P W

    1990-01-01

    The problem of endotracheal erosion associated with neonatal high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) is investigated through measurement of air velocity profiles in a scaled up model of the system. Fluid mechanical scaling principles are applied in order to construct a model within which velocity profiles are measured by hot-wire anemometry. The effects of two different jet geometries are investigated. Velocity gradients measured near the tracheal wall are used to measure the shear stresses caused by the jet flow on the wall. The Chilton-Colburn analogy between the transport of momentum and mass is applied to investigate tracheal drying caused by the high shear flow. Shear forces are seen to be more than two times higher for jets located near the endotracheal tube wall than for those located axisymmetrically in the center of the tube. Since water vapor fluxes are dependent on these shears, they are also higher for the asymmetric case. Fluxes are shown to be greatly dependent on the temperature and relative humidity of the inspired gas. Water from the tracheal surface may be depleted within one second if inspired gases are inadequately heated and humidified. It is recommended that the design of neonatal HFJV devices include delivery of heated (near body temperature), humidified (as close to 100% humidity as possible) gases through an axisymmetric jet to best avoid the problem of endotracheal erosion.

  16. Curved wall-jet burner for synthesizing titania and silica nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    A novel curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner was designed for flame synthesis, by injecting precursors through a center tube and by supplying fuel/air mixtures as an annular-inward jet for rapid mixing of the precursors in the reaction zone. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles were produced in ethylene (C2H4)/air premixed flames using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as the precursors, respectively. Particle image velocimetry measurements confirmed that the precursors can be injected into the flames without appreciably affecting flow structure. The nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In the case of TiO2, the phase of nanoparticles could be controlled by adjusting the equivalence ratio, while the particle size was dependent on the precursor loading rate and the flame temperature. The synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles exhibited high crystallinity and the anatase phase was dominant at high equivalence ratios (φ > 1.3). In the case of SiO2, the particle size could be controlled from 11 to 18 nm by adjusting the precursor loading rate. © 2014 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sawtooth control in JET with ITER relevant low field side resonance ion cyclotron resonance heating and ITER-like wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, J. P.; Lennholm, M.; Chapman, I.T.; Lerche, E.; Reich, M.; Alper, B.; Bobkov, V.; Dumont, R.; Faustin, J. M.; Jacquet, P.; Jaulmes, F.; Johnson, T.; Keeling, D. L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Nicolas, T.; Tholerus, S.; Blackman, T.; Carvalho, I. S.; Coelho, R.; Van Eester, D.; Felton, R.; Goniche, M.; Kiptily, V.; Monakhov, I.; Nave, M. F. F.; von Thun, Perez; Sabot, R.; Sozzi, C.; Tsalas, M.

    2015-01-01

    New experiments at JET with the ITER-like wall show for the first time that ITER-relevant low field side resonance first harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) can be used to control sawteeth that have been initially lengthened by fast particles. In contrast to previous (Graves et al 2012

  18. Modelling of the JET DT experiments in carbon and ITER-like wall configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagoerski, R.; Stepniewski, W.; Ivanova-Stanik, I. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Juelich (Germany); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JET contributors

    2016-08-15

    In this paper numerical simulations with the self-consistent COREDIV code of the planned JET DT experiments have been performed. First, record shot from the 1997 experiments was simulated and good agreement with experimental data has been found. Direct extrapolation of the carbon wall results to the new ILW configuration (discharge parameters as for the shot 42746) shows very good core plasma performance with even higher fusion power but with too large power to the divertor. However, with the neon seeding the heat load and plate temperatures can be efficiently reduced keeping good the plasma performance. Investigations have been done also for the planned DT operation scenario based on a conventional ELMy H-mode at high plasma current and magnetic field. Simulations for the reference ELMy H-mode shot 87412 show good agreement with the experimental data but the direct extrapolation of the DD results to deuterium-tritium operation shows relatively poor performance in terms of the achieved fusion power. The situation improves, if the highest heating power is assumed (41 MW) and fusion powers in the excess of 12 MW can be achieved. All the high performance shots require the heat load control by neon seeding which shows rather beneficial effect on the plasma performance allowing for relatively wide operational window in terms of the amount of the allowed neon influx. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Contributions to Plasma Physics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA Weinheim. This)

  19. Overview of LH experiments in JET with an ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirov, K. K.; Baranov, Yu.; Brix, M.; Corrigan, G.; Mailloux, J.; Rimini, F.; Stamp, M. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Barbato, E. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Roma (Italy); Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Petrzilka, V. [Association EURATOM-IPP.CR, IPP AS CR, 182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    An overview of the recent results of Lower Hybrid (LH) experiments at JET with the ITER-like wall (ILW) is presented. Topics relevant to LH wave coupling are addressed as well as issues related to ILW and LH system protections. LH wave coupling was studied in conditions determined by ILW recycling and operational constraints. It was concluded that LH wave coupling was not significantly affected and the pre-ILW performance could be recovered after optimising the launcher position and local gas puffing. SOL density measurements were performed using a Li-beam diagnostic. Dependencies on the D2 injection rate from the dedicated gas valve, the LH power and the LH launcher position were analysed. SOL density modifications due to LH were modelled by the EDGE2D code assuming SOL heating by collisional dissipation of the LH wave and/or possible ExB drifts in the SOL. The simulations matched reasonably well the measured SOL profiles. Observations of arcs and hotspots with visible and IR cameras viewing the LH launcher are presented.

  20. Operation and coupling of LH waves with the ITER-like wall at JET

    CERN Document Server

    Kirov, K K; Ekedahl, A; Petrzilka, V; Arnoux, G; Baranov, Yu; Brix, M; Goniche, M; Jachmich, S; Mayoral, M-L; Ongena, J; Rimini, F; Stamp, M; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2013-01-01

    In this paper important aspects of Lower Hybrid (LH) operation with the ITER Like Wall (ILW) [1] at JET are reported. Impurity release during LH operation was investigated and it was found that there is no significant Be increase with LH power. Concentration of W was analysed in more detail and it was concluded that LH contributes negligibly to its increase. No cases of W accumulation in LH-only heating experiments were observed so far. LH wave coupling was studied and optimised to achieve the level of system performance similar to before ILW installation. Measurements by Li-beam were used to study systematic dependencies of the SOL density on the gas injection rate from a dedicated gas introduction module and the LH power and launcher position. Experimental results are supported by SOL transport modelling. Observations of arcs in front of the LH launcher and hotspots on magnetically connected sections of the vessel are reported. Overall, a relatively troublefree operation of the LH system up to 2.5MW of coup...

  1. Comparison of hybrid and baseline ELMy H-mode confinement in JET with the carbon wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Challis, C.; Osborne, T.; Snyder, P. B.; Alper, B.; Angioni, C.; Bourdelle, C.; Buratti, P.; Crisanti, F.; Giovannozzi, E.; Giroud, C.; Groebner, R.; Hobirk, J.; Jenkins, I.; Joffrin, E.; Leyland, M. J.; Lomas, P.; Mantica, P.; McDonald, D.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Saarelma, S.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; de Vries, P.; Zarzoso, D.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    The confinement in JET baseline type I ELMy H-mode plasmas is compared to that in so-called hybrid H-modes in a database study of 112 plasmas in JET with the carbon fibre composite (CFC) wall. The baseline plasmas typically have βN ˜ 1.5-2, H98 ˜ 1, whereas the hybrid plasmas have βN ˜ 2.5-3, H98 contains both low- (δ ˜ 0.2-0.25) and high-triangularity (δ ˜ 0.4) hybrid and baseline H-mode plasmas from the last JET operational campaigns in the CFC wall from the period 2008-2009. Based on a detailed confinement study of the global as well as the pedestal and core confinement, there is no evidence that the hybrid and baseline plasmas form separate confinement groups; it emerges that the transition between the two scenarios is of a gradual kind rather than demonstrating a bifurcation in the confinement. The elevated confinement enhancement factor H98 in the hybrid plasmas may possibly be explained by the density dependence in the τ98 scaling as n0.41 and the fact that the hybrid plasmas operate at low plasma density compared to the baseline ELMy H-mode plasmas. A separate regression on the confinement data in this study shows a reduction in the density dependence as n0.09±0.08. Furthermore, inclusion of the plasma toroidal rotation in the confinement regression provides a scaling with the toroidal Alfvén Mach number as Mach_A^{0.41+/- 0.07} and again a reduced density dependence as n0.15±0.08. The differences in pedestal confinement can be explained on the basis of linear MHD stability through a coupling of the total and pedestal poloidal pressure and the pedestal performance can be improved through plasma shaping as well as high β operation. This has been confirmed in a comparison with the EPED1 predictive pedestal code which shows a good agreement between the predicted and measured pedestal pressure within 20-30% for a wide range of βN ˜ 1.5-3.5. The core profiles show a strong degree of pressure profile consistency. No beneficial effect of core

  2. Overview of erosion–deposition diagnostic tools for the ITER-Like Wall in the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M., E-mail: rubel@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Coad, J.P. [VTT, Association EURATOM-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Widdowson, A.; Matthews, G.F. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Esser, H.G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Hirai, T. [ITER Organisation, Cadarache (France); Likonen, J. [VTT, Association EURATOM-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Lungu, C.P. [NILPRP, Association EURATOM-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania); Mayer, M. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Pedrick, L. [VTT, Association EURATOM-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Ruset, C. [NILPRP, Association EURATOM-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-07-15

    This paper presents scientific and technical issues related to the development of erosion–deposition diagnostic tools for JET operated with the ITER-Like Wall: beryllium and tungsten marker tiles and several types of wall probes installed in the main chamber and in the divertor. Markers tiles are the standard limiter and divertor components additionally coated first with a thin sandwich of Ni–Be and Mo–W for, beryllium and tungsten markers, respectively. Both types of markers are embedded in regular arrays of limiter and divertor tiles. Coated W–Be probes are also inserted in the Be-covered Inconel cladding tiles on the central column. Other types of erosion–deposition diagnostic tools are: rotating collectors, deposition traps, louver clips, quartz microbalance and mirrors for the First Mirror Test at JET for ITER. The specific role of these tools is discussed in detail.

  3. Erosion at the inner wall of JET during the discharge campaign 2011–2012 in comparison with previous campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krat, S. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gasparyan, Yu; Pisarev, A. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 (Russian Federation); Bykov, I. [Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, Stockholm 10044 (Sweden); Mayer, M., E-mail: matej.mayer@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Saint Aubin, G. de; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lungu, C.P. [NILPRP, Association EURATOM-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania); Widdowson, A. [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM/UKAEA – Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    The erosion of Be and W marker layers was investigated using long-term samples during the first ITER-like wall discharge campaign 2011–2012. The markers were mounted in Be coated Inconel tiles between the inner wall guard limiters (IWGL). They were analyzed using Rutherford backscattering (RBS) before and after exposure. All samples showed strong erosion. The results were compared to the data for Be and W erosion rates for the 2005–2009 and the 2001–2004 campaigns, respectively, when JET was operated with a carbon wall. In 2005–2009 Be and C samples were used, and W samples were used in 2001–2004. The mean W erosion rates and the toroidal and poloidal distributions of the W erosion were the same for the 2001–2004 and the 2011–2012 campaigns. The mean erosion rate of Be during the 2011–2012 campaign was smaller by a factor of about two compared to the 2005–2009 campaign and showed a different poloidal distribution. The mean erosion rate of the inner JET ITER-like wall was about 4–5 times smaller than the mean erosion rate of the carbon wall.

  4. Time-resolved schlieren POD and aft deck pressure correlations on a rectangular supersonic nozzle and sonic wall jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andrew; Stack, Cory; Gaitonde, Datta; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    A multi-stream single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) with aft deck, based on three-stream engine concepts, is currently undergoing experimental tests at Syracuse University's Skytop Turbulence Laboratory. In the context of this study, we view this as an idealized representation consisting of two canonical flows; a supersonic convergent-divergent (CD) nozzle and a sonic wall jet (representing the 3rd stream). The jet operates at a bulk flow of Mj , 1 = 1 . 6 and wall jet Mj , 3 = 1 . 0 . Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is then performed on the schlieren images and the time-dependent coefficients are related to the near-field deck pressure. Structures within the flow field are correlated to particular flow events and help track the downstream evolution of the jet. A multitude of scales are seen within the flow corresponding to a wide range of coherent structures. High fidelity LES is also performed on the same nozzle geometry and relations are made back to the experiments. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  5. Optimization of MGI in JET using the TOKES code and mitigation of RE damage for the first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestchanyi, S., E-mail: serguei.pestchanyi@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boboc, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bazylev, B.; Landman, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We simulated disruption mitigation using massive noble gas injection with the TOKES code. •The results of these simulations have been verified by comparison with JET experiments. •We have found that the amount of gas for triggering the thermal quench can be reduced 40 times. •We propose a special sacrificial diaphragm for mitigation of the wall damage with runaway electrons (RE). •The diaphragm erosion with RE beam has been roughly estimated. -- Abstract: Simulations of massive gas injection (MGI) into the JET plasma using noble gas (NG) have been performed using the TOKES code. The results of these simulations have been verified by comparison with JET experiment for disruption control. Further simulations performed showed that the amount of NG for triggering the thermal quench can be reduced 40 times comparing with the JET experiment. Such small amount of injected NG should generate runaway electrons (RE) with rather large probability. For mitigation of the wall damage with these RE, a special sacrificial diaphragm consisting of several W ‘nails’ with a characteristic thickness of 2 cm has been proposed. The diaphragm erosion with RE beam has been roughly estimated from above as less than 0.5 cm per disruption. Taking into account the plasma shielding may decrease erosion ∼10 times.

  6. Ventricle wall dissection and vascular preservation with the pulsed water jet device: novel tissue dissector for flexible neuroendoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Endo, Toshiki; Fujimura, Miki; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-03-01

    Neuroendoscopic surgery allows minimally invasive surgery, but lacks effective methods to control bleeding. Water jet dissection with continuous flow has been used in liver and kidney surgery since the 1980s, and is effective for tissue manipulation with vascular preservation, but involves some potential risks, such as elevation of intracranial pressure during application in the ventricles. The authors previously reported the efficacy of the actuator-driven pulsed water jet device (ADPJ) to dissect soft tissue with vascular preservation in microscopic neurosurgery. This feasibility study investigated the use of the ADPJ to reduce the amount of water usage, leading to more safety with sustained efficacy. A small-diameter pulsed water jet device was developed for use with the flexible neuroendoscope. To identify the optimal conditions for the water jet, the flow rate, water pressure, and distance between the nozzle and target were analyzed in an in vitro study by using a gelatin brain phantom. A ventricle model was used to monitor the internal pressure and temperature. For ex vivo experiments the porcine brain was harvested and ventricle walls were exposed, and subsequently immersed into physiological saline. For in vivo experiments the cortex was microsurgically resected to make the small cortico-ventricle window, and then the endoscope was introduced to dissect ventricle walls. In the in vitro experiments, water pressure was approximately 6.5 bar at 0.5 mm from the ADPJ nozzle and was maintained at 1 mm, but dropped rapidly toward 50% at 2 mm, and became 10% at 3.5 mm. The ADPJ required less water to achieve the same dissection depth compared with the continuous-flow water jet. With the ventricle model, the internal pressure and temperature were well controlled at the baseline, with open water drainage. These results indicated that the ADPJ can be safely applied within the ventricles. The ADPJ was introduced into a flexible endoscope and the ventricle walls were

  7. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimurthy, M.; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2016-06-01

    Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a normal slot air jet is experimental investigated. Present study focuses on the influence of jet-to-plate spacing (Z/D h ) (0.5-10) and Reynolds number (2500-20,000) on the fluid flow and heat transfer distribution. A single slot jet with an aspect ratio (l/b) of about 22 is chosen for the current study. Infrared Thermal Imaging technique is used to capture the temperature data on the target surface. Local heat transfer coefficients are estimated from the thermal images using `SMART VIEW' software. Wall static pressure measurement is carried out for the specified range of Re and Z/D h . Wall static pressure coefficients are seen to be independent of Re in the range between 5000 and 15,000 for a given Z/D h . Nu values are higher at the stagnation point for all Z/D h and Re investigated. For lower Z/D h and higher Re, secondary peaks are observed in the heat transfer distributions. This may be attributed to fluid translating from laminar to turbulent flow on the target plate. Heat transfer characteristics are explained based on the simplified flow assumptions and the pressure data obtained using Differential pressure transducer and static pressure probe. Semi-empirical correlation for the Nusselt number in the stagnation region is proposed.

  8. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Adimurthy; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2017-02-01

    Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a normal slot air jet is experimental investigated. Present study focuses on the influence of jet-to-plate spacing ( Z/D h ) (0.5-10) and Reynolds number (2500-20,000) on the fluid flow and heat transfer distribution. A single slot jet with an aspect ratio ( l/b) of about 22 is chosen for the current study. Infrared Thermal Imaging technique is used to capture the temperature data on the target surface. Local heat transfer coefficients are estimated from the thermal images using `SMART VIEW' software. Wall static pressure measurement is carried out for the specified range of Re and Z/D h . Wall static pressure coefficients are seen to be independent of Re in the range between 5000 and 15,000 for a given Z/D h . Nu values are higher at the stagnation point for all Z/D h and Re investigated. For lower Z/D h and higher Re, secondary peaks are observed in the heat transfer distributions. This may be attributed to fluid translating from laminar to turbulent flow on the target plate. Heat transfer characteristics are explained based on the simplified flow assumptions and the pressure data obtained using Differential pressure transducer and static pressure probe. Semi-empirical correlation for the Nusselt number in the stagnation region is proposed.

  9. Characterization and heat flux testing of beryllium coatings on Inconel for JET ITER-like wall project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Linke, J [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Sundelin, P [Alfven Laboratory, Association EURATOM-VR, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Rubel, M [Alfven Laboratory, Association EURATOM-VR, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Kuehnlein, W [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Wessel, E [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Coad, J P [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lungu, C P [National Institute of Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Association EURATOM-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania); Matthews, G F [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pedrick, L [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Piazza, G [EFDA, CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    In order to perform a fully integrated material test, JET has launched the ITER-like wall project with the aim of installing a full metal wall during the next major shutdown. The material foreseen for the main chamber wall is bulk Be at the limiters and Be coatings on inconel tiles elsewhere. R and D process comprises global characterization (structure, purity etc) of the evaporated films and testing of their performance under heat loads. The major results are (i) the layers have survived energy loads of 20 MJ m{sup -2} which is significantly above the required level of 5-10 MJ m{sup -2} (ii) melting limit of beryllium coating would be at the energy level of 30 MJ m{sup -2} (iii) cyclic thermal load of 10 MJ m{sup -2} for up to 50 cycles have not induced any noticeable damage such as flaking or detachment.

  10. Impact of nitrogen seeding on confinement and power load control of a high-triangularity JET ELMy H-mode plasma with a metal wall

    CERN Document Server

    Giroud, C; Jachmich, S; Rimini, F; Beurskens, M N A; Balboa, I; Brezinsek, S; Coelho, R; Coenen, J W; Frassinetti, L; Joffrin, E; Oberkofler, M; Lehnen, M; Liu, Y; Marsen, S; K, K McCormick; Meigs, A; Neu, R; Sieglin, B; van Rooij, G; Arnoux, G; Belo, P; Brix, M; Clever, M; Coffey, I; Devaux, S; Douai, D; Eich, T; Flanagan, J; Grunhagen, S; Huber, A; Kempenaars, M; Kruezi, U; Lawson, K; Lomas, P; Lowry, C; Nunes, I; Sirinnelli, A; Sips, A C C; Stamp, M; Wiesen, S; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the impact on confinement and power load of the high-shape 2.5MA ELMy H-mode scenario at JET of a change from an all carbon plasma facing components to an all metal wall. In preparation to this change, systematic studies of power load reduction and impact on confinement as a result of fuelling in combination with nitrogen seeding were carried out in JET-C and are compared to their counterpart in JET with a metallic wall. An unexpected and significant change is reported on the decrease of the pedestal confinement but is partially recovered with the injection of nitrogen.

  11. Turbulent heat flux measurement in a non-reacting round jet, using BAM:Eu2+ phosphor thermography and particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunchang; Böhm, Benjamin; Sadiki, Amsini; Dreizler, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Turbulent mixing is highly important in flows that involve heat and mass transfer. Information on turbulent heat flux is needed to validate the mixing models implemented in numerical simulations. The calculation of turbulent heat fluxes requires instantaneous information on temperature and velocity. Even using minimally intrusive laser optical methods, simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity is still a challenge. In this study, thermographic phosphor particles are used for simultaneous thermometry and velocimetry: conventional particle image velocimetry is combined with temperature-dependent spectral shifts of BAM:Eu2+ phosphor particles upon UV excitation. The novelty of this approach is the analysis of systematic errors and verification using the well-known properties of a heated turbulent jet issuing into a low velocity, cold coflow. The analysis showed that systematic errors caused by laser fluence, multiple scattering, or preferential signal absorption can be reduced such that reliable measurement of scalar fluxes becomes feasible, which is a prerequisite for applying the method to more complex heat transfer problems.

  12. Vortex dynamics and wall shear stress behaviour associated with an elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J.; New, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Vortical structures and dynamics of a Re h = 2100 elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate were studied at H/ d h = 1, 2 and 4 jet-to-plate separation distances. Flow investigations were conducted along both its major and minor planes using laser-induced fluorescence and digital particle image velocimetry techniques. Results show that the impingement process along the major plane largely consists of primary jet ring-vortex and wall-separated secondary vortex formations, where they subsequently separate from the flat plate at smaller H/ d h = 1 and 2 separation distances. Key vortex formation locations occur closer to the impingement point as the separation distance increases. Interestingly, braid vortices and rib structures begin to take part in the impingement process at H/ d h = 4 and wave instabilities dominate the flow field. In contrast, significantly more coherent primary and secondary vortices with physically larger vortex core sizes and higher vortex strengths are observed along the minor plane, with no signs of braid vortices and rib structures. Lastly, influences of these different flow dynamics on the major and minor plane instantaneous and mean skin friction coefficient levels are investigated to shed light on the effects of separation distance on the wall shear stress distributions.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Transient 3-D Turbulent Heated Jet into Crossflow in a Thick-Wall T-Junction Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Hailing; Chen Tingkuan; Luo Yushan; Wang Haijun

    2001-01-01

    The present work is to investigate the transient three-dimensional heated turbulent jet into crossflow in a thick wall T-junction pipe using CFD package. Two cases with the jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 0.05 and 0.5 are computed, with a finite-volume method utilizing k-ε turbulent model. Comparison of the steady-state computations with measured data shows good qualitative agreement. Transient process of injection is simulated to examine the thermal shock on the T-junction component. Temporal temperature of the component is acquired by thermal coupling with the fluid. Via analysis of the flow and thermal characteristics, factors causing the thermal shock are studied. Optimal flow rates are discussed to reduce the thermal shock.

  14. Experience of handling beryllium, tritium and activated components from JET ITER like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdowson, A.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Batistoni, P.; Belonohy, E.; Coad, J. P.; Dinca, P.; Flammini, D.; Fox, F.; Heinola, K.; Jepu, I.; Likonen, J.; Lilley, S.; Lungu, C. P.; Matthews, G. F.; Naish, J.; Pompilian, O.; Porosnicu, C.; Rubel, M.; Villari, R.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    JET components are removed periodically for surface analysis to assess material migration and fuel retention. This paper describes issues related to handling JET components and procedures for preparing samples for analysis; in particular a newly developed procedure for cutting beryllium tiles is presented. Consideration is also given to the hazards likely due to increased tritium inventory and material activation from 14 MeV neutrons following the planned TT and DT operations (DTE2) in 2017. Conclusions are drawn as to the feasibility of handling components from JET post DTE2.

  15. Long-term evolution of the impurity composition and impurity events with the ITER-like wall at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, J. W.; Sertoli, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Coffey, I.; Dux, R.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Huber, A.; Ivanova, D.; Krieger, K.; Lawson, K.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; Neu, R.; Puetterich, T.; van Rooij, G. J.; Stamp, M. F.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-07-01

    This paper covers aspects of long-term evolution of intrinsic impurities in the JET tokamak with respect to the newly installed ITER-like wall (ILW). At first the changes related to the change over from the JET-C to the JET-ILW with beryllium (Be) as the main wall material and tungsten (W) in the divertor are discussed. The evolution of impurity fluxes in the newly installed W divertor with respect to studying material migration is described. In addition, a statistical analysis of transient impurity events causing significant plasma contamination and radiation losses is shown. The main findings comprise a drop in carbon content (×20) (see also Brezinsek et al (2013 J. Nucl. Mater. 438 S303)), low oxygen content (×10) due to the Be first wall (Douai et al 2013 J. Nucl. Mater. 438 S1172-6) as well as the evolution of the material mix in the divertor. Initially, a short period of repetitive ohmic plasmas was carried out to study material migration (Krieger et al 2013 J. Nucl. Mater. 438 S262). After the initial 1600 plasma seconds the material surface composition is, however, still evolving. With operational time, the levels of recycled C are increasing slightly by 20% while the Be levels in the deposition-dominated inner divertor are dropping, hinting at changes in the surface layer material mix made of Be, C and W. A steady number of transient impurity events, consisting of W and constituents of inconel, is observed despite the increase in variation in machine operation and changes in magnetic configuration as well as the auxiliary power increase.

  16. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Adimurthy; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2017-08-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the local distribution of wall static pressure and the heat transfer coefficient on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet. The experimental parameters include, nozzle-to-plate spacing (Z /D h = 0.5-10.0), axial distance from stagnation point ( x/D h ), size of detached rib ( b = 4-12 mm) and Reynolds number ( Re = 2500-20,000). The wall static pressure on the surface is recorded using a Pitot tube and a differential pressure transmitter. Infrared thermal imaging technique is used to capture the temperature distribution on the target surface. It is observed that, the maximum wall static pressure occurs at the stagnation point ( x/D h = 0) for all nozzle-to-plate spacing ( Z/D h ) and rib dimensions studied. Coefficient of wall static pressure ( C p ) decreases monotonically with x/D h . Sub atmospheric pressure is evident in the detached rib configurations for jet to plate spacing up to 6.0 for all ribs studied. Sub atmospheric region is stronger at Z/D h = 0.5 due to the fluid accelerating under the rib. As nozzle to plate spacing ( Z/D h ) increases, the sub-atmospheric region becomes weak and vanishes gradually. Reasonable enhancement in both C p as well as Nu is observed for the detached rib configuration. Enhancement is found to decrease with the increase in the rib width. The results of the study can be used in optimizing the cooling system design.

  17. Effects of the false vocal folds on sound generation by an unsteady glottal jet through rigid wall model of the larynx

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Funada, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, the effects of the false vocal folds (FVFs) on sound generation induced by an unsteady glottal jet through a two-dimensional rigid wall model of the larynx are investigated by conducting numerical experiments. The glottal jets are simulated by solving the basic equations for a compressible viscous fluid based on the larynx model with and without the FVFs. The existence of the FVFs increases the amplitude of noise-like pressure fluctuation at the glottis and faraway from ...

  18. A NEW DOUBLE-SLIT CURVED WALL-JET (CWJ) BURNER FOR STABILIZING TURBULENT PREMIXED AND NON-PREMIXED FLAMES

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-06-30

    A novel double-slit curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner was proposed and employed, which utilizes the Coanda effect by supplying fuel and air as annular-inward jets over a curved surface. We investigated the stabilization characteristics and structure of methane/air, and propane/air turbulent premixed and non-premixed flames with varying global equivalence ratio, , and Reynolds number, Re. Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH radicals were conducted. The burner showed potential for stable operation for methane flames with relatively large fuel loading and overall rich conditions. These have a non-sooting nature. However, propane flames exhibit stable mode for a wider range of equivalence ratio and Re. Mixing characteristics in the cold flow of non-premixed cases were first examined using acetone fluorescence technique, indicating substantial transport between the fuel and air by exhibiting appreciable premixing conditions.PIV measurements revealed that velocity gradients in the shear layers at the boundaries of the annularjets generate the turbulence, enhanced with the collisions in the interaction jet, IJ,region. Turbulent mean and rms velocities were influenced significantly by Re and high rms turbulent velocities are generated within the recirculation zone improving the flame stabilization in this burner.Premixed and non-premixed flames with high equivalence ratio were found to be more resistant to local extinction and exhibited a more corrugated and folded nature, particularly at high Re. For flames with low equivalence ratio, the processes of local quenching at IJ region and of re-ignition within merged jet region maintained these flames further downstream particularly for non-premixed methane flame, revealing a strong intermittency.

  19. Inlet turbulence intensity level and cross-stream distribution effects on the heat transfer in plane wall jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the turbulence intensity level and its cross-stream distribution at the inlet on the numerical prediction of the heat transfer in a two-dimensional turbulent-wall jet was investigated. The investigation was carried out within the framework of the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model. The predicted Nusselt number showed the influence of the turbulence intensity level and its cross-stream distribution at the inlet to be significant but restricted to the first 15 slot widths from the inlet slot. Beyond this location, all the predictions were observed to collapse onto a single curve which exhibited a maximum over-prediction of about 30 percent when compared with the available experimental data.

  20. Fabrication of platinum-decorated single-walled carbon nanotube based hydrogen sensors by aerosol jet printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Ding, Haiyan; Lin, Jian; Shen, Fangping; Cui, Zheng; Zhang, Ting

    2012-12-21

    The coffee ring effect is reduced effectively and a hydrogen sensor with platinum-decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is prepared by aerosol jet printing (AJP) technology. The stable aqueous solution of platinum functional SWCNTs is prepared by a series of chemical and physical processes and the electrode array is formed by micro-fabrication technology. The AJP process is also researched in detail including the number of printing passes and the printing distance between electrodes. Then, the functional SWCNT aqueous solution is printed on the electrode array and the response of this sensor to the hydrogen is measured carefully. The results show that a functional SWCNT sensor has excellent sensing properties toward hydrogen.

  1. Coupled core-SOL modelling of W contamination in H-mode JET plasmas with ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parail, V., E-mail: Vassili.parail@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Corrigan, G.; Da Silva Aresta Belo, P. [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); De La Luna, E. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Harting, D. [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Koechl, F. [Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Koskela, T. [Aalto University, Department of Applied Physics, P.O. Box 14100, FIN-00076 Aalto (Finland); Meigs, A.; Militello-Asp, E.; Romanelli, M. [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Tsalas, M. [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    The influence of the ITER-like Wall (ILW) with divertor target plate made of tungsten (W), on plasma performance in JET H-mode is being investigated since 2011 (see F. Romanelli and references therein). One of the key issues in discharges with low level of D fuelling is observed accumulation of W in the plasma core, which leads to a reduction in plasma performance. To study the interplay between W sputtering on the target plate, penetration of W through the SOL and edge transport barrier (ETB) and its further accumulation in plasma core predictive modelling was launched using a coupled 1.5D core and 2D SOL code JINTRAC (Romanelli, 2014; Cenacchi and Taroni, 1988; Taroni et al., 1992; Wiesen et al., 2006). Simulations reveal the important role of ELMs in W sputtering and plasma density control. Analyses also confirm pivotal role played by the neo-classical pinch of heavy impurities within the ETB.

  2. Development of a mirror-based endoscope for divertor spectroscopy on JET with the new ITER-like wall (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, A; Brezinsek, S; Mertens, Ph; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Terra, A; Arnoux, G; Balshaw, N; Clever, M; Edlingdon, T; Egner, S; Farthing, J; Hartl, M; Horton, L; Kampf, D; Klammer, J; Lambertz, H T; Matthews, G F; Morlock, C; Murari, A; Reindl, M; Riccardo, V; Samm, U; Sanders, S; Stamp, M; Williams, J; Zastrow, K D; Zauner, C

    2012-10-01

    A new endoscope with optimised divertor view has been developed in order to survey and monitor the emission of specific impurities such as tungsten and the remaining carbon as well as beryllium in the tungsten divertor of JET after the implementation of the ITER-like wall in 2011. The endoscope is a prototype for testing an ITER relevant design concept based on reflective optics only. It may be subject to high neutron fluxes as expected in ITER. The operating wavelength range, from 390 nm to 2500 nm, allows the measurements of the emission of all expected impurities (W I, Be II, C I, C II, C III) with high optical transmittance (≥ 30% in the designed wavelength range) as well as high spatial resolution that is ≤ 2 mm at the object plane and ≤ 3 mm for the full depth of field (± 0.7 m). The new optical design includes options for in situ calibration of the endoscope transmittance during the experimental campaign, which allows the continuous tracing of possible transmittance degradation with time due to impurity deposition and erosion by fast neutral particles. In parallel to the new optical design, a new type of possibly ITER relevant shutter system based on pneumatic techniques has been developed and integrated into the endoscope head. The endoscope is equipped with four digital CCD cameras, each combined with two filter wheels for narrow band interference and neutral density filters. Additionally, two protection cameras in the λ > 0.95 μm range have been integrated in the optical design for the real time wall protection during the plasma operation of JET.

  3. Development of a mirror-based endoscope for divertor spectroscopy on JET with the new ITER-like wall (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Terra, A.; Clever, M.; Lambertz, H. T.; Samm, U. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Arnoux, G.; Balshaw, N.; Edlingdon, T.; Farthing, J.; Matthews, G. F.; Riccardo, V.; Sanders, S.; Stamp, M.; Williams, J.; Zastrow, K. D. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Egner, S. [Kayser-Threde GmbH, D-81379 Munich (Germany); and others

    2012-10-15

    A new endoscope with optimised divertor view has been developed in order to survey and monitor the emission of specific impurities such as tungsten and the remaining carbon as well as beryllium in the tungsten divertor of JET after the implementation of the ITER-like wall in 2011. The endoscope is a prototype for testing an ITER relevant design concept based on reflective optics only. It may be subject to high neutron fluxes as expected in ITER. The operating wavelength range, from 390 nm to 2500 nm, allows the measurements of the emission of all expected impurities (W I, Be II, C I, C II, C III) with high optical transmittance ({>=}30% in the designed wavelength range) as well as high spatial resolution that is {<=}2 mm at the object plane and {<=}3 mm for the full depth of field ({+-}0.7 m). The new optical design includes options for in situ calibration of the endoscope transmittance during the experimental campaign, which allows the continuous tracing of possible transmittance degradation with time due to impurity deposition and erosion by fast neutral particles. In parallel to the new optical design, a new type of possibly ITER relevant shutter system based on pneumatic techniques has been developed and integrated into the endoscope head. The endoscope is equipped with four digital CCD cameras, each combined with two filter wheels for narrow band interference and neutral density filters. Additionally, two protection cameras in the {lambda} > 0.95 {mu}m range have been integrated in the optical design for the real time wall protection during the plasma operation of JET.

  4. Simulation of tungsten sputtering with EDGE2D–EIRENE in low triangularity L-mode JET ITER like wall configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harting, D.; Groth, M.; Beurskens, M.; Boerner, P.; Brix, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Corrigan, G.; Lehnen, M.; Marsen, S.; van Rooij, G. J.; Reiter, D.; Wiesen, S.

    2013-01-01

    The 2D edge plasma transport code EDGE2D-EIRENE has been upgraded to account for the actual material and geometric properties of the newly installed İTER\\} like wall (ILW) at JET. This includes the simulation of beryllium and tungsten impurities as well as a revised treatment of sputtering by main p

  5. Impact of nitrogen seeding on confinement and power load control of a high-triangularity JET ELMy H-mode plasma with a metal wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giroud, C.; Maddison, G. P.; Jachmich, S.; Rimini, F.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Balboa, I.; Brezinsek, S.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Frassinetti, L.; Joffrin, E.; Oberkofler, M.; Lehnen, M.; Liu, Y.; Marsen, S.; McCormick, K.; Meigs, A.; Neu, R.; Sieglin, B.; van Rooij, G. J.; Arnoux, G.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coffey, I.; Devaux, S.; Douai, D.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; S. Grünhagen,; Huber, A.; Kempenaars, M.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K.; Lomas, P.; Lowry, C.; Nunes, I.; Sirinnelli, A.; Sips, A.C.C.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the impact on confinement and power load of the high-shape 2.5 MA ELMy H-mode scenario at JET of a change from all carbon plasma-facing components to an all metal wall. In preparation to this change, systematic studies of power load reduction and impact on confinement as a result

  6. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Corrigan, G.; Harting, D.; Wiesen, S.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lowry, C.; Maggi, C. F.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Sergienko, G.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached \\{JET\\} L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side tar

  7. In-vessel calibration of the imaging diagnostics for the real-time protection of the JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, V., E-mail: V.Huber@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Supercomputing Centre, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Sergienko, G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung—Plasmaphysik, Partner of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kinna, D.; Balboa, I.; Collins, S.; Conway, N.; Maggi, C. F.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Price, M.; Silburn, S.; Zastrow, K.-D. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Drewelow, P. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Wynn, A. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    The in situ absolute calibration of the JET real-time protection imaging system has been performed for the first time by means of radiometric light source placed inside the JET vessel and operated by remote handling. High accuracy of the calibration is confirmed by cross-validation of the near infrared (NIR) cameras against each other, with thermal IR cameras, and with the beryllium evaporator, which lead to successful protection of the JET first wall during the last campaign. The operation temperature ranges of NIR protection cameras for the materials used on JET are Be 650-1600 °C, W coating 600-1320 °C, and W 650-1500 °C.

  8. Melt damage to the JET ITER-like Wall and divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, G. F.; Bazylev, B.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Coenen, J.; Heinola, K.; Kiptily, V.; Maier, H.; Reux, C.; Riccardo, V.; Rimini, F.; Sergienko, G.; Thompson, V.; Widdowson, A.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    In October 2014, JET completed a scoping study involving high power scenario development in preparation for DT along with other experiments critical for ITER. These experiments have involved intentional and unintentional melt damage both to bulk beryllium main chamber tiles and to divertor tiles. This paper provides an overview of the findings of concern for machine protection in JET and ITER, illustrating each case with high resolution images taken by remote handling or after removal from the machine. The bulk beryllium upper dump plate tiles and some other protection tiles have been repeatedly flash melted by what we believe to be mainly fast unmitigated disruptions. The flash melting produced in this way is seen at all toroidal locations and the melt layer is driven by j × B forces radially outward and upwards against gravity. In contrast, the melt pools caused while attempting to use MGI to mitigate deliberately generated runaway electron beams are localized to several limiters and the ejected material appears less influenced by j × B forces and shows signs of boiling. In the divertor, transient melting of bulk tungsten by ELMs was studied in support of the ITER divertor material decision using a specially prepared divertor module containing an exposed edge. Removal of the module from the machine in 2015 has provided improved imaging of the melt and this confirms that the melt layers are driven by ELMs. No other melt damage to the other 9215 bulk tungsten lamellas has yet been observed.

  9. Numerical and experimental study of Boussinesq wall horizontal turbulent jet of fresh water in a static homogeneous environment of salt water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BELCAID Aicha; LE PALEC Georges; DRAOUI Abdeslam

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a numerical and experimental study about buoyant wall turbulent jet in a static homogeneous environment. A light fluid of fresh water is injected horizontally and tangentially to a plane wall into homogenous salt water ambient. This later is given with different values of salinity and the initial fractional density is small, so the applicability of the Boussinesq approximation is valid. Since the domain temperature is assumed to be constant, the density of the mixture is a function of the salt concentration only. Mathematical model is based on the finite volume method and reports on an application of standardk-ε turbulence model for steady flow with densimetric Froude numbers of 1-75 and Reynolds numbers of 2 000-6 000. The basic features of the model are the conservation of mass, momentum and concentration. The boundaries of jet body, the radius and cling length are determined. It is found that the jet spreading and behavior depend on the ratio between initial buoyancy flux and momentum, i.e., initial Froude number, and on the influence of wall boundary which corresponds to Coanda effect. Laboratory experiments were conducted with photographic observations of jet trajectories and numerical results are described and compared with the experiments. A good agreement with numerical and experimental results has been achieved.

  10. Core-SOL modelling of neon seeded JET discharges with the ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telesca, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Zagoerski, R.; Czarnecka, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S.; Huber, A.; Wiesen, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Klima- und Energieforschung-Plasmaphysik, Juelich (Germany); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Drewelow, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Giroud, C. [CCFE Culham, Abingdon (United Kingdom); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JET EFDA contributors

    2016-08-15

    Five ELMy H-mode Ne seeded JET pulses have been simulated with the self-consistent core-SOL model COREDIV. In this five pulse series only the Ne seeding rate was changed shot by shot, allowing a thorough study of the effect of Ne seeding on the total radiated power and of its distribution between core and SOL tobe made. The increase in the simulations of the Ne seeding rate level above that achieved in experiments shows saturation of the total radiated power at a relatively low radiated-heating power ratio (f{sub rad} = 0.60) and a further increase of the ratio of SOL to core radiation, in agreement with the reduction of W release at high Ne seeding level. In spite of the uncertainties caused by the simplified SOL model of COREDIV (neutral model, absence of ELMs and slab model for the SOL), the increase of the perpendicular transport in the SOL with increasing Ne seeding rate, which allows to reproduce numerically the experimental distribution core-SOL of the radiated power, appears to be of general applicability. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Contributions to Plasma Physics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA Weinheim. This)

  11. Fast functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacyak, Daniel; Ihde, Jörg; Merten, Christian; Hartwig, Andreas; Lommatzsch, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    The afterglow of an atmospheric pressure plasma has been used for the fast oxidative functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that the MWCNT morphology is mostly preserved when the MWCNTs are dispersed in a solvent and injected as a spray into the plasma. Contact angle measurements show that this approach enhances the wettability of MWCNTs and reduces their sedimentation in an aqueous dispersion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and electrokinetic measurements show that oxygen plasma incorporates about 6.6 at.% of oxygen and creates mainly hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups on the MWCNT surface. The typical effective treatment time is estimated to be in the range of milliseconds. The approach is ideally suited for combination with the industrial gas phase CVD synthesis of MWCNTs.

  12. Quick-Mixing Studies Under Reacting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, May Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    The low-NO(x) emitting potential of rich-burn/quick-mix/lean-burn )RQL) combustion makes it an attractive option for engines of future stratospheric aircraft. Because NO(x) formation is exponentially dependent on temperature, the success of the RQL combustor depends on minimizing high temperature stoichiometric pocket formation in the quick-mixing section. An experiment was designed and built, and tests were performed to characterize reaction and mixing properties of jets issuing from round orifices into a hot, fuel-rich crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct. The reactor operates on propane and presents a uniform, non-swirling mixture to the mixing modules. Modules consisting of round orifice configurations of 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, and 18 holes were evaluated at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and jet-to-mainstream mass-flaw ratio of 2.5. Temperatures and concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, HC, and NO(x) were obtained upstream, down-stream, and within the orifice plane to determine jet penetration as well as reaction processes. Jet penetration was a function of the number of orifices and affected the mixing in the reacting system. Of the six configurations tested, the 14-hole module produced jet penetration close to the module half-radius and yielded the best mixing and most complete combustion at a plane one duct diameter from the orifice leading edge. The results reveal that substantial reaction and heat release occur in the jet mixing zone when the entering effluent is hot and rich, and that the experiment as designed will serve to explore satisfactorily jet mixing behavior under realistic reacting conditions in future studies.

  13. Effect of nitrogen seeding on the energy losses and on the time scales of the electron temperature and density collapse of type-I ELMs in JET with the ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Dodt, D.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Sirinelli, A.; Boom, J. E.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C.; Jachmich, M. S.; Kempenaars, M.; Lomas, P.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C.; Neu, R.; Nunes, I.; Perez von Thun, C.; Sieglin, B.; Stamp, M.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2015-02-01

    The baseline type-I ELMy H-mode scenario has been re-established in JET with the new tungsten MKII-HD divertor and beryllium on the main wall (hereafter called the ITER-like wall, JET-ILW). The first JET-ILW results show that the confinement is degraded by 20-30% in the baseline scenarios compared to the previous carbon wall JET (JET-C) plasmas. The degradation is mainly driven by the reduction in the pedestal temperature. Stored energies and pedestal temperature comparable to the JET-C have been obtained to date in JET-ILW baseline plasmas only in the high triangularity shape using N2 seeding. This work compares the energy losses during ELMs and the corresponding time scales of the temperature and density collapse in JET-ILW baseline plasmas with and without N2 seeding with similar JET-C baseline plasmas. ELMs in the JET-ILW differ from those with the carbon wall both in terms of time scales and energy losses. The ELM time scale, defined as the time to reach the minimum pedestal temperature soon after the ELM collapse, is ˜2 ms in the JET-ILW and lower than 1 ms in the JET-C. The energy losses are in the range ΔWELM/Wped ≈ 7-12% in the JET-ILW and ΔWELM/Wped ≈ 10-20% in JET-C, and fit relatively well with earlier multi-machine empirical scalings of ΔWELM/Wped with collisionality. The time scale of the ELM collapse seems to be related to the pedestal collisionality. Most of the non-seeded JET-ILW ELMs are followed by a further energy drop characterized by a slower time scale ˜8-10 ms (hereafter called slow transport events), that can lead to losses in the range ΔWslow/Wped ≈ 15-22%, slightly larger than the losses in JET-C. The N2 seeding in JET-ILW significantly affects the ELMs. The JET-ILW plasmas with N2 seeding are characterized by ELM energy losses and time scales similar to the JET-C and by the absence of the slow transport events.

  14. The REACT Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Paul; Blystad, Astrid; Byskov, Jens;

    selected disease and programme interventions and services, within general care and on health systems management. Efforts to improve health sector performance have not yet been satisfactory, and adequate and sustainable improvements in health outcomes have not been shown. Priority setting in health systems...... decisions; and the provision of leadership and the enforcement of conditions. REACT - "REsponse to ACcountable priority setting for Trust in health systems" is an EU-funded five-year intervention study, which started in 2006 testing the application and effects of the AFR approach in one district each...... in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia. Qualitative and quantitative methods are applied in an action research framework. The project baseline surveys have already been completed and indicate both a strong need and a high willingness for change in the study districts. REACT has developed active research...

  15. CFD prediction of the reacting flow field inside a subscale scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsomboon, T.; Northam, G. B.; Rogers, R. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD code has been used to calculate the reacting flowfield inside a hydrogen-fueled, subscale scramjet combustor. Pilot fuel was injected transversely upstream of the combustor and the primary fuel was injected transversely downstream of a backward facing step. A finite rate combustion model with two-step kinetics was used. The CFD code used the explicit MacCormack algorithm with point-implicit treatment of the chemistry source terms. Turbulent mixing of the jets with the airstream was simulated by a simple mixing length scheme, whereas near wall turbulence was accounted for by the Baldwin-Lomax model. Computed results were compared with experimental wall pressure measurements.

  16. Introduction to Climbing Wall Robot for High Pressure Water Jet Cutting%基于高压水射流技术的爬壁机器人介绍

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗晓凯; 龚烈航; 孙义柯

    2016-01-01

    介绍了几种常见的且已投入实际生产工作的爬壁机器人的结构原理,同时分析了在结合高压水射流切割技术后,各类机器人的性能优势以及不足之处。最后论述了在日益发展迅速的高压水射流切割技术下,爬壁机器人在技术方面所面临的一些问题。%This paper introduced the working principle of several kinds of climbing robots used in practical production ,analyzed their advantages and disadvantages after combining with high-pressure water jet cutting technology .At last ,the paper discussed some problems in climbing wall robots ,with the rapid development of high-pressure water jet cutting technology .

  17. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  18. Wall catalysis experiment on AFE. [Aeroassist Flight Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the wall catalysis experiment which is planned as part of the Aeroassist Flight experiments (AFE) that will be flown from the Space Shuttle Orbiter in late 1993. Research on candidate high-catalytic efficiency overcoats for the experiment conducted in an arc-jet air stream are discussed. The temperature distribution over the AFE heat shield is also predicted using a reacting boundary layer solution that includes surface kinetics and optical properties determined from these tests.

  19. A study of the wall/jet interaction on a transient spray. Application to diesel injection; Etude de l'interaction jet/paroi dans un spray transitoire. Application a l'injection diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chale Gongora, H.G.

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this work is to better understand the mechanisms that govern the formation and development of the parietal flow occurring during the impact of a diesel fuel jet on a plate. In order to isolate the dynamical aspects of the phenomenon, a non-confined experimental configuration at ambient temperature and pressure has been used. The behaviour of the dispersed phase for different conditions of jet approach and different plate temperatures has been analyzed. Velocity and diameter fields of the free zone and of the parietal zone have been measured using a laser doppler apparatus up to a plate surface resolution of 0.2 mm. In a first step, an estimation of the average time value gives information about the global behaviour of the spray: the plate effect is sensible up to a very reduced distance but increases with the plate temperature, the momentum of the parietal jet is localized in a zone very close to the wall, an increase of the droplets size and of radial velocities in the parietal zone is observed when the nozzle is moved closer to the wall, and the increase of the plate temperature facilitates the jet penetration and leads to a reduction of the droplets size (increase of the shear stresses) and to a reduction of the liquid film thickness submitted to splashing. In order to examine the behaviour of velocity and droplets diameter with time, a processing has been defined which provides an average description of the phenomena. A laser tomography study in association with fast cinematography and CCD camera video recording has permitted to outline the main aspects of the evolution of the parietal spray with time: fast development of a swirl which drags most of the small droplets and limits their dispersion, effect of the temperature rise of the plate in the beginning of fuel injection, development of a more intense swirl which leads to an increase of velocity fluctuations, development of wavelet structures in the internal zone of the flow, near the wall, and

  20. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M., E-mail: mathias.groth@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Brezinsek, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Belo, P. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Association EURATOM-IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Corrigan, G. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Harting, D.; Wiesen, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Beurskens, M.N.A.; Brix, M. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Clever, M.; Coenen, J.W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Eich, T. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Huber, A. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Association “EURATOM Belgium State”, Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Brussels (Belgium); Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Lowry, C. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C.F. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institut for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald (Germany); and others

    2013-07-15

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached JET L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side target were observed in high-recycling scrape-off layer conditions, whilst in close-to-sheath-limited conditions almost identical plasmas were obtained. The 30% reduction in total radiation with the beryllium/tungsten wall is consistent with a reduction of carbon as the dominant impurity radiator; however similar ion current to the plates, emission from recycling neutrals and neutral pressures in the pumping plenum were measured. Simulations with the EDGDE2/EIRENE code of these plasmas indicate a reduction of the total divertor radiation when carbon is omitted, but significantly higher power loads in high-recycling and detached conditions are predicted than measured.

  1. Deuterium Balmer/Stark spectroscopy and impurity profiles: first results from mirror-link divertor spectroscopy system on the JET ITER-like wall

    CERN Document Server

    Meigs, A G; Clever, M; Huber, A; Marsen, S; Nicholas, C; Stamp, M; Zastrow, K-D; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2013-01-01

    For the ITER-like wall, the JET mirror link divertor spectroscopy system was redesigned to fully cover the tungsten horizontal strike plate with faster time resolution and improved near-UV performance. Since the ITER-like wall project involves a change in JET from a carbon dominated machine to a beryllium and tungsten dominated machine with residual carbon, the aim of the system is to provide the recycling flux, equivalent, to the impinging deuterium ion flux, the impurity fluxes (C, Be, O) and tungsten sputtering fluxes and hence give information on the tungsten divertor source. In order to do this self-consistently, the system also needs to provide plasma characterization through the deuterium Balmer spectra measurements of electron density and temperature during high density. L-Mode results at the density limit from Stark broadening/line ratio analysis will be presented and compared to Langmuir probe profiles and 2D-tomography of low-n Balmer emission [1]. Comparison with other diagnostics will be vital fo...

  2. Deuterium Balmer/Stark spectroscopy and impurity profiles: First results from mirror-link divertor spectroscopy system on the JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meigs, A.G., E-mail: Andrew.Meigs@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S.; Clever, M.; Huber, A. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institut for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (Germany); Nicholas, C. [Dept. of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Stamp, M.; Zastrow, K.-D. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    For the ITER-like wall, the JET mirror link divertor spectroscopy system was redesigned to fully cover the tungsten horizontal strike plate with faster time resolution and improved near-UV performance. Since the ITER-like wall project involves a change in JET from a carbon dominated machine to a beryllium and tungsten machine with residual carbon, the aim of the system is to provide the recycling flux, equivalent to the impinging deuterium ion flux, the impurity fluxes (C, Be, O) and tungsten sputtering fluxes and hence give information on the tungsten divertor source. In order to do this self-consistently, the system provides plasma characterization through the deuterium Balmer spectra measurements of electron density and temperature during high density. L-mode results at the density limit from Stark broadening/line ratio analysis will be presented and compared to Langmuir probe profiles and 2D-tomography of low-n Balmer emission [1]. Comparison with other diagnostics will be vital for modeling attempts with the EDGE2D-EIRENE code [2] as the best possible data sets need to be provided to study detachment.

  3. Deuterium Balmer/Stark spectroscopy and impurity profiles: First results from mirror-link divertor spectroscopy system on the JET ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigs, A. G.; Brezinsek, S.; Clever, M.; Huber, A.; Marsen, S.; Nicholas, C.; Stamp, M.; Zastrow, K.-D.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2013-07-01

    For the ITER-like wall, the JET mirror link divertor spectroscopy system was redesigned to fully cover the tungsten horizontal strike plate with faster time resolution and improved near-UV performance. Since the ITER-like wall project involves a change in JET from a carbon dominated machine to a beryllium and tungsten machine with residual carbon, the aim of the system is to provide the recycling flux, equivalent to the impinging deuterium ion flux, the impurity fluxes (C, Be, O) and tungsten sputtering fluxes and hence give information on the tungsten divertor source. In order to do this self-consistently, the system provides plasma characterization through the deuterium Balmer spectra measurements of electron density and temperature during high density. L-mode results at the density limit from Stark broadening/line ratio analysis will be presented and compared to Langmuir probe profiles and 2D-tomography of low-n Balmer emission [1]. Comparison with other diagnostics will be vital for modeling attempts with the EDGE2D-EIRENE code [2] as the best possible data sets need to be provided to study detachment.

  4. Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames Stabilized on Double-Slit Curved Wall-Jet Burner with Simultaneous OH-Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-04-29

    A double-slit curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner utilizing a Coanda effect by supplying fuel and air as annular-inward jets over a curved surface was employed to investigate the stabilization characteristics and structure of propane/air turbulent non-premixed flames with varying global equivalence ratio and Reynolds number. Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals were conducted. The burner showed a potential of stable and non-sooting operation for relatively large fuel loading and overall rich conditions. Mixing characteristics in cold flow were first examined using an acetone fluorescence technique, indicating substantial transport between the fuel and air by exhibiting appreciable premixing conditions. PIV measurements revealed that the flow field consisted of a wall-jet region leading to a recirculation zone through flow separation, an interaction jet region resulting from the collision of annular-inward jets, followed by a merged-jet region. The flames were stabilized in the recirculation zone and, in extreme cases, only a small flame seed remained in the recirculation zone. Together with the collision of the slit jets in the interaction jet region, the velocity gradients in the shear layers at the boundaries of the annular jets generate the turbulence. Turbulent mean and rms velocities were influenced by the presence of the flame, particularly in the recirculation zone. Flames with a high equivalence ratio were found to be more resistant to local extinction and exhibited a more corrugated and folded nature, particularly at high Reynolds numbers. For flames with a low equivalence ratio, local quenching and re-ignition processes maintained flames in the merged jet region, revealing a strong intermittency, which was substantiated by the increased principal strain rates for these flames. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  5. Acoustically Forced Coaxial Hydrogen / Liquid Oxygen Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-15

    visualized for both reacting and nonreacting cases. The jet flame was studied unforced, without acoustics , and forced, with transverse acoustic waves in...liquid rocket injector flames react to acoustic waves . In this study, a representative coaxial gaseous hydrogen / liquid oxygen (LOX) jet flame is...hydrogen / liquid oxygen (LOX) jet flame is visualized for both reacting and nonreacting cases. The jet flame was studied unforced, without acoustics , and

  6. An analytical expression for the electric field and particle tracing in modelling of Be erosion experiments at the JET ITER-like Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodkina, I. [National Research Nuclear University MEPHI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Borodin, D.; Kirschner, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Tsvetkov, I.V.; Kurnaev, V.A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPHI, Moscow (Russian Federation); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Komm, M.; Dejarnac, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Prague (Czech Republic); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JET contributors

    2016-08-15

    A new analytical approximation for the electric potential profile in the presence of an oblique magnetic field and the analytical solution for the particle motion just before the impact with a plasma-facing surface are presented. These approximations are in good agreement with fluid solutions and the corresponding PIC simulations. These expressions were applied to provide effective physical erosion yields for Be, which have in a second step been used in ERO code simulations of spectroscopy at Be limiters of the JET ITER-like wall. These new analytical expressions lead to an increase of the effective physical sputtering yields of Be by deuteron impact up to 30% in comparison with earlier pure numerical simulations. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Simulation of tungsten sputtering with EDGE2D–EIRENE in low triangularity L-mode JET ITER like wall configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harting, D., E-mail: d.harting@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – IEK-4, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Otakaari 4, 02015 Espoo (Finland); Beurskens, M. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE Fusion, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Boerner, P. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – IEK-4, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Brix, M. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE Fusion, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Coenen, J.W. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – IEK-4, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Corrigan, G. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE Fusion, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lehnen, M. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – IEK-4, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, TEC, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Association EURATOM, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Rooij, G. van [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen PO Box 1207, 3420BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); and others

    2013-07-15

    The 2D edge plasma transport code EDGE2D-EIRENE has been upgraded to account for the actual material and geometric properties of the newly installed ITER like wall (ILW) at JET. This includes the simulation of beryllium and tungsten impurities as well as a revised treatment of sputtering by main plasma and impurity atoms and ions (including self sputtering). In this work, two L-mode density regimes, a sheath limited and a high recycling regime, are presented with a power scan from 2 to 6 MW. Tungsten is self consistently simulated with the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma by the EDGE2D–EIRENE code. A detailed analysis of the tungsten sputtering is presented, resolving the individual contributions of the different atomic and ion species in the simulations.

  8. Development of a mirror-based endoscope for divertor spectroscopy on JET with the new ITER-like wall (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Terra, A.; Arnoux, G.; Balshaw, N.; Clever, M.; Edlingdon, T.; Egner, S.; Farthing, J.; Hartl, M.; Horton, L.; Kampf, D.; Klammer, J.; Lambertz, H. T.; Matthews, G. F.; Morlock, C.; Murari, A.; Reindl, M.; Riccardo, V.; Samm, U.; Sanders, S.; Stamp, M.; Williams, J.; Zastrow, K. D.; Zauner, C.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-01

    A new endoscope with optimised divertor view has been developed in order to survey and monitor the emission of specific impurities such as tungsten and the remaining carbon as well as beryllium in the tungsten divertor of JET after the implementation of the ITER-like wall in 2011. The endoscope is a prototype for testing an ITER relevant design concept based on reflective optics only. It may be subject to high neutron fluxes as expected in ITER. The operating wavelength range, from 390 nm to 2500 nm, allows the measurements of the emission of all expected impurities (W I, Be II, C I, C II, C III) with high optical transmittance (≥30% in the designed wavelength range) as well as high spatial resolution that is ≤2 mm at the object plane and ≤3 mm for the full depth of field (±0.7 m). The new optical design includes options for in situ calibration of the endoscope transmittance during the experimental campaign, which allows the continuous tracing of possible transmittance degradation with time due to impurity deposition and erosion by fast neutral particles. In parallel to the new optical design, a new type of possibly ITER relevant shutter system based on pneumatic techniques has been developed and integrated into the endoscope head. The endoscope is equipped with four digital CCD cameras, each combined with two filter wheels for narrow band interference and neutral density filters. Additionally, two protection cameras in the λ > 0.95 μm range have been integrated in the optical design for the real time wall protection during the plasma operation of JET.

  9. Numerical analysis of the jet stage of bubble near a solid wall using a front tracking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L. T.; Yao, X. L.; Zhang, A. M.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of a toroidal bubble near a solid wall for a large part of stand-off parameters γ (γ=d/Rmax, d is the distance between the solid wall and the bubble centre at the moment of formation and Rmax is the maximum bubble radius) have been extensively studied, but some mechanics of a toroidal bubble are not completely clear, especially for the small stand-off parameters γ ≤ 0.8. In the present study, on the basis of the finite volume method, the Navier-Stokes equations with inviscid and incompressible assumption are directly solved using a staggered grid on the fixed grid. The dynamics of the toroidal bubble near the solid for different stand-off parameters (γ = 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 0.97, respectively) are simulated by a front tracking method. Initial conditions of numerical simulation are estimated through the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, based on the maximum size and collapse time of a spark-generated bubble. One of the numerical results is compared with a spark-generated bubble experiment, showing that the results between them are favorable with regard to both the bubble shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The numerical results for the different stand-off parameters, including the change process of the water layer, the development process of the splash flow and radial flow, the splitting phenomenon of the toroidal bubble, and the trend of pressure on the center of the solid wall, are discussed, where some new phenomena are discovered.

  10. The impact of thermal fatigue and carbidization on the W coatings deposited on CFC tiles for the ITER-like Wall project at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruset, C., E-mail: ruset@infim.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest, Euratom-MEdC Association Romania (Romania); Grigore, E.; Falie, D.; Gherendi, M. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest, Euratom-MEdC Association Romania (Romania); Maier, H. [Max-Plank Institut für Plasma Physik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Rasinski, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Matthews, G.F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Euratom Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Zoita, V. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest, Euratom-MEdC Association Romania (Romania); EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Degradation curves of the W coatings depend on temperature and number of pulses. ► Thermo-mechanical properties of the W coatings are associated with degradation curves. ► Thermal fatigue and carbidization affect the interface between CFC and W. ► A pore structure was detected at the interface by SEM examination. -- Abstract: Since August 2011 JET operates with the ITER-like wall comprising bulk Be tiles, bulk W tiles and W coated CFC tiles with a thickness of 10–15 μm and 20–25 μm. In order to evaluate behavior of the W coatings to a cyclic thermal loading relevant to JET operation, high heat flux (HHF) tests have been carried out up to 5100 pulses with an electron beam facility at peak temperatures of 1000 °C, 1250 °C and 1450 °C. The pulse duration was 24 s. Optical inspections of the W layer performed periodically by interrupting the test revealed small delaminations with the size of 50–500 μm. The dependence of the delamination percentage on the number of pulses can be seen as a degradation curve for each particular W coating. In this way the thermo-mechanical properties of the W coatings can be characterized quantitatively. Thermal fatigue and carbidization of the tungsten due to the diffusion of the carbon from the substrate have been recognized as mechanisms for degradation of the coatings. Tungsten carbides have been identified by using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) diffraction analysis on FIB (focused ion beam) prepared cross-section samples subjected to HHF tests. Nano-pores developed at the CFC–Mo and Mo–W interfaces during the tests might be also responsible for the degradation of the coating.

  11. Real-time control of divertor detachment in H-mode with impurity seeding using Langmuir probe feedback in JET-ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemaut, C.; Lennholm, M.; Harrison, J.; Carvalho, I.; Valcarcel, D.; Felton, R.; Griph, S.; Hogben, C.; Lucock, R.; Matthews, G. F.; Perez Von Thun, C.; Pitts, R. A.; Wiesen, S.; contributors, JET

    2017-04-01

    Burning plasmas with 500 MW of fusion power on ITER will rely on partially detached divertor operation to keep target heat loads at manageable levels. Such divertor regimes will be maintained by a real-time control system using the seeding of radiative impurities like nitrogen (N), neon or argon as actuator and one or more diagnostic signals as sensors. Recently, real-time control of divertor detachment has been successfully achieved in Type I ELMy H-mode JET-ITER-like wall discharges by using saturation current (I sat) measurements from divertor Langmuir probes as feedback signals to control the level of N seeding. The degree of divertor detachment is calculated in real-time by comparing the outer target peak I sat measurements to the peak I sat value at the roll-over in order to control the opening of the N injection valve. Real-time control of detachment has been achieved in both fixed and swept strike point experiments. The system has been progressively improved and can now automatically drive the divertor conditions from attached through high recycling and roll-over down to a user-defined level of detachment. Such a demonstration is a successful proof of principle in the context of future operation on ITER which will be extensively equipped with divertor target probes.

  12. Determination of guanine and adenine by high-performance liquid chromatography with a self-fabricated wall-jet/thin-layer electrochemical detector at a glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yaping; Yan, Hongling; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive wall-jet/thin-layer amperometric electrochemical detector (ECD) coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for simultaneous determination of guanine (G) and adenine (A). The analytes were detected at a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and the HPLC-ECD calibration curves showed good linearity (R(2)>0.997) under optimized conditions. Limits of detection for G and A are 0.6 nM and 1.4 nM (S/N=3), respectively, which are lower than those obtained with an UV-vis detector and a commercial electrochemical detector. We have successfully applied this HPLC-ECD to assess the contents of G and A in hydrochloric acid-digested calf thymus double-stranded DNA. In addition, we compared in detail the analysis of G and A by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and by the HPLC-ECD system on both bare GCE and electroreduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified GCE. We found that the adsorption of G and A on the electrode surfaces can vary their anodic CV peaks and the competitive adsorption of G and A on the limited sites of the electrode surfaces can cause crosstalk effects on their anodic CV peak signals, but the HPLC-ECD system is insensitive to such electrode-adsorption and can give more reliable analytical results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations of JET ITER-like wall L-mode discharges utilising poloidal VUV/visible spectral emission profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, K.D., E-mail: Kerry.Lawson@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Belo, P. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Jülich (Germany); Corrigan, G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Czarnecka, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Association EURATOM-IPPLM, Warsaw (Poland); Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Drewelow, P. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (Germany); Harting, D. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Jülich (Germany); Książek, I. [Institute of Physics, Opole University, ul.Oleska 48, 45-052 Opole (Poland); Maggi, C.F. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Marchetto, C. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, CNR, Milano (Italy); Meigs, A.G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Menmuir, S. [Euratom/VR Association, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Stamp, M.F. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wiesen, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Jülich (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    A discrepancy in the divertor radiated powers between EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations, both with and without drifts, and JET-ILW experiments employing a set of NBI-heated L-mode discharges with step-wise density variation is investigated. Results from a VUV/visible poloidally scanning spectrometer are used together with bolometric measurements to determine the radiated power and its composition. The analysis shows the importance of D line radiation in contributing to the divertor radiated power, while contributions from D radiative recombination are smaller than expected. Simulations with W divertor plates underestimate the Be content in the divertor, since no allowance is made for Be previously deposited on the plates being re-eroded. An improved version of EDGE2D-EIRENE is used to test the importance of the deposited layer in which the sputtering yield from supposed pure Be divertor plates is reduced to match the spectroscopic signals, while keeping the sputtering yield for the Be main chamber walls unchanged.

  14. Intra-ELM phase modelling of a JET ITER-like wall H-mode discharge with EDGE2D-EIRENE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harting, D.M., E-mail: Derek.Harting@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wiesen, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – IEK4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – IEK4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Corrigan, G.; Arnoux, G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Boerner, P. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – IEK4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Devaux, S.; Flanagan, J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Järvinen, A. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Reiter, D. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – IEK4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    We present the application of an improved EDGE2D-EIRENE SOL transport model for the ELM phase utilizing kinetic correction of the sheath-heat-transmission coefficients and heat-flux-limiting factors used in fluid SOL modelling. With a statistical analysis over a range of similar type-I ELMy H-mode discharges performed at the end of the first JET ITER-like wall campaign, we achieved a fast (Δt = 200 μs) temporal evolution of the outer midplane n{sub e} and T{sub e} profiles and the target-heat and particle-flux profiles, which provides a good experimental data set to understand the characteristics of an ELM cycle. We will demonstrate that these kinetic corrections increase the simulated heat-flux-rise time at the target to experimentally observed times but the power-decay time at the target is still underestimated by the simulations. This longer decay times are potentially related to a change of the local recycling coefficient at the tungsten target plate directly after the heat pulse.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  16. Scaling of the frequencies of the type one edge localized modes and their effect on the tungsten source in JET ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devynck, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Meyer, O.; Contributors, JET

    2016-12-01

    A database of 250 pulses taken randomly during the experimental campaigns of JET with the ITER-like wall (ILW) is used to study the frequency dependences of the type I edge localized modes (ELM). A scaling of the ELM frequency is presented as a function of the pedestal density drop dN ped and a very simple model to interpret this scaling is discussed. In this model, the frequency of the ELMs is governed by the time needed by the neutral flux to refill the density of the pedestal. The filling rate is the result of a small imbalance between the neutral flux filling the pedestal and the outward flux that expels the particles to the SOL. The ELM frequency can be governed by such a mechanism if the recovery time of the temperature of the pedestal in JET occurs before or at the same time as the one of the density. This is observed to be the case. An effect of the fuelling is measured when the number of injected particles is less than 1  ×  1022 particles s-1. In that case an increase of the inter-ELM time is observed which is related to the slower recovery of the density pedestal. Additionally, a scaling is found for the source of tungsten during the ELMs. The number of tungsten atoms eroded by the ELMs per second is proportional to dN ped multiplied by the ELM frequency. This is possible only if the tungsten sputtering yield is independent of the energy of the impinging particle hitting the divertor. This result is in agreement with Guillemault et al (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 085006) and is compatible with the D+  ions hitting the divertor having energies above 2 keV. Finally, by plotting the Wcontent/Wsource ratio during ELM crash, a global decreasing behaviour with the ELM frequency is found. However at frequencies below 40 Hz a scatter towards upper values is found. This scatter is found to correlate with the gas injection level. In a narrow ELM frequency band around 20 Hz, it is found that both the ratio Wcontent/Wsource and Wsource

  17. Interpretation of scrape-off layer profile evolution and first-wall ion flux statistics on JET using a stochastic framework based on fillamentary motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkden, N. R.; Wynn, A.; Militello, F.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G.; Guillemaut, C.; Harrison, J.; Moulton, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the use of a novel modelling technique based around intermittent transport due to filament motion, to interpret experimental profile and fluctuation data in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of JET during the onset and evolution of a density profile shoulder. A baseline case is established, prior to shoulder formation, and the stochastic model is shown to be capable of simultaneously matching the time averaged profile measurement as well as the PDF shape and autocorrelation function from the ion-saturation current time series at the outer wall. Aspects of the stochastic model are then varied with the aim of producing a profile shoulder with statistical measurements consistent with experiment. This is achieved through a strong localised reduction in the density sink acting on the filaments within the model. The required reduction of the density sink occurs over a highly localised region with the timescale of the density sink increased by a factor of 25. This alone is found to be insufficient to model the expansion and flattening of the shoulder region as the density increases, which requires additional changes within the stochastic model. An example is found which includes both a reduction in the density sink and filament acceleration and provides a consistent match to the experimental data as the shoulder expands, though the uniqueness of this solution can not be guaranteed. Within the context of the stochastic model, this implies that the localised reduction in the density sink can trigger shoulder formation, but additional physics is required to explain the subsequent evolution of the profile.

  18. 5th International Conference on Jets, Wakes and Separated Flows

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume collects various contributions from the 5th International Conference on Jets, Wakes and Separated Flows (ICJWSF2015) that took place in Stockholm during June 2015. Researchers from all around the world presented their latest results concerning fundamental and applied aspects of fluid dynamics. With its general character, the conference embraced many aspects of fluid dynamics, such as shear flows, multiphase flows and vortex flows, for instance. The structure of the present book reflects the variety of topics treated within the conference i.e. Jets, Wakes, Separated flows, Vehicle aerodynamics, Wall-bounded and confined flows, Noise, Turbomachinery flows, Multiphase and reacting flows, Vortex dynamics, Energy-related flows and a section dedicated to Numerical analyses.

  19. Numerical analysis of jet impingement heat transfer at high jet Reynolds number and large temperature difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    was investigated at a jet Reynolds number of 1.66 × 105 and a temperature difference between jet inlet and wall of 1600 K. The focus was on the convective heat transfer contribution as thermal radiation was not included in the investigation. A considerable influence of the turbulence intensity at the jet inlet......Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall was investigated numerically for a ratio of 2 between the jet inlet to wall distance and the jet inlet diameter. The influence of turbulence intensity at the jet inlet and choice of turbulence model on the wall heat transfer...... was observed in the stagnation region, where the wall heat flux increased by a factor of almost 3 when increasing the turbulence intensity from 1.5% to 10%. The choice of turbulence model also influenced the heat transfer predictions significantly, especially in the stagnation region, where differences of up...

  20. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Ralph W.; Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Jou, Wen-Huei; Riley, James J.; Givi, Peyman

    1988-01-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers are presented. This is an extension of earlier work to a more detailed study of previous three dimensional simulations of cold reacting flows plus the development, validation, and use of codes to simulate chemically reacting shear layers with heat release. Additional analysis of earlier simulations showed good agreement with self similarity theory and laboratory data. Simulations with a two dimensional code including the effects of heat release showed that the rate of chemical product formation, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release. Subsequent three dimensional simulations showed similar behavior, in agreement with laboratory observations. Baroclinic torques and thermal expansion in the mixing layer were found to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to diffuse the pairing vortices, resulting in a net reduction in vorticity. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers were shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques.

  1. Structure and Dynamics of Fuel Jets Injected into a High-Temperature Subsonic Crossflow: High-Data-Rate Laser Diagnostic Investigation under Steady and Oscillatory Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucht, Robert [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Anderson, William [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-01-23

    applying advanced experimental diagnostic techniques with increasing fidelity for the purposes of computational validation and model development. Numerical simulation of the reacting jet in crossflow is challenging because of the complex vortical structures in the flowfield and compounded by an unsteady crossflow. The resulting benchmark quality data set will include comprehensive, accurate measurements of mean and fluctuating components of velocity, pressure, and flame front location at high pressure and with crossflow conditions more representative of modern gas turbine engines. A proven means for producing combustion dynamics is used for the performing combustion instability experimental study on a reacting jet in crossflow configuration. The method used to provide an unsteady flowfield into which the transverse jet is injected is a unique and novel approach that permits elevated temperature and pressure conditions. A model dump combustor is used to generate and sustain an acoustically oscillating vitiated flow that serves as the crossflow for transverse jet injection studies. A fully optically accessible combustor test section affords full access surrounding the point of jet injection. High speed 10 kHz planar measurements OH PLIF and high frequency 180 kHz wall pressure measurements are performed on the injected reacting transverse jet and surrounding flowfield, respectively, under simulated unstable conditions. The overlay of the jet velocity flowfield and the flame front will be investigated using simultaneous 10 kHz OH PLIF and PIV in experiments to be performed in the near future.

  2. Measurements of Non-reacting and Reacting Flow Fields of a Liquid Swirl Flame Burner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHONG Cheng Tung; HOCHGREB Simone

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the liquid fuel spray and flow field characteristics inside a combustor is crucial for designing a fuel efficient and low emission device. Characterisation of the flow field of a model gas turbine liquid swirl burner is performed by using a 2-D particle imaging velocimetry(PIV) system. The flow field pattern of an axial flow burner with a fixed swirl intensity is compared under confined and unconfined conditions, i.e., with and without the combustor wall. The effect of temperature on the main swirling air flow is investigated under open and non-reacting conditions. The result shows that axial and radial velocities increase as a result of decreased flow density and increased flow volume. The flow field of the main swirling flow with liquid fuel spray injection is compared to non-spray swirling flow. Introduction of liquid fuel spray changes the swirl air flow field at the burner outlet, where the radial velocity components increase for both open and confined environment. Under reacting condition, the enclosure generates a corner recirculation zone that intensifies the strength of radial velocity. The reverse flow and corner recirculation zone assists in stabilizing the flame by preheating the reactants. The flow field data can be used as validation target for swirl combustion modelling.

  3. Twin Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  4. Design, development, and demonstration of a fully LabVIEW controlled in situ electrochemical Fourier transform infrared setup combined with a wall-jet electrode to investigate the electrochemical interface of nanoparticulate electrocatalysts under reaction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesselberger, Markus; Ashton, Sean J; Wiberg, Gustav K H; Arenz, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    We present a detailed description of the construction of an in situ electrochemical ATR-FTIR setup combined with a wall-jet electrode to investigate the electrocatalytic properties of nanoparticulate catalysts in situ under controlled mass transport conditions. The presented setup allows the electrochemical interface to be probed in combination with the simultaneous determination of reaction rates. At the same time, the high level of automation allows it to be used as a standard tool in electrocatalysis research. The performance of the setup was demonstrated by probing the oxygen reduction reaction on a platinum black catalyst in sulfuric electrolyte.

  5. Acoustic imaging for diagnostics of chemically reacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, K.; Seshan, P.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of local diagnostics, in chemically reacting systems, with acoustic imaging is developed. The elements of acoustic imaging through ellipsoidal mirrors are theoretically discussed. In a general plan of the experimental program, the first system is chosen in these studies to be a simple open jet, non premixed turbulent flame. Methane is the fuel and enriched air is the oxidizer. This simple chemically reacting flow system is established at a Reynolds number (based on cold viscosity) of 50,000. A 1.5 m diameter high resolution acoustic mirror with an f-number of 0.75 is used to map the acoustic source zone along the axis of the flame. The results are presented as acoustic power spectra at various distances from the nozzle exit. It is seen that most of the reaction intensity is localized in a zone within 8 diameters from the exit. The bulk reactions (possibly around the periphery of the larger eddies) are evenly distributed along the length of the flame. Possibilities are seen for locally diagnosing single zones in a multiple cluster of reaction zones that occur frequently in practice. A brief outline is given of the future of this work which will be to apply this technique to chemically reacting flows not limited to combustion.

  6. Improved EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations of JET ITER-like wall L-mode discharges utilising poloidal VUV/visible spectral emission profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawson, K. D.; Groth, M.; Belo, da Silva Ares; Brezinsek, S.; Corrigan, G.; Czarnecka, A.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Harting, D.; Książek, I.; Maggi, C. F.; Marchetto, C.; Meigs, A. G.; Menmuir, S.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.

    2015-01-01

    A discrepancy in the divertor radiated powers between EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations, both with and without drifts, and JET-ILW experiments employing a set of NBI-heated L-mode discharges with step-wise density variation is investigated. Results from a VUV/visible poloidally scanning spectrometer are use

  7. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Chan, Tucker; Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-04-02

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables — jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum — have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their “local” computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applications do require knowledge about the jet constituents, we also build a hybrid event shape that incorporates (local) jet clustering information. As a straightforward application of our general technique, we derive an event-shape version of jet trimming, allowing event-wide jet grooming without explicit jet identification. Finally, we briefly mention possible applications of our method for jet substructure studies.

  8. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  9. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon, E-mail: junkeun@postech.ac.kr; Kang, Kwan Hyoung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, In Seok [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  10. Fuzzy jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, Lester [Department of Statistics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Nachman, Benjamin [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Schwartzman, Ariel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stansbury, Conrad [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  11. Equilibrium chemical reaction of supersonic hydrogen-air jets (the ALMA computer program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghobashi, S.

    1977-01-01

    The ALMA (axi-symmetrical lateral momentum analyzer) program is concerned with the computation of two dimensional coaxial jets with large lateral pressure gradients. The jets may be free or confined, laminar or turbulent, reacting or non-reacting. Reaction chemistry is equilibrium.

  12. High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows: Intrinsic Flame Instability and its Effects on the Turbulent Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludnenko, Alexei

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent reacting flows are pervasive both in our daily lives on Earth and in the Universe. They power modern society being at the heart of many energy generation and propulsion systems, such as gas turbines, internal combustion and jet engines. On astronomical scales, thermonuclear turbulent flames are the driver of some of the most powerful explosions in the Universe, knows as Type Ia supernovae. Despite this ubiquity in Nature, turbulent reacting flows still pose a number of fundamental questions often exhibiting surprising and unexpected behavior. In this talk, we will discuss several such phenomena observed in direct numerical simulations of high-speed, premixed, turbulent flames. We show that turbulent flames in certain regimes are intrinsically unstable even in the absence of the surrounding combustor walls or obstacles, which can support the thermoacoustic feedback. Such instability can fundamentally change the structure and dynamics of the turbulent cascade, resulting in a significant (and anisotropic) redistribution of kinetic energy from small to large scales. In particular, three effects are observed. 1) The turbulent burning velocity can develop pulsations with significant peak-to-peak amplitudes. 2) Unstable burning can result in pressure build-up and the formation of pressure waves or shocks when the flame speed approaches or exceeds the speed of a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration. 3) Coupling of pressure and density gradients across the flame can lead to the anisotropic generation of turbulence inside the flame volume and flame acceleration. We extend our earlier analysis, which relied on a simplified single-step reaction model, by demonstrating existence of these effects in realistic chemical flames (hydrogen and methane) and in thermonuclear flames in degenerate, relativistic plasmas found in stellar interiors. Finally, we discuss the implications of these results for subgrid-scale LES combustion models. This work was supported by the Air Force

  13. Jet Observables Without Jet Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolini, Daniele; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables---jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum---have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their "local" computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applicatio...

  14. Calorimetry of non-reacting systems

    CERN Document Server

    McCullough, John P

    2013-01-01

    Experimental Thermodynamics, Volume 1: Calorimetry of Non-Reacting Systems covers the heat capacity determinations for chemical substances in the solid, liquid, solution, and vapor states, at temperatures ranging from near the absolute zero to the highest at which calorimetry is feasible.This book is divided into 14 chapters. The first four chapters provide background information and general principles applicable to all types of calorimetry of non-reacting systems. The remaining 10 chapters deal with specific types of calorimetry. Most of the types of calorimetry treated are developed over a c

  15. Study of Several Impinging Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Impinging Jets are frequently adapted for cooling overheated parts.With the film cooling technique,this process improves thermal exchanges between walls and fluid.However if many works have concerned only the thermal aspect of this problem[1],its dynamic field has been rarely studied especially for multiple impingements.As the two phenomena caanot be totally dissociated.we have undertaken the aerodynamic and thermal study of jets impinging on a aplane wall,Various techniques,have been used as visualizations(spreading over method.LASER sheet visualizations),LDA measurements to propose a topology schema of the flow and infraed thermography.

  16. Application of actuator-driven pulsed water jet in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage surgery: its effectiveness for dissection around ruptured aneurysmal walls and subarachnoid clot removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hidenori; Endo, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-07-01

    In clipping surgery for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), critical steps include clot removal and dissection of aneurysms without premature rupture or brain injuries. To pursue this goal, a piezo actuator-driven pulsed water jet (ADPJ) system was introduced in this study. This study included 42 patients, who suffered aSAH and underwent clipping surgery. Eleven patients underwent surgery with the assistance of the ADPJ system (ADPJ group). In the other 31 patients, surgery was performed without the ADPJ system (Control group). The ADPJ system was used for clot removal and aneurysmal dissection. The clinical impact of the ADPJ system was judged by comparing the rate of premature rupture, degree of clot removal, and clinical outcomes. Intraoperatively, a premature rupture was encountered in 18.2 and 25.8% of cases in the ADPJ and control groups, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, intraoperative observation suggested that the ADPJ system was effective in clot removal and dissection of aneurysms in a safe manner. Computed tomography scans indicated the achievement of higher degrees of clot removal, especially when the ADPJ system was used for cases with preoperative clot volumes of more than 25 ml (p = 0.047, Mann-Whitney U test). Clinical outcomes, including incidence of postoperative brain injury or symptomatic vasospasm, were similar in both groups. We described our preliminary surgical results using the ADPJ system for aSAH. Although further study is needed, the ADPJ system was considered a safe and effective tool for clot removal and dissection of aneurysms.

  17. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  18. Numerical Methods For Chemically Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, R. J.; Yee, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Issues related to numerical stability, accuracy, and resolution discussed. Technical memorandum presents issues in numerical solution of hyperbolic conservation laws containing "stiff" (relatively large and rapidly changing) source terms. Such equations often used to represent chemically reacting flows. Usually solved by finite-difference numerical methods. Source terms generally necessitate use of small time and/or space steps to obtain sufficient resolution, especially at discontinuities, where incorrect mathematical modeling results in unphysical solutions.

  19. Algorithm For Computation Of Chemically Reacting Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Chen, Chein-Pin; Shang, Huan-Min

    1995-01-01

    Efficient algorithm developed for use in solving differential equations of transient, chemically reacting flows at all speeds from zero to high mach numbers. Mathematical models represent coupling of thermal, chemical, and dynamical effects. Original intended application is numerical simulation of flows in rocket engines; also applicable to other complex flows affected by finite-rate chemistry - for example, flows in turbines and in internal-combustion engines.

  20. A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Reis, Martina; Wang, Yongqi; Bono Maurizio Sacchi Bassi, Adalberto

    2013-11-01

    A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures is formulated. The intermolecular interactions among the constituents of the mixture are accounted for through additional freedom degrees to each constituent of the mixture. Balance equations for polar reacting continuum mixtures are accordingly formulated and a proper set of constitutive equations is derived with basis in the Müller-Liu formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. Moreover, the non-equilibrium and equilibrium responses of the reacting mixture are investigated in detail by emphasizing the inner and reactive structures of the medium. From the balance laws and constitutive relations, the effects of molecular structure of constituents upon the fluid flow are studied. It is also demonstrated that the local thermodynamic equilibrium state can be reached without imposing that the set of independent constitutive variables is time independent, neither spatially homogeneous nor null. The resulting constitutive relations presented throughout this work are of relevance to many practical applications, such as swelling of clays, developing of bio and polymeric membranes, and use of electrorheological fluids in industrial processes. The first author acknowledges financial support from National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq) and German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

  1. Quantitative analysis of schlieren photographs for internal combustion engine diagnostics. 2nd Report. ; Smoothing of background distortion and analytical results of transient wall-impinging jet. Nainen kikan ni okeru schlieren shashin no teiryoka gazo shoriho ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. ; Background no yugami jokyo, narabini hiteijo hekimen shototsu funryu no kaiseki kekka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, H.; Chikahisa, T.; Murayama, T. (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-02-25

    It was previously reported, for the research on the internal combustion engine, that the quantitative analysis of Schlieren photographs, one of simple visualization technologies, is effective on the heightening in accuracy of the analysis by Schlieren photographs and however, insufficient in countermeasures against the background distortion, causing errors. Then, by removing background distortion and analyzing Schlieren photographs, taken of transient wall-impinging jet, evaluation was made of the present quantitative analysis. As a result, a method could be shown to effectively correct the background distortion. Further, upon analyzing transient wall-impinging jet by that method, result could be obtained to be sufficiently accurate to grasp its structural characteristics. The resent quantitative analysis is advantageous in capability of, among others, monentarily quantify the two-dimensional phenomenon by a simple unit, and support the quantitative information for the Schlieren measurerment, widely used in the research on the internal combustion engine. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Spray generation from free and half-free jets

    OpenAIRE

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan

    1999-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This is an experimental investigation of the ligament and drop formation at the free surface of wall jets, flowing over sand-roughened plates, and on unbounded two-dimensional jets, discharging into atmosphere. Experiments were conducted with both fresh and simulated sea water. Measurements were made with several high-speed imagers and a pulsating laser system and analyzed through the use of appropriate software. The wall-jet Reynolds ...

  3. Measurements on Buoyant Jet Flows from a Ceiling-Mounted Slot Diffuser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Möller, Åke T. A.

    Ceiling-mounted slot diffusers in ventilated rooms will often generate a flow of the wall jet type. The jet follows the ceiling, entrains air from the occupied zone and generates a recirculating flow in the whole room. This paper will deal with the flow in the ceiling region. The wall jet flow...

  4. Turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-11-01

    We study turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures in a developed turbulence. In our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 69 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.80.69] using a path-integral approach for a delta-correlated in a time random velocity field, we demonstrated a strong modification of turbulent transport in fluid flows with chemical reactions or phase transitions. In the present study we use the spectral τ approximation that is valid for large Reynolds and Peclet numbers and show that turbulent diffusion of the reacting species can be strongly depleted by a large factor that is the ratio of turbulent and chemical times (turbulent Damköhler number). We have demonstrated that the derived theoretical dependence of a turbulent diffusion coefficient versus the turbulent Damköhler number is in good agreement with that obtained previously in the numerical modeling of a reactive front propagating in a turbulent flow and described by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov-Fisher equation. We have found that turbulent cross-effects, e.g., turbulent mutual diffusion of gaseous admixtures and turbulent Dufour effect of the chemically reacting gaseous admixtures, are less sensitive to the values of stoichiometric coefficients. The mechanisms of the turbulent cross-effects differ from the molecular cross-effects known in irreversible thermodynamics. In a fully developed turbulence and at large Peclet numbers the turbulent cross-effects are much larger than the molecular ones. The obtained results are applicable also to heterogeneous phase transitions.

  5. Stability of compressible reacting mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. S.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Linear instability of compressible reacting mixing layers is analyzed with emphasis on the effects of heat release and compressibility. Laminar solutions of the compressible boundary-layer equations are used as the base flows. The parameters of this study are the adiabatic flame temperature, the Mach number of the upper stream, frequency, wavenumber, and the direction of propagation of the disturbance wave. Stability characteristics of the flow are presented. Three groups of unstable modes are found when the Mach number and/or heat release are large. Finally, it is shown that the unstable modes are two-dimensional for large heat release even in highly compressible flow.

  6. Jet quenching via jet collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, J; Wiedemann, U

    2011-01-01

    The strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions measured by ATLAS and CMS provide important constraints on the dynamical mechanisms underlying jet quenching. In this work, we show that the transport of soft gluons away from the jet cone - jet collimation - can account for the observed dijet asymmetry with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude. Further, we show that the energy loss attained through this mechanism results in a very mild distortion of the azimuthal angle dijet distribution.

  7. Emerging jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Weiler, Andreas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  8. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  9. Numerical simulation of the generation mechanism of axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. D.; Gao, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper an axisymmetric computational aeroacoustic procedure is developed to investigate the generation mechanism of axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones. The axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations and the two equations standard k-ɛ turbulence model modified by Turpin and Troyes ["Validation of a two-equation turbulence model for axisymmetric reacting and non-reaction flows," AIAA Paper No. 2000-3463 (2000)] are solved in the generalized curvilinear coordinate system. A generalized wall function is applied in the nozzle exit wall region. The dispersion-relation-preserving scheme is applied for space discretization. The 2N storage low-dissipation and low-dispersion Runge-Kutta scheme is employed for time integration. Much attention is paid to far-field boundary conditions and turbulence model. The underexpanded axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones are simulated over the Mach number from 1.05 to 1.2. Numerical results are presented and compared with the experimental data by other researchers. The simulated wavelengths of A0, A1, A2, and B modes and part of simulated amplitudes agree very well with the measurement data by Ponton and Seiner ["The effects of nozzle exit lip thickness on plume resonance," J. Sound Vib. 154, 531 (1992)]. In particular, the phenomena of modes jumping have been captured correctly although the numerical procedure has to be improved to predict the amplitudes of supersonic jet screech tones more accurately. Furthermore, the phenomena of shock motions are analyzed. The predicted splitting and combination of shock cells are similar with the experimental observations of Panda ["Shock oscillation in underexpanded screeching jets," J. Fluid. Mech. 363, 173 (1998)]. Finally, the receptivity process is numerically studied and analyzed. It is shown that the receptivity zone is associated with the initial thin shear layer, and the incoming and reflected sound waves.

  10. Facilities GIS Modeling for the REACT System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Real-Time Emergency Action Coordination Tool (REACT) was developed under contract to NASA and deployed for use by the entire agency.  NASA REACT is a...

  11. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  12. Pdf - Transport equations for chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, W.

    1989-01-01

    The closure problem for the transport equations for pdf and the characteristic functions of turbulent, chemically reacting flows is addressed. The properties of the linear and closed equations for the characteristic functional for Eulerian and Lagrangian variables are established, and the closure problem for the finite-dimensional case is discussed for pdf and characteristic functions. It is shown that the closure for the scalar dissipation term in the pdf equation developed by Dopazo (1979) and Kollmann et al. (1982) results in a single integral, in contrast to the pdf, where double integration is required. Some recent results using pdf methods obtained for turbulent flows with combustion, including effects of chemical nonequilibrium, are discussed.

  13. Multiphase reacting flows modelling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Marchisio, Daniele L

    2007-01-01

    The papers in this book describe the most widely applicable modeling approaches and are organized in six groups covering from fundamentals to relevant applications. In the first part, some fundamentals of multiphase turbulent reacting flows are covered. In particular the introduction focuses on basic notions of turbulence theory in single-phase and multi-phase systems as well as on the interaction between turbulence and chemistry. In the second part, models for the physical and chemical processes involved are discussed. Among other things, particular emphasis is given to turbulence modeling strategies for multiphase flows based on the kinetic theory for granular flows. Next, the different numerical methods based on Lagrangian and/or Eulerian schemes are presented. In particular the most popular numerical approaches of computational fluid dynamics codes are described (i.e., Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddy Simulation, and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach). The book will cover particle-based meth...

  14. Mathematical aspects of reacting and diffusing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fife, Paul C

    1979-01-01

    Modeling and analyzing the dynamics of chemical mixtures by means of differ- tial equations is one of the prime concerns of chemical engineering theorists. These equations often take the form of systems of nonlinear parabolic partial d- ferential equations, or reaction-diffusion equations, when there is diffusion of chemical substances involved. A good overview of this endeavor can be had by re- ing the two volumes by R. Aris (1975), who himself was one of the main contributors to the theory. Enthusiasm for the models developed has been shared by parts of the mathematical community, and these models have, in fact, provided motivation for some beautiful mathematical results. There are analogies between chemical reactors and certain biological systems. One such analogy is rather obvious: a single living organism is a dynamic structure built of molecules and ions, many of which react and diffuse. Other analogies are less obvious; for example, the electric potential of a membrane can diffuse like a chemical, and ...

  15. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  16. Geometry and expected performance of the solid tungsten outer divertor row in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Mertens, P.; Altmann, H.; Lomas, P. J.; Riccardo, V.

    2010-01-01

    At JET new plasma-facing components for the main chamber wall and the divertor are being designed and built to mimic the expected ITER plasma wall conditions in the deuterium-tritium operation phase. The main wall elements at JET will be made of beryllium and the divertor plasma-facing surface will

  17. Effect of the velocity ratio on the turbulent structure of the plane wall jet under the self-preserving state. 1st Report. ; Conditions for self-preservation and mean flow field. Jiko hozon jokenka no heimen hekimen funryu no ranryu kozo ni oyobosu sokudohi no eikyo. 1. ; Jiko hozon no joken to heikin sokudoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osaka, H.; Mchizuki, S. (Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi (Japan)); Tominaga, T. (Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi (Japan))

    1991-11-25

    Relation was studied between the turbulent structure and velocity ratio of plane wall jet of the self-preserving liquid, constant in pressure gradient (velocity ratio). The experimental unit for the study is 100mm in height (S{sub 1}) of jet outlet in the flowing field, 384mm in height of external flow outlet, 400mm in width of both those outlets and approximately 2400mm in length of aluminum made plane for the measurement. To measure the mean velocity and frictional stress against wall surface, used were Pitot and Preston tubes. As a velocity ratio, setting was made at the three values, i.e., 2.0, 2.9 and 4.0. The mean flow gives self-preserving characteristics in the range of 57jet accompanied with an external flow. The mean velocity distributions approximate to one another against the same value of velocity ratio. As for the similarity of velocity distribution in both the inner layer and outer layer regions, the velocity distributions in the former region are not similar as influenced by the velocity ratio, while those in the latter region are approximate regardless of velocity ratio. As for the length scale, the half value width also lowers in growing ratio with lowering in velocity ratio. 14 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Plasma current asymmetries during disruptions in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, S. N.; Hender, T. C.; Morris, J.; Riccardo, V.; Zakharov, L. E.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-07-01

    A key feature of disruptions during vertical displacement events, discovered in JET in 1996, is the toroidal variation in the measured plasma current Ip, i.e. the plasma current asymmetries, lasting for almost the entire current quench. The unique magnetic diagnostics at JET (full set of poloidal coils and saddle loops recorded either from two toroidally opposite or from four toroidally orthogonal locations) allow for a comprehensive analysis of asymmetrical disruptions with a large scale database. This paper presents an analysis of 4854 disruptions over an 18 year period that includes both the JET carbon (C) wall and the ITER-like (IL) wall (a mixed beryllium/tungsten first wall). In spite of the Ip quench time significantly increasing for the IL-wall compared to C-wall disruptions, the observed toroidal asymmetry time integral (˜ sideways force impulse), did not increase for IL-wall disruptions. The Ip asymmetry has a dominantly n = 1 structure. Its motion in the toroidal direction has a sporadic behaviour, in general. The distributions of the number of rotation periods are found to be very similar for both C- and IL-wall disruptions, and multi-turn rotation was sometimes observed. The Ip asymmetry amplitude has no degradation with rotation frequency for either the C- or IL-wall disruption. Therefore dynamic amplification remains a potentially serious issue for ITER due to possible mechanical resonance of the machine components with the rotating asymmetry.

  19. Jet Quenching via Jet Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration recently reported strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions. In this work, we discuss to what extent these first data constrain already the microscopic mechanism underlying jet quenching. Simple kinematic arguments lead us to identify a frequency collimation mechanism via which the medium efficiently trims away the soft components of the jet parton shower. Through this mechanism, the observed dijet asymmetry can be accomodated with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude.

  20. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  1. Experimental investigation into flow in an ejector with four synthetic jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dančová Petra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with experimental investigation into flow in an ejector with four synthetic jets. The aim of the synthetic jets is to excite the mixing layer in the ejector and intensify the mixing process. The cavities of the synthetic jet actuators are hidden in the mixing chamber wall and the synthetic jets are perpendicular to the ejector axis. CTA and pneumatic measuring method were used to investigate the influences of synthetic jets on flow inside the ejector.

  2. On plane submerged laminar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    We address the laminar flow generated when a developed stream of liquid of kinematic viscosity ν flowing along channel of width 2 h discharges into an open space bounded by two symmetric plane walls departing from the channel rim with an angle α 1 . Attention is focused on values of the jet volume flux 2 Q such that the associated Reynolds number Re = Qh / ν is of order unity. The formulation requires specification of the boundary conditions far from the channel exit. If the flow is driven by the volume flux, then the far-field solution corresponds to Jeffery-Hamel self-similar flow. However, as noted by Fraenkel (1962), such solutions exist only for α potential flow driven by the jet entrainment, and a Falkner-Skan near-wall boundary layer. Numerical integrations of the Navier-Stokes equations are used to ascertain the existence of these different solutions.

  3. Rotation Effect on Jet Impingement Heat Transfer in Smooth Rectangular Channels with Film Coolant Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Parsons

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of channel rotation on jet impingement cooling by arrays of circular jets in twin channels was studied. Impinging jet flows were in the direction of rotation in one channel and opposite to the direction of rotation in the other channel. The jets impinged normally on the smooth, heated target wall in each channel. The spent air exited the channels through extraction holes in each target wall, which eliminates cross flow on other jets. Jet rotation numbers and jet Reynolds numbers varied from 0.0 to 0.0028 and 5000 to 10,000, respectively. For the target walls with jet flow in the direction of rotation (or opposite to the direction of rotation, as rotation number increases heat transfer decreases up to 25% (or 15% as compared to corresponding results for non-rotating conditions. This is due to the changes in flow distribution and rotation induced Coriolis and centrifugal forces.

  4. Engine room cooling system using jet pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, J.W.; Lee, S.H. [Daewoo Heavy Industries Ltd. (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    Construction machinery includes an engine enclosure separated from a cooling system enclosure by a wall to reduce noise and advance cooling system performance. For this structure, however, the axial fan cannot be of benefit to the engine room, and so the temperature rise in the engine room makes several bad conditions. This paper proposes that hot air in engine room is evacuated by secondary pipe using jet pump. This paper demonstrates the structure and the effect of jet pump and useful guideline on design of area, length, and shape of secondary pipe to maximize the effect of jet pump. (author). 4 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. A Course in Transport Phenomena in Multicomponent, Multiphase, Reacting Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, R. G.; Whitaker, S.

    1978-01-01

    This course concentrates on a rigorous development of the multicomponent transport equations, boundary conditions at phase interfaces, and volume-averaged transport equations for multiphase reacting systems. (BB)

  6. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  7. Numerical simulation of reacting and non-reacting flow in a combustion chamber; Numerisk simulering av reagerande och icke-reagerande stroemning i en braennkammare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, A.; Revstedt, J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this work has been to do a preliminary study of how well numerical calculations with different turbulence models can predict the flow and temperature fields of a strongly swirling and combusting flow in an experimental combustion chamber and to see which parameters in the mathematical model are the most important. The combustion chamber on which we have done the calculations is called Validation Rig II and was designed by Volvo Aero Corporation. The main part of the study has been carried out on a non-reacting flow but some work has also been done on reacting flow. In most cases it has not been meaningful to compare the calculations with the measurements because they differ quite a lot from each other. For the non-reacting case the following investigations have been made: * How the solution differs for different turbulence models, * The solutions sensitivity to inlet boundary conditions, * How different types of leakage disturb the flow, and * The difference in results between two different CFD-codes, the commercial code CFDS-Flow3D and a code developed at the department of fluid mechanics. For the reacting cases we have studied the influence of: * one or two reaction steps, * the effects of a change in reaction rate, * the influence of thermal radiation, and * the effects of changing the boundary conditions for temperature on the walls. The results from these calculations show that the inlet turbulence intensity has very little effect on the values of the turbulent quantities as well as the velocity profiles at the outlet. Changing the turbulence model or the outlet boundary conditions gives some change in velocity profiles at the outlet but only marginal effects on the swirl number. 21 refs, 54 figs, 19 tabs

  8. Combined LAURA-UPS solution procedure for chemically-reacting flows. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure seeks to combine the thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver LAURA with the parabolized Navier-Stokes solver UPS for the aerothermodynamic solution of chemically-reacting air flowfields. The interface protocol is presented and the method is applied to two slender, blunted shapes. Both axisymmetric and three dimensional solutions are included with surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons between the present method and previously published results. The case of Mach 25 flow over an axisymmetric six degree sphere-cone with a noncatalytic wall is considered to 100 nose radii. A stability bound on the marching step size was observed with this case and is attributed to chemistry effects resulting from the noncatalytic wall boundary condition. A second case with Mach 28 flow over a sphere-cone-cylinder-flare configuration is computed at both two and five degree angles of attack with a fully-catalytic wall. Surface pressures are seen to be within five percent with the present method compared to the baseline LAURA solution and heat transfers are within 10 percent. The effect of grid resolution is investigated and the nonequilibrium results are compared with a perfect gas solution, showing that while the surface pressure is relatively unchanged by the inclusion of reacting chemistry the nonequilibrium heating is 25 percent higher. The procedure demonstrates significant, order of magnitude reductions in solution time and required memory for the three dimensional case over an all thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution.

  9. Dynamic Behavior of Reacting Gas Jets Submerged in Liquids: A Photographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    W. B. Behnke, Jr ., Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago, IL 60690 W. P. Chernock, Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT 06095 J. M. Hendrie...92152-5000 Dr. Earl Quandt, Jr . Code 2704 David Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center Annapolis, MD 21402 Mr. Richard Bloomquist Code 2752... Darsie Advanced Technology Group Sunstrand Energy Systems 4747 Harrison Avenue Rockford, IL 61101 Professor Gerard M. Faeth Department of Aerospace

  10. A Framework for the Modelling of Biphasic Reacting Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Sin, Gürkan; O’Connell, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic reacting systems have a broad application range from organic reactions in pharmaceutical and agro-bio industries to CO 2 capture. However, mathematical modelling of biphasic reacting systems is a formidable challenge due to many phenomena underlying the process such as chemical equilibri...... systems: a PTC-based reaction system and pseudo-PTC system....

  11. Jet Car Track Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located in Lakehurst, New Jersey, the Jet Car Track Site supports jet cars with J57 engines and has a maximum jet car thrust of 42,000 pounds with a maximum speed of...

  12. JET: Preparing the future in fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynár, J.; Ongena, J.; Duran, I.; Hron, M.; Pánek, R.; Petržílka, V.; Žáček, F.

    2004-03-01

    JET (Joint European Torus) is the largest tokamak in the world and the only fusion facility able to operate with Tritium, the fusion fuel, and Beryllium, the ITER first wall material. JET also features the most complete remote handling equipment for invessel maintenance. As a multinational research center, JET provides logistic experience in preparing for operation of the global facility, tokamak ITER. Experiments on JET are focused on ITER-relevant studies, in particular on detailing the operational scenarios (EL My H-modes and advanced regimes), on enhancing the heating systems, on developing diagnostics for burning plasmas etc. Pioneering real-time control techniques have been implemented that maximize performance and minimize internal disturbances of JET plasmas. In helium plasmas, ion cyclotron heating (ICRH) created fast α-particles, mimicking their populations in future burning plasmas. The recent successful Trace Tritium campaign provided important new data on fuel transport. Current enhancements on JET include a new ITER-like ELM-resilient high power ICRH antenna (7 MW) and over twenty new diagnostics that will further extend the JET scientific capabilities and push the facility even closer to the ITER parameters. A special mention is given to the involvement of the fusion experts from Association EURATOM-IPP.CR, who have been actively participating in the collective use of JET facility for more than three years.

  13. Numerical analysis of an impinging jet reactor for the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of titania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-06-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  14. Jet Impingement Heat Transfer at High Reynolds Numbers and Large Density Variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary la...... density from the ideal gas law versus real gas data. In both cases the effect was found to be negligible.......Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary....... The results also show a noticeable difference in the heat transfer predictions when applying different turbulence models. Furthermore calculations were performed to study the effect of applying temperature dependent thermophysical properties versus constant properties and the effect of calculating the gas...

  15. Jet Impingement Heat Transfer at High Reynolds Numbers and Large Density Variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary la...... density from the ideal gas law versus real gas data. In both cases the effect was found to be negligible........ The results also show a noticeable difference in the heat transfer predictions when applying different turbulence models. Furthermore calculations were performed to study the effect of applying temperature dependent thermophysical properties versus constant properties and the effect of calculating the gas......Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary...

  16. Numerical Computation of the Chemically Reacting Flow around the National Aero-Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannehill, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the research accomplished. The research performed during the grant period can be divided into the following major areas: (1) Computation of chemically reacting Supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) flowfields. (2) Application of a two-equation turbulence model to supersonic combustion flowfields. (3) Computation of the integrated aerodynamic and propulsive flowfields of a generic hypersonic space plane. (4) Computation of hypersonic flows with finite-catalytic walls. (5) Development of an upwind Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code for thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flows.

  17. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  18. Impingement of a radial jet with an annular jet. 3rd Report. Curved properties of main jet with pressure field; Hoshajo funryu to kanjo funryu no shototsu ni kansuru kenkyu. 3. Atsuryokuba ni yoru shufunryu no wankyoku tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Kozato, Y.; Tanaka, E. [Gifu University, Gifu (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kariya, M. [Meidensha Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-25

    Annular jets (control flows) flowing out from a columnar nozzle and a concentrically circular annular nozzle were impinged perpendicularly to a main jet flowing radially from the columnar nozzle. Then, an investigation was given on pressure in a recirculation flow region, bending of the main jet, and reattachment characteristics of the main jet onto a side wall face when the deflection of the main jet and its reattachment phenomenon onto the side wall face are controlled. The experiment was performed under the conditions of a nozzle width of 6 mm, an inter-nozzle distance of 4, a control flow rate (a ratio of a flow-out rate of the control flow to that of the main jet) from 0 to 0.6, with the step height varied. Investigations were made on change of static pressure distribution in jets in the downstream direction, change of static pressure on the side wall face in the downstream direction, and the relationship between the reattachment position on the side wall and the average static pressure in the recirculation flow region. The relationship of the reattachment position of the main jet on the side wall with the average side wall static pressure and the average static pressure in the recirculation flow region is expressed by one curve. The reattachment position gets closer to the nozzle outlet as the pressure decreases in the recirculation flow region. 9 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Species Source Term Mapping for Reacting Flow CFD Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Simulations of reacting flow in applications such as scramjet engines are currently limited in their utility or accuracy by the chemistry sub-models employed....

  20. Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Diagnostic for Reacting Flows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A diagnostic technique is proposed for measuring temperature and velocity simultaneously in a high temperature reacting flow for aiding research in propulsion. The...

  1. Numerical simulation of high speed chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuricht, Scott Richard

    A single step second-order accurate flux-difference-splitting method has been developed for solving unsteady quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional flows of multispecies fluids with finite rate chemistry. A systematic method for incorporating the source term effects into the wave strength parameters of Roe's linearized approximate Riemann solver is presented that is consistent with characteristic theory. The point implicit technique is utilized to achieve second-order time accuracy of the local area source term The stiffness associated with the chemical reactions is removed by implicitly integrating the kinetics system using the LSODE package. From the implicit integration, values of the species production rates are developed and incorporated into the flux-difference-splitting framework using a source term projection and splitting technique that preserves the upwind nature of source terms. Numerous validation studies are presented to illustrate the capability of the numerical method. Shock tube and converging-diverging nozzle cases show the method is second order accurate in space and time for one-dimensional flows. A supersonic source flow case and a subsonic sink flow case show the method is second order spatially accurate for two-dimensional flows. Static combustion and steady supersonic combustion cases illustrate the ability of the method to accurately capture the ignition delay for hydrogen-air mixtures. Demonstration studies are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the method. One-dimensional flow in a shock tube predicts species dissociation behind the main shock wave. One-dimension flow in supersonic nozzles predicts the well-known chemical freezing effect in an expanding flow. Two-dimensional cases consisted of a model of a scramjet combustor and a rocket motor nozzle. A parametric study was performed on a model of a scramjet combustor. The parameters studied were; wall angle, inlet Mach number, inlet temperature, and inlet equivalence ratio

  2. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  3. FLOW CHARACTERISTICS OF TURBULENT JETS INJECTED OBLIQUELY IN CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ting-ting; LI Shao-hua; XU Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulation has been performed to investigate the characteristics of the turbulent jet issuing obliquely into a crossflow, at the injection angles of 90° and 60°. The SIMPLEC algorithm in the body-fitted coordinates and the wall-function method using the RNG k-ε turbulence model have been adopted to simulate this flow at two jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios, 2 and 4. The numerical results are good agreement with the experimental measurements, the jet trajectories have been given, the separation events in the lee of the jet exit have been found, and the forming mechanism has been analyzed.

  4. Overview of the JET results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, F.; JET Contributors,

    2015-10-01

    Since the installation of an ITER-like wall, the JET programme has focused on the consolidation of ITER design choices and the preparation for ITER operation, with a specific emphasis given to the bulk tungsten melt experiment, which has been crucial for the final decision on the material choice for the day-one tungsten divertor in ITER. Integrated scenarios have been progressed with the re-establishment of long-pulse, high-confinement H-modes by optimizing the magnetic configuration and the use of ICRH to avoid tungsten impurity accumulation. Stationary discharges with detached divertor conditions and small edge localized modes have been demonstrated by nitrogen seeding. The differences in confinement and pedestal behaviour before and after the ITER-like wall installation have been better characterized towards the development of high fusion yield scenarios in DT. Post-mortem analyses of the plasma-facing components have confirmed the previously reported low fuel retention obtained by gas balance and shown that the pattern of deposition within the divertor has changed significantly with respect to the JET carbon wall campaigns due to the absence of thermally activated chemical erosion of beryllium in contrast to carbon. Transport to remote areas is almost absent and two orders of magnitude less material is found in the divertor.

  5. The Giant Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.; Arnone, E.; Zanotti, F.; Cummer, S.; Li, J.; Füllekrug, M.; van der Velde, O.

    2012-04-01

    Thunderstorm clouds may discharge directly to the ionosphere in spectacular luminous jets - the longest electric discharges on our planet. The electric properties of jets, such as their polarity, conductivity, and currents, have been predicted by models, but are poorly characterized by measurements. Here we present an analysis of the first gigantic jet that with certainty has a positive polarity. The jet region in the mesosphere was illuminated by an unusual sprite discharge generated by a positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash shortly after the onset of the jet. The sprite appeared with elements in a ring at ~40 km distance around the jet, the elements pointing curving away from the jet. This suggests that the field close the jet partially cancels the field driving the sprite. From a simple model of the event we conclude that a substantial portion of the positive cloud potential must be carried to ~50 km altitude, which is also consistent with the observed channel expansion and the electromagnetic radiation associated with the jet. It is further shown that blue jets are likely to substantially modify the free electron content in the lower ionosphere because of increased electron attachment driven by the jet electric field. The model further makes clear the relationship between jets, gigantic jets, and sprites. This is the first time that sprites are used for sounding the properties of the mesosphere. The observations presented here will allow evaluation of theories for jet and gigantic jet generation and of their influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system.

  6. Overview of the JET results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanelli, F.; Abhangi, M.; Abreu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Since the installation of an ITER-like wall, the JET programme has focused on the consolidation of ITER design choices and the preparation for ITER operation, with a specific emphasis given to the bulk tungsten melt experiment, which has been crucial for the final decision on the material choice...... for the day-one tungsten divertor in ITER. Integrated scenarios have been progressed with the re-establishment of long-pulse, high-confinement H-modes by optimizing the magnetic configuration and the use of ICRH to avoid tungsten impurity accumulation. Stationary discharges with detached divertor conditions...

  7. Wonderful Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  8. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  9. High-Speed Jet Formation after Solid Object Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekle, Stephan; Gordillo, José Manuel; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    A circular disc hitting a water surface creates an impact crater which after collapse leads to a vigorous jet. Upon impact an axisymmetric air cavity forms and eventually pinches off in a single point halfway down the cavity. Two fast sharp-pointed jets are observed shooting up- and downwards from the closure location, which by then has turned into a stagnation point surrounded by a locally hyperbolic flow pattern. This flow, however, is not the mechanism feeding the jets. Using high-speed imaging and numerical simulations we show that jetting is fed by the local flow around the base of the jet, which is forced by the colliding cavity walls. We show how the well-known theory of a collapsing void (using a line of sinks on the symmetry axis) can be continued beyond pinch-off to obtain a new and quantitative model for jet formation which agrees well with numerical and experimental data.

  10. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  11. REACT: Resettable Hold Down and Release Actuator for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Nestor; Collado, Marcelo; Cabás, Ramiro

    2014-07-01

    A new HDRA based on SMA technology, called REACT, has been designed for development of loads and appendixes in space applications. This design involves a rod supported by spheres that block its axial movement during a preload application. The rod shape allows misalignment and blocks the rotation around axial axis for a proper installation of the device. Because of the high preload requirements for this type of actuators, finite element analysis (FEA) has been developed in order to check the structure resistance. The results of the FEA have constrained the REACT design, in terms of dimensions, materials, and shape of the mechanical parts. A complete test campaign for qualification of REACT is proposed. Several qualification models are intended to be built for testing in parallel. Therefore, it is a way to demonstrate margins which allows getting some statistics.

  12. COARSE-GRID SIMULATION OF REACTING AND NON-REACTING GAS-PARTICLE FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran Sundaresan

    2004-03-01

    The principal goal of this project, funded under the ''DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative'' is virtual demonstration of circulating fluidized bed performance. We had proposed a ''virtual demonstration tool'', which is based on the open-domain CFD code MFIX. The principal challenge funded through this grant is to devise and implement in this CFD code sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures. Within the past year, which was the third year of the project, we have made the following specific advances. (a) We have completed a study of the impact of sub-grid models of different levels of detail on the results obtained in coarse-grid simulations of gas-particle flow. (b) We have also completed a study of a model problem to understand the effect of wall friction, which was proved in our earlier work to be very important for stable operation of standpipes in a circulating fluidized bed circuit. These are described in a greater detail in this report.

  13. Analysis of reacting flowfields in low-thrust rocket engines and plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan Mitchell

    The mixing and combustion processes in small gaseous hydrogen-oxygen thrusters and plumes are studied by means of a computational model developed as a general purpose analytic procedure for solving low speed, reacting, internal flowfields. The model includes the full Navier-Stokes equations coupled with species diffusion equations for a hydrogen-oxygen reaction kinetics system as well as the option to use either the k-Epsilon or q-Omega low Reynolds number, two-equation turbulence models. Solution of the governing equations is accomplished by a finite-volume formulation with central-difference spatial discretizations and an explicit, four-stage, Runge Kutta time-integration procedure. The Runge-Kutta scheme appears to provide efficient convergence when applied to the calculation of turbulent, reacting flowfields in these small thrusters. Appropriate boundary conditions are developed to properly model propellant mass flowrates and regenerative wall cooling. The computational method is validated against measured engine performance parameters on a global level, as well as experimentally obtained exit plane and plume flowfield properties on a local level. The model does an excellent job of predicting the measured performance trends of an auxiliary thruster as a function of O/F ratio, although the performance levels are consistently underpredicted by approximately 4 percent. These differences arise because the extent to which the wall coolant layer and combustion gases mix and react is underpredicted. Predictions of velocity components, temperature and species number densities in the near-field plume regions of several low-thrust engines show reasonable agreement with experimental data obtained by two separate laser diagnostic techniques. Discrepancies between the predictions and measurements are primarily due to three-dimensional mixing processes which are not accounted for in the analysis. Both comparisons with experiment and the evident reason for errors in absolute

  14. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  15. Study of Water Jet Impulse in Water-Jet Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-rang; MA Wei-wei; CHEN Ming

    2005-01-01

    The water jet impulse is brought forward to study the traction force of the water jet to the flying weft in water-jet looms. The distribution of the water jet impulse in the shed is tested by a sensor, and the influence of water jet parameters on the water jet impulse is analyzed.

  16. Impact of turbulence anisotropy near walls in room airflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schälin, A.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2004-01-01

    for the work. The growth rate parallel to the wall in a three-dimensional wall jet is large compared with the growth rate perpendicular to the wall, and it is large compared with the growth rate in a free circular jet. It is shown that it is not possible to predict the high growth rate parallel with a surface......The influence of different turbulence models used in computational fluid dynamics predictions is studied in connection with room air movement. The turbulence models used are the high Re-number k–e model and the high Re- number Reynolds stress model (RSM). The three-dimensional wall jet is selected...... in a three- dimensional wall jet by the k–e turbulence model. Furthermore, it is shown that the growth rate can be predicted to a certain extent by the RSM with wall reflection terms. The flow in a deep room can be strongly influenced by details as the growth rate of a three-dimensional wall jet. Predictions...

  17. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  18. Imaging flow during impingement of differentially heated jets over a flat surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathee, Yogender; Vinoth, B.R.; Panigrahi, P.K., E-mail: panig@iitk.ac.in; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • We carried out experiments to model thermal striping phenomenon in LMFBR. • We examined temperature fluctuation in flow field using shadowgraphy. • We correlated the wall temperature fluctuations to flow fluctuations. • The PIV measurements showed a distinct recirculation zone for equal velocity jets. • Equal velocity jets show highest temperature fluctuations. - Abstract: The present study investigates thermal fluctuations occurring in the mixing region of two adjacent differentially heated water jets impinging on a horizontal stainless steel surface. The nozzle diameters of the individual jets are equal. The jets are immersed in a pool of water at the ambient temperature. The Reynolds number range considered in the experiments is 2.09 × 10{sup 3}–2.51 × 10{sup 4} for each jet, while the Richardson number is in the range of 9.58 × 10{sup −3}–1.38 × 10{sup −2}. Light intensity fluctuations in the interfacial region of the jets are imaged using the shadowgraph technique. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been carried out in a plane passing across the two jets. The effect of various flow rates near the nozzles and the impingement plate are visualized. Time-averaged and RMS temperature fluctuations on the exposed face of the impingement plate are measured using thermocouples. Spectra of light intensity fluctuations determined from the shadowgraph data are correlated with those in wall temperature. Light intensity spectra grow in amplitude in the flow direction, as additional jet instabilities set in. The spectra are broadband with distinct peaks, typical of high Reynolds number jets. Time-averaged and RMS wall temperature distribution are quite distinct from those of light intensity within the impinging jets. Consistent with a wall-jet behavior, the largest RMS wall temperature occurs near the stagnation point and decays away from it. The gradient in the time-averaged wall temperature is the highest for equal velocity jets and

  19. Modeling and design of reacting systems with phase transfer catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piccolo, Chiara; Hodges, George; Piccione, Patrick M.;

    2011-01-01

    , some of the design issues related to improved reaction operation are analyzed. Since the solubility of the different forms of the PTC in the organic solvent affects ultimately the catalyst partition coefficients, therefore, the organic solvent plays an important role in the design of PTC-based reacting...

  20. Termite Proteins Cross-React with Cockroach Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimp are among a group of 8 foods that commonly cause food allergy, and shrimp allergens have been demonstrated to cross-react with arthropod proteins, such as those from cockroaches. Edible insects are beginning to be popularized as an alternate source of protein and have a high nutrition value....

  1. Moment estimation for chemically reacting systems by extended Kalman filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruess, J; Milias-Argeitis, A; Summers, S; Lygeros, J

    2011-01-01

    In stochastic models of chemically reacting systems that contain bimolecular reactions, the dynamics of the moments of order up to n of the species populations do not form a closed system, in the sense that their time-derivatives depend on moments of order n + 1. To close the dynamics, the moments o

  2. Wall force produced during disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.

    2009-11-01

    The study of disruptions is of great importance for ITER. Previous work on disruptions [1] is extended to compute toroidally asymmetric wall force in ITER, using the M3D code. The disruptions are produced by n = 1 resistive wall modes or external kink modes. A thin wall resistive boundary model is used to calculate the wall forces. The symmetric wall force, produced by a VDE, and the asymmetric wall force, produced by n = 1 modes, are comparable in magnitude. It is found that the asymmetric and axisymmetric forces scale with the growth rate of the instability multiplied by the square of the current divided by magnetic field. A similar scaling was reported for VDEs in JET [2]. Numerically, the study of disruptions is very challenging. In the M3D extended MHD code, dealiasing was applied in the toroidal direction. Advection terms were treated with a numerical upwind method. These techniques provided sufficient numerical stability to simulate entire disruption events. [4pt] [1] R. Paccagnella, H. R. Strauss, and J. Breslau, Nucl. Fusion (2009) 49 035003. [2] V. Riccardo, T. C. Hender, P. J. Lomas, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion (2004)

  3. Turbine ram jet engine. Turbinen-Staustrahltriebwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabs, A.

    1991-04-25

    A turbine ram jet engine is described with a ram compressed air duct, which is formed between an outer duct wall and a housing-like jacket of a basic turbine engine and is to be shut off on the incoming air side with means of shutting off, by which the ram compressed air duct is shut off with the basic engine switched on and the ram jet engine switched off with simultaneous release of suction air into the basic engine. The jacket should form an air shaft opening out polygonally in the direction of the end of the ram compressed air duct on the inlet side and should have penetrations, where the means of shutting off at the penetrations are hinged flaps, which open up the penetrations with the ram jet engine switched on and thus form a shut-off body of the air shaft symmetrically opposite the ram air flow.

  4. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  5. Active Control of Jet Engine Inlet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-31

    investigation was performed with no pressure applied across the fan. To measure the high-frequency, unsteady jet velocity, an IFA 300 hot - wire anemometry ...flow at the engine face. Recommendations for the measurement devices include hot -film or hot - wire sensors and wall-mounted, high frequency pressure...the blade and creates flow instabilities that convect through the later compressor stages. This report presents a study performed to gain an

  6. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  7. The dilution effect on the extinction of wall diffusion flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiti Nadjib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic process of the interaction between a turbulent jet diffusion methane flame and a lateral wall was experimentally studied. The evolution of the flame temperature field with the Nitrogen dilution of the methane jet flame was examined. The interaction between the diffusion flame and the lateral wall was investigated for different distance between the wall and the central axes of the jet flame. The dilution is found to play the central role in the flame extinction process. The flame response as the lateral wall approaches from infinity and the increasing of the dilution rate make the flame extinction more rapid than the flame without dilution, when the nitrogen dilution rate increase the flame temperature decrease.

  8. ATLAS Standard Model Measurements Using Jet Grooming and Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Boosted topologies allow to explore Standard Model processes in kinematical regimes never tested before. In such LHC challenging environments, standard reconstruction techniques quickly hit the wall. Targeting hadronic final states means to properly reconstruct energy and multiplicity of the jets in the event. In order to be able to identify the decay product of boosted objects, i.e. W bosons, $t\\bar{t}$ pairs or Higgs produced in association with $t\\bar{t}$ pairs, ATLAS experiment is currently exploiting several algorithms using jet grooming and jet substructure. This contribution will mainly cover the following ATLAS measurements: $t\\bar{t}$ differential cross section production and jet mass using the soft drop procedure. Standard Model measurements offer the perfect field to test the performances of new jet tagging techniques which will become even more important in the search for new physics in highly boosted topologies.”

  9. Experimental thermodynamics experimental thermodynamics of non-reacting fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Neindre, B Le

    2013-01-01

    Experimental Thermodynamics, Volume II: Experimental Thermodynamics of Non-reacting Fluids focuses on experimental methods and procedures in the study of thermophysical properties of fluids. The selection first offers information on methods used in measuring thermodynamic properties and tests, including physical quantities and symbols for physical quantities, thermodynamic definitions, and definition of activities and related quantities. The text also describes reference materials for thermometric fixed points, temperature measurement under pressures, and pressure measurements. The publicatio

  10. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  11. Physical gasdynamics of reacting media. Fizicheskaia gazodinamika reagiruiushchikh sred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, B.V.; Grishin, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The fundamentals of the mechanics of reacting gases (aerothermochemistry) are presented in a systematic manner. Topics discussed include the kinetic theory of gases, elements of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics, transfer coefficients and mathematical models of gas flows, and transfer processes in a radiating gas. Attention is also given to similarity criteria and classification of aerothermochemical phenomena, elements of combustion theory, and some aspects of boundary layer theory. 81 references.

  12. Flow Field Effects on Nucleation in a Reacting Mixture Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    chemically reacting flows has been analysed by Fendell (1965) who considered the effect of the straining motion in a stagnation point flow on ignition...stagnation point diffusion flame ( Fendell , 1965, Linan, 1974). In the present study the effect of the strain rate or velocity gradient on nucleation kinetics...Symposium (International) on Corn- bustion, 799-810, Academic Press. Fendell , F. E. (1965). Ignition and extinction in combustion of initially unmixed

  13. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  14. Combined Thermo-Hydraulic Analysis of a Cryogenic Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Chorowski, M

    1999-01-01

    A cryogenic jet is a phenomenon encountered in different fields like some technological processes and cryosurgery. It may also be a result of cryogenic equipment rupture or a cryogen discharge from the cryostats following resistive transition in superconducting magnets. Heat exchange between a cold jet and a warm steel element (e.g. a buffer tank wall or a transfer line vacuum vessel wall) may result in an excessive localisation of thermal strains and stresses. The objective of the analysis is to get a combined (analytical and experimental) one-dimensional model of a cryogenic jet that will enable estimation of heat transfer intensity between the jet and steel plate with a suitable accuracy for engineering applications. The jet diameter can only be determined experimentally. The mean velocity profile can be calculated from the fact that the total flux of momentum along the jet axis is conserved. The proposed model allows deriving the jet crown area with respect to the distance from the vent and the mean veloc...

  15. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  16. Asymetrical structure in coastal river flows and jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Sekula, Emil; Bateman, Allen

    2010-05-01

    We apply visual scaling methods to both laboratory experiments and to satellite images of coastal flows as a tool to understand jet/boundary interactions in the environment. We compare the structure of SAR(Synthetic Aperture Radar) images of coastal jets and vortices and to experiments of jets of different Reynolds numbers and their images searching for common scaling and structural relationship between these two kinds of jets taking advantage of the self-similarity of the mixing processes. In order to investigate the structure of ocean surface detected jets (SAR)and vortices near the coast, we compare wall and boundary effects on the structure of turbulent jets (3D and 2D) which are non-homogeneous. We also use the multifractal analysis of SAR and experimental jets (plumes) images looking for relationship between these two kinds of jets. The SAR images exhibit a large variation of natural features produced by winds, internal waves, the bathymetric distribution, by thermal or solutal convection by rain, etc. These produce variations in the sea surface roughness. The satellite-borne SAR is able to detect oceanic features with a range of scales. The spatial cross-correlation may give an indication of the length over which such features are correlated. We compare the inner and outer jet boundaries detecting a clear asymetry, A similar effect is detected in laboratory experiments at large Reynolds number when a wall is near one of the sides of the jet. The geometrical constrains are seen to affect also the scale to scale energy transfer.

  17. TASI Lectures on Jet Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    Jet physics is a rich and rapidly evolving field, with many applications to physics in and beyond the Standard Model. These notes, based on lectures delivered at the June 2012 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute, provide an introduction to jets at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics covered include sequential jet algorithms, jet shapes, jet grooming, and boosted Higgs and top tagging.

  18. Jet propagation and deceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, Manel

    2013-01-01

    Extragalactic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are divided into two morphological types, namely Fanaroff-Riley I (FRI) and Fanaroff-Riley II (FRII). The former show decollimated structure at the kiloparsec scales and are thought to be decelerated by entrainment within the first kiloparsecs of evolution inside the host galaxy. The entrainment and deceleration can be, at least partly, due to the interaction of jets with stellar winds and gas clouds that enter in the jet as they orbit around the galactic centre. In this contribution, I review recent simulations to study the dynamic effect of entrainment from stellar winds in jets and the direct interaction of jets with gas clouds and stellar winds. I also briefly describe the importance of these interactions as a possible scenario of high-energy emission from extragalactic jets.

  19. What ignites optical jets?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian Jester

    2002-12-23

    The properties of radio galaxies and quasars with and without optical or X-ray jets are compared. The majority of jets from which high-frequency emission has been detected so far (13 with optical emission, 11 with X-rays, 13 with both) are associated with the most powerful radio sources at any given redshift. It is found that optical/X-ray jet sources are more strongly beamed than the average population of extragalactic radio sources. This suggests that the detection or non-detection of optical emission from jets has so far been dominated by surface brightness selection effects, not by jet physics. It implies that optical jets are much more common than is currently appreciated.

  20. Mini-Jet Controlled Turbulent Round Air Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜诚; 米建春; 周裕; 詹杰

    2011-01-01

    We report an investigation of the active control of a round air jet by multiple radial blowing mini-jets.The Reynolds number based on the jet exit velocity and diameter is 8000.It is found that once the continuous minijets are replaced with pulsed ones,the centerline velocity decay rate K can be greatly increased as the pulsing frequency of mini-jets approaches the natural vortex frequency of the main jet.For example,the K value is amplified by more than 50% with two(or four)pulsed mini-jets blowing,compared with the continuous mini-jets at the same ratio of the mass flow rate of the mini-jets to that of the main jet.%We report an investigation of the active control of a round air jet by multiple radial blowing mini-jets. The Reynolds number based on the jet exit velocity and diameter is 8000. It is found that once the continuous mini-jets are replaced with pulsed ones, the centerline velocity decay rate K can be greatly increased as the pulsing frequency of mini-jets approaches the natural vortex frequency of the main jet. For example, the K value is amplified by more than 50% with two (or four) pulsed mini-jets blowing, compared with the continuous mini-jets at the same ratio of the mass Sow rate of the mini-jets to that of the main jet.

  1. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  2. Effect of the velocity ratio on the turbulent structure of the plane wall jet under the self-preserving state. 2nd Report. Turbulent field; Jiko hozon jokenka no heimen hekimen funryu no ranryu kozo ni oyobosu sokudohi no eikyo. 2. Ranryuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osaka, H.; Mochizuki, S. [Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sugihara, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-09-25

    In this study the plane wall jet under the self-preserving pressure gradient was measured to investigate the effect of the ratio of the maximum velocity Um to the external stream velocity Ue on the turbulent quantities. Velocity ratio Um/Ue was set at three values within the range of 2.0 to 4.0. Under such conditions, three components of turbulent intensity and Reynolds shear stress were measured by using two linearized hot wire anemometers. The turbulent flow is closely self-preserving in the range of 57

  3. Properties of gluon jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  4. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  5. Numerical modelling of unsteady flow behaviour in the rectangular jets with oblique opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T. Hart

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vortex shedding in a bank of three rectangular burner-jets was investigated using a CFD model. The jets were angled to the wall and the whole burner was recessed into a cavity in the wall; the ratio of velocities between the jets varied from 1 to 3. The model was validated against experimentally measured velocity profiles and wall pressure tapings from a physical model of the same burner geometry, and was generally found to reproduce the mean flow field faithfully. The CFD model showed that vortex shedding was induced by a combination of an adverse pressure gradient, resulting from the diffuser-like geometry of the recess, and the entrainment of fluid into the spaces separating the jets. The asymmetry of the burner, a consequence of being angled to the wall, introduced a cross-stream component into the adverse pressure gradient that forced the jets to bend away from their geometric axes, the extent of which depended upon the jet velocity. The vortex shedding was also found to occur in different jets depending on the jet velocity ratio.

  6. Analytical Study on Impingement Heat Transfer with Single—Phase Free—Surface Circular Liquid Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.F.Ma; T.Masuoka; 等

    1996-01-01

    An analytical research was conducted to study heat transfer from horizontal surfaces to normally impinging circular jets under arbitrary-heat-flux conditions.The laminar thermal and hydraulic bound ary layers were divided into five regions of flow.General expressions of heat transfer coefficients were obtained in all the four regions of stagnation and wall jet zones before the hydraulic jump.

  7. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  8. Jet mass spectra in Higgs+one jet at NNLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouttenus, Teppo T.; Stewart, Iain W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Tackmann, Frank J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Waalewijn, Wouter J. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-02-15

    The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m{sup 2}{sub jet}/p{sup jet}{sub T} scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the jet mass spectra for quark and gluon jets. We also study the effect of hadronization and underlying event on the jet mass in Pythia. To highlight the similarity of inclusive and exclusive jet mass spectra, a comparison to LHC data is presented.

  9. Dynamics of Water Jet in Water Jet Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克让; 陈明

    2001-01-01

    On the base of the study on dynamics of water jet in water jet looms, the parameters of water jet mechanism which affect the speed of water jet are analyzed and optimized. So the stability of the water jet can be improved to raise the speed of water jet as well as weft insertion rate and to enlarge the width of woven fabrics a lot. At the same time it also points out that to increase water jet speed and to prolong its affective jet time depend mainly on the accretion of spring rate (constant)of stiffness and the diminution of plunger's cross sectional area respectively.

  10. Thermo - hydraulic analysis of a cryogenic jet: application to helium recovery following resistive transitions in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chorowski, M; Konopka, G

    1999-01-01

    A resistive transition (quench) of the LHC sector magnets will be followed by cold helium venting to a quench buffer volume of 2000 m3 at ambient temperature. The volume will be composed of eight medium-pressure (2 MPa) gas storage tanks made of carbon steel, which constrains the temperature of the wall to be higher than -50 oC (223 K). Possible spot cooling intensity and thermo-mechanical stresses in the tank wall following helium injection have been analysed previously and the aim of the present study is experimental verification of basic assumptions concerning cryogenic jet parameters and heat transfer between jet crown and tank wall. For this purpose jet diameter, velocity profile and convective heat transfer between jet and steel plate have been measured. A simple jet model description based on momentum conservation has been proposed. Then, the lowest possible temperature of the tank wall which may occur has been assessed.

  11. ReACT Methodology Proof of Concept Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bri Rolston; Sarah Freeman

    2014-03-01

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) funded INL Researchers to evaluate a novel process for assessing and mitigating cyber security risks. The proof of concept level of the method was tested in an industry environment. This case study, plus additional case studies will support the further development of the method into a tool to assist industry in securing their critical networks. This report provides an understanding of the process developed in the Response Analysis and Characterization Tool (ReACT) project. This report concludes with lessons learned and a roadmap for final development of these tools for use by industry.

  12. Research on the mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Honghui; Wang, Boyi; Dai, Zhenqing

    2010-03-01

    An experimental research was carried out to study the fluid mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets. High pressure air was injected into a water tank through converging-diverging nozzles (Laval nozzles). The jets were operated at different conditions of over-, full- and under-expansions. The jet sequences were visualized using a CCD camera. It was found that the injection of supersonic air jets into water is always accompanied by strong flow oscillation, which is related to the phenomenon of shock waves feedback in the gas phase. The shock wave feedback is different from the acoustic feedback when a supersonic gas jet discharges into open air, which causes screech tone. It is a process that the shock waves enclosed in the gas pocket induce a periodic pressure with large amplitude variation in the gas jet. Consequently, the periodic pressure causes the jet oscillation including the large amplitude expansion. Detailed pressure measurements were also conducted to verify the shock wave feedback phenomenon. Three kinds of measuring methods were used, i.e., pressure probe submerged in water, pressure measurements from the side and front walls of the nozzle devices respectively. The results measured by these methods are in a good agreement. They show that every oscillation of the jets causes a sudden increase of pressure and the average frequency of the shock wave feedback is about 5-10 Hz.

  13. Research on the mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An experimental research was carried out to study the fluid mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets. High pressure air was injected into a water tank through converging-diverging nozzles (Laval nozzles). The jets were operated at different conditions of over-, full- and under-expansions. The jet sequences were visualized using a CCD camera. It was found that the injection of supersonic air jets into water is always accompanied by strong flow oscillation, which is related to the phenomenon of shock waves feedback in the gas phase. The shock wave feedback is different from the acoustic feedback when a supersonic gas jet discharges into open air, which causes screech tone. It is a process that the shock waves enclosed in the gas pocket induce a periodic pressure with large amplitude variation in the gas jet. Consequently, the periodic pressure causes the jet oscillation including the large amplitude expansion. Detailed pressure measurements were also conducted to verify the shock wave feedback phenomenon. Three kinds of measuring methods were used, i.e., pressure probe submerged in water, pressure measurements from the side and front walls of the nozzle devices respectively. The results measured by these methods are in a good agreement. They show that every oscillation of the jets causes a sudden increase of pressure and the average frequency of the shock wave feedback is about 5–10 Hz.

  14. Value of proximal regurgitant jet size in tricuspid regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, J M; Vandervoort, P; Mele, D; Weyman, A; Thomas, J D

    1996-04-01

    Recent studies have shown good agreement between proximal regurgitant jet size obtained with transthoracic color flow mapping and regurgitant fraction in patients with mitral regurgitation. To evaluate this in patients with tricuspid regurgitation, we analyzed 40 patients in sinus rhythm, 16 with free jets and 24 with impinging jets, comparing proximal jet size (millimeters) with parameters derived from the Doppler two-dimensional echocardiographic method (regurgitant fraction) and the flow-convergence method (peak flow rate, effective regurgitant orifice area, and momentum). Good agreement was noted between peak flow rate (r = 0.80, p fair between effective regurgitant orifice (r = 0.65, p < 0.001), peak flow rate (0.65, p < 0.001), and momentum (r = 0.62, p < 0.001) with mean jet proximal size. Jet proximal size obtained with transthoracic color flow mapping is a good semiquantitative tool for measuring tricuspid regurgitation in free jets that correlates well with established measures of the severity and with new parameters available from analysis of the proximal acceleration field. In patients with eccentrically directed wall jets, the correlation weakens but still appears clinically significant.

  15. Measurements of a single pulse impinging jet. A CFD reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovo Mirko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports three sets of measurements of a single pulse impinging jet. The purpose is to serve as a reference for CFD validation. A gas injector generates a single pulse jet at Re ~90000. The jet impinges on a temperature controlled flat target at different angles (0º, 30º, 45º and 60º. The jet velocity field is measured with PIV. The evolution of the jet velocity profile in time is reported at two different locations (suitable as CFD inlet conditions. At the same locations also turbulence quantities are reported. The impingement wall temperature is measured with fast responding thermocouples and infrared camera. These give high time and space resolution respectively. Results are reported in a format suitable for comparison with CFD simulations. The results show that the heat transfer effects are highest for the jet impinging normally on the target. Target inclination has remarkable effects on the jet penetration rate and repeatability. Even small target inclinations result creates a preferential direction for the jet flow and cause a shift in the position of the stagnation region.

  16. An experimental study of the fluid mechanics associated with porous walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Heaman, J.; Smith, A.

    1992-01-01

    The fluid mechanics of air exiting from a porous material is investigated. The experiments are filter rating dependent, as porous walls with filter ratings differing by about three orders of magnitude are studied. The flow behavior is investigated for its spatial and temporal stability. The results from the investigation are related to jet behavior in at least one of the following categories: (1) jet coalescence effects with increasing flow rate; (2) jet field decay with increasing distance from the porous wall; (3) jet field temporal turbulence characteristics; and (4) single jet turbulence characteristics. The measurements show that coalescence effects cause jet development, and this development stage can be traced by measuring the pseudoturbulence (spatial velocity variations) at any flow rate. The pseudoturbulence variation with increasing mass flow reveals an initial increasing trend followed by a leveling trend, both of which are directly proportional to the filter rating. A critical velocity begins this leveling trend and represents the onset of fully developed jetting action in the flow field. A correlation is developed to predict the onset of fully developed jets in the flow emerging from a porous wall. The data further show that the fully developed jet dimensions are independent of the filter rating, thus providing a length scale for this type of flow field (1 mm). Individual jet characteristics provide another unifying trend with similar velocity decay behavior with distance; however, the respective turbulence magnitudes show vast differences between jets from the same sample. Measurements of the flow decay with distance from the porous wall show that the higher spatial frequency components of the jet field dissipate faster than the lower frequency components. Flow turbulence intensity measurements show an out of phase behavior with the velocity field and are generally found to increase as the distance from the wall is increased.

  17. Faraday, Jets, and Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    When a 6-mm layer of fine sand with an average grain size of 40 µm is poured into a cylindrical container and shaken vertically, thin jets are seen to emerge from an airy cloud of grains, almost like protuberances from the corona of the sun. A quasi two-dimensional setup reveals the jet-formation

  18. Effect of reacted acidic monomer with calcium on bonding performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, K; Ma, S; Aida, M; Maeda, T; Ikemi, T; Hirata, M; Nishiyama, N

    2011-05-01

    We determined the number of reacted and unreacted 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) molecules with calcium during the demineralization process of hydroxyapatite or dentin by 10-MDP-based one-step (Clearfil Tri-S Bond, TS) or two-step self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond Primer, SE). We then examined the effects of the number of reacted and/or unreacted 10-MDP molecules on the initial bond strength and bond durability of the resultant adhesive layer. The null hypotheses were that (1) the etching efficacy of tooth apatite by 10-MDP used in TS was the same as that in SE, and (2) the unreacted 10-MDP polymer included within the adhesive layer does not affect bond durability. Addition of hydroxyapatite or dentin to the TS and SE resulted in decreases in the NMR peak intensities for 10-MDP. The peak intensity for 10-MDP showed a greater reduction in SE than in TS, consistent with the observation that SE provided significantly higher initial mean bond strengths than TS. Further, the unreacted 10-MDP polymer within the adhesive layer did not decrease the mean bond strength, despite the application of 20,000x thermo-cycling.

  19. Sticky Tunes: How Do People React to Involuntary Musical Imagery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria J.; Liikkanen, Lassi A.; Jakubowski, Kelly; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI) or ‘earworms’; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies. PMID:24497938

  20. Sticky tunes: how do people react to involuntary musical imagery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J Williamson

    Full Text Available The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI or 'earworms'; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies.

  1. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  2. High speed turbulent reacting flows: DNS and LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givi, Peyman

    1990-01-01

    Work on understanding the mechanisms of mixing and reaction in high speed turbulent reacting flows was continued. Efforts, in particular, were concentrated on taking advantage of modern computational methods to simulate high speed turbulent flows. In doing so, two methodologies were used: large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). In the work related with LES the objective is to study the behavior of the probability density functions (pdfs) of scalar properties within the subgrid in reacting turbulent flows. The data base obtained by DNS for a detailed study of the pdf characteristics within the subgrid was used. Simulations are performed for flows under various initializations to include the effects of compressibility on mixing and chemical reactions. In the work related with DNS, a two-dimensional temporally developing high speed mixing layer under the influence of a second-order non-equilibrium chemical reaction of the type A + B yields products + heat was considered. Simulations were performed with different magnitudes of the convective Mach numbers and with different chemical kinetic parameters for the purpose of examining the isolated effects of the compressibility and the heat released by the chemical reactions on the structure of the layer. A full compressible code was developed and utilized, so that the coupling between mixing and chemical reactions is captured in a realistic manner.

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TURBULENT JETS WITH LATERAL INJECTION INTO A CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ting-ting; LI Shao-hua; XU Zhong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, Numerical simulations of mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy fields are presented for three-dimensional lateral jet in crossflow, at the injection angles of -60° and -30°. The RNG k-ε turbulence model, with the two-layer wall function method, is adopted to simulate the characteristics of this flow at the jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios, 1, 2 and 4. The results show that the injection angle and jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio can change the flow fields, and the range upstream affected by jet injected laterally increase and the curvature of jet trajectories varies along the flow direction. Furthermore, the separation events in the lee of the jet exit and behind the jet bending-segment have been found, and the mechanisms of two vortex systems are analyzed.

  4. Jet propulsion without inertia

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolie, Saverio E

    2010-01-01

    A body immersed in a highly viscous fluid can locomote by drawing in and expelling fluid through pores at its surface. We consider this mechanism of jet propulsion without inertia in the case of spheroidal bodies, and derive both the swimming velocity and the hydrodynamic efficiency. Elementary examples are presented, and exact axisymmetric solutions for spherical, prolate spheroidal, and oblate spheroidal body shapes are provided. In each case, entirely and partially porous (i.e. jetting) surfaces are considered, and the optimal jetting flow profiles at the surface for maximizing the hydrodynamic efficiency are determined computationally. The maximal efficiency which may be achieved by a sphere using such jet propulsion is 12.5%, a significant improvement upon traditional flagella-based means of locomotion at zero Reynolds number. Unlike other swimming mechanisms which rely on the presentation of a small cross section in the direction of motion, the efficiency of a jetting body at low Reynolds number increas...

  5. Dimensionless scalings of confinement, heat transport and pedestal stability in JET-ILW and comparison with JET-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Saarelma, S.; Lomas, P.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Bilkova, P.; Boom, J. E.; de la Luna, E.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Flanagan, J.; Garzotti, L.; Giroud, C.; Hawks, N.; Joffrin, E.; Kempenaars, M.; Kim, Hyun-Tae; Kruezi, U.; Loarte, A.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Meneses, L.; Maggi, C. F.; Menmuir, S.; Peterka, M.; Rachlew, E.; Romanelli, M.; Stefanikova, E.; Contributors, JET

    2017-01-01

    Three dimensionless scans in the normalized Larmor radius ρ *, normalized collisionality ν * and normalized plasma pressure β have been performed in JET with the ITER-like wall (JET-ILW). The normalized energy confinement and the thermal diffusivity exhibit a scaling with ρ * consistent with the earlier results obtained in the carbon wall JET (JET-C) and with a gyro-Bohm scaling. In the pedestal, experimental results show that the stability is not dependent on ρ *, qualitatively in agreement with the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model. The ν * dimensionless scaling shows that JET-ILW normalized confinement has a stronger dependence on collisionality than JET-C. This leads to a reduction of the difference in the confinement between JET-ILW and JET-C to  ≈10% at low ν *. The pedestal stability shows an improvement with decreasing ν *. This is ascribed to the increase of the bootstrap current, to the reduction of the pedestal width and to the reduction of the relative shift between pedestal density and temperature position. The β dimensionless scan shows that, at low collisionality, JET-ILW normalized confinement has no clear dependence with β, in agreement with part of the earlier scalings. At high collisionality, a reduction of the normalized confinement with increasing β is observed. This behaviour is driven mainly by the pedestal where the stability is reduced with increasing β. The P-B analysis shows that the stability reduction with increasing β at high ν * is due to the destabilizing effect of the increased relative shift.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  7. Materials Analysis of Transient Plasma-Wall Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-13

    model showing the importance sputter and re-deposition. plasma, pulsed plasma, directed energy, transient wall interaction, high energy density...each equipped with a 25kV copper- vapor thyratron start switch capable of sub-microsecond triggering resolution. Each start switch is paired with a...sample exposure positions within the plasma jet. The probe utilizes a PCB Piezotronics model 113B21 pressure sensor modified to work in the plasma jet

  8. Automatic location of disruption times in JET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R; Vega, J; Murari, A

    2014-11-01

    The loss of stability and confinement in tokamak plasmas can induce critical events known as disruptions. Disruptions produce strong electromagnetic forces and thermal loads which can damage fundamental components of the devices. Determining the disruption time is extremely important for various disruption studies: theoretical models, physics-driven models, or disruption predictors. In JET, during the experimental campaigns with the JET-C (Carbon Fiber Composite) wall, a common criterion to determine the disruption time consisted of locating the time of the thermal quench. However, with the metallic ITER-like wall (JET-ILW), this criterion is usually not valid. Several thermal quenches may occur previous to the current quench but the temperature recovers. Therefore, a new criterion has to be defined. A possibility is to use the start of the current quench as disruption time. This work describes the implementation of an automatic data processing method to estimate the disruption time according to this new definition. This automatic determination allows both reducing human efforts to locate the disruption times and standardizing the estimates (with the benefit of being less vulnerable to human errors).

  9. Dynamics of inertial particles in free jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casciola, C M; Gualtieri, P; Picano, F; Sardina, G [Dipartimento di Meccanica e Aeronautica, Sapienza University, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Troiani, G, E-mail: carlomassimo.casciola@uniroma1.it [ENEA C R Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    Turbulent mixing of small and diluted inertial particles presents many peculiar and unexpected features such as preferential segregation at small scales, i.e. clustering or, in wall flows, preferential wall accumulation, i.e. turbophoresis, which are induced by the multi-scale features of the turbulence in the carrier fluid. In the context of multi-phase flows, the effect of turbulence on particle distributions was commonly addressed in simplified geometries as in homogeneous or channel flows. The present paper discusses the dynamics of suspensions with different inertia in the far field of turbulent axisymmetric jets by means of direct numerical simulations. The jet is a well-known constant Reynolds number flow where the characteristic length scale grows linearly with distance from the jet origin, while the characteristic velocity decays in inverse proportion. These features, combined with the finite inertia, induce peculiar non-equilibrium effects on the spatial distribution of the particles. They range from spatially developing small-scale clustering, due to the multi-scale nature of the turbulent fluctuations, to self-similarity of the mean particle velocity profile, presumably collapsing on a one-parameter family of shapes parameterized in terms of the local large-scale Stokes number. The properties presented here are the most evident features of this most interesting system, where intermittency and spatial inhomogeneity interact to induce even subtler effects of spatial segregation, which certainly deserve further investigation.

  10. Simulations of Solar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  11. Performances of Rh and Mo mirrors under JET exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marot, L.; Meyer, E.; Rubel, M.; Ivanova, D.; Widdowson, A.; Coad, J. P.; Likonen, J.; Hakola, A.; Koivuranta, S.; De Temmerman, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a comprehensive surface characterization of rhodium and molybdenum mirrors exposed on the main chamber wall of JET during campaigns with carbon plasma-facing components. As determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Scannin

  12. REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC/TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Becky Murdock, REAC/TS Registry and Health Physics Technician

    2012-12-12

    Over the past four years, REAC/TS has presented a number of case reports from its Radiation Accident Registry. Victims of radiological or nuclear incidents must meet certain dose criteria for an incident to be categorized as an “accident” and be included in the registry. Although the greatest numbers of “accidents” in the United States that have been entered into the registry involve radiation devices, the greater percentage of serious accidents have involved sealed sources of one kind or another. But if one looks at the kinds of accident scenarios that have resulted in extreme consequence, i.e., death, the greater share of deaths has occurred in medical settings.

  13. Reacting chemistry at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Morgan, Thomas; Huwel, Lutz; Graham, William

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interaction with gas-liquid interfaces is becoming increasingly important in biological applications, chemical analysis and medicine. It introduces electrons, new ionic species and reactive species and contributes to chemical and electrical self-organization at the interface. To provide insight into the associated physics and chemistry at work in the evolution of the plasma in the air-water interface (AWI), a time-dependent one-dimensional modelling has been developed. The numerical simulation is used to solve the kinetic equations and help identify the important reaction mechanisms and describe the phenomena associated with hundreds of reacting pathways in gas-phase and liquid-phase AWI chemistry. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K04998.

  14. Toward parallel, adaptive mesh refinement for chemically reacting flow simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devine, K.D.; Shadid, J.N.; Salinger, A.G. Hutchinson, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hennigan, G.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Adaptive numerical methods offer greater efficiency than traditional numerical methods by concentrating computational effort in regions of the problem domain where the solution is difficult to obtain. In this paper, the authors describe progress toward adding mesh refinement to MPSalsa, a computer program developed at Sandia National laboratories to solve coupled three-dimensional fluid flow and detailed reaction chemistry systems for modeling chemically reacting flow on large-scale parallel computers. Data structures that support refinement and dynamic load-balancing are discussed. Results using uniform refinement with mesh sequencing to improve convergence to steady-state solutions are also presented. Three examples are presented: a lid driven cavity, a thermal convection flow, and a tilted chemical vapor deposition reactor.

  15. 3D Reacting Flow Analysis of LANTR Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Hemminger, Joseph A.; Bulman, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents performance predictions for LANTR nozzles and the system implications for their use in a manned Mars mission. The LANTR concept is rocket thrust augmentation by injecting Oxygen into the nozzle to combust the Hydrogen exhaust of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket. The performance predictions are based on three-dimensional reacting flow simulations using VULCAN. These simulations explore a range of O2/H2 mixture ratios, injector configurations, and concepts. These performance predictions are used for a trade analysis within a system study for a manned Mars mission. Results indicate that the greatest benefit of LANTR will occur with In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). However, Hydrogen propellant volume reductions may allow greater margins for fitting tanks within the launch vehicle where packaging issues occur.

  16. Jets and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kramer, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-12-15

    The observation of quark and gluon jets has played a crucial role in establishing Quantum Chromodynamics [QCD] as the theory of the strong interactions within the Standard Model of particle physics. The jets, narrowly collimated bundles of hadrons, reflect configurations of quarks and gluons at short distances. Thus, by analysing energy and angular distributions of the jets experimentally, the properties of the basic constituents of matter and the strong forces acting between them can be explored. In this review we summarise the properties of quark and gluon jets and the impact of their observation on Quantum Chromodynamics, primarily the discovery of the gluons as the carriers of the strong force. Focusing on these basic points, jets in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions will be in the foreground of the discussion. In addition we will delineate the role of jets as tools for exploring other particle aspects in ep and pp/p anti p collisions - quark and gluon densities in protons, measurements of the QCD coupling, fundamental 2-2 quark/gluon scattering processes, but also the impact of jet decays of top quarks, and W{sup {+-}},Z bosons on the electroweak sector. The presentation to a large extent is formulated in a non-technical language with the intent to recall the significant steps historically and convey the significance of this field also to communities beyond high energy physics. (orig.)

  17. Solar coronal jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  18. The Kevlar-walled anechoic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenport, William J.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Borgoltz, Aurelien; Ravetta, Patricio A.; Barone, Matthew F.; Brown, Kenneth A.; Morton, Michael A.

    2013-08-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of an anechoic wind tunnel test section with walls made from thin Kevlar cloth have been measured and analyzed. The Kevlar test section offers some advantages over a conventional free-jet arrangement. The cloth contains the bulk of the flow but permits the transmission of sound with little loss. The containment results in smaller far-field aerodynamic corrections meaning that larger models can be tested at higher Reynolds numbers. The containment also eliminates the need for a jet catcher and allows for a much longer test section. Model-generated noise is thus more easily separated from facility background using beamforming. Measurements and analysis of acoustic and aerodynamic corrections for a Kevlar-walled test section are presented and discussed, along with benchmark trailing edge noise measurements.

  19. Jet Formation and Dynamics: Comparison of Quasars and Microquasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundt, Wolfgang

    Quasars and Microquasars share the following properties: (i) They have similar, elongated morphologies - reminiscent of being driven by supersonic beams - consisting of cores, knots, and heads, with jet-opening angles rams the jet channels and blows the cocoons (subsonically) after having been stalled in a head. The supersonic jets form on passing a central deLaval nozzle, first proposed by Blandford and Rees in 1974, which forms naturally due to the huge density contrast of 10^-8.3T_4 with respect to the ambient medium (of temperature T, T_4:=T/10^4 K). Beam stability and narrowness are likewise guaranteed by the density contrast (of jet fluid and CSM). Observed are both the (thermal) radiation of the rammed channel-wall material, and the synchrotron radiation of the deflected beam particles.

  20. Jets with Variable R

    CERN Document Server

    Krohn, David; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new class of jet algorithms designed to return conical jets with a variable Delta R radius. A specific example, in which Delta R scales as 1/pT, proves particularly useful in capturing the kinematic features of a wide variety of hard scattering processes. We implement this Delta R scaling in a sequential recombination algorithm and test it by reconstructing resonance masses and kinematic endpoints. These test cases show 10-20% improvements in signal efficiency compared to fixed Delta R algorithms. We also comment on cuts useful in reducing continuum jet backgrounds.

  1. Channel Wall Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Root Growth and Water distribution in living walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars

    walls; the vertical orientation of the growing medium, plants are growing vertically above or below each other in a limited rooting volume; there is an increased exposure to weather and the plants can react differently to water conditions and competition from other plants. Plant growth is the core...

  3. Tungsten coatings under high thermal loads in JET and Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruset, C.; Maier, H.; Grigore, E.; Matthews, G.; De Temmerman, G.; Widdowson, A.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2014-01-01

    During the C28–C30 campaigns the ITER-like wall (ILW) was periodically inspected by an in vessel inspection system without breaking the vacuum. After these campaigns the JET chamber was opened and the wall was inspected with a high resolution camera. The marker tiles were removed from the chamber an

  4. Tungsten coatings under high thermal loads in JET and Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruset, C.; Maier, H.; Grigore, E.; Matthews, G.; De Temmerman, G.; Widdowson, A.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2014-01-01

    During the C28–C30 campaigns the ITER-like wall (ILW) was periodically inspected by an in vessel inspection system without breaking the vacuum. After these campaigns the JET chamber was opened and the wall was inspected with a high resolution camera. The marker tiles were removed from the chamber

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of reacting stagnation flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergthorson, Jeff; Dimotakis, Paul

    2003-11-01

    Planar laminar premixed flames are stabilized in the stagnation flowfield of an impinging jet. These flames are studied experimentally through measurements of the axial velocity and CH radical profiles, the equivalence ratio, plate temperature, and the static (Bernoulli) pressure drop across the nozzle. The velocity measurements are performed using Particle Streak Velocimetry (PSV), a technique valuable in flame measurements due to the low particle-mass loading, high accuracy and short run times possible. The CH radical profile is measured using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF), which provides a very accurate marker for the reaction zone location. The experimental results are compared to predictions by a one-dimensional simulation which incorporates full chemistry. Difficulties in performing detailed comparisons between one-dimensional simulations and finite-nozzle-diameter experiments are discussed in the context of validating chemical kinetics models. To further investigate the validity of these chemical kinetics models, global flame properties such as extinction strain-rates are also investigated.

  6. Measurements of Jets in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Nattrass, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE detector can be used for measurements of jets in pp , p Pb, and Pb–Pb collisions. Measurements of jets in pp collisions are consis- tent with expectations from perturbative calculations and jets in p Pb scale with the number of nucleon–nucleon collisions, indicating that cold nuclear matter effects are not observed for jets. Measurements in Pb–Pb collisions demonstrate suppression of jets relative to expectations from binary scaling to the equivalent number of nucleon–nucleon collisions

  7. Astrophysics: Cosmic jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andy

    2010-02-01

    In some galaxies, matter falling onto a supermassive black hole is ejected in narrow jets moving at close to the speed of light. New observations provide insight into the workings of these cosmic accelerators.

  8. Jet lag prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000719.htm Jet lag prevention To use the sharing features on this page, ... Headache Irritability Stomach upset Sore muscles Tips for Prevention Before your trip: Get plenty of rest, eat ...

  9. Jet Engine Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Technology Solutions, Lockheed Martin Robert S. Carnes , M.D. NRAC Member, Battelle Memorial Institute MajGen Paul A. Fratarangelo, USMC (Ret) NRAC...Development, Acquisition) (VADM Architzel). The Naval Research Advisory Committee members (Bowes, Bowler, Carnes and Fratarangelo) have broad...Lockheed Martin ADP Boeing: Jet Engine Noise Reduction for Tactical Fighter Aircraft Mr. Tom Kaemming, K. Viswanathan, Ph . D. Tactical Jet Noise

  10. Jets and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The observation of quark and gluon jets has played a crucial role in establishing Quantum Chromodynamics [QCD] as the theory of the strong interactions within the Standard Model of particle physics. The jets, narrowly collimated bundles of hadrons, reflect configurations of quarks and gluons at short distances. Thus, by analysing energy and angular distributions of the jets experimentally, the properties of the basic constituents of matter and the strong forces acting between them can be explored. In this review we summarise the properties of quark and gluon jets and the impact of their observation on Quantum Chromodynamics, primarily the discovery of the gluons as the carriers of the strong force. Focusing on these basic points, jets in $e^+ e^-$ collisions will be in the foreground of the discussion. In addition we will delineate the role of jets as tools for exploring other particle aspects in $ep$ and $pp/p\\bar{p}$ collisions - quark and gluon densities in protons, measurements of the QCD coupling, fundam...

  11. Jet engine. Strahltriebwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.J.

    1990-11-15

    A gas turbine axial-flow compressor aggregate is mounted in a jet engine consisting of a high-temperature combustion chamber that is composed of conical rings forming slits and set together to a ring column and reaches up to the propelling nozzle, a compressed-air generator supplying the jet engine with compressed air at subsonic speeds and running into the propelling nozzle and a shell encasing the jet engine while leaving a certain intermediate space. The compressor aggregate has a relatively high fuel consumption and high emission rates, involves high production and maintenance costs and puts the blades at a high risk of overheating. The problem basic to the invention was to install a compressed-air generator in the jet engine that has lower fuel consumption and emission rates and is cheaper to manufacture and to service. The invention provides free-piston compressors for compressed-air generators arranged in a circle around the central high-temperature combustion chamber. The ring of compressors can rotate on bearings against the jet engine shell, so that each compressor can be turned to the bottom and serviced there. The jet engine is suitable as an engine for supersonic aircraft.

  12. Turbulence Characteristics of Swirling Reacting Flow in a Combustor with Staged Air Injection%分级进风燃烧室内旋流反应流的湍流特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健; 普勇; 周力行

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the turbulent reacting flow in a swirl combustor with staged air injection. The air injected into the combustor is composed of the primary swirling jet and the secondary non-swirling jet. A three dimension-laser particle dynamic analyzer (PDA) was employed to measure the instantaneous gas velocity. The probability density functions (PDF) for the instantaneous gas axial and tangential velocities at each measuring location, as well as the radial profiles of the root mean square of fluctuating gas axial and tangential velocities and the second-order moment for the fluctuating gas axial and tangential velocities are obtained. The measured results delineate the turbulence properties of the swirling reacting flow under the conditions of staged combustion.

  13. Prediction of engine and near-field plume reacting flows in low-thrust chemical rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan M.; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    A computational model is employed to study the reacting flow within the engine and near-field plumes of several small gaseous hydrogen-oxygen thrusters. The model solves the full Navier-Stokes equations coupled with species diffusion equations for a hydrogen-oxygen reaction kinetics system and includes a two-equation q-omega model for turbulence. Predictions of global performance parameters and localized flowfield variables are compared with experimental data in order to assess the accuracy with which these flowfields are modeled and to identify aspects of the model which require improvement. Predicted axial and radial velocities 3 mm downstream of the exit plane show reasonable agreement with the measurements. The predicted peak in axial velocity in the hydrogen film coolant along the nozzle wall shows the best agreement; however, predictions within the core region are roughly 15 percent below measured values, indicating an underprediction of the extent to which the hydrogen diffuses and mixes with the core flow. There is evidence that this is due to three-dimensional mixing processes which are not included in the axisymmetric model.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Compressible Reacting Boundary Layer using a Temporal Slow Growth Homogenization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalian, Victor; Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A DNS of a compressible, reacting boundary layer flow at Reθ ~ 430 was performed using a temporal slow-growth homogenization, for a multispecies flow model of air at supersonic regime. The overall scenario parameters are related to those of the flow over an ablating surface of a space capsule upon Earth's atmospheric re-entry. The simulation algorithm features Fourier spatial discretization in the streamwise and spanwise directions, B-splines in the wall normal direction, and is marched semi-implicitly in time using the SMR91 scheme. Flow statistics will be presented for relevant flow quantities, in particular those related with RANS modeling. Since analogous slow growth computations can be performed using RANS to predict the flow mean profiles, the use of data gathered from this type of simulation as a vehicle for the calibration and uncertainty quantification of RANS models will be discussed. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  15. Jet Mass Spectra in Higgs + One Jet at NNLL

    CERN Document Server

    Jouttenus, Teppo T; Tackmann, Frank J; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-01-01

    The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m_jet^2/p_T^jet scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the je...

  16. Method and apparatus for constructing an underground barrier wall structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Brian P.; Stewart, Willis E.; Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for constructing a underground barrier wall structure using a jet grout injector subassembly comprising a pair of primary nozzles and a plurality of secondary nozzles, the secondary nozzles having a smaller diameter than the primary nozzles, for injecting grout in directions other than the primary direction, which creates a barrier wall panel having a substantially uniform wall thickess. This invention addresses the problem of the weak "bow-tie" shape that is formed during conventional jet injection when using only a pair of primary nozzles. The improvement is accomplished by using at least four secondary nozzles, of smaller diameter, located on both sides of the primary nozzles. These additional secondary nozzles spray grout or permeable reactive materials in other directions optimized to fill in the thin regions of the bow-tie shape. The result is a panel with increased strength and substantially uniform wall thickness.

  17. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  18. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  19. Teens impulsively react rather than retreat from threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfuss, Michael; Caudle, Kristina; Drysdale, Andrew T; Johnston, Natalie E; Cohen, Alexandra O; Somerville, Leah H; Galván, Adriana; Tottenham, Nim; Hare, Todd A; Casey, B J

    2014-01-01

    There is a significant inflection in risk taking and criminal behavior during adolescence, but the basis for this increase remains largely unknown. An increased sensitivity to rewards has been suggested to explain these behaviors, yet juvenile offences often occur in emotionally charged situations of negative valence. How behavior is altered by changes in negative emotional processes during adolescence has received less attention than changes in positive emotional processes. The current study uses a measure of impulsivity in combination with cues that signal threat or safety to assess developmental changes in emotional responses to threat cues. We show that adolescents, especially males, impulsively react to threat cues relative to neutral ones more than adults or children, even when instructed not to respond. This adolescent-specific behavioral pattern is paralleled by enhanced activity in limbic cortical regions implicated in the detection and assignment of emotional value to inputs and in the subsequent regulation of responses to them when successfully suppressing impulsive responses to threat cues. In contrast, prefrontal control regions implicated in detecting and resolving competing responses show an adolescent-emergent pattern (i.e. greater activity in adolescents and adults relative to children) during successful suppression of a response regardless of emotion. Our findings suggest that adolescence is a period of heightened sensitivity to social and emotional cues that results in diminished regulation of behavior in their presence. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Numerical Investigation of a Statistically Stationary Turbulent Reacting Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, Matthew R.; Pope, Stephen B.

    1997-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been very useful in the study of inert scalar mixing in turbulent flows, and has recently become feasible for studies of reacting scalars. We have formulated an accessible inhomogeneous nonpremixed turbulent reactive flow for investigating the effects of mixing on reaction and testing mixing models. The mixture fraction-progress variable approach is used with a model single-step reversible finite-rate thermochemistry, yielding non-trivial stationary solutions corresponding to stable reaction and allowing local extinction to occur. A mean gradient in the mixture fraction gives rise to stationarity without forcing, as well as a flame brush. A range of reaction zone thicknesses and Damkohler numbers are examined, yielding a broad spectrum of behavior, ranging from thick to thin flames, and from local extinction to near equilibrium. Based on this study results from full probability density function (PDF) simulations using the IEM and EMST mixing models are evaluated. Conditional moment closure (CMC) results are evaluated as well.

  1. Dynamic Load Balancing Strategies for Parallel Reacting Flow Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick; Meneses, Esteban; Givi, Peyman

    2014-11-01

    Load balancing in parallel computing aims at distributing the work as evenly as possible among the processors. This is a critical issue in the performance of parallel, time accurate, flow simulators. The constraint of time accuracy requires that all processes must be finished with their calculation for a given time step before any process can begin calculation of the next time step. Thus, an irregularly balanced compute load will result in idle time for many processes for each iteration and thus increased walltimes for calculations. Two existing, dynamic load balancing approaches are applied to the simplified case of a partially stirred reactor for methane combustion. The first is Zoltan, a parallel partitioning, load balancing, and data management library developed at the Sandia National Laboratories. The second is Charm++, which is its own machine independent parallel programming system developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The performance of these two approaches is compared, and the prospects for their application to full 3D, reacting flow solvers is assessed.

  2. 9519 biotite granodiorite reacted in a temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, R.W.; Bayhurst, G.K.

    1980-10-01

    A biotite granodiorite from the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system was reacted in a controlled temperature gradient with initially distilled water for 60d. Polished rock prisms were located in the gradient at 72, 119, 161, 209, 270, and 310/sup 0/C. Scanning electron microscope and microprobe analyses show the appearance of secondary phases: Ca-montmorillonite at 72/sup 0/C and 119/sup 0/C; zeolite, either stilbite or heulandite, at 161/sup 0/C; and another zeolite, thomsonite, at higher temperatures. Solution analyses show a steady state equilibrium exists between solution and overgrowths after about 2 weeks of reaction. The chemographic relations for the system are explored in some detail indicating the divariant assemblages may be placed in a reasonable sequence in intensive variable space. These relations predict high and low temperature effects not directly observed experimentally as well as relevant univariant equilibria. Solution chemistry indicates the Na-Ca-K geothermometer more adequately predicts temperature in this system than does the silica geothermometer.

  3. CERN reacts to increased costs to completion of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Aspects of LHC construction. The CERN Council, where the representatives of the 20 Member States of the Organization decide on scientific programmes and financial resources, held its 120th session on 14 December under the chairmanship of Prof. Maurice Bourquin (CH). CERN adjusts to the LHC Director-General, Luciano Maiani, stressed that CERN was now fully engaged in the LHC and outlined the first moves to react to the increased cost to completion of the LHC. The new accelerator is an extremely complex, high-tech project which CERN is building under very severe conditions. However, the technical challenges are solved and industrial production of accelerator elements, and installation are starting. Professor Maiani said that 2001 had been a very hard but decisive year for CERN. An important milestone had been passed during this meeting with the approval of the LHC dipole magnets contract, the last major contract for the accelerator. The new costs to completion of the LHC project are now clear. A first propos...

  4. Neutron streaming along ducts and labyrinths at the JET biological shielding: Effect of concrete composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilopoulou, T.; Stamatelatos, I. E.; Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were performed at the Joint European Torus (JET) in order to validate the computational tools and methods applied for neutron streaming calculations through penetrations in the JET Hall biological shielding. In the present work the sensitivity of the simulations on the hydrogen and boron content in concrete shielding was investigated. MCNP code was used to simulate neutron streaming along the JET Hall personnel entrance labyrinth for deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasma sources for different concrete wall compositions. Neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent along the labyrinth were calculated. Simulation results for the "as built" JET concrete composition were compared against measurements performed using thermoluminescence detectors. This study contributes to the optimization of the radiation shielding of JET and, furthermore, provides information from JET experience that may assist in optimizing and validating the radiation shielding design methodology used in its successor fusion devices ITER and DEMO.

  5. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Flow in Attachment Jet Combustors by LDV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUNLI; CHENG-KANGWU

    1993-01-01

    Flame stabilization in attachment jet combustors is based on the existence of the high temperature recirculation zone,provided by the Coanda effect of an attachment jet.The single attachment jet in a rectangular channel is a fundamental form of this type of flow.In this paper,the detailed characteristics of turbulent flow of a single attachment jet were experimentally studied by using a 2-D LDV,The flowfield consists of a forward flow and two reverse flows.The forward one is composed of a curved and a straight section.The curved section resembles a bent turbulent free jet,and the straight part is basically a section of turbulent wall jet.A turbulent couter-gradient transport region exists at the curved section.According to the results,this kind of combustor should have a large sudden enlarge ment ratio and not too narrow in width.

  6. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The calculus of variations is employed to find steady divergence-free velocity fields that maximize transport of a tracer between two parallel walls held at fixed concentration for one of two constraints on flow strength: a fixed value of the kinetic energy or a fixed value of the enstrophy. The optimizing flows consist of an array of (convection) cells of a particular aspect ratio Gamma. We solve the nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations analytically for weak flows and numerically (and via matched asymptotic analysis in the fixed energy case) for strong flows. We report the results in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, a dimensionless measure of the tracer transport, as a function of the Peclet number Pe, a dimensionless measure of the energy or enstrophy of the flow. For both constraints the maximum transport Nu_{MAX}(Pe) is realized in cells of decreasing aspect ratio Gamma_{opt}(Pe) as Pe increases. For the fixed energy problem, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-1/2}, while for the fixed enstrophy scen...

  7. QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT FLUX FROM A REACTING THERMITE SPRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Nixon; Michelle Pantoya

    2009-07-01

    Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors can not survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite spray conditions are reported. Results indicate that this newly developed energetic material heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability.

  8. Calorimetry of the JET ITER-Like Wall components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaux, S., E-mail: stephane.devaux@ccfe.ac.uk [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Arnoux, G. [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Center, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Corre, Y. [Association EURTATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/IRFM, Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Gardarein, J-L.; Gaspar, J. [IUSTI UMR CNRS 7343, Aix-Marseille University Marseille (France); Jacquet, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Marcotte, F. [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Center, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Matthews, G.; Beaumont, P.; Cramp, S.; Dalley, S.; Kinna, D.; Horton, A.; Lomas, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mertens, Ph. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-4 (Plasma Physics), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Riccardo, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Valcàrcel, D. [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-07-15

    As part of the ILW project, new diagnostics have been installed in order to protect the plasma-facing components (PFCs). Here we present the diagnostics used to monitor the PFC temperature, thermocouples and cameras, and assess the consistency of their measurements. In dedicated limited L-mode plasmas, the surface of the limiter tiles are heated up to 900 °C. The comparison of surface temperature measurements from IR and near IR cameras, which have been calibrated against a black-body source, leads to a Be emissivity of 0.18, comparable with the theoretical one. Energy calculation derived from thermocouples, which are embedded in both limiters and divertor target plates (W-coated CFC), is compared to a 1D model based on thermal quadrupole approach (benchmarked with an ANSYS model) associated to an inversion computation. The analysis of 20 pulses shows that a good energy balance is achieved within the error bar of the model, assessed to be of 30%.

  9. Linear models for sound from supersonic reacting mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, P. Shivakanth; Samanta, Arnab

    2016-12-01

    We perform a linearized reduced-order modeling of the aeroacoustic sound sources in supersonic reacting mixing layers to explore their sensitivities to some of the flow parameters in radiating sound. Specifically, we investigate the role of outer modes as the effective flow compressibility is raised, when some of these are expected to dominate over the traditional Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) -type central mode. Although the outer modes are known to be of lesser importance in the near-field mixing, how these radiate to the far-field is uncertain, on which we focus. On keeping the flow compressibility fixed, the outer modes are realized via biasing the respective mean densities of the fast (oxidizer) or slow (fuel) side. Here the mean flows are laminar solutions of two-dimensional compressible boundary layers with an imposed composite (turbulent) spreading rate, which we show to significantly alter the growth of instability waves by saturating them earlier, similar to in nonlinear calculations, achieved here via solving the linear parabolized stability equations. As the flow parameters are varied, instability of the slow modes is shown to be more sensitive to heat release, potentially exceeding equivalent central modes, as these modes yield relatively compact sound sources with lesser spreading of the mixing layer, when compared to the corresponding fast modes. In contrast, the radiated sound seems to be relatively unaffected when the mixture equivalence ratio is varied, except for a lean mixture which is shown to yield a pronounced effect on the slow mode radiation by reducing its modal growth.

  10. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  11. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botton, V., E-mail: valery.botton@insa-lyon.fr; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H. [LMFA, UMR CNRS 5509, Université de Lyon, ECL/INSA Lyon/Univ. Lyon 1, 36 avenue Guy deCollongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Moudjed, B. [LMFA, UMR CNRS 5509, Université de Lyon, ECL/INSA Lyon/Univ. Lyon 1, 36 avenue Guy deCollongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); LIEFT, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Garandet, J. P. [LIEFT, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  12. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botton, V.; Moudjed, B.; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  13. Improved engine wall models for Large Eddy Simulation (LES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plengsaard, Chalearmpol

    Improved wall models for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) are presented in this research. The classical Werner-Wengle (WW) wall shear stress model is used along with near-wall sub-grid scale viscosity. A sub-grid scale turbulent kinetic energy is employed in a model for the eddy viscosity. To gain better heat flux results, a modified classical variable-density wall heat transfer model is also used. Because no experimental wall shear stress results are available in engines, the fully turbulent developed flow in a square duct is chosen to validate the new wall models. The model constants in the new wall models are set to 0.01 and 0.8, respectively and are kept constant throughout the investigation. The resulting time- and spatially-averaged velocity and temperature wall functions from the new wall models match well with the law-of-the-wall experimental data at Re = 50,000. In order to study the effect of hot air impinging walls, jet impingement on a flat plate is also tested with the new wall models. The jet Reynolds number is equal to 21,000 and a fixed jet-to-plate spacing of H/D = 2.0. As predicted by the new wall models, the time-averaged skin friction coefficient agrees well with experimental data, while the computed Nusselt number agrees fairly well when r/D > 2.0. Additionally, the model is validated using experimental data from a Caterpillar engine operated with conventional diesel combustion. Sixteen different operating engine conditions are simulated. The majority of the predicted heat flux results from each thermocouple location follow similar trends when compared with experimental data. The magnitude of peak heat fluxes as predicted by the new wall models is in the range of typical measured values in diesel combustion, while most heat flux results from previous LES wall models are over-predicted. The new wall models generate more accurate predictions and agree better with experimental data.

  14. Numerical modeling of a turbulent semi-confined slot jet impinging on a concave surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results from a numerical study of a turbulent slot jet impinging on a concave surface. Five different low Reynolds number k-ε models were evaluated to predict the heat transfer under a two dimensional steady turbulent jet. The effects of flow and geometrical parameters (e.g. jet Reynolds number and jet-to-target separation distance have been investigated. The Yap correction is applied for reducing the over-prediction of Nusselt number in the near wall region. It is shown that among the models tested in this study, the LS-Yap model is capable of predicting local Nusselt number in good agreement with the experimental data in both stagnation and wall jet region. Moreover, after implementation of Yap correction, no significant effect of the nozzle-to-surface distance, h/B, on the predicted stagnation Nusselt number has been found. Finally it is demonstrated that the higher values of turbulent Prandtl number reduces the heat diffusion along the wall and consequently the predicted local Nusselt number is reduced especially in the wall jet region.

  15. Turbulent heat transfer for impinging jet flowing inside a cylindrical hot cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halouane Yacine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Convective heat transfer from an isothermal hot cylindrical cavity due to a turbulent round jet impingement is investigated numerically. Three-dimensional turbulent flow is considered in this work. The Reynolds stress second order turbulence model with wall standard treatment is used for the turbulence predictions the problem parameters are the jet exit Reynolds number, ranging from 2x104 to 105and the normalized impinging distance to the cavity bottom and the jet exit Lf, ranging from 4 to 35. The computed flow patterns and isotherms for various combinations of these parameters are analyzed in order to understand the effect of the cavity confinement on the heat transfer phenomena. The flow in the cavity is divided into three parts, the area of free jet, and the area of the jet interaction with the reverse flow and the semi-quiescent flow in the region of the cavity bottom. The distribution of the local and mean Nusselt numbers along the cavity walls for above combinations of the flow parameters are detailed. Results are compared against to corresponding cases for impinging jet on a plate for the case of the bottom wall. The analysis reveals that the average Nusselt number increases considerably with the jet exit Reynolds number. Finally, it was found that the average Nusselt number at the stagnation point could be correlated by a relationship in the form Nu=f(Lf,Re.

  16. Comparing Spray Characteristics from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) National Combustion Code (NCC) Calculations Against Experimental Data for a Turbulent Reacting Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Moder, Jeffery P.

    2010-01-01

    Developing physics-based tools to aid in reducing harmful combustion emissions, like Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Unburnt Hydrocarbons (UHC s), and Sulfur Dioxides (SOx), is an important goal of aeronautics research at NASA. As part of that effort, NASA Glenn Research Center is performing a detailed assessment and validation of an in-house combustion CFD code known as the National Combustion Code (NCC) for turbulent reacting flows. To assess the current capabilities of NCC for simulating turbulent reacting flows with liquid jet fuel injection, a set of Single Swirler Lean Direct Injection (LDI) experiments performed at the University of Cincinnati was chosen as an initial validation data set. This Jet-A/air combustion experiment operates at a lean equivalence ratio of 0.75 at atmospheric pressure and has a 4 percent static pressure drop across the swirler. Detailed comparisons of NCC predictions for gas temperature and gaseous emissions (CO and NOx) against this experiment are considered in a previous work. The current paper is focused on detailed comparisons of the spray characteristics (radial profiles of drop size distribution and at several radial rakes) from NCC simulations against the experimental data. Comparisons against experimental data show that the use of the correlation for primary spray break-up implemented by Raju in the NCC produces most realistic results, but this result needs to be improved. Given the single or ten step chemical kinetics models, use of a spray size correlation gives similar, acceptable results

  17. A new computational method for reacting hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, M. L.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Pricop, M. V.; Fadgyas, M. C.; Pepelea, D.; Stoican, M. G.

    2017-07-01

    Hypersonic gas dynamics computations are challenging due to the difficulties to have reliable and robust chemistry models that are usually added to Navier-Stokes equations. From the numerical point of view, it is very difficult to integrate together Navier-Stokes equations and chemistry model equations because these partial differential equations have different specific time scales. For these reasons, almost all known finite volume methods fail shortly to solve this second order partial differential system. Unfortunately, the heating of Earth reentry vehicles such as space shuttles and capsules is very close linked to endothermic chemical reactions. A better prediction of wall heat flux leads to smaller safety coefficient for thermal shield of space reentry vehicle; therefore, the size of thermal shield decreases and the payload increases. For these reasons, the present paper proposes a new computational method based on chemical equilibrium, which gives accurate prediction of hypersonic heating in order to support the Earth reentry capsule design.

  18. Relativistic AGN jets I. The delicate interplay between jet structure, cocoon morphology and jet-head propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walg, S.; Achterberg, A.; Markoff, S.; Keppens, R.; Meliani, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical jets reveal strong signs of radial structure. They suggest that the inner region of the jet, the jet spine, consists of a low-density, fast-moving gas, while the outer region of the jet consists of a more dense and slower moving gas, called the jet sheath. Moreover, if jets carry angul

  19. Electromagnetic thin-wall model for simulations of plasma wall-touching kink and vertical modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Atanasiu, Calin V.; Lackner, Karl; Hoelzl, Matthias; Strumberger, Erika

    2015-12-01

    > The understanding of plasma disruptions in tokamaks and predictions of their effects require realistic simulations of electric current excitation in three-dimensional vessel structures by the plasma touching the walls. As discovered at JET in 1996 (Litunovski JET Internal Report contract no. JQ5/11961, 1995; Noll et al., Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology, Lisbon (ed. C. Varandas & F. Serra), vol. 1, 1996, p. 751. Elsevier) the wall-touching kink modes are frequently excited during vertical displacement events and cause large sideways forces on the vacuum vessel which are difficult to withstand in large tokamaks. In disruptions, the sharing of electric current between the plasma and the wall plays an important role in plasma dynamics and determines the amplitude and localization of the sideways force (Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 40, 2000, p. 1805; Riccardo & Walker, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, vol. 42, 2000, p. 29; Zakharov, Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 062507; Riccardo et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 49, 2009, 055012; Bachmann et al., Fusion Engng Des., vol. 86, 2011, pp. 1915-1919). This paper describes a flat triangle representation of the electric circuits of a thin conducting wall of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. Implemented into the shell simulation code (SHL) and the source sink current code (SSC), this model is suitable for modelling the electric currents excited in the wall inductively and through current sharing with the plasma.

  20. Jet Substructure by Accident

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Timothy; Lisanti, Mariangela; Lou, Hou Keong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new search strategy for high-multiplicity hadronic final states. When new particles are produced at threshold, the distribution of their decay products is approximately isotropic. If there are many partons in the final state, it is likely that several will be clustered into the same large-radius jet. The resulting jet exhibits substructure, even though the parent states are not boosted. This "accidental" substructure is a powerful discriminant against background because it is more pronounced for high-multiplicity signals than for QCD multijets. We demonstrate how to take advantage of accidental substructure to reduce backgrounds without relying on the presence of missing energy. As an example, we present the expected limits for several R-parity violating gluino decay topologies. This approach allows for the determination of QCD backgrounds using data-driven methods, which is crucial for the feasibility of any search that targets signatures with many jets and suppressed missing energy.

  1. Renewable jet fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Jet length/velocity ratio: a new index for echocardiographic evaluation of chronic aortic regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Karaçimen, Denizhan; Erer, Hatice Betül; İlhan, Erkan; Sayar, Nurten; Karakuş, Gültekin; Çekirdekçi, Elif; Eren, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Management of aortic regurgitation depends on the assessment for severity. Echocardiography remains as the most widely available tool for evaluation of aortic regurgitation. In this manuscript, we describe a novel parameter, jet length/velocity ratio, for the diagnosis of severe aortic regurgitation. A total of 30 patients with aortic regurgitation were included to this study. Severity of aortic regurgitation was assessed with an aortic regurgitation index incorporating five echocardiographic parameters. Jet length/velocity ratio is calculated as the ratio of maximum jet penetrance to mean velocity of regurgitant flow. Jet length/velocity ratio was significantly higher in patients with severe aortic regurgitation (2.03 ± 0.53) compared to patients with less than severe aortic regurgitation (1.24 ± 0.32, P < 0.001). Correlation of jet length/velocity ratio with aortic regurgitation index was very good (r(2) = 0.86) and correlation coefficient was higher for jet length/velocity ratio compared to vena contracta, jet width/LVOT ratio and pressure half time. For a cutoff value of 1.61, jet length/velocity ratio had a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 88%, with an AUC value of 0.955. Jet length/velocity ratio is a novel parameter that can be used to assess severity of chronic aortic regurgitation. Main limitation for usage of this novel parameter is jet impringement to left ventricular wall. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Multichannel discharge between jet electrolyte cathode and jet electrolyte anode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shakirova, E. F.; Gaitsin, Al. F.; Son, E. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of multichannel discharge between a jet electrolyte cathode and jet electrolyte anode within a wide range of parameters. We pioneer the reveal of the burning particularities and characteristics of multichannel discharge with jet electrolyte and droplet

  4. Jets from Merging Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    radiated away in gravitational waves, the hypermassive neutron star loses its support and collapses to a black hole.Plasma velocities turn around (51.5 ms)Initially the plasma was falling inward, but as the disk of neutron-star debris is accreted onto the black hole, energy is released. This turns the plasma near the black hole poles around and flings it outward.Magnetic field forms a helical funnel (62.5 ms)The fields near the poles of the black hole amplify as they are wound around, creating a funnel that provides the wall of the jet.Jet outflow extends to heights greater than 445 km (64.5 ms)The disk is all accreted and, since the fuel is exhausted, the outflow shuts off (within 100ms)Neutron-Star SuccessPlot showing the gravitational wave signature for one of the authors simulations. The moments of merger of the neutron stars and collapse to a black hole are marked. [Adapted from Ruiz et al. 2016]These simulations show that no initial black hole is needed to launch outflows; a merger of two neutron stars can result in an sGRB-like jet. Another interesting result is that the magnetic field configuration doesnt affect the formation of a jet: neutron stars with magnetic fields confined to their interiors launch jets as effectively as those with pulsar-like magnetic fields. The accretion timescale for both cases is consistent with the duration of an sGRB.While this simulation models milliseconds of real time, its enormously computationally challenging and takes months to simulate. The successes of this simulation represent exciting advances in numerical relativity, as well as in our understanding of the electromagnetic counterparts that may accompany gravitational waves.BonusCheck out this awesome video of the authors simulations. The colors differentiate the plasma density and the white lines depict the pulsar-like magnetic field that initially threads the two merging neutron stars. Watch as the neutron stars evolve through the different stages outlined above, eventually

  5. High-speed Jet Formation after Solid Object Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Gekle, Stephan; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    A circular disc impacting on a water surface creates a remarkably vigorous jet. Upon impact an axisymmetric air cavity forms and eventually pinches off in a single point halfway down the cavity. Immediately after closure two fast sharp-pointed jets are observed shooting up- and downwards from the closure location, which by then has turned into a stagnation point surrounded by a locally hyperbolic flow pattern. This flow, however, is {\\it not} the mechanism feeding the two jets. Using high-speed imaging and numerical simulations we show that jetting is fed by the local flow around the base of the jet, which is forced by the colliding cavity walls. Based on this insight, we then show how the analytical description of a collapsing void (using a line of sinks along the axis of symmetry) can be continued beyond the time of pinch-off to obtain a quantitative model for jet formation which is in good agreement with the numerical and experimental data.

  6. Relativistic AGN jets I. The delicate interplay between jet structure, cocoon morphology and jet-head propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walg, S.; Achterberg, A.; Markoff, S.; Keppens, R.; Meliani, Z.

    2013-08-01

    Astrophysical jets reveal strong signs of radial structure. They suggest that the inner region of the jet, the jet spine, consists of a low-density, fast-moving gas, while the outer region of the jet consists of a more dense and slower moving gas, called the jet sheath. Moreover, if jets carry angular momentum, the resultant centrifugal forces lead to a radial stratification. Current observations are not able to fully resolve the radial structure, so little is known about its actual profile. We present three active galactic nuclei jet models in 2.5D of which two have been given a radial structure. The first model is a homogeneous jet, the only model that does not carry angular momentum; the second model is a spine-sheath jet with an isothermal equation of state; and the third jet model is a (piecewise) isochoric spine-sheath jet, with constant but different densities for jet spine and jet sheath. In this paper, we look at the effects of radial stratification on jet integrity, mixing between the different jet components and global morphology of the jet-head and surrounding cocoon. We consider steady jets that have been active for 23 Myr. All jets have developed the same number of strong internal shocks along their jet axis at the final time of simulation. These shocks arise when vortices are being shed by the jet-head. We find that all three jets maintain their stability all the way up to the jet-head. The isothermal jet maintains part of its structural integrity at the jet-head where the distinction between jet spine and jet sheath material can still be made. In this case, mixing between jet spine and jet sheath within the jet is fairly inefficient. The isochoric jet, on the other hand, loses its structural jet integrity fairly quickly after the jet is injected. At its jet-head, little structure is maintained and the central part of the jet predominantly consists of jet sheath material. In this case, jet spine and jet sheath material mix efficiently within the jet

  7. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

    2015-12-09

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP11(2015)072 smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  8. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  9. Resolving Boosted Jets with XCone

    CERN Document Server

    Thaler, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies---dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs---that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  10. Implications of Upwells as Hydrodynamic Jets in a Pulse Jet Mixed System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, Leonard F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bamberger, Judith A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Minette, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    satisfies these criteria when vigorous breakthrough is achieved, not all available data follow the free jet profile for the central upwell, particularly at lower nozzle velocities. Alternative flow regimes are considered and new models for cloud height, “cavern height,” and the rate of jet penetration (jet celerity) are benchmarked against data to anchor scaling analyses. This analytical modeling effort to provide a technical basis for scaling PJM mixed vessels has significant implications for vessel mixing, because jet physics underlies “cavern” height, cloud height, and the volume of mixing considerations. A new four-parameter cloud height model compares favorably to experimental results. This model is predictive of breakthrough in 8 ft vessel tests with the two-part simulant. Analysis of the upwell in the presence of yield stresses finds evidence of expanding turbulent jets, confined turbulent jets, and confined laminar flows. For each, the critical elevation at which jet momentum depletes is predicted, which compare favorably to experimental cavern height data. Partially coupled momentum and energy balances suggest that these are limiting cases of a gradual transition from a turbulent expanding flow to a confined laminar flow. This analysis of the central upwell alone lays essential groundwork for complete analysis of mode three mixing (i.e., breakthrough with slow peripheral mixing). Consideration of jet celerity shows that the rate of jet penetration is a governing consideration in breakthrough to the surface. Estimates of the volume of mixing are presented. This analysis shows that flow along the vessel wall is sluggish such that the central upwell governs the volume of mixing. This analysis of the central upwell alone lays essential groundwork for complete analysis of mode three mixing and estimates of hydrogen release rates from first principles.

  11. Jet Photoproduction at THERA

    OpenAIRE

    Klasen, M.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that a future high-energy electron-proton collider like THERA could largely extend the current HERA program in jet photoproduction of testing QCD and determining the partonic structure of the proton and the photon. Depending on the electron beam energy (250-500 GeV) and the collider mode ($ep$ or $\\gamma p$), the range in the hard transverse energy scale of the jets could be increased by a factor of 2-3 and the reach in the momentum fraction $x$ of the partons in the proton or ...

  12. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  13. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  14. Progress in understanding halo current at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardo, V.; Arnoux, G.; Beaumont, P.; Hacquin, S.; Hobirk, J.; Howell, D.; Huber, A.; Joffrin, E.; Koslowski, R.; Lam, N.; Leggate, H.; Rachlew, E.; Sergienko, G.; Stephen, A.; Todd, T.; Zerbini, M.; Delogu, R.; Grando, L.; Marcuzzi, D.; Peruzzo, S.; Pomaro, N.; Sonato, P.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2009-05-01

    The poloidal distribution of the halo current density on the top dump plate in JET can now be measured thanks to a new set of Rogowskii coils. These are the first measurements in JET able to offer an insight in the width of the halo current interaction with the wall. Therefore they offer both validation of the assumption made for JET disruption design criteria and one additional point in the extrapolation of the expected halo current width, and hence halo current density (and related local electro-mechanical loads on in-vessel components) for ITER. During upward events, the measured current density is consistent with the measured total poloidal halo current. The halo footprint extends over most of the upper dump plate, converting to a halo current flux tube width of ~100 mm. A set of four toridal field pick-up coils installed 90° apart now allows a more accurate measurement of the poloidal halo current, in particular its toroidal peaking factor, and direct comparison between halo and plasma asymmetries.

  15. Developments in remote metrology at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindham, T.J., E-mail: tim.mindham@ccfe.ac.uk [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sandford, G.C.; Hermon, G. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Belcher, C. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pace, N. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Babcock Nuclear Division, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The need to maximise the operational availability of fusion devices has driven the enhancements in accuracy, flexibility and speed associated with the inspection techniques used at JET. To this end, the remote installation of the ITER-Like Wall (ILW) tiles, conduits and embedded diagnostics has necessitated the adoption of technologies from other industries for their use in conjunction with the JET Remote Handling (RH) system. The novel adaptation of targetless stereophotogrammetry, targeted single-camera photogrammetry and gap measurement techniques for remote applications has prompted a range of challenges and lessons learnt both from the design process and operational experience. Interfacing Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components with the existing RH equipment has highlighted several issues of relevance to the developing ITER RH system. This paper reports results from the stereophotogrammetry and the single-camera photogrammetry surveys, allowing analysis of the effectiveness of the RH system as a platform for in-vessel measurement. This includes scrutiny of the accuracy achieved with each technique as well as the impact on the in-vessel Configuration Management Model (CMM). The paper concludes with a summary of key recommendations for the ITER RH system based on the experience of remote metrology at JET.

  16. An Inviscid Decoupled Method for the Roe FDS Scheme in the Reacting Gas Path of FUN3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kyle B.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    An approach is described to decouple the species continuity equations from the mixture continuity, momentum, and total energy equations for the Roe flux difference splitting scheme. This decoupling simplifies the implicit system, so that the flow solver can be made significantly more efficient, with very little penalty on overall scheme robustness. Most importantly, the computational cost of the point implicit relaxation is shown to scale linearly with the number of species for the decoupled system, whereas the fully coupled approach scales quadratically. Also, the decoupled method significantly reduces the cost in wall time and memory in comparison to the fully coupled approach. This work lays the foundation for development of an efficient adjoint solution procedure for high speed reacting flow.

  17. Autoreactive antibodies are present in sheep with Johne's disease and cross-react with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sven; Bannantine, John P; Griffin, J Frank T

    2007-07-01

    Mycobacterial infection has been linked to the generation of autoantibodies, including anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA), in clinical studies and small animal models. In an attempt to identify antibodies that react with both self and mycobacterial antigens in naturally infected ruminants, we generated a phage display library comprising single chain antibody fragments (scFv) from sheep with Johne's disease (JD). The library was screened simultaneously against ovine small intestinal tissue and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). A clone (termed AutoH1) reacted strongly with host tissue and MAP, recognizing a proteinase-susceptible 32 kDa determinant in ovine gut tissues and lymphatics, and in blood granulocytes but not mononuclear cells. In granulocytes, binding was to cytoplasmic granules and cell membranes; in MAP, AutoH1 bound bacterial cell wall determinants. We further identified a synthetic peptide sequence recognized by AutoH1, using this to generate a carrier:peptide fusion protein (paH1). Sera of normal and JD sheep were screened for AutoH1-like autoantibody activity; 7/11 JD animals showed autoreactivity that could be blocked by paH1, while 0/21 normal animals showed no such serological reactivity. It is possible that the severe pathology observed in ruminant JD may have an autoimmune component, possibly due to ANCA-type binding; this remains to be further investigated.

  18. ePLAS Development for Jet Modeling and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Rodney J. Mason

    2011-09-07

    Plasma jets provide an alternate approach to the creation of high energy density laboratory plasmas (HEDLP). For the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), typically 30 partially ionized argon jets, produced with mini-rail guns, will be focused into a central volume for subsequent magnetic compression into high density plasma liners that can reach high (0.1 Mbar) peak pressures upon stagnation. The jets are typically 2.5 cm in radius traveling at Mach number 30. Ultimate success will require optimized tuning of the rail configurations, the nozzles injecting the gases, and the careful implementation of pre-ionization. The modeling of plasma jet transport is particularly challenging, due the large space (100 sq cm) and time scales (microseconds) involved. Even traditional implicit methods are insufficient, due to the usual need to track electrons explicitly on the mesh. Wall emission and chemistry must be managed, as must ionization of the jet plasma. Ions in the jets are best followed as particles to account properly for collisions upon jet merger. This Phase I Project developed the code ePLAS to attack and successfully surmount many of these challenges. It invented a new 'super implicit' electromagnetic scheme, using implicit electron moment currents that allowed for modeling of jets over multi-cm and multi-picoseconds on standard, single processor 2 GHz PCs. It enabled merger studies of two jets, in preparation for the multi-jet merger problem. The Project explored particle modeling for the ions, and prepared for the future addition of a grid-base jet ion collision model. Access was added to tabular equations of state for the study of ionization effects in merging jets. The improved code was discussed at the primary plasma meetings (IEEE and APS) during the Project period. Collaborations with National Laboratory and industrial partners were nurtured. Code improvements were made to facilitate code use. See: http://www.researchapplicationscorp.com. The ePLAS code

  19. Jet substructure using semi-inclusive jet functions within SCET

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Vitev, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method to evaluate jet substructure observables in inclusive jet measurements based upon semi-inclusive jet functions within the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). In this work we consider the jet fragmentation function, where a hadron $h$ is identified inside a fully reconstructed jet as a first example. We introduce a new semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function ${\\mathcal G}^h_i(z= \\omega_J/\\omega,z_h=\\omega_h/\\omega_J,\\omega_J, R,\\mu)$ which depends on the jet radius $R$ and the large light-cone momenta of the parton '$i$' initiating the jet ($\\omega$), the jet ($\\omega_J$), and the hadron $h$ ($\\omega_h$). We are then able to express the jet fragmentation function as a semi-inclusive jet observable rather than as an exclusive one, which is closer to the actual experimental measurements. We demonstrate the consistency of the effective field theory treatment and standard perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order (NLO). We further derive the renormalization gro...

  20. Intermonsoonal equatorial jets

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.

    Three transects each from the cruises of R V Pioneer (84 , 88 degrees and 92 degrees E) during May-June 1964 and R V Vityaz (77 , 84 degrees and 94 degrees E) during October-November 1962 were used to compare pre and postmonsoon equatorial jets...

  1. Fluid Jet Polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this thesis research was to investigate the possibilities and limitations of the Fluid Jet Polishing (FJP) technique. FJP is a new optical fabrication technique that is capable of making shape corrections and reducing the surface roughness of glass and other materials. The principle of o

  2. Fluid Jet Polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this thesis research was to investigate the possibilities and limitations of the Fluid Jet Polishing (FJP) technique. FJP is a new optical fabrication technique that is capable of making shape corrections and reducing the surface roughness of glass and other materials. The principle of

  3. Jet-Images: Computer Vision Inspired Techniques for Jet Tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Cogan, Josh; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon- initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  4. Jet-images: computer vision inspired techniques for jet tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, Josh; Kagan, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory,Menlo Park, CA 94028 (United States)

    2015-02-18

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon-initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  5. Turbulent acidic jets and plumes injected into an alkaline environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulpre, Hendrik

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of a strong acidic turbulent jet or plume injected into an alkaline environment comprising of a weak/strong base are examined theoretically and experimentally. A chemistry model is developed to understand how the pH of a fluid parcel of monoprotic acid changes as it is diluted and reacts with the ambient fluid. A standard fluid model, based on a top-hat model for acid concentration and velocity is used to express how the dilution of acid varies with distance from the point of discharge. These models are applied to estimate the point of neutralisation and the travel time with distance within the jet/plume. An experimental study was undertaken to test the theoretical results. These experiments involved injecting jets or vertical plumes of dilute nitric acid into a large tank containing a variety of base salts dissolved in water. The injected fluid contained litmus indicator dye which showed a change in colour from red to blue close to the point of neutralisation. In order to obtain a range of neutralisation distances, additional basic salts were added to the water to increase its pH buffering capacity. The results are applied to discuss the environmental implications of an acidic jet/plume injected into the sea off the South East coast of Great Britain.

  6. DIAMOND PORT JET INTERACTION WITH SUPERSONIC FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Interaction flow field of the sonic air jet through diamond shaped orifices at different incidence angles (10 degrees, 27.5 degrees, 45 degrees and 90 degrees) and total pressures (0.10 MPa and 0. 46 MPa) with a Mach 5.0 freestream was studied experimentally. A 90 degrees circular injector was examined for comparison. Crosssection Mach number contours were acquired by a Pitot-cone five-hole pressure probe.The results indicate that the low Mach semicircular region close to the wall is the wake region. The boundary layer thinning is in the areas adjacent to the wake. For the detached case, the interaction shock extends further into the freestream, and the shock shape has more curvature, also the low-Mach upwash region is larger. The vortices of the plume and the height of the jet interaction shock increase with increasing incidence angle and jet pressure. 90 degrees diamond and circular injector have stronger plume vorticity, and for the circular injector low-Mach region is smaller than that for the diamond injector. Tapered ramp increases the plume vorticity, and the double ramp reduces the level of vorticity. The three-dimensional interaction shock shape was modeled from the surface shock shape, the center plane shock shape, and crosssectional shock shape. The shock total pressure was estimated with the normal component of the Mach number using normal shock theory. The shock induced total pressure losses decrease with decreasing jet incidence angle and injection pressure,where the largest losses are incurred by the 90 degrees, circular injector.

  7. Analysis and testing of high entrainment single nozzle jet pumps with variable mixing tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, K. E.; Hill, P. G.; Gilbert, G. B.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to predict the performance characteristics of axisymmetric single-nozzle jet pumps with variable area mixing tubes. The primary flow may be subsonic or supersonic. The computer program uses integral techniques to calculate the velocity profiles and the wall static pressures that result from the mixing of the supersonic primary jet and the subsonic secondary flow. An experimental program was conducted to measure mixing tube wall static pressure variations, velocity profiles, and temperature profiles in a variable area mixing tube with a supersonic primary jet. Static pressure variations were measured at four different secondary flow rates. These test results were used to evaluate the analytical model. The analytical results compared well to the experimental data. Therefore, the analysis is believed to be ready for use to relate jet pump performance characteristics to mixing tube design.

  8. The role of MHD in causing impurity peaking in JET Hybrid plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hender, T C; Casson, F J; Alper, B; Baranov, Yu; Baruzzo, M; Challis, C D; Koechl, F; Marchetto, C; Nave, M F F; Pütterich, T; Cortes, S Reyes; Contributors, JET

    2015-01-01

    In Hybrid plasma operation in JET with its ITER-like wall (JET-ILW) it is found that n>1 tearing activity can significantly enhance the rate of on-axis peaking of tungsten impurities, which in turn significantly degrades discharge performance. Core n=1 instabilities can be beneficial in removing tungsten impurities from the plasma core (e.g. sawteeth or fishbones), but can conversely also degrade core confinement (particularly in combination with simultaneous n=3 activity). The nature of MHD instabilities in JET Hybrid discharges, with both its previous Carbon wall and subsequent JET-ILW, is surveyed statistically and the character of the instabilities is examined. Possible qualitative models for how the n>1 islands can enhance on-axis tungsten transport accumulation processes are presented.

  9. Jet substructure using semi-inclusive jet functions in SCET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California,Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ringer, Felix; Vitev, Ivan [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-25

    We propose a new method to evaluate jet substructure observables in inclusive jet measurements, based upon semi-inclusive jet functions in the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). As a first example, we consider the jet fragmentation function, where a hadron h is identified inside a fully reconstructed jet. We introduce a new semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G{sub i}{sup h}(z=ω{sub J}/ω,z{sub h}=ω{sub h}/ω{sub J},ω{sub J},R,μ), which depends on the jet radius R and the large light-cone momenta of the parton ‘i’ initiating the jet (ω), the jet (ω{sub J}), and the hadron h (ω{sub h}). The jet fragmentation function can then be expressed as a semi-inclusive observable, in the spirit of actual experimental measurements, rather than as an exclusive one. We demonstrate the consistency of the effective field theory treatment and standard perturbative QCD calculations of this observable at next-to-leading order (NLO). The renormalization group (RG) equation for the semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G{sub i}{sup h}(z,z{sub h},ω{sub J},R,μ) are also derived and shown to follow exactly the usual timelike DGLAP evolution equations for fragmentation functions. The newly obtained RG equations can be used to perform the resummation of single logarithms of the jet radius parameter R up to next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL{sub R}) accuracy. In combination with the fixed NLO calculation, we obtain NLO+NLL{sub R} results for the hadron distribution inside the jet. We present numerical results for pp→(jet h)X in the new framework, and find excellent agreement with existing LHC experimental data.

  10. Relativistic AGN jets II. Jet properties and mixing effects for episodic jet activity

    CERN Document Server

    Walg, Sander; Markoff, Sera; Keppens, Rony; Porth, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Various radio galaxies show signs of having gone through episodic jet outbursts in the past. An example is the class of double-double radio galaxies (DDRGs). However, to follow the evolution of an individual source in real-time is impossible due to the large time scales involved. Numerical studies provide a powerful tool to investigate the temporal behavior of episodic jet outbursts in a (magneto-)hydrodynamical setting. We simulate the injection of two jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN), separated by a short interruption time. Three different jet models are compared. We find that an AGN jet outburst cycle can be divided into four phases. The most prominent phase occurs when the restarted jet is propagating completely inside the hot and inflated cocoon left behind by the initial jet. In that case, the jet-head advance speed of the restarted jet is significantly higher than the initial jet-head. While the head of the initial jet interacts strongly with the ambient medium, the restarted jet propagates almos...

  11. Use of Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Jet for Polymer Surface Modification: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuettner, Lindsey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are playing an increasingly important role in materials processing procedures. Plasma treatment is a useful tool to modify surface properties of materials, especially polymers. Plasma reacts with polymer surfaces in numerous ways thus the type of process gas and plasma conditions must be explored for chosen substrates and materials to maximize desired properties. This report discusses plasma treatments and looks further into atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and the effects of gases and plasma conditions. Following the short literature review, a general overview of the future work and research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is discussed.

  12. Real vs. simulated relativistic jets

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, J L; Agudo, I; Marscher, A P; Jorstad, S G; Aloy, M A

    2005-01-01

    Intensive VLBI monitoring programs of jets in AGN are showing the existence of intricate emission patterns, such as upstream motions or slow moving and quasi-stationary componentes trailing superluminal features. Relativistic hydrodynamic and emission simulations of jets are in very good agreement with these observations, proving as a powerful tool for the understanding of the physical processes taking place in the jets of AGN, microquasars and GRBs. These simulations show that the variability of the jet emission is the result of a complex combination of phase motions, viewing angle selection effects, and non-linear interactions between perturbations and the underlying jet and/or ambient medium. Both observations and simulations suggest that shock-in-jet models may be an overly simplistic idealization when interpreting the emission structure observed in actual jets.

  13. Turbulent jet in confined counterflow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sivapragasam; M D Deshpande; S Ramamurthy; P White

    2014-06-01

    The mean flowfield of a turbulent jet issuing into a confined, uniform counterflow was investigated computationally. Based on dimensional analysis, the jet penetration length was shown to scale with jet-to-counterflow momentum flux ratio. This scaling and the computational results reproduce the well-known correct limit of linear growth of the jet penetration length for the unconfined case when the momentum flux ratio is small. However, for the high momentum flux ratio case corresponding to the confinement, the jet penetration length is shown to reach an asymptotic limit of about 3.57 times the confining duct diameter. This conclusion is contrary to the existing results which predict indefinite growth. A simple modification of an existing similarity solution for the jet in an unconfined counterflow provides a convenient framework for presenting the results of the flowfield and jet penetration length.

  14. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging.

  15. Variable geometry inlet design for scram jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Daniel P. (Inventor); Drake, Alan (Inventor); Andreadis, Dean (Inventor); Beckel, Stephen A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved variable geometry inlet for a scram jet engine having at least one combustor module. The variable geometry inlet comprises each combustor module having two sidewalls. Each of the sidewalls has a central portion with a thickness and a tapered profile forward of the central portion. The tapered profile terminates in a sharp leading edge. The variable geometry inlet further comprises each module having a lower wall and a movable cowl flap positioned forward of the lower wall. The movable cowl flap has a leading edge and the leading edges of the sidewalls intersect the leading edge of the cowl flap.

  16. ReACT!: An Interactive Educational Tool for AI Planning for Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogmus, Zeynep; Erdem, Esra; Patogulu, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents ReAct!, an interactive educational tool for artificial intelligence (AI) planning for robotics. ReAct! enables students to describe robots' actions and change in dynamic domains without first having to know about the syntactic and semantic details of the underlying formalism, and to solve planning problems using…

  17. RECENT ADVANCES IN STUDIES ON MULTIPHASE AND REACTING FLOWS IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周力行

    2002-01-01

    The recent developments and advances of studies on multiphase and reacting flows, including gas-solid, gas-liquid, liquid-solid and reacting flows, in China are reviewed. Special emphasis is laid on the fundamental studies and numerical models. Some important experimental results are also reported. But measurement techniques are not covered.

  18. Theoretical Aerodynamics of Jets in Ground Effect. Phase V. Asymptotic Theory of Turbulent Wall Jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    University of California Berkeley, CA 9472) Code 2,flB Office of Naval Research Dr. H. R. Chaplin 800 N. (uincy Street Code 1600 Arlington, VA 22217 David ...VA 22217 2 copies Code 1302 Z. "." David W. Taylor Naval Ship Research . Dr. J.L. Potter and Developrient Center Deputy Director, Technology...Naval Sea Systems ’ omand Un ivers it ’y of Arizona Washington, D)C 20362 Tucson, AZ 85721 C- ,, ~SI-A 09G3 . ’)r. K.T. Yen Naval Sea Systems Command Code

  19. Study on influence of characteristics of air-supply jet on draincontamination efficiency and air quality in heading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘何清; 施式亮; 刘荣华; 王海桥

    2001-01-01

    Based on the theory of air-supply jet, the conception and theory of the air quality and the drain-contamination efficiency, the results achieved by comparing the circular cross-section wall jet with the plane wall jet were following: firstly, within the limitation of the ventilation distance at the tunnel heading in a coal mine, there were a better air quality and a higher efficiency of drain-contamination with application of the plane wall jet ventilation. Secondly, there was a advantage to improve the air quality of the workers' breathing area with mounting the air-supply outlet on the top but not on the side of the tunnel heading.

  20. Study on influence of characteristics of air-supply jet on drain contamination efficiency and air quality in heading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU He-qing; SHI Shi-liang; LIU Rong-hua; WANG H ai-qiao

    2001-01-01

    Based on the theory of air-supply jet, the conception and theory o f the air quality and the drain-contamination efficiency, the results achieved b y comparing the circular cross-section wall jet with the plane wall jet were fo l lowing: firstly, within the limitation of the ventilation distance at the tunnel heading in a coal mine, there were a better air quality and a higher efficiency of drain-contamination with application of the plane wall jet ventilation. Sec o ndly, there was a advantage to improve the air quality of the workers breathin g area with mounting the air-supply outlet on the top but not on the side of the tunnel heading.

  1. Expected performance of ATLAS for measurements of jets, b-jets, tau-jets, and ETmis

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M

    2002-01-01

    Jets and missing energy are among the most important objects of LHC physics. The accuracy of measurements of missing energy and direction and energy of jets put strong requirements on the detector performance. These requirements and the ATLAS Calorimeter system which is projected to fulfill these requirements are presented. The jet reconstruction algorithms and jet energy scale calibration are shortly discussed. Forward jet tagging, b-tagging and tau-tagging are important issues of many physical analyses. Reconstruction of resonances is an example of complex use of calorimeter performance

  2. Description of the ATLAS jet veto measurement and jet gap jet events at hadronic colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Royon, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a new QCD description of the ATLAS jet veto measurement, using the Banfi- Marchesini-Smye equation to constrain the inter-jet QCD radiation. This equation resums emis- sions of soft gluons at large angles and leads to a very good description of data. We also investigate jet gap jet events in hadron-hadron collisions, in which two jets are produced and separated by a large rapidity gap. Using a renormalisation-group improved NLL kernel implemented in the HERWIG Monte Carlo program, we show that the BFKL predictions are in good agreement with the Tevatron data, and present predictions that could be tested at the LHC.

  3. Sound Radiation from a Supersonic Jet Passing Through a Partially Open Exhaust Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    The radiation of sound from a perfectly expanded Mach 2.5 cold supersonic jet of 25.4 mm exit diameter flowing through a partially open rigid-walled duct with an upstream i-deflector has been studied experimentally. In the experiments, the nozzle is mounted vertically, with the nozzle exit plane at a height of 73 jet diameters above ground level. Relative to the nozzle exit plane (NEP), the location of the duct inlet is varied at 10, 5, and -1 jet diameters. Far-field sound pressure levels were obtained at 54 jet diameters above ground with the aid of acoustic sensors equally spaced around a circular arc of radius equal to 80 jet diameters from the jet axis. Data on the jet acoustic field for the partially open duct were obtained and compared with those with a free jet and with a closed duct. The results suggest that for the partially open duct the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) decreases as the distance between the NEP and the duct inlet plane decreases, while the opposite trend is observed for the closed duct. It is also concluded that the observed peak frequency in the partially open duct increases above the free jet value as the angle from the duct axis is increased, and as the duct inlet plane becomes closer to the NEP.

  4. Instability of jet plume from an overexpanded nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    2005-11-01

    Our study involves the phenomenon of supersonic nozzle flow separation wherein a shock forms inside a convergent-divergent nozzle. Of particular interest is the instability of the jet plume exiting this type of nozzle. A rectangular apparatus of aspect ratio 3.57 and flexible walls enabled a parametric study of the mean and turbulent properties of the jet plume versus nozzle pressure ratio (from 1.2 to 2.0), exit-to-throat area ratio (from 1.0 to 1.8) and wall divergence angle at the nozzle exit (from 0 to 4 deg.) Time-resolved surveys of total pressure were obtained by means of a dynamic Pitot probe. The growth rate of the jet and the peak rms value of total pressure fluctuation near the nozzle exit increase several fold with area ratio. This trend becomes most pronounced for nozzle pressure ratio around 1.6. At fixed area ratio and nozzle pressure ratio, the wall divergence angle has little effect on the instability.

  5. Physical Modelling of Axisymmetric Turbulent Impinging Jets as used within the Nuclear Industry for Mobilisation of Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKendrick, D.; Biggs, S.R.; Fairweather, M. [Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Rhodes, D. [Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The impingement of a fluid jet onto a surface has broad applications across many industries. Within the UK nuclear industry, during the final stages of fuel reprocessing, impinging fluid jets are utilised to mobilise settled sludge material within storage tanks and ponds in preparation for transfer and ultimate immobilisation through vitrification. Despite the extensive applications of impinging jets within the nuclear and other industries, the study of two-phase, solid loaded, impinging jets is limited, and generally restricted to computational modelling. Surprisingly, very little fundamental understanding of the turbulence structure within such fluid flows through experimental investigation is found within the literature. The physical modelling of impinging jet systems could successfully serve to aid computer model validation, determine operating requirements, evaluate plant throughput requirements, optimise process operations and support design. Within this project a method is illustrated, capable of exploring the effects of process and material variables on flow phenomena of impinging jets. This is achieved via the use of non-intrusive measurement techniques Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), Ultrasonic Doppler Velocity Profiler (UDVP) and high speed imaging. The turbulence structure for impinging jets, and their resultant radial wall jets, is presented at different jet-to-plate ratios, jet Reynolds numbers and jet outlet diameters. (authors)

  6. SparkJet Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  7. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation periods allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  8. Astrophysical Jets and Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    De Gouveia dal Pino, E M

    2004-01-01

    Highly collimated supersonic jets and less collimated outflows are observed to emerge from a wide variety of astrophysical objects. They are seen in young stellar objects (YSOs), proto-planetary nebulae, compact objects (like galactic black holes or microquasars, and X-ray binary stars), and in the nuclei of active galaxies (AGNs). Despite their different physical scales (in size, velocity, and amount of energy transported), they have strong morphological similarities. What physics do they share? These systems either hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) in nature and are, as such, governed by non-linear equations. While theoretical models helped us to understand the basic physics of these objects, numerical simulations have been allowing us to go beyond the one-dimensional, steady-state approach extracting vital information. In this lecture, the formation, structure, and evolution of the jets are reviewed with the help of observational information, MHD and purely hydrodynamical modeling, and numerical si...

  9. Comparative study of Trombe wall, water wall and trans wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodha, M.S.; Bansal, N.K.; Singh, S.; Ram, S.; Annamalai, M.; Iyer, M.V.; Nirmala, K.A.; Venkatesh, P.; Prasad, C.R.; Subramani, C.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal performances of three systems viz. Trombe wall: (1) without; and (2) with vents (forced air circulation), water wall and Transwall have been studied analytically interms of heat flux entering the living space (Maintained at 20/sup 0/C) corresponding to the meteriological data on January 19, 1981 at New Delhi (India), a typical cold winter day. Subsequent parametric studies using the simulation indicated that the Transwall system is the more efficient system for the passive heating of buildings.

  10. Interacting Jets from Binary Protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, G C; O'Sullivan, S; Spicer, D; Bacciotti, F; Rosén, A

    2007-01-01

    We investigate potential models that could explain why multiple proto-stellar systems predominantly show single jets. During their formation, stars most frequently produce energetic outflows and jets. However, binary jets have only been observed in a very small number of systems. We model numerically 3D binary jets for various outflow parameters. We also model the propagation of jets from a specific source, namely L1551 IRS 5, known to have two jets, using recent observations as constraints for simulations with a new MHD code. We examine their morphology and dynamics, and produce synthetic emission maps. We find that the two jets interfere up to the stage where one of them is almost destroyed or engulfed into the second one. We are able to reproduce some of the observational features of L1551 such as the bending of the secondary jet. While the effects of orbital motion are negligible over the jets dynamical timeline, their interaction has significant impact on their morphology. If the jets are not strictly pa...

  11. Jet-Environment Interactions as Diagnostics of Jet Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the interaction of jets with their environments. Jets can transport a sizable fraction of accretion energy away from black holes and neutron stars. Because they are collimated, they can travel to distances far beyond the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole. Yet, their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic medium must eventually halt their advance and dissipate the energy they carry. The termination of the jet, and the inflation of large scale cavities of relativistic plasma offers one of the most powerful ways to constrain the physics of jets. In this chapter, we will review the inflation of radio lobes, the propagation of hot spots, the creation of shells and cavities, and the bending of jet by proper motion through their environment, both in the context of AGN jets and microquasars.

  12. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swierkowski, S.; Ciarlo, D.

    1996-05-13

    Goal is to develop a multi-channel micromachined chemical fluid jet dispenser that is applicable to prototype tests with biological samples that demonstrate its utility for molecular biology experiments. Objective is to demonstrate a new device capable of ultrasonically ejecting droplets from 10-200 {mu}m diameter capillaries that are arranged in an array that is linear or focused. The device is based on several common fabrication procedures used in MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology: piezoelectric actuators, silicon, etc.

  13. Methodology for Flight Relevant Arc-Jet Testing of Flexible Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Bruce, Walter E., III; Mesick, Nathaniel J.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    A methodology to correlate flight aeroheating environments to the arc-jet environment is presented. For a desired hot-wall flight heating rate, the methodology provides the arcjet bulk enthalpy for the corresponding cold-wall heating rate. A series of analyses were conducted to examine the effects of the test sample model holder geometry to the overall performance of the test sample. The analyses were compared with arc-jet test samples and challenges and issues are presented. The transient flight environment was calculated for the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Earth Atmospheric Reentry Test (HEART) vehicle, which is a planned demonstration vehicle using a large inflatable, flexible thermal protection system to reenter the Earth's atmosphere from the International Space Station. A series of correlations were developed to define the relevant arc-jet test environment to properly approximate the HEART flight environment. The computed arcjet environments were compared with the measured arc-jet values to define the uncertainty of the correlated environment. The results show that for a given flight surface heat flux and a fully-catalytic TPS, the flight relevant arc-jet heat flux increases with the arc-jet bulk enthalpy while for a non-catalytic TPS the arc-jet heat flux decreases with the bulk enthalpy.

  14. Numerical Investigation of Nozzle Geometry Effect on Turbulent 3-D Water Offset Jet Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Mohammad Aliha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the Yang-Shih low Reynolds k-ε turbulence model, the mean flow field of a turbulent offset jet issuing from a long circular pipe was numerically investigated. The experimental results were used to verify the numerical results such as decay rate of streamwise velocity, locus of maximum streamwise velocity, jet half width in the wall normal and lateral directions, and jet velocity profiles. The present study focused attention on the influence of nozzle geometry on the evolution of a 3D incompressible turbulent offset jet. Circular, square-shaped, and rectangular nozzles were considered here. A comparison between the mean flow characteristics of offset jets issuing from circular and square-shaped nozzles, which had equal area and mean exit velocity, were made numerically. Moreover, the effect of aspect ratio of rectangular nozzles on the main features of the flow was investigated. It was shown that the spread rate, flow entrainment, and mixing rate of an offset jet issuing from circular nozzle are lower than square-shaped one. In addition, it was demonstrated that the aspect ratio of the rectangular nozzles only affects the mean flow field of the offset jet in the near field (up to 15 times greater than equivalent diameter of the nozzles. Furthermore, other parameters including the wall shear stress, flow entrainment and the length of potential core were also investigated.

  15. Stationary Relativistic Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Komissarov, S S; Lyutikov, M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe a simple numerical approach which allows to study the structure of steady-state axisymmetric relativistic jets using one-dimensional time-dependent simulations. It is based on the fact that for narrow jets with v~c the steady-state equations of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics can be accurately approximated by the one-dimensional time-dependent equations after the substitution z=ct. Since only the time-dependent codes are now publicly available this is a valuable and efficient alternative to the development of a high-specialized code for the time-independent equations. The approach is also much cheaper and more robust compared to the relaxation method. We tested this technique against numerical and analytical solutions found in literature as well as solutions we obtained using the relaxation method and found it sufficiently accurate. In the process, we discovered the reason for the failure of the self-similar analytical model of the jet reconfinement in relatively flat atmospheres a...

  16. Astrophysical jets and outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.

    Highly collimated supersonic jets and less collimated outflows are observed to emerge from a wide variety of astrophysical objects. They are seen in young stellar objects (YSOs), proto-planetary nebulae, compact objects (like galactic black holes or microquasars, and X-ray binary stars), and in the nuclei of active galaxies (AGNs). Despite their different physical scales (in size, velocity, and amount of energy transported), they have strong morphological similarities. What physics do they share? These systems are either hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) in nature and are, as such, governed by non-linear equations. While theoretical models helped us to understand the basic physics of these objects, numerical simulations have been allowing us to go beyond the one-dimensional, steady-state approach extracting vital information. In this lecture, the formation, structure, and evolution of the jets are reviewed with the help of observational information, MHD and purely hydrodynamical modeling, and numerical simulations. Possible applications of the models particularly to YSOs and AGN jets are addressed.

  17. A gyrokinetic perspective on the JET-ILW pedestal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, D. R.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S.; Valanju, P.; Liu, X.

    2017-03-01

    JET has been unable to recover historical confinement levels when operating with an ITER-like wall (ILW) due largely to the inaccessibility of high pedestal temperatures. Finding a path to overcome this challenge is of utmost importance for both a prospective JET DT campaign and for future ITER operation. Gyrokinetic simulations (using the Gene code) quantitatively capture experimental transport levels for a representative experimental discharge and qualitatively recover the major experimental trends. Microtearing turbulence is a major transport mechanisms for the low-temperature pedestals characteristic of unseeded JET-ILW discharges. At higher temperatures and/or lower {ρ\\ast} , we identify electrostatic ITG transport of a type that is strongly shear-suppressed on smaller machines. Consistent with observations, this transport mechanism is strongly reduced by the presence of a low-Z impurity (e.g. carbon or nitrogen at the level of {{Z}\\text{eff}}∼ 2 ), recovering the accessibility of high pedestal temperatures. Notably, simulations based on dimensionless {ρ\\ast} scans recover historical scaling behavior except in the unique JET-ILW parameter regime where ITG turbulence becomes important. Our simulations also elucidate the observed degradation of confinement caused by gas puffing, emphasizing the important role of the density pedestal structure. This study maps out important regions of parameter space, providing insights that may point to optimal physical regimes that can enable the recovery of high pedestal temperatures on JET.

  18. The JET technology program in support of ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, P., E-mail: paola.batistoni@jet.efda.org [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Associazione EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Likonen, J. [Association EURATOM-TEKES, VTT, PO Box 1000, 02044 VTT Espoo (Finland); Bekris, N. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S. [Association EURATOM-Forschungszentrum Jülich, IPP, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Coad, P. [EURATOM CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Horton, L. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Matthews, G. [EURATOM CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rubel, M. [Royal Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-VR, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Sips, G. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Syme, B.; Widdowson, A. [EURATOM CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents an overview of the current and planned technological activities at JET in support of ITER operation and safety. The scope is very broad and it ranges from analysis of components from the ITER-like Wall (ILW) to determine material erosion and deposition, dust generation and fuel retention to neutronics measurements and analyses. Preliminary results are given of the post-mortem analyses of samples exposed to JET plasmas during the first JET-ILW operation in 2011–2012, and retrieved during the following in-vessel intervention. JET is the only fusion machine capable of producing significant neutron yields, up to nearly 10{sup 19} n/s (14.1 MeV) in DT operations. Recently, the technological potential of a new DT campaign at JET in support of ITER has been explored and the outcome of this assessment is presented. The expected 14 MeV neutron yield, the use of tritium, the preparation and implementation of safety measures will provide a unique occasion to gain experience in several ITER relevant technological areas. A number of projects and experiments to be conducted in conjunction with the DT operation have been identified and they are described in this paper.

  19. Simulations of Spray Reacting Flows in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar PDF Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of the Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar probability density function (PDF) method. The flow field is calculated by using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS and URANS) with nonlinear turbulence models, and when the scalar PDF method is invoked, the energy and compositions or species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of an ensemble averaged density-weighted fine-grained probability density function that is referred to here as the averaged probability density function (APDF). A nonlinear model for closing the convection term of the scalar APDF equation is used in the presented simulations and will be briefly described. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar PDF method in both improving the simulation quality and reducing the computing cost are observed.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE VORTEX FORMATION AND ENTRA-INMENT CHARACTERISTICS FOR A ROUND TRANSVERSE JET IN SHALLOW WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jing-yu; ZHANG Yan; WANG Dao-zeng

    2009-01-01

    The vortex formation and entrainment characteristics for a round transverse jet in shallow water were experimentally investigated by means of a combination of LIF flow visualization and PIV measurement. A scarf vortex wrapped around the main body of the jet is formed in the near-wall region due to the interaction between the resulting wall jet and sufficiently shallow crossflow, with some more or less unsteady flow properties and with spreading ranges as functions of both the velocity ratio and the water depth within the near field. The entrainment of the ambient crossflow fluid into the jet main body is closely associated with the time-evolving features of the shear layer between the jet and surrounding fluid as well as the induced vortical structures near the wall. In the case of slight impingement upon the wall, the interaction between the jet shear layer and the weak, unstable scarf vortex gives rise to an appreciable local entrainment enhancement, confined in the near-wall region in the vicinity of the stagnation point. While in the case of intense impingement upon the wall, the well-organized and stable scarf vortex gives rise to a greatly enhanced entrainment and a greatly increased lateral spreading rate nearly throughout the overall near field as compared to the conventional wall jet. In addition, the entrainment of the ambient crossflow fluid by the scarf vortex in this case occurs largely on the surface of the unique spiral roller structure by itself due to the presence of smaller and unorganized eddies, and accordingly the scarf vortex is likely to keep its spiral roller structure steadily to a relatively great downstream distance within the near field.

  1. Rapid Confined Mixing Using Transverse Jets Part 2: Multiple Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forliti, David; Salazar, David

    2012-11-01

    An experimental study has been conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base to investigate the properties of confined mixing devices that employ transverse jets. The experiment considers the mixing of water with a mixture of water and fluorescein, and planar laser induced fluorescence was used to measure instantaneous mixture fraction distributions in the cross section view. Part one of this study presents the scaling law development and results for a single confined transverse jet. Part two will describe the results of configurations including multiple transverse jets. The different regimes of mixing behavior, ranging from under to overpenetration of the transverse jets, are characterized in terms of a new scaling law parameter presented in part one. The level of unmixedness, a primary metric for mixing device performance, is quantified for different jet diameters, number of jets, and relative flow rates. It is apparent that the addition of a second transverse jet provides enhanced scalar uniformity in the main pipe flow cross section compared to a single jet. Three and six jet configurations also provide highly uniform scalar distributions. Turbulent scalar fluctuation intensities, spectral features, and spatial eigenfunctions using the proper orthogonal decomposition will be presented. Distribution A: Public Release, Public Affairs Clearance Number: 12656.

  2. Computational studies of reacting flows with applications to zinc selenide nanoparticle synthesis and methane/hydrogen separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsona, Maria

    This work is a numerical study of the design and operation of two reacting flow systems, each with great potential in their fields. The design of reacting flow systems by computer simulations are successfully used in science and engineering to evaluate design geometries and operation, without resorting to experimental trial and error that is expensive, time consuming and, in some cases, dangerous. The models of the two systems described in this work are based on fundamental conservation equations for momentum and mass transfer coupled with chemical reaction kinetics and particle dynamics. The first part of this work is a study aiming to elucidate the transport phenomena and chemical reactions that control the size of ZnSe nanoparticles formed by a new vapor-phase synthesis route. The nanoparticles are synthesized by reacting vapors of (CH3)2Zn:N(C2H 5)3 adduct with H2Se gas (diluted in hydrogen) fed continuously from opposite sides into a counterflow jet reactor. The nuclei of the nanocrystals are formed by a direct condensation reaction near the stagnation point. The nuclei grow into nanoparticles by coalescence/coagulation and by surface growth reactions. A 2D model of an axially symmetric reactor was developed that includes descriptions of flow, mass transfer by convection and diffusion, chemical kinetics, particle nucleation, coagulation and surface growth. The coupled nonlinear partial differential equations of the model were solved using the Galerkin Finite Element Method. The model was used to study the relative importance of the underlying physical and chemical phenomena in controlling particle size and particle size distribution. Model predictions compared well with the limited experimental data available for this system. The model was also used for model-assisted design of the experimental counterflow jet reactor, where vapor-phase synthesis of ZnSe nanoparticles was demonstrated for the first time. The second part of this work involves the development of

  3. Decelerating relativistc two-component jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin

  4. Decelerating relativistic two-component jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin

  5. Decelerating relativistic two-component jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin an

  6. Decelerating relativistc two-component jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin an

  7. Control of a Circular Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Gohil, Trushar B; Muralidhar, K

    2010-01-01

    The present study report direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a circular jet and the effect of a large scale perturbation at the jet inlet. The perturbation is used to control the jet for increased spreading. Dual-mode perturbation is obtained by combining an axisymmetric excitation with the helical. In the fluid dynamics videos, an active control of the circular jet at a Reynolds number of 2000 for various frequency ratios (both integer and non-integer) has been demonstrated. When the frequency ratio is fixed to 2, bifurcation of the jet on a plane is evident. However, for a non-integer frequency ratio, the axisymmetric jet is seen to bloom in all directions.

  8. Root Growth and Water distribution in living walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars

    walls; the vertical orientation of the growing medium, plants are growing vertically above or below each other in a limited rooting volume; there is an increased exposure to weather and the plants can react differently to water conditions and competition from other plants. Plant growth is the core......Living walls is a way of bringing plants and green areas into cities, and offer both positive environmental and aesthetical effects. A prerequisite for optimal performance of a living wall is that the plant cover is properly established why the individual plant should have optimal conditions...... for root growth. This thesis investigates the correlations between the growing media and root and shoots growth, and studies root growth patterns of different plant species and effects of planting position and root interactions of plants growing in living walls. There are a number of challenges with living...

  9. Progress Towards an LES Wall Model Including Unresolved Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Kyle; Redman, Andrew; Aikens, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Wall models used in large eddy simulations (LES) are often based on theories for hydraulically smooth walls. While this is reasonable for many applications, there are also many where the impact of surface roughness is important. A previously developed wall model has been used primarily for jet engine aeroacoustics. However, jet simulations have not accurately captured thick initial shear layers found in some experimental data. This may partly be due to nozzle wall roughness used in the experiments to promote turbulent boundary layers. As a result, the wall model is extended to include the effects of unresolved wall roughness through appropriate alterations to the log-law. The methodology is tested for incompressible flat plate boundary layers with different surface roughness. Correct trends are noted for the impact of surface roughness on the velocity profile. However, velocity deficit profiles and the Reynolds stresses do not collapse as well as expected. Possible reasons for the discrepancies as well as future work will be presented. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number ACI-1053575. Computational resources on TACC Stampede were provided under XSEDE allocation ENG150001.

  10. Domain Walls on Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe domain walls that live on $A_2$ and $A_3$ singularities. The walls are BPS if the singularity is resolved and non--BPS if it is deformed and fibered. We show that these domain walls may interpolate between vacua that support monopoles and/or vortices.

  11. The Lamportian cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. (Michigan State Univ. Plant Research Lab., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  12. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  13. Impeller for Water Jet Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center engineers helped North American Marine Jet (NAMJ), Inc. improve the proposed design of a new impeller for jet propulsion system. With a three-dimensional computer model of the new marine jet engine blades, engineers were able to quickly create a solid ploycarbonate model of it. The rapid prototyping allowed the company to avoid many time-consuming and costly steps in creating the impeller.

  14. Material Transport with Air Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Patkó

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In the field of industry, there are only a very few examples of material transportwith air jet, and one of these is the air jet loom. In this weaving technology, the weft (thetransversal yarn of the fabric is shot by air jet. This paper will set up the mathematicalmodel of yarn end movement. For a special case, I will specify a solution of the model.

  15. 2D numerical simulation of impinging jet onto the concave surface by k - w - overline{{v2 }} - f turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Zeinab; Nazari, Mohammad Reza; Khalaji, Erfan

    2016-03-01

    In the present article, the characteristics of turbulent jet impinging onto a concave surface is studied using k - w - overline{{v2 }} - f turbulence model. Dependent parameters such as inlet Reynolds number (2960 heat transfer of stagnation area and wall jet goes up and down through nozzle-plate distance enhancement respectively. Finally, the effects of sinusoidal pulsed inlet profile on heat transfer of unconfined impinging jet indicate direct affiliation of amplitude and neutral impact of frequency on Nusselt number distribution.

  16. Active Region Jets II: Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active-region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/XRT, SDO/AIA and HMI, and IRIS/SJ data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets (Sterling et al. 2016, ApJ, 821, 100). The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ˜Nature, 523, 437). For some jets strands are difficult/ impossible to detect, perhaps due to their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ~1.5×10^19 Mx/hr. An average flux of ~5×10^18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ~10^28—10^29 ergs of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption buildup and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  17. Jet Suppression Measured in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Zvi Hirsh; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced, and jets propagating through this medium are known to suffer energy loss. This results in a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than expected in the absence of medium effects, and thus modifications of the jet yield are directly sensitive to the energy loss mechanism. Furthermore, jets with different flavor content are expected to be affected by the medium in different ways. Parton showers initiated by quarks tend to have fewer fragments carrying a larger fraction of the total jet energy than those resulting from gluons. In this talk, the latest ATLAS results on single jet suppression will be presented. Measurements of the nuclear modification factor, RAA, for fully reconstructed jets are shown. The rapidity dependence of jet suppression is discussed, which is sensitive to the relative energy loss between quark and gluon jets. New measurements of single hadron suppression out to pT~150 GeV ...

  18. The formation of interstellar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  19. Jet physics at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Seidel

    2002-05-29

    Recent analyses by the CDF and D0 Collaborations of jet data produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are presented. These include new studies of the inclusive jet production cross section, a measurement of the strong coupling constant, the first measurement of subjet multiplicity of quark and gluon jets, examination of ratios of multijet cross sections and their implications for choice of renormalization scale, and a study of charged jet evolution and energy flow in the underlying event. The results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  20. Two- and three-dimensional marginal separation of laminar, incompressible viscous jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, S.; Kluwick, A. [TU Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer

    2000-07-01

    If a laminar two-dimensional viscous jet flows past a wall which is curved up an adverse pressure gradient forms inside the jet owing to the streamline curvature. As a consequence, solutions based on the boundary layer approximation may terminate in the form of a Goldstein-singularity or may develop a marginal separation singularity. The latter one is characterized by the fact that the wall shear stress vanishes in a single point but immediately recovers and can be used to develop a local interaction strategy which is able to describe small separation regions. In the present study the results obtained by Zametaev for locally plane walls are extended to include the effects of two- and three-dimensional obstacles. Special emphasis is placed on the nonuniqueness of the solution for the wall shear stress distribution which is governed by a nonlinear integro-differential equation. (orig.)

  1. Immunolocalization of 8-5' and 8-8' linked structures of lignin in cell walls of Chamaecyparis obtusa using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyoto, Shingo; Yoshinaga, Arata; Tanaka, Naoyuki; Wada, Munehisa; Kamitakahara, Hiroshi; Takabe, Keiji

    2013-03-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies were generated against dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol- or pinoresinol-p-aminohippuric acid (pAHA)-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate as probes that specifically react with 8-5' or 8-8' linked structure of lignin in plant cell walls. Hybridoma clones were selected that produced antibodies that positively reacted with dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol- or pinoresinol-pAHA-BSA and negatively reacted with pAHA-BSA and guaiacylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether-pAHA-BSA conjugates containing 8-O-4' linkage. Eight clones were established for each antigen and one of each clone that positively reacted with wood sections was selected. The specificity of these antibodies was examined by competitive ELISA tests using various lignin dimers with different linkages. The anti-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol antibody reacted specifically with dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol and did not react with other model compounds containing 8-O-4', 8-8', or 5-5' linkages. The anti-pinoresinol antibody reacted specifically with pinoresinol and syringaresinol and did not react with the other model compounds containing 8-O-4', 8-5', or 5-5' linkages. The antibodies also did not react with dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol acetate or pinoresinol acetate, indicating that the presence of free phenolic or aliphatic hydroxyl group was an important factor in their reactivity. In sections of Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa), labeling by the anti-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol antibody was found in the secondary walls of phloem fibers and in the compound middle lamellae, and secondary walls of tracheids. Weak labeling by the anti-pinoresinol antibody was found in secondary walls of phloem fibers and secondary walls and compound middle lamellae of developed tracheids. These labelings show the localization of 8-5' and 8-8' linked structure of lignin in the cell walls.

  2. Numerical investigation of mixing in parallel jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durve, Ameya [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Patwardhan, Ashwin W., E-mail: aw.patwardhan@ictmumbai.edu.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Banarjee, Indraneel; Padmakumar, G.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Experimental thermal Hydraulics Section, Separation Technology and Hydraulics Division, Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of adjacent third jet on the mixing of two plane parallel jets is studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Validation of CFD model with experimental data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of mixing behavior of two jet flow and three jet flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three jet systems provide more efficient mixing than single jet and two jet systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Turbulent fluctuations occurring in the two jet flow are smaller as compared to the three jet flow. - Abstract: A system of parallel jets is widely encountered in many industrial applications. Wide spread applications necessitate the study of the basic mixing phenomenon of parallel jets. In the present study, the mixing phenomenon in the two jet flow and the three jet flow has been studied numerically by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations. The results predicted by the Reynolds stress model compare well with the experimental data of axial velocity and shear stress available in literature. An attempt has been made to predict the critical mixing regions such as the merge point and the combine point by correlating them with jet spacing and jet exit conditions. A comparison between single jet, two jet and three jet systems has been carried out to evaluate the effect of presence of the second and the third jet on the mixing phenomenon and turbulent fluctuations.

  3. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Georgiadis, John G.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Rogers, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1μm demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  4. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  5. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, Ramj; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  6. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2012-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  7. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, Ramj; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  8. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  9. Ambulatory REACT: real-time seizure detection with a DSP microprocessor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Robert P; Faul, Stephen; Marnane, William P

    2010-01-01

    REACT (Real-Time EEG Analysis for event deteCTion) is a Support Vector Machine based technology which, in recent years, has been successfully applied to the problem of automated seizure detection in both adults and neonates. This paper describes the implementation of REACT on a commercial DSP microprocessor; the Analog Devices Blackfin®. The primary aim of this work is to develop a prototype system for use in ambulatory or in-ward automated EEG analysis. Furthermore, the complexity of the various stages of the REACT algorithm on the Blackfin processor is analysed; in particular the EEG feature extraction stages. This hardware profile is used to select a reduced, platform-aware feature set, in order to evaluate the seizure classification accuracy of a lower-complexity, lower-power REACT system.

  10. Rule-Based Multidisciplinary Tool for Unsteady Reacting Real-Fluid Flows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A design and analysis computational tool is proposed for simulating unsteady reacting flows in combustor devices used in reusable launch vehicles. Key aspects...

  11. Impurity profiles at the JET divertor targets compared with the DIVIMP code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, G.F.; Gottardi, N.A.C.; Harbour, P.J.; Horton, L.D.; Jackel, H.J.; De Kock, L.; Loarte, A.; Maggi, C.F.; O' Brien, D.P.J.; Simonini, R.; Spence, J.; Stamp, M.F.; Stott, P.E.; Summers, H.P.; Tagle, J.; Von Hellerman, M. (JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)); Stangeby, P.C.; Elder, J.D. (Univ. Toronto, Inst. for Aerospace Studies, Downsview, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-12-01

    In this paper we describe the simulation of edge diagnostics in JET using the DIVIMP (divertor impurity) Monte Carlo code. We concentrate on two ohmic pulses and show how the results are influenced by a variety of modeling assumptions. Our results show that a wall source must be included to explain the diagnostic signals. The wall source is shown to be a significant source of impurity in the discharges studied and more generally. (orig.).

  12. KEEFEKTIFAN STRATEGI REACT DITINJAU DARI PRESTASI BELAJAR, KEMAMPUAN PENYELESAIAN MASALAH, KONEKSI MATEMATIS, SELF EFFICACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runtyani Irjayanti Putri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk: (1 mendeskripsikan keefektifan strategi pembelajaran REACT pada pembelajaran turunan fungsi ditinjau dari prestasi belajar matematika, kemampuan penyelesaian masalah matematis, kemampuan koneksi matematis, dan Self efficacy siswa SMA Negeri 4 Magelang, (2 menentukan strategi pembelajaran yang lebih efektif diantara strategi REACT dan pembelajaran konvensional pada pembelajaran turunan fungsi ditinjau dari aspek prestasi belajar matematika, kemampuan penyelesaian masalah matematis, kemampuan koneksi matematis, dan Self efficacy siswa SMA Negeri 4 Magelang. Penelitian ini adalah penelitian quasi experiment. Teknik pengumpulan data yang digunakan adalah teknik tes dan nontes. Teknik analisis data yang digunakan adalah uji one sample t-test, uji T2 Hotelling’s, dan uji t-Bonferroni. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa: (1 strategi pembelajaran REACT efektif pada pembelajaran turunan fungsi ditinjau dari prestasi belajar matematika, kemampuan penyelesaian masalah matematis, kemampuan koneksi matematis, dan Self efficacy siswa SMA Negeri 4 Magelang, dan (2 strategi pembelajaran REACT lebih efektif daripada pembelajaran konvensional pada pembelajaran turunan fungsi ditinjau dari aspek prestasi belajar matematika, kemampuan penyelesaian masalah matematis, kemampuan koneksi matematis, dan Self efficacy siswa SMA Negeri 4 Magelang. Kata Kunci: strategi REACT, prestasi belajar, kemampuan penyelesaian masalah matematis, kemampuan koneksi matematis, dan Self efficacy siswa SMA   THE EFFECTIVENESS OF REACT STRATEGY VIEWED FROM LEARNING ACHIEVEMENT, PROBLEM SOLVING ABILITY, MATHEMATICAL CONNECTION, SELF EFFICACY Abstract The aims of this study are to: (1 to describe the effectiveness of the REACT strategy viewed from Mathematics Learning Achievement, Mathematics Problem Solving Ability, Mathematics Connection Ability, and Student Self efficacy of State Senior High School 4 Magelang Students, and (2 determine a more effective

  13. Hadron jets in perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, C.

    1982-11-01

    The subject of hadron jet studies, to judge by the work presented at this workshop, is a maturing field which is still gathering steam. The very detailed work being done in lepton-lepton and lepton-hadron collisions, the second-generation measurements being carried out at Fermilab, the CERN SPS, and the ISR, and the very high energy hard scatterings being observed at the CERN Collider all show enormous promise for increased understanding. Perhaps we shall yet reach that long-sought nirvana in which high-p/sub perpendicular/ collisions become truly simple.

  14. CFD-DEM Analysis of Particle Attrition in a Jet in a Fluidised Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulchini, F.; Nan, W.; Ghadiri, M.; Yazdan Panah, M.; Bertholin, S.; Amblard, B.; Cloupet, A.; Gauthier, T.

    2017-06-01

    In fluidised bed processes, the solids are in vigorous motion and thus inevitably subjected to mechanical stresses due to inter-particle and particle-wall impacts. These stresses lead to a gradual degradation of the particles by surface wear, abrasion and body fragmentation commonly termed attrition. One significant contribution of attrition comes from the air jets of the fluidised bed distributor. Particles are entrained into the air jet, where they get accelerated and impacted onto the fluidised bed particles. The jet induced attrition only affects the part of the bed which is limited by the jet length, where the mode of attrition is largely collisional. The overall jet attrition rate is therefore the result of the combination of the single particle damage and the flux of particles entering into that region. The attrition behaviour of particles in the jet region is analysed by evaluating their propensity of breakage experimentally and by simulating an air-jet in a bed of particles by CFD-DEM. The frequency of collisions and impact velocities are estimated from which the attrition due to a single air-jet is predicted.

  15. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  16. Jet Vectoring Control Using a Novel Synthetic Jet Actuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A primary air jet vectoring control system with a novel synthetic jet actuator (SJA) is presented and simulated numerically. The results show that, in comparison with an existing traditional synthetic jet actuator, which is able to perform the duty of either "push" or "pull", one novel synthetic jet actuator can fulfill both "push" and "pull" functions to vector the primary jet by shifting a slide block inside it. Therefore, because the new actuator possesses greater efficiency, it has potentiality to replace the existing one in various applications, such as thrust vectoring and the reduction of thermal signature. Moreover, as the novel actuator can fulfill those functions that the existing one can not, it may well be expected to popularize it into more flow control systems.

  17. Protostellar jets the best laboratories for investigating astrophysical jets

    CERN Document Server

    De Gouveia dal Pino, E M

    1995-01-01

    Highly collimated supersonic jets are observed to emerge from a wide variety of astrophysical objects, ranging from Active Nuclei of Galaxies (AGN's) to Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) within our own Galaxy. Despite their different physical scales (in size, velocity, and amount of energy transported), they have strong morphological similarities. Thanks to the proximity and relatively small timescales, which permit direct observations of evolutionary changes, YSO jets are, perhaps, the best laboratories for cosmic jet investigation. In this lecture, the formation, structure, and evolution of the YSO jets are reviewed with the help of observational information, MHD and purely hydrodynamical modeling, and numerical simulations. Possible applications of the models to AGN jets are also addressed.

  18. Flow Characteristics of Rectangular Underexpanded Impinging Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minoru YAGA; Yoshio KINJO; Masumi TAMASHIRO; Kenyu OYAKAWA

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the flow fields of underexpanded impinging jet issued from rectangular nozzles of aspect ratio 1,3 and 5 are numerically and experimentally studied. Two dimensional temperature and pressure distributions are measured by using infrared camera and the combination of a pressure scanning device and a stepping motor, respectively. The variation of the stagnation pressure on the impinging plate reveals that a hystcretic phenomenon exists during the increasing and decreasing of the pressure ratio for the aspect ratio of 3.0 and 5.0. It is also found that the nozzle of aspect ratio 1.0 caused the largest total pressure loss pc/p0 = 0.27 at the pressure ratio of p0/pb, = 6.5, where pc is the stagnation center pressure on the wall, p0 the upstream stagnation pressure, pb the ambient pressure. The other two nozzles showed that the pressure loss pc / p0=0.52 and 0.55 were achieved by the nozzles of the aspect ratio 3,0 and 5.0, respectively. The comparison between the calculations and experiments is fairly good, showing the three dimensional streamlines and structures of the shock waves in the jets. However, the hysteresis of the pressure variations observed in the experiments between the pressure ratio of 3.5 and 4.5 cannot be confirmed in the calculations.

  19. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  20. LES of film cooling for different jet fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Renze; W.Schr(o)der; M.Meinke

    2007-01-01

    The present paper investigates the impact of the velocity and density ratio on the turbulent mixing process in gas turbine blade film cooling.A cooling fluid is injected from an inclined pipe at α=30° into a turbulent boundary layer profile at a freestream Reynolds number of Re∞=400000.This jet-in-a-crossflow(JICF) problem is investigated using large-eddy simulations(LES).The governing equations comprise the Navier-Stokes equations plus additional transport equations for several species to simulate a non-reacting gas mixture.A variation of the density ratio is simulated by the heat-mass transfer analogy,i.e.,gases of different density are effused into an an air crossflow at a constant temperature.An efficient large-eddy simulation method for low subsonic flows based on an implicit dual time-stepping scheme combined with low Mach number preconditioning is applied.The numerical results and experimental velocity data measured using two-component particle-image velocimetry (PIV) are in excellent agreement.The results show the dynamics of the flow field in the vicinity of the jet hole,i.e.,the recirculation region and the inclination of the shear layers,to be mainly determined by the velocity ratio.However,evaluating the cooling efficiency downstream of the jet hole the mass flux ratio proves to be the dominant similarity parameter,i.e.,the density ratio between the fluids and the velocity ratio have to be considered.

  1. The lean burn direct injection jet ignition gas engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boretti, Alberto A.; Watson, Harry C. [School of Science and Engineering, University of Ballarat, PO Box 663, Ballarat, Victoria 3353 (Australia)

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents a new in-cylinder mixture preparation and ignition system for various fuels including hydrogen, methane and propane. The system comprises a centrally located direct injection (DI) injector and a jet ignition (JI) device for combustion of the main chamber (MC) mixture. The fuel is injected in the MC with a new generation, fast actuating, high pressure, high flow rate DI injector capable of injection shaping and multiple events. This injector produces a bulk, lean stratified mixture. The JI system uses a second DI injector to inject a small amount of fuel in a small pre-chamber (PC). In the spark ignition (SI) version, a spark plug then ignites a slightly rich mixture. In the auto ignition version, a DI injector injects a small amount of higher pressure fuel in the small PC having a hot glow plug (GP) surface, and the fuel auto ignites in the hot air or when in contact with the hot surface. Either way the MC mixture is then bulk ignited through multiple jets of hot reacting gases. Bulk ignition of the lean, jet controlled, stratified MC mixture resulting from coupling DI with JI makes it possible to burn MC mixtures with fuel to air equivalence ratios reducing almost to zero for a throttle-less control of load diesel-like and high efficiencies over almost the full range of loads. (author)

  2. CONTROL OF TWO DIMENSIONAL JETS USING MINIATURE ZERO MASS FLUX JETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Zero mass flux jets, synthesized by acoustic actuators, have been used for the purpose of jet mixing enhancement and jet vectoring. Zero mass flux jets composed of entirely entrained fluid allow momentum transfer into the embedding flow. In the present experiments, miniature-scale high aspect ratio actuator jets are placed along the long sides and near the exit plane of a primary two-dimensional jet. In different modes, the primary jet can be vectored either towards or away from the actuator jets and the jet mixing is enhanced. The disturbance of the excitation frequency is developed while the unstable frequency of the primary jet is completely suppressed.

  3. Spin torque and interactions in ferromagnetic semiconductor domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovatski, Elizabeth Ann

    The motion of domain walls due to the spin torque generated by coherent carrier transport is of considerable interest for the development of spintronic devices. We model the charge and spin transport through domain walls in ferromagnetic semiconductors for various systems. With an appropriate model Hamiltonian for the spin-dependent potential, we calculate wavefunctions inside the domain walls which are then used to calculate transmission and reflection coefficients, which are then in turn used to calculate current and spin torque. Starting with a simple approximation for the change in magnetization inside the domain wall, and ending with a sophisticated transfer matrix method, we model the common pi wall, the less-studied 2pi wall, and a system of two pi walls separated by a variable distance. We uncover an interesting width dependence on the transport properties of the domain wall. 2pi walls in particular, have definitive maximums in resistance and spin torque for certain domain wall widths that can be seen as a function of the spin mistracking in the system---when the spins are either passing straight through the domain wall (narrow walls) or adiabatically following the magnetization (wide walls), the resistance is low as transmission is high. In the intermediate region, there is room for the spins to rotate their magnetization, but not necessarily all the way through a 360 degree rotation, leading to reflection and resistance. We also calculate that there are widths for which the total velocity of a 2pi wall is greater than that of a same-sized pi wall. In the double-wall system, we model how the system reacts to changes in the separation of the domain walls. When the domain walls are far apart, they act as a spin-selective resonant double barrier, with sharp resonance peaks in the transmission profile. Brought closer and closer together, the number and sharpness of the peaks decrease, the spectrum smooths out, and the domain walls brought together have a

  4. Momentum transfer by astrophysical jets

    CERN Document Server

    Chernin, L M; De Gouveia dal Pino, E M; Benz, W

    1994-01-01

    We have used 3-D smoothed particle hydrodynamical simulations to study the basic properties of the outflow that is created by a protostellar jet in a dense molecular cloud. The dynamics of the jet/cloud interaction is strongly affected by the cooling in the shocked gas behind the bow shock at the head of the jet. We show that this cooling is very rapid, with the cooling distance of the gas much less than the jet radius. Thus, although ambient gas is initially driven away from the jet axis by the high thermal pressure odf the post-shock gas, rapid cooling reduces the pressure and the outflow subsequently evolves in a momentum-conserving snowplow fashion. The velocity of the ambient gas is high in the vicinity of the jet head, but decreases rapidly as more material is swept up. Thus, this type of outflow produces extremely high velocity clumps of post shock gas which resemble the features seen in outflows. We have investigated the transfer of momentum from the jet to the ambient medium as a function of the jet ...

  5. The Highest Redshift Relativistic Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C.C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D.E; Schwartz, D.A.; Wardle, J.F.C.; Gobeille, D.; Lee, N.P.

    2007-12-18

    We describe our efforts to understand large-scale (10's-100's kpc) relativistic jet systems through observations of the highest-redshift quasars. Results from a VLA survey search for radio jets in {approx} 30 z > 3.4 quasars are described along with new Chandra observations of 4 selected targets.

  6. Jet charge at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  7. Core shifts in blazar jets

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A; Pjanka, Patryk; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of core shift in jets, which is the dependence of the position of the jet radio core on the frequency. We derive a new method to measure the jet magnetic field based on both the value of the shift and the observed flux, which compliments the standard method assuming equipartition. Using both methods, we re-analyse the blazar sample of Zamaninasab et al. We find that equipartition is satisfied only if the jet opening angle in the radio core region is close to the values found observationally, $\\simeq$0.1--0.2 divided by the bulk Lorentz factor, $\\Gamma_{\\rm j}$. Larger values, e.g., $1/\\Gamma_{\\rm j}$, would imply very strong departures from equipartition. A small jet opening angle implies in turn the magnetization parameter of $\\ll 1$. We determine the jet magnetic flux taking this effect into account. We find that the average jet magnetic flux is compatible with the model of jet formation due to black-hole spin energy extraction and accretion being magnetically arrested. We calculate the ...

  8. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  9. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  10. LHCb; LHCb Jet Reconstruction

    CERN Multimedia

    Augusto, O

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. It has been designed to collide proton beams at an energy up to 14 TeV in the center of mass. In 2011, the data taking was done with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, the instant luminosity has reached values greater than $4 \\times 10^{32} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ and the integrated luminosity reached the value of 1.02 $fb^{-1}$ on the LHCb. The jet reconstruction is fundamental to observe events that can be used to test pertubative QCD (pQCD). It also provides a way to observe standard model channels and searches for new physics like SUSY. The anti-kt algorithm is a jet reconstruction algorithm that is based on the distance of the particles on the space $\\eta \\times \\phi$ and on the transverse momentum of particles. To maximize the energy resolution all information about the trackers and the calo...

  11. Experimental Study on Bubble Pulse Features Under the Combined Action of Horizontal and Vertical Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王诗平; 初文华; 张阿漫

    2014-01-01

    The pulse features of a bubble have a close connection with the boundary condition. When a bubble moves near a rigid wall, it will be attracted by the Bjerknes force of the wall, and a jet pointing at the wall will be generated. In real application, the bubble may move under the combined action of walls in different directions when it forms at the corner of a pipe or at the bottom of a dam. The motion of the bubble shows complex and nonlinear characteristics under these conditions. In order to investigate the bubble pulse features near complex walls, a horizontal wall and a vertical wall are put into the experimental water tank synchronously, and an electric circuit with 200 voltages is designed to generate discharge bubbles, and then experimental study on the bubble pulse features under the combined action of horizontal and vertical walls is carried out. The influences of the combined action of two walls on the bubble shape, pulse period, moving trace and inside jet are obtained by changing the distances from bubble center to the two walls. It aims at providing references for the relevant theoretical and numerical research.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Vandresar, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of fluid mixing on the depressurization of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. The test tank is approximately ellipsoidal, having a volume of 4.89 m(exp 3) and an average wall heat flux of 4.2 W/m(exp 2) due to external heat input. A mixer unit was installed near the bottom of the tank to generate an upward directed axial jet flow normal to the liquid-vapor interface. Mixing tests were initiated after achieving thermally stratified conditions in the tank either by the introduction of hydrogen gas into the tank or by self-pressurization due to ambient heat leak through the tank wall. The subcooled liquid jet directed towards the liquid-vapor interface by the mixer induced vapor condensation and caused a reduction in tank pressure. Tests were conducted at two jet submergence depths for jet Reynolds numbers from 80,000 to 495,000 and Richardson numbers from 0.014 to 0.52. Results show that the rate of tank pressure change is controlled by the competing effects of subcooled jet flow and the free convection boundary layer flow due to external tank wall heating. It is shown that existing correlations for mixing time and vapor condensation rate based on small scale tanks may not be applicable to large scale liquid hydrogen systems.

  13. Elucidating Jet Energy Loss Using Jets: Prospects from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Grau, N

    2009-01-01

    The details of jet energy loss, as measured at RHIC with single particles and mu lti-particle correlations, are unresolved, and new experimental measurements are necessary in order to shed light on the mechanism and behavior of energy loss. Utilizing the ATLAS electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry, full jet reconstru ction in a heavy ion environment will be performed over a wide range of $p_T$ an d rapidity. With fully reconstructed jets, new and more sensitive probes are ava ilable to test models of energy loss. In this talk, we present a series of obser vables such as the jet $R_{AA}$, the transverse momentum, $j_T$, spectrum of fra gments, the fragmentation function $D(z)$, jet shapes, and di-jet correlations, that aresensitive to perturbative and non-perturbative energy loss. We also disc uss the current level of sensitivity to expected modifications using several dif ferent jet algorithms, the cone, $k_T$, and anti-$k_T$ algorithms.

  14. Solar heating wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, J.L.

    1983-08-16

    A solar heating wall is disclosed including a water pipe circulation system having a plurality of separate tubes, each formed as a loop, connected between a water supply and a return. The separate tubes are arranged in a single vertical plane at the approximate center of the wall. The wall is formed within a frame which is packed with a material suited for use as a thERMAL RESERVOIR, SUCH AS concrete. The frame provides extra support by having a series of horizontally disposed cross supports on one surface of the wall and a series of vertically disposed cross supports on the opposite surface A pressure relief valve may be provided between the water supply to the separate tubes and the water supply to the building or structure containing the solar wall, so that the solar wall can be adapted for use with a city water system.

  15. Wall conditioning for ITER: Current experimental and modeling activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douai, D., E-mail: david.douai@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, Association Euratom-CEA, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Kogut, D. [CEA, IRFM, Association Euratom-CEA, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Brezinsek, S. [FZJ, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52441 Jülich (Germany); Hagelaar, G.J.M. [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d’Energie, UMR5213, Toulouse (France); Hong, S.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Lomas, P.J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Lyssoivan, A. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Nunes, I. [Associação EURATOM-IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Pitts, R.A. [ITER International Organization, F-13067 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Rohde, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Vries, P.C. de [ITER International Organization, F-13067 St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    Wall conditioning will be required in ITER to control fuel and impurity recycling, as well as tritium (T) inventory. Analysis of conditioning cycle on the JET, with its ITER-Like Wall is presented, evidencing reduced need for wall cleaning in ITER compared to JET–CFC. Using a novel 2D multi-fluid model, current density during Glow Discharge Conditioning (GDC) on the in-vessel plasma-facing components (PFC) of ITER is predicted to approach the simple expectation of total anode current divided by wall surface area. Baking of the divertor to 350 °C should desorb the majority of the co-deposited T. ITER foresees the use of low temperature plasma based techniques compatible with the permanent toroidal magnetic field, such as Ion (ICWC) or Electron Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ECWC), for tritium removal between ITER plasma pulses. Extrapolation of JET ICWC results to ITER indicates removal comparable to estimated T-retention in nominal ITER D:T shots, whereas GDC may be unattractive for that purpose.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to intermediate filament proteins of human cells: unique and cross-reacting antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gown, A M; Vogel, A M

    1982-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the intermediate filament proteins of different human cells. The reactivity of these antibodies with the different classes of intermediate filament proteins was determined by indirect immunofluorescence on cultured cells, immunologic indentification on SDS polyacrylamide gels ("wester blot" experiments), and immunoperoxidase assays on intact tissues. The following four antibodies are described: (a) an antivimentin antibody generated against human fibroblast cytoskeleton; (b), (c) two antibodies that recognize a 54-kdalton protein in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells; and (d) an antikeratin antibody made to stratum corneum that recognizes proteins of molecular weight 66 kdaltons and 57 kdaltons. The antivimentin antibody reacts with vimentin (58 kdaltons), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and keratins from stratum corneum, but does not recognize hepatoma intermediate filaments. In immunofluorescence assays, the antibody reacts with mesenchymal cells and cultured epithelial cells that express vimentin. This antibody decorates the media of blood vessels in tissue sections. One antihepatoma filament antibody reacts only with the 54 kdalton protein of these cells and, in immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase assays, only recognizes epithelial cells. It reacts with almost all nonsquamous epithelium. The other antihepatoma filament antibody is much less selective, reacting with vimentin, GFAP, and keratin from stratum corneum. This antibody decorates intermediate filaments of both mesenchymal and epithelial cells. The antikeratin antibody recognizes 66-kdalton and 57-kdalton proteins in extracts of stratum corneum and also identifies proteins of similar molecular weights in all cells tested. However, by immunofluorescence, this antibody decorates only the intermediate filaments of epidermoid carcinoma cells. When assayed on tissue sections, the antibody reacts with squamous epithelium and some, but not all

  17. Cell Wall Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Boudart, Georges; Minic, Zoran; Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we will focus on the contribution of proteomics to the identification and determination of the structure and function of CWPs as well as discussing new perspectives in this area. The great variety of proteins found in the plant cell wall is described. Some families, such as glycoside hydrolases, proteases, lectins, and inhibitors of cell wall modifying enzymes, are discussed in detail. Examples of the use of proteomic techniques to elucidate the structure of various cell wall...

  18. Staggered domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Hoelbling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We construct domain wall fermions with a staggered kernel and investigate their spectral and chiral properties numerically in the Schwinger model. In some relevant cases we see an improvement of chirality by more than an order of magnitude as compared to usual domain wall fermions. Moreover, we present first results for four-dimensional quantum chromodynamics, where we also observe significant reductions of chiral symmetry violations for staggered domain wall fermions.

  19. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  20. Selective fluid cushion in the submucosal layer by water jet: advantage for endoscopic mucosal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehler, G F B A; Sold, M G; Fischer, K; Post, S; Enderle, M

    2007-01-01

    Numerous new techniques have recently been reported and described for the endoscopic mucosal resection of large superficial lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. We present here for the first time the application of a water jet dissector for mucosa elevation. In an ex vivo study, the effectiveness of a water jet dissector (Helix Hydro-Jet) placed directly on the stomach walls of 8 pigs was examined to create a mucosal elevation. After having determined optimal pressures, angle of application, and application times, 13 submucosal fluid cushions were produced in different areas of the stomach walls of 8 pigs in vivo, and the sizes of the resulting submucosal cushions were measured. Using pressures between 30 and 70 bar, it was routinely possible to create submucosal fluid cushions in the stomach wall ex vivo as well as in vivo. Histological examination showed a selective edema in the submucosa without damage to the deeper mucosal layers of the gastric wall. The capacity of a targeted high-pressure water jet to penetrate the mucosa and selectively create a fluid cushion in the submucosa facilitates endoscopic resection of the mucosa. This new method could contribute to ameliorate the endoscopic treatment of mucosal tumors which previously could not be resected endoscopically due to their size, extent, or location. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. LARGE-SCALE VORTICAL STRUCTURES PRODUCED BY AN IMPINGING DENSITY JET IN SHALLOW CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The large-scale vortical structures produced by an impinging density jet in shallow crossflow were numerically investigated in detail using RNG turbulence model.The scales, formation mechanism and evolution feature of the upstream wall vortex in relation to stagnation point and the Scarf vortex in near field were analyzed. The computed characteristic scales of the upstream vortex show distinguished three-dimensionality and vary with the velocity ratio and the water depth. The Scarf vortex in the near field plays an important role in the lateral concentration distributions of the impinging jet in crossflow. When the velocity ratio is relatively small, there exists a distinct lateral high concentration aggregation zone at the lateral edge between the bottom layer wall jet and the ambient crossflow, which is dominated by the Scarf vortex in the near field.

  2. Study of Transport and Micro-structural properties of Magnesium Di-Boride Strand under react and bend mode and bend and react mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Ananya; Das, Subrat Kumar; Bano, Anees; Pradhan, Subrata

    2017-04-01

    I-V characterization of commercial multi-filamentary Magnesium Di-Boride (MgB2) wire of diameter 0.83 mm were studied in Cryocooler at self-field I-V characterization system under both react and bend mode and bend and react mode for a range of temperature 6 K - 25 K. This study is of practical technical relevance where the heat treatment of the superconducting wire makes the wire less flexible for winding in magnet and in other applications. In the present work the bending diameter was varied from 40 mm to 20 mm and for each case critical current (Ic) of the strand is measured for above range of temperature. A customized sample holder is fabricated and thermally anchored with the 2nd cold stage of Cryocooler. It is observed from the measurement that the strand is more susceptible to degradation for react and bend cases. The transport measurement of the strand was accompanied by SEM analyses of bend samples. Also the tensile strength of the raw strands and the heat treated strands were carried out at room temperature in Universal Testing Machine (UTM) to have an estimate about the limiting winding tension value during magnet fabrication.

  3. Direct observation of spin-injection in tyrosinate-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Ampoumogli, Asem; Gournis, Dimitrios; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Jankovic, Lubos; Christoforidis, Konstantinos C.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Froudakis, George E.; Maccallini, Enrico; Rudolf, Petra; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report on the interaction of a tyrosinate radical with single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). The tyrosinate radical was formed from tyrosine (ester) by Fenton's reagent and, reacted in situ with carbon nanotubes resulting in novel tyrosinated carbon nanotube derivatives. The covalent

  4. Calcium antagonists decrease capillary wall damage in aging hypertensive rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farkas, E.; de Jong, G.I.; Apro, E.; Keuker, J.I.H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic hypertension during aging is a serious threat to the cerebral vasculature. The larger brain arteries can react to hypertension with an abnormal wall thickening, a loss of elasticity and a narrowed lumen. However, little is known about the hypertension-induced alterations of cerebral capillar

  5. Resonance Production in Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Markert, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Hadronic resonances with short life times and strong coupling to the dense medium may exhibit mass shifts and width broadening as signatures of chiral symmetry restoration at the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Resonances with different lifetimes are also used to extract information about the time evolution and temperature of the expanding hadronic medium. In order to collect information about the early stage (at the phase transition) of a heavy-ion collision, resonances and decay particles which are unaffected by the hadronic medium have to be used. We explore a possible new technique to extract signals from the early stage through the selection of resonances from jets. A first attempt of this analysis, using the reconstructed $\\phi$(1020) from 200 GeV Au+Au collisions in STAR, is presented.

  6. Impinging Jet Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, Ray-tracing data visualization technique was used to obtain realistic and detailed flow motions during impinging of two liquid jets. Different patterns of sheet and rim configurations were presented to shed light into the underlying physics, including liquid chain, closed rim, open rim, unstable rim and flapping sheet. In addition, stationary asymmetrical waves were observed and compared with existing theories. The generation of stationary capillary wave in respect to the liquid rim were explained by the classic shallow water wave theory. The atomization process caused by development of the impact waves were observed in detail, including fragmentation of liquid sheet, formation of liquid ligaments, and breakup of ligament into droplet. The locking-on feature of the wavelength of impact wave were also found to be similar to that of perturbed free shear layers.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Study of Twin Underexpanded Impinging Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minoru Yaga; Minoru Okano; Masumi Tamashiro; Kenyu Oyakawa

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the dual underexpanded impinging jets are experimentally and numerically studied. The experiments were performed by measuring the unsteady and averaged wall static pressures and by visualizing density fields using schlieren method. Numerical calculations were also conducted by solving unsteady three dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations with Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. The main parameters for the dual jets are the non-dimensional distance between the two nozzle centers H/D covering 1.5, 2.0, the nozzle to plate separation L/D 2.0, 3.0,4.0 and 5.0 and the pressure ratio defined by Po/Pb 1.0~6.0, where D is the diameter of each nozzle exit, Po the stagnation pressure and Pb the back pressure. It is found that the agreement between the experiments and the calculations is good. The fountain flow at the middle of the two jets is observed both in the experiments and the calculation. According to FFT analysis of the experiments for the twin jets,relatively low frequency (up to 5 kHz) is dominant for H/D =1.5, L/D =2.0 and pressure ratio Po/Pb =3.0 and 5.0,which is confirmed by the experiments.

  8. Collection of an electrospinning jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tao; Reneker, Darrell

    2006-03-01

    Electrospinning [1, 2] of polymer nanofibers involves an electrically driven bending instability of the elongating jet. If the jet is collected on a stationary surface immediately before or after the bending instability occurs, the jet buckles as it stops. Bending and buckling are distinct phenomena. The determination of the behavior of the jet path in the vicinity of the onset of the first bending instability is important for the orderly collection of the nanofiber. Precise adjustment of the fluid flow, the electrical current, and the shape of the region from which the jet issued, produced a very stable jet which was observed with a high frame rate, short exposure time camera. The fluid jet and the resulting nanofibers were collected on a solid, electrically conducting substrate which was moved laterally, and simultaneously, away from the tip. This collected material preserved a record of the straight segment and the bending and buckling instabilities with a minimum of overlapping. The occurrence of a second bending instability was sometimes observed in the dry fiber. 1. Doshi, J.; Reneker, D.H., Journal of Electrostatics; 35, 151, 1995 2. Reneker, D.H. ;Yarin,A.L.Fong, H.; Koombhongse, S., Journal of Applied Physics, 87, 4531, 2000

  9. Magnetic Dissipation in Relativistic Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Mizuno

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most promising mechanisms for producing and accelerating relativistic jets, and maintaining collimated structure of relativistic jets involve magnetohydrodynamical (MHD processes. We have investigated the magnetic dissipation mechanism in relativistic jets via relativistic MHD simulations. We found that the relativistic jets involving a helical magnetic field are unstable for the current-driven kink instability, which leads to helically distorted structure in relativistic jets. We identified the regions of high current density in filamentary current sheets, indicative of magnetic reconnection, which are associated to the kink unstable regions and correlated to the converted regions of magnetic to kinetic energies of the jets. We also found that an over-pressured relativistic jet leads to the generation of a series of stationary recollimation shocks and rarefaction structures by the nonlinear interaction of shocks and rarefaction waves. The differences in the recollimation shock structure due to the difference of the magnetic field topologies and strengths may be observable through mm-VLBI observations and space-VLBI mission.

  10. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari [National Institute of Technology, Assam (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-03-15

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  11. Jet energy calibration in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Doug

    A correct energy calibration for jets is essential to the success of the ATLAS experi- ment. In this thesis I study a method for deriving an in situ jet energy calibration for the ATLAS detector. In particular, I show the applicability of the missing transverse energy projection fraction method. This method is shown to set the correct mean energy for jets. Pileup effects due to the high luminosities at ATLAS are also stud- ied. I study the correlations in lateral distributions of pileup energy, as well as the luminosity dependence of the in situ calibration metho

  12. A semi-Lagrangian transport method for kinetic problems with application to dense-to-dilute polydisperse reacting spray flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doisneau, François; Arienti, Marco; Oefelein, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    For sprays, as described by a kinetic disperse phase model strongly coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations, the resolution strategy is constrained by accuracy objectives, robustness needs, and the computing architecture. In order to leverage the good properties of the Eulerian formalism, we introduce a deterministic particle-based numerical method to solve transport in physical space, which is simple to adapt to the many types of closures and moment systems. The method is inspired by the semi-Lagrangian schemes, developed for Gas Dynamics. We show how semi-Lagrangian formulations are relevant for a disperse phase far from equilibrium and where the particle-particle coupling barely influences the transport; i.e., when particle pressure is negligible. The particle behavior is indeed close to free streaming. The new method uses the assumption of parcel transport and avoids to compute fluxes and their limiters, which makes it robust. It is a deterministic resolution method so that it does not require efforts on statistical convergence, noise control, or post-processing. All couplings are done among data under the form of Eulerian fields, which allows one to use efficient algorithms and to anticipate the computational load. This makes the method both accurate and efficient in the context of parallel computing. After a complete verification of the new transport method on various academic test cases, we demonstrate the overall strategy's ability to solve a strongly-coupled liquid jet with fine spatial resolution and we apply it to the case of high-fidelity Large Eddy Simulation of a dense spray flow. A fuel spray is simulated after atomization at Diesel engine combustion chamber conditions. The large, parallel, strongly coupled computation proves the efficiency of the method for dense, polydisperse, reacting spray flows.

  13. A semi-Lagrangian transport method for kinetic problems with application to dense-to-dilute polydisperse reacting spray flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doisneau, François, E-mail: fdoisne@sandia.gov; Arienti, Marco, E-mail: marient@sandia.gov; Oefelein, Joseph C., E-mail: oefelei@sandia.gov

    2017-01-15

    For sprays, as described by a kinetic disperse phase model strongly coupled to the Navier–Stokes equations, the resolution strategy is constrained by accuracy objectives, robustness needs, and the computing architecture. In order to leverage the good properties of the Eulerian formalism, we introduce a deterministic particle-based numerical method to solve transport in physical space, which is simple to adapt to the many types of closures and moment systems. The method is inspired by the semi-Lagrangian schemes, developed for Gas Dynamics. We show how semi-Lagrangian formulations are relevant for a disperse phase far from equilibrium and where the particle–particle coupling barely influences the transport; i.e., when particle pressure is negligible. The particle behavior is indeed close to free streaming. The new method uses the assumption of parcel transport and avoids to compute fluxes and their limiters, which makes it robust. It is a deterministic resolution method so that it does not require efforts on statistical convergence, noise control, or post-processing. All couplings are done among data under the form of Eulerian fields, which allows one to use efficient algorithms and to anticipate the computational load. This makes the method both accurate and efficient in the context of parallel computing. After a complete verification of the new transport method on various academic test cases, we demonstrate the overall strategy's ability to solve a strongly-coupled liquid jet with fine spatial resolution and we apply it to the case of high-fidelity Large Eddy Simulation of a dense spray flow. A fuel spray is simulated after atomization at Diesel engine combustion chamber conditions. The large, parallel, strongly coupled computation proves the efficiency of the method for dense, polydisperse, reacting spray flows.

  14. Semi-implicit iterative methods for low Mach number turbulent reacting flows: Operator splitting versus approximate factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArt, Jonathan F.; Mueller, Michael E.

    2016-12-01

    Two formally second-order accurate, semi-implicit, iterative methods for the solution of scalar transport-reaction equations are developed for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of low Mach number turbulent reacting flows. The first is a monolithic scheme based on a linearly implicit midpoint method utilizing an approximately factorized exact Jacobian of the transport and reaction operators. The second is an operator splitting scheme based on the Strang splitting approach. The accuracy properties of these schemes, as well as their stability, cost, and the effect of chemical mechanism size on relative performance, are assessed in two one-dimensional test configurations comprising an unsteady premixed flame and an unsteady nonpremixed ignition, which have substantially different Damköhler numbers and relative stiffness of transport to chemistry. All schemes demonstrate their formal order of accuracy in the fully-coupled convergence tests. Compared to a (non-)factorized scheme with a diagonal approximation to the chemical Jacobian, the monolithic, factorized scheme using the exact chemical Jacobian is shown to be both more stable and more economical. This is due to an improved convergence rate of the iterative procedure, and the difference between the two schemes in convergence rate grows as the time step increases. The stability properties of the Strang splitting scheme are demonstrated to outpace those of Lie splitting and monolithic schemes in simulations at high Damköhler number; however, in this regime, the monolithic scheme using the approximately factorized exact Jacobian is found to be the most economical at practical CFL numbers. The performance of the schemes is further evaluated in a simulation of a three-dimensional, spatially evolving, turbulent nonpremixed planar jet flame.

  15. Jet performance in Run 2 at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kunigo, Takuto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Slides for the talk "Jet performance in Run 2" at BOOST 2016. In this talk, the jet energy calibration sequence ( including in-situ calibrations at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV ), jet energy scale and resolution uncertainties and the jet calibration plan for 2016 will be presented.

  16. Jet reconstruction and heavy jet tagging at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The jet reconstruction and the heavy jet flavour tagging at LHCb will be discussed with focus on the last published measurements such as the measurement of forward tt, W+bb and W+cc production in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV and the search for the SM Higgs boson decaying in bbbar or ccbar in association to W or Z boson.

  17. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful, a

  18. Domain wall filters

    CERN Document Server

    Bär, O; Neuberger, H; Witzel, O; Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  19. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  20. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  1. Jet charge determination at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tokar, Stano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a jet could be very useful both for testing different aspects of the Standard model and for searching signals of a beyond-the-standard-model physics. A weighted sum of the charges of a jet constituents can be used at the LHC experiments to distinguish among jets from partons with different charges. A few applications of the jet charge variable are presented here. The jet charge was used to distinguish jets initiated by $b$ quarks from those initiated by $\\bar{b}$ quarks, for distinguishing between boosted hadronically decaying $W^+$ and $W^{-}$, and for distinguishing jets initiated by quarks from those initiated by gluons.

  2. Immune response of sheep to Haemonchus contortus: serum antibodies against cross reacting antigens between parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charley, J; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1981-01-01

    Normal and H. contortus infected sera were studied by ELISA technique against different stages of the parasites. In all cases antibody activity was detected. This activity in serum is partially eliminated after absorption with an adult worm extract of N brasiliensis. N. brasiliensis and H. contortus antigens were analysed by TCIEP with a rabbit anti-N. brasiliensis serum to examine shared antigens of H. contortus. A minimum of seven cross reacting antigens were detected. H. contortus adult worm extract was absorbed by the rabbit anti-N. brasiliensis serum. After absorption all cross reacting antigens were removed but at least one antigen reacting with a rabbit serum anti-H. Contortus is maintained. When this antigen is tested in elisa technique only a weak antibody activity is found in normal serum.

  3. Process to separate alkali metal salts from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier; Larsen, Dennis; Killpack, Jeff

    2017-06-27

    A process to facilitate gravimetric separation of alkali metal salts, such as alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides, from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons. The disclosed process is part of a method of upgrading a hydrocarbon feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the hydrocarbon feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase containing alkali metal salts and reduced heavy metals, and an upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock. The inorganic phase may be gravimetrically separated from the upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock after mixing at a temperature between about 350.degree. C. to 400.degree. C. for a time period between about 15 minutes and 2 hours.

  4. JET diagnostic enhancements in preparation for DT operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, J.; Murari, A.; Perez Von Thun, C.; Marocco, D.; Tardocchi, M.; Belli, F.; García Muñoz, M.; Silva, A.; Soare, S.; Craciunescu, T.; Santala, M.; Blanchard, P.; Balboa, I.; Hawkes, N.

    2016-11-01

    In order to complete the exploitation of the JET ITER-like Wall and to take full benefit from deuterium-tritium experiments on JET, a set of diagnostic system refurbishments or upgrades is in progress. These diagnostic enhancements focus mainly on neutron, gamma, fast ions, instabilities, and operations support. These efforts intend to provide better spatial, temporal, and energy resolution while increasing measurement coverage. Also previously non-existing capabilities, such as Doppler reflectometry is now available for scientific exploitation. Guaranteeing diagnostic reliability and consistency during the expected DT conditions is also a critical objective of the work and systems being implemented. An overview of status and scope of the ongoing projects is presented.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Coherent Structure of Impinging Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingzhou YU; Lihua CHEN; Hanhui JIN; Jianren FAN

    2005-01-01

    @@ The flow field of a rectangular exit, semi-confined and submerged turbulent jet impinging orthogonally on a flat plate with Reynolds number 8500 was studied by large eddy simulation (LES). A dynamic sub-grid stress model has been used for the small scales of turbulence. The evolvements such as the forming, developing, moving,pairing and merging of the coherent structures of vortex in the whole regions were obtained. The results revealed that the primary vortex structures were generated periodically, which was the key factor to make the secondary vortices generate in the wall jet region. In addition, the eddy intensity of the primary vortices and the secondary vortices induced by the primary vortices along with the time were also analyzed.

  6. Needle-free jet injections: dependence of jet penetration and dispersion in the skin on jet power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-07-07

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, a quantitative understanding of the energetics of jet injection is still lacking. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B (SRB). The power of the jet at the nozzle was varied from 1 to 600 W by independently altering the nozzle diameter (30-560 microm) and jet velocity (100-200 m/s). The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power. Additional experiments were performed using a model material, polyacrylamide gel, to further understand the dependence of jet penetration on jet power. These experiments demonstrated that jet power also effectively describes gel erosion due to liquid impingement.

  7. Hard and soft walls

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Kimball A

    2011-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand divergences which occur when quantum fields are confined by bounding surfaces, we investigate local energy densities (and the local energy-momentum tensor) in the vicinity of a wall. In this paper, attention is largely confined to a scalar field. If the wall is an infinite Dirichlet plane, well known volume and surface divergences are found, which are regulated by a temporal point-splitting parameter. If the wall is represented by a linear potential in one coordinate $z$, the divergences are softened. The case of a general wall, described by a potential of the form $z^\\alpha$ for $z>0$ is considered. If $\\alpha>2$, there are no surface divergences, which in any case vanish if the conformal stress tensor is employed. Divergences within the wall are also considered.

  8. Evolution variable dependence of jet substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaki, Yasuhito

    2015-01-01

    Studies on jet substructure have evolved significantly in recent years. Jet substructure is essentially determined by QCD radiations and non-perturbative effects. Predictions of jet substructure are usually different among Monte Carlo event generators, and are governed by the parton shower algorithm implemented. For leading logarithmic parton shower, even though one of the core variables is the evolution variable, its choice is not unique. We examine evolution variable dependence of the jet substructure by developing a parton shower generator that interpolates between different evolution variables using a parameter $\\alpha$. Jet shape variables and associated jet rates for quark and gluon jets are used to demonstrate the $\\alpha$-dependence of the jet substructure. We find angular ordered shower predicts wider jets, while relative transverse momentum ($p_{\\bot}$) ordered shower predicts narrower jets. This is qualitatively in agreement with the missing phase space of $p_{\\bot}$ ordered showers. Such differenc...

  9. Structure, Mixing, and Stability of Flush and Elevated Jets in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkyan, Levon; Getsinger, Daniel; Peng, Terry Wen Yu; Smith, Owen; Karagozian, Ann

    2013-11-01

    The present experiments explore the characteristics of equidensity and variable density transverse jets using acetone PLIF, stereo PIV, and hot wire anemometry. Jets composed of mixtures of helium and nitrogen are injected normally from different types of nozzles (flush and elevated with respect to the wind tunnel wall, and converging as well as straight shapes) into an air crossflow. A range of jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios J and density ratios S is examined, within which previous studies have identified conditions for upstream shear layer transition from convective to absolute instability. The present study examines the relationships among transverse jet structure, including vortical rollup and cross-sectional symmetry/asymmetry, jet mixing characteristics, and shear layer stability characteristics. The role of the crossflow boundary layer as well as jet injection systems for structure, mixing, and stability is evaluated and related to prior observations on vorticity evolution for jets in crossflow. Supported by NSF grant CBET-1133015 & AFOSR grant FA9550-11-1-0128 (A001768901).

  10. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MEAN AND TURBULENCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AN IMPINGING DENSITY JET IN A CONFINED CROSSFLOW IN NEAR FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jing-yu; WANG Dao-zeng; ZHANG Yan

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional mean and turbulence characteristics of an impinging density jet in a confined crossflow were numerically investigated using the RNG turbulence model. The comparison of the subregion structures and gross features between the numerical results and the experimental data show good agreement. The velocity, Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) and concentration distributions of the impinging jet in near field were obtained and analyzed. The results indicate that the flow and concentration fields of the impinging jet in the crossflow exhibit distinguished three-dimensionality in the near field. There exist upstream wall vortices and downstream wall jet zones in the impinging region, and the TKE and concentration decays are asymmetrical in relation to the stagnation point. The lateral concentration distribution range in the impinging region spreads considerably. The enhanced entrainment and mixing of the impinging jet in the confined crossflow are mostly associated with the impinging action and lateral expansion in the impinging region. The presence of the bottom wall restrains the formation of the spanwise rollers in the transverse jet region and vertical entrainment and mixing in the impinging region and the transition region.

  11. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  12. Applying Hanford Tank Mixing Data to Define Pulse Jet Mixer Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Holton, Langdon K.

    2015-12-07

    Pulse jet mixed (PJM) process vessels are being developed for storing, blending, and chemical processing of nuclear waste slurries at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to be built at Hanford, Washington. These waste slurries exhibit variable process feed characteristics including Newtonian to non-Newtonian rheologies over a range of solids loadings. Waste feed to the WTP from the Hanford Tank Farms will be accomplished via the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) system which includes million-gallon underground storage double-shell tanks (DSTs) with dual-opposed jet mixer pumps. Experience using WFD type jet mixer pumps to mobilize actual Hanford waste in DSTs may be used to establish design threshold criteria of interest to pulse jet mixed process vessel operation. This paper describes a method to evaluate the pulse jet mixed vessel capability to process waste based on information obtained during mobilizing and suspending waste by the WFD system jet mixer pumps in a DST. Calculations of jet velocity and wall shear stress in a specific pulse jet mixed process vessel were performed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The CFD-modelled process vessel consists of a 4.9-m- (16-ft-) diameter tank with a 2:1 semi-elliptical head, a single, 10-cm (4-in.) downward facing 60-degree conical nozzle, and a 0.61-m (24-in.) inside diameter PJM. The PJM is located at 70% of the vessel radius with the nozzle stand-off-distance 14 cm (6 in.) above the vessel head. The CFD modeled fluid velocity and wall shear stress can be used to estimate vessel waste-processing performance by comparison to available actual WFD system process data. Test data from the operation of jet mixer pumps in the 23-m (75-ft) diameter DSTs have demonstrated mobilization, solid particles in a sediment matrix were moved from their initial location, and suspension, mobilized solid particles were moved to a higher elevation in the vessel than their initial location, of waste solids

  13. V+jets from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fengwangdong

    2016-01-01

    This document is dedicated to recent results on the measurements of a vector boson production associated with jets (V+jets) using CMS detector experiment, with a central proton-proton (pp) collision energy of respectively 8 TeV (RunI) and 13 TeV (RunII). The vector boson can be a W boson, Z boson, or photon. The jets are of any flavor, as well as the ones containing heavy flavor quarks, such as bottom(b) quarks. The inclusive cross sections of V+jets processes and differential cross sections as a function of various kinematic observables are presented and compared to several theoretical predictions. In general, the comparison between theoretical calculations and measurement are crucial for improving modeling and precision on QCD dynamics.

  14. Top Jets at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, L.G.; Lee, S.J.; Perez, G.; Sung, I.; Virzi, J.

    2008-10-06

    We investigatethe reconstruction of high pT hadronically-decaying top quarksat the Large Hadron Collider. One of the main challenges in identifying energetictop quarks is that the decay products become increasingly collimated. This reducesthe efficacy of conventional reconstruction methods that exploit the topology of thetop quark decay chain. We focus on the cases where the decay products of the topquark are reconstructed as a single jet, a"top-jet." The most basic"top-tag" methodbased on jet mass measurement is considered in detail. To analyze the feasibility ofthe top-tagging method, both theoretical and experimental aspects of the large QCDjet background contribution are examined. Based on a factorization approach, wederive a simple analytic approximation for the shape of the QCD jet mass spectrum.We observe very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. We consider high pT tt bar production in the Standard Model as an example, and show that our theoretical QCD jet mass distributions can efficiently characterize the background via sideband analyses. We show that with 25 fb-1 of data, our approach allows us to resolve top-jets with pT _> 1 TeV, from the QCD background, and about 1.5 TeV top-jets with 100 fb-1, without relying on b-tagging. To further improve the significancewe consider jet shapes (recently analyzed in 0807.0234 [hep-ph]), which resolve thesubstructure of energy flow inside cone jets. A method of measuring the top quarkpolarization by using the transverse momentum of the bottom quark is also presented.The main advantages of our approach are: (i) the mass distributions are driven byfirst principle calculations, instead of relying solely on Monte Carlo simulation; (ii) for high pT jets (pT _> 1 TeV), IR-safe jet shape variables are robust against detectorresolution effects. Our analysis can be applied to other boosted massive particlessuch as the electroweak gauge bosons and the Higgs.

  15. Jet Quenching with Parton evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Luan

    2009-01-01

    We report the evolution effects on jet energy loss with detailed balance. The initial conditions and parton evolution based on perturbative QCD in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC are determined. The parton evolution affect the jet energy loss evidently. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss and will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high P_{T} hadron spectra.

  16. Jet-quenching and correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fuqiang Wang

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the experimental aspects of jet-quenching and correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Emphasis is put on correlation measurements, namely jet-like correlations with anisotropic flow subtraction in heavy-ion collisions and long-range pseudorapidity correlations in small systems. Future path on correlation studies is envisioned which may elucidate jet–medium interactions and the properties of the hot dense medium in QCD.

  17. A KPC-scale X-ray jet in the BL LAC Source S5 2007+777

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambruna, Rita; Maraschi, Laura; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The BL Lac S3 2007++777, a classical radio-selected BL Lac from the sample of Stirkel et al. exhibiting an extended (19") radio jet. was observed with Chandra revealing an X-ray jet with simi1ar morphology. The hard X-ray spectrum and broad band SED is consistent with an IC/CMB origin for the X-ray emission, implying a highly relativistic flow at small angle to the line of sight with an unusually large deprojected length, 300 kpc. A structured jet consisting of a fast spine and slow wall is consistent with the observations.

  18. Experimental and kinetic modeling study of 3-methylheptane in a jet-stirred reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Karsenty, Florent

    2012-08-16

    Improving the combustion of conventional and alternative fuels in practical applications requires the fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. The focus of the present study is on a high-molecular-weight branched alkane, namely, 3-methylheptane, oxidized in a jet-stirred reactor. This fuel, along with 2-methylheptane, 2,5-dimethylhexane, and n-octane, are candidate surrogate components for conventional diesel fuels derived from petroleum, synthetic Fischer-Tropsch diesel and jet fuels derived from coal, natural gas, and/or biomass, and renewable diesel and jet fuels derived from the thermochemical treatment of bioderived fats and oils. This study presents new experimental results along with a low- and high-temperature chemical kinetic model for the oxidation of 3-methylheptane. The proposed model is validated against these new experimental data from a jet-stirred reactor operated at 10 atm, over the temperature range of 530-1220 K, and for equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1, and 2. Significant effort is placed on the understanding of the effects of methyl substitution on important combustion properties, such as fuel reactivity and species formation. It was found that 3-methylheptane reacts more slowly than 2-methylheptane at both low and high temperatures in the jet-stirred reactor. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. Jets and environment of microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2008-01-01

    Two relativistic X-ray jets have been detected with the Chandra X-ray observatory from the black hole X-ray transient XTE J1550-564. We report a full analysis of the evolution of the two jets with a gamma-ray burst external shock model. A plausible scenario suggests a cavity outside the central source and the jets first travelled with constant velocity and then are slowed down by the interactions between the jets and the interstellar medium (ISM). The best fitted radius of the cavity is $\\sim$0.36 pc on the eastern side and $\\sim$0.46 pc on the western side, and the densities also show asymmetry, of $\\sim$0.015 cm$^{-3}$ on the east to $\\sim$0.21 cm$^{-3}$ on the west. A large scale low density region is also found in another microquasar system, H 1743-322. These results are consistent with previous suggestions that the environment of microquasars should be rather vacuous, compared to the normal Galactic environment. A generic scenario for microquasar jets is proposed, classifying the observed jets into three...

  20. Numerical Simulations of Bouncing Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Bonito, Andrea; Lee, Sanghyun

    2015-01-01

    Bouncing jets are fascinating phenomenons occurring under certain conditions when a jet impinges on a free surface. This effect is observed when the fluid is Newtonian and the jet falls in a bath undergoing a solid motion. It occurs also for non-Newtonian fluids when the jets falls in a vessel at rest containing the same fluid. We investigate numerically the impact of the experimental setting and the rheological properties of the fluid on the onset of the bouncing phenomenon. Our investigations show that the occurrence of a thin lubricating layer of air separating the jet and the rest of the liquid is a key factor for the bouncing of the jet to happen. The numerical technique that is used consists of a projection method for the Navier-Stokes system coupled with a level set formulation for the representation of the interface. The space approximation is done with adaptive finite elements. Adaptive refinement is shown to be very important to capture the thin layer of air that is responsible for the bouncing.