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Sample records for reactant molecules reaction

  1. Reactants encapsulation and Maillard Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, A.D.; Fogliano, V.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades many efforts have been addressed to the control of Maillard Reaction products in different foods with the aim to promote the formation of compounds having the desired color and flavor and to reduce the concentration of several potential toxic molecules. Encapsulation, already

  2. On the mechanism of effective chemical reactions with turbulent mixing of reactants and finite rate of molecular reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorotilin, V. P., E-mail: VPVorotilin@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    A generalization of the theory of chemical transformation processes under turbulent mixing of reactants and arbitrary values of the rate of molecular reactions is presented that was previously developed for the variant of an instantaneous reaction [13]. The use of the features of instantaneous reactions when considering the general case, namely, the introduction of the concept of effective reaction for the reactant volumes and writing a closing conservation equation for these volumes, became possible due to the partition of the whole amount of reactants into “active” and “passive” classes; the reactants of the first class are not mixed and react by the mechanism of instantaneous reactions, while the reactants of the second class approach each other only through molecular diffusion, and therefore their contribution to the reaction process can be neglected. The physical mechanism of reaction for the limit regime of an ideal mixing reactor (IMR) is revealed and described. Although formally the reaction rate in this regime depends on the concentration of passive fractions of the reactants, according to the theory presented, the true (hidden) mechanism of the reaction is associated only with the reaction of the active fractions of the reactants with vanishingly small concentration in the volume of the reactor. It is shown that the rate constant of fast chemical reactions can be evaluated when the mixing intensity of reactants is much less than that needed to reach the mixing conditions in an IMR.

  3. Thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru

    1981-02-01

    The energetics of ions and the thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules have been studied with a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It was found that the translational energy of ion can be easily obtained from analysis of the decay curve using the time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The condensation-elimination reactions proceeded via cross- and homo-elimination mechanism in which the nature of intermediate-complex could be correlated with the nature of reactant ion. It was elucidated that behavior of poly-atomic oxygen-containing ions on the condensation-elimination reactions is considerably influenced by their oxonium ion structures having functional groups. In addition, the rate constants of the condensation-elimination reactions have affected with the energy state of reactant ion and the dipole moment and/or the polarizability of neutral molecule. It was clarified that the rate constants of the ion-molecule clustering reactions in poly-atomic oxygen-containing molecules such as cyclic ether of six member rings are very large and the cluster ions are stable owing to the large number of vibrational degree of freedom in the cluster ions. (author)

  4. Molecular beam studies of ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentry, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented in which an attempt is made to highlight some of the areas in which molecular beam techniques contribute to the understanding of ion--molecule reaction dynamics. Included are reactant kinetic energy range and resolution, internal state selection and analysis, and new chemical systems and phenomena. 35 references

  5. Agent-based simulation of reactions in the crowded and structured intracellular environment: Influence of mobility and location of the reactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapin Alexei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper we apply a novel agent-based simulation method in order to model intracellular reactions in detail. The simulations are performed within a virtual cytoskeleton enriched with further crowding elements, which allows the analysis of molecular crowding effects on intracellular diffusion and reaction rates. The cytoskeleton network leads to a reduction in the mobility of molecules. Molecules can also unspecifically bind to membranes or the cytoskeleton affecting (i the fraction of unbound molecules in the cytosol and (ii furthermore reducing the mobility. Binding of molecules to intracellular structures or scaffolds can in turn lead to a microcompartmentalization of the cell. Especially the formation of enzyme complexes promoting metabolic channeling, e.g. in glycolysis, depends on the co-localization of the proteins. Results While the co-localization of enzymes leads to faster reaction rates, the reduced mobility decreases the collision rate of reactants, hence reducing the reaction rate, as expected. This effect is most prominent in diffusion limited reactions. Furthermore, anomalous diffusion can occur due to molecular crowding in the cell. In the context of diffusion controlled reactions, anomalous diffusion leads to fractal reaction kinetics. The simulation framework is used to quantify and separate the effects originating from molecular crowding or the reduced mobility of the reactants. We were able to define three factors which describe the effective reaction rate, namely f diff for the diffusion effect, f volume for the crowding, and f access for the reduced accessibility of the molecules. Conclusions Molecule distributions, reaction rate constants and structural parameters can be adjusted separately in the simulation allowing a comprehensive study of individual effects in the context of a realistic cell environment. As such, the present simulation can help to bridge the gap between in vivo and in vitro

  6. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  7. The general theory of multistage geminate reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. III. Two-stage reversible dissociation in geminate reaction A + A↔C↔B + B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipriyanov, Alexey A.; Kipriyanov, Alexander A.; Doktorov, Alexander B. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-14

    Specific two-stage reversible reaction A + A↔C↔B + B of the decay of species C reactants by two independent transition channels is considered on the basis of the general theory of multistage reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. It is assumed that at the initial instant of time, the reacting system contains only reactants C. The employed general approach has made it possible to consider, in the general case, the inhomogeneous initial distribution of reactants, and avoid application of model concepts of a reaction system structure (i.e., of the structure of reactants and their molecular mobility). Slowing of multistage reaction kinetics as compared to the kinetics of elementary stages is established and physically interpreted. To test approximations (point approximation) used to develop a universal kinetic law, a widely employed specific model of spherical particles with isotropic reactivity diffusing in solution is applied. With this particular model as an example, ultimate kinetics of chemical conversion of reactants is investigated. The question concerning the depths of chemical transformation at which long-term asymptotes are reached is studied.

  8. The general theory of multistage geminate reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. III. Two-stage reversible dissociation in geminate reaction A + A ↔ C ↔ B + B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipriyanov, Alexey A; Kipriyanov, Alexander A; Doktorov, Alexander B

    2016-04-14

    Specific two-stage reversible reaction A + A ↔ C ↔ B + B of the decay of species C reactants by two independent transition channels is considered on the basis of the general theory of multistage reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. It is assumed that at the initial instant of time, the reacting system contains only reactants C. The employed general approach has made it possible to consider, in the general case, the inhomogeneous initial distribution of reactants, and avoid application of model concepts of a reaction system structure (i.e., of the structure of reactants and their molecular mobility). Slowing of multistage reaction kinetics as compared to the kinetics of elementary stages is established and physically interpreted. To test approximations (point approximation) used to develop a universal kinetic law, a widely employed specific model of spherical particles with isotropic reactivity diffusing in solution is applied. With this particular model as an example, ultimate kinetics of chemical conversion of reactants is investigated. The question concerning the depths of chemical transformation at which long-term asymptotes are reached is studied.

  9. Kinetics of the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways: influences of pH and reactant initial concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A previously proposed kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways has been validated by changing the initial pH (4.8, 5.5, 6.0, 6.8 and 7.5) of the reaction and reactant initial concentrations (1:2 and 2:1 molar ratios were compared to the 1:1 ratio). The model consists of 10

  10. Single-molecule stochastic times in a reversible bimolecular reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peter; Valleriani, Angelo

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we consider the reversible reaction between reactants of species A and B to form the product C. We consider this reaction as a prototype of many pseudobiomolecular reactions in biology, such as for instance molecular motors. We derive the exact probability density for the stochastic waiting time that a molecule of species A needs until the reaction with a molecule of species B takes place. We perform this computation taking fully into account the stochastic fluctuations in the number of molecules of species B. We show that at low numbers of participating molecules, the exact probability density differs from the exponential density derived by assuming the law of mass action. Finally, we discuss the condition of detailed balance in the exact stochastic and in the approximate treatment.

  11. Electrode redox reactions with polarizable molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2018-04-01

    A theory of redox reactions involving electron transfer between a metal electrode and a polarizable molecule in solution is formulated. Both the existence of molecular polarizability and its ability to change due to electron transfer distinguish this problem from classical theories of interfacial electrochemistry. When the polarizability is different between the oxidized and reduced states, the statistics of thermal fluctuations driving the reactant over the activation barrier becomes non-Gaussian. The problem of electron transfer is formulated as crossing of two non-parabolic free energy surfaces. An analytical solution for these free energy surfaces is provided and the activation barrier of electrode electron transfer is given in terms of two reorganization energies corresponding to the oxidized and reduced states of the molecule in solution. The new non-Gaussian theory is, therefore, based on two theory parameters in contrast to one-parameter Marcus formulation for electrode reactions. The theory, which is consistent with the Nernst equation, predicts asymmetry between the cathodic and anodic branches of the electrode current. They show different slopes at small electrode overpotentials and become curved at larger overpotentials. However, the curvature of the Tafel plot is reduced compared to the Marcus-Hush model and approaches the empirical Butler-Volmer form with different transfer coefficients for the anodic and cathodic currents.

  12. Vibrational-state-selected ion--molecule reaction cross sections at thermal energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijkeren, D. van; Boltjes, E.; Eck, J. van; Niehaus, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method designed to measure relative ion—molecule reaction rates at thermal collision energies for selected reactant ion vibrational states is described. Relative reaction rates are determined for the three endothermic reactions: H2+ (υ)(He,H)HeH+, H2+ (υ)(Ne,H)NeH+, D2+(υ)(Ne, D)NeD+, and for the

  13. Antiphase dual-color correlation in a reactant-product pair imparts ultrasensitivity in reaction-linked double-photoswitching fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wei; Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Li, Alexander D Q

    2015-04-08

    A pair of reversible photochemical reactions correlates their reactant and product specifically, and such a correlation uniquely distinguishes their correlated signal from others that are not linked by this reversible reaction. Here a nanoparticle-shielded fluorophore is photodriven to undergo structural dynamics, alternating between a green-fluorescence state and a red-fluorescence state. As time elapses, the fluorophore can be in either state but not both at the same time. Thus, the red fluorescence is maximized while the green fluorescence is minimized and vice versa. Such an antiphase dual-color (AD) corelationship between the red and green fluorescence maxima as well as between their minima can be exploited to greatly improve the signal-to-noise ratio, thus enhancing the ultimate detection limit. Potential benefits of this correlation include elimination of all interferences originating from single-color dyes and signal amplification of AD photoswitching molecules by orders of magnitude.

  14. The effects of reactants ratios, reaction temperatures and times on Maillard reaction products of the L-ascorbic acid/L-glutamic acid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yan ZHOU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transformation law of the Maillard reaction products with three different reactants ratios - equimolar reactants, excess L-glutamic acid and excess L-ascorbic acid reaction respectively, five different temperatures, and different time conditions for the L-ascorbic acid / L-glutamic acid system were investigated. Results showed that, the increase of the reaction time and temperature led to the increase of the browning products, uncoloured intermediate products, as well as aroma compounds. Compared with the equimolar reaction system, the excess L-ascorbic acid reaction system produced more browning products and uncoloured intermediate products, while the aroma compounds production remained the same. In the excess L-glutamic acid system, the uncoloured intermediate products increased slightly, the browning products remained the same, while the aroma compounds increased.

  15. Direct single-molecule dynamic detection of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jianxin; Jia, Chuancheng; Li, Yanwei; Liu, Zitong; Wang, Jinying; Yang, Zhongyue; Gu, Chunhui; Su, Dingkai; Houk, Kendall N; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule detection can reveal time trajectories and reaction pathways of individual intermediates/transition states in chemical reactions and biological processes, which is of fundamental importance to elucidate their intrinsic mechanisms. We present a reliable, label-free single-molecule approach that allows us to directly explore the dynamic process of basic chemical reactions at the single-event level by using stable graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions. These junctions are constructed by covalently connecting a single molecule with a 9-fluorenone center to nanogapped graphene electrodes. For the first time, real-time single-molecule electrical measurements unambiguously show reproducible large-amplitude two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on solvent environments in a nucleophilic addition reaction of hydroxylamine to a carbonyl group. Both theoretical simulations and ensemble experiments prove that this observation originates from the reversible transition between the reactant and a new intermediate state within a time scale of a few microseconds. These investigations open up a new route that is able to be immediately applied to probe fast single-molecule physics or biophysics with high time resolution, making an important contribution to broad fields beyond reaction chemistry.

  16. Effects of the Hydrophobicity of the Reactants on Diels-Alder Reactions in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Ale; Otto, Sijbren; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the importance of the hydrophobicity of different parts of diene and dienophile on the aqueous acceleration of Diels-Alder reactions, second-order rate constants have been determined for the reactions of cyclopentadiene (1), 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene (4), and 1,3-cyclohexadiene (6) with

  17. Laboratory studies of ion-molecule reactions and interstellar chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyano, Inosuke

    1989-01-01

    Several types of laboratory studies have been performed on ion-molecule reactions relevant to the formation of the interstellar molecules. Special emphasis is placed on the formation, structure, and reactivity of the C 3 H 3 + ions, which are believed to play a key role in interstellar chemistry. When these ions are produced by the reaction of C 3 H 4+ with C 3 H 4 in a beam-gas arrangement, their times-of-flight (TOF) show abnormally broad distributions regardless of the sources of the reactant C 3 H 4 + ion (photoionization of allene, propyne, the cyclopropene) and the nature of the neutral reactant, while all other product ions from the same reaction show sharp TOF distributions. On the other hand, all C 3 H 3 + ions produced by unimolecular decomposition of energetic C 3 H 4 + ions show sharp TOF distribution. The peculiarity of the C 3 H 3 + ions manifested in these and other experiments is discussed in conjunction with interstellar chemistry

  18. Directing Reaction Pathways through Controlled Reactant Binding at Pd-TiO2 Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Bingwen; Nikolla, Eranda; Medlin, J Will

    2017-06-01

    Recent efforts to design selective catalysts for multi-step reactions, such as hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), have emphasized the preparation of active sites at the interface between two materials having different properties. However, achieving precise control over interfacial properties, and thus reaction selectivity, has remained a challenge. Here, we encapsulated Pd nanoparticles (NPs) with TiO 2 films of regulated porosity to gain a new level of control over catalyst performance, resulting in essentially 100 % HDO selectivity for two biomass-derived alcohols. This catalyst also showed exceptional reaction specificity in HDO of furfural and m-cresol. In addition to improving HDO activity by maximizing the interfacial contact between the metal and metal oxide sites, encapsulation by the nanoporous oxide film provided a significant selectivity boost by restricting the accessible conformations of aromatics on the surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Diazo Compounds as Highly Tunable Reactants in 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Reactions with Cycloalkynes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Diazo compounds, which can be accessed directly from azides by deimidogenation, are shown to be extremely versatile dipoles in 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions with a cyclooctyne. The reactivity of a diazo compound can be much greater or much less than its azide analog, and is enhanced markedly in polar-protic solvents. These reactivities are predictable from frontier molecular orbital energies. The most reactive diazo compound exhibited the highest known second-order rate constant to date for a dipolar cycloaddition with a cycloalkyne. These data provide a new modality for effecting chemoselective reactions in a biological context. PMID:23227302

  20. Hydrogen transfer reactions of interstellar Complex Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Barcia, S.; Russ, P.; Kästner, J.; Lamberts, T.

    2018-06-01

    Radical recombination has been proposed to lead to the formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) in CO-rich ices in the early stages of star formation. These COMs can then undergo hydrogen addition and abstraction reactions leading to a higher or lower degree of saturation. Here, we have studied 14 hydrogen transfer reactions for the molecules glyoxal, glycoaldehyde, ethylene glycol, and methylformate and an additional three reactions where CHnO fragments are involved. Over-the-barrier reactions are possible only if tunneling is invoked in the description at low temperature. Therefore the rate constants for the studied reactions are calculated using instanton theory that takes quantum effects into account inherently. The reactions were characterized in the gas phase, but this is expected to yield meaningful results for CO-rich ices due to the minimal alteration of reaction landscapes by the CO molecules. We found that rate constants should not be extrapolated based on the height of the barrier alone, since the shape of the barrier plays an increasingly larger role at decreasing temperature. It is neither possible to predict rate constants based only on considering the type of reaction, the specific reactants and functional groups play a crucial role. Within a single molecule, though, hydrogen abstraction from an aldehyde group seems to be always faster than hydrogen addition to the same carbon atom. Reactions that involve heavy-atom tunneling, e.g., breaking or forming a C-C or C-O bond, have rate constants that are much lower than those where H transfer is involved.

  1. The effect of layer thickness and composition on the kinetics of solid state reactions in the niobium-selenium system studied using superlattice reactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuto, M.; Kevan, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    The ability to form an amorphous reaction intermediate by the low temperature interdiffusion of a modulated elemental reactant is shown to be a function of the overall composition as well as elemental layer thicknesses in the niobium-selenium system. For niobium-rich reactants, an amorphous reaction intermediate was observed to form upon low temperature annealing of reactants with modulation thicknesses less than 60 A. Further annealing of the amorphous intermediates led to the crystallization of Nb 2 Se, Nb 5 Se 4 or Nb 3 Se 4 depending upon the overall composition of the amorphous intermediate. Modulated elemental reactants with overall compositions containing more than two-thirds selenium were found to heterogeneously nucleate NbSe 2 at the reacting interfaces. The formation of the thermodynamically expected compounds Nb 2 Se 3 , NbSe 3 , and Nb 2 Se 9 at their respective compositions required extended high temperature annealing to react the dichalcogenide with the remaining elemental reactants. A striking difference between the evolution of the low angle diffraction patterns in these two composition regimes suggests the differences in the reaction kinetics result from a composition dependence of the diffusion coefficients. (orig.)

  2. CATALYST-FREE REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT-FEE CONDITIONS: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF HETEROCYCLIC HYDRAZONES BELOW THE MELTING POINT OF NEAT REACTANTS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    NRMRL-CIN-1437 Jeselnik, M., Varma*, R.S., Polanc, S., and Kocevar, M. Catalyst-free Reactions under Solvent-fee Conditions: Microwave-assisted Synthesis of Heterocyclic Hydrazones below the Melting Point of Neat Reactants. Published in: Chemical Communications 18:1716-1717 (200...

  3. Growing interstellar molecules with ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of gas-phase ion-molecule reactions continue to provide important insights into the chemistry of molecular growth in interstellar environments. It is also true that the measurements are becoming more demanding as larger molecules capture our interest. While some of these measurements are motivated by current developments in chemical models of interstellar environments or by new molecular observations by astronomers, others explore novel chemistry which can lead to predictions of new interstellar molecules. Here the author views the results of some recent measurements, taken in the Ion Chemistry Laboratory at York University with the SIFT technique, which address some of the current needs of modellers and observers and which also provide some new fundamental insight into molecular growth, particularly when it occurs in the presence of large molecules such as PAH molecules which are now thought to have a major influence on the chemistry of interstellar environments in which they are present

  4. General theory of the multistage geminate reactions of the isolated pairs of reactants. II. Detailed balance and universal asymptotes of kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipriyanov, Alexey A; Doktorov, Alexander B

    2014-10-14

    The analysis of general (matrix) kinetic equations for the mean survival probabilities of any of the species in a sample (or mean concentrations) has been made for a wide class of the multistage geminate reactions of the isolated pairs. These kinetic equations (obtained in the frame of the kinetic approach based on the concept of "effective" particles in Paper I) take into account various possible elementary reactions (stages of a multistage reaction) excluding monomolecular, but including physical and chemical processes of the change in internal quantum states carried out with the isolated pairs of reactants (or isolated reactants). The general basic principles of total and detailed balance have been established. The behavior of the reacting system has been considered on macroscopic time scales, and the universal long-term kinetics has been determined.

  5. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, J.M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with elucidating the dynamics of elementary ion-molecule reactions at collision energies near and below 1 eV. From measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the reaction products, one can infer intimathe details about the nature of collisions leading to chemical reaction, the geometries and lifetimes of intermediate complexes that govern the reaction dynamics, and the collision energy dependence of these dynamical features. The author employs crossed-beam low energy mass spectrometry technology developed over the last several years, with the focus of current research on proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of te O{sup {minus}} ion with species such as HF, H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 3}.

  6. The formation of urea in space. I. Ion-molecule, neutral-neutral, and radical gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigiano, Flavio Siro; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Largo, Antonio; Spezia, Riccardo

    2018-02-01

    Context. Many organic molecules have been observed in the interstellar medium thanks to advances in radioastronomy, and very recently the presence of urea was also suggested. While those molecules were observed, it is not clear what the mechanisms responsible to their formation are. In fact, if gas-phase reactions are responsible, they should occur through barrierless mechanisms (or with very low barriers). In the past, mechanisms for the formation of different organic molecules were studied, providing only in a few cases energetic conditions favorable to a synthesis at very low temperature. A particularly intriguing class of such molecules are those containing one N-C-O peptide bond, which could be a building block for the formation of biological molecules. Urea is a particular case because two nitrogen atoms are linked to the C-O moiety. Thus, motivated also by the recent tentative observation of urea, we have considered the synthetic pathways responsible to its formation. Aims: We have studied the possibility of forming urea in the gas phase via different kinds of bi-molecular reactions: ion-molecule, neutral, and radical. In particular we have focused on the activation energy of these reactions in order to find possible reactants that could be responsible for to barrierless (or very low energy) pathways. Methods: We have used very accurate, highly correlated quantum chemistry calculations to locate and characterize the reaction pathways in terms of minima and transition states connecting reactants to products. Results: Most of the reactions considered have an activation energy that is too high; but the ion-molecule reaction between NH2OHNH2OH2+ and formamide is not too high. These reactants could be responsible not only for the formation of urea but also of isocyanic acid, which is an organic molecule also observed in the interstellar medium.

  7. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors work during the past year has focused on several problems in the condensation reactions of C + and CH 3 + with small molecules, particularly hydrocarbons. Their emphasis has been on understanding the dynamics of collision complex formation and isomerization of transient intermediates along the reaction coordinate. In many ionic reactions, intermediates having non-classical valence structures may be nearly as stable as their classical analogs, in contrast with neutral systems where the non-classical structures are much less stable. The C + + NH 3 system shows this behavior, indicating that the non-classical HCNH 2 + structure formed by insertion of C + into the N-H bond serves as a precursor to the products. N-H bond cleavage in this intermediate to form HCNH + occurs over a large barrier and occurs more readily than the 1,2 hydrogen atom shift to form the classical H 2 C = NH + intermediate. Their experimental kinetic energy distribution for this channel is consistent with the presence of a large exit channel barrier. Their recently published work on C + + H 2 O also demonstrates this phenomenon. The CHOH + hydroxycarbene cation serves as the initial intermediate and isomerization to the classical H 2 CO + cation is competitive with O-H or C-H cleavage to yield the formyl, HCO + , or isoformyl, COH + , cations. They have also completed studies on the reactions of C + with O 2 , CH 3 OH, HCN, and the two-carbon containing hydrocarbons ethane, ethylene, and acetylene

  8. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive...... theory of charge transfer in polar media offers convenient tools for the treatment of experimental data for such systems, with due account of large-amplitude strongly anharmonic intramolecular reorganization. Equations for the activation barrier and free energy relationships are provided, incorporating...

  9. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  10. Ion-molecule reactions: their role in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lias, S.G.; Ausloos, P.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive review of ion--molecule reactions is presented, including information from mass spectrometric, organic chemistry, and NMR studies, from theoretical calculations, and from gas and liquid phase radiation chemistry. Special emphasis is placed on interpreting the role of ion--molecule reactions in systems under high energy irradiation. The discussion is presented under the following chapter headings: ion--molecule reactions and their role in radiation chemistry; unimolecular processes: the nature and structure of ionic intermediates in radiolysis; ion lifetimes and the fate of unreactive ions; kinetics and mechanisms of ion--molecule reactions; proton transfer reactions; negative atom and two-atom transfer reactions; condensation reactions; and, association or clustering reactions

  11. A SIFT study of the reactions of H2ONO+ ions with several types of organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; Wang, Tianshu; Spanel, Patrik

    2003-11-01

    A selected ion flow tube (SIFT) study has been carried out of the reactions of hydrated nitrosonium ions, NO+H2O, which theory has equated to protonated nitrous acid ions, H2ONO+. One objective of this study was to investigate if this ion exhibits the properties of both a cluster ion and a protonated acid in their reactions with a variety of organic molecules. The chosen reactant molecules comprise two each of the following types--amines, terpenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes and alcohols. The reactant H2ONO+ (NO+H2O) ions are formed in a discharge ion source and injected into helium carrier gas where they are partially vibrationally excited and partially dissociated to NO+ ions. Hence, the reactions of the H2ONO+ ions had to be studies simultaneously with NO+ ions, the reactions of the latter ions readily being studied by selectively injecting NO+ ions into the carrier gas. The results of this study indicate that the H2ONO+ ions undergo a wide variety of reaction processes that depend on the properties of the reactant molecules such as their ionisation energies and proton affinities. These processes include charge transfer with compounds, M, that have low ionisation energies (producing M+), proton transfer with compounds possessing large proton affinities (MH+), hydride ion transfer (M---H+), alkyl radical (M---R+), alkoxide radical transfer (M---OR+), ion-molecule association (NO+H2OM) and ligand switching (NO+M), producing the ions given in parentheses.

  12. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions. PMID:26108369

  13. Ejection of Coulomb Crystals from a Linear Paul Ion Trap for Ion-Molecule Reaction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K A E; Pollum, L L; Petralia, L S; Tauschinsky, A; Rennick, C J; Softley, T P; Heazlewood, B R

    2015-12-17

    Coulomb crystals are being increasingly employed as a highly localized source of cold ions for the study of ion-molecule chemical reactions. To extend the scope of reactions that can be studied in Coulomb crystals-from simple reactions involving laser-cooled atomic ions, to more complex systems where molecular reactants give rise to multiple product channels-sensitive product detection methodologies are required. The use of a digital ion trap (DIT) and a new damped cosine trap (DCT) are described, which facilitate the ejection of Coulomb-crystallized ions onto an external detector for the recording of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra. This enables the examination of reaction dynamics and kinetics between Coulomb-crystallized ions and neutral molecules: ionic products are typically cotrapped, thus ejecting the crystal onto an external detector reveals the masses, identities, and quantities of all ionic species at a selected point in the reaction. Two reaction systems are examined: the reaction of Ca(+) with deuterated isotopologues of water, and the charge exchange between cotrapped Xe(+) with deuterated isotopologues of ammonia. These reactions are examples of two distinct types of experiment, the first involving direct reaction of the laser-cooled ions, and the second involving reaction of sympathetically-cooled heavy ions to form a mixture of light product ions. Extensive simulations are conducted to interpret experimental results and calculate optimal operating parameters, facilitating a comparison between the DIT and DCT approaches. The simulations also demonstrate a correlation between crystal shape and image shape on the detector, suggesting a possible means for determining crystal geometry for nonfluorescing ions.

  14. Vibrational-rotational excitation: chemical reactions of vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.B.; Smith, I.W.M.

    1979-03-01

    This review considers a limited number of systems, particularly gas-phase processes. Excited states and their preparation, direct bimolecular reactions, reactions of highly excited molecules, and reactions in condensed phases are discussed. Laser-induced isotope separation applications are mentioned briefly. 109 references

  15. Renewable synthesis-gas-production. Do hydrocarbons in the reactant flow of the reverse water-gas shift reaction cause coke formation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.; Kern, C.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In a two-step synthetic fuel production process based on carbon dioxide and renewable hydrogen, the best possible selectivity towards liquid hydrocarbons (Hc) shall be implemented. The process consists of a combination of the Reverse Water-Gas Shift reaction and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. To achieve this goal, gaseous short-chained Hc from the FTS reactor are recycled in the RWGS unit. In this paper, challenges coming up with the implementation of a recycle loop are discussed. First of all, it has to be examined whether Hc are converted under conditions present in the RWGS reactor. The coking caused by the recycle of Hc is regarded, including thermal coking in the heating zone of the reactor and catalytic coking in the catalyst bed. Coking of course is unwanted, as it deactivates the catalyst. The scope of this work is to find out to which extent and under which conditions gaseous Hc can be recycled. Therefore, experiments were carried out in both, a quartz glass reactor using a commercial Ni-catalyst at ambient pressure and in a pressurized steel reactor (without catalyst) to examine coking during the thermal decomposition of Hc. The catalytic experiments at atmospheric pressure showed that a recycle of CH{sub 4} did not cause coking up to a ratio of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} below one. For these conditions, long term stability was proved. The reaction rates of the CH{sub 4} conversion were below those of the RWGS reaction. However, replacing CH{sub 4} by C{sub 3}H{sub 8} leads to thermal and catalytic coking. Catalytic coking hits the maximum level at about 700 C and decreases for higher temperatures and, thus is not regarded as a problem for the RWGS reactor. In contrast to that, thermal coking raises with higher temperatures, but it can be supressed efficiently with additional injection of H{sub 2}O, which of course shifts the equilibrium towards the undesired reactant side. (orig.)

  16. Ion-molecule reactions in the binary mixture of ethylene oxide and trioxane, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru; Sugiura, Toshio.

    1977-01-01

    The formation mechanism of protonated molecular ions by cross-reactions in ethylene oxide-trioxane mixtures has been studied with use of a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The precursors of the product ions were determined by analysis of the fine structure of their ionization efficiency curves using deuterated ethylene oxide. Protonated ethylene oxide is formed by the hydrogen atom transfer reaction of ethylene oxide molecular ion with trioxane, and protonated trioxane by the proton transfer reaction of CHO + (from ethylene oxide) with trioxane. In the ion-molecule reactions of ethylene-d 4 oxide-trioxane mixtures, appreciable isotope effect was observed. The CHO + from ethylene oxide is an important reactant ion as compared with that from trioxane in the proton transfer reaction, and CHO + from ethylene oxide was suggested as a thermal reactive ion. The order of proton affinity could be estimated from the proton transfer reactions involving CHO + . It was found that the proton affinity of trioxane is smaller than that of ethylene oxide. (auth.)

  17. The (e,2e) reaction in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, S.; Dixon, A.; Teubner, P.J.O.; Weigold, E.

    1975-01-01

    The aplication of the (e,2e) technique is discussed in the framework of (e,2e) on molecular hydrogen. It is shown that the technique is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between simple wavefunctions and those containing configuration interactions. By comparing the data on H 2 and D 2 is shown that the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is confirmed to an accuracy of about 3 per cent. The data is also used to contrast other methods of determining electron momentum distributions in molecules. Data on methane, carbon monoxide and molecular nitrogen is also presented. (author)

  18. A barrier-free atomic radical-molecule reaction: N (2D) NO2 (2A1) mechanistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ming-Hui; Liu, Hui-Ling; Huang, Xu-Ri; Zhan, Jin-Hui; Sun, Chia-Chung

    The reaction of N (2D) radical with NO2 molecule has been studied theoretically using density functional theory and ab initio quantum chemistry method. Singlet electronic state [N2O2] potential energy surfaces (PES) are calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-311+G(d) + ZPE and G3B3 levels of theory. All the involved transition states for generation of (2NO) and (O2 + N2) lie much lower than the reactants. Thus, the novel reaction N + NO2 can proceed effectively even at low temperatures and it is expected to play a role in both combustion and interstellar processes. On the basis of the analysis of the kinetics of all pathways through which the reactions proceed, we expect that the competitive power of reaction pathways may vary with experimental conditions for the title reaction.

  19. Mechanochemical Association Reaction of Interfacial Molecules Driven by Shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, Arash; He, Xin; Yeon, Jejoon; Kim, Seong H; Martini, Ashlie

    2018-05-29

    Shear-driven chemical reaction mechanisms are poorly understood because the relevant reactions are often hidden between two solid surfaces moving in relative motion. Here, this phenomenon is explored by characterizing shear-induced polymerization reactions that occur during vapor phase lubrication of α-pinene between sliding hydroxylated and dehydroxylated silica surfaces, complemented by reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that oxidative chemisorption of the α-pinene molecules at reactive surface sites, which transfers oxygen atoms from the surface to the adsorbate molecule, is the critical activation step. Such activation takes place more readily on the dehydroxylated surface. During this activation, the most strained part of the α-pinene molecules undergoes a partial distortion from its equilibrium geometry, which appears to be related to the critical activation volume for mechanical activation. Once α-pinene molecules are activated, association reactions occur between the newly attached oxygen and one of the carbon atoms in another molecule, forming ether bonds. These findings have general implications for mechanochemistry because they reveal that shear-driven reactions may occur through reaction pathways very different from their thermally induced counterparts and specifically the critical role of molecular distortion in such reactions.

  20. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  1. Flexible single molecule simulation of reaction-diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Loetstedt, Per

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for simulation of the motion and reactions of single molecules at a microscopic level. The molecules diffuse in a solvent and react with each other or a polymer and molecules can dissociate. Such simulations are of interest e.g. in molecular biology. The algorithm is similar to the Green's function reaction dynamics (GFRD) algorithm by van Zon and ten Wolde where longer time steps can be taken by computing the probability density functions (PDFs) and then sample from the distribution functions. Our computation of the PDFs is much less complicated than GFRD and more flexible. The solution of the partial differential equation for the PDF is split into two steps to simplify the calculations. The sampling is without splitting error in two of the coordinate directions for a pair of molecules and a molecule-polymer interaction and is approximate in the third direction. The PDF is obtained either from an analytical solution or a numerical discretization. The errors due to the operator splitting, the partitioning of the system, and the numerical approximations are analyzed. The method is applied to three different systems involving up to four reactions. Comparisons with other mesoscopic and macroscopic models show excellent agreement.

  2. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  3. Electro-induced reactions of biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocisek, J.

    2010-01-01

    The thesis presents the results of research activities in the field of electron interactions with biologically relevant molecules which was carried out during my PhD studies at the Department of Experimental Physics, Comenius University in Bratislava. Electron induced interactions with biologically relevant molecules were experimentally studied using crossed electron-molecule beams experiment. The obtained results, were presented in four publications in international scientific journals. First study of deals with electron impact ionisation of furanose alcohols [see 1. in list of author publications on page 22]. It has been motivated by most important works in the field of electron induced damages of DNA bases [4]. Studied 3-hydroxytetrahydrofuran and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol, are important model molecules for more complex biological systems (e.g. deoxyribose).The influence of hydroxyl group on stabilisation of the positive ions of the molecules, together with the stability of furan ring in ionized form are main themes of the study. The studies of small amides and aminoacids are connected to scientific studies in the field of formation of the aminoacids and other biologically relevant molecules in space and works trying to explain electron induced processes in more complex molecules[12, 13, 24]. The most important results were obtained for aminoacid Serine [see 2. in list of author publications on page 22]. We have showed that additional OH group of Serine considerably lower the reaction enthalpy limit of reactions resulting to formation of neutral water molecules, in comparison to other amino acids. Also the study of (M-H)- reaction channel using the electron beam with FWHM under 100 meV is of high importance in the field. The last part of the thesis is focused on the electron interactions with organosilane compounds. Materials prepared from organosilane molecules in plasmas have wide range of applications in both biology and medicine. We have studied electron

  4. Chemisorption and Reactions of Small Molecules on Small Gold Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Bond

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The activity of supported gold particles for a number of oxidations and hydrogenations starts to increase dramatically as the size falls below ~3 nm. This is accompanied by an increased propensity to chemisorption, especially of oxygen and hydrogen. The explanation for these phenomena has to be sought in kinetic analysis that connects catalytic activity with the strength and extent of chemisorption of the reactants, the latter depending on the electronic structure of the gold atoms constituting the active centre. Examination of the changes to the utilisation of electrons as particle size is decreased points to loss of metallic character at about 3 nm, as energy bands are replaced by levels, and a band gap appears. Detailed consideration of the Arrhenius parameters (E and ln A for CO oxidation points clearly to a step-change in activity at the point where metallic character is lost, as opposed to there being a monotonic dependence of rate on a physical property such as the fraction of atoms at corners or edges of particles. The deplorable scarcity of kinetic information on other reactions makes extension of this analysis difficult, but non-metallic behaviour is an unavoidable property of very small gold particles, and therefore cannot be ignored when seeking to explain their exceptional activity.

  5. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F.; Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/, 4 2 D/sub 5/2/, and 5 2 S/sub 1/2/) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions. 12 refs., 9 figs

  6. Single-molecule chemical reactions on DNA origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    as templates for building materials with new functional properties. Relatively large nanocomponents such as nanoparticles and biomolecules can also be integrated into DNA nanostructures and imaged. Here, we show that chemical reactions with single molecules can be performed and imaged at a local position...... on a DNA origami scaffold by atomic force microscopy. The high yields and chemoselectivities of successive cleavage and bond-forming reactions observed in these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of post-assembly chemical modification of DNA nanostructures and their potential use as locally......DNA nanotechnology and particularly DNA origami, in which long, single-stranded DNA molecules are folded into predetermined shapes, can be used to form complex self-assembled nanostructures. Although DNA itself has limited chemical, optical or electronic functionality, DNA nanostructures can serve...

  7. Molecular Beam Chemistry: Reactions of Oxygen Atoms with Halogen Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-15

    nonlinear one has s = 3, r = 1, and n = 3/2. In the "loose" complex the bending modes go over to free rotation of the product diatomit molecule; thus s...contains no adjustable parameters. All observable properties *l of the reaction may be predicted including product velocity and angular dis- tributions...example, P. R. Bevington, Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences (McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1969). 65. Equation (3) is strictly

  8. Temperature dependence of three-body ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehringer, H.; Arnold, F.

    1983-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ion-molecule association reactions (i) N 2 + + N 2 + M → N 4 + + M (M=N 2 , He), (ii) O 2 + + O 2 + M → O 4 + + M (M=O 2 , He) and (iii) He + + 2He → He 2 + + He have been studied over an extended temperature range to temperatures as low as 30K with a recently constructed liquid helium-cooled ion drift tube. Over most of the temperature range the threebody reaction rate coefficients show an inverse temperature dependence proportional to Tsup(-n) with n in the range 0.6 to 2.9. This temperature dependence is quite consistent with current theories of ion molecule association. At low temperatures, however, a deviation from the Tsup(-n) dependence was observed for the association reactions (ii). For reactions (i) different temperature dependences were obtained for N 2 and He third bodies indicating an additional temperature dependence of the collisional stabilisation process. (Authors)

  9. Dynamics of anion-molecule reactions at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikosch, J.

    2007-11-01

    Anion-molecule reactions must find their way through deeply bound entrance and exit channel complexes separated by a central barrier. This results in low reaction rates and rich dynamics since direct pathways compete with the formation of transient intermediates. In this thesis we examine the probability of proton transfer to a small anion and transient lifetimes of a thermoneutral bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (S N 2) reaction at well defined variable temperature down to 8 Kelvin in a multipole trap. The observed strong inverse temperature dependence is attributed to the deficit of available quantum states in the entrance channel at decreasing temperature. Furthermore we investigate scattering dynamics of S N 2 reactions at defined relative energy between 0.4 and 10 eV by crossed beam slice imaging. A weakly exothermic reaction with high central barrier proceeds via an indirect, complex-mediated mechanism at low relative energies featuring high internal product excitation in excellent quantitative agreement with a statistical model. In contrast, direct backward scattering prevails for higher energies with product velocities close to the kinematical cutoff. For a strongly exothermic reaction, competing S N 2-, dihalide- and proton transfer-channels are explored which proceed by complex mediation for low energy and various rebound-, grazing- and collision induced bond rupture-mechanisms at higher energy. From our data and a collaboration with theory we identify a new indirect roundabout S N 2 mechanism involving CH 3 -rotation. (orig.)

  10. Dynamics of anion-molecule reactions at low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikosch, J.

    2007-11-15

    Anion-molecule reactions must find their way through deeply bound entrance and exit channel complexes separated by a central barrier. This results in low reaction rates and rich dynamics since direct pathways compete with the formation of transient intermediates. In this thesis we examine the probability of proton transfer to a small anion and transient lifetimes of a thermoneutral bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (S{sub N}2) reaction at well defined variable temperature down to 8 Kelvin in a multipole trap. The observed strong inverse temperature dependence is attributed to the deficit of available quantum states in the entrance channel at decreasing temperature. Furthermore we investigate scattering dynamics of S{sub N}2 reactions at defined relative energy between 0.4 and 10 eV by crossed beam slice imaging. A weakly exothermic reaction with high central barrier proceeds via an indirect, complex-mediated mechanism at low relative energies featuring high internal product excitation in excellent quantitative agreement with a statistical model. In contrast, direct backward scattering prevails for higher energies with product velocities close to the kinematical cutoff. For a strongly exothermic reaction, competing S{sub N}2-, dihalide- and proton transfer-channels are explored which proceed by complex mediation for low energy and various rebound-, grazing- and collision induced bond rupture-mechanisms at higher energy. From our data and a collaboration with theory we identify a new indirect roundabout S{sub N}2 mechanism involving CH{sub 3}-rotation. (orig.)

  11. Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2013-11-26

    Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

  12. Model for competitive binary and ternary ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, E.

    1985-01-01

    A mechanism by which competitive binary and ternary ion-molecule reactions can occur is proposed. Calculations are undertaken for the specific system CH3(+) + NH3 + He which has been studied in the laboratory by Smith and Adams (1978), and the potential surface of which has been studied theoretically by Nobes and Radom (1983). It is shown that a potential-energy barrier in the exit channel prevents the rapid dissociation of collision complexes with large amounts of angular momentum and thereby allows collisional stabilization of the complexes. The calculated ternary-reaction rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental value, but a plot of the effective two-body rate coefficient of the ternary channel vs helium density does not quite show the observed saturation. 21 references

  13. (e,2e) reactions on atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.

    1984-01-01

    At high enough incident energy and for high enough momentum transfer an incident electron interacts with a single electron of a target atom or molecule, cleanly removing it and leaving the residual ion in one of its spectrum of quantum states. Under these conditions the dynamics of the reaction simply involves a two-electron collision, the target electron having a momentum given by the structure of the target and ion, and equal and opposite to the recoil momentum of the ion. Since two-electron collisions are well understood (Mott scattering) the reaction is the basis of the understanding of the energy and momentum structure of the target and ion known as electron momentum spectroscopy

  14. CATALYST-FREE REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT-FEE CONDITIONS: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF HETEROCYCLIC HYDRAZONES BELOW THE MELTING POINT OF NEAT REACTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reaction of neat 5- or 8-oxobenzopyran-2(1H)-ones with a variety of aromatic and heteroaromatic hydrazines are remarkable accelerated upon irradiation in a household microwave oven in the absence of any catalyst, solid support or solvent thus providing an environmentally frie...

  15. P-d capture reactions in muonic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Capture reactions for very low-energy n-d and p-d systems are calculated and compared with experiment, as are low-energy n-d and p-d scattering. We find excellent agreement for the n-d scattering lengths, but poor agreement for the p-d case, which we believe is a problem with the experimental extrapolation. The n-d radiative capture is sensitive to details of the meson-exchange currents, but reasonable models agree with the data. The latter models are in good agreement with experiment when extended to the p-d case. Our large quartet capture rate resolves a long-standing anomaly. The EO capture matrix element recently obtained from a reanalysis of internal conversion in muonic molecules is in excellent agreement with our predictions. This matrix element is very clean theoretically and provides the best test of the calculations. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Toward the first study of chemical reaction dynamics of Mu with vibrational-state-selected reactants in the gas phase: The Mu+H2*(v=1) reaction by stimulated Raman pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakule, Pavel; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Pratt, Francis; Gumplinger, Peter; Momose, Takamasa; Torikai, Eiko; Fleming, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated Raman pumping (SRP) is used to produce H 2 in its first vibrational state, in order to measure, for the first time, the Mu+H 2 *(v=1)→MuH+H reaction rate at room temperature, as a prototypical example of new directions in gas-phase muonium chemistry, utilizing the pulsed muon beam and a new dedicated laser system at the RIKEN/RAL Laboratory. Reported here is a preliminary result but the final results are expected to provide definitive new tests of reaction rate theory on the highly accurate H 3 potential energy surface. The major difficulty in this experiment, compared to the standard SRP process, is to ensure a homogeneous excitation over a volume of several cm 3 and of sufficient intensity to ensure a measurable Mu relaxation rate. The techniques used to accomplish this are described. The experiment utilizes the 2nd harmonic output of a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) with pulse energies up to 500 mJ at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. Different optical setups have been constructed and tested in order to optimize the number of laser-pumped H 2 molecules and their overlap with the stopping profile of the muon beam in the reaction cell (total volume ∼100x40x4mm 3 ). The first result of this experiment gives a measured relaxation rate due to laser excitation of λ*=0.085±0.051μs -1 , consistent with theory but limited by both low statistics and particularly a high background relaxation rate.

  17. Surface Chemistry Dependence of Mechanochemical Reaction of Adsorbed Molecules-An Experimental Study on Tribopolymerization of α-Pinene on Metal, Metal Oxide, and Carbon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Kim, Seong H

    2018-02-20

    Mechanochemical reactions between adsorbate molecules sheared at tribological interfaces can induce association of adsorbed molecules, forming oligomeric and polymeric products often called tribopolymers). This study revealed the role or effect of surface chemistry of the solid substrate in mechanochemical polymerization reactions. As a model reactant, α-pinene was chosen because it was known to readily form tribopolymers at the sliding interface of stainless steel under vapor-phase lubrication conditions. Eight different substrate materials were tested-palladium, nickel, copper, stainless steel, gold, silicon oxide, aluminum oxide, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). All metal substrates and DLC were initially covered with surface oxide species formed naturally in air or during the oxidative sample cleaning. It was found that the tribopolymerization yield of α-pinene is much higher on the substrates that can chemisorb α-pinene, compared to the ones on which only physisorption occurs. From the load dependence of the tribopolymerization yield, it was found that the surfaces capable of chemisorption give a smaller critical activation volume for the mechanochemical reaction, compared to the ones capable of physisorption only. On the basis of these observations and infrared spectroscopy analyses of the adsorbed molecules and the produced polymers, it was concluded that the mechanochemical reaction mechanisms might be different between chemically reactive and inert surfaces and that the chemical reactivity of the substrate surface greatly influences the tribochemical polymerization reactions of adsorbed molecules.

  18. Equalization equations in reactant resolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    given partitioning of the system in physical or functional space. The most frequently ... Then, the inter-reactant equilibrium is considered. The ... Global equilibrium. Even though the chemical potential in the case of global equilibrium is equalized by definition (see (1)), we repeat here the proof, for the current needs, using.

  19. Computational modeling of chemical reactions and interstitial growth and remodeling involving charged solutes and solid-bound molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Nims, Robert J; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-01

    Mechanobiological processes are rooted in mechanics and chemistry, and such processes may be modeled in a framework that couples their governing equations starting from fundamental principles. In many biological applications, the reactants and products of chemical reactions may be electrically charged, and these charge effects may produce driving forces and constraints that significantly influence outcomes. In this study, a novel formulation and computational implementation are presented for modeling chemical reactions in biological tissues that involve charged solutes and solid-bound molecules within a deformable porous hydrated solid matrix, coupling mechanics with chemistry while accounting for electric charges. The deposition or removal of solid-bound molecules contributes to the growth and remodeling of the solid matrix; in particular, volumetric growth may be driven by Donnan osmotic swelling, resulting from charged molecular species fixed to the solid matrix. This formulation incorporates the state of strain as a state variable in the production rate of chemical reactions, explicitly tying chemistry with mechanics for the purpose of modeling mechanobiology. To achieve these objectives, this treatment identifies the specific theoretical and computational challenges faced in modeling complex systems of interacting neutral and charged constituents while accommodating any number of simultaneous reactions where reactants and products may be modeled explicitly or implicitly. Several finite element verification problems are shown to agree with closed-form analytical solutions. An illustrative tissue engineering analysis demonstrates tissue growth and swelling resulting from the deposition of chondroitin sulfate, a charged solid-bound molecular species. This implementation is released in the open-source program FEBio ( www.febio.org ). The availability of this framework may be particularly beneficial to optimizing tissue engineering culture systems by examining the

  20. Observing single molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emory, S. R. (Steven R.); Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, P. M. (Peter M); Keller, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    We report the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of broad SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm{sup -1} and 1340 cm{sup -1} observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurements of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

  1. Reaction dynamics of small molecules at metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, P.A.

    1999-09-01

    The dissociation-desorption dynamics of D 2 upon the Sn/Pt(111) surface alloy are dependent on the surface concentration of Sn. The p(2 x 2) Sn/Pt(111) alloy surface (Θ Sn = 0.25 ML), is initially ∼30 times less reactive towards D 2 adsorption than clean Pt(111). On the (√3 x √3) R30 deg Sn/Pt(111) alloy surface (Θ Sn = 0.33 ML), increased inhibition of D 2 adsorption is reported, with S o ∼ 10 -5 at low energy, coinciding with the loss of stable Pt 3 hollow sites and a significant reduction in the D atom binding energy. Sticking on the √3 alloy is activated with an increased energy threshold of ∼280 meV, with no evidence that vibration enhances dissociation. The barrier to dissociation remains in the entrance channel before the D 2 bond begins to stretch. Vibrational excitation is, however, observed in nitrogen desorption from the catalytic reaction of NO + H 2 over Pd(110). For a surface at 600 K, N 2 vibrational state population ratios of P(v=1/v=0) = 0.50 ± 0.05 and P(v=2/v=0) = 0.60 ± 0.20 are reported. Desorption occurs via the N(ad) + N(ad) recombination channel with little energy released into translation and rotation. The translational energy release observed is dependent on the N 2 vibrational state, with translational temperatures of 425 K, 315 K and 180 K reported for the v=0, 1 and 2 states respectively. Sub-thermal energy releases and normally directed angular distributions suggest the influence of a trapping mechanism, recombining molecules scattering through a molecularly adsorbed state, with a transition state of large d NN responsible for the product vibrational excitation. Although N 2 dissociation on Fe(100) forms a simple overlayer structure, on Fe(110), molecular chemisorption does not occur at or above room temperature and the sticking is extremely small (∼10 -6 to 10 -7 ). Activated nitrogen bombardment can be used to prepare a 'surface nitride' with a structure related to the geometry of bulk Fe 4 N. Scanning tunnelling

  2. Studies of gas phase ion/molecule reactions by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleingeld, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An important field in which Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance has useful applications is that of gas phase ion chemistry, the subject of this thesis. First, the general picture of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase is discussed. Next, some positive ion-molecule reactions are described, whereas the remaining chapters deal with negative ion-molecule reactions. Most of these studies have been performed using the FT-ICR method. Reactions involving H 3 O - and NH 4 - ions are described whereas the other chapters deal with larger organic complexes. (Auth.)

  3. Analytical applications of ion/molecule reactions in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinter, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The development of triple quadrupole mass spectrometers as a means of performing tandem mass spectrometry has provided a versatile instrument on which the ion/molecule reactions of a mass selected ion can be studied. This dissertation details the application of ion/molecule reactions in a triple quadrupole to two analytical problems. Part I. Ion/Molecule Reactions of Ammonia with Translationally Excited C 2 H 5 O + /Ions. The ability to impart low center-of-mass translational energies, which upon collision are converted into internal energy, allows the observation of reactions that require energy input. In addition, the systematic variation of the ion kinetic energy, often referred to as energy-resolved mass spectrometer, adds another dimension to the mass spectrum and can allow the observation of thresholds for reactions requiring energy input. This investigation develops methods for determining these thresholds. Part 2. The Use of Ion/Molecule Reactions in selected Reaction Monitoring GC/MSD/MS Analyses. An approach to improving the selectivity of an analysis is to improve the selectivity of the detection method. In GC/MS, one method has been to monitor a selected fragmentation reaction, either metastable or collisionally activated, in a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analysis. This develops the use of ion/molecule reactions for selected reaction monitoring analyses

  4. Conductive polymer layers to limit transfer of fuel reactants to catalysts of fuel cells to reduce reactant crossover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanis, Ronald J.; Lambert, Timothy N.

    2016-12-06

    An apparatus of an aspect includes a fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell catalyst layer is operable to catalyze a reaction involving a fuel reactant. A fuel cell gas diffusion layer is coupled with the fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell gas diffusion layer includes a porous electrically conductive material. The porous electrically conductive material is operable to allow the fuel reactant to transfer through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer to reach the fuel cell catalyst layer. The porous electrically conductive material is also operable to conduct electrons associated with the reaction through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. An electrically conductive polymer material is coupled with the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. The electrically conductive polymer material is operable to limit transfer of the fuel reactant to the fuel cell catalyst layer.

  5. Energy and Molecules from Photochemical/Photocatalytic Reactions. An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Ravelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic reactions have been defined as those processes that require both a (not consumed catalyst and light. A previous definition was whether such reactions brought a system towards or away from the (thermal equilibrium. This consideration brings in the question whether a part of the photon energy is incorporated into the photochemical reaction products. Data are provided for representative organic reactions involving or not molecular catalysts and show that energy storage occurs only when a heavily strained structure is generated, and in that case only a minor part of photon energy is actually stored (ΔG up to 25 kcal·mol−1. The green role of photochemistry/photocatalysis is rather that of forming highly reactive intermediates under mild conditions.

  6. A Reaction Database for Small Molecule Pharmaceutical Processes Integrated with Process Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Woodley, John

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the development of a reaction database with the objective to collect data for multiphase reactions involved in small molecule pharmaceutical processes with a search engine to retrieve necessary data in investigations of reaction-separation schemes, such as the role of organic......; compounds participating in the reaction; use of organic solvents and their function; information for single step and multistep reactions; target products; reaction conditions and reaction data. Information for reactor scale-up together with information for the separation and other relevant information...

  7. Dynamics of ion–molecule reactions from beam experiments: A historical survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk; Futrell, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 377, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 84-92 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ion–molecule reactions * Dynamics * Beam scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  8. Gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, S.I.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (chapter 2 contains a short description of this method). Three chapters are mainly concerned with mechanistic aspects of gas phase ion/molecule reactions. An equally important aspect of the thesis is the stability and reactivity of α-thio carbanions, dipole stabilized carbanions and homoenolate anions, dealt with in the other four chapters. (Auth.)

  9. Multicomponent reactions provide key molecules for secret communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukis, Andreas C; Reiter, Kevin; Frölich, Maximiliane; Hofheinz, Dennis; Meier, Michael A R

    2018-04-12

    A convenient and inherently more secure communication channel for encoding messages via specifically designed molecular keys is introduced by combining advanced encryption standard cryptography with molecular steganography. The necessary molecular keys require large structural diversity, thus suggesting the application of multicomponent reactions. Herein, the Ugi four-component reaction of perfluorinated acids is utilized to establish an exemplary database consisting of 130 commercially available components. Considering all permutations, this combinatorial approach can unambiguously provide 500,000 molecular keys in only one synthetic procedure per key. The molecular keys are transferred nondigitally and concealed by either adsorption onto paper, coffee, tea or sugar as well as by dissolution in a perfume or in blood. Re-isolation and purification from these disguises is simplified by the perfluorinated sidechains of the molecular keys. High resolution tandem mass spectrometry can unequivocally determine the molecular structure and thus the identity of the key for a subsequent decryption of an encoded message.

  10. Single-molecule detection of dihydroazulene photo-thermal reaction using break junction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cancan; Jevric, Martyn; Borges, Anders; Olsen, Stine T.; Hamill, Joseph M.; Zheng, Jue-Ting; Yang, Yang; Rudnev, Alexander; Baghernejad, Masoud; Broekmann, Peter; Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Wandlowski, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Solomon, Gemma C.; Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Hong, Wenjing

    2017-05-01

    Charge transport by tunnelling is one of the most ubiquitous elementary processes in nature. Small structural changes in a molecular junction can lead to significant difference in the single-molecule electronic properties, offering a tremendous opportunity to examine a reaction on the single-molecule scale by monitoring the conductance changes. Here, we explore the potential of the single-molecule break junction technique in the detection of photo-thermal reaction processes of a photochromic dihydroazulene/vinylheptafulvene system. Statistical analysis of the break junction experiments provides a quantitative approach for probing the reaction kinetics and reversibility, including the occurrence of isomerization during the reaction. The product ratios observed when switching the system in the junction does not follow those observed in solution studies (both experiment and theory), suggesting that the junction environment was perturbing the process significantly. This study opens the possibility of using nano-structured environments like molecular junctions to tailor product ratios in chemical reactions.

  11. Reaction mechanism studies of unsaturated molecules using photofragment translational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longfellow, C.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1996-05-01

    A number of molecules have been studied using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy. In Chapter One a brief introduction to the experimental technique is given. In Chapter Two the infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) of acetic acid is discussed. Carbon dioxide and methane were observed for the first time as products from dissociation under collisionless conditions. Chapter Three relates an IRMPD experiment of hexafluoropropene. The predominant channel produces CFCF{sub 3} or C{sub 2}F{sub 4} and CF{sub 2}, with the heavier species undergoing further dissociation to two CF{sub 2} fragments. In Chapter Four the ultraviolet (UV) dissociation of hexafluoropropene is investigated. Chapter Five explores the IRMPD of octafluoro-1-butene and octafluoro-2-butene.

  12. Growth and Destruction of PAH Molecules in Reactions with Carbon Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    A very high abundance of atomic carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and the high reactivity of these species toward different hydrocarbon molecules including benzene, raise questions regarding the stability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in space. To test the efficiency of destruction of PAH molecules via reactions with atomic carbon, we performed a set of laboratory and computational studies of the reactions of naphthalene, anthracene, and coronene molecules with carbon atoms in the ground state. The reactions were investigated in liquid helium droplets at T = 0.37 K and by quantum chemical computations. Our studies suggest that all small and all large catacondensed PAHs react barrierlessly with atomic carbon, and therefore should be efficiently destroyed by such reactions in a broad temperature range. At the same time, large compact pericondensed PAHs should be more inert toward such a reaction. In addition, taking into account their higher photostability, much higher abundances of pericondensed PAHs should be expected in various astrophysical environments. The barrierless reactions between carbon atoms and small PAHs also suggest that, in the ISM, these reactions could lead to the bottom-up formation of PAH molecules.

  13. Resonance reactions and enhancement of weak interactions in collisions of cold molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-01-01

    With the creation of ultracold atoms and molecules, a new type of chemistry - 'resonance' chemistry - emerges: chemical reactions can occur when the energy of colliding atoms and molecules matches a bound state of the combined molecule (Feshbach resonance). This chemistry is rather similar to reactions that take place in nuclei at low energies. In this paper we suggest some problems for future experimental and theoretical work related to the resonance chemistry of ultracold molecules. Molecular Bose-Einstein condensates are particularly interesting because in this system collisions and chemical reactions are extremely sensitive to weak fields; also, a preferred reaction channel may be enhanced due to a finite number of final states. The sensitivity to weak fields arises due to the high density of narrow compound resonances and the macroscopic number of molecules with kinetic energy E=0 (in the ground state of a mean-field potential). The high sensitivity to the magnetic field may be used to measure the distribution of energy intervals, widths, and magnetic moments of compound resonances and study the onset of quantum chaos. A difference in the production rate of right-handed and left-handed chiral molecules may be produced by external electric E and magnetic B fields and the finite width Γ of the resonance (correlation ΓE·B). The same effect may be produced by the parity-violating energy difference in chiral molecules

  14. Singlet oxygen: photosensitized generation, detection and reaction with organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K; Mohan, Hari; Bajaj, P N; Sapre, A V; Mittal, J P; Mukherjee, T [Radiation and Photochemistry Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2006-10-15

    Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) is an excited state of molecular oxygen, having antiparallel spin in the same {pi} antibonding orbital. The study of singlet oxygen production and reactivity has emerged as a rich and diverse area, with implication in diverse fields, such as synthetic chemistry, polymer chemistry, photodynamic therapy, etc. There are several known methods to produce singlet oxygen, and also various techniques employed to detect it. Out of these, photosensitization method is the most popular one. In this article, photosensitized production of singlet oxygen from triplet oxygen and photosensitizers in presence of light, and its detection by the infrared luminescence at 1270 nm have been presented. Further, some results using different types of photosensitizers, effect of solvent on singlet oxygen quantum yields and lifetime have been discussed. The quenching rate constants of singlet oxygen have been determined with different types of organic molecules such as derivatives of thiourea and its analogues, hydroxy indoles and antioxidants and the results have been presented. (author)

  15. Singlet oxygen: photosensitized generation, detection and reaction with organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.; Hari Mohan; Bajaj, P.N.; Sapre, A.V.; Mittal, J.P.; Mukherjee, T.

    2006-10-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) is an excited state of molecular oxygen, having antiparallel spin in the same π antibonding orbital. The study of singlet oxygen production and reactivity has emerged as a rich and diverse area, with implication in diverse fields, such as synthetic chemistry, polymer chemistry, photodynamic therapy, etc. There are several known methods to produce singlet oxygen, and also various techniques employed to detect it. Out of these, photosensitization method is the most popular one. In this article, photosensitized production of singlet oxygen from triplet oxygen and photosensitizers in presence of light, and its detection by the infrared luminescence at 1270 nm have been presented. Further, some results using different types of photosensitizers, effect of solvent on singlet oxygen quantum yields and lifetime have been discussed. The quenching rate constants of singlet oxygen have been determined with different types of organic molecules such as derivatives of thiourea and its analogues, hydroxy indoles and antioxidants and the results have been presented. (author)

  16. Negative ion molecule reactions of WF6: evidence for a pressure dependent branching ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viggiano, A.A.; Paulson, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Rate coefficients have been measured in a selected ion flow tube (SIFT) for reactions of several negative ions with WF 6 . With the exception of SF - 5 , all the reactant ions studied having an electron detachment energy less than 3.36 eV reacted rapidly by charge exchange. SF - 5 transferred a fluoride ion producing WF - 7 . Ions with detachment energies greater than 3.36 eV associated rapidly with WF - 6 . Br - , with a detachment energy of 3.36 eV, reacted with WF 6 both by ion-neutral association and by charge exchange. The branching ratio for these two channels was found to depend on temperature and pressure. All these data indicate that the electron affinity of WF 6 is nearly equal to that of Br

  17. Experimental and theoretical data on ion-molecule-reactions relevant for plasma modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansel, A.; Praxmarer, C.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-01-01

    Despite the fact that the rate coefficients of hundreds of ion-molecule-reactions have been published in the literature, much more data are required for the purpose of plasma modelling. Many ion molecule reactions have rate coefficients, k, as large as the collisional limiting value, k c , i.e. the rate coefficients k c at which ion-neutral collision complexes are formed are close to the actual rate coefficients observed. In the case of the interaction of an ion with a non polar molecule, k c , is determined by the Langevin limiting value k L being typically 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 . However, when ions react with polar molecules k c is predicted by the average dipole orientation (ADO) theory. These classical theories yield accurate rate coefficients at thermal and elevated temperatures for practically all proton transfer as well as for many charge transfer and hydrogen abstraction reactions. The agreement between experimental and calculated values is usually better than ±20% and in the case of proton transfer reactions the agreement seems to be even better as recent investigations have shown. Even the interaction of the permanent ion dipole with non polar and polar neutrals can be taken into account to predict reaction rate coefficients as has been shown very recently in reactions of the highly polar ion ArH 3 + with various neutrals

  18. Single-Molecule Sensing with Nanopore Confinement: from Chemical Reactions to Biological Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yao; Ying, Yi-Lun; Gao, Rui; Long, Yi-Tao

    2018-03-25

    The nanopore can generate an electrochemical confinement for single-molecule sensing which help understand the fundamental chemical principle in nanoscale dimensions. By observing the generated ionic current, individual bond-making and bond-breaking steps, single biomolecule dynamic conformational changes and electron transfer processes that occur within pore can be monitored with high temporal and current resolution. These single-molecule studies in nanopore confinement are revealing information about the fundamental chemical and biological processes that cannot be extracted from ensemble measurements. In this concept, we introduce and discuss the electrochemical confinement effects on single-molecule covalent reactions, conformational dynamics of individual molecules and host-guest interactions in protein nanopores. Then, we extend the concept of nanopore confinement effects to confine electrochemical redox reactions in solid-state nanopores for developing new sensing mechanisms. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Rate coefficients for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at interstellar temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.; Clary, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    A theory has been developed recently which predicts that the rate coefficients, k, for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at low temperatures will be much greater than the canonical value of 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 . The new theory indicates that k is greatest for low-lying rotational sates and increases rapidly with decreasing temperature. We refer to recent laboratory measurements which validate the theory, present calculated values of k for the reactions of H + 3 ions with several polar molecules, and discuss their significance to interstellar chemistry. For the reactions of ions with molecules having large dipole moments, we recommend that k values as large as 10 -7 cm 3 s -1 should be used in ion-chemical models of low-temperature interstellar clouds

  20. A Reaction Database for Small Molecule Pharmaceutical Processes Integrated with Process Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Papadakis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of a reaction database with the objective to collect data for multiphase reactions involved in small molecule pharmaceutical processes with a search engine to retrieve necessary data in investigations of reaction-separation schemes, such as the role of organic solvents in reaction performance improvement. The focus of this reaction database is to provide a data rich environment with process information available to assist during the early stage synthesis of pharmaceutical products. The database is structured in terms of reaction classification of reaction types; compounds participating in the reaction; use of organic solvents and their function; information for single step and multistep reactions; target products; reaction conditions and reaction data. Information for reactor scale-up together with information for the separation and other relevant information for each reaction and reference are also available in the database. Additionally, the retrieved information obtained from the database can be evaluated in terms of sustainability using well-known “green” metrics published in the scientific literature. The application of the database is illustrated through the synthesis of ibuprofen, for which data on different reaction pathways have been retrieved from the database and compared using “green” chemistry metrics.

  1. Generalized transition state theory. Quantum effects for collinear reactions of hydrogen molecules and isotopically substituted hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    Canonical variational transition state theory, microcanonical variational transition state theory, and Miller's unified statistical theory were used in an attempt to correct two major deficiencies of the conventional transition state theory. These are: (1) the necessity of extra assumptions to include quantum mechanical tunneling effects and (2) the fundamental assumption that trajectories crossing a dividing surface in phase space proceed directly to products. The accuracy of these approximate methods were tested by performing calculations for several collinear reactions of hydrogen, deuterium, chlorine, or iodine, with five isotopes of hydrogen molecules and comparison of these results with those from accurate quantitative calculations of the reaction probabilities as functions of energy and of the thermal rate constants as functions of temperature. 49 references, 28 figures, 17 tables

  2. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... be readily produced. Products of chemical adsorption and/or chemical reactions induced within adsorbates are aggregated on the surface and observed by light scattering. We will demonstrate how pressure and spectral dependencies of the chemical outcomes, polarization of the light and interference of two laser...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis....

  3. GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON ANIONS WITH MOLECULES OF INTERSTELLAR RELEVANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang Zhibo; Martinez, Oscar; Wehres, Nadine; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied reactions of small dehydrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anions with neutral species of interstellar relevance. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K for the reactions of phenide (C 6 H – 5 ), naphthalenide (C 10 H – 7 ), and anthracenide (C 14 H – 9 ) with atomic H, H 2 , and D 2 using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube instrument. Reaction rate constants of phenide with neutral molecules (CO, O 2 , CO 2 , N 2 O, C 2 H 2 , CH 3 OH, CH 3 CN, (CH 3 ) 2 CO, CH 3 CHO, CH 3 Cl, and (CH 3 CH 2 ) 2 O) are also measured under the same conditions. Experimental measurements are accompanied by ab initio calculations to provide insight into reaction pathways and enthalpies. Our measured reaction rate constants should prove useful in the modeling of astrophysical environments, particularly when applied to dense regions of the interstellar and circumstellar medium.

  4. Gas-phase Reactions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions with Molecules of Interstellar Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang, Zhibo; Martinez, Oscar; Wehres, Nadine; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2012-02-01

    We have studied reactions of small dehydrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anions with neutral species of interstellar relevance. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K for the reactions of phenide (C6H- 5), naphthalenide (C10H- 7), and anthracenide (C14H- 9) with atomic H, H2, and D2 using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube instrument. Reaction rate constants of phenide with neutral molecules (CO, O2, CO2, N2O, C2H2, CH3OH, CH3CN, (CH3)2CO, CH3CHO, CH3Cl, and (CH3CH2)2O) are also measured under the same conditions. Experimental measurements are accompanied by ab initio calculations to provide insight into reaction pathways and enthalpies. Our measured reaction rate constants should prove useful in the modeling of astrophysical environments, particularly when applied to dense regions of the interstellar and circumstellar medium.

  5. Predicting Upscaled Behavior of Aqueous Reactants in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E. E.; Hansen, S. K.; Bolster, D.; Richter, D. H.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    When modeling reactive transport, reaction rates are often overestimated due to the improper assumption of perfect mixing at the support scale of the transport model. In reality, fronts tend to form between participants in thermodynamically favorable reactions, leading to segregation of reactants into islands or fingers. When such a configuration arises, reactions are limited to the interface between the reactive solutes. Closure methods for estimating control-volume-effective reaction rates in terms of quantities defined at the control volume scale do not presently exist, but their development is crucial for effective field-scale modeling. We attack this problem through a combination of analytical and numerical means. Specifically, we numerically study reactive transport through an ensemble of realizations of two-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. We then employ regression analysis to calibrate an analytically-derived relationship between reaction rate and various dimensionless quantities representing conductivity-field heterogeneity and the respective strengths of diffusion, reaction and advection.

  6. Enhancing chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  7. Supramolecular Systems and Chemical Reactions in Single-Molecule Break Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Hu, Duan; Tan, Zhibing; Bai, Jie; Xiao, Zongyuan; Yang, Yang; Shi, Jia; Hong, Wenjing

    2017-04-01

    The major challenges of molecular electronics are the understanding and manipulation of the electron transport through the single-molecule junction. With the single-molecule break junction techniques, including scanning tunneling microscope break junction technique and mechanically controllable break junction technique, the charge transport through various single-molecule and supramolecular junctions has been studied during the dynamic fabrication and continuous characterization of molecular junctions. This review starts from the charge transport characterization of supramolecular junctions through a variety of noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bond, π-π interaction, and electrostatic force. We further review the recent progress in constructing highly conductive molecular junctions via chemical reactions, the response of molecular junctions to external stimuli, as well as the application of break junction techniques in controlling and monitoring chemical reactions in situ. We suggest that beyond the measurement of single molecular conductance, the single-molecule break junction techniques provide a promising access to study molecular assembly and chemical reactions at the single-molecule scale.

  8. The Crossed-Beam Scattering Method in Studies of Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 212, - (2001), s. 413-443 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : ion-molecule reaction dynamics * ion scattering * experimental methods Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2001

  9. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  10. Embedding of polyaniline molecules on adhesive tape using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamatmat, J. K.; Gillado, A. V.; Herrera, M. U.

    2017-05-01

    Polyaniline molecules are embedded on adhesive tape using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique. The infrared spectrum shows the existence of molecular vibrational modes associated with the presence of polyaniline molecules on the sample. With the addition of polyaniline molecules, the conductivity of adhesive tape increases. Surface conductivity increases with number of dipping cycle until it reaches a certain value. Beyond this value, surface conductivity begins to decrease. The surface conductivity of the sample is associated with the connectivity of the embedded polyaniline molecules. The connectivity increases as the number of dipping cycle progresses. Meanwhile, the decrease in surface conductivity is attributed to the eroding of existing embedded structure at higher number of dipping cycle.

  11. Cross sections and rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Wang, J.G.

    2001-05-01

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data on charge exchange processes in collisions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules have been collected and critically assessed. Using well established scaling relationships for the charge exchange cross sections at low and high collision energies, as well as the known rate coefficients for these reactions in the thermal energy region, a complete cross section database is constructed for proton-C x H y charge exchange reactions from thermal energies up to several hundreds keV for all C x H y molecules with x=1, 2, 3 and 1 ≤ y ≤ 2x + 2. Rate coefficients for these charge exchange reactions have also been calculated in the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 20 keV. (author)

  12. Cross sections and rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K.; Kato, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Wang, J.G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens (United States)

    2001-05-01

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data on charge exchange processes in collisions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules have been collected and critically assessed. Using well established scaling relationships for the charge exchange cross sections at low and high collision energies, as well as the known rate coefficients for these reactions in the thermal energy region, a complete cross section database is constructed for proton-C{sub x}H{sub y} charge exchange reactions from thermal energies up to several hundreds keV for all C{sub x}H{sub y} molecules with x=1, 2, 3 and 1 {<=} y {<=} 2x + 2. Rate coefficients for these charge exchange reactions have also been calculated in the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 20 keV. (author)

  13. Nanoscale control of reversible chemical reaction between fullerene C60 molecules using scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Masato; Kuwahara, Yuji; Aono, Masakazu; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2011-04-01

    The nanoscale control of reversible chemical reactions, the polymerization and depolymerization between C60 molecules, has been investigated. Using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the polymerization and depolymerization can be controlled at designated positions in ultrathin films of C60 molecules. One of the two chemical reactions can be selectively induced by controlling the sample bias voltage (V(s)); the application of negative and positive values of V(s) results in polymerization and depolymerization, respectively. The selectivity between the two chemical reactions becomes extremely high when the thickness of the C60 film increases to more than three molecular layers. We conclude that STM-induced negative and positive electrostatic ionization are responsible for the control of the polymerization and depolymerization, respectively.

  14. Theory of the reaction dynamics of small molecules on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Bret [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The objective of this project has been to develop realistic theoretical models for gas-surface interactions, with a focus on processes important in heterogeneous catalysis. The dissociative chemisorption of a molecule on a metal is a key step in many catalyzed reactions, and is often the rate-limiting step. We have explored the dissociative chemisorption of H2, H2O and CH4 on a variety of metal surfaces. Most recently, our extensive studies of methane dissociation on Ni and Pt surfaces have fully elucidated its dependence on translational energy, vibrational state and surface temperature, providing the first accurate comparisons with experimental data. We have explored Eley-Rideal and hot atom reactions of H atoms with H- and C-covered metal surfaces. H atom interactions with graphite have also been explored, including both sticking and Eley-Rideal recombination processes. Again, our methods made it possible to explain several experiments studying these reactions. The sticking of atoms on metal surfaces has also been studied. To help elucidate the experiments that study these processes, we examine how the reaction dynamics depend upon the nature of the molecule-metal interaction, as well as experimental variables such as substrate temperature, beam energy, angle of impact, and the internal states of the molecules. Electronic structure methods based on Density Functional Theory are used to compute each molecule-metal potential energy surface. Both time-dependent quantum scattering techniques and quasi-classical methods are used to examine the reaction or scattering dynamics. Much of our effort has been directed towards developing improved quantum methods that can accurately describe reactions, as well as include the effects of substrate temperature (lattice vibration).

  15. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  16. Benchmarking density functional tight binding models for barrier heights and reaction energetics of organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruden, Maja; Andjeklović, Ljubica; Jissy, Akkarapattiakal Kuriappan; Stepanović, Stepan; Zlatar, Matija; Cui, Qiang; Elstner, Marcus

    2017-09-30

    Density Functional Tight Binding (DFTB) models are two to three orders of magnitude faster than ab initio and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods and therefore are particularly attractive in applications to large molecules and condensed phase systems. To establish the applicability of DFTB models to general chemical reactions, we conduct benchmark calculations for barrier heights and reaction energetics of organic molecules using existing databases and several new ones compiled in this study. Structures for the transition states and stable species have been fully optimized at the DFTB level, making it possible to characterize the reliability of DFTB models in a more thorough fashion compared to conducting single point energy calculations as done in previous benchmark studies. The encouraging results for the diverse sets of reactions studied here suggest that DFTB models, especially the most recent third-order version (DFTB3/3OB augmented with dispersion correction), in most cases provide satisfactory description of organic chemical reactions with accuracy almost comparable to popular DFT methods with large basis sets, although larger errors are also seen for certain cases. Therefore, DFTB models can be effective for mechanistic analysis (e.g., transition state search) of large (bio)molecules, especially when coupled with single point energy calculations at higher levels of theory. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions and high-pressure mass spectrometer, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Kenzo

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for the fact that the research in gas-phase ion-molecule reactions, to which wide interest is shown, have greatly contributed to the physical and chemical fields are that, first it is essential in understanding general phenomena concerning ions, second, it can furnish many unique informations in the dynamics of chemical reactions, and third, usefulness of '' chemical ionization'' methods has been established as its application to chemical analysis. In this review, the history and trend of studies and equipments in gas-phase ion-molecule reactions are surveyed. The survey includes the chemical ionization mass spectrometer for simultaneously measuring the positive and negative ions utilizing a quadrupole mass spectrometer presented by Hunt and others, flowing afterglow method derived from the flowing method which traces neutral chemical species mainly optically, ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, trapped ion mass spectrometer and others. Number of reports referred to ion-molecule reactions issued during the last one year well exceeds the total number of reports concerning mass spectrometers presented before 1955. This truly shows how active the research and development are in this field. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Photo- and radiation-chemical stability of molecules. Reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.G.; Ovchinnikov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    In the review of works published up to 1978 one of the main problems of radiation chemistry is discussed, namely the relationship between the structure of organic molecules and their resistance to the effect of ionizing radiation. Theoretical aspects of this problem are considered for reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off. It is shown that the radical yield in low-temperature radiation-chemical experiments is connected with the position of lower triplet states of molecules, ionization potentials, polarity of medium and the energy of C-H bonds in cation radicals

  19. Temperature dependence of third order ion molecule reactions. The reaction H+3 + 2H2 = H+5 + H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, K.; Kebarle, P.

    1975-01-01

    The rate constants k 1 for Reaction (1): H + 3 +2H 2 = H + 5 +H 2 were measured in the temperature range 100--300 degreeK. The temperature dependence of k 1 has the form k 1 proportionalT - /subn/, where n=2.3. Pierce and Porter have reported a much stronger negative temperature dependence with n=4.6. The difference arises from a determination of k 1 at 300 degreeK obtained by Arifov and used by Porter. The present k 1 (300 degreeK) =9times10 -30 (cm 6 molecules -2 center-dotsec -1 ). This is more than an order of magnitude larger than the Arifov value. The temperature dependence of third body dependent association reactions like (1) is examined on the basis of the energy transfer theory and the recently proposed trimolecular complex transition state theory by Meot-Ner, Solomon, Field, and Gershinowitz. The temperature dependence of the rate constant for the reverse reaction (-1) is obtained from k 1 and the previously determined temperature dependence of the equilibria (1). k/sub -//sub 1/ gives a good straight line Arrhenius plot leading to k/sub -//sub 1/ =8.7times10 -6 exp(-8.4/RT) cm 3 molecules -1 center-dotsec -1 . The activation energy is in kcal/mole. The preexponential factor is much larger than the rate constant for Langevin collisions. This is typical for pyrolysis of ions involving second order activation

  20. Influence of vibrations of gas molecules on neutron reaction cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C. D.; Schrack, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The change in molecular vibrational energy upon absorption of a neutron by a nucleus bound in a free molecule can influence resonance shape and other aspects of neutron reaction cross sections. A formalism is developed for centrosymmetric molecules such as UF6 and applied to the shape of the 6.67 eV resonance in 238U. The ratio of the resonance shape for 238UF6 gas and for solid 238U3O8 has been measured and compared with the calculation. Reasonable agreement is obtained indicating the validity of the calculation and the necessity to include vibration effects to avoid large errors in measurements and calculations on gascontaining systems. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 238U(n,γ) measured at 6.67 eV resonance; Effect of molecular vibrations studied experimentally and theoretically.

  1. Drift-tube studies of ion-molecule reactions at low collision energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental studies of ion-molecule reactions at low collision energies using two drift tube mass spectrometer apparatus. The reactions studied are (i) proton transfer from HeH + to ArH + , (ii) charge and ion transfer reactions of O 2 2+ with NO, CO 2 , Ne and O 2 + ( 4 π u ) with CO 2 , (iii) oxidation reactions of Zr + and ZrO + with NO, CO 2 and O 2 , (iv) vibrational quenching reactions of H 3 + with He, (v) termolecular clustering reactions of H 2 CN + and H 2 CN + (HCN) (with He as the third body), (vi) three body association reactions of H + and D + with He (with He as the third body) and (vii) termolecular association reaction of NO + with NO (with Ne as third body). All the reactions were studied at thermal energies (at room temperature), reactions of O 2 2+ with NO and CO 2 , Zr + with NO/CO 2 /O 2 were also studied at center-of-mass energies higher than thermal and the association reactions of H 2 CN + /H 2 CN + (HCN) with HCN and H + /D + with He were studied at low temperatures. In addition, the thesis presents model calculations for the sweep-out effect which is an instrumental effect. A super Langevin rate constant is introduced which is a higher-order correction to the Langevin model. A theoretical model for the three-body ion-atom association rate constant is presented in the appendix of the thesis

  2. A Pilot Study of Ion - Molecule Reactions at Temperatures Relevant to the Atmosphere of Titan

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zymak, Illia; Žabka, Ján; Polášek, Miroslav; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2016), s. 533-538 ISSN 0169-6149 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19693S Grant - others:COST(XE) TD1308 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titan ionosphere * variable temperature selected ions flow tube * ion-molecule reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2016

  3. Calculation of rate coefficients of some proton-transfer ion-molecule reactions in weakly ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    A classical collision theory is used to describe thermal bimolecular rate coefficeints for reaction between positive and negative ions and polar molecules in a carrier gas. Special attention is paid to ion-molecule reaction in which proton transfer occurs. These reactions play an important role in terrestrial plasma devices, in ionosphere, in planetary atmospheres and in interstellar matter. The equilibrium rate coefficients of the reactions are calculated based on a microscopic reactive cross section derived from a long distance polar molecule-ion potential. The results are compared with experimental values of afterglow measurements. (D.Gy.)

  4. Selected ion flow tube studies of S2+ reactions with a series of organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Brian K.; Adams, Nigel G.

    1997-11-01

    A selected ion flow tube (SIFT) has been used to study the reactions of S2+ with a series of organic molecules (as well as H2, CO, NH3, NO and NO2). These include the hydrocarbons, C2H4, C2H6, CH2CCH2, CH3CHCH2 and C3H8; alcohols and thiols, CH3OH, C2H5OH, CH3SH and C2H5SH; ethers (CH3)2O and (C2H5)2O; aldehydes and ketones, CH3CHO, C2H5CHO and (CH3)2CO; and carboxylic acids and esters, HCO2H, HCO2CH3, HCO2C2H5, CH3CO2H, CH3CO2CH3, CH3CO2C2H5, C2H5CO2H, C2H5CO2CH3 and C2H5CO2C2H5. The rate coefficients are generally close to the collisional values, with exceptions among the reactions involving the smaller molecules. Most prevalent are abstraction reactions leading to formation of the thiosulfeno radical, HS2, or its protonated form; three-body associations; and channels leading to formation of the acetyl and propionyl cations, CH3CO+ and C2H5CO+, respectively. Only in reactions involving the alkenes is cleavage of the S---S bond of S2+ observed. The isomeric molecules in the data set generally react very differently, as would be expected from reactivity controlled by the position and complexity of the functional groups. The data are discussed in terms of reaction mechanisms, thermodynamics, and implications for interstellar chemistry.

  5. Ion-molecule reactions in the binary mixture of ethylene oxide and trioxane, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru; Arakawa, Kazuo; Sugiura, Toshio.

    1978-01-01

    The ion-molecule reactions in the binary mixture of ethylene oxide and trioxane have been studied with use of a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. As cross-reaction product ions, C 3 H 5 O 2 + , C 3 H 6 O 2 +sup(, and C**3**H**7**O**2**)+sup( were observed under the conditions of long delay times and elevated pressure. It was found that these ions are formed by the dissociation of unstable intermediate-complex resulting from the reaction of ethylene oxide molecular ion with trioxane. It was proposed that the complex is of cyclic structure in which positive charge is delocalized. From the consideration of isotopic distribution of the product ions in ethylene-d**4** oxide-trioxane mixtures, the skeletal structures of the product ions were investigated. The rate constants of the formation reactions of C**3**H**5**O**2**)+sup(, C**3**H**6**O**2**)+sup(, and C**3**H**7**O**2**)+sup( in ethylene oxide-trioxane mixtures were found to be 2.20 x 10)-10sup(, 2.61 x 10)-10sup(, and 1.74 x 10)-10sup( cm)3sup( molecule)-1sup(s)-1 , respectively. (auth.)

  6. New fundamental equations of thermodynamics for systems in chemical equilibrium at a specified partial pressure of a reactant and the standard transformed formation properties of reactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberty, R.A.; Oppenheim, I.

    1993-01-01

    When temperature, pressure, and the partial pressure of a reactant are fixed, the criterion of chemical equilibrium can be expressed in terms of the transformed Gibbs energy G' that is obtained by using a Legendre transform involving the chemical potential of the reactant that is fixed. For reactions of ideal gases, the most natural variables to use in the fundamental equation are T, P', and P B , where P' is the partial pressure of the reactants other than the one that is fixed and P B is the partial pressure of the reactant that is fixed. The fundamental equation for G' yields the expression for the transformed entropy S', and a transformed enthalpy can be defined by the additional Legendre transform H'=G'+TS'. This leads to an additional form of the fundamental equation. The calculation of transformed thermodynamic properties and equilibrium compositions is discussed for a simple system and for a general multireaction system. The change, in a reaction, of the binding of the reactant that is at a specified pressure can be calculated using one of the six Maxwell equations of the fundamental equation in G'

  7. Possible reaction pathways of the lincomycin molecule according to the DFT calculation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Bahar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human-used antibiotics are eliminated from the body with little or no transformation at all. Traces of eliminated antibiotics enter the receiving environment directly since they cannot be treated in prevalent wastewater treatment facilities. Thus, wastewaters containing traces of antibiotics have to be treated accordingly. Lincomycin is subsequently isolated from Streptomyces lincolnensis. Lincomycin and its derivatives are antibiotics exhibiting biological activity against Gram-positive bacteria, and are natural antibiotics in the environment as pollutants. This study aims to predict the degradation mechanism of lincomycin molecule in the gaseous phase and aqueous media. Probable reaction path of lincomycin molecule with OH radicals was analyzed. Optimized geometry was calculated via Gauss View 5. Subsequently, the lowest energy status was determined through geometric optimization via Gaussian 09 program. Aiming to determine the intermediates in photocatalytic degradation mechanism of lincomycin, geometric optimization of the molecule was realized through DFT method. Activation energy for the probable reaction path was calculated, and their most stable state from the thermodynamic perspective determined for the gaseous phase and aqueous media. Impact of water solvent was investigated using the conductor-like screening solvation model (COSMO. The predicted mechanism was confirmed by comparison with experimental results on simple structures reported in literature.

  8. Vibronic coupling in ionized organic molecules: structural distortions and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Ffrancon

    2003-01-01

    Ionized organic molecules (radical cations) in radiation chemistry are liable to undergo vibronic coupling whenever there is a relatively small energy gap (∼0.5-1.5 eV) between their ground and excited states. As a result of this mixing, the force constant for the symmetry-allowed vibrational mode that couples these states is lowered in the ground state of the radical cation so that deformation can take place more easily along this specific mode. This pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect can then result in a permanent structural distortion of the radical cation relative to the symmetry of the parent neutral molecule. It can also bring about an energetically favored pathway for a facile chemical rearrangement along a reaction coordinate defined by the coupling mode. Examples taken from matrix-isolation studies are used to illustrate these dramatic consequences of vibronic coupling in radical cations. Thus, the bicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene and tetramethylurea radical cations are found to have twisted structures departing from the C 2v symmetry of their parent molecules, while the oxirane and bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane radical cations undergo ring-opening rearrangements along reaction coordinates that correspond to the deformational modes predicted by the pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect

  9. Low energy electron-initiated ion-molecule reactions of ribose analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozejko, P.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experiments in which plasmid DNA samples were bombarded with low energy ( 2 O, DNA bases, and sugar-phosphate backbone analogues. To this end, the cyclic molecule tetrahydrofuran, and its derivatives, provide useful models for the sugar-like molecules contained in the backbone of DNA. In addition to LEE induced dissociation by processes such as dissociative electron attachment (DEA), molecules may be damaged by ions and neutral species of non-thermal energies created by LEE in the surrounding environment. In this contribution, we investigate with electron stimulated desorption techniques, LEE damage to films of desoxy-ribose analogues in the presence of various molecular coadsorbates, that simulate changes in local molecular environment. In one type of experiments tetrahydrofuran is deposited onto multilayer O2. A desorbed signal of OH - indicates ion-molecule reactions of the type O - + C 4 H 8 O -> OH - + C 4 H 7 O, where the O - was formed initially by DEA to O 2 . Further electron stimulated desorption measurements for tetrahydrofuran and derivatives adsorbed on H 2 O, Kr, N 2 O and CH 3 OH will be presented and discussed

  10. Photochemical reactions of triplet benzophenone and anthraquinone molecules with amines in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalesskaya, G.A.; Sambor, E.G.; Belyi, N.N.

    2004-01-01

    The intermolecular photoinduced reactions between triplet ketone molecules and aliphatic amines and pyridine are studied by the quenching of delayed fluorescence of anthraquinone and benzophenone vapors by diethylamine, dibutylamine, cyclohexylamine, triethylamine, and pyridine. In the temperature range 423-573 K, the delayed fluorescence quenching rate constants k q are estimated from changes in the decay rate constant and the intensity of delayed fluorescence upon increasing pressure of bath gases. It is ascertained that, in the gas phase, the mixtures under study exhibit both a negative and a positive dependence of k q on temperature, which indicates that some photoinduced reactions do not have activation barriers. The rate constant k q is shown to increase with decreasing ionization potential of the electron donors. This points to the importance of interactions with charge transfer in the photoreaction of triplet ketone molecules with aliphatic amines and pyridine in the gas phase. The relationship between k q and the change in the free energy ΔG upon the photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer, which is the primary stage of the photochemical reaction, is studied. It is shown that the dependence k q (ΔG) for the donor-acceptor pairs under study is described well by the Marcus equation, in which the average vibrational energies of the donor and acceptor are taken into account for the estimate of ΔG

  11. Low energy cross section data for ion-molecule reactions in hydrogen systems and for charge transfer of multiply charged ions with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Kazuhiko

    2007-04-01

    Systematic cross section measurements for ion-molecule reactions in hydrogen systems and for charge transfer of multiply charged ions in low energy collisions with atoms and molecules have been performed continuously by the identical apparatus installed with an octo-pole ion beam guide (OPIG) since 1980 till 2004. Recently, all of accumulated cross section data for a hundred collision systems has been entered into CMOL and CHART of the NIFS atomic and molecular numerical database together with some related cross section data. In this present paper, complicated ion-molecule reactions in hydrogen systems are revealed and the brief outlines of specific properties in low energy charge transfer collisions of multiply charged ions with atoms and molecules are introduced. (author)

  12. Low temperature synthesis of Mo2C/W2C superlattices via ultra-thin modulated reactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.D.; Johnson, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The authors report here a synthesis method of preparing carbide superlattices using ultra-thin modulated reactants. Initial investigations into the synthesis of the binary systems, Mo 2 C and W 2 C using ultra-thin modulated reactants revealed that both can be formed at relatively low temperatures (500 and 600 C respectively). DSC and XRD data suggested a two step reaction pathway involving interdiffusion of the initial modulated reactant followed by crystallization of the final product, if the modulation length is on the order of 10 angstrom. This information was used to form Mo 2 C/W 2 C superlattices using the structure of the ultra-thin modulated reactant to control the final superlattice period. Relatively large superlattice modulations were kinetically trapped by having several repeat units of each binary within the total repeat of the initial reactant. DSC and XRD data again are consistent with a two step reaction pathway leading to the formation of carbide superlattices

  13. Rotational state dependence of ion-polar molecule reactions at very low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubernet, M.L.; McCarroll, R.

    1989-01-01

    The adiabatic rotational state method is used to investigate the rotational state dependence of the rate coefficients for ion-polar molecule reactions in the very low temperature regime characteristic of interstellar molecular clouds. Results obtained for the systems H 3 + +HCl and H 3 + +HCN indicate that all the methods based on the adiabatic separation of the rotational and radial motion of the collision complex - adiabatic capture centrifugal sudden approximation (ACCSA), statistical adiabatic channel model, classical adiabatic invariance method - agree very satisfactorily in the low temperature limit. Discrepancies observed between some of the published data would appear to arise from numerical inaccuracies rather than from any defect of the theory. (orig.)

  14. A Monte Carlo simulation of the exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on a heterogeneous solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisao

    1980-01-01

    A method of the Monte Carlo simulation of the isotopic exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on an arbitrarily heterogeneous solid surface is described by employing hydrogen as an example. (author)

  15. Effect of vibrational excitation on the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.L.

    1981-11-01

    A new experimental technique for the study of vibrational effects on ion-molecule reaction cross sections is described. Vibrational and collision energy dependent cross sections are presented for proton and H atom transfer, charge transfer and collision induced dissociation reactions in various isotopic H 2 + + H 2 systems. Charge and proton transfer cross sections are presented for the reactions of H 2 + and D 2 + with Ar, N 2 , CO, and O 2 . All the reactions are shown to be highly influenced by avoided crossings between the ground and first excited potential energy surfaces. Because of the nature of the crossings, vibrational motion of the systems can cause both adiabatic and non-adiabatic behavior of the system. This makes the vibrational dependences of the various cross sections a very sensitive probe of the dynamics of the collisions particularly, their behavior in the region of the crossings. Evidence is seen for charge transfer between reagents as they approach each other, transition to and in some cases reactions on excited potential energy surfaces, competition between different channels, and strong coupling of proton and charge transfer channels which occurs only for two of the systems studied (H 2 + + Ar, N 2 ). Oscillatory structure is observed in the collision energy dependence of the endoergic H 2 + (v = 0) + Ar charge transfer reaction for the first time, and a simple model which is commonly used for atom-atom charge transfer is used to fit the peaks. Finally a simple model is used to assess the importance of energy resonance and Franck-Condon effects on molecular charge transfer

  16. Stereoselectivity in catalytic reactions: CO oxidation on Pd(100) by rotationally aligned O2 molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattuone, L.; Gerbi, A.; Savio, L.; Cappelletti, D.; Pirani, F.; Rocca, M.

    2010-05-01

    We report on stereodynamical effects in heterogeneous catalytic reactions as measured by molecular beam-surface experiments. Specifically for CO oxidation on Pd(100) we find that the rotational alignment of the incoming O2 at low (Θ = 0.04 ML) and at intermediate (ΘCO = 0.17 ML) CO pre-coverage, causes a higher reactivity of molecules in high and in low helicity states, respectively (corresponding to helicoptering and cartwheeling motion of O2). In first approximation, at low CO pre-coverage the difference in reactivity is determined by the different location of the O atoms generated in the dissociation process by the different parent molecules, while at intermediate CO pre-coverage the reactivity is influenced also by the different ability of cartwheeling and helicoptering O2 to penetrate through the CO adlayer. In accord with this the total amount of CO2 produced is always largest for helicopters which generate supersurface O atoms at least in the low CO pre-coverage limit. A deeper inspection of the data indicates, however, that the dynamics is more complex, two different pathways being present for the reaction with O generated by helicopters and one for O generated by cartwheels. Moreover, cartwheels generated oxygen influences the reactivity of subsequently arriving helicopters.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF BENZENE AS A TRACE REACTANT IN TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainer, Melissa G. [Planetary Environments Laboratory, Code 699, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sebree, Joshua A. [NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow, Code 699, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Heidi Yoon, Y.; Tolbert, Margaret A., E-mail: melissa.trainer@nasa.gov [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Box 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    Benzene has been detected in Titan's atmosphere by Cassini instruments, with concentrations ranging from sub-ppb in the stratosphere to ppm in the ionosphere. Sustained levels of benzene in the haze formation region could signify that it is an important reactant in the formation of Titan's organic aerosol. To date, there have not been laboratory investigations to assess the influence of benzene on aerosol properties. We report a laboratory study on the chemical composition of organic aerosol formed from C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} via far ultraviolet irradiation (120-200 nm). The compositional results are compared to those from aerosol generated by a more ''traditional Titan'' mixture of CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2}. Our results show that even a trace amount of C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (10 ppm) has significant impact on the chemical composition and production rates of organic aerosol. There are several pathways by which photolyzed benzene may react to form larger molecules, both with and without the presence of CH{sub 4}, but many of these reaction mechanisms are only beginning to be explored for the conditions at Titan. Continued work investigating the influence of benzene in aerosol growth will advance understanding of this previously unstudied reaction system.

  18. Confined Catalysis in the g-C3N4/Pt(111) Interface: Feasible Molecule Intercalation, Tunable Molecule-Metal Interaction, and Enhanced Reaction Activity of CO Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujiao; Feng, Yingxin; Yu, Ming'an; Wan, Qiang; Lin, Sen

    2017-09-27

    The deposition of a two-dimensional (2D) atomic nanosheet on a metal surface has been considered as a new route for tuning the molecule-metal interaction and surface reactivity in terms of the confinement effect. In this work, we use first-principles calculations to systematically explore a novel nanospace constructed by placing a 2D graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) nanosheet over a Pt(111) surface. The confined catalytic activity in this nanospace is investigated using CO oxidation as a model reaction. With the inherent triangular pores in the g-C 3 N 4 overlayer being taken advantage of, molecules such as CO and O 2 can diffuse to adsorb on the Pt(111) surface underneath the g-C 3 N 4 overlayer. Moreover, the mechanism of intercalation is also elucidated, and the results reveal that the energy barrier depends mainly on the properties of the molecule and the channel. Importantly, the molecule-catalyst interaction can be tuned by the g-C 3 N 4 overlayer, considerably reducing the adsorption energy of CO on Pt(111) and leading to enhanced reactivity in CO oxidation. This work will provide important insight for constructing a promising nanoreactor in which the following is observed: The molecule intercalation is facile; the molecule-metal interaction is efficiently tuned; the metal-catalyzed reaction is promoted.

  19. Synthesis of new thermoelectrics using modulated elemental reactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbostel, M D; Sellinschegg, H; Johnson, D C

    1997-07-01

    A series of new, metastable ternary crystalline compounds with the skutterudite crystal structure have been synthesized using modulated elemental reactants. The initial reactants are made up of multiple repeats of a {approximately}25 {angstrom} thick unit containing elemental layers of the desired ternary metal, iron and antimony. Low temperature annealing (150 C) results in interdiffusion of the elemental layers to form amorphous reaction intermediates. Annealing these intermediates at temperatures between 200 C and 250 C results in exothermic crystallization of the desired skutterudite crystal structure. Most of the new compounds prepared are only kinetically stable, decomposing exothermically to form thermodynamically more stable mixtures of binary compounds and elements. Low angle x-ray diffraction studies show that the resulting films are exceedingly smooth. These films have an ideal geometry for measuring properties of importance for thermoelectric devices--the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity. Thermal conductivity can be measured using a modification of the 3{omega} technique of Cahill. Samples can be produced rapidly, allowing for systematic screening and subsequent optimization as a function of composition and doping levels.

  20. Vibronic coupling in ionized organic molecules. Structural distortions and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, F.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Ionized organic molecules (radical cations, RC) are prone to undergo vibronic coupling whenever there is a relatively small energy gap ( 2v point group of the neutral parent molecule by twisting at the olefinic π bond to the lower C 2 symmetry in the RC (Chem. Eur. J. 2002, 8, 1074). These experiments clearly revealed a double minimum in the potential energy surface along the a 2 torsional mode. This is in accord with the coupling of the 2 B 1 and 2 B 2 Born-Oppenheimer states in C 2v symmetry, this mixing of the 2 B 1 π-ionized ground state and the 2 B 2 δ-ionized excited state being facilitated by the low (∼ 1.0 eV) gap between these states, as estimated from photoelectron spectroscopy. Turning to the second class of RC where unimolecular rearrangement reactions are promoted by vibronic interaction, several cases have emerged where the rearrangement would not be expected if it were based only on the ground-state properties of the RC. It was found (Chem. Phy. Lett. 1988, 143, 521) that the ethylene oxide RC undergoes C-C ring opening to the oxallyl species despite the fact that the ground state corresponds to ionization from the nonbonding oxygen π lone-pair orbital. The reaction develops excited-state character as a result of the vibronic mixing so that the activation barrier to ring opening is lowered. We will discuss the unusual rearrangements of the bicyclo[1.1.1.]pentane and [1.1.1]propellane RC from a similar perspective, emphasis being placed on the decisive role of symmetry in predicting the course of these rearrangements. We illustrate how this approach can reconcile conflicting considerations on some of the 'unexpected' reaction pathways followed by highly strained organic RC

  1. Liquid Water Transport in the Reactant Channels of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rupak

    Water management has been identified as a critical issue in the development of PEM fuel cells for automotive applications. Water is present inside the PEM fuel cell in three phases, i.e. liquid phase, vapor phase and mist phase. Liquid water in the reactant channels causes flooding of the cell and blocks the transport of reactants to the reaction sites at the catalyst layer. Understanding the behavior of liquid water in the reactant channels would allow us to devise improved strategies for removing liquid water from the reactant channels. In situ fuel cell tests have been performed to identify and diagnose operating conditions which result in the flooding of the fuel cell. A relationship has been identified between the liquid water present in the reactant channels and the cell performance. A novel diagnostic technique has been established which utilizes the pressure drop multiplier in the reactant channels to predict the flooding of the cell or the drying-out of the membrane. An ex-situ study has been undertaken to quantify the liquid water present in the reactant channels. A new parameter, the Area Coverage Ratio (ACR), has been defined to identify the interfacial area of the reactant channel which is blocked for reactant transport by the presence of liquid water. A parametric study has been conducted to study the effect of changing temperature and the inlet relative humidity on the ACR. The ACR decreases with increase in current density as the gas flow rates increase, removing water more efficiently. With increase in temperature, the ACR decreases rapidly, such that by 60°C, there is no significant ACR to be reported. Inlet relative humidity of the gases does change the saturation of the gases in the channel, but did not show any significant effect on the ACR. Automotive powertrains, which is the target for this work, are continuously faced with transient changes. Water management under transient operating conditions is significantly more challenging and has not

  2. Proton-transfer reactions in ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.; Schmidt, R.; Schuster, R.

    1985-01-01

    Ion-molecule reactions play an important role in various radiolytic processes, e.g. gas-pulse radiolysis, environmental research. For a discussion of mechanisms rate coefficients have to be assessed. Here gas-phase rate coefficients of ion-(polar) molecule reactions are calculated using the ideas of interaction potentials, reactive cross-sections and distribution functions of the translational energies of both the reactants (ions I, molecules M). The starting point of our approach, directed especially to gas-phase proton-transfer reactions, is the idea that the rate coefficient k can be calculated as an ion-molecule capture-rate coefficient multiplied by a 'steric factor' representing the probability for proton transfer. Mutual capture of the reaction partners within a possible reaction zone is caused by the physical interaction between an ion and a polar molecule. A model is discussed. Results are presented. (author)

  3. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  4. Reaction mechanism of O-acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic. ... healing, fertilization, cell differentiation and growth, ... to lower the side effects of drug administration. Since ... tozoa and plants. ... give turnover products or could produce a stable ad- ...... be due to the hydrolysis with water molecule.

  5. Applications of a single-molecule detection in early disease diagnosis and enzymatic reaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Various single-molecule techniques were utilized for ultra-sensitive early diagnosis of viral DNA and antigen and basic mechanism study of enzymatic reactions. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV) served as the screening target in a flow system. Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532) labeled single-stranded DNA probes were hybridized to the target HPV-16 DNA in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell and had a linear dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was employed to achieve zero false-positive count. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the system. A surface-based method was used to improve the throughput of the flow system. HPV-16 DNA was hybridized to probes on a glass surface and detected with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. In the single-probe mode, the whole genome and target DNA were fluorescently labeled before hybridization, and the detection limit is similar to the flow system. In the dual-probe mode, a second probe was introduced. The linear dynamic range covers 1.44-7000 copies/cell, which is typical of early infection to near-cancer stages. The dual-probe method was tested with a crudely prepared sample. Even with reduced hybridization efficiency caused by the interference of cellular materials, we were still able to differentiate infected cells from healthy cells. Detection and quantification of viral antigen with a novel single-molecule immunosorbent assay (SMISA) was achieved. Antigen from human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) was chosen to be the target in this study. The target was sandwiched between a monoclonal capture antibody and a

  6. Understanding the reaction between muonium atoms and hydrogen molecules: zero point energy, tunnelling, and vibrational adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldegunde, J.; Jambrina, P. G.; García, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Sáez-Rábanos, V.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    The advent of very precise measurements of rate coefficients in reactions of muonium (Mu), the lightest hydrogen isotope, with H2 in its ground and first vibrational state and of kinetic isotope effects with respect to heavier isotopes has triggered a renewed interests in the field of muonic chemistry. The aim of the present article is to review the most recent results about the dynamics and mechanism of the reaction Mu+H2 to shed light on the importance of quantum effects such as tunnelling, the preservation of the zero point energy, and the vibrational adiabaticity. In addition to accurate quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, quasiclassical trajectories (QCT) have been run in order to check the reliability of this method for this isotopic variant. It has been found that the reaction with H2(v=0) is dominated by the high zero point energy (ZPE) of the products and that tunnelling is largely irrelevant. Accordingly, both QCT calculations that preserve the products' ZPE as well as those based on the Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics methodology can reproduce the QM rate coefficients. However, when the hydrogen molecule is vibrationally excited, QCT calculations fail completely in the prediction of the huge vibrational enhancement of the reactivity. This failure is attributed to tunnelling, which plays a decisive role breaking the vibrational adiabaticity when v=1. By means of the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that the tunnelling takes place through the ν1=1 collinear barrier. Somehow, the tunnelling that is missing in the Mu+H2(v=0) reaction is found in Mu+H2(v=1).

  7. Synthesis of ZnO particles using water molecules generated in esterification reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šarić, Ankica; Gotić, Marijan; Štefanić, Goran; Dražić, Goran

    2017-07-01

    Zinc oxide particles were synthesized without the addition of water by autoclaving (anhydrous) zinc acetate/alcohol and zinc acetate/acetic acid/alcohol solutions at 160 °C. The solvothermal synthesis was performed in ethanol or octanol. The structural, optical and morphological characteristics of ZnO particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy, FE-SEM and TEM/STEM microscopy. 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of ester (ethyl- or octyl-acetate) in the supernatants which directly indicate the reaction mechanism. The formation of ester in this esterification reaction generated water molecule in situ, which hydrolyzed anhydrous zinc acetate and initiated nucleation and formation of ZnO. It was found that the size and shape of ZnO particles depend on the type of alcohol used as a solvent and on the presence of acetic acid in solution. The presence of ethanol in the ;pure; system without acetic acid favoured the formation of fine and uniform spherical ZnO nanoparticles (∼20 nm). With the addition of small amount of acetic acid the size of these small nanoparticles increased significantly up to a few hundred nanometers. The addition of small amount of acetic acid in the presence of octanol caused even more radical changes in the shape of ZnO particles, favouring the growth of huge rod-like particles (∼3 μm).

  8. Flame Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Coupled with Negative Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Ion Molecule Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Bhat, Suhail Muzaffar; Shiea, Jentaie

    2017-07-01

    Flame atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) combined with negative electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was developed to detect the ion/molecule reactions (IMRs) products between nitric acid (HNO 3 ) and negatively charged amino acid, angiotensin I (AI) and angiotensin II (AII), and insulin ions. Nitrate and HNO 3 -nitrate ions were detected in the oxyacetylene flame, suggesting that a large quantity of nitric acid (HNO 3 ) was produced in the flame. The HNO 3 and negatively charged analyte ions produced by a negative ESI source were delivered into each arm of a Y-shaped stainless steel tube where they merged and reacted. The products were subsequently characterized with an ion trap mass analyzer attached to the exit of the Y-tube. HNO 3 showed the strongest affinity to histidine and formed (M histidine -H+HNO 3 ) - complex ions, whereas some amino acids did not react with HNO 3 at all. Reactions between HNO 3 and histidine residues in AI and AII resulted in the formation of dominant [M AI -H+(HNO 3 )] - and [M AII -H+(HNO 3 )] - ions. Results from analyses of AAs and insulin indicated that HNO 3 could not only react with basic amino acid residues, but also with disulfide bonds to form [M-3H+(HNO 3 ) n ] 3- complex ions. This approach is useful for obtaining information about the number of basic amino acid residues and disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Identification of Carboxylate, Phosphate, and Phenoxide Functionalities in Deprotonated Molecules Related to Drug Metabolites via Ion-Molecule Reactions with water and Diethylhydroxyborane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanyu; Ma, Xin; Kong, John Y.; Zhang, Minli; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2017-10-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ion-molecule reactions has emerged as a powerful tool for structural elucidation of ionized analytes. However, most currently used reagents were designed to react with protonated analytes, making them suboptimal for acidic analytes that are preferentially detected in negative ion mode. In this work we demonstrate that the phenoxide, carboxylate, and phosphate functionalities can be identified in deprotonated molecules by use of a combination of two reagents, diethylmethoxyborane (DEMB) and water. A novel reagent introduction setup that allowed DEMB and water to be separately introduced into the ion trap region of the mass spectrometer was developed to facilitate fundamental studies of this reaction. A new reagent, diethylhydroxyborane (DEHB), was generated inside the ion trap by hydrolysis of DEMB on introduction of water. Most carboxylates and phenoxides formed a DEHB adduct, followed by addition of one water molecule and subsequent ethane elimination (DEHB adduct +H2O - CH3CH3) as the major product ion. Phenoxides with a hydroxy group adjacent to the deprotonation site and phosphates formed a DEHB adduct, followed by ethane elimination (DEHB adduct - CH3CH3). Deprotonated molecules with strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds or without the aforementioned functionalities, including sulfates, were unreactive toward DEHB/H2O. Reaction mechanisms were explored via isotope labeling experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The mass spectrometry method allowed the differentiation of phenoxide-, carboxylate-, phosphate-, and sulfate-containing analytes. Finally, it was successfully coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of a mixture containing hymecromone, a biliary spasm drug, and its three possible metabolites. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Reactions of Ground State Nitrogen Atoms N(4S) with Astrochemically-Relevant Molecules on Interstellar Dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Lahouari; Nourry, Sendres

    2015-06-01

    In the last few years, ambitious programs were launched to probe the interstellar medium always more accurately. One of the major challenges of these missions remains the detection of prebiotic compounds and the understanding of reaction pathways leading to their formation. These complex heterogeneous reactions mainly occur on icy dust grains, and their studies require the coupling of laboratory experiments mimicking the extreme conditions of extreme cold and dilute media. For that purpose, we have developed an original experimental approach that combine the study of heterogeneous reactions (by exposing neutral molecules adsorbed on ice to non-energetic radicals H, OH, N...) and a neon matrix isolation study at very low temperatures, which is of paramount importance to isolate and characterize highly reactive reaction intermediates. Such experimental approach has already provided answers to many questions raised about some astrochemically-relevant reactions occurring in the ground state on the surface of dust grain ices in dense molecular clouds. The aim of this new present work is to show the implication of ground state atomic nitrogen on hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from some astrochemically-relevant species, at very low temperatures (3K-20K), without providing any external energy. Under cryogenic temperatures and with high barrier heights, such reactions involving N(4S) nitrogen atoms should not occur spontaneously and require an initiating energy. However, the detection of some radicals species as byproducts, in our solid samples left in the dark for hours at 10K, proves that hydrogen abstraction reactions involving ground state N(4S) nitrogen atoms may occur in solid phase at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show the efficiency of radical species formation stemming from non-energetic N-atoms and astrochemically-relevant molecules. We will then discuss how such reactions, involving nitrogen atoms in their ground states, might be the first key step

  11. Cytosine Radical Cations: A Gas-Phase Study Combining IRMPD Spectroscopy, UVPD Spectroscopy, Ion-Molecule Reactions, and Theoretical Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesslie, M.; Lawler, J. T.; Dang, A.; Korn, J. A.; Bím, Daniel; Steinmetz, V.; Maitre, P.; Tureček, F.; Ryzhov, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 10 (2017), s. 1293-1301 ISSN 1439-4235 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion-molecule reactions * IRMPD spectroscopy * nucleobases * radical ions * UVPD spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.075, year: 2016

  12. Theoretical study of quantum molecular reaction dynamics and of the effects of intense laser radiation on a diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardi, P.S.

    1984-11-01

    Within the very broad field of molecular dynamics, we have concentrated on two simple yet important systems. The systems are simple enough so that they are adequately described with a single Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface and that the dynamics can be calculated accurately. They are important because they give insight into solving more complicated systems. First we discuss H + H 2 reactive scattering. We present an exact formalism for atom-diatom reactive scattering which avoids the problem of finding a coordinate system appropriate for both reactants and products. We present computational results for collinear H + H 2 reactive scattering which agree very well with previous calculations. We also present a coupled channel distorted wave Born approximation for atom-diatom reactive scattering which we show is a first order approximation to our exact formalism. We present coupled channel DWBA results for three dimensional H + H 2 reactive scattering. The second system is an isolated HF molecule in an intense laser field. Using classical trajectories and quantum dynamics, we look at energy absorbed and transition probabilities as a function of the laser pulse time and also averaged over the pulse time. Calculations are performed for both rotating and nonrotating HF. We examine one and two photon absorption about the fundamental frequency, multiphoton absorption, and overtone absorption. 127 references, 31 figures, 12 tables

  13. Theoretical study of quantum molecular reaction dynamics and of the effects of intense laser radiation on a diatomic molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dardi, P.S.

    1984-11-01

    Within the very broad field of molecular dynamics, we have concentrated on two simple yet important systems. The systems are simple enough so that they are adequately described with a single Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface and that the dynamics can be calculated accurately. They are important because they give insight into solving more complicated systems. First we discuss H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. We present an exact formalism for atom-diatom reactive scattering which avoids the problem of finding a coordinate system appropriate for both reactants and products. We present computational results for collinear H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering which agree very well with previous calculations. We also present a coupled channel distorted wave Born approximation for atom-diatom reactive scattering which we show is a first order approximation to our exact formalism. We present coupled channel DWBA results for three dimensional H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. The second system is an isolated HF molecule in an intense laser field. Using classical trajectories and quantum dynamics, we look at energy absorbed and transition probabilities as a function of the laser pulse time and also averaged over the pulse time. Calculations are performed for both rotating and nonrotating HF. We examine one and two photon absorption about the fundamental frequency, multiphoton absorption, and overtone absorption. 127 references, 31 figures, 12 tables.

  14. Chemical reactions of water molecules on Ru(0001) induced by selective excitation of vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugarza, Aitor; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-05-07

    Tunneling electrons in a scanning tunneling microscope were used to excite specific vibrational quantum states of adsorbed water and hydroxyl molecules on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface. The excited molecules relaxed by transfer of energy to lower energy modes, resulting in diffusion, dissociation, desorption, and surface-tip transfer processes. Diffusion of H{sub 2}O molecules could be induced by excitation of the O-H stretch vibration mode at 445 meV. Isolated molecules required excitation of one single quantum while molecules bonded to a C atom required at least two quanta. Dissociation of single H{sub 2}O molecules into H and OH required electron energies of 1 eV or higher while dissociation of OH required at least 2 eV electrons. In contrast, water molecules forming part of a cluster could be dissociated with electron energies of 0.5 eV.

  15. Correlation between the Inhibition of Positronium Formation by Scavenger Molecules, and Chemical Reaction Rate of Electrons with these Molecules in Nonpolar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levay, B.; Mogensen, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    a correlation between the inhibition coefficient and the chemical rate constant of electrons with scavenger molecules. We found that the dependence of the inhibition coefficient on the work function (VOo)f electrons in different liquids shows a very unusual behavior, similar to that recently found...... for the chemical rate constants of quasifree electrons with the same scavenger molecules. The inhibition coefficient as a function of Vo had a maximum for C2HsBr, while it increased monotonously with decreasing V, for CC14. The inhibition coefficient for C2H5Br in a 1:l molar tetramethylsilane......-n-tetradecane mixture was found to be greater than in both of the pure components. The clear correlation found between electron scavenging rate constants and positronium inhibition constitutes the severest test to date of the spur reaction model of positronium formation. The importance of the positron annihilation...

  16. Selective scanning tunnelling microscope electron-induced reactions of single biphenyl molecules on a Si(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Damien; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Lesnard, Hervé; Lastapis, Mathieu; Lorente, Nicolas; Sonnet, Philippe; Dujardin, Gérald

    2009-06-03

    Selective electron-induced reactions of individual biphenyl molecules adsorbed in their weakly chemisorbed configuration on a Si(100) surface are investigated by using the tip of a low-temperature (5 K) scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) as an atomic size source of electrons. Selected types of molecular reactions are produced, depending on the polarity of the surface voltage during STM excitation. At negative surface voltages, the biphenyl molecule diffuses across the surface in its weakly chemisorbed configuration. At positive surface voltages, different types of molecular reactions are activated, which involve the change of adsorption configuration from the weakly chemisorbed to the strongly chemisorbed bistable and quadristable configurations. Calculated reaction pathways of the molecular reactions on the silicon surface, using the nudge elastic band method, provide evidence that the observed selectivity as a function of the surface voltage polarity cannot be ascribed to different activation energies. These results, together with the measured threshold surface voltages and the calculated molecular electronic structures via density functional theory, suggest that the electron-induced molecular reactions are driven by selective electron detachment (oxidation) or attachment (reduction) processes.

  17. An ICR study of ion-molecule reactions of PH(n)+ ions. [of importance to interstellar chemistry, using ion cyclotron resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    The reactions of PH(n)+ ions (n = 0-3) were examined with a number of neutrals using ion-cyclotron-resonance techniques. The reactions examined have significance for the distribution of phosphorus in interstellar molecules. The results indicate that interstellar molecules containing the P-O bond are likely to be more abundant than those containing the P-H bond.

  18. Expedient construction of small molecule macroarrays via sequential palladium- and copper-mediated reactions and their ex situ biological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Reto; Breitbach, Anthony S; Blackwell, Helen E

    2012-05-01

    We report the highly efficient syntheses of a series of focused libraries in the small molecule macroarray format using Suzuki-Miyaura and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (or "click") reactions. The libraries were based on stilbene and triazole scaffolds, which are known to have a broad range of biological activities, including quorum-sensing (QS) modulation in bacteria. The library products were generated in parallel on the macroarray in extremely short reaction times (~10-20 min) and isolated in excellent purities. Biological testing of one macroarray library post-cleavage (ex situ) revealed several potent agonists of the QS receptor, LuxR, in Vibrio fischeri. These synthetic agonists, in contrast to others that we have reported, were only active in the presence of the native QS signal in V. fischeri, which is suggestive of a different mode of activity. Notably, the results presented herein showcase the ready compatibility of the macroarray platform with chemical reactions that are commonly utilized in small molecule probe and drug discovery today. As such, this work serves to expand the utility of the small molecule macroarray as a rapid and operationally straightforward approach toward the synthesis and screening of bioactive agents.

  19. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly.

  20. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom ''sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly

  1. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes in the gas-phase, ion-molecule reactions and neutralization mechanisms of hydrocarbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausloos, P.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the fate of unreactive hydrocarbon ions in various selected gaseous systems. It is shown that experiments performed with the high radiation dose rates obtained in pulse radiolysis experiments have several advantages over conventional low dose rate experiments for the elucidation of the mechanism of homogeneous neutralization of unreactive hydrocarbon ions. This is so because the charged species has a much shorter lifetime with respect to neutralization under high dose rate (pulse radiolysis) conditions, so that the reaction of the ions with minor impurities or accumulated products is much less probable than in low dose rate experiments. It is further shown through a few examples, that quantitative information about the rate contants of neutralization events and ion-molecule reactions can be obtained when the dose rate is high enough for neutralization and chemical reaction to be in competition. Once reliable rate constants for neutralization and ion-molecule reactions are derived, one can obtain a quantitative evaluation of the products which will by formed in the pulse radiolysis of a hydrocarbon gas mixture from a computer calculation. (author)

  2. Dynamical resonances in the fluorine atom reaction with the hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. The concept of transition state has played a crucial role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Resonances in the transition state region are important in many chemical reactions at reaction energies near the thresholds. Detecting and characterizing isolated reaction resonances, however, have been a major challenge in both experiment and theory. In this Account, we review the most recent developments in the study of reaction resonances in the benchmark F + H 2 --> HF + H reaction. Crossed molecular beam scattering experiments on the F + H 2 reaction have been carried out recently using the high-resolution, highly sensitive H-atom Rydberg tagging technique with HF rovibrational states almost fully resolved. Pronounced forward scattering for the HF (nu' = 2) product has been observed at the collision energy of 0.52 kcal/mol in the F + H 2 (j = 0) reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on two new potential energy surfaces, the Xu-Xie-Zhang (XXZ) surface and the Fu-Xu-Zhang (FXZ) surface, show that the observed forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) in the F + H 2 reaction is caused by two Feshbach resonances (the ground resonance and first excited resonance). More interestingly, the pronounced forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) at 0.52 kcal/mol is enhanced considerably by the constructive interference between the two resonances. In order to probe the resonance potential more accurately, the isotope substituted F + HD --> HF + D reaction has been studied using the D-atom Rydberg tagging technique. A remarkable and fast changing dynamical picture has been mapped out in the collision energy range of 0.3-1.2 kcal/mol for this reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on the XXZ surface suggest that the ground resonance on this potential is too high in comparison with the experimental results of the F + HD reaction. However, quantum scattering calculations on the FXZ surface can reproduce nearly quantitatively the resonance

  3. Synthesis of novel steroid-tetrahydroquinoline hybrid molecules and D-homosteroids by intramolecular cyclization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Angéla; Wölfling, János; Kubas, Melanie; Cuesta Seijo, Jose Antonio; Sevvana, Madhumati; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Forgó, Péter; Schneider, Gyula

    2004-05-01

    Steroidal aryliminium salts were prepared from D-seco-pregnene aldehyde 2b, and their BF3.OEt2-catalyzed reactions were studied. The nature of the substituent R1 in the anilines 3-6 essentially influenced the chemoselectivity. Using unsubstituted 3, 4-methoxy- (4) or 4-bromoaniline (5), different tetrahydroquinoline derivatives 7a-13a via intramolecular hetero Diels-Alder reaction were formed. In the case of 4-nitroaniline (6) the N-arylamino-D-homopregnane (14a) were also obtained. We assume, that an intramolecular Prins reaction led to this type of fluoro-D-homosteroid. The main products represent a new class of tetrahydroquinolino-androstenes.

  4. Modeling of the reactant conversion rate in a turbulent shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, S. H.; Madnia, C. K.; Givi, P.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of spatially developing shear flows under the influence of infinitely fast chemical reactions of the type A + B yields Products. The simulation results are used to construct the compositional structure of the scalar field in a statistical manner. The results of this statistical analysis indicate that the use of a Beta density for the probability density function (PDF) of an appropriate Shvab-Zeldovich mixture fraction provides a very good estimate of the limiting bounds of the reactant conversion rate within the shear layer. This provides a strong justification for the implementation of this density in practical modeling of non-homogeneous turbulent reacting flows. However, the validity of the model cannot be generalized for predictions of higher order statistical quantities. A closed form analytical expression is presented for predicting the maximum rate of reactant conversion in non-homogeneous reacting turbulence.

  5. Study of ions - molecules reactions in the gas phase with collision reaction cell devices: Applications to the direct resolution of spectroscopic interferences in ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, G.

    2008-12-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry emerged as the most widespread mass spectrometry technique in inorganic analytical chemistry for determining the concentration of a given isotope or an isotope ratio. The problem of spectroscopic interferences, inherent to this technique, finds a solution through the use of reaction cell devices. An in situ interference removal is feasible with the addition of a well selected gas in the cell. The understanding of the chemistry of ions-molecules interactions in the gas phase is however fundamental to optimize the efficiency of such devices. An accurate knowledge of experimental conditions in the reaction zone according to instrumental parameters appears crucial in order to interpret observed reactivities. This preliminary study is then used for the resolution of two nuclear field characteristic interferences. (author)

  6. Kinetics of ion/molecule reactions in Xe++acteone system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradov, P.S.; Misharin, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    A reaction of Xe+ ion with acetone and subsequent transformations of the product ions at a buffer gas pressure (He) of 1.1 Torr were studied by the flow reactor technique mass spectrometry. A kinetic scheme describing the evolution of the ionic composition has been determined. The rate constants of the key reactions involved in the scheme have been evaluated. A channel of the production of acetone cation in A state in a charge transfer reaction was observed. A production of slowly reacting isomer of the acetone cation in secondary reactions was detected. Its product in the reaction with acetone is the 'nonprotonated dimer'. The kinetics of the production of ternary ions - ( CH 3 CO + CH 3 COCH 3 )(m/e=101), CH 3 COCH 3 H + (m/e=59) as well as the production of ions of the fourth generation ( CH 3 CO + (CH 3 COCH 3 ) 2 ) (m/e=159) and (CH 3 COCH 3 ) 2 H + was observed. CH 3 CO + ion (m/e=43) was found as the main reaction product. The main pathways scheme of ionic transformations is shown. (nevyjel)

  7. Reaction of N,N’-dimethylformamide and divalent viologen molecule to generate an organic dopant for molybdenum disulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fukui

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuning the carrier concentration is essential for semiconducting materials to apply optoelectronic devices. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 is a semiconducting material composed of atomically thin (∼0.7 nm thickness layers. To dope thin MoS2, instead of using conventional atom/ion injection processes, a surface charge transfer method was successfully applied. In this study, we report a simple preparation method of a molecular dopant applicable to the doping process. The method follows a previous report for producing a molecular dopant, benzyl viologen (BV which shows electron doping to MoS2. To prepare dopant BV molecules, a reduction process with a commercially available divalent BV by sodium borohydride (NaBH4 is required; however, the reaction requires a large consumption of NaBH4. NaBH4 drastically reacts with the solvent water itself. We found a reaction process of BV in an organic solvent, N,N’-dimethylformamide (DMF, by adding a small amount of water dissolving the divalent BV. The reaction is mild (at room temperature and is autonomous once DMF comes into contact with the divalent BV aqueous solution. The reaction can be monitored with a UV-Vis spectrometer, and kinetic analysis indicates two reaction steps between divalent/monovalent/neutral viologen isomers. The product was soluble in toluene and did not dissolve in water, indicating it is similar to the reported dopant BV. The synthesized molecule was found to act as a dopant for MoS2 by applying a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (MOSFET structure. The process is a general method and applicable to other viologen-related dopants to tune the electronic structure of 2D materials to facilitate generating atomically thin devices.

  8. Reaction of N,N'-dimethylformamide and divalent viologen molecule to generate an organic dopant for molybdenum disulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, A.; Miura, K.; Ichimiya, H.; Tsurusaki, A.; Kariya, K.; Yoshimura, T.; Ashida, A.; Fujimura, N.; Kiriya, D.

    2018-05-01

    Tuning the carrier concentration is essential for semiconducting materials to apply optoelectronic devices. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a semiconducting material composed of atomically thin (˜0.7 nm thickness) layers. To dope thin MoS2, instead of using conventional atom/ion injection processes, a surface charge transfer method was successfully applied. In this study, we report a simple preparation method of a molecular dopant applicable to the doping process. The method follows a previous report for producing a molecular dopant, benzyl viologen (BV) which shows electron doping to MoS2. To prepare dopant BV molecules, a reduction process with a commercially available divalent BV by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is required; however, the reaction requires a large consumption of NaBH4. NaBH4 drastically reacts with the solvent water itself. We found a reaction process of BV in an organic solvent, N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF), by adding a small amount of water dissolving the divalent BV. The reaction is mild (at room temperature) and is autonomous once DMF comes into contact with the divalent BV aqueous solution. The reaction can be monitored with a UV-Vis spectrometer, and kinetic analysis indicates two reaction steps between divalent/monovalent/neutral viologen isomers. The product was soluble in toluene and did not dissolve in water, indicating it is similar to the reported dopant BV. The synthesized molecule was found to act as a dopant for MoS2 by applying a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (MOSFET) structure. The process is a general method and applicable to other viologen-related dopants to tune the electronic structure of 2D materials to facilitate generating atomically thin devices.

  9. Reactions of electronically excited molecular nitrogen with H2 and H2O molecules: theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelevkin, Alexey V.; Sharipov, Alexander S.

    2018-05-01

    Comprehensive quantum chemical analysis with the usage of the second-order perturbation multireference XMCQDPT2 approach was carried out to study the processes in the   +  H2 and   +  H2O systems. The energetically favorable reaction pathways have been revealed based on the exploration of potential energy surfaces. It has been shown that the reactions   +  H2 and   +  H2O occur with small activation barriers and, primarily, lead to the formation of N2H  +  H and N2H  +  OH products, respectively. Further, the interaction of these species could give rise to the ground state and H2 (or H2O) products, however, the estimations, based on RRKM theory and dynamic reaction coordinate calculations, exhibited that the   +  H2 and   +  H2O reactions lead to the dissociative quenching predominately. Appropriate rate constants for revealed reaction channels have been estimated by using a canonical variational theory and capture approximation. Corresponding three-parameter Arrhenius expressions for the temperature range T  =  300  ‑  3000 K were reported.

  10. The hydrogen atom-deuterium molecule reaction: Experimental determination of product quantum state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinnen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The H + H 2 atom exchange reaction (and its isotopic analogs) is the simplest neutral bimolecular chemical reaction because of the small number of electrons in the system and the lightness of the nuclei. The H 3 potential energy surface (PES) is the most accurately known reactive surface (LSTH surface); there have been both quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) and quantal calculations performed on it. This is one of the few systems for which theory is ahead of experiment, and many theoretical predictions await experimental comparison. The H + D 2 → HD + D reaction is studied using thermal D 2 (∼298 K) and translationally hot hydrogen atoms. Photolysis of HI at 266 nm generates H atoms with center-of-mass collision energies of 1.3 and 0.55 eV, both of which are above the classical reaction barrier of 0.42 eV. The rovibrational population distribution of the molecular product is measured by (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). A major effort has been directed toward calibrating the (2+1) REMPI detection procedure, to determine quantitatively the relationship between ion signals and relative quantum state populations for HD. An effusive, high-temperature nozzle has been constructed to populate thermally the high rovibrational levels observed in the reaction. The results are compared to theoretical calculations of the E,F 1 Σ g + - X 1 Σ g + two-photon transition moments. For the H + D 2 reaction, the populations of all energetically accessible HD product levels are measured. Specifically, the following levels are observed: HD(v = 0, J = 0-15), HD(v = 1, J = 0-12), and HD(v = 2, J = 0-8). Of the available energy, 73% is partitioned into product translation, 18% into HD rotation, and 9% into HD vibration

  11. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, R.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  12. Search for the radiative capture reaction d + d -> sup 4 He + gamma from the dd mu muonic molecule state

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanova, L N; Eijk, C W E

    2002-01-01

    A search for the muon catalyzed fusion (MCF) reaction d + d -> sup 4 He + gamma in the dd mu muonic molecule was performed using the experimental MCF installation TRITON and NaI(Tl) detectors for gamma quanta. The high-pressure target filled with deuterium was exposed to the negative muon beam of the JINR phasotron to detect gamma quanta with energy 23.8 MeV. The first experimental estimation for the yield of the radiative deuteron capture from the dd mu state J = 1 was obtained at the level eta subgamma <= 2 x 10 sup - sup 5 per one fusion

  13. Quantum infinite order sudden approximation for ion-molecule reactions: treatment of the He + H2+ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.; Nakamura, H.; Kouri, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this work the ion-molecule reaction He + H 2 + (v/sub i/) → HeH + (v/sub f/) + H(v/sub i/ = 0-7, v/sub f/ = 0-2) was studied quantum mechanically in the energy range 1.3 eV ≤ E/sub tot/ ≤ 1.8 eV. The calculations were carried out employing the Reactive Infinite Order Sudden Approximation (RIOSA). The two features characteristic of this system in the above energy range, namely the strong enhancement of the reaction rate with the initial vibrational energy (at a fixed total energy) and the relatively weak dependence of the cross sections on translational energy, were found to be well reproduced in the numerical treatment. The results also revealed the existence of two mechanisms of the exchange process: one is the ordinary mechanism and the other is probably related to the spectator stripping model

  14. High-Resolution State-Selected Ion-Molecule Reaction Studies Using Pulsed Field Ionization Photoelectron-Secondary Ion Coincidence Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qian, X

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an octopole-quadrupole photoionization apparatus at the Advanced Light Source for absolute integral cross-section measurements of rovibrational-state-selected ion-molecule reactions...

  15. In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eric P

    2011-05-24

    A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

  16. Infrared Chemiluminescence Studies of Ion-Molecule Reactions in a Flowing Afterglow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    reaction rate constants and branching ratios have been addressed in drift tubes and flow drift systems, and the translational energy distribution of atomic...composed of about 40 thin cylindrical sections of flow tube , separated by mylar spacers and connected by precision resistors. In the region of LIF... tube radius (Albritton, 1967). For proper operation of a drift tube , ionic species of only one polarity can be present. Efficient separation of

  17. Quadrupole corrections to matrix elements of transitions in resonant reactions of muonic molecule formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faifman, M.P.; Strizh, T.A.; Armour, E.A.G.; Harston, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The calculated resonant formation rates of the muonic molecules DDμ and DTμ are presented. The approach developed earlier for calculating the transition matrix elements in the dipole approximation has been extended to include the quadrupole terms in the multipole expansion of the interaction operator. The calculated dependence of the DTμ formation rates on the energies of the incident Tμ muonic atoms shows that the effect of including the quadrupole correction is to reduce the magnitude of the peak rates by about 20-30% at the different temperatures, compared to those calculated in the dipole approximation. The dependence on temperature for the DDμ formation rates is obtained with the differences between the presented and previous calculations being less than 5%. (orig.)

  18. A study of the ion-molecule reaction in a microwave plasma of propylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmi, U.

    1980-07-01

    Microwave plasma of propylene and of argon-propylene mixture were sampled by a quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The composition of the plasma was investigated as a function of external parameters such as pressure, initial concentration of gases, microwave power and sampling position. Three main paths were determined for the pyrolysis and polymerization of propylene, that constitute the rate determining step. Rate constants were determined for the various reactions between propylene and the intermediates. An overall rate constant for the disappearance of propylene was determined. This constant was found to be dependent on the initial gas concentration and on plasma pressure

  19. Effect of collision energy and vibrational excitation on endothermic ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, T.P.

    1984-07-01

    This thesis is divided into two major parts. In the first part an experimental study of proton and deuteron transfer in H 2 + + He and HD + + He has been carried out as a function of kinetic and vibrational energy. The data gives evidence that at lower kinetic energies, the spectator stripping mechanism indeed plays an important role when H 2 + or HD + is vibrationally excited. The second half of this thesis examines the relative efficiencies between the excitation of C-C stretching vibration and collision energy on the promotion of the H atom transfer reaction of C 2 H 2 + + H 2 → C 2 H 3 + + H

  20. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo A R S Latino

    Full Text Available The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF, the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure

  1. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latino, Diogo A R S; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1)H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1)H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of

  2. Building one molecule from a reservoir of two atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L R; Hood, J D; Yu, Y; Zhang, J T; Hutzler, N R; Rosenband, T; Ni, K-K

    2018-05-25

    Chemical reactions typically proceed via stochastic encounters between reactants. Going beyond this paradigm, we combined exactly two atoms in a single, controlled reaction. The experimental apparatus traps two individual laser-cooled atoms [one sodium (Na) and one cesium (Cs)] in separate optical tweezers and then merges them into one optical dipole trap. Subsequently, photoassociation forms an excited-state NaCs molecule. The discovery of previously unseen resonances near the molecular dissociation threshold and measurement of collision rates are enabled by the tightly trapped ultracold sample of atoms. As laser-cooling and trapping capabilities are extended to more elements, the technique will enable the study of more diverse, and eventually more complex, molecules in an isolated environment, as well as synthesis of designer molecules for qubits. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  3. Probing the rate-determining region of the potential energy surface for a prototypical ion-molecule reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Liu, Xinguo; Sweeny, Brendan C; Miller, Thomas M; Ard, Shaun G; Shuman, Nicholas S; Viggiano, Albert A; Guo, Hua

    2018-03-13

    We report a joint experimental-theoretical study of the F -  + HCl → HF + Cl - reaction kinetics. The experimental measurement of the rate coefficient at several temperatures was made using the selected ion flow tube method. Theoretical rate coefficients are calculated using the quasi-classical trajectory method on a newly developed global potential energy surface, obtained by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points with augmentation of long-range electrostatic terms. In addition to good agreement between experiment and theory, analyses suggest that the ion-molecule reaction rate is significantly affected by shorter-range interactions, in addition to the traditionally recognized ion-dipole and ion-induced dipole terms. Furthermore, the statistical nature of the reaction is assessed by comparing the measured and calculated HF product vibrational state distributions to that predicted by the phase space theory.This article is part of the theme issue 'Modern theoretical chemistry'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  4. Velocity map imaging of ion-molecule reaction products: Co+(3F4)+isobutane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Emily L.; Thurau, Gert; Weisshaar, James C.

    2002-07-01

    The velocity map imaging technique is applied to mass-selected CoC3H6++CH4 and CoC4H8++H2 elimination products from the Co+(3F4)+isobutane reaction studied under crossed-beam conditions at 0.21 eV collision energy. For both reactions we obtain the joint scattering probability distribution P(E,Θ), where E and Θ are the product translational energy and scattering angle. The fraction of available energy deposited into product translation is 0.4 for H2, compared with 0.1 for CH4. For the CH4 product, the angular distribution is forward-backwards symmetric and sharply peaked at Θ=0 and 180°. P(E,Θ) is not separable into the product of an energy and an angular function; rather, the angular distribution peaks more sharply at higher translational energy. Evidently, incipient CoC3H6++CH4 products equilibrate in the Co+(C3H6)(CH4) exit-channel well, from which they decay statistically. The product translational energy distribution P(E) is consistent with orbiting-transition state phase-space theory with no exit-channel barrier. In addition, the energy-integrated angular distribution T(Θ) is consistent with the predictions of the early statistical complex decay model of Miller and Herschbach for fragmentation from a transition state that is a prolate top. In sharp contrast, P(E) for the CoC4H8++H2 products exhibits a substantial hot, nonstatistical tail towards high energy. Perhaps the H2 channel has a late potential energy barrier some 0.5 eV above products, but we view this explanation as highly unlikely. Instead, we suggest that the potential energy from an earlier multicenter transition state is funneled efficiently, and highly nonstatistically, into product translation. This surprising conclusion may apply to H2 products for the entire family of reactions of the late-3D series transition metal cations Fe+, Co+, and Ni+ with alkanes.

  5. Localizing internal friction along the reaction coordinate of protein folding by combining ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Alessandro; Wensley, Beth G.; Soranno, Andrea; Nettels, Daniel; Borgia, Madeleine B.; Hoffmann, Armin; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Lipman, Everett A.; Clarke, Jane; Schuler, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Theory, simulations and experimental results have suggested an important role of internal friction in the kinetics of protein folding. Recent experiments on spectrin domains provided the first evidence for a pronounced contribution of internal friction in proteins that fold on the millisecond timescale. However, it has remained unclear how this contribution is distributed along the reaction and what influence it has on the folding dynamics. Here we use a combination of single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, nanosecond fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, microfluidic mixing and denaturant- and viscosity-dependent protein-folding kinetics to probe internal friction in the unfolded state and at the early and late transition states of slow- and fast-folding spectrin domains. We find that the internal friction affecting the folding rates of spectrin domains is highly localized to the early transition state, suggesting an important role of rather specific interactions in the rate-limiting conformational changes. PMID:23149740

  6. Rapid heating evaporation of Pb(NO3)2. Evidence for heterogeneous ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radus, T.P.; Udseth, H.R.; Friedman, L.

    1979-01-01

    A mass spectrometric investigation of the lead nitrate system is reported in which the lead nitrate was evaporated from a probe filament that was heated as rapidly as 5000 0 C/s. Both electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) source techniques were used in this study. Fragment ions and decomposition products were observed under EI conditions. Under CI conditions solvated fragment ions and protonated solvated molecular ions were detected. Temperature measurements of rates of evaporation were made by monitoring the resistance of the probe filament as it was heated. Activation energies calculated by using these temperature coefficients of evaporation rates indicate that evaporations under CI conditions are assisted by heterogeneous ion-molecule reactions

  7. Gas Chromatographic-Ion Trap Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds by Ion-Molecule Reactions Using the Electron-Deficient Reagent Ion CCl{3/+}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhong; Su, Yue; Wang, Hao-Yang; Guo, Yin-Long

    2011-10-01

    When using tetrachloromethane as the reagent gas in gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry equipped with hybrid ionization source, the cation CCl{3/+} was generated in high abundance and further gas-phase experiments showed that such an electron-deficient reagent ion CCl{3/+} could undergo interesting ion-molecule reactions with various volatile organic compounds, which not only present some informative gas-phase reactions, but also facilitate qualitative analysis of diverse volatile compounds by providing unique mass spectral data that are characteristic of particular chemical structures. The ion-molecule reactions of the reagent ion CCl{3/+} with different types of compounds were studied, and results showed that such reactions could give rise to structurally diagnostic ions, such as [M + CCl3 - HCl]+ for aromatic hydrocarbons, [M - OH]+ for saturated cyclic ether, ketone, and alcoholic compounds, [M - H]+ ion for monoterpenes, M·+ for sesquiterpenes, [M - CH3CO]+ for esters, as well as the further fragment ions. The mechanisms of ion-molecule reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic ketones and alcoholic compounds with the reagent ion CCl{3/+} were investigated and proposed according to the information provided by MS/MS experiments and theoretical calculations. Then, this method was applied to study volatile organic compounds in Dendranthema indicum var. aromaticum and 20 compounds, including monoterpenes and their oxygen-containing derivatives, aromatic hydrocarbon and sesquiterpenes were identified using such ion-molecule reactions. This study offers a perspective and an alternative tool for the analysis and identification of various volatile compounds.

  8. Time resolved FTIR study of the catalytic CO oxidation under periodic variation of the reactant concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritzenberger, J; Wokaun, A [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Oxidation of CO over palladium/zirconia catalyst obtained from an amorphous Pd{sub 25}Zr{sub 75} precursor was investigated by time resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Sine wave shaped modulation of the reactant concentration, i.e. variation of CO or O{sub 2} partial pressure, was used to induce variations of the IR signals of product (CO{sub 2}) and unconverted reactant (CO), which were detected in a multi-pass absorption cell. The phase shift {phi} between external perturbation and variation of the CO{sub 2} signal was examined in dependence on temperature (100{sup o}C{<=}T{<=}350{sup o}C) and modulation frequency (1.39x10{sup -4}Hz{<=}{omega}{<=}6.67x10{sup -2}Hz). From the phase shift values, a simple Eley-Rideal mechanism is excluded, and the rate limiting step of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for the CO oxidation may be identified. Adsorption and possible surface movement of CO to the actual reaction site determine the rate of the CO oxidation on the palladium/zirconia catalyst used in our study. The introduction of an external perturbation is a first step towards the application of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to heterogeneous catalyzed reactions. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  9. Computational Modelling of Thermal Stability in a Reactive Slab with Reactant Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Makinde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates both the transient and the steady state of a one-step nth-order oxidation exothermic reaction in a slab of combustible material with an insulated lower surface and an isothermal upper surface, taking into consideration reactant consumption. The nonlinear partial differential equation governing the transient reaction-diffusion problem is solved numerically using a semidiscretization finite difference technique. The steady-state problem is solved using a perturbation technique together with a special type of the Hermite-Padé approximants. Graphical results are presented and discussed quantitatively with respect to various embedded parameters controlling the systems. The crucial roles played by the boundary conditions in determining the thermal ignition criticality are demonstrated.

  10. Polyneutron Chain Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John C. Fisher

    2000-01-01

    Although helium atoms do not form molecules, a sufficiently large number will bind into a stable liquid droplet. A comparable situation is expected for neutrons, with a sufficiently large number binding into a stable droplet of neutron matter. Such polyneutron droplets can be viewed as isotopes of an element with nuclear charge Z=0, tentatively denoted neutrium, symbol Nt. Because of the relatively weak binding of neutrons compared with that of a mix of neutrons and protons, the minimum number of neutrons required for stability of a droplet is fairly large. Early estimates of ∼60 may be reduced to a dozen or so by the BCS pairing interaction. The Nt entries with N≥12 are new to the table of isotopes. Because all of them are beta-unstable, none is expected to persist as a free particle. Yet, some may occasionally be produced by means to be described below, and it is of interest to examine their decay chains and their interactions with charged nuclei to ascertain how their presence might be revealed. Although these reactions are interesting, they cannot be taken seriously without identifying a source for the initial Nt isotope that begins the chain. Here, we consider possible interactions between 16 O and A Nt. Although there is no strong interaction between them, we can expect a very weak residual attraction that can form a loosely bound 16 O A Nt nuclear molecule. This is not a compound nucleus in the usual sense because, considered as fluids, the 16 O and A Nt droplets are immiscible. For a droplet with fewer than about 60 neutrons, beta decay of A Nt is prevented by the buildup of Coulomb energy associated with transforming A Nt into A H in close proximity to 16 O. Thus, it is possible that 16 O A Nt molecules can persist indefinitely and that a few of them may be present in ordinary water as supermassive oxygen nuclei. Because the binding of these molecules is weak, the A Nt component can tunnel to an adjacent nucleus, and if the adjacent nucleus is 18 O, a

  11. Effects of annealing on the properties of atomic layer deposited Ru thin films deposited by NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} as reactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Joon; Kim, Soo-Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@ynu.ac.kr

    2016-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ru using a non-oxidizing reactant is indispensable considering its application as a seed layer for Cu electroplating and a bottom electrode for dynamic random access memory capacitors. In this study, ALD-Ru films were deposited using a sequential supply of dicarbonyl-bis(5-methyl-2,4-hexanediketonato) Ru(II) (C{sub 16}H{sub 22}O{sub 6}Ru) and potential non-oxidizing reducing agents, NH{sub 3} or H{sub 2}, as the reactants at a substrate temperature of 250 °C, and the effects of post-annealing in a H{sub 2} ambient on the film properties were investigated. The highly conformal deposition of Ru films was possible using the present reaction scheme but its resistivity was as high as ~ 750 μΩ-cm due to carbon incorporation into the film and the formation of an amorphous structure. Low temperature annealing at 300 °C at H{sub 2} ambient after deposition was found to improve the properties significantly in terms of the resistivity, impurities contents and crystallinity. For example, the film resistivity was decreased drastically to ~ 40 μΩ-cm with both the release of C in the film and crystallization after annealing based on secondary ion mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy, whereas perfect step coverage at a very small-sized dual trench (aspect ratio: ~ 3, the top opening size of 45 nm and bottom size of 20 nm) was maintained after annealing. - Highlights: • Ru thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} molecules. • Effects of low temperature (300 °C) post-annealing on the film properties were investigated. • Post annealing improved the properties of ALD-Ru films. • Perfect step coverage of ALD-Ru was confirmed at trench structure (top opening width: 45 nm).

  12. Chemical reaction dynamics of Rydberg atoms with neutral molecules: A comparison of molecular-beam and classical trajectory results for the H(n)+D2→HD+D(n') reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Hui; Dai Dongxu; Wu Guorong; Wang, C.-C.; Harich, Steven A.; Hayes, Michael Y.; Wang Xiuyan; Gerlich, Dieter; Yang Xueming; Skodje, Rex T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent molecular-beam experiments have probed the dynamics of the Rydberg-atom reaction, H(n)+D 2 →HD+D(n) at low collision energies. It was discovered that the rotationally resolved product distribution was remarkably similar to a much more limited data set obtained at a single scattering angle for the ion-molecule reaction H + +D 2 →D + +HD. The equivalence of these two problems would be consistent with the Fermi-independent-collider model (electron acting as a spectator) and would provide an important new avenue for the study of ion-molecule reactions. In this work, we employ a classical trajectory calculation on the ion-molecule reaction to facilitate a more extensive comparison between the two systems. The trajectory simulations tend to confirm the equivalence of the ion+molecule dynamics to that for the Rydberg-atom+molecule system. The theory reproduces the close relationship of the two experimental observations made previously. However, some differences between the Rydberg-atom experiments and the trajectory simulations are seen when comparisons are made to a broader data set. In particular, the angular distribution of the differential cross section exhibits more asymmetry in the experiment than in the theory. The potential breakdown of the classical model is discussed. The role of the 'spectator' Rydberg electron is addressed and several crucial issues for future theoretical work are brought out

  13. Ion-Molecule Reaction of Gas-Phase Chromium Oxyanions: CrxOyHz- + H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianotto, Anita Kay; Hodges, Brittany DM; Benson, Michael Timothy; Harrington, Peter Boves; Appelhans, Anthony David; Olson, John Eric; Groenewold, Gary Steven

    2003-01-01

    Chromium oxyanions having the general formula CrxOyHz- play a key role in many industrial, environmental, and analytical processes, which motivated investigations of their intrinsic reactivity. Reactions with water are perhaps the most significant, and were studied by generating CrxOyHz- in the gas phase using a quadrupole ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer. Of the ions in the Cr1OyHz envelope (y = 2, 3, 4; z = 0, 1), only CrO2- was observed to react with H2O, producing the hydrated CrO3H2- at a slow rate (∼0.07% of the ion-molecule collision constant at 310 K). CrO3-, CrO4-, and CrO4H- were unreactive. In contrast, Cr2O4-, Cr2O5-, and Cr2O5H2- displayed a considerable tendency to react with H2O. Cr2O4- underwent sequential reactions with H2O, initially producing Cr2O5H2- at a rate that was ∼7% efficient. Cr2O5H2- then reacted with a second H2O by addition to form Cr2O6H4- (1.8% efficient) and by OH abstraction to form Cr2O6H3- (0.6% efficient). The reactions of Cr2O5- were similar to those of Cr2O5H2-: Cr2O5- underwent addition to form Cr2O6H2- (3% efficient) and OH abstraction to form Cr2O6H- (<1% efficient). By comparison, Cr2O6- was unreactive with H2O, and in fact, no further H2O addition could be observed for any of the Cr2O6Hz- anions. Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations showed that reactive CrxOyHz- species underwent nucleophilic attack by the incoming H2O molecules, which produced an initially formed adduct in which the water O was bound to a Cr center. The experimental and computational studies suggested that Cr2OyHz- species that have bi- or tricoordinated Cr centers are susceptible to attack by H2O; however, when the metal becomes tetracoordinate, reactivity stops. For the Cr2OyHz- anions the lowest energy structures all contained rhombic Cr2O2 rings with pendant O atoms and/or OH groups. The initially formed [Cr2Oy- + H2O] adducts underwent H rearrangement to a gem O atom to produce stable dihydroxy structures. The calculations indicated that

  14. Glucansucrase Gtf180-ΔN of Lactobacillus reuteri 180 : enzyme and reaction engineering for improved glycosylation of non-carbohydrate molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devlamynck, Tim; Te Poele, Evelien M; Meng, Xiangfeng; van Leeuwen, Sander S; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-01-01

    Glucansucrases have a broad acceptor substrate specificity and receive increased attention as biocatalysts for the glycosylation of small non-carbohydrate molecules using sucrose as donor substrate. However, the main glucansucrase-catalyzed reaction results in synthesis of α-glucan polysaccharides

  15. Sub-ensemble monitoring of DNA strand displacement using multiparameter single-molecule FRET

    OpenAIRE

    Baltierra Jasso, Laura; Morten, Michael; Magennis, Steven William

    2018-01-01

    Non-enzymatic DNA strand displacement is an important mechanism in dynamic DNA nanotechnology. Here we show that the large parameter space that is accessible by single-molecule FRET is ideal for the simultaneous monitoring of multiple reactants and products of DNA strand exchange reactions. We monitored the strand displacement from double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at 37 °C; the data were modelled as a second-order reaction approaching equilibrium, with a rate constan...

  16. Atomic-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Movies for Study of Organic Molecules, Assemblies, and Reactions: The First 10 Years of Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Eiichi

    2017-06-20

    A molecule is a quantum mechanical entity. "Watching motions and reactions of a molecule with our eyes" has therefore been a dream of chemists for a century. This dream has come true with the aid of the movies of atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopic (AR-TEM) molecular images through real-time observation of dynamic motions of single organic molecules (denoted hereafter as single-molecule atomic-resolution real-time (SMART) TEM imaging). Since 2007, we have reported movies of a variety of single organic molecules, organometallic molecules, and their assemblies, which are rotating, stretching, and reacting. Like movies in the theater, the atomic-resolution molecular movies provide us information on the 3-D structures of the molecules and also their time evolution. The success of the SMART-TEM imaging crucially depends on the development of "chemical fishhooks" with which fish (organic molecules) in solution can be captured on a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT, serving as a "fishing rod"). The captured molecules are connected to a slowly vibrating CNT, and their motions are displayed on a monitor in real time. A "fishing line" connecting the fish and the rod may be a σ-bond, a van der Waals force, or other weak connections. Here, the molecule/CNT system behaves as a coupled oscillator, where the low-frequency anisotropic vibration of the CNT is transmitted to the molecules via the weak chemical connections that act as an energy filter. Interpretation of the observed motions of the molecules at atomic resolution needs us to consider the quantum mechanical nature of electrons as well as bond rotation, letting us deviate from the conventional statistical world of chemistry. What new horizons can we explore? We have so far carried out conformational studies of individual molecules, assigning anti or gauche conformations to each C-C bond in conformers that we saw. We can also determine the structures of van der Waals assemblies of organic molecules

  17. Effect of the number of phenyl groups per molecule on the reactivity of hydroxyl or carboxyl group in hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Minoru; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Oguma, Shuichi

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen-exchange reactions in solid alcohols (or solid carboxylic acids) which contain phenyl group(s) in each molecule have been observed in a gas-solid system or liquid-solid system at 40 ≅ 80deg C. The data thus obtained have been analyzed by using the A''-McKay plot method, and 'the acidities based on kinetic logic' have been obtained for those compounds. From the acidities the following four characteristics have been determined. (1) The acidity increases with increases of temperature. (2) The reactivities of carboxylic acids are larger than those of alcohols at any temperature. (3) The effect of the number of phenyl groups on the reactivity of the functional group in the molecule in question is fairly large. (4) Acidity based on kinetic logic can be applied not only to gas-solid reactions, but also to liquid-solid reactions. (orig.)

  18. Nucleic Acid Templated Reactions for Chemical Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Seitz, Oliver

    2017-06-21

    Nucleic acid directed bioorthogonal reactions offer the fascinating opportunity to unveil and redirect a plethora of intracellular mechanisms. Nano- to picomolar amounts of specific RNA molecules serve as templates and catalyze the selective formation of molecules that 1) exert biological effects, or 2) provide measurable signals for RNA detection. Turnover of reactants on the template is a valuable asset when concentrations of RNA templates are low. The idea is to use RNA-templated reactions to fully control the biodistribution of drugs and to push the detection limits of DNA or RNA analytes to extraordinary sensitivities. Herein we review recent and instructive examples of conditional synthesis or release of compounds for in cellulo protein interference and intracellular nucleic acid imaging. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  19. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestdagh, J.M.; Balko, B.A.; Covinsky, M.H.; Weiss, P.S.; Vernon, M.F.; Schmidt, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-06-01

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl - repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O 2 is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO 2 is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed

  20. Polyimide resin composites via in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermo-oxidatively stable polyimide/graphite-fiber composites were prepared using a unique in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on reinforcing fibers. This was accomplished by using an aromatic diamine and two ester-acids in a methyl alcohol solvent, rather than a previously synthesized prepolymer varnish, as with other A-type polyimides. A die molding procedure was developed and a composite property characterization conducted with high modulus graphite fiber tow. Flexure, tensile, compressive, and shear tests were conducted at temperatures from 72 to 650 F on laminates before and after exposures at the given temperatures in an air environment for times up to 1000 hours. The composite material was determined to be oxidatively, thermally, and hydrolytically stable.

  1. Communication: Equivalence between symmetric and antisymmetric stretching modes of NH3 in promoting H + NH3 → H2 + NH2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongwei; Yang, Minghui; Guo, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Vibrational excitations of reactants sometimes promote reactions more effectively than the same amount of translational energy. Such mode specificity provides insights into the transition-state modulation of reactivity and might be used to control chemical reactions. We report here a state-of-the-art full-dimensional quantum dynamical study of the hydrogen abstraction reaction H + NH3 → H2 + NH2 on an accurate ab initio based global potential energy surface. This reaction serves as an ideal candidate to study the relative efficacies of symmetric and degenerate antisymmetric stretching modes. Strong mode specificity, particularly for the NH3 stretching modes, is demonstrated. It is further shown that nearly identical efficacies of the symmetric and antisymmetric stretching modes of NH3 in promoting the reaction can be understood in terms of local-mode stretching vibrations of the reactant molecule.

  2. Temperature dependence of He(2 3PJ) reactions: Collision-induced mixing and conversion to He2( 3Πg) molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X.; Soletsky, P.A.; Bryan, W.H.; Dunning, F.B.; Walters, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    The rate coefficients for mixing between He(2 3 P J, MJ) levels during collisions with ground-state helium atoms and for conversion of He(2 3 P J ) atoms to He 2 (b 3 Π g ) molecules via three-body reactions in helium gas have been investigated over the temperature range 1.6--300 K. The measured rate coefficients for collisionally induced P-state mixing decrease slowly with decreasing temperature, from (1.8±0.5)x10 -9 cm 3 s -1 at 300 K to (4.5±0.5)x10 -10 cm 3 s -1 at 4.2 K. The rate coefficients for the production of He 2 (b 3 Π g ) molecules via three-body reactions are observed to increase with decreasing temperature and are described by the relation k P congruent(2.5+267T -1 )x10 -32 cm 6 s -1 . This behavior, which is very different from that noted in earlier studies of the conversion of He(2 3 S 1 ) atoms to He 2 (a 3 Σ u + ) molecules through three-body reactions, suggests that the reaction is not thermally activated

  3. ON THE RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OF LiH AND LiH+ MOLECULES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: NEW RESULTS FROM QUANTUM REACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovino, Stefano; Tacconi, Mario; Gianturco, Franco A.; Galli, Daniele; Palla, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The relative efficiencies of the chemical pathways that can lead to the destruction of LiH and LiH + molecules, conjectured to be present in the primordial gas and to control molecular cooling processes in the gravitational collapse of the post-recombination era, are revisited by using accurate quantum calculations for the several reactions involved. The new rates are employed to survey the behavior of the relative abundance of these molecules at redshifts of interest for early universe conditions. We find significant differences with respect to previous calculations, the present ones yielding LiH abundances higher than LiH + at all redshifts.

  4. A continuous flow microfluidic calorimeter: 3-D numerical modeling with aqueous reactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Mehmet A., E-mail: mehmet.sen@mathworks.com [Northeastern University, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, 360 Hungtington Avenue, 334 Snell Engineering Center, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kowalski, Gregory J., E-mail: gkowal@coe.neu.edu [Northeastern University, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, 360 Hungtington Avenue, 334 Snell Engineering Center, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fiering, Jason, E-mail: jfiering@draper.com [Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Larson, Dale, E-mail: dlarson@draper.com [Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    Highlights: • A co-flow microreactor is modeled in flow, reaction/diffusion, and thermal domains. • Analysis shows how arrayed temperature sensors can provide enthalpy of reaction. • Optical plasmonic temperature sensors could be arrayed suitably for calorimetry. • The reactor studied has a volume of 25 nL. - Abstract: A computational analysis of the reacting flow field, species diffusion and heat transfer processes with thermal boundary layer effects in a microchannel reactor with a coflow configuration was performed. Two parallel adjacent streams of aqueous reactants flow along a wide, shallow, enclosed channel in contact with a substrate, which is affixed to a temperature controlled plate. The Fluent computational fluid dynamics package solved the Navier–Stokes, mass transport and energy equations. The energy model, including the enthalpy of reaction as a nonuniform heat source, was validated by calculating the energy balance at several control volumes in the microchannel. Analysis reveals that the temperature is nearly uniform across the channel thickness, in the direction normal to the substrate surface; hence, measurements made by sensors at or near the surface are representative of the average temperature. Additionally, modeling the channel with a glass substrate and a silicone cover shows that heat transfer is predominantly due to the glass substrate. Finally, using the numerical results, we suggest that a microcalorimeter could be based on this configuration, and that temperature sensors such as optical nanohole array sensors could have sufficient spatial resolution to determine enthalpy of reaction.

  5. A continuous flow microfluidic calorimeter: 3-D numerical modeling with aqueous reactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Mehmet A.; Kowalski, Gregory J.; Fiering, Jason; Larson, Dale

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A co-flow microreactor is modeled in flow, reaction/diffusion, and thermal domains. • Analysis shows how arrayed temperature sensors can provide enthalpy of reaction. • Optical plasmonic temperature sensors could be arrayed suitably for calorimetry. • The reactor studied has a volume of 25 nL. - Abstract: A computational analysis of the reacting flow field, species diffusion and heat transfer processes with thermal boundary layer effects in a microchannel reactor with a coflow configuration was performed. Two parallel adjacent streams of aqueous reactants flow along a wide, shallow, enclosed channel in contact with a substrate, which is affixed to a temperature controlled plate. The Fluent computational fluid dynamics package solved the Navier–Stokes, mass transport and energy equations. The energy model, including the enthalpy of reaction as a nonuniform heat source, was validated by calculating the energy balance at several control volumes in the microchannel. Analysis reveals that the temperature is nearly uniform across the channel thickness, in the direction normal to the substrate surface; hence, measurements made by sensors at or near the surface are representative of the average temperature. Additionally, modeling the channel with a glass substrate and a silicone cover shows that heat transfer is predominantly due to the glass substrate. Finally, using the numerical results, we suggest that a microcalorimeter could be based on this configuration, and that temperature sensors such as optical nanohole array sensors could have sufficient spatial resolution to determine enthalpy of reaction

  6. An oxidative cross-coupling reaction of 4-hydroxydithiocoumarin and amines/thiols using a combination of I2 and TBHP: access to lead molecules for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Karuna; Arora, Neha; Ray Bagdi, Prasanta; Gattu, Radhakrishna; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar; Khan, Abu T

    2018-02-06

    A metal-free I 2 /TBHP induced highly atom economic and operationally simple oxidative cross-coupling reaction has been developed for the direct synthesis of sulfenamides/sulfanes/disulfides from the reaction of 4-hydroxydithiocoumarin and amines/thiols. The novelties of the present protocol are unprecedented S-C bond formation in addition to S-N and S-S bonds, shorter reaction time, mild and environmentally benign reaction conditions, functional group tolerance and moderate to excellent yields. Moreover, the four newly synthesized compounds namely 4q, 6d, 6e and 7a exhibit anti-proliferative activity against the breast cancer cell line MCF7, and may be lead molecules for future drug development.

  7. Use of periodic variations of reactant concentrations in time resolved ftir studies of CO oxidation on Pd/ZrO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortelli, E; Wokaun, A [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Sine wave modulation of feed concentrations was used to induce dynamic variations in the concentrations of products, intermediates and reactants, which were monitored in a diffuse reflectance FTIR (DRIFT) cell. The phase shift {Delta}{phi} between the external perturbation of the feed and the signals of products, intermediates and reactants was examined in dependence on the modulation frequency {omega}. Reaction constants of a simplified model mechanism were estimated for a Pd{sub 25}Zr{sub 75} based catalyst for CO oxidation. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  8. Low energy ion-molecule reaction dynamics and chemiionization kinetics: Progress report, February 1, 1985-January 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The research program at Rochester is devoted to an understanding of the dynamics of elementary gas phase ionic reactions by using the molecular beam methods. We seek to elucidate pathways for energy disposal in elementary reactions, with the goal of using this information to understand the topology of the potential surfaces which govern the reaction, applying the results to ionic channels in combustion systems. We have made significant accomplishments in several distinct areas of research in crossed beam studies of ion-neutral reaction dynamics in the past three years. Our research has focused on the following topics and has resulted in 15 publications and submissions to major journals, with several additional manuscripts in preparation: dynamics of gas phase proton transfer reactions, gas phase carbon and methyl cation chemistry, reactive scattering from double minimum potentials, reactions of highly vibrationally excited ions: NH 3 + + D 2 , and electron and proton transfer reactions of anions. 9 refs

  9. Reaction energetics on long-range corrected density functional theory: Diels-Alder reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raman K; Tsuneda, Takao

    2013-02-15

    The possibility of quantitative reaction analysis on the orbital energies of long-range corrected density functional theory (LC-DFT) is presented. First, we calculated the Diels-Alder reaction enthalpies that have been poorly given by conventional functionals including B3LYP functional. As a result, it is found that the long-range correction drastically improves the reaction enthalpies. The barrier height energies were also computed for these reactions. Consequently, we found that dispersion correlation correction is also crucial to give accurate barrier height energies. It is, therefore, concluded that both long-range exchange interactions and dispersion correlations are essentially required in conventional functionals to investigate Diels-Alder reactions quantitatively. After confirming that LC-DFT accurately reproduces the orbital energies of the reactant and product molecules of the Diels-Alder reactions, the global hardness responses, the halves of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy gaps, along the intrinsic reaction coordinates of two Diels-Alder reactions were computed. We noticed that LC-DFT results satisfy the maximum hardness rule for overall reaction paths while conventional functionals violate this rule on the reaction pathways. Furthermore, our results also show that the HOMO-LUMO gap variations are close to the reaction enthalpies for these Diels-Alder reactions. Based on these results, we foresee quantitative reaction analysis on the orbital energies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Ceramic membrane reactor with two reactant gases at different pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Mieville, Rodney L.

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a ceramic membrane reactor for syngas production having a reaction chamber, an inlet in the reactor for natural gas intake, a plurality of oxygen permeating ceramic slabs inside the reaction chamber with each slab having a plurality of passages paralleling the gas flow for transporting air through the reaction chamber, a manifold affixed to one end of the reaction chamber for intake of air connected to the slabs, a second manifold affixed to the reactor for removing the oxygen depleted air, and an outlet in the reaction chamber for removing syngas.

  11. Solid-state photoelectrochemical H2 generation with gaseous reactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwu, Kingsley O.; Galeckas, Augustinas; Kuznetsov, Andrej Yu.; Norby, Truls

    2013-01-01

    Photocurrent and H 2 production were demonstrated in an all solid-state photoelectrochemical cell employing gaseous methanol and water vapour at the photoanode. Open circuit photovoltage of around −0.4 V and short circuit photocurrent of up to 250 μA/cm 2 were obtained. At positive bias, photocurrent generation was limited by the irradiance, i.e., the amount of photogenerated charge carriers at the anode. Time constants and impedance spectra showed an electrochemical capacitance of the cell of about 15 μF/cm 2 in the dark, which increased with increasing irradiance. With only water vapour at the anode, the short circuit photocurrent was about 6% of the value with gaseous methanol and water vapour. The photoanode and electrocatalyst on carbon paper support were affixed to the proton conducting membrane using Nafion ® as adhesive, an approach that yielded photocurrents up to 15 times better than that of a cell assembled by hot-pressing, in spite of the overall cell resistance of the latter being up to five times less than that of the former. This is attributed, at least partially, to reactants being more readily available at the photoanode of the better performing cell

  12. Organic chemistry - Fast reactions 'on water'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, JE; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    Efficient reactions in aqueous organic chemistry do not require soluble reactants, as had been thought. A newly developed ‘on-water’ protocol is characterized by short reaction times, and the products are easy to isolate.

  13. Part 1: Kinetic energy dependencies of selected ion-molecule reactions; Part 2: Photochemistry of (FSO3)2, FSO3, and FNO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burley, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    In Part 1, guided ion beam mass spectroscopy is used to study the ion-molecule reactions O + ( 4 S) + H 2 (D 2 , HD), (O +4 S) + N 2 , C + ( 2 P) + O 2 and C + (P) + N 2 . Integral reaction cross sections are measured as a function of kinetic energy in the center-of-mass frame. Reaction mechanisms and dynamics are examined, and the results are compared to the predictions of phase space theory. In some cases, thermochemistry for neutral and ionic species is derived. In Part 2, photoabsorption cross sections are measured for peroxydisulfuryl difluoride, (FSO 3 ) 2 , and the fluorosulfate radical, FSO 3 . Photoabsorption cross sections of nitrosyl fluoride, FNO, are also measured, and the FNO absorption spectrum is analyzed and assigned. Spectral results for FNO are compared to the predictions and ab initio calculations and to those obtained for the isoelectronic compound HONO. 259 refs., 34 figs., 9 tabs

  14. Transport processes in exothermic gas-solid reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijay, P.L.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    1997-01-01

    The variation of the concentration of gaseous reactant, temperature distribution for an exothermic reaction, the diffusivity factor and the reaction ratio profiles with various radial positions of a solid reactant have been computed and illustrated for a specific case of reduction reaction of UO 3 by hydrogen

  15. Method for predicting enzyme-catalyzed reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacek, William S.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Mu, Fangping; Unkefer, Pat J.

    2013-03-19

    The reactivity of given metabolites is assessed using selected empirical atomic properties in the potential reaction center. Metabolic reactions are represented as biotransformation rules. These rules are generalized from the patterns in reactions. These patterns are not unique to reactants but are widely distributed among metabolites. Using a metabolite database, potential substructures are identified in the metabolites for a given biotransformation. These substructures are divided into reactants or non-reactants, depending on whether they participate in the biotransformation or not. Each potential substructure is then modeled using descriptors of the topological and electronic properties of atoms in the potential reaction center; molecular properties can also be used. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) or classifier is trained to classify a potential reactant as a true or false reactant using these properties.

  16. Untangling reaction pathways through modern approaches to high-throughput single-molecule force-spectroscopy experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulin, D.; Berghuis, B.A.; Depken, S.M.; Dekker, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule experiments provide a unique means for real-time observation of the activity of individual biomolecular machines. Through such techniques, insights into the mechanics of for example, polymerases, helicases, and packaging motors have been gleaned. Here we describe the recent advances

  17. HYDROGEN MOLECULE INTERACTION WITH CpCr(CO3 CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Spataru

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen molecule interaction with CpCr (CO3 catalyst has been studied using the B3LYP, B86 functionals and the 6-311++G** , LACV3P basis sets. The best results in the testing calculations of the analyzed reaction have been obtained by using the B86/6-311++G** DFT version giving quite good agreement between experimental and theoretical calculated enthalpies. The dispersion corrected DFT Grimme’s and Head-Gordon and coworkers’functionals have been attempted without any improvement of the results. The free energies of the initial reactants, transition states, intermediate compounds and fi nal products of the typical six-ring bond modifi cation mechanism have been calculated. The energy barriersof the reaction pathways are too high in the DFT approximation.

  18. Glycerol transesterification with ethyl acetate to synthesize acetins using ethyl acetate as reactant and entrainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Shafiei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Transesterification of glycerol with ethyl acetate was performed over acidic catalysts in the batch and semi-batch systems. Ethyl acetate was used as reactant and entrainer to remove the produced ethanol during the reaction, through azeotrope formation. Since the azeotrope of ethyl acetate and ethanol forms at 70 oC, all the experiments were performed at this temperature. Para-toluene sulfonic acid, sulfuric acid, and Amberlyst 36 were used as catalyst. The effect of process parameters including ethyl acetate to glycerol molar ratio (6-12, reaction time (3-9 h, and the catalyst to glycerol weight (2.5-9.0%, on the conversion and products selectivities were investigated. Under reflux conditions, 100% glycerol conversion was obtained with 45%, 44%, and 11% selectivity to monoacetin, diacetin, and triacetin, respectively. Azeotropic reactive distillation led to 100% conversion of glycerol with selectivities of 3%, 48% and 49% for monoacetin, diacetin, and triacetin. During the azeotropic reactive distillation, it was possible to remove ethanol to shift the equilibrium towards diacetin and triacetin. Therefore, the total selectivity to diacetin and triacetin was increased from 55% to 97% through azeotropic distillation.

  19. Electron-Exchange Reactions of Aromatic Molecules; Echanges d'Electrons de Molecules Aromatiques; Reaktsii ehlektronnogo obmena aromaticheskikh molekul; Reacciones de Intercambio Electronico en Moleculas Aromaticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malachesky, P. A.; Miller, T. A.; Layloff, T.; Adams, R. N. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    1965-10-15

    A large body of information is available on the rates and mechanisms of inorganic electron-exchange processes. In contrast, purely organic systems have received only minor attention. The homogeneous electron-exchange rates (k{sub exc}) and the heterogeneous rate constants for the electrode reaction (k{sub el}) have been measured only for a few hydrocarbons. We have measured k{sub exc} for a variety of aromatic systems including hydrocarbons, quinones and nitro compounds. These measurements have been carried out via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line broadening measurements on mixtures of radical ions and their parent compounds. We have been able to measure k{sub exc} with a precision that allows detection of small differences presumably due to molecular structure and environment. Hydrocarbon systems like anthracene/anthracene anion are very rapid with k{sub exc} values of ca. 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} litres mole{sup -1} sec{sup -1}. Some substituted aromatics like quinones and nitriles are also quite rapid. However, when a strong electron acceptor function is present like a nitro group in nitrobenzene, the value of k{sub exc} decreases by a factor of 10. It is possible to correlate changes in k{sub exc} in the nitrobenzene series with the unpaired electron density in terms of the {sup 14}N coupling constants of the EPR spectra. Further, the nitro aromatic series show very large variations in k{sub exc} with the solvent system. These changes can be correlated with recent studies of the solvation effect on hyperfine coupling constants. Marcus has reviewed recently chemical and electrochemical electron-transfer theory and suggested correlations between k{sub exc} and k{sub el}. We have measured k{sub el} especially for the nitrobenzene system under conditions which are as nearly identical experimentally to the EPR studies as possible. The electrochemical investigations were carried out by a steady-state d.c. method to eliminate some of the uncertainties inherent in

  20. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  1. Imaging chemical reactions - 3D velocity mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichinin, A. I.; Gericke, K.-H.; Kauczok, S.; Maul, C.

    Visualising a collision between an atom or a molecule or a photodissociation (half-collision) of a molecule on a single particle and single quantum level is like watching the collision of billiard balls on a pool table: Molecular beams or monoenergetic photodissociation products provide the colliding reactants at controlled velocity before the reaction products velocity is imaged directly with an elaborate camera system, where one should keep in mind that velocity is, in general, a three-dimensional (3D) vectorial property which combines scattering angles and speed. If the processes under study have no cylindrical symmetry, then only this 3D product velocity vector contains the full information of the elementary process under study.

  2. Ground states of molecules. XLIX. MINDO/3 study of the retro-diels-alder reaction of cyclohexene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, M.J.S.; Olivella, S.; Rzepa, H.S.

    1978-01-01

    The retro-Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene to form ethylene and butadiene has been studied, using MINDO/3. The transition state is predicted to be very unsymmetric, corresponding to weakening of one of the two breaking CC bonds. The calculated entropy of activation agrees well with experiment and the calculated secondary isotope effects for 4,4-dideuteriocyclohexene and 4,4,5,5-tetradeuteriocyclohexene are similar to those measured for an analogous reaction by Taagepera and Thornton. Discrepancies between the conclusions reached here and those from recent ab-initio calculations are discussed. 4 tables, 3 figures, 53 references

  3. High pressure chemistry of red phosphorus by photoactivated simple molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto; Fanetti, Samuele; Caporali, Maria; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2013-06-01

    High pressure (HP) is very effective in reducing intermolecular distances and inducing unexpected chemical reactions. In particular the photoactivation of the reactants in HP conditions can lead to very efficient and selective processes. The chemistry of phosphorus is currently based on the white molecular form. The red polymeric allotrope, despite more stable and much less toxic, has not attracted much attention so far. However, switching from the white to the red form would benefit any industrial procedure, especially from an environmental point of view. On the other side, water and ethanol are renewable, environmental friendly and largely available molecules, usable as reactants and photoactivators in HP conditions. Here we report a study on the HP photoinduced reactivity of red phosphorus with water and ethanol, showing the possibility of very efficient and selective processes, leading to molecular hydrogen and valuable phosphorus compounds. The reactions have been studied by means of FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and pressure has been generated using DAC and SAC. HP reactivity has been activated by the two-photon absorption of near-UV wavelengths and occured in total absence of solvents, catalysts and radical initiators, at room T and mild pressure conditions (0.2-1.5 GPa).

  4. Gas-phase ion/molecule isotope-exchange reactions: methodology for counting hydrogen atoms in specific organic structural environments by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.F.; Sethi, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ion/molecule reactions are described which facilitate exchange of hydrogens for deuteriums in a variety of different chemical environments. Aromatic hydrogens in alkylbenzenes, oxygenated benzenes, m-toluidine, m-phenylenediamine, thiophene, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metallocenes are exchanged under positive ion CI conditions by using either D 2 O, EtOD, or ND 3 as the reagent gas. Aromatic hydrogens, benzylic hydrogens, and hydrogens on carbon adjacent to carbonyl groups suffer exchange under negative ion CI conditions in ND 3 , D 2 O, and EtOD, respectively. A possible mechanism for the exchange process is discussed. 1 figure, 2 tables

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease and patterns of volatile organic compounds in the exhaled breath of children: A case-control study using Ion Molecule Reaction-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monasta, Lorenzo; Pierobon, Chiara; Princivalle, Andrea; Martelossi, Stefano; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Pasini, Francesco; Perbellini, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) profoundly affect quality of life and have been gradually increasing in incidence, prevalence and severity in many areas of the world, and in children in particular. Patients with suspected IBD require careful history and clinical examination, while definitive diagnosis relies on endoscopic and histological findings. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the alveolar air of pediatric patients with IBD presents a specific volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) pattern when compared to controls. Patients 10-17 years of age, were divided into four groups: Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), controls with gastrointestinal symptomatology, and surgical controls with no evidence of gastrointestinal problems. Alveolar breath was analyzed by ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry. Four models were built starting from 81 molecules plus the age of subjects as independent variables, adopting a penalizing LASSO logistic regression approach: 1) IBDs vs. controls, finally based on 18 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 95%, specificity = 69%, AUC = 0.925); 2) CD vs. UC, finally based on 13 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 76%, AUC = 0.934); 3) IBDs vs. gastroenterological controls, finally based on 15 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 65%, AUC = 0.918); 4) IBDs vs. controls, built starting from the 21 directly or indirectly calibrated molecules only, and finally based on 12 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 71%, AUC = 0.888). The molecules identified by the models were carefully studied in relation to the concerned outcomes. This study, with the creation of models based on VOCs profiles, precise instrumentation and advanced statistical methods, can contribute to the development of new non-invasive, fast and relatively inexpensive diagnostic tools, with high sensitivity and specificity. It also represents a crucial step towards gaining further insights on the etiology of IBD through the

  6. Cross sections of the O++H2→OH++H ion-molecule reaction and isotopic variants (D2, HD): Quasiclassical trajectory study and comparison with experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Rodrigo; Sierra, Jose Daniel; Gonzalez, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    A dynamics study [cross section and microscopic mechanism versus collision energy (E T )] of the reaction O + +H 2 →OH + +H, which plays an important role in Earth's ionosphere and interstellar chemistry, was conducted using the quasiclassical trajectory method, employing an analytical potential energy surface (PES) recently derived by our group [R. Martinez et al., J. Chem. Phys. 120, 4705 (2004)]. Experimental excitation functions for the title reaction, as well as its isotopic variants with D 2 and HD, were near-quantitatively reproduced in the calculations in the very broad collision energy range explored (E T =0.01-6.0 eV). Intramolecular and intermolecular isotopic effects were also examined, yielding data in good agreement with experimental results. The reaction occurs via two microscopic mechanisms (direct and nondirect abstraction). The results were satisfactorily interpreted based on the reaction probability and the maximum impact parameter dependences with E T , and considering the influence of the collinear [OHH] + absolute minimum of the PES on the evolution from reactants to products. The agreement between theory and experiment suggests that the reaction mainly occurs through the lowest energy PES and nonadiabatic processes are not very important in the wide collision energy range analyzed. Hence, the PES used to describe this reaction is suitable for both kinetics and dynamics studies

  7. L-Selectride-Mediated Highly Diastereoselective Asymmetric Reductive Aldol Reaction: Access to an Important Subunit for Bioactive Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Kass, Jorden; Anderson, David D.; Xu, Xiaoming; Marian, Christine

    2008-01-01

    L-Selectride reduction of a chiral or achiral enone followed by reaction of the resulting enolate with optically active α-alkoxy aldehydes proceeded with excellent diastereoselectivity. The resulting α,α-dimethyl-β-hydroxy ketones are inherent to a variety of biologically active natural products.

  8. L-selectride-mediated highly diastereoselective asymmetric reductive aldol reaction: access to an important subunit for bioactive molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arun K; Kass, Jorden; Anderson, David D; Xu, Xiaoming; Marian, Christine

    2008-11-06

    L-selectride reduction of a chiral or achiral enone followed by reaction of the resulting enolate with optically active alpha-alkoxy aldehydes proceeded with excellent diastereoselectivity. The resulting alpha,alpha-dimethyl-beta-hydroxy ketones are inherent to a variety of biologically active natural products.

  9. SCScore: Synthetic Complexity Learned from a Reaction Corpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Connor W; Rogers, Luke; Green, William H; Jensen, Klavs F

    2018-02-26

    Several definitions of molecular complexity exist to facilitate prioritization of lead compounds, to identify diversity-inducing and complexifying reactions, and to guide retrosynthetic searches. In this work, we focus on synthetic complexity and reformalize its definition to correlate with the expected number of reaction steps required to produce a target molecule, with implicit knowledge about what compounds are reasonable starting materials. We train a neural network model on 12 million reactions from the Reaxys database to impose a pairwise inequality constraint enforcing the premise of this definition: that on average, the products of published chemical reactions should be more synthetically complex than their corresponding reactants. The learned metric (SCScore) exhibits highly desirable nonlinear behavior, particularly in recognizing increases in synthetic complexity throughout a number of linear synthetic routes.

  10. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation

  11. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  12. Reaction analogues in the radiation-induced deamination and dephosphorylation of bio-organic molecules 2: Oxygenated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1988-02-01

    The OH-induced deamination and dephosphorylation of simple peptides and phosphate esters in oxygenated solutions involve the fomation and subsequent degradation of the perodyl radicals RCONHC(/dot O/)R 2 and /bigcirc P/ OC(/dot O/ 2 )R 2 respectively. Reaction analogues in the degradation of peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals in these two systems are evaluated with reference to the OH-induced main-chain cleavage of protein and DNA. 25 refs

  13. Reaction-based small-molecule fluorescent probes for dynamic detection of ROS and transient redox changes in living cells and small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic detection of transient redox changes in living cells and animals has broad implications for human health and disease diagnosis, because intracellular redox homeostasis regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays important role in cell functions, normal physiological functions and some serious human diseases (e.g., cancer, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, etc.) usually have close relationship with the intracellular redox status. Small-molecule ROS-responsive fluorescent probes can act as powerful tools for dynamic detection of ROS and redox changes in living cells and animals through fluorescence imaging techniques; and great advances have been achieved recently in the design and synthesis of small-molecule ROS-responsive fluorescent probes. This article highlights up-to-date achievements in designing and using the reaction-based small-molecule fluorescent probes (with high sensitivity and selectivity to ROS and redox cycles) in the dynamic detection of ROS and transient redox changes in living cells and animals through fluorescence imaging. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Temperature modulation and quadrature detection for selective titration of two-state exchanging reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrelli, K; Barilero, T; Cavatore, E; Berthoumieux, H; Le Saux, T; Croquette, V; Lemarchand, A; Gosse, C; Jullien, L

    2011-04-01

    Biological samples exhibit huge molecular diversity over large concentration ranges. Titrating a given compound in such mixtures is often difficult, and innovative strategies emphasizing selectivity are thus demanded. To overcome limitations inherent to thermodynamics, we here present a generic technique where discrimination relies on the dynamics of interaction between the target of interest and a probe introduced in excess. Considering an ensemble of two-state exchanging reactants submitted to temperature modulation, we first demonstrate that the amplitude of the out-of-phase concentration oscillations is maximum for every compound involved in a reaction whose equilibrium constant is equal to unity and whose relaxation time is equal to the inverse of the excitation angular frequency. Taking advantage of this feature, we next devise a highly specific detection protocol and validate it using a microfabricated resistive heater and an epifluorescence microscope, as well as labeled oligonucleotides to model species displaying various dynamic properties. As expected, quantification of a sought for strand is obtained even if interfering reagents are present in similar amounts. Moreover, our approach does not require any separation and is compatible with imaging. It could then benefit some of the numerous binding assays performed every day in life sciences.

  15. A combinatorial chemistry approach to the investigation of cerium oxide and plutonium oxide reactions with small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John T.; Warner, Benjamin P.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Havrilla, George J.; Morris, David E.; Buscher, C. Thomas

    2000-07-01

    We are currently investigating the potential chemistry of the 3013 Standard waste storage containers. These containers are filled with waste that is a mixture of inorganic salts and plutonium oxide that has been calcined to remove water and other volatiles. There has been concern about possible pressure buildup due to the formation of hydrogen or other gases. We are utilizing a combinatorial chemistry approach to investigate a range of possible reactions that may occur in the containers with various concentrations of metal oxides and inorganic salts.

  16. Charge distribution effects in polyatomic reactants involved in simple electron transfer reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fawcett, W. R.; Chavis, G. J.; Hromadová, Magdaléna

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 23 (2008), s. 6787-6792 ISSN 0013-4686 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electron transfer kinetics * charge distribution effects * double - layer effects in electrode kinetics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.078, year: 2008

  17. Complex nonlinear behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    The fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle investigated in this paper can exhibit periodic solutions. These solutions bifurcate from the steady state in a Hopf bifurcation. The Hopf bifurcation encountered at the lowest value of the inlet concentration turns the steady state unstable and marks......,that the dynamic behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle is much more complex than previously reported....

  18. Thermoneutral isotope exchange reactions of cations in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausloos, P.; Lias, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Rate constants have been measured for reactions of the type AD 2 + + MH → MD + ADH + , where AD 2 + is CD 3 CND + , CD 3 CDOD + , (CD 3 COCD 3 )D + , or (C 2 D 5 ) 2 OD + and the MH molecules are alcohols, acids, mercaptans, H 2 S, AsH 3 , PH 3 , or aromatic molecules. Rate constants are also presented for the reactions Ar/sub H/D + + D 2 O → Ar/sub d/D + + HDO, where Ar/sub H/D + is a deuteronated aromatic molecule and Ar/sub D/D + is the same species with a D atom incorporated on the ring. In all but two cases, the competing deuteron transfer is sufficiently endothermic that it cannot be observed under the conditions of the ICR experiments at 320 to 420 K. The efficiencies of the isotope exchange reactions are interpreted in terms of estimated potential surface cross sections for the reactions AD 2 + + MH → [AD 2 + MH] → [ADMHD + ] → [ADH + MD] → ADH + + MD. When the formation of the [ADMHD + ] complex is estimated to be thermoneutral or slightly endothermic, the isotope exchange process is inefficient (probability of a reactive collision 2 + MH] → [ADMHD + ] is exothermic. For most of the systems, trends in reaction efficiency appear to be related to factors such as dipole moments of reactant species (or for aromatic compounds, the electron-donating or -withdrawing properties of ring substituents) which influence the relative orientation of the two reactant species in the complex

  19. Gas-phase reaction rate constants for atmospheric pressure ionization in ion-mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandiver, V.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an instrumental technique in which gaseous ions are formed from neutral molecules by proton and charge transfer from reactant ions through collisional ionization. An abbreviated rate theory has been proposed for atmospheric pressure ionization (API) in IMS, but supporting experimental measurements have not been reported. The objectives of this thesis were (1) assessment of existing API rate theory using positive and negative product ions in IMS, (2) measurement of API equilibria and kinetics for binary mixtures, and (3) investigating of cross-ionizations with multiple-product ions in API reactions. Although IMS measurements and predictions from rate theory were comparable, shapes and slopes of response curves for both proton transfer and electron capture were not described exactly by existing theory. In particular, terms that are needed for calculation of absolute rate constants were unsuitable in the existing theory. These included recombination coefficients,initial number of reactant ions, and opposing ion densities

  20. Ethanol oxidation reactions catalyzed by water molecules: CH3CH2OH+n H2O→ CH3CHO+ H2+n H2O (n=0,1,2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Hisaoka, S.; Nitta, T.

    2002-09-01

    Ab initio density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the catalytic role of water molecules in the oxidation reaction of ethanol: CH3CH2OH+n H2O→ CH3CHO+ H2+n H2O (n=0,1,2) . The results show that the potential energy barrier for the reaction is 88.0 kcal/mol in case of n=0, while it is reduced by ˜34 kcal/mol when two water molecules are involved ( n=2) in the reaction. As a result, the rate constant increases to 3.31×10 -4 s-1, which shows a significant catalytic role of water molecules in the ethanol oxidation reactions.

  1. Organocatalyzed, Visible-Light Photoredox-Mediated, One-Pot Minisci Reaction Using Carboxylic Acids via N-(Acyloxy)phthalimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Trevor C; Li, Ning; Yazdani, Aliza N; Dhar, T G Murali

    2018-03-02

    An improved, one-pot Minisci reaction has been developed using visible light, an organic photocatalyst, and carboxylic acids as radical precursors via the intermediacy of in situ-generated N-(acyloxy)phthalimides. The conditions employed are mild, demonstrate a high degree of functional group tolerance, and do not require a large excess of the carboxylic acid reactant. As a result, this reaction can be applied to drug-like scaffolds and molecules with sensitive functional groups, enabling late-stage functionalization, which is of high interest to medicinal chemistry.

  2. Reactive scattering from oriented molecules: The three-center reaction K+ICl --> KI+Cl, KCl+I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, H. J.; Möller, J.

    1992-12-01

    In a crossed molecular beam experiment, we have measured the angular and time-of-flight (TOF) distributions of the products KCl and KI formed in the reaction K+ICl→KI+Cl, KCl+I at an elevated collision energy of Etr=1.64 eV. Employing the brute force method, we have prepared an oriented ICl beam and studied in addition also the orientation dependence of these distributions. The results are (i) KCl is the dominant product, but also KI is substantially formed with a branching ratio of 4:1; (ii) the double differential reaction cross section in the center-of-mass frame (contour maps) indicates that all products are preferentially forward scattered and constrained to the forward hemisphere; (iii) the KCl flux consists of two distinct components which differ markedly in kinetic energy and dependence on the ICl orientation; there are also indications of the existence of two components of KI; (iv) 65%, 84%, and 64% of the available energy is vested into the internal degrees of freedom for the fast, slow component of KCl and KI, respectively; (v) the existence of two components can be rationalized on the basis of the harpooning mechanism where the jumping electron accesses the ground state or one of the low excited states of the ICl- ion and triggers the subsequent explosion of the ion with more or less kinetic energy of the fragments depending on the initially populated state; (vi) the energies released during dissociation of ICl- in the 2Σ ground state and the first 2Π state are ≤0.19 and ≤1.2 eV, respectively; (vii) the fast KCl component features a negative steric effect suggesting favorable product formation for attacks of K to the I end of ICl, the steric effect of the slow KI component is positive, i.e., attacks to the Cl end form products favorably; the other components exhibit no significant steric effect; (viii) the steric effects can be quantitatively rationalized using the same model as mentioned above; (ix) the magnitude of the steric effect suggests a

  3. Dynamic disorder in single-molecule Michaelis-Menten kinetics: The reaction-diffusion formalism in the Wilemski-Fixman approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Srabanti; Cherayil, Binny J.

    2007-09-01

    Single-molecule equations for the Michaelis-Menten [Biochem. Z. 49, 333 (1913)] mechanism of enzyme action are analyzed within the Wilemski-Fixman [J. Chem. Phys. 58, 4009 (1973); 60, 866 (1974)] approximation after the effects of dynamic disorder—modeled by the anomalous diffusion of a particle in a harmonic well—are incorporated into the catalytic step of the reaction. The solution of the Michaelis-Menten equations is used to calculate the distribution of waiting times between successive catalytic turnovers in the enzyme β-galactosidase. The calculated distribution is found to agree qualitatively with experimental results on this enzyme obtained at four different substrate concentrations. The calculations are also consistent with measurements of correlations in the fluctuations of the fluorescent light emitted during the course of catalysis, and with measurements of the concentration dependence of the randomness parameter.

  4. Single-molecule fluorescence measurements reveal the reaction mechanisms of the core RISC, composed of human Argonaute 2 and a guide RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Myung Hyun; Song, Ji-Joon; Hohng, Sungchul

    2015-12-01

    In eukaryotes, small RNAs play important roles in both gene regulation and resistance to viral infection. Argonaute proteins have been identified as a key component of the effector complexes of various RNA-silencing pathways, but the mechanistic roles of Argonaute proteins in these pathways are not clearly understood. To address this question, we performed single-molecule fluorescence experiments using an RNA-induced silencing complex (core-RISC) composed of a small RNA and human Argonaute 2. We found that target binding of core-RISC starts at the seed region of the guide RNA. After target binding, four distinct reactions followed: target cleavage, transient binding, stable binding, and Argonaute unloading. Target cleavage required extensive sequence complementarity and accelerated core-RISC dissociation for recycling. In contrast, the stable binding of core-RISC to target RNAs required seed-match only, suggesting a potential explanation for the seed-match rule of microRNA (miRNA) target selection.

  5. Effect of cationic molecules on the oxygen reduction reaction on fuel cell grade Pt/C (20 wt%) catalyst in potassium hydroxide (aq, 1 mol dm(-3)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ai Lien; Inglis, Kenneth K; Whelligan, Daniel K; Murphy, Sam; Varcoe, John R

    2015-05-14

    This study investigates the effect of 1 mmol dm(-3) concentrations of a selection of small cationic molecules on the performance of a fuel cell grade oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst (Johnson Matthey HiSPEC 3000, 20 mass% Pt/C) in aqueous KOH (1 mol dm(-3)). The cationic molecules studied include quaternary ammonium (including those based on bicyclic systems) and imidazolium types as well as a phosphonium example: these serve as fully solubilised models for the commonly encountered head-groups in alkaline anion-exchange membranes (AAEM) and anion-exchange ionomers (AEI) that are being developed for application in alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells (APEFCs), batteries and electrolysers. Both cyclic and hydrodynamic linear sweep rotating disk electrode voltammetry techniques were used. The resulting voltammograms and subsequently derived data (e.g. apparent electrochemical active surface areas, Tafel plots, and number of [reduction] electrons transferred per O2) were compared. The results show that the imidazolium examples produced the highest level of interference towards the ORR on the Pt/C catalyst under the experimental conditions used.

  6. Recurrence Relations for the Equilibrium Means of Distributions Arising in Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.K. Elsheikh

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we derive recurrence relations that describe how the equilibrium mean of the number molecules of a reactant varies with each of the parameters defining the initial state for four basic reversible chemical reactions. In essence, the relations provide a rationale for updating the equilibrium mean following the addition (or removal of a molecule of one of the types involved in the reaction, there being a relation for each type. With a new parameterization introduced for each reaction, the relations provide a convenient means of evaluating the means, variances and other important moments without any need to work out the underlying distributions. As an application, the relations are used to numerically assess-approximate expressions for the means and variances.

  7. Molecule-Level g-C3N4 Coordinated Transition Metals as a New Class of Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Electrode Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yao

    2017-02-21

    Organometallic complexes with metal-nitrogen/carbon (M-N/C) coordination are the most important alternatives to precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORR and OER) in energy conversion devices. Here, we designed and developed a range of molecule-level graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) coordinated transition metals (M-C3N4) as a new generation of M-N/C catalysts for these oxygen electrode reactions. As a proof-of-concept example, we conducted theoretical evaluation and experimental validation on a cobalt-C3N4 catalyst with a desired molecular configuration, which possesses comparable electrocatalytic activity to that of precious metal benchmarks for the ORR and OER in alkaline media. The correlation of experimental and computational results confirms that this high activity originates from the precise M-N2 coordination in the g-C3N4 matrix. Moreover, the reversible ORR/OER activity trend for a wide variety of M-C3N4 complexes has been constructed to provide guidance for the molecular design of this promising class of catalysts.

  8. Electrostatic catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Albert C.; Haworth, Naomi L.; Darwish, Nadim; Ciampi, Simone; Bloomfield, Nathaniel J.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Coote, Michelle L.

    2016-03-01

    It is often thought that the ability to control reaction rates with an applied electrical potential gradient is unique to redox systems. However, recent theoretical studies suggest that oriented electric fields could affect the outcomes of a range of chemical reactions, regardless of whether a redox system is involved. This possibility arises because many formally covalent species can be stabilized via minor charge-separated resonance contributors. When an applied electric field is aligned in such a way as to electrostatically stabilize one of these minor forms, the degree of resonance increases, resulting in the overall stabilization of the molecule or transition state. This means that it should be possible to manipulate the kinetics and thermodynamics of non-redox processes using an external electric field, as long as the orientation of the approaching reactants with respect to the field stimulus can be controlled. Here, we provide experimental evidence that the formation of carbon-carbon bonds is accelerated by an electric field. We have designed a surface model system to probe the Diels-Alder reaction, and coupled it with a scanning tunnelling microscopy break-junction approach. This technique, performed at the single-molecule level, is perfectly suited to deliver an electric-field stimulus across approaching reactants. We find a fivefold increase in the frequency of formation of single-molecule junctions, resulting from the reaction that occurs when the electric field is present and aligned so as to favour electron flow from the dienophile to the diene. Our results are qualitatively consistent with those predicted by quantum-chemical calculations in a theoretical model of this system, and herald a new approach to chemical catalysis.

  9. Single-molecule Imaging Analysis of Elementary Reaction Steps of Trichoderma reesei Cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) Hydrolyzing Crystalline Cellulose Iα and IIII*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibafuji, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akihiko; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Naohisa; Fukuda, Shingo; Watanabe, Hiroki; Samejima, Masahiro; Ando, Toshio; Noji, Hiroyuki; Koivula, Anu; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Iino, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) is a molecular motor that directly hydrolyzes crystalline celluloses into water-soluble cellobioses. It has recently drawn attention as a tool that could be used to convert cellulosic materials into biofuel. However, detailed mechanisms of action, including elementary reaction steps such as binding, processive hydrolysis, and dissociation, have not been thoroughly explored because of the inherent challenges associated with monitoring reactions occurring at the solid/liquid interface. The crystalline cellulose Iα and IIII were previously reported as substrates with different crystalline forms and different susceptibilities to hydrolysis by TrCel7A. In this study, we observed that different susceptibilities of cellulose Iα and IIII are highly dependent on enzyme concentration, and at nanomolar enzyme concentration, TrCel7A shows similar rates of hydrolysis against cellulose Iα and IIII. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and high speed atomic force microscopy, we also determined kinetic constants of the elementary reaction steps for TrCel7A against cellulose Iα and IIII. These measurements were performed at picomolar enzyme concentration in which density of TrCel7A on crystalline cellulose was very low. Under this condition, TrCel7A displayed similar binding and dissociation rate constants for cellulose Iα and IIII and similar fractions of productive binding on cellulose Iα and IIII. Furthermore, once productively bound, TrCel7A processively hydrolyzes and moves along cellulose Iα and IIII with similar translational rates. With structural models of cellulose Iα and IIII, we propose that different susceptibilities at high TrCel7A concentration arise from surface properties of substrate, including ratio of hydrophobic surface and number of available lanes. PMID:24692563

  10. Observation of the adsorption and desorption of vibrationally excited molecules on a metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirhatti, Pranav R.; Rahinov, Igor; Golibrzuch, Kai; Werdecker, Jörn; Geweke, Jan; Altschäffel, Jan; Kumar, Sumit; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Bartels, Christof; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2018-06-01

    The most common mechanism of catalytic surface chemistry is that of Langmuir and Hinshelwood (LH). In the LH mechanism, reactants adsorb, become thermalized with the surface, and subsequently react. The measured vibrational (relaxation) lifetimes of molecules adsorbed at metal surfaces are in the range of a few picoseconds. As a consequence, vibrational promotion of LH chemistry is rarely observed, with the exception of LH reactions occurring via a molecular physisorbed intermediate. Here, we directly detect adsorption and subsequent desorption of vibrationally excited CO molecules from a Au(111) surface. Our results show that CO (v = 1) survives on a Au(111) surface for 1 × 10-10 s. Such long vibrational lifetimes for adsorbates on metal surfaces are unexpected and pose an interesting challenge to the current understanding of vibrational energy dissipation on metal surfaces. They also suggest that vibrational promotion of surface chemistry might be more common than is generally believed.

  11. Stepped MS(All) Relied Transition (SMART): An approach to rapidly determine optimal multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry parameters for small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Lin; Liu, Huiying; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Mengqiu; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-02-11

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) is a universal approach for quantitative analysis because of its high specificity and sensitivity. Nevertheless, optimization of MRM parameters remains as a time and labor-intensive task particularly in multiplexed quantitative analysis of small molecules in complex mixtures. In this study, we have developed an approach named Stepped MS(All) Relied Transition (SMART) to predict the optimal MRM parameters of small molecules. SMART requires firstly a rapid and high-throughput analysis of samples using a Stepped MS(All) technique (sMS(All)) on a Q-TOF, which consists of serial MS(All) events acquired from low CE to gradually stepped-up CE values in a cycle. The optimal CE values can then be determined by comparing the extracted ion chromatograms for the ion pairs of interest among serial scans. The SMART-predicted parameters were found to agree well with the parameters optimized on a triple quadrupole from the same vendor using a mixture of standards. The parameters optimized on a triple quadrupole from a different vendor was also employed for comparison, and found to be linearly correlated with the SMART-predicted parameters, suggesting the potential applications of the SMART approach among different instrumental platforms. This approach was further validated by applying to simultaneous quantification of 31 herbal components in the plasma of rats treated with a herbal prescription. Because the sMS(All) acquisition can be accomplished in a single run for multiple components independent of standards, the SMART approach are expected to find its wide application in the multiplexed quantitative analysis of complex mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of Reactants Reaction Mechanisms and Reaction Products Leading to Extreme Acid Rain and Acid Aerosol Conditions in Southern California

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Morgan, J. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Munger, J. W.; Waldman, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of fogwater collected by inertial impaction in the Los Angeles basin and the San Joaquin Valley indicated unusually high concentrations of major and minor ions. The dominant ions measured were NO_3^-, SO_4^(2-), NH_4^+ and H^+ Nitrate exceeded sulfate on an equivalent basis by a factor of 2.5 in the central and coastal regions of the Los Angeles basin, but was approximately equal in the eastern Los Angeles basin and the San Joaquin Valley. Maximum observed values for NH_4^+, NO_3^- a...

  13. The effects of combined therapy of rheumatoid arthritis on the acute phase reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Pllana, Ejup; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Rexhepi, Blerta

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the results of studies of acute phase reactants in the 60 treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were divided into two groups, depending on the applied treatment: group I (n = 30) was treated with methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine, and group II (n = 30) with methotrexate. The results of our study shows that there is a statistically significant reduction in the value of acute phase reactants and clinical parameters after treatment in both investigated groups of patients, and also a significant statistical difference between the first and second group of treated patients.

  14. Physiological environment induce quick response - slow exhaustion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko eHiroi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In vivo environments are highly crowded and inhomogeneous, which may affect reaction processes in cells. In this study we examined the effects of intracellular crowding and an inhomogeneity on the behavior of in vivo reactions by calculating the spectral dimension (ds, which can be translated into the reaction rate function. We compared estimates of anomaly parameters obtained from Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS data with fractal dimensions derived from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM image analysis. FCS analysis indicated that the anomalous property was linked to physiological structure. Subsequent TEM analysis provided an in vivo illustration; soluble molecules likely percolate between intracellular clusters, which are constructed in a self-organizing manner. We estimated a cytoplasmic spectral dimension ds to be 1.39 ± 0.084. This result suggests that in vivo reactions initially run faster than the same reactions in a homogeneous space; this conclusion is consistent with the anomalous character indicated by FCS analysis. We further showed that these results were compatible with our Monte-Carlo simulation in which the anomalous behavior of mobile molecules correlates with the intracellular environment, leading to description as a percolation cluster, as demonstrated using TEM analysis. We confirmed by the simulation that the above-mentioned in vivo like properties are different from those of homogeneously concentrated environments. Additionally, simulation results indicated that crowding level of an environment might affect diffusion rate of reactant. Such knowledge of the spatial information enables us to construct realistic models for in vivo diffusion and reaction systems.

  15. Matrix effect on hydrogen-atom tunneling of organic molecules in cryogenic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneki

    2000-01-01

    Although the tunneling of atoms through potential energy barriers separating the reactant and reaction systems is not paid much attention in organic reactions, this plays an important role in reactions including the transfer of light atoms. Atomic tunneling is especially important for chemical reactions at low temperatures, since the thermal activation of reactant systems is very slow process in comparison with the tunneling. One of the typical reactions of atomic tunneling is hydrogen-atom abstraction from alkanes in cryogenic solids exposed to high-energy radiation. Irradiation of alkane molecules causes the homolytic cleavage of C-H bonds, which results in the pairwise formation of free hydrogen atoms and organic free radicals. Since the activation energies for the abstraction of hydrogen atoms from alkane molecules by free hydrogen atoms are higher than 5 kcal/mol, the lifetime of free hydrogen atoms at 77 K is estimated from the Arrhenius equation of k=vexp(-E a /RT) to be longer than 10 hrs. However, except for solid methane, free hydrogen atoms immediately convert to alkyl radicals even at 4.2 K by hydrogen-atom tunneling from alkane molecules to the free hydrogen atoms. The rate of hydrogen atom tunneling does not necessary increase with decreasing activation energy or the peak height of the potential energy barrier preventing the tunneling. Although the activation energy is the lowest at the tertiary carbon of alkanes, hydrogen atom tunneling from branched alkanes with tertiary carbon at the antepenultimate position of the carbon skeleton is the fastest at the secondary penultimate carbon. Based on our experimental results, we have proposed that the peculiarity of the hydrogen-atom abstraction in cryogenic solids comes from the steric hindrance by matrix molecules to the deformation of alkane molecules from the initial sp 3 to the final sp 2 configurations. The steric hindrance causes the increase of the height of the potential energy barrier for the

  16. A Chebyshev method for state-to-state reactive scattering using reactant-product decoupling: OH + H2 → H2O + H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitaš, Marko T; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2013-08-14

    We extend a recently developed wave packet method for computing the state-to-state quantum dynamics of AB + CD → ABC + D reactions [M. T. Cvitaš and S. C. Althorpe, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 4557 (2009)] to include the Chebyshev propagator. The method uses the further partitioned approach to reactant-product decoupling, which uses artificial decoupling potentials to partition the coordinate space of the reaction into separate reactant, product, and transition-state regions. Separate coordinates and basis sets can then be used that are best adapted to each region. We derive improved Chebyshev partitioning formulas which include Mandelshtam-and-Taylor-type decoupling potentials, and which are essential for the non-unitary discrete variable representations that must be used in 4-atom reactive scattering calculations. Numerical tests on the fully dimensional OH + H2 → H2O + H reaction for J = 0 show that the new version of the method is as efficient as the previously developed split-operator version. The advantages of the Chebyshev propagator (most notably the ease of parallelization for J > 0) can now be fully exploited in state-to-state reactive scattering calculations on 4-atom reactions.

  17. Hydride, hydrogen, proton, and electron affinities of imines and their reaction intermediates in acetonitrile and construction of thermodynamic characteristic graphs (TCGs) of imines as a "molecule ID card".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Qiao-Yun; Chen, Qiang; Mei, Lian-Rui

    2010-02-05

    A series of 61 imines with various typical structures were synthesized, and the thermodynamic affinities (defined as enthalpy changes or redox potentials in this work) of the imines to abstract hydride anions, hydrogen atoms, and electrons, the thermodynamic affinities of the radical anions of the imines to abstract hydrogen atoms and protons, and the thermodynamic affinities of the hydrogen adducts of the imines to abstract electrons in acetonitrile were determined by using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The pure heterolytic and homolytic dissociation energies of the C=N pi-bond in the imines were estimated. The polarity of the C=N double bond in the imines was examined using a linear free-energy relationship. The idea of a thermodynamic characteristic graph (TCG) of imines as an efficient "Molecule ID Card" was introduced. The TCG can be used to quantitatively diagnose and predict the characteristic chemical properties of imines and their various reaction intermediates as well as the reduction mechanism of the imines. The information disclosed in this work could not only supply a gap of thermodynamics for the chemistry of imines but also strongly promote the fast development of the applications of imines.

  18. Mechanisms for the inversion of chirality: Global reaction route mapping of stereochemical pathways in a probable chiral extraterrestrial molecule, 2-aminopropionitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Vikas

    2015-01-01

    2-Aminopropionitrile (APN), a probable candidate as a chiral astrophysical molecule, is a precursor to amino-acid alanine. Stereochemical pathways in 2-APN are explored using Global Reaction Route Mapping (GRRM) method employing high-level quantum-mechanical computations. Besides predicting the conventional mechanism for chiral inversion that proceeds through an achiral intermediate, a counterintuitive flipping mechanism is revealed for 2-APN through chiral intermediates explored using the GRRM. The feasibility of the proposed stereochemical pathways, in terms of the Gibbs free-energy change, is analyzed at the temperature conditions akin to the interstellar medium. Notably, the stereoinversion in 2-APN is observed to be more feasible than the dissociation of 2-APN and intermediates involved along the stereochemical pathways, and the flipping barrier is observed to be as low as 3.68 kJ/mol along one of the pathways. The pathways proposed for the inversion of chirality in 2-APN may provide significant insight into the extraterrestrial origin of life

  19. Energy distribution in dissociations of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koernig, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis studies are reported of fragmentation processes in polyatomic molecules. In order to find out which dessocaciation reactions take place, how they are brought about by the internal energy of the reactant, and to investigate the structure of the dissociating 'transition state', the fragment mass and the corresponding kinetic energy release (KER) are determined by differential translational spectroscopy using a position and time sensitive two-particle coincidence detector. The results are interpreted using the statistical theory of unimolecular dissociation. It turns out that the standard assumptions of the theory, especially in calculating KER-distributions, are not realistic in all molecules considered. Dissociation is induced by the neutralization with alkali metal vapour. In ch. 2 the experimental method and the analysis of the data (dissociation pathways, branching ratios and ε-d-distributions) are introduced and exemplified by measurements of cyclohexane, which represents the upper limit in precursor and fragment mass accessible in the apparatus. In ch. 3 a study is reported of the molecules methylchloride (CH 3 Cl) and the acetylradical (CH 3 CO). In spite of their similar geometric structures, completely different dissociation mechanisms have been found. Methylchloride dissociates via a repulsive state; acetyl radicals show energy scrambling. The energy distribution from dissociating acetyl exemplifies dynamical effects in the dissociation. In ch. 4 an investigation of a number of prototype hydrocarbons is presented. The dissociation pathways of several small linear alkanes indicate that neutralization takes place to unknown repulsive potentials, of which the position and steepness are determined from the kinetic energy release. (author). 118 refs.; 40 figs.; 5 tabs

  20. A selected ion flow tube study of the ion molecule association reactions of protonated (MH+), nitrosonated (MNO+) and dehydroxidated (M-OH)(+) carboxylic acids (M) with H2O

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brůhová Michalčíková, R.; Španěl, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 368, JUL 2014 (2014), s. 15-22 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28882S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ion molecule reactions * proton transfer * selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.972, year: 2014

  1. Teachers' Misconceptions about the Effects of Addition of More Reactants or Products on Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek; Ma, Hong-jia; Yang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The importance of research on misconceptions about chemical equilibrium is well recognized by educators, but in the past, researchers' interest has centered on student misconceptions and has neglected teacher misconceptions. Focusing on the effects of adding more reactants or products on chemical equilibrium, this article discusses the various…

  2. Catalytic membrane in denitrification of water: a means to facilitate intraporous diffusion of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinich, O.M.; Cuperus, F.P.; Gemert, van R.W.; Gribov, E.N.; Nosova, L.V.

    2000-01-01

    The series of mono- and bi-metallic catalysts with Pd and/or Cu supported over γ-Al 2O 3 was investigated with respect to reduction of nitrate and nitrite ions in water by hydrogen. Pronounced limitations of catalytic performance due to intraporous diffusion of the reactants were observed in the

  3. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  4. Detailed high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of OMEGA separated reactants inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, Brian M., E-mail: bmhaines@lanl.gov; Fincke, James R.; Shah, Rahul C.; Boswell, Melissa; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Gore, Robert A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna C.; Jungman, Gerard; Klein, Andreas; Rundberg, Robert S.; Steinkamp, Michael J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T087, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Grim, Gary P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Forrest, Chad J.; Silverstein, Kevin; Marshall, Frederic J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    We present results from the comparison of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) simulations with data from the implosions of inertial confinement fusion capsules with separated reactants performed on the OMEGA laser facility. Each capsule, referred to as a “CD Mixcap,” is filled with tritium and has a polystyrene (CH) shell with a deuterated polystyrene (CD) layer whose burial depth is varied. In these implosions, fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium ions can occur only in the presence of atomic mix between the gas fill and shell material. The simulations feature accurate models for all known experimental asymmetries and do not employ any adjustable parameters to improve agreement with experimental data. Simulations are performed with the RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code using an Implicit Large Eddy Simulation (ILES) strategy for the hydrodynamics. We obtain good agreement with the experimental data, including the DT/TT neutron yield ratios used to diagnose mix, for all burial depths of the deuterated shell layer. Additionally, simulations demonstrate good agreement with converged simulations employing explicit models for plasma diffusion and viscosity, suggesting that the implicit sub-grid model used in ILES is sufficient to model these processes in these experiments. In our simulations, mixing is driven by short-wavelength asymmetries and longer-wavelength features are responsible for developing flows that transport mixed material towards the center of the hot spot. Mix material transported by this process is responsible for most of the mix (DT) yield even for the capsule with a CD layer adjacent to the tritium fuel. Consistent with our previous results, mix does not play a significant role in TT neutron yield degradation; instead, this is dominated by the displacement of fuel from the center of the implosion due to the development of turbulent instabilities seeded by long-wavelength asymmetries. Through these processes, the long

  5. High pressure chemistry of red phosphorus by photo-activated simple molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceppatelli, M; Bini, R; Caporali, M; Peruzzini, M; Fanetti, S

    2014-01-01

    High pressure (HP) is very effective in reducing intermolecular distances and inducing unexpected chemical reactions. In addition the photo-activation of the reactants in HP conditions can lead to very efficient and selective processes. The chemistry of phosphorus is currently based on the white molecular form. The red polymeric allotrope, despite more stable and much less toxic, has not attracted much attention so far. However, switching from the white to the red form would benefit any industrial procedure, especially from an environmental point of view. On the other side, water and ethanol are renewable, environmental friendly and largely available molecules, usable as reactants and photo-activators in HP conditions. Here we report a study on the HP photo-induced reactivity of red phosphorus with water and ethanol, showing the possibility of very efficient and selective processes, leading to molecular hydrogen and valuable phosphorus compounds. The reactions have been studied by means of FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and pressure has been generated using membrane Diamond (DAC) and Sapphire (SAC) anvil cells. HP reactivity has been activated by the two-photon absorption of near-UV wavelengths and occurred in total absence of solvents, catalysts and radical initiators, at room T and mild pressure conditions (0.2–1.5 GPa).

  6. High pressure chemistry of red phosphorus by photo-activated simple molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppatelli, M.; Fanetti, S.; Bini, R.; Caporali, M.; Peruzzini, M.

    2014-05-01

    High pressure (HP) is very effective in reducing intermolecular distances and inducing unexpected chemical reactions. In addition the photo-activation of the reactants in HP conditions can lead to very efficient and selective processes. The chemistry of phosphorus is currently based on the white molecular form. The red polymeric allotrope, despite more stable and much less toxic, has not attracted much attention so far. However, switching from the white to the red form would benefit any industrial procedure, especially from an environmental point of view. On the other side, water and ethanol are renewable, environmental friendly and largely available molecules, usable as reactants and photo-activators in HP conditions. Here we report a study on the HP photo-induced reactivity of red phosphorus with water and ethanol, showing the possibility of very efficient and selective processes, leading to molecular hydrogen and valuable phosphorus compounds. The reactions have been studied by means of FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and pressure has been generated using membrane Diamond (DAC) and Sapphire (SAC) anvil cells. HP reactivity has been activated by the two-photon absorption of near-UV wavelengths and occurred in total absence of solvents, catalysts and radical initiators, at room T and mild pressure conditions (0.2-1.5 GPa).

  7. In-situ Studies of the Reactions of Bifunctional and Heterocyclic Molecules over Noble Metal Single Crystal and Nanoparticle Catalysts Studied with Kinetics and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliewer, Christopher J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-06-30

    Sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in combination with gas chromatography (GC) was used in-situ to monitor surface bound reaction intermediates and reaction selectivities for the hydrogenation reactions of pyrrole, furan, pyridine, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal over Pt(111), Pt(100), Rh(111), and platinum nanoparticles under Torr reactant pressures and temperatures of 300K to 450K. The focus of this work is the correlation between the SFG-VS observed surface bound reaction intermediates and adsorption modes with the reaction selectivity, and how this is affected by catalyst structure and temperature. Pyrrole hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Rh(111) single crystals at Torr pressures. It was found that pyrrole adsorbs to Pt(111) perpendicularly by cleaving the N-H bond and binding through the nitrogen. However, over Rh(111) pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry binding through the {pi}-aromatic orbitals. A surface-bound pyrroline reaction intermediate was detected over both surfaces with SFG-VS. It was found that the ring-cracking product butylamine is a reaction poison over both surfaces studied. Furan hydrogenation was studied over Pt(111), Pt(100), 10 nm cubic platinum nanoparticles and 1 nm platinum nanoparticles. The product distribution was observed to be highly structure sensitive and the acquired SFG-VS spectra reflected this sensitivity. Pt(100) exhibited more ring-cracking to form butanol than Pt(111), while the nanoparticles yielded higher selectivities for the partially saturated ring dihydrofuran. Pyridine hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The α-pyridyl surface adsorption mode was observed with SFG-VS over both surfaces. 1,4-dihydropyridine was seen as a surface intermediate over Pt(100) but not Pt(111). Upon heating the surfaces to 350K, the adsorbed pyridine changes to a flat-lying adsorption mode. No evidence was found for the pyridinium cation. The hydrogenation of the

  8. The Glaser–Hay reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Mie Højer; Jensen, Jonas; Tortzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative Glaser–Hay coupling of two terminal alkynes to furnish a butadiyne is a key reaction for acetylenic scaffolding. Although the reaction is performed under rather simple conditions [CuCl/TMEDA/O2 (air)], the mechanism is still under debate. Herein we present detailed studies...... on the scope of this reaction by using both 13C NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. The former method was used to study the kinetics of the coupling of aryl-substituted alkynes as the aryl carbon resonances of the reactants and products have similar NOEs and relaxation times. The reaction was found...... to be zero-order with respect to the terminal alkyne reactant under standard preparative conditions. Moreover, as the reaction proceeded, a clear change to slower reaction kinetics was observed, but it was still apparently zero-order. The onset of this change was found to depend on the catalyst loading...

  9. Modeling of chemical reactions in micelle: water-mediated keto-enol interconversion as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marracino, Paolo; Amadei, Andrea; Apollonio, Francesca; d'Inzeo, Guglielmo; Liberti, Micaela; di Crescenzo, Antonello; Fontana, Antonella; Zappacosta, Romina; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2011-06-30

    The effect of a zwitterionic micelle environment on the efficiency of the keto-enol interconversion of 2-phenylacetylthiophene has been investigated by means of a joint application of experimental and theoretical/computational approaches. Results have revealed a reduction of the reaction rate constant if compared with bulk water essentially because of the different solvation conditions experienced by the reactant species, including water molecules, in the micelle environment. The slight inhibiting effect due to the application of a static electric field has also been theoretically investigated and presented.

  10. Mass spectrometric studies of bimolecular reactions in a selected ion flow tube (SIFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shul, R.J.; Upschulte, B.L.; Passarella, R.; Keesee, R.G.; Castleman, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    The rate coefficients for a number of thermal energy charge transfer reactions have been obtained with a selected ion flow tube (SIFT). The reactions studied involve Ar + and Ar 2 + with a variety of neutral molecules including: O 2 , CS 2 , CO 2 , SO 2 , H 2 S, NH 3 , and SF 6 . Such reactions have been of long-standing interest in the field of gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry from both a practical and fundamental point of view. Consideration of charge transfer reactions as possible sources of chemical lasers and their role in ionospheric and interstellar chemistry account for much of the interest. Fundamentally, the mechanism involved in these reactions has yet to be definitively established. The consumption deposition of energy into internal modes and translational degrees of freedom in such reactions has also been a topic of considerable debate. The apparatus consists of five main components: an ion source, SIFT quadrupole, ion injector, flow tube, and a mass spectrometer detection system. Ions formed in a high pressure source leak into a SIFT quadrupole where they are mass selected. The primary ion of interest is then injected into the flow tube where reactions are studied. Once in the flow tube the ions are carried downstream by an inert buffer gas, either argon, nitrogen, or helium in the present study. Neutral reactant gas is added through a reactant gas inlet (RGI) at an appropriate location downstream in the flow tube, and allowed to react with the injected ions. Ions on the flow tube axis are sampled through a 1 mm orifice where they are mass analyzed by a second quadrupole mass spectrometer and detected with a channeltron electron multiplier

  11. Entropy and chemical change. 1: Characterization of product (and reactant) energy distributions in reactive molecular collisions: Information and enthropy deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, R. B.; Levine, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Optimal means of characterizing the distribution of product energy states resulting from reactive collisions of molecules with restricted distributions of initial states are considered, along with those for characterizing the particular reactant state distribution which yields a given set of product states at a specified total energy. It is suggested to represent the energy-dependence of global-type results in the form of square-faced bar plots, and of data for specific-type experiments as triangular-faced prismatic plots. The essential parameters defining the internal state distribution are isolated, and the information content of such a distribution is put on a quantitative basis. The relationship between the information content, the surprisal, and the entropy of the continuous distribution is established. The concept of an entropy deficiency, which characterizes the specificity of product state formation, is suggested as a useful measure of the deviance from statistical behavior. The degradation of information by experimental averaging is considered, leading to bounds on the entropy deficiency.

  12. Acute-phase reactants in periodontal disease: current concepts and future implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archana, Vilasan; Ambili, Ranjith; Nisha, Krishnavilasam Jayakumary; Seba, Abraham; Preeja, Chandran

    2015-05-01

    Periodontal disease has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events by unknown mechanisms. C-reactive protein is a systemic marker released during the acute phase of an inflammatory response and is a prognostic marker for cardiovascular disease, with elevated serum levels being reported during periodontal disease. Studies also reported elevated levels of various other acute-phase reactants in periodontal disease. It has been reported extensively in the literature that treatment of periodontal infections can significantly lower serum levels of C-reactive protein. Therefore, an understanding of the relationship between acute-phase response and the progression of periodontal disease and other systemic health complications would have a profound effect on the periodontal treatment strategies. In view of this fact, the present review highlights an overview of acute-phase reactants and their role in periodontal disease. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Development of a novel fingerprint for chemical reactions and its application to large-scale reaction classification and similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nadine; Lowe, Daniel M; Sayle, Roger A; Landrum, Gregory A

    2015-01-26

    Fingerprint methods applied to molecules have proven to be useful for similarity determination and as inputs to machine-learning models. Here, we present the development of a new fingerprint for chemical reactions and validate its usefulness in building machine-learning models and in similarity assessment. Our final fingerprint is constructed as the difference of the atom-pair fingerprints of products and reactants and includes agents via calculated physicochemical properties. We validated the fingerprints on a large data set of reactions text-mined from granted United States patents from the last 40 years that have been classified using a substructure-based expert system. We applied machine learning to build a 50-class predictive model for reaction-type classification that correctly predicts 97% of the reactions in an external test set. Impressive accuracies were also observed when applying the classifier to reactions from an in-house electronic laboratory notebook. The performance of the novel fingerprint for assessing reaction similarity was evaluated by a cluster analysis that recovered 48 out of 50 of the reaction classes with a median F-score of 0.63 for the clusters. The data sets used for training and primary validation as well as all python scripts required to reproduce the analysis are provided in the Supporting Information.

  14. Experimental investigation of laminar LPG-H{sub 2} jet diffusion flame with preheated reactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.P. Mishra; P. Kumar [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India). Combustion Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering

    2008-10-15

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the effect of H{sub 2} addition on flame length, soot free length fraction (SFLF), flame radiant fraction, gas temperature and emission level in LPG-H{sub 2} composite fuel jet diffusion flame for two preheated cases namely, (i) preheated air and (ii) preheated air and fuel. Results show that the H{sub 2} addition leads to a reduction in flame length which may be caused due to an increased gas temperature. Besides this, the flame length is also observed to be reduced with increasing reactants temperature. The soot free length fraction (SFLF) increases as H{sub 2} is added to fuel stream. This might have been caused by decrease in the C/H ratio in the flame and is favorable to attenuate PAH formation rate. Interestingly, the SFLF is observed to be reduced with increasing reactants temperature that may be due to reduction in induction period of soot formation caused by enhanced flame temperature. Moreover, the decreased radiant heat fraction with hydrogen addition is pertinent with the reduction in soot concentration level. The reduction in NOx emission level with H{sub 2} addition to the fuel stream is also observed. On the contrary, NOx emission level is found to be enhanced significantly with reactant temperature that can be attributed to the increase in thermal NOx through Zeldovich mechanism. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Design, fabrication and performance of a mixed-reactant membraneless micro direct methanol fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrego-Martínez, J. C.; Moreno-Zuria, A.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Arriaga, L. G.; Sun, Shuhui; Mohamedi, Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, we report the design, fabrication and evaluation of a membraneless mixed-reactant and air-breathing microfluidic direct methanol fuel cell (ML-μDMFC) stack operated in passive mode. The operation under mixed-reactant conditions was achieved by using a highly methanol-tolerant Ag/Pt/CP cathode with ultra-low Pt loading in alkaline medium. Prior to the fabrication of the stack, a flow simulation was made in order to study the behavior of the reactants stream in the microchannel through the 2 cells. Subsequently, the device was tested in passive mode using a mixture of 5 M MeOH +0.5 M KOH. The results showed that by connecting the 2 cells in series, it is possible to effectively double the voltage of a single ML-μDMFC, as well as increasing the absolute power by 75% with practically no cost increase. The stack was capable of operate continuously for more than 2 h with a single charge of 40 μL, producing an OCV of 0.89 V and a maximum power density of 3.33 mW mgPt-1. Additionally, the device exhibited good stability throughout a 10 h test.

  16. Multiresponse modelling of the caramelisation reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Quintas, Mafalda; Guimarães, Carla; Baylina, João; Brandão, Teresa R. S.; Silva, Cristina L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Multiresponse modelling is a powerful tool for studying complex kinetics of reactions occurring in food products. This modelling technique uses information of reactants and products involved, allowing insightful kinetic parameters estimation and helping in clarifying reaction mechanisms. One example of a complex reaction that occurs in food processing is the caramelisation reaction. Caramelisation is the common name for a group of reactions observed when carbohydrates are exposed to high temp...

  17. The behavior of exciplex decay processes and interplay of radiationless transition and preliminary reorganization mechanisms of electron transfer in loose and tight pairs of reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Michael G; Soboleva, Irina V; Dolotova, Elena V

    2007-01-18

    Exciplex emission spectra and rate constants of their decay via internal conversion and intersystem crossing are studied and discussed in terms of conventional radiationless transition approach. Exciplexes of 9-cyanophenanthrene with 1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene and 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene were studied in heptane, toluene, butyl acetate, dichloromethane, butyronitrile, and acetonitrile. A better description of spectra and rate constants is obtained using 0-0 transition energy and Gauss broadening of vibrational bands rather than the free energy of electron transfer and reorganization energy. The coincidence of parameters describing exciplex emission spectra and dependence of exciplex decay rate constants on energy gap gives the evidence of radiationless quantum transition mechanism rather than thermally activated medium reorganization mechanism of charge recombination in exciplexes and excited charge transfer complexes (contact radical ion pairs) as well as in solvent separated radical ion pairs. Radiationless quantum transition mechanism is shown to provide an appropriate description also for the main features of exergonic excited-state charge separation reactions if fast mutual transformations of loose and tight pairs of reactants are considered. In particular, very fast electron transfer (ET) in tight pairs of reactants with strong electronic coupling of locally excited and charge transfer states can prevent the observation of an inverted region in bimolecular excited-state charge separation even for highly exergonic reactions.

  18. Ab Initio Study of Chemical Reactions of Cold SrF and CaF Molecules with Alkali-Metal and Alkaline-Earth-Metal Atoms: The Implications for Sympathetic Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosicki, Maciej Bartosz; Kędziera, Dariusz; Żuchowski, Piotr Szymon

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the energetics of the atom exchange reaction in the SrF + alkali-metal atom and CaF + alkali-metal atom systems. Such reactions are possible only for collisions of SrF and CaF with the lithium atoms, while they are energetically forbidden for other alkali-metal atoms. Specifically, we focus on SrF interacting with Li, Rb, and Sr atoms and use ab initio methods to demonstrate that the SrF + Li and SrF + Sr reactions are barrierless. We present potential energy surfaces for the interaction of the SrF molecule with the Li, Rb, and Sr atoms in their energetically lowest-lying electronic spin states. The obtained potential energy surfaces are deep and exhibit profound interaction anisotropies. We predict that the collisions of SrF molecules in the rotational or Zeeman excited states most likely have a strong inelastic character. We discuss the prospects for the sympathetic cooling of SrF and CaF molecules using ultracold alkali-metal atoms.

  19. Remarkable nanoconfinement effects on chemical equilibrium manifested in nucleotide dimerization and H-D exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Micha; Rubinovich, Leonid

    2011-10-06

    Nanoconfinement entropic effects on chemical equilibrium involving a small number of molecules, which we term NCECE, are revealed by two widely diverse types of reactions. Employing statistical-mechanical principles, we show how the NCECE effect stabilizes nucleotide dimerization observed within self-assembled molecular cages. Furthermore, the effect provides the basis for dimerization even under an aqueous environment inside the nanocage. Likewise, the NCECE effect is pertinent to a longstanding issue in astrochemistry, namely the extra deuteration commonly observed for molecules reacting on interstellar dust grain surfaces. The origin of the NCECE effect is elucidated by means of the probability distributions of the reaction extent and related variations in the reactant-product mixing entropy. Theoretical modelling beyond our previous preliminary work highlights the role of the nanospace size in addition to that of the nanosystem size, namely the limited amount of molecules in the reaction mixture. Furthermore, the NCECE effect can depend also on the reaction mechanism, and on deviations from stoichiometry. The NCECE effect, leading to enhanced, greatly variable equilibrium "constants", constitutes a unique physical-chemical phenomenon, distinguished from the usual thermodynamical properties of macroscopically large systems. Being significant particularly for weakly exothermic reactions, the effects should stabilize products in other closed nanoscale structures, and thus can have notable implications for the growing nanotechnological utilization of chemical syntheses conducted within confined nanoreactors.

  20. Are Nonadiabatic Reaction Dynamics the Key to Novel Organosilicon Molecules? The Silicon (Si(3P))-Dimethylacetylene (C4H6(X1A1g)) System as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aaron M; Dangi, Beni B; Yang, Tao; Kaiser, Ralf I; Lin, Lin; Chou, Tzu-Jung; Chang, Agnes H H

    2018-06-06

    The bimolecular gas phase reaction of ground-state silicon (Si; 3 P) with dimethylacetylene (C 4 H 6 ; X 1 A 1g ) was investigated under single collision conditions in a crossed molecular beams machine. Merged with electronic structure calculations, the data propose nonadiabatic reaction dynamics leading to the formation of singlet SiC 4 H 4 isomer(s) and molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) via indirect scattering dynamics along with intersystem crossing (ISC) from the triplet to the singlet surface. The reaction may lead to distinct energetically accessible singlet SiC 4 H 4 isomers ( 1 p8- 1 p24) in overall exoergic reaction(s) (-107 -20 +12 kJ mol -1 ). All feasible reaction products are either cyclic, carry carbene analogous silylene moieties, or carry C-Si-H or C-Si-C bonds that would require extensive isomerization from the initial collision complex(es) to the fragmenting singlet intermediate(s). The present study demonstrates the first successful crossed beams study of an exoergic reaction channel arising from bimolecular collisions of silicon, Si( 3 P), with a hydrocarbon molecule.

  1. Reaction of H2 with O2 in Excited Electronic States: Reaction Pathways and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelevkin, Alexey V; Loukhovitski, Boris I; Sharipov, Alexander S

    2017-12-21

    Comprehensive quantum chemical analysis with the use of the multireference state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field approach was carried out to study the reactions of H 2 with O 2 in a 1 Δ g , b 1 Σ g + , c 1 Σ u - , and A' 3 Δ u electronically excited states. The energetically favorable reaction pathways and possible intersystem crossings have been revealed. The energy barriers were refined employing the extended multiconfiguration quasi-degenerate second-order perturbation theory. It has been shown that the interaction of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (A' 3 Δ u ) with H 2 occurs through the H-abstraction process with relatively low activation barriers that resulted in the formation of the HO 2 molecule in A″ and A' electronic states, respectively. Meanwhile, molecular oxygen in singlet sigma states (b 1 Σ g + and c 1 Σ u - ) was proved to be nonreactive with respect to the molecular hydrogen. Appropriate rate constants for revealed reaction and quenching channels have been estimated using variational transition-state theory including corrections for the tunneling effect, possible nonadiabatic transitions, and anharmonicity of vibrations for transition states and reactants. It was demonstrated that the calculated reaction rate constant for the H 2 + O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) process is in reasonable agreement with known experimental data. The Arrhenius approximations for these processes have been proposed for the temperature range T = 300-3000 K.

  2. Strategies for Innovation in Multicomponent Reaction Design

    OpenAIRE

    Ganem, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    By generating structural complexity in a single step from three or more reactants, multicomponent reactions (MCRs) make it possible to synthesize target compounds with greater efficiency and atom economy. The history of such reactions can be traced to the mid-nineteenth century when Strecker first produced α-aminonitriles from the condensation of aldehydes with ammonia and hydrogen cyanide.

  3. Structures and reaction rates of the gaseous oxidation of SO2 by an O− 3 (H2O)0–5 cluster – a density functional theory investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Kurten, T.; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    2011-01-01

    Based on density functional theory calculations we present a study of the gaseous oxidation of SO2 to SO3 by an anionic O3−(H2On cluster, n=0–5. The configurations of the most relevant reactants, transition states, and products are discussed and compared to previous findings. Two different classes......, the most energetically favorable class of transition states vary with the number of water molecules attached. A kinetic model is utilized, taking into account the most likely outcomes of the initial SO2O3−(H2O)n collision complexes. This model shows that the reaction takes place at collision rates...

  4. Photo induced multiple fragmentation of atoms and molecules: Dynamics of Coulombic many-particle systems studied with the COLTRIMS reaction microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czasch, A.; Schmidt, L.Ph.H.; Jahnke, T.; Weber, Th.; Jagutzki, O.; Schoessler, S.; Schoeffler, M.S.; Doerner, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    2005-01-01

    Many-particle dynamics in atomic and molecular physics has been investigated by using the COLTRIMS reaction microscope. The COLTRIMS technique visualizes photon and ion induced many-particle fragmentation processes in the eV and milli-eV regime. It reveals the complete momentum pattern in atomic and molecular many-particle reactions comparable to the bubble chamber in nuclear physics

  5. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  6. Rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radicals with cis-3-hexene: an experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Thaís da Silva; Peirone, Silvina; Barrera, Javier A; Abrate, Juan P A; Lane, Silvia I; Arbilla, Graciela; Bauerfeldt, Glauco Favilla

    2015-04-14

    The kinetics of the cis-3-hexene + OH reaction were investigated by an experimental relative rate method and at the density functional theory level. The experimental set-up consisted of a 200 L Teflon bag, operated at atmospheric pressure and 298 K. OH radicals were produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. Relative rate coefficients were determined by comparing the decays of the cis-3-hexene and reference compounds (cyclohexene, 2-buten-1-ol and allyl ether). The mean second-order rate coefficient value found was (6.27 ± 0.66) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), the uncertainty being estimated by propagation of errors. Theoretical calculations for the addition reaction of OH to cis-3-hexene have also been performed, at the BHandHLYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level, in order to investigate the reaction mechanism, to clarify the experimental observations and to model the reaction kinetics. Different conformations of the reactants, pre-barrier complexes and saddle points were considered in our calculations. The individual rate coefficients, calculated for each conformer of the reactant, at 298 K, using a microcanonical variational transition state method, are 4.19 × 10(-11) and 1.23 × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The global rate coefficient was estimated from the Boltzmann distribution of the conformers to be 8.10 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), which is in agreement with the experimental value. Rate coefficients calculated over the temperature range from 200-500 K are also given. Our results suggest that the complex mechanism, explicitly considering different conformations for the stationary points, must be taken into account for a proper description of the reaction kinetics.

  7. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  8. A classical trajectory study of the adatom -surface bond dissociation in the collision reaction between an adsorbed H atom and an N2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayhan, U.

    2005-01-01

    The collisionnal dissociation of the Adatom-Surface bond in the diatomic molecule N2(gas)/H(ads) collision taking place on a W(100) bcc-structure surface have been studied by classical trajectory method over the collision energy ranges (0.1-2.0 eV ) and the attractive well depth (0.19-4.0 eV). of the N2 molecule (gas)/H(ads) interactions. When the energy accumulate into the adatom bond, thus leading to a a large dissociation probability

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of cations containing C-N bonds in the reaction of benzene with atomic nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Stefano, Marco; Rosi, Marzio; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Ascenzi, Daniela; Bassi, Davide; Franceschi, Pietro; Tosi, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    In the last few years, astronomical spectra have revealed the presence of aromatic and polyaromatic molecules in extraterrestrial environments, near carbon stars, in molecular clouds and meteorites. Moreover, the recent observation of benzene in interstellar space has noticeably increased the interest in the entire class of molecules and in their chemical behavior. In this work, we have investigated the reaction between the benzene molecule and the atomic nitrogen cation and, in particular, the mechanisms by which the reactants are converted into cationic products containing at least one C-N bond, according to the general scheme C 6 H 6 +N + →H m C n N + +C x H y . We have measured the energy dependence of the cross section in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Relevant stationary points of the potential energy surface have been studied by using the density functional theory hybrid functional B3LYP with the 6-31G* basis set. Thermochemical calculations, and the comparison with experimental results, allow us to distinguish between exoergic and endoergic processes and to obtain a detailed description of the reaction mechanisms. We show that aromatic hydrocarbons may be converted into organic-nitrogen compounds via the insertion of N + into the benzene ring and the formation of C-N bonds from C-C ring reactants

  10. Electron transfer reactions of metal complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutin, N.

    1977-01-01

    A few representative electron-transfer reactions are selected and their kinetic parameters compared with the predictions of activated complex models. Since Taube has presented an elegant treatment of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions, emphasis is on bimolecular reactions. The latter electron-transfer reactions are more complicated to treat theoretically since the geometries of their activated complexes are not as well known as for the intramolecular case. In addition in biomolecular reactions, the work required to bring the two reactants together needs to be calculated. Since both reactants generally carry charges this presents a non-trivial problem at the ionic strengths usually used to study bimolecular electron transfer

  11. Thermodynamic properties and equilibrium constant of chemical reaction in nanosystem: An theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Jianping; Zhao, Ruihua; Xue, Yongqiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► There is an obvious influence of the size on thermodynamic properties for the reaction referring nano-reactants. ► Gibbs function, enthalpy, entropy and equilibrium constant are dependent on the reactant size. ► There is an approximate linear relation between them. - Abstract: The theoretical relations of thermodynamic properties, the equilibrium constant and reactant size in nanosystem are described. The effects of size on thermodynamic properties and the equilibrium constant were studied using nanosize zinc oxide and sodium bisulfate solution as a reaction system. The experimental results indicated that the molar Gibbs free energy, the molar enthalpy and the molar entropy of the reaction decrease, but the equilibrium constant increases with decreasing reactant size. Linear trends were observed between the reciprocal of size for nano-reactant and thermodynamic variable, which are consistent with the theoretical relations.

  12. Alkyl hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of the CN radical with ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2018-04-01

    We present a study of the abstraction of alkyl hydrogen atoms from the β and α positions of ethanol by the CN radical in solution using the Empirical Valence Bond (EVB) method. We have built separate 2 × 2 EVB models for the Hβ and Hα reactions, where the atom transfer is parameterized using ab initio calculations. The intra- and intermolecular potentials of the reactant and product molecules were modelled with the General AMBER Force Field, with some modifications. We have carried out the dynamics in water and chloroform, which are solvents of contrasting polarity. We have computed the potential of mean force for both abstractions in each of the solvents. They are found to have a small and early barrier along the reaction coordinate with a large energy release. Analyzing the solvent structure around the reaction system, we have found two solvents to have little effect on either reaction. Simulating the dynamics from the transition state, we also study the fate of the energies in the HCN vibrational modes. The HCN molecule is born vibrationally hot in the CH stretch in both reactions and additionally in the HCN bends for the Hα abstraction reaction. In the early stage of the dynamics, we find that the CN stretch mode gains energy at the expense of the energy in CH stretch mode.

  13. Replacing Chlorine with Hydrogen Chloride as a Possible Reactant for Synthesis of Titanium Carbide Derived Carbon Powders for High-Technology Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallo, Indrek; Thomberg, Thomas; Jänes, Alar; Lust, Enn

    2013-01-01

    Micro- and mesoporous carbide-derived carbons were synthesized from titanium carbide (TiC) powder via gas phase reaction by using different reactants (Cl 2 and HCl) within the temperature range from 700 to 1100 °C. Analysis of XRD results show that TiC-derived carbons (TiC-CDC) consist mainly of graphitic crystallites. The first-order Raman spectra showed the graphite-like absorption peaks at ∼1577 cm 1 and the disorder-induced peaks at ∼1338 cm- 1 . The energy-related properties of supercapacitors based on 1 M (C 2 H 5 ) 3 CH 3 NBF 4 in acetonitrile and carbide-derived carbons (TiC-CDC (Cl 2 ) and TiC-CDC (HCl)) as electrode materials were also investigated using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, galvanostatic charge/discharge and constant power methods. The Ragone plots for carbide-derived carbons prepared by using different reactants (Cl 2 , HCl) are quite similar and at high power loads TiC-CDC (Cl 2 ) material synthesized at 900 °C, i.e. materials with optimal porous structure, deliver higher power at constant energy

  14. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  15. Catalytic routes to fuels from C1 and oxygenate molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Shuai

    2017-02-23

    This account illustrates concepts in chemical kinetics underpinned by the formalism of transition state theory using catalytic processes that enable the synthesis of molecules suitable as fuels from C-1 and oxygenate reactants. Such feedstocks provide an essential bridge towards a carbon-free energy future, but their volatility and low energy density require the formation of new C-C bonds and the removal of oxygen. These transformations are described here through recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and site requirements in catalysis by surfaces, with emphasis on enabling concepts that tackle ubiquitous reactivity and selectivity challenges. The hurdles in forming the first C-C bond from C-1 molecules are illustrated by the oxidative coupling of methane, in which surface O-atoms form OH radicals from O-2 and H2O molecules. These gaseous OH species act as strong H-abstractors and activate C-H bonds with earlier transition states than oxide surfaces, thus rendering activation rates less sensitive to the weaker C-H bonds in larger alkane products than in CH4 reactants. Anhydrous carbonylation of dimethyl ether forms a single C-C bond on protons residing within inorganic voids that preferentially stabilize the kinetically-relevant transition state through van der Waals interactions that compensate for the weak CO nucleophile. Similar solvation effects, but by intrapore liquids instead of inorganic hosts, also become evident as alkenes condense within MCM-41 channels containing isolated Ni2+ active sites during dimerization reactions. Intrapore liquids preferentially stabilize transition states for C-C bond formation and product desorption, leading to unprecedented reactivity and site stability at sub-ambient temperatures and to 1-alkene dimer selectivities previously achieved only on organometallic systems with co-catalysts or activators. C-1 homologation selectively forms C-4 and C-7 chains with a specific backbone (isobutane, triptane) on solid

  16. Catalytic routes to fuels from C1 and oxygenate molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Shuai; Agirrezabal-Telleria, Iker; Bhan, Aditya; Simonetti, Dante; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Iglesia, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    This account illustrates concepts in chemical kinetics underpinned by the formalism of transition state theory using catalytic processes that enable the synthesis of molecules suitable as fuels from C-1 and oxygenate reactants. Such feedstocks provide an essential bridge towards a carbon-free energy future, but their volatility and low energy density require the formation of new C-C bonds and the removal of oxygen. These transformations are described here through recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and site requirements in catalysis by surfaces, with emphasis on enabling concepts that tackle ubiquitous reactivity and selectivity challenges. The hurdles in forming the first C-C bond from C-1 molecules are illustrated by the oxidative coupling of methane, in which surface O-atoms form OH radicals from O-2 and H2O molecules. These gaseous OH species act as strong H-abstractors and activate C-H bonds with earlier transition states than oxide surfaces, thus rendering activation rates less sensitive to the weaker C-H bonds in larger alkane products than in CH4 reactants. Anhydrous carbonylation of dimethyl ether forms a single C-C bond on protons residing within inorganic voids that preferentially stabilize the kinetically-relevant transition state through van der Waals interactions that compensate for the weak CO nucleophile. Similar solvation effects, but by intrapore liquids instead of inorganic hosts, also become evident as alkenes condense within MCM-41 channels containing isolated Ni2+ active sites during dimerization reactions. Intrapore liquids preferentially stabilize transition states for C-C bond formation and product desorption, leading to unprecedented reactivity and site stability at sub-ambient temperatures and to 1-alkene dimer selectivities previously achieved only on organometallic systems with co-catalysts or activators. C-1 homologation selectively forms C-4 and C-7 chains with a specific backbone (isobutane, triptane) on solid

  17. The elementary steps of the photodissociation and recombination reactions of iodine molecules enclosed in cages and channels of zeolite crystals: A femtosecond time-resolved study of the geometry effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flachenecker, G.; Materny, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments on iodine molecules enclosed into well-defined cages and channels of different crystalline SiO 2 modifications of zeolites. The new experimental results obtained from iodine in TON (Silica-ZSM-22), FER (Silica-Ferrierit), and MFI (Silicalit-1) porosils are compared with data published earlier on the iodine/DDR (Decadodecasil 3R) porosil system [Flachenecker et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 5, 865 (2003)]. A summary of all findings is given. The processes analyzed by means of the ultrafast spectroscopy are the vibrational relaxation as well as the dissociation and recombination reactions, which are caused by the interaction of the photo-excited iodine molecules with the cavity walls of the porosils. A clear dependence of the observed dynamics on the geometry of the surrounding lattice structure can be seen. These measurements are supported by temperature-dependent experiments. Making use of a theoretical model which is based on the classical Langevin equation, an analysis of the geometry-reaction relation is performed. The Brownian dynamics simulations show that in contrast to the vibrational relaxation the predissociation dynamics are independent of the frequency of collisions with the surroundings. From the results obtained in the different surroundings, we conclude that mainly local fields are responsible for the crossing from the bound B state to the repulsive a/a ' states of the iodine molecules

  18. Platinum- and membrane-free swiss-roll mixed-reactant alkaline fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziznia, Amin; Oloman, Colin W; Gyenge, Előd L

    2013-05-01

    Eliminating the expensive and failure-prone proton exchange membrane (PEM) together with the platinum-based anode and cathode catalysts would significantly reduce the high capital and operating costs of low-temperature (<373 K) fuel cells. We recently introduced the Swiss-roll mixed-reactant fuel cell (SR-MRFC) concept for borohydride-oxygen alkaline fuel cells. We now present advances in anode electrocatalysis for borohydride electrooxidation through the development of osmium nanoparticulate catalysts supported on porous monolithic carbon fiber materials (referred to as an osmium 3D anode). The borohydride-oxygen SR-MRFC operates at 323 K and near atmospheric pressure, generating a peak power density of 1880 W m(-2) in a single-cell configuration by using an osmium-based anode (with an osmium loading of 0.32 mg cm(-2)) and a manganese dioxide gas-diffusion cathode. To the best of our knowledge, 1880 W m(-2) is the highest power density ever reported for a mixed-reactant fuel cell operating under similar conditions. Furthermore, the performance matches the highest reported power densities for conventional dual chamber PEM direct borohydride fuel cells. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of quercetin with superoxide radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lespade, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ab initio molecular dynamics is performed to describe the reaction of quercetin and superoxide. • The reaction occurs near the sites 4′ and 7 when the system contains sufficiently water molecules. • The difference of reactivity of superoxide compared to commonly used radicals as DPPH · or ABTS ·+ is explained. - Abstract: Superoxide plays an important role in biology but in unregulated concentrations it is implicated in a lot of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Antioxidants like flavonoids are abundant in plant and are good scavengers of superoxide radical. The modeling of superoxide scavenging by flavonoids from the diet still remains a challenge. In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of the flavonoid quercetin toward superoxide radical has been carried out using Car–Parrinello density functional theory. The study has proven different reactant solvation by modifying the number of water molecules surrounding superoxide. The reaction consists in the gift of a hydrogen atom of one of the hydroxyl groups of quercetin to the radical. When it occurs, it is relatively fast, lower than 100 fs. Calculations show that it depends largely on the environment of the hydroxyl group giving its hydrogen atom, the geometry of the first water layer and the presence of a certain number of water molecules in the second layer, indicating a great influence of the solvent on the reactivity.

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of quercetin with superoxide radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lespade, Laure, E-mail: l.lespade@ism.u-bordeaux1.fr

    2016-08-22

    Highlights: • Ab initio molecular dynamics is performed to describe the reaction of quercetin and superoxide. • The reaction occurs near the sites 4′ and 7 when the system contains sufficiently water molecules. • The difference of reactivity of superoxide compared to commonly used radicals as DPPH{sup ·} or ABTS{sup ·+} is explained. - Abstract: Superoxide plays an important role in biology but in unregulated concentrations it is implicated in a lot of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Antioxidants like flavonoids are abundant in plant and are good scavengers of superoxide radical. The modeling of superoxide scavenging by flavonoids from the diet still remains a challenge. In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of the flavonoid quercetin toward superoxide radical has been carried out using Car–Parrinello density functional theory. The study has proven different reactant solvation by modifying the number of water molecules surrounding superoxide. The reaction consists in the gift of a hydrogen atom of one of the hydroxyl groups of quercetin to the radical. When it occurs, it is relatively fast, lower than 100 fs. Calculations show that it depends largely on the environment of the hydroxyl group giving its hydrogen atom, the geometry of the first water layer and the presence of a certain number of water molecules in the second layer, indicating a great influence of the solvent on the reactivity.

  1. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  2. Monitoring mass transport in heterogeneously catalyzed reactions by field-gradient NMR for assessing reaction efficiency in a single pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljubasich, L.; Blümich, B.; Stapf, S.

    2011-09-01

    An important aspect in assessing the performance of a catalytically active reactor is the accessibility of the reactive sites inside the individual pellets, and the mass transfer of reactants and products to and from these sites. Optimal design often requires a suitable combination of micro- and macropores in order to facilitate mass transport inside the pellet. In an exothermic reaction, fluid exchange between the pellet and the surrounding medium is enhanced by convection, and often by the occurrence of gas bubbles. Determining mass flow in the vicinity of a pellet thus represents a parameter for quantifying the reaction efficiency and its dependence on time or external reaction conditions. Field gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods are suggested as a tool for providing parameters sensitive to this mass flow in a contact-free and non-invasive way. For the example of bubble-forming hydrogen peroxide decomposition in an alumina pellet, the dependence of the mean-squared displacement of fluid molecules on spatial direction, observation time and reaction time is presented, and multi-pulse techniques are employed in order to separate molecular displacements from coherent and incoherent motion on the timescale of the experiment. The reaction progress is followed until the complete decomposition of H 2O 2.

  3. Reactions of guanine with methyl chloride and methyl bromide: O6-methylation versus charge transfer complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Mishra, P. C.; Suhai, S.

    Density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31+G* and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels was employed to study O6-methylation of guanine due to its reactions with methyl chloride and methyl bromide and to obtain explanation as to why the methyl halides cause genotoxicity and possess mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. Geometries of the various isolated species involved in the reactions, reactant complexes (RCs), and product complexes (PCs) were optimized in gas phase. Transition states connecting the reactant complexes with the product complexes were also optimized in gas phase at the same levels of theory. The reactant complexes, product complexes, and transition states were solvated in aqueous media using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) of the self-consistent reaction field theory. Zero-point energy (ZPE) correction to total energy and the corresponding thermal energy correction to enthalpy were made in each case. The reactant complexes of the keto form of guanine with methyl chloride and methyl bromide in water are appreciably more stable than the corresponding complexes involving the enol form of guanine. The nature of binding in the product complexes was found to be of the charge transfer type (O6mG+ · X-, X dbond Cl, Br). Binding of HCl, HBr, and H2O molecules to the PCs obtained with the keto form of guanine did not alter the positions of the halide anions in the PCs, and the charge transfer character of the PCs was also not modified due to this binding. Further, the complexes obtained due to the binding of HCl, HBr, and H2O molecules to the PCs had greater stability than the isolated PCs. The reaction barriers involved in the formation of PCs were found to be quite high (?50 kcal/mol). Mechanisms of genotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis caused by the methyl halides appear to involve charge transfer-type complex formation. Thus the mechanisms of these processes involving the methyl halides appear to be quite different from those that involve the

  4. Charge-Dipole Acceleration of Polar Gas Molecules towards Charged Nanoparticles: Involvement in Powerful Charge-Induced Catalysis of Heterophase Chemical Reactions and Ball Lightning Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Meshcheryakov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In humid air, the substantial charge-dipole attraction and electrostatic acceleration of surrounding water vapour molecules towards charged combustible nanoparticles cause intense electrostatic hydration and preferential oxidation of these nanoparticles by electrostatically accelerated polar water vapour molecules rather than nonaccelerated nonpolar oxygen gas molecules. Intense electrostatic hydration of charged combustible nanoparticles converts the nanoparticle's oxide-based shells into the hydroxide-based electrolyte shells, transforming these nanoparticles into reductant/air core-shell nanobatteries, periodically short-circuited by intraparticle field and thermionic emission. Partially synchronized electron emission breakdowns within trillions of nanoparticles-nanobatteries turn a cloud of charged nanoparticles-nanobatteries into a powerful radiofrequency aerosol generator. Electrostatic oxidative hydration and charge-catalyzed oxidation of charged combustible nanoparticles also contribute to a self-oscillating thermocycling process of evolution and periodic autoignition of inflammable gases near to the nanoparticle's surface. The described effects might be of interest for the improvement of certain nanotechnological heterophase processes and to better understand ball lightning phenomenon.

  5. A cellular automata approach to chemical reactions : 1 reaction controlled systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    A direct link between the chemical reaction controlled (shrinking core) model and cellular automata, to study the dissolution of particles, is derived in this paper. Previous research on first and second order reactions is based on the concentration of the reactant. The present paper describes the

  6. A Combined Probe-Molecule, Mössbauer, Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Density Functional Theory Approach for Evaluation of Potential Iron Active Sites in an Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneebone, Jared L. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Daifuku, Stephanie L. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Kehl, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Wu, Gang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chung, Hoon T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hu, Michael Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alp, E. Ercan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); More, Karren L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Holby, Edward F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Neidig, Michael L. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2017-07-06

    While non-precious metal M-N-C (M = Fe or Co) catalysts have been developed that are effective for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, no consensus has yet been reached regarding the nature of the M sites in these heterogeneous catalysts that are responsible for reaction with dioxygen (O2). While multiple studies have developed correlations between Fe distributions in as-prepared catalysts and ORR activity, the direct identification of sites reactive towards O2 or O2-analog molecules remains a significant challenge. In the present study, we demonstrate a new approach to identifying and characterizing potential Fe active sites in complex ORR catalysts that combines an effective probe molecule (NO(g)) Mössbauer spectroscopy and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Mössbauer spectroscopic studies demonstrate that NO(g) treatment of electrochemically reduced PANI-57Fe-C leads to selective reaction with only a sub-set of the Fe species present. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic studies identified new Fe-ligand vibrations associated with the site reactive towards NO(g). DFT calculations of vibrational properties of a small selection of previously proposed active site structures suggest that graphene zig-zag edge hosted Fe-N structures may be responsible for the observed vibrational behavior with NO(g) probe molecules. Moreover, such sites are likely also reactive to O2, possibly serving as the ORR active sites in the synthesized materials.

  7. Effect of heating on Maillard reactions in milk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Heated milk is subject to the Maillard reaction; lactose and lysine residues in milk proteins (mainly casein) are the reactants. An overview is given of the early, advanced and final stages of the Maillard reaction as it occurs in milk. The early Maillard reaction is confined to the formation of the

  8. Bayesian estimation for quantification by real-time polymerase chain reaction under a branching process model of the DNA molecules amplification process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalam, N.; Jacob, C.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction is to determine the initial amount X0 of specific nucleic acids from an observed trajectory of the amplification process, the amplification being achieved through successive replication cycles. This process depends on the efficiency fpngn of

  9. Correction: Zielinski, W., et al. Ionic Liquids as Solvents for Rhodium and Platinum Catalysts Used in Hydrosilylation Reaction. Molecules 2016, 21, 1115

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Zielinski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The authors are sorry to report that the yield of the hydrosilylation reaction in [P44414][NTf2] (1 IL with [RhCl(PPh33] was replaced with the yield reported for [P44414][NTf2] (1 IL with K2PtCl4 in their published paper [1]. [...

  10. Greener Synthetic Alternatives to Organic Molecules and Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brief account of reactions involving microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants or catalyzed by mineral support surfaces, such as alumina, silica, clay, or their ‘doped’ versions, for the rapid one-pot assembly of heterocyclic compounds from in situ generated reactive intermedia...

  11. Green Synthetic Alternatives to Organic Molecules and Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brief account of reactions involving microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants or catalyzed by mineral support surfaces, such as alumina, silica, clay, or their ‘doped’ versions, for the rapid one-pot assembly of heterocyclic compounds from in situ generated reactive intermedia...

  12. A Regime Diagram for Autoignition of Homogeneous Reactant Mixtures with Turbulent Velocity and Temperature Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.; Pal, Pinaki; Wooldridge, Margaret S.; Mansfield, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical scaling analysis is conducted to propose a diagram to predict weak and strong ignition regimes for a compositionally homogeneous reactant mixture with turbulent velocity and temperature fluctuations. The diagram provides guidance on expected ignition behavior based on the thermo-chemical properties of the mixture and the flow/scalar field conditions. The analysis is an extension of the original Zeldovich’s analysis by combining the turbulent flow and scalar characteristics in terms of the characteristic Damköhler and Reynolds numbers of the system, thereby providing unified and comprehensive understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms controlling ignition characteristics. Estimated parameters for existing experimental measurements in a rapid compression facility show that the regime diagram predicts the observed ignition characteristics with good fidelity.

  13. A Regime Diagram for Autoignition of Homogeneous Reactant Mixtures with Turbulent Velocity and Temperature Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2015-04-02

    A theoretical scaling analysis is conducted to propose a diagram to predict weak and strong ignition regimes for a compositionally homogeneous reactant mixture with turbulent velocity and temperature fluctuations. The diagram provides guidance on expected ignition behavior based on the thermo-chemical properties of the mixture and the flow/scalar field conditions. The analysis is an extension of the original Zeldovich’s analysis by combining the turbulent flow and scalar characteristics in terms of the characteristic Damköhler and Reynolds numbers of the system, thereby providing unified and comprehensive understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms controlling ignition characteristics. Estimated parameters for existing experimental measurements in a rapid compression facility show that the regime diagram predicts the observed ignition characteristics with good fidelity.

  14. SHS synthesis of Si-SiC composite powders using Mg and reactants from industrial waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanadee, Tawat

    2017-11-01

    Si-SiC composite powders were synthesized by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) using reactants of fly ash-based silica, sawdust-based activated carbon, and magnesium. Fly ash-based silica and sawdust-based activated carbon were prepared from coal mining fly ash and Para rubber-wood sawdust, respectively. The work investigated the effects of the synthesis atmosphere (air and Ar) on the phase and morphology of the SHS products. The SHS product was leached by a two-step acid leaching processes, to obtain the Si-SiC composite powder. The SHS product and SHS product after leaching were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The results indicated that the SHS product synthesized in air consisted of Si, SiC, MgO, and intermediate phases (SiO2, Mg, Mg2SiO4, Mg2Si), whereas the SHS product synthesized in Ar consisted of Si, SiC, MgO and a little Mg2SiO4. The SiC content in the leached-SHS product was higher when Ar was used as the synthesis atmosphere. As well as affecting the purity, the synthesis atmospheres also affected the average crystalline sizes of the products. The crystalline size of the product synthesized in Ar was smaller than that of the product synthesized in air. All of the results showed that fly ash and sawdust could be effective waste-material reactants for the synthesis of Si-SiC composite powders.

  15. Infrared laser induced organic reactions. 2. Laser vs. thermal inducment of unimolecular and hydrogen bromide catalyzed bimolecular dehydration of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danen, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a mixture of reactant molecules can be induced by pulsed infrared laser radiation to react via a route which is totally different from the pathway resulting from heating the mixture at 300 0 C. The high-energy unimolecular elimination of H 2 O from ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol and HBr can be selectively induced with a pulsed CO 2 laser in preference to either a lower energy bimolecular HBr-catalyzed dehydration or the more facile dehydration of 2-propanol. Heating the mixture resulted in the almost exclusive reaction of 2-propanol to produce propylene. It was demonstrated that the bimolecular ethanol + HBr reaction cannot be effectively induced by the infrared laser radiation as evidenced by the detrimental effect on the yield of ethylene as the HBr pressure was increased. The selective, nonthermal inducement of H 2 O elimination from vibrationally excited ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol required relatively low reactant pressures. At higher pressures intermolecular V--V energy transfer allowed the thermally more facile dehydration from 2-propanol to become the predominant reaction channel

  16. Method for sensing and measuring a concentration or partial pressure of a reactant used in a redox reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findl, E.

    1984-12-21

    A method for sensing or measuring the partial pressure or concentration of an electroactive species used in conjunction with an electrolyte, the method being characterized by providing a constant current between an anode and a cathode of an electrolyte-containing cell, while measuring changes in voltage that occur between either the anode and cathode or between a reference electrode and one of the main electrodes of the cell, thereby to determine the concentration or partial pressure of the electro-active species as a function of said measured voltage changes. The method of the invention can be practiced using either a cell having only an anode and a cathode, or using a cell having an anode and a cathode in combination with a reference electrode. Accurate measurements of small concentrations or partial pressures of electro-active species are obtainable with the method of the invention, by using constant currents of only a few microamperes between the anode and cathode of the cell, while the concentration-determining voltage is measured.

  17. Spectrally Resolved and Functional Super-resolution Microscopy via Ultrahigh-Throughput Single-Molecule Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rui; Moon, Seonah; Kenny, Samuel J; Xu, Ke

    2018-03-20

    SMLM was next utilized to achieve f-SRM. By encoding functional information into the spectral responses of environment-sensing fluorescent probes, f-SRM transcends the structural information provided by typical SRM techniques and reveals the spatiotemporal distribution of physicochemical parameters with single-molecule sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution. As one example, by employing the solvatochromic dye Nile Red to sense local chemical polarity, we revealed nanoscale heterogeneity in the membranes of live mammalian cells. This enabled us to unveil substantial polarity differences between the plasma membrane and the membranes of nanoscale intracellular organelles, a result we determined to be due to differences in local cholesterol levels. With the addition of cholesterol or cholera toxin, we further observed the formation of low-polarity, raftlike nanodomains in the plasma membrane. In another study, we generalized SR-SMLM to fluorogenic single-molecule reactions. As a wide-field technique, SR-SMLM readily captures the emission spectra of individual product fluorescent molecules that are stochastically produced from nonfluorescent reactants at random locations over large sample areas, and therefore, it provides the unique possibility to spectrally identify and characterize single product molecules in a high-throughput fashion. Using the ring-opening reaction of a photochromic spiropyran as an example, we demonstrated that the capability to resolve the emission spectra of single product molecules could unveil rich, multipath reaction pathways. In summary, by integrating the spatial, temporal, and spectral dimensions of single-molecule fluorescence, SR-SMLM and f-SRM add rich spectral and functional dimensions to SRM and thus open up new ways of probing biological and chemical systems at the single-molecule and nanoscale levels.

  18. Evidence for excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in donor-acceptor molecule 5-(4-dimethylamino-phenyl)-penta-2,4-dienoic acid methyl ester: Experimental and quantum chemical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar Paul, Bijan; Samanta, Anuva; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    Intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) reaction has been investigated in 5-(4-dimethylamino-phenyl)-penta-2,4-dienoic acid methyl ester (DPDAME) using spectroscopic techniques. The molecule DPDAME shows local emission in non-polar solvent and dual emission in polar solvents. Solvatochromic effects on the Stokes shifted emission band clearly demonstrate the charge transfer character of the excited state. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed at Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theoretical (DFT) levels to correlate the experimental findings. Potential energy curves (PECs) for the ICT reaction have been evaluated along the donor twist angle at DFT and time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) levels for the ground and excited states, respectively, using B3LYP hybrid functional and 6-31G** basis set. The solvent effects on the spectral properties have been explored theoretically at the same level with time dependent density functional theory-polarized continuum model (TDDFT-PCM) and the theoretical results are found to well substantiate the solvent polarity dependent Stokes shifted emission of DPDAME. Huge enhancement of dipole moment (Δμ=16.42 D) of the molecule following photoexcitation dictates the highly polar character of the excited state. Although elucidation of PECs does not exactly predict the operation of ICT according to twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) model in DPDAME, lowering of vertical transition energy as a function of the donor twist coordinate scripts the occurrence of red shifted emission as observed experimentally.

  19. Sub-Ensemble Monitoring of DNA Strand Displacement Using Multiparameter Single-Molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltierra-Jasso, Laura E; Morten, Michael J; Magennis, Steven W

    2018-03-05

    Non-enzymatic DNA strand displacement is an important mechanism in dynamic DNA nanotechnology. Here, we show that the large parameter space that is accessible by single-molecule FRET is ideal for the simultaneous monitoring of multiple reactants and products of DNA strand exchange reactions. We monitored the strand displacement from double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at 37 °C; the data were modelled as a second-order reaction approaching equilibrium, with a rate constant of 10 m -1  s -1 . We also followed the displacement from a DNA three-way junction (3WJ) by ssDNA. The presence of three internal mismatched bases in the middle of the invading strand did not prevent displacement from the 3WJ, but reduced the second-order rate constant by about 50 %. We attribute strand exchange in the dsDNA and 3WJ to a zero-toehold pathway from the blunt-ended duplex arms. The single-molecule approach demonstrated here will be useful for studying complex DNA networks. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  1. On the existence of and mechanism for microwave-specific reaction rate enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Gregory B; Richert, Ranko; Stiegman, A E

    2015-04-01

    The use of microwave radiation to drive chemical reactions has become ubiquitous in almost all fields of chemistry. In all of these areas it is principally due to rapid and convenient heating resulting in significantly higher rates of reaction, with other advantages including enhanced product selectivity and control of materials properties. Although microwave heating continues to grow as an enabling technology, fundamental research into the nature of microwave heating has not grown at the same rate. In the case of chemical reactions run in homogeneous solution, particularly synthetic organic reactions, there is considerable controversy over the origins of rate enhancement, with a fundamental question being whether there exist microwave-specific effects, distinct from what can be attained under conventional convective heating, that can accelerate a reaction rate. In this Perspective, we discuss unique aspects of microwave heating of molecules in solution and discuss the origin and nature of microwave-specific effects arising from the process of "selective heating" of reactants in solution. Integral to this discussion is work from the field of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, which provides a model for selective heating by Debye relaxation processes. The Perspective also includes a critical discussion of hypotheses of non-thermal effects (alternatively classified here as resonant processes) and an outline of specific reaction parameters for chemical systems in which microwave-specific Debye relaxation processes can result in observable reaction rate enhancement.

  2. Crossed-beam reaction of carbon atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. IV. Chemical dynamics of methylpropargyl radical formation, C4H5, from reaction of C(3Pj) with propylene, C3H6 (X1A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.I.; Stranges, D.; Bevsek, H.M.; Lee, Y.T.; Suits, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction between ground state carbon atoms and propylene, C 3 H 6 , was studied at average collision energies of 23.3 and 45.0 kJmol -1 using the crossed molecular beam technique. Product angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of C 4 H 5 at m/e=53 were recorded. Forward-convolution fitting of the data yields a maximum energy release as well as angular distributions consistent with the formation of methylpropargyl radicals. Reaction dynamics inferred from the experimental results suggest that the reaction proceeds on the lowest 3 A surface via an initial addition of the carbon atom to the π-orbital to form a triplet methylcyclopropylidene collision complex followed by ring opening to triplet 1,2-butadiene. Within 0.3 endash 0.6 ps, 1,2-butadiene decomposes through carbon endash hydrogen bond rupture to atomic hydrogen and methylpropargyl radicals. The explicit identification of C 4 H 5 under single collision conditions represents a further example of a carbon endash hydrogen exchange in reactions of ground state carbon with unsaturated hydrocarbons. This versatile machine represents an alternative pathway to build up unsaturated hydrocarbon chains in combustion processes, chemical vapor deposition, and in the interstellar medium. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Study of the ionization of alkane-electron scavenger reactant mixtures irradiated by 60Co gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, Jacques.

    1977-01-01

    This study deals with ionization of alkane-electron scavenger reactant mixtures, irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays. It is shown that the extrapolated free-ion yields (extrapolated yield method) decrease with the reactant concentration. On the basis of ONSAGER model and theoretical treatment of MOZUMDER, the cross sections of epithermal electron attachment in hexane, cyclohexane, 2,2-dimethylbutane, cyclopentane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane for CCl 4 , C 7 F 14 , C 6 H 5 Br, C 6 H 5 Cl, C 6 F 14 , (C 6 H 5 ) 2 are determined. A comparison between gas-phase and liquid-phase cross sections is established [fr

  4. Transesterification of castor oil usingMgO/SiO2 catalyst and coconutoilas co-reactant

    OpenAIRE

    Kamisah D. Pandiangan; Novesar Jamarun; Syukri Arief; Wasinton Simanjuntak

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the transesterification of castor oil with the use of coconut oil as co-reactant and MgO/SiO2as heterogeneous base catalyst. The catalyst was preparedfrom rice husk silica and magnesium nitrate by sol-gel method, with MgO load of 20% relative to silica, and then subjected to sintering treatment at 600 oC for 6 hours. A series of experiments was carried out, indicating that the use of coconut oil as co-reactant significantly promoted the conversion of castor oil into b...

  5. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  6. Exact quantum dynamics study of the O++H2(v=0,j=0)→OH++H ion-molecule reaction and comparison with quasiclassical trajectory calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Rodrigo; Lucas, Josep M.; Gimenez, Xavier; Aguilar, Antonio; Gonzalez, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    The close-coupling hyperspherical (CCH) exact quantum method was used to study the title barrierless reaction up to a collision energy (E T ) of 0.75 eV, and the results compared with quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations to determine the importance of quantum effects. The CCH integral cross section decreased with E T and, although the QCT results were in general quite similar to the CCH ones, they presented a significant deviation from the CCH data within the 0.2-0.6 eV collision energy range, where the QCT method did not correctly describe the reaction probability. A very good accord between both methods was obtained for the OH + vibrational distribution, where no inversion of population was found. For the OH + rotational distributions, the agreement between the CCH and QCT results was not as good as in the vibrational case, but it was satisfactory in many conditions. The kk ' angular distribution showed a preferential forward character, and the CCH method produced higher forward peaks than the QCT one. All the results were interpreted considering the potential energy surface and plots of a representative sampling of reactive trajectories

  7. Light activation of one rhodopsin molecule causes the phosphorylation of hundreds of others. A reaction observed in electropermeabilized frog rod outer segments exposed to dim illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, B.M.; Biernbaum, M.S.; Bownds, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    A rhodopsin phosphorylation reaction that occurs with high-gain is observed if measurements are made in electropermeabilized frog rod outer segments (ROS) stimulated by a dim flash of light in the operating range of the photoreceptor. Flashes of light exciting 1000 or fewer of the 3 x 10(9) rhodopsins present/ROS results in the incorporation of 1400 phosphates from ATP into the rhodopsin pool for each excited rhodopsin (Rho*). This amplification decreases with increasing light intensity, falling most sharply after each disk has absorbed one photon. The high-gain reaction is lost if the ROS are broken into vesicles by shearing, leaving a low-gain rhodopsin phosphorylation characterized in previous studies using brighter illumination. The high-gain but not the low-gain phosphorylation appears to be regulated by G-protein and by calcium levels in the range over which intracellular calcium changes when rod photoreceptors are illuminated. Kinetic measurements made on the phosphorylation observed at higher light intensities shows that it initially occurs rapidly enough for a role in terminating the photoresponse. The high-gain phosphorylation observed at lower light intensities may play a global role in regulating light-adaptation of the rod photoreceptor, and its existence suggests that a search for a similar high-gain modification in systems using the homologous beta-adrenergic or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors might be rewarding

  8. Multiscale simulations of patchy particle systems combining Molecular Dynamics, Path Sampling and Green's Function Reaction Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Peter

    Important reaction-diffusion processes, such as biochemical networks in living cells, or self-assembling soft matter, span many orders in length and time scales. In these systems, the reactants' spatial dynamics at mesoscopic length and time scales of microns and seconds is coupled to the reactions between the molecules at microscopic length and time scales of nanometers and milliseconds. This wide range of length and time scales makes these systems notoriously difficult to simulate. While mean-field rate equations cannot describe such processes, the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. The recently developed multiscale Molecular Dynamics Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) approach combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesocopic scale where particles are far apart, with microscopic Molecular (or Brownian) Dynamics, for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. The association and dissociation of particles are treated with rare event path sampling techniques. I will illustrate the efficiency of this method for patchy particle systems. Replacing the microscopic regime with a Markov State Model avoids the microscopic regime completely. The MSM is then pre-computed using advanced path-sampling techniques such as multistate transition interface sampling. I illustrate this approach on patchy particle systems that show multiple modes of binding. MD-GFRD is generic, and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level, including the orientational dynamics, opening up the possibility for large-scale simulations of e.g. protein signaling networks.

  9. Potential Energy Surfaces for Reactions of X Metal Atoms (X = Cu, Zn, Cd, Ga, Al, Au, or Hg with YH4 Molecules (Y = C, Si, or Ge and Transition Probabilities at Avoided Crossings in Some Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Novaro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review ab initio studies based on quantum mechanics on the most important mechanisms of reaction leading to the C–H, Si–H, and Ge–H bond breaking of methane, silane, and germane, respectively, by a metal atom in the lowest states in Cs symmetry: X(2nd excited state, 1st excited state and ground state + YH4→ H3XYH → H + XYH3 and XH + YH3. with X = Au, Zn, Cd, Hg, Al, and G, and Y = C, Si, and Ge. Important issues considered here are (a the role that the occupation of the d-, s-, or p-shells of the metal atom plays in the interactions with a methane or silane or germane molecule, (b the role of either singlet or doublet excited states of metals on the reaction barriers, and (c the role of transition probabilities for different families of reacting metals with these gases, using the H–X–Y angle as a reaction coordinate. The breaking of the Y–H bond of YH4 is useful in the production of amorphous hydrogenated films, necessary in several fields of industry.

  10. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  11. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  12. Ultrahigh-sensitive detection of molecules produced in catalytic reactions by uni-atomic-composition bi-element clusters supported on solid substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumatsu, H; Fukui, N

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring catalytic activities of uni-atomic-composition bi-element clusters supported on a solid substrate. The cluster sample is prepared by irradiating a cluster-ion beam having the uni-atomic composition onto the substrate on a soft-landing condition in an ultra-high vacuum. The catalytic activity is measured by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) mass analysis. Molecules at a density as low as 3 cm −3 have been detected with an ultrahigh-sensitive TPD mass spectrometer consisting of a cylindrical electron gun, a quadrupole mass filter and a micro-channel-plate ion-detector. The high reproducibility has been achieved by careful calibration of the TPD mass spectrometer. As a benchmark example, thermal oxidation of CO catalysed on Pt 30 disks supported on a silicon surface was studied. The CO 2 products have been successfully observed at the Pt 30 density as low as 3 × 10 12 clusters in a circular area of 8 mm in diameter at the ramping rate of the sample temperature as low as 0.3 K s −1 .

  13. Reactions of laser-ablated Co, Rh, and Ir with CO: Infrared spectra and density functional calculations of the metal carbonyl molecules, cations and anions in solid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, M.; Andrews, L.

    1999-01-01

    Laser ablation produces metal atoms, cations, and electrons for reaction with CO during condensation in excess neon at 4 K. Infrared spectra are observed for the metal carbonyls, cations, and anions, which are identified from isotopic shifts ( 13 CO, C 18 O) and splittings using mixed isotopic precursors. Density functional calculations with pseudopotentials for Rh and Ir predict the observed carbonyl stretching frequencies within 1--2%. This characterization of the simple RhCO + , RhCO, and RhCO - (and Ir) species over a 350 cm -1 range provides a scale for comparison of larger catalytically active Rh and Ir carbonyl complexes in solution and on surfaces to estimate charge on the metal center. This work provides the first spectroscopic characterization of Rh and Ir carbonyl cations and anions except for the stable tetracarbonyl anions in solution

  14. Chemical reaction due to stronger Ramachandran interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The origin of a chemical reaction between two reactant atoms is associated with the activation energy, on the assumption that, high-energy collisions between these atoms, are the ones that overcome the activation energy. Here, we show that a stronger attractive van der Waals (vdW) and electron-ion Coulomb interactions ...

  15. Reactions of acid bisphosphonodithioates with nitriles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutyrev, G.A.; Korolev, O.S.; Yarkova, E.G.; Cherkasov, R.A.; Pudovik, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    The reactions of acid bisphosphonodithioates with aceto- and benzo-nitriles go with the intermediate formation of a 1:1 adduct, which breaks down into a thioamide and a cyclic trithiopyrophosphonate. The stability of the latter falls with the lengthening of the carbon chain in the original thiophosphorus reactant. A detailed analysis of IR and NMR spectra is given to confirm these results

  16. Switching from Reactant to Substrate Engineering in the Selective Synthesis of Graphene Nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Díez, Néstor; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Nita, Pawel; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Basagni, Andrea; Vasseur, Guillaume; Tiso, Federica; Sedona, Francesco; Das, Pranab K; Fujii, Jun; Vobornik, Ivana; Sambi, Mauro; Pascual, José Ignacio; Ortega, J Enrique; de Oteyza, Dimas G

    2018-04-27

    The challenge of synthesizing graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with atomic precision is currently being pursued along a one-way road, based on the synthesis of adequate molecular precursors that react in predefined ways through self-assembly processes. The synthetic options for GNR generation would multiply by adding a new direction to this readily successful approach, especially if both of them can be combined. We show here how GNR synthesis can be guided by an adequately nanotemplated substrate instead of by the traditionally designed reactants. The structural atomic precision, unachievable to date through top-down methods, is preserved by the self-assembly process. This new strategy's proof-of-concept compares experiments using 4,4''-dibromo-para-terphenyl as a molecular precursor on flat Au(111) and stepped Au(322) substrates. As opposed to the former, the periodic steps of the latter drive the selective synthesis of 6 atom-wide armchair GNRs, whose electronic properties have been further characterized in detail by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, angle resolved photoemission, and density functional theory calculations.

  17. Modification of the liquid cooling channel of PEMFCs for their operation with dry reactant gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, Jin-Cherng; Hsueh, Kan-Lin; Tsau, Fanghei; Chen, Fa-Lin

    2011-01-01

    In order to tackle both water and thermal problems, a modified PEMFC is proposed in the present study for its operation with dry reactant gases via the modification of liquid cooling channel with circulating liquid electrolyte. Fuel cell with both circulating liquid electrolyte and solid polymer membrane operated with either dry or humidified H 2 /O 2 is compared in the present study at temperatures of 40, 50, 65, and 80 o C, respectively. The measured E-I data show that such single cell can be operated at 80 o C without humidification. Besides, a semi-empirical equation to predict the current/voltage relationship, and the electrochemical impedance method are also employed in the present study for cell resistance analysis. The analysis results show that the high interfacial resistance should be one of the major reasons for the inferior performance of the present cell. Based on the discovery, an improvement of the present fuel cell is further proposed by Nafion ionomer spreading on the electrode before the assembly of membrane and electrode. The maximum power density of the cell after electrode treatment reaches 75 mW/cm 2 for dry H 2 /O 2 operation at 0.4 V, which is almost threefold improvement compared with that without electrode treatment.

  18. Use of Gas Transported Reactants for Uranium Remediation in Vadose Zone Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Truex, Michael J.; Resch, Charles T.; Williams, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    This laboratory-scale investigation is focused on decreasing mobility of uranium in subsurface contaminated sediments in the vadose zone by in situ geochemical manipulation at low water content. This geochemical manipulation of the sediment surface phases included reduction, pH change (acidic and alkaline), and additions of chemicals (phosphate, ferric iron) to form specific precipitates. Reactants were advected into 1-D columns packed with Hanford 200 area U-contaminated sediment as a reactive gas (for CO2, NH3, H2S, SO2), with a 0.1% water content mist (for NaOH, Fe(III), HCl, PO4) and with a 1% water content foam (for PO4). Because uranium is present in the sediment in multiple phases, changes in U surface phases were evaluated with a series of liquid extractions that dissolve progressively less soluble phases and electron microbe identification of mineral phases. In terms of the short-term decrease in U mobility (in decreasing order), NH3, NaOH mist, CO2, HCl mist, and Fe(III) mist showed 20% to 35% change in U surface phases. The two reductive gas treatments (H2S and SO2) showed little change. For long-term decrease in U transport, mineral phases created that had low solubility (phosphates, silicates) were desired, so NH3, phosphates (mist and foam delivered), and NaOH mist showed the greatest formation of these minerals.

  19. The reactions of SO3 with HO2 radical and H2O...HO2 radical complex. Theoretical study on the atmospheric formation of HSO5 and H2SO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Javier; Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Anglada, Josep M

    2010-03-07

    The influence of a single water molecule on the gas-phase reactivity of the HO(2) radical has been investigated by studying the reactions of SO(3) with the HO(2) radical and with the H(2)O...HO(2) radical complex. The naked reaction leads to the formation of the HSO(5) radical, with a computed binding energy of 13.81 kcal mol(-1). The reaction with the H(2)O...HO(2) radical complex can give two different products, namely (a) HSO(5) + H(2)O, which has a binding energy that is computed to be 4.76 kcal mol(-1) more stable than the SO(3) + H(2)O...HO(2) reactants (Delta(E + ZPE) at 0K) and an estimated branching ratio of about 34% at 298K and (b) sulfuric acid and the hydroperoxyl radical, which is computed to be 10.51 kcal mol(-1) below the energy of the reactants (Delta(E + ZPE) at 0K), with an estimated branching ratio of about 66% at 298K. The fact that one of the products is H(2)SO(4) may have relevance in the chemistry of the atmosphere. Interestingly, the water molecule acts as a catalyst, [as it occurs in (a)] or as a reactant [as it occurs in (b)]. For a sake of completeness we have also calculated the anharmonic vibrational frequencies for HO(2), HSO(5), the HSO(5)...H(2)O hydrogen bonded complex, H(2)SO(4), and two H(2)SO(4)...H(2)O complexes, in order to help with the possible experimental identification of some of these species.

  20. Synthesis and Exploratory Catalysis of 3d Metals: Group-Transfer Reactions, and the Activation and Functionalization of Small Molecules Including Greenhouse Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindiola, Daniel J.

    2014-05-07

    Our work over the past three years has resulted in the development of electron rich and low-coordinate vanadium fragments, molecular nitrides of vanadium and parent imide systems of titanium, and the synthesis of phosphorus containing molecules of the 3d transition metal series. Likewise, with financial support from BES Division in DOE (DE-FG02-07ER15893), we now completed the full characterization of the first single molecular magnet (SMM) of Fe(III). We demonstrated that this monomeric form of Fe(III) has an unusual slow relaxation of the magnetization under zero applied field. To make matters more interesting, this system also undergoes a rare example of an intermediate to high-spin transition (an S = 3/2 to S = 5/2 transition). In 2010 we reported the synthesis of the first neutral and low-coordinate vanadium complexes having the terminal nitride functionality. We have now completed a full study to understand formation of the nitride ligand from the metastable azide precursor, and have also explored the reactivity of the nitride ligand in the context of incomplete and complete N-atom transfer. During the 2010-2013 period we also discovered a facile approach to assemble low-coordinate and low-valent vanadium(II) complexes and exploit their multielectron chemistry ranging from 1-3 electrons. Consequently, we can now access 3d ligand frameworks such as cyclo-P3 (and its corresponding radical anion), nitride radical anions and cations, low-coordinate vanadium oxo’s, and the first example of a vanadium thionitrosyl complex. A cis-divacant iron(IV) imido having some ligand centered radical has been also discovered, and we are in the process of elucidating its electronic structure (in particular the sign of zero field splitting and the origin of its magnitude), bonding and reactivity. We have also revisited some paramagnetic and classic metallocene compounds with S >1/2 ground states in order to understand their reactivity patterns and electronic structure. Lastly

  1. Formation of new halogenothiocarbonylsulfenyl halides, XC(S)SY, through photochemical matrix reactions starting from CS2 and a dihalogen molecule XY (XY=Cl2, Br2, or BrCl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Yeny A; Romano, Rosana M; Védova, Carlos O Della; Downs, Anthony J

    2007-05-28

    Isolation of a dihalogen molecule XY (XY=Cl2, Br2, or BrCl) with CS2 in a solid Ar matrix at about 15 K leads, by broad-band UV-vis photolysis (200molecules have also been identified as products of the various photoreactions: syn-ClC(S)SCl, anti-ClC(S)SCl, syn-BrC(S)SBr, anti-BrC(S)SBr, syn-ClC(S)SBr, anti-ClC(S)SBr, syn-BrC(S)SCl, anti-BrC(S)SCl, ClC(S)S*, BrCS*, and Br*...SCS. The IR spectra of these hitherto unknown species have been interpreted with reference to the predictions of ab initio (HF and MP2) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results are analyzed in relation to the reaction pathways accessed by matrix photolysis.

  2. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.; Langourieux, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14 CO 2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed [fr

  3. Controlled formation of Ni(DMG)2 microrods/tubes by manipulating the kinetics of chemical reactions and their application in naked-eye sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianli; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2012-08-01

    We have demonstrated controlled preparation of Ni(DMG)2 microrods/tubes via chemical reaction method. By manipulating the reaction kinetics via the concentration of reactants, shapes of the resulting microstructures can be easily tuned from microrods to microtubes. Size of the resulting products can also be controlled through changing the reaction temperatures. It was proposed that under high reactants' concentrations, molecules will prefer to grow at corners or edges of nuclei with high free energies, to reduce the total energy in the system, which would lead to partial or complete hollow interiors and eventually resulted in mircotubes. The fact that DMG show high selectivity with Ni2+ and accompanied with obvious color change enable us to fabricate test strip for naked-eye detection of Ni2+. Benefit from the large surface areas of DMG nanoparticles on the test strip, the detection limit is improved by two orders over that of conventional solution method. This strategy is sensitive, simple and easy to handle, thus expected to possess potentials for the practical Ni2+ detection applications.

  4. Distribution in flowing reaction-diffusion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Herrmann, Hans J.; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2009-01-01

    A power-law distribution is found in the density profile of reacting systems A+B→C+D and 2A→2C under a flow in two and three dimensions. Different densities of reactants A and B are fixed at both ends. For the reaction A+B, the concentration of reactants asymptotically decay in space as x-1/2 and x-3/4 in two dimensions and three dimensions, respectively. For 2A, it decays as log (x) /x in two dimensions. The decay of A+B is explained considering the effect of segregation of reactants in the isotropic case. The decay for 2A is explained by the marginal behavior of two-dimensional diffusion. A logarithmic divergence of the diffusion constant with system size is found in two dimensions. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

  5. Distribution in flowing reaction-diffusion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kamimura, Atsushi

    2009-12-28

    A power-law distribution is found in the density profile of reacting systems A+B→C+D and 2A→2C under a flow in two and three dimensions. Different densities of reactants A and B are fixed at both ends. For the reaction A+B, the concentration of reactants asymptotically decay in space as x-1/2 and x-3/4 in two dimensions and three dimensions, respectively. For 2A, it decays as log (x) /x in two dimensions. The decay of A+B is explained considering the effect of segregation of reactants in the isotropic case. The decay for 2A is explained by the marginal behavior of two-dimensional diffusion. A logarithmic divergence of the diffusion constant with system size is found in two dimensions. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

  6. Exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. II - Proposal for an heterogeneous initiation mechanism of gaseous phase reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marteau, Chantal; Gaillard-Cusin, Francoise; James, Henri [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Centre de Recherches sur la Chimie de Combustion et des Hautes Temperatures

    1978-05-01

    Investigation of experimental data related to evolution period exhibited by H/sub 2/-D/sub 2/ exchange process requires to take into account the variation against time of every atomic species -adsorbed or not- implied in the reaction mechanism. The formation of first chain carriers involves: - chemisorption of either gaseous reactant on the surface active centres (..sigma..), e.g.: ..sigma.. + 1/2 H/sub 2/ reversible ..sigma..H; - consecutive generation of atomic species through hetero-homogeneous transfer between chemisorbed species (..sigma..H) and gaseous molecules: ..sigma..H+H/sub 2/..--> sigma..+H/sub 2/+H/sup 0/, ..sigma..H+D/sub 2/..--> sigma..+HD+D/sup 0/. Therefore, it can be shown that the heterogeneous initiation process of a gas phase reaction identifies to a chain linear mechanism. Such an heterogeneous sequence conditions the further proceeding of the homogeneous chain reaction; both evolutions being kinematically connected. Rate constant of hydrogen adsorption on silica glass: ksub(a1) approximately 10/sup 14/ exp(-47/RT)Isup(0,5).molesup(-0,5).S/sup -1/ has been evaluated.

  7. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  8. Realisation and crossed molecular beams study of H2/O chemical reactions at several excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, Jacqueline

    1986-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the reactive collision O + H 2 OH + H in a crossed beam experiment. This process including several channels taken a part in the chemistry of the upper atmosphere as well as in the combustion of hydrogen. According to the electronic or vibrational state of the reactants, the OH radical is produced in its ground electronic state OH (X 2 π) or in its first excited state OH (A 2 Σ + ). When the reactants are in their ground state, the reaction is endothermic in the conditions of the experiment (center of mass kinetic energy ≅ 0.12 eV). The following reactions have been obtained: O( 1 D) +H 2 (v=O) → OH (X 2 π) +H( 2 S) and O( 1 D) +H 2 (v≥5) → OH (A 2 Σ + ) +H( 2 S). The atomic oxygen is produced in its excited state O( 1 D) in a radio-frequency discharge which dissociates the molecular oxygen seeded in a carrier gas (He or Ar) and the hydrogen molecules are excited vibrationally by electron bombardment. The first reaction is studied by time-of-flight measurements. In this way, it has been possible to observe the different vibrational levels on which the OH radical is produced. The analysis of this vibrational distribution shows the competition between the abstraction and insertion-dissociation mechanisms. In the second reaction, the analysis of the spontaneous fluorescence of OH (A 2 Σ + ) reveals a very hot and non-Boltzmann rotational excitation. (author) [fr

  9. Time behaviour of the reaction front in the catalytic A + B → B + C reaction-diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, F.G.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Wio, H.S.

    1994-07-01

    The problem of the time evolution of the position and width of a reaction front between initially separated reactants for the catalytic reaction A + B → B + C (C inert) is treated within a recently introduced Galanin-like scheme. (author). 6 refs

  10. Effects of balneotherapy on the reactants of acute inflammation phase in Ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Bojana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects sacroiliac joints, spinal column and peripheral joints. Beside medication therapy, physical and balneotherapy play an important role in its complex treatment. Objective. The aim of the research was to establish serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP, α 1-acid glycoprotein (α 1-AGP, ceruloplasmine (CP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (SE before and after the balneotherapy in ankylosing spondylitis. Methods. The research included 50 AS patients according to the revised New York criteria, of mean age 43 years, who were treated for 14 days on the average at the Clinic for Rheumatology of the Institute 'Niška Banja'. All the patients received medications and balneotherapy (radioactive oligomineral baths, peloid, massage, kinesitherapy; the serum concentrations of CRP, α1-AGP, CP and SE were measured before and after balneotherapy. Serum proteins were determined using original Nor Partigen plates Boehringer. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was measured by Westergreen method. Balneotherapy was applied individually, intensively or mildly, depending on the AS stage and activity phase. Results. After dosed balneotherapy, a significant decrease in the concentrations of CP (p<0.05, α1-AGP (p<0.01 and CRP (p<0.05 was registered in the serums of AS patients. ESR was not significantly reduced. Conclusion. The research proved that α 1-acid glycoprotein, ceruloplasmine and C-reactive protein represent more sensitive inflammation markers as compared to erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The identification of acute phase reactants is important in the evaluation of dosed balneotherapy efficiency in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

  11. Cord Blood Acute Phase Reactants Predict Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena B Mithal

    Full Text Available Early onset sepsis (EOS is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants, yet diagnosis remains inadequate resulting in missed cases or prolonged empiric antibiotics with adverse consequences. Evaluation of acute phase reactant (APR biomarkers in umbilical cord blood at birth may improve EOS detection in preterm infants with intrauterine infection.In this nested case-control study, infants (29.7 weeks gestation, IQR: 27.7-32.2 were identified from a longitudinal cohort with archived cord blood and placental histopathology. Patients were categorized using culture, laboratory, clinical, and antibiotic treatment data into sepsis groups: confirmed sepsis (cEOS, n = 12; presumed sepsis (PS, n = 30; and no sepsis (controls, n = 30. Nine APRs were measured in duplicate from cord blood using commercially available multiplex immunoassays (Bio-Plex Pro™. In addition, placental histopathologic data were linked to biomarker results.cEOS organisms were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Proteus mirabilis, Haemophilus influenzae and Listeria monocytogenes. C-reactive protein (CRP, serum amyloid A (SAA, haptoglobin (Hp, serum amyloid P and ferritin were significantly elevated in cEOS compared to controls (p<0.01. SAA, CRP, and Hp were elevated in cEOS but not in PS (p<0.01 and had AUCs of 99%, 96%, and 95% respectively in predicting cEOS. Regression analysis revealed robust associations of SAA, CRP, and Hp with EOS after adjustment for covariates. Procalcitonin, fibrinogen, α-2-macroglobulin and tissue plasminogen activator were not significantly different across groups. Placental acute inflammation was associated with APR elevation and was present in all cEOS, 9 PS, and 17 control infants.This study shows that certain APRs are elevated in cord blood of premature infants with EOS of intrauterine origin. SAA, CRP, and Hp at birth have potential diagnostic utility for risk stratification and identification of infants with EOS.

  12. The Unimolecular Reactions of CF3CHF2 Studied by Chemical Activation: Assignment of Rate Constants and Threshold Energies to the 1,2-H Atom Transfer, 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF Elimination Reactions, and the Dependence of Threshold Energies on the Number of F-Atom Substituents in the Fluoroethane Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caleb A; Gillespie, Blanton R; Heard, George L; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2017-11-22

    The recombination of CF 3 and CHF 2 radicals in a room-temperature bath gas was used to prepare vibrationally excited CF 3 CHF 2 * molecules with 101 kcal mol -1 of vibrational energy. The subsequent 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions were observed as a function of bath gas pressure by following the CHF 3 , CF 3 (F)C: and C 2 F 4 product concentrations by gas chromatography using a mass spectrometer as the detector. The singlet CF 3 (F)C: concentration was measured by trapping the carbene with trans-2-butene. The experimental rate constants are 3.6 × 10 4 , 4.7 × 10 4 , and 1.1 × 10 4 s -1 for the 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions, respectively. These experimental rate constants were matched to statistical RRKM calculated rate constants to assign threshold energies (E 0 ) of 88 ± 2, 88 ± 2, and 87 ± 2 kcal mol -1 to the three reactions. Pentafluoroethane is the only fluoroethane that has a competitive H atom transfer decomposition reaction, and it is the only example with 1,1-HF elimination being more important than 1,2-HF elimination. The trend of increasing threshold energies for both 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF processes with the number of F atoms in the fluoroethane molecule is summarized and investigated with electronic-structure calculations. Examination of the intrinsic reaction coordinate associated with the 1,1-HF elimination reaction found an adduct between CF 3 (F)C: and HF in the exit channel with a dissociation energy of ∼5 kcal mol -1 . Hydrogen-bonded complexes between HF and the H atom migration transition state of CH 3 (F)C: and the F atom migration transition state of CF 3 (F)C: also were found by the calculations. The role that these carbene-HF complexes could play in 1,1-HF elimination reactions is discussed.

  13. Non-equilibrium reactive flux: A unified framework for slow and fast reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2017-10-21

    The flux formulation of reaction rate theory is recast in terms of the expectation value of the reactive flux with an initial condition that corresponds to a non-equilibrium, factorized reactant density. In the common case of slow reactive processes, the non-equilibrium expression reaches the plateau regime only slightly slower than the equilibrium flux form. When the reactants are described by a single quantum state, as in the case of electron transfer reactions, the factorized reactant density describes the true initial condition of the reactive process. In such cases, the time integral of the non-equilibrium flux expression yields the reactant population as a function of time, allowing characterization of the dynamics in cases where there is no clear separation of time scales and thus a plateau regime cannot be identified. The non-equilibrium flux offers a unified approach to the kinetics of slow and fast chemical reactions and is ideally suited to mixed quantum-classical methods.

  14. The bio-complex "reaction pattern in vertebrate cells" reduces cytokine-induced cellular adhesion molecule mRNA expression in human endothelial cells by attenuation of NF-kappaB translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnau, Cindy; Liebermann, Herbert E H; Helbig, Franz; Staudt, Alexander; Felix, Stephan B; Ewert, Ralf; Landsberger, Martin

    2009-02-28

    The bio-complex "reaction pattern in vertebrate cells" (RiV) is mainly represented by characteristic exosome-like particles--probably as reaction products of cells to specific stress. The transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a central role in inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that RiV particle preparations (RiV-PP) reduce cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin) by the attenuation of NF-kappaB translocation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). After 4 hours, pre-incubation of HUVEC with RiV-PP before stimulation with TNF-alpha significantly reduced ICAM-1 (65.5+/-10.3%) and VCAM-1 (71.1+/-12.3%) mRNA expression compared to TNF-alpha-treated cells (100%, n=7). ICAM-1 surface expression was significantly albeit marginally reduced in RiV/TNF-alpha- treated cells (92.0+/-5.6%, n=4). No significant effect was observed on VCAM-1 surface expression. In RiV/TNF-alpha-treated cells (n=4), NF-kappaB subunits p50 (85.7+/-4.1%) and p65 (85.0+/-1.8%) nuclear translocation was significantly reduced. RiV-PP may exert an anti-inflammatory effect in HUVEC by reducing CAM mRNA expression via attenuation of p50 and p65 translocation.

  15. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  16. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Controlling the photochemical reaction of an azastilbene derivative in water using a water-soluble pillar[6]arene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Danyu; Wang, Pi; Shi, Bingbing

    2017-09-20

    Photochemistry plays an important role in our lives. It has also been a common tool in the laboratory to construct complicated systems from small molecules. Supramolecular chemistry provides an opportunity to solve some of the problems in controlling photochemical reactions via non-covalent interactions. By using confining media and weak interactions between the medium and the reactant molecule, the excited state behavior of molecules has been successfully manipulated. Pillararenes, a new class of macrocyclic hosts, have rarely been used in the field of photochemical investigations, such as the controlling of photo-induced reactions. Herein, we explore a synthetic macrocyclic host, a water-soluble pillar[6]arene, as a controlling tool to manipulate the photo-induced reactions (hydration) in water. A host-guest system in water based on a water-soluble pillar[6]arene and an azastilbene derivative, (E)-4,4'-dimethyl-4,4'-diazoniastilbene diiodide, has been constructed. Then this water-soluble pillar[6]arene was successfully employed to control the photohydration of the azastilbene derivative in water as a "protective agent".

  18. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    one of the products of the chemical reaction involved in respira- tion and an important ... exists in the familiar colourless, odourless, non-toxic and non- inflammable ... used in established industrial processes for decaffination of coffee and tea!

  19. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  20. Taking snapshots of photoexcited molecules in disordered media using pulsed synchrotron x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.X.

    2004-01-01

    Photoexcited molecules are quintessential reactants in photochemistry. Structures of these photoexcited molecules in disordered media in which a majority of photochemical reactions take place remained elusive for decades owing to a lack of suitable X-ray sources, despite their importance in understanding fundamental aspects in photochemistry. As new pulsed X-ray sources become available, short-lived excited-state molecular structures in disordered media can now be captured by using laser-pulse pump, X-ray pulse-probe techniques of third-generation synchrotron sources with time resolutions of 30-100 ps, as demonstrated by examples in this review. These studies provide unprecedented information on structural origins of molecular properties in the excited states. By using other ultrafast X-ray facilities that will be completed in the near future, time-resolution for the excited-state structure measurements should reach the femtosecond timescales, which will make 'molecular movies' of bond breaking or formation, and vibrational relaxation, a reality.

  1. Correlation between catalytic activity and bonding and coordination number of atoms and molecules on transition metal surfaces: theory and experimental evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falicov, L.M.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Correlation between catalytic activity and low-energy local electronic fluctuation in transition metals is proposed. A theory and calculations are presented which indicate that maximum electronic fluctuants take place at high-coordination metal sites. Either (i) atomically rough surfaces that expose to the reactant molecules atoms with large numbers of nonmagnetic or weakly magnetic neighbors in the first or second layer at the surface or (ii) stepped and kinked surfaces are the most active in carrying out structure-sensitive catalytic reactions. The synthesis of ammonia from N 2 and H 2 over iron and rhenium surfaces, 1 H 2 / 2 H 2 exchange over stepped platinum crystal surfaces at low pressures, and the hydrogenolysis (C - C bond breaking) of isobutane at kinked platinum crystal surfaces are presented as experimental evidence in support of the theory

  2. Vibrational and rotational excitation effects of the N(2D) + D2(X1Σg +) → ND(X3Σ+) + D(2S) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziliang; Wang, Haijie; Wang, Xiquan; Shi, Yanying

    2018-05-01

    The effects of the rovibrational excitation of reactants in the N(2D) + D2(X1Σg+) → ND(X3Σ+) + D(2S) reaction are calculated in a collision energy range from the threshold to 1.0 eV using the time-dependent wave packet approach and a second-order split operator. The reaction probability, integral cross-section, differential cross-section and rate constant of the title reaction are calculated. The integral cross-section and rate constant of the initial states v = 0, j = 0, 1, are in good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. The rotational excitation of the D2 molecule has little effect on reaction probability, integral cross-section and the rate constant, but it increased the sideways and forward scattering signals. The vibrational excitation of the D2 molecule reduced the threshold and broke up the forward-backward symmetry of the differential cross-section; it also increased the forward scattering signals. This may be because the vibrational excitation of the D2 molecule reduced the lifetime of the intermediate complex.

  3. The efficiency of driving chemical reactions by a physical non-equilibrium is kinetically controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göppel, Tobias; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-07-27

    An out-of-equilibrium physical environment can drive chemical reactions into thermodynamically unfavorable regimes. Under prebiotic conditions such a coupling between physical and chemical non-equilibria may have enabled the spontaneous emergence of primitive evolutionary processes. Here, we study the coupling efficiency within a theoretical model that is inspired by recent laboratory experiments, but focuses on generic effects arising whenever reactant and product molecules have different transport coefficients in a flow-through system. In our model, the physical non-equilibrium is represented by a drift-diffusion process, which is a valid coarse-grained description for the interplay between thermophoresis and convection, as well as for many other molecular transport processes. As a simple chemical reaction, we consider a reversible dimerization process, which is coupled to the transport process by different drift velocities for monomers and dimers. Within this minimal model, the coupling efficiency between the non-equilibrium transport process and the chemical reaction can be analyzed in all parameter regimes. The analysis shows that the efficiency depends strongly on the Damköhler number, a parameter that measures the relative timescales associated with the transport and reaction kinetics. Our model and results will be useful for a better understanding of the conditions for which non-equilibrium environments can provide a significant driving force for chemical reactions in a prebiotic setting.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of reactant gases mass flow rates on power density in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, E. E.; Taymaz, I.

    2018-03-01

    In this study it was experimentally investigated the effect of mass flow rates of reactant gases which is one of the most important operational parameters of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell on power density. The channel type is serpentine and single PEM fuel cell has an active area of 25 cm2. Design-Expert 8.0 (trial version) was used with four variables to investigate the effect of variables on the response using. Cell temperature, hydrogen mass flow rate, oxygen mass flow rate and humidification temperature were selected as independent variables. In addition, the power density was used as response to determine the combined effects of these variables. It was kept constant cell and humidification temperatures while changing mass flow rates of reactant gases. From the results an increase occurred in power density with increasing the hydrogen flow rates. But oxygen flow rate does not have a significant effect on power density within determined mass flow rates.

  5. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  6. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  7. Synthesis of nanoparticles from malleable and ductile metals using powder-free, reactant-assisted mechanical attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Brandon W; Perez, Jesus Paulo L; Yu, Jiang; Boatz, Jerry A; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-11-26

    A reactant-assisted mechanochemical method was used to produce copious nanoparticles from malleable/ductile metals, demonstrated here for aluminum, iron, and copper. The milling media is intentionally degraded via a reactant-accelerated wear process, where the reactant aids particle production by binding to the metal surfaces, enhancing particle production, and reducing the tendency toward mechanochemical (cold) welding. The mechanism is explored by comparing the effects of different types of solvents and solvent mixtures on the amount and type of particles produced. Particles were functionalized with oleic acid to aid in particle size separation, enhance dispersion in hydrocarbon solvents, and protect the particles from oxidation. For aluminum and iron, the result is air-stable particles, but for copper, the suspended particles are found to dissolve when exposed to air. Characterization was performed using electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Density functional theory was used to examine the nature of carboxylic acid binding to the aluminum surface, confirming the dominance of bridging bidentate binding.

  8. The influence of tertiary butyl hydrazine as a co-reactant on the atomic layer deposition of silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golrokhi, Zahra; Marshall, Paul A.; Romani, Simon [Centre for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering,The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Rushworth, Simon [EpiValence, The Wilton Centre, Redcar, Cleveland, TS10 4RF (United Kingdom); Chalker, Paul R. [Centre for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering,The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Potter, Richard J., E-mail: rjpott@liverpool.ac.uk [Centre for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering,The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • We demonstrate metallic silver growth by direct liquid injection thermal ALD. • A substituted hydrazine is used as a powerful reducing agent for the first time. • The hydrazine extends the ALD temperature window compared with alcohol. • Hydrazine promotes a more planar growth mode compared to alcohol. • Film adhesion is improved using hydrazine compared with alcohol. - Abstract: Ultra-thin conformal silver films are the focus of development for applications such as anti-microbial surfaces, optical components and electronic devices. In this study, metallic silver films have been deposited using direct liquid injection thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) using (hfac)Ag(1,5-COD) ((hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)) as the metal source and tertiary butyl hydrazine (TBH) as a co-reactant. The process provides a 23 °C wide ‘self-limiting’ ALD temperature window between 105 and 128 °C, which is significantly wider than is achievable using alcohol as a co-reactant. A mass deposition rate of ∼20 ng/cm{sup 2}/cycle (∼0.18 Å/cycle) is observed under self-limiting growth conditions. The resulting films are crystalline metallic silver with a near planar film-like morphology which are electrically conductive. By extending the temperature range of the ALD window by the use of TBH as a co-reactant, it is envisaged that the process will be exploitable in a range of new low temperature applications.

  9. Characterization of reactants, reaction mechanisms, and reaction products in atmospheric water droplets: fog, cloud, dew, and rain water chemistry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Jacob, D.J.; Waldman, J.M.; Munger, J.W.; Flagan, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Analyses of ground-based fogwater collected by inertial impaction in the Los Angeles basin, the San Gabriel Mountains, and the San Joaquin Valley revealed very high concentrations of NO3 SO4 S, NH4 , and other ions, often coupled with very high acidities. Fogs and strata in the Los Angeles basin typically had pH values ranging from 2 to 4. Acidities were not as high in the San Joaquin Valley, mostly because of scavenging by the fogs of ammonia from agricultural sources. Deposition of fogwater was observed to be an important pollutant sink during stagnation episodes in the San Joaquin Valley, and may also be an important source of acid input to surfaces in some areas. Kinetic experiments showed that H2O2 is important in the oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) at low pH. Metal-catalyzed autoxidation could also be an important source of sulfate. However, the extreme acidities observed in fogs (below pH 3) require condensation on preexistent acidic nuclei and scavenging of gaseous nitric acid. Stabilization of S(IV) in the fog was observed, and this was attributed to the formation of S(IV)-aldehyde adducts.

  10. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Helen; Hundt, P. Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  11. Ion-molecule reactions in alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshitz, C.; Weiss, M.

    1980-01-01

    Fragment ions from 1,5-hexadiyne are trapped in an electron space charge and allowed to react with the neutral 1,5-hexadiyne present. The reactivities are similar to those of ions of the same elementary formulae in the benzene system. Secondary ions of major abundance observed are, in decreasing order of importance: C 10 H + 8 , C 9 H + 7 , C 12 H + 8 , C 12 H + 9 and C 7 H + 7 . In contrast to the benzene system, the ion C 12 H + 11 is of minor importance. (orig.)

  12. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  13. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamitros, M., E-mail: matkara@gmail.com [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Luan, S. [University of New Mexico, Department of Computer Science, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Allison, J. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Baldacchino, G. [CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, LIDYL, Radiation Physical Chemistry Group, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR3299, SIS2M, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Davidkova, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Francis, Z. [Saint Joseph University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Mkalles, Beirut (Lebanon); Friedland, W. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ivantchenko, V. [Ecoanalytica, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation); Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Ivantchenko, A. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Mantero, A. [SwHaRD s.r.l., via Buccari 9, 16153 Genova (Italy); Nieminem, P.; Santin, G. [ESA-ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tran, H.N. [Division of Nuclear Physics and Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Stepan, V. [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Incerti, S., E-mail: incerti@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  14. Study of temperature, air dew point temperature and reactant flow effects on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performances using electrochemical spectroscopy and voltammetry techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasterlain, S.; Hissel, D. [FC LAB, Techn' Hom, rue Thierry Mieg, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); FEMTO-ST (UMR CNRS 6174), ENISYS Department, University of Franche-Comte, Techn' Hom, rue Thierry Mieg, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); Candusso, D.; Harel, F. [FC LAB, Techn' Hom, rue Thierry Mieg, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); INRETS, The French National Institute for Transport and Safety Research, Techn' Hom, rue Thierry Mieg, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); Bergman, P.; Menard, P.; Anwar, M. [University of Connecticut, Connecticut Global Fuel Cell Center Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 44 Weaver Road, Unit 5233, Storrs, CT 06269-5233 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A single PEMFC has been operated by varying the assembly temperature, the air dew point temperature and the anode/cathode stoichiometry rates with the aim to identify the parameters and combinations of factors affecting the cell performance. Some of the experiments were conducted with low humidified reactants (relative humidity of 12%). The FC characterizations tests have been conducted using in situ electrochemical methods based on load current and cell voltage signal analysis, namely: polarization curves, EIS measurements, cyclic and linear sweep voltammetries (CV and LSV). The impacts of the parameters on the global FC performances were observed using the polarization curves whereas EIS, CV and LSV test results were used to discriminate the different voltage loss sources. The test results suggest that some parameter sets allow maximal output voltages but can also induce material degradation. For instance, higher FC temperature and air flow values can induce significant electrical efficiency benefits, notably by increasing the reversible potential and the reaction kinetics. However, raising the cell temperature can also gradually dry the FC and increase the risk of membrane failure. LSV has also shown that elevated FC temperature and relative humidity can also accelerate the electrolyte degradation (i.e. slightly higher fuel crossover rate) and reduce the lifetime consequently. (author)

  15. Study of temperature, air dew point temperature and reactant flow effects on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performances using electrochemical spectroscopy and voltammetry techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasterlain, S.; Candusso, D.; Hissel, D.; Harel, F.; Bergman, P.; Menard, P.; Anwar, M.

    A single PEMFC has been operated by varying the assembly temperature, the air dew point temperature and the anode/cathode stoichiometry rates with the aim to identify the parameters and combinations of factors affecting the cell performance. Some of the experiments were conducted with low humidified reactants (relative humidity of 12%). The FC characterizations tests have been conducted using in situ electrochemical methods based on load current and cell voltage signal analysis, namely: polarization curves, EIS measurements, cyclic and linear sweep voltammetries (CV and LSV). The impacts of the parameters on the global FC performances were observed using the polarization curves whereas EIS, CV and LSV test results were used to discriminate the different voltage loss sources. The test results suggest that some parameter sets allow maximal output voltages but can also induce material degradation. For instance, higher FC temperature and air flow values can induce significant electrical efficiency benefits, notably by increasing the reversible potential and the reaction kinetics. However, raising the cell temperature can also gradually dry the FC and increase the risk of membrane failure. LSV has also shown that elevated FC temperature and relative humidity can also accelerate the electrolyte degradation (i.e. slightly higher fuel crossover rate) and reduce the lifetime consequently.

  16. Real time monitoring of accelerated chemical reactions by ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hsuan; Lo, Ta-Ju; Kuo, Fang-Yin; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonication has been used to accelerate chemical reactions. It would be ideal if ultrasonication-assisted chemical reactions could be monitored by suitable detection tools such as mass spectrometry in real time. It would be helpful to clarify reaction intermediates/products and to have a better understanding of reaction mechanism. In this work, we developed a system for ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry (UASI-MS) with an ~1.7 MHz ultrasonic transducer to monitor chemical reactions in real time. We demonstrated that simply depositing a sample solution on the MHz-based ultrasonic transducer, which was placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, the analyte signals can be readily detected by the mass spectrometer. Singly and multiply charged ions from small and large molecules, respectively, can be observed in the UASI mass spectra. Furthermore, the ultrasonic transducer used in the UASI setup accelerates the chemical reactions while being monitored via UASI-MS. The feasibility of using this approach for real-time acceleration/monitoring of chemical reactions was demonstrated. The reactions of Girard T reagent and hydroxylamine with steroids were used as the model reactions. Upon the deposition of reactant solutions on the ultrasonic transducer, the intermediate/product ions are readily generated and instantaneously monitored using MS within 1 s. Additionally, we also showed the possibility of using this reactive UASI-MS approach to assist the confirmation of trace steroids from complex urine samples by monitoring the generation of the product ions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Premixed Turbulent Combustion in High Reynolds Number Regimes of Thickened Flamelets and Distributed Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    multiple Damkohler or Karlovitz numbers to account for auto - ignition and other types of chemistry, (d)… For example, residence time is important since...First, the rapid compression of reactants within a shock tube or an HCCI engine is known to rapidly elevate the temperature of the reactants above...the ignition temperature, causing reactions to become distributed in space [4]. Alden et al. reported broad CH zones within an HCCI engine experiment

  18. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  19. Mechanistic Insights into Catalytic Ethanol Steam Reforming Using Isotope-Labeled Reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephen; Castaldi, Marco J

    2016-08-26

    The low-temperature ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction mechanism over a supported Rh/Pt catalyst has been investigated using isotope-labeled EtOH and H2 O. Through strategic isotope labeling, all nonhydrogen atoms were distinct from one another, and allowed an unprecedented level of understanding of the dominant reaction pathways. All combinations of isotope- and non-isotope-labeled atoms were detected in the products, thus there are multiple pathways involved in H2 , CO, CO2 , CH4 , C2 H4 , and C2 H6 product formation. Both the recombination of C species on the surface of the catalyst and preservation of the C-C bond within ethanol are responsible for C2 product formation. Ethylene is not detected until conversion drops below 100 % at t=1.25 h. Also, quantitatively, 57 % of the observed ethylene is formed directly through ethanol dehydration. Finally there is clear evidence to show that oxygen in the SiO2 -ZrO2 support constitutes 10 % of the CO formed during the reaction. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Origin of Enhanced Reactivity of a Microsolvated Nucleophile in Ion Pair SN2 Reactions: The Cases of Sodium p-Nitrophenoxide with Halomethanes in Acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang-Gen; Xu, Ke; Ren, Yi

    2015-04-30

    In a kinetic experiment on the SN2 reaction of sodium p-nitrophenoxide with iodomethane in acetone-water mixed solvent, Humeres et al. (J. Org. Chem. 2001, 66, 1163) found that the reaction depends strongly on the medium, and the fastest rate constant was observed in pure acetone. The present work tries to explore why acetone can enhance the reactivity of the title reactions. Accordingly, we make a mechanistic study on the reactions of sodium p-nitrophenoxide with halomethanes (CH3X, X = Cl, Br, I) in acetone by using a supramolecular/continuum model at the PCM-MP2/6-311+G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level, in which the ion pair nucleophile is microsolvated by one to three acetone molecules. We compared the reactivity of the microsolvated ion pair nucleophiles with solvent-free ion pair and anionic ones. Our results clearly reveal that the microsolvated ion pair nucleophile is favorable for the SN2 reactions; meanwhile, the origin of the enhanced reactivity induced by microsolvation of the nucleophile is discussed in terms of the geometries of transition state (TS) structures and activation strain model, suggesting that lower deformation energies and stronger interaction energies between the deformed reactants in the TS lead to the lower overall reaction barriers for the SN2 reaction of microsolvated sodium p-nitrophenoxide toward halomethanes in acetone.

  1. Polymeric Electrolyte Membrane Photoelectrochemical (PEM-PEC Cell with a Web of Titania Nanotube Arrays as Photoanode and Gaseous Reactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsampas M.N.

    2017-01-01

    Photoanodes of titania nanotube arrays, TNTAs, were developed, for the first time, on a Ti-web of microfiber substrates, by electrochemical anodization. The performance of TNTAs/Ti-web photoanodes were evaluated in both gaseous and liquid reactants. Due to the presence of reliable reference electrode in gas phase direct comparison of the results was possible. Gas phase operation with He or Air as carrier gases and only 2.5% of water content exhibits very promising photoefficiency in comparison with conventional PEC cells.

  2. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  3. Serum levels of chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL) during virus infections; indication that chicken MBL is an acute phase reactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Jensenius, J. C.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum collectin which is believed to be an opsonin of the innate immune defence against various microorganisms. MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in man. We investigated the concentration of serum MBL in chickens infected with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV...... levels returned to normal values 6-10 days after infection. The results indicated that MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in chickens....

  4. Nuclear molecules and their deexcitation channels, case of Cr{sup 48} generated by the Mg{sup 24} + Mg{sup 24} resonant reaction; Molecules nucleaires et leurs modes de desexcitation: le cas du {sup 48}Cr et de la reaction resonante {sup 24}Mg + {sup 24}Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salsac, M.D

    2006-12-15

    This work is dedicated to the study of the resonance (E = 45,7 MeV, J{sup {pi}} = 36{sup +}, {gamma} = 170 keV) of the Mg{sup 24} + Mg{sup 24} composite nucleus. The PRISMA fragment spectrometer combined with the CLARA gamma detector have been used to study the deexcitation through inelastic channels of the composite system. It is showed that the resonant flux is mainly observed in the inelastic channels involving the contributions 0{sup +}, 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} of the band based on the fundamental state of Mg{sup 24}. This is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions of the molecular model of Uegaki and Abe. Only 30% of the resonant flux has been observed in the inelastic channels and in the transfer channels. The missing flux has been investigated in the fusion/evaporation deexcitation channels with the GASP gamma multi-detector. A weak resonant effect has been highlighted in some residual nuclei such as Ti{sup 45}, Ca{sup 42} and K{sup 39}. A link between the prolate di-nucleus Ca{sup 48} generated in Mg{sup 24} + Mg{sup 24} reaction and a Cr{sup 48} nucleus that has just undergone a Jacobi transition from oblate to prolate, has been discovered. To explain a part of the missing flux it is suggested that the dipolar giant resonance might feed very deformed nuclei through particle emission.

  5. MICROWAVE IRRADIATION IN BENIGN SYNTHESIS OF ORGANIC MOLECULES, NOBLE NANOMETALS AND NANOCOMPOSITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brief historic account of reactions involving microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants or catalyzed by mineral support surfaces, such as alumina, silica, clay, or their ‘doped’ versions, for the rapid one-pot assembly of heterocyclic compounds [1] from in situ generated reacti...

  6. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Geol

    1990-10-01

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  7. Reaction Hamiltonian and state-to-state description of chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruf, B.A.; Kresin, V.Z.; Lester, W.A. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    A chemical reaction is treated as a quantum transition from reactants to products. A specific reaction Hamiltonian (in second quantization formalism) is introduced. The approach leads to Franck-Condon-like factor, and adiabatic method in the framework of the nuclear motion problems. The influence of reagent vibrational state on the product energy distribution has been studied following the reaction Hamiltonian method. Two different cases (fixed available energy and fixed translational energy) are distinguished. Results for several biomolecular reactions are presented. 40 refs., 5 figs

  8. The influence of KD and K anti K mesonic molecules in selected reactions; Auswirkung der im KD- und K anti K-Kanal gebildeten mesonischen Molekuele in verschiedenen Reaktionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassen, F.P.

    2004-07-01

    The attractive potential of the Juelich meson exchange model in the K anti K-channel causes formation of a scalar isoscalar molecule. We investigate this observation from different points of view. First we look at the dependence of pion production in the peripheral reaction {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}n on the momentum transferred at the nucleus. Accounting for the production via {pi} and a{sub 1} emission in a consistent way, we are able to explain the momentum dependence using the Juelich model. Furthermore we investigate how a measurement of dd {yields} {alpha}K anti K close to threshold may contribute to our knowledge on K anti K interaction and the f{sub 0}(980). The Juelich model links the properties of the f{sub 0}(980) to the a{sub 0}(980). We will use this information to learn about the d anti K-interaction in pp {yields} dK anti K. The recent discovery of the D{sup *}{sub sJ}(2317) o ers a different perspective on the dynamical generation of poles, since it may be connected to the KD-threshold nearby. We construct a SU(4)-extention of the Juelich model including isospin violation. Within this extention a dynamical resonance is formed, which only may explain the D{sup *}{sub sJ}(2317) if isoscalar production is assumed. Special interest is paid to the predicted width of the D{sup *}{sub sJ}(2317) associated with a dynamical interpretation. (orig.)

  9. Multi-scale simulation of reaction-diffusion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijaykumar, A.

    2017-01-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function

  10. Generalized hydrodynamic treatment of the interplay between restricted transport and catalytic reactions in nanoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David M; Wang, Jing; Evans, James W

    2012-06-01

    Behavior of catalytic reactions in narrow pores is controlled by a delicate interplay between fluctuations in adsorption-desorption at pore openings, restricted diffusion, and reaction. This behavior is captured by a generalized hydrodynamic formulation of appropriate reaction-diffusion equations (RDE). These RDE incorporate an unconventional description of chemical diffusion in mixed-component quasi-single-file systems based on a refined picture of tracer diffusion for finite-length pores. The RDE elucidate the nonexponential decay of the steady-state reactant concentration into the pore and the non-mean-field scaling of the reactant penetration depth.

  11. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however......, not a sufficient condition in order to establish genuine tunneling as a result of quantum dynamics. This proposition is illustrated for a two-dimensional model potential describing dissociative sticking of N-2 on Ru(s). It is suggested that the remarkable heavy atom tunneling, found in this system, is related...

  12. Characterization of the Redox reaction of V(V) in Ammonia Buffers with Square-Wave Voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Mirceski, Valentin; Gulaboski, Rubin; Petrovska-Jovanovic, Simka; Stojanova, Kornelija

    2001-01-01

    The redox reaction of V(V) in ammonia buffers solution with pH = 8.60 was studied by means of square-wave and cyclic voltammetry. The redox reaction studied exhibits properties of a surface redox process in which both the reactant and the product of the redox reaction are immobilized on the electrode surface.

  13. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  14. Formation of long carbon chain molecules during laser vaporization of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, J.R.; Zhang, Q.; O'Brien, S.C.; Curl, R.F.; Kroto, H.W.; Smalley, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite is laser vaporized into a He carrier gas containing various simple molecules such as H 2 , H 2 O, NH 3 , and CH 3 CN, supersonically expanded, and skimmed into a molecular beam, and the beam is interrogated by photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Without added reactants in the He carrier gas, C/sub n/ species up to n = 130 are readily observed. Two distributions separated at about n = 40 appear to be present with the low n species the focus of this work. In the presence of added reagents, new species appear as a result of reaction. These are satisfactorily explained on the basis that a significant proportion of the C/sub n/ species initially formed are reactive radicals with linear carbon chain structures which can readily add H, N, or CN at the ends to form relatively stable polyynes or cyanopolyynes. Some of the cyanopolyynes detected have also been observed in the interstellar medium, and circumstellar carbon condensation processes in the atmospheres of carbon-rich stars similar to those studied here are suggested as possible synthetic sources

  15. Heavy-atom isotope effects on binding of reactants to lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawlita, E.

    1993-04-01

    18 O and 13 C kinetic isotope effects have been measured on the reaction of pyruvate kinase with phospho-enol-pyruvate and ADP using a remote label technique. The magnitude of both investigated isotope effects showed a dependence on the concentration of ADP. However, while the carbon effect was simply 'washed out' to unity at high ATP concentration, the oxygen effect becomes inverse and reached 0.9928 at the highest used concentration of ADP. Such a result testifies that the assumption of the negligible effect of isotopic substitution on enzyme-substrate associations remains correct only for carbon effects. An equilibrium 18 O isotope effect on association of oxalate with lactate dehydrogenase in the presence of NADHP has been evaluated by both experimental and theoretical means. Experimental methods, which involved equilibrium dialysis and gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric measurement of isotopic ration, yielded an inverse value of 0.9840. Semiempirical methods involved vibrational analysis of oxalate in two different environments. The comparison of calculated values with the experimentally determined isotope effect indicated that the AM 1 Hamiltonian proved superior to its PM 3 counterpart in this modelling. 160 refs, 8 figs, 18 tabs

  16. A quantum generalization of intrinsic reaction coordinate using path integral centroid coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Motoyuki; Fujisaki, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) for quantum many-body systems described in terms of the mass-weighted ring polymer centroids in the imaginary-time path integral theory. This novel kind of reaction coordinate, which may be called the ''centroid IRC,'' corresponds to the minimum free energy path connecting reactant and product states with a least amount of reversible work applied to the center of masses of the quantum nuclei, i.e., the centroids. We provide a numerical procedure to obtain the centroid IRC based on first principles by combining ab initio path integral simulation with the string method. This approach is applied to NH 3 molecule and N 2 H 5 - ion as well as their deuterated isotopomers to study the importance of nuclear quantum effects in the intramolecular and intermolecular proton transfer reactions. We find that, in the intramolecular proton transfer (inversion) of NH 3 , the free energy barrier for the centroid variables decreases with an amount of about 20% compared to the classical one at the room temperature. In the intermolecular proton transfer of N 2 H 5 - , the centroid IRC is largely deviated from the ''classical'' IRC, and the free energy barrier is reduced by the quantum effects even more drastically.

  17. Threshold electron impact ionization of molecules (CF4, CHF3, CH4, C3H8) and clusters (Ar, Ne, H2, D2), dissociative electron attachment to hydrogen and surface induced reactions of fullerenes (Cn, n=50-60)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiegele, T.

    2001-02-01

    After many years of research the accurate determination and interpretation of threshold energies at which a molecule is ionized by electron impact remains still difficult. The reasons for this are a number of technical obstacles like preparing electrons with a high energy resolution and a complicated physical situation in the reaction complex involving a quantum mechanical many body system. The use of photoionization sometimes appears to be less difficult but nevertheless the values obtained by this technique are not directly comparable to those obtained by electron impact studies. With the use of a newly constructed hemispherical electron monochromator the interaction of electrons under high energy resolution (up to 30 meV) with atoms, molecules and clusters was investigated. In the present study two new techniques have been invoked to obtain more information about the energy resolution of the electrons. Up to now it was only possible to determine the electron energy resolution with the help of s-wave attachment cross sections, e.g. the Cl-/CCl4 resonance at 0 eV. The new techniques allow the investigation at higher energies (at about 12 up to about 58 eV) and by using positive ions. Especially in the case of measuring threshold energies of positive ions the new methods have the advantage that there is no need to change between positive and negative ions. Additionally one gets information about the calibration and the linearity of the energy scale. The value at which the resolution is determined lies also in the range of the threshold. The results show that the resolution is constant over a large electron energy range. Due to low ion signals at the threshold regions the used electron energy resolution was set at about 120 meV for most of the present measurements. In the present work it was for the first time possible to measure accurately the appearance energies for rare gas cluster ions (Ar, Ne) and for hydrogen cluster ions. There are two important observations

  18. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andri Cahyo Kumoro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation is one of the common methods of modifying starch properties by introducing acetil (CH3CO groups to starch molecules at low temperatures. While most acetylation is conducted using starch as anhidroglucose source and acetic anhydride or vinyl acetate as nucleophilic agents, this work employ reactants, namely flour and glacial acetic acid. The purpose of this work are to study the effect of pH reaction and GAA/GF mass ratio on the rate of acetylation reaction and to determine its rate constants. The acetylation of gadung flour with glacial acetic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide as a homogenous catalyst was studied at ambient temperature with pH ranging from 8-10 and different mass ratio of acetic acid : gadung flour (1:3; 1:4; and 1:5. It was found that increasing pH, lead to increase the degree of substitution, while increasing GAA/GF mass ratio caused such decreases in the degree of substitution, due to the hydrolysis of the acetylated starch. The desired starch acetylation reaction is accompanied by undesirable hydrolysis reaction of the acetylated starch after 40-50 minutes reaction time. Investigation of kinetics of the reaction observed that the value of mass transfer rate constant (Kcs is smaller than the surface reaction rate constant (k. Thus, it can be concluded that rate controlling step is mass transfer.  © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 7th August 2014; Revised: 8th September 2014; Accepted: 14th September 2014How to Cite: Kumoro, A.C., Amelia, R. (2015. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (1: 30-37. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37

  19. Process for carrying out a chemical reaction with ionic liquid and carbon dioxide under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.C.; Shariati, A.; Florusse, L.J.; Peters, C.J.; Van Spronsen, J.; Witkamp, G.J.; Sheldon, R.A.; Gutkowski, K.I.

    2006-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for carrying out a chemical reaction in an ionic liquid as solvent and CO2 as cosolvent, in which process reactants are reacted in a homogeneous phase at selected pressure and temperature to generate a reaction product at least containing an end-product of the

  20. Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.; Escher, C.

    1988-06-07

    The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction. 7 figs.

  1. Analyzing Reaction Rates with the Distortion/Interaction-Activation Strain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Houk, Kendall N.

    2017-01-01

    The activation strain or distortion/interaction model is a tool to analyze activation barriers that determine reaction rates. For bimolecular reactions, the activation energies are the sum of the energies to distort the reactants into geometries they have in transition states plus the interaction

  2. Solvent-Free Wittig Reaction: A Green Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sam H.; Angel, Stephen A.

    2004-01-01

    Some Wittig reactions can be carried out by grinding the reactants in a mortar with a pestle for about 20 minutes, as per investigation. A laboratory experiment involving a solvent-free Wittig reaction that can be completed in a three-hour sophomore organic chemistry laboratory class period, are developed.

  3. Comparing Amide-Forming Reactions Using Green Chemistry Metrics in an Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennie, Michael W.; Roth, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, upper-division undergraduate chemistry and biochemistry majors investigate amide-bond-forming reactions from a green chemistry perspective. Using hydrocinnamic acid and benzylamine as reactants, students perform three types of amide-forming reactions: an acid chloride derivative route; a coupling reagent promoted…

  4. Mechanism and models for collisional energy transfer in highly excited large polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, R. G.

    1995-01-01

    Collisional energy transfer in highly excited molecules (say, 200-500 kJ mol -1 above the zero-point energy of reactant, or of product, for a recombination reaction) is reviewed. An understanding of this energy transfer is important in predicting and interpreting the pressure dependence of gas-phase rate coefficients for unimolecular and recombination reactions. For many years it was thought that this pressure dependence could be calculated from a single energy-transfer quantity, such as the average energy transferred per collision. However, the discovery of 'super collisions' (a small but significant fraction of collisions which transfer abnormally large amounts of energy) means that this simplistic approach needs some revision. The 'ordinary' (non-super) component of the distribution function for collisional energy transfer can be quantified either by empirical models (e.g., an exponential-down functional form) or by models with a physical basis, such as biased random walk (applicable to monatomic or diatomic collision partners) or ergodic (for polyatomic collision partners) treatments. The latter two models enable approximate expressions for the average energy transfer to be estimated from readily available molecular parameters. Rotational energy transfer, important for finding the pressure dependence for recombination reactions, can for these purposes usually be taken as transferring sufficient energy so that the explicit functional form is not required to predict the pressure dependence. The mechanism of 'ordinary' energy transfer seems to be dominated by low-frequency modes of the substrate, whereby there is sufficient time during a vibrational period for significant energy flow between the collision partners. Super collisions may involve sudden energy flow as an outer atom of the substrate is squashed between the substrate and the bath gas, and then is moved away from the interaction by large-amplitude motion such as a ring vibration or a rotation; improved

  5. Integrating reaction and analysis: investigation of higher-order reactions by cryogenic trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrollan Stockinger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for the investigation of a higher-order reaction by on-column reaction gas chromatography is presented. The reaction and the analytical separation are combined in a single experiment to investigate the Diels–Alder reaction of benzenediazonium-2-carboxylate as a benzyne precursor with various anthracene derivatives, i.e. anthracene, 9-bromoanthracene, 9-anthracenecarboxaldehyde and 9-anthracenemethanol. To overcome limitations of short reaction contact times at elevated temperatures a novel experimental setup was developed involving a cooling trap to achieve focusing and mixing of the reactants at a defined spot in a fused-silica capillary. This trap functions as a reactor within the separation column in the oven of a gas chromatograph. The reactants are sequentially injected to avoid undefined mixing in the injection port. An experimental protocol was developed with optimized injection intervals and cooling times to achieve sufficient conversions at short reaction times. Reaction products were rapidly identified by mass spectrometric detection. This new approach represents a practical procedure to investigate higher-order reactions at an analytical level and it simultaneously provides valuable information for the optimization of the reaction conditions.

  6. The reactants equation of state for the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) based explosive PBX 9502

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Tariq D.

    2017-07-01

    The response of high explosives (HEs), due to mechanical and/or thermal insults, is of great importance for both safety and performance. A major component of how an HE responds to these stimuli stems from its reactant equation of state (EOS). Here, the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene based explosive PBX 9502 is investigated by examining recent experiments. Furthermore, a complete thermal EOS is calibrated based on the functional form devised by Wescott, Stewart, and Davis [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 053514 (2005)]. It is found, by comparing to earlier calibrations, that a variety of thermodynamic data are needed to sufficiently constrain the EOS response over a wide range of thermodynamic state space. Included in the calibration presented here is the specific heat as a function of temperature, isobaric thermal expansion, and shock Hugoniot response. As validation of the resulting model, isothermal compression and isentropic compression are compared with recent experiments.

  7. Free Energy Contribution Analysis Using Response Kernel Approximation: Insights into the Acylation Reaction of a Beta-Lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Toshio; Ando, Kanta; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta; Koseki, Shiro

    2016-09-08

    A widely applicable free energy contribution analysis (FECA) method based on the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approximation using response kernel approaches has been proposed to investigate the influences of environmental residues and/or atoms in the QM region on the free energy profile. This method can evaluate atomic contributions to the free energy along the reaction path including polarization effects on the QM region within a dramatically reduced computational time. The rate-limiting step in the deactivation of the β-lactam antibiotic cefalotin (CLS) by β-lactamase was studied using this method. The experimentally observed activation barrier was successfully reproduced by free energy perturbation calculations along the optimized reaction path that involved activation by the carboxylate moiety in CLS. It was found that the free energy profile in the QM region was slightly higher than the isolated energy and that two residues, Lys67 and Lys315, as well as water molecules deeply influenced the QM atoms associated with the bond alternation reaction in the acyl-enzyme intermediate. These facts suggested that the surrounding residues are favorable for the reactant complex and prevent the intermediate from being too stabilized to proceed to the following deacylation reaction. We have demonstrated that the free energy contribution analysis should be a useful method to investigate enzyme catalysis and to facilitate intelligent molecular design.

  8. Chemistry and kinetics of size-selected cobalt cluster cations at thermal energies. I. Reactions with CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B. C.; Kerns, K. P.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The chemistry and kinetics of size-selected Co+n cluster-ion (n=2-8) reactions with CO are studied using a selected ion drift tube affixed with a laser vaporization source operated under well-defined thermal conditions. All reactions studied in the present work are found to be association reactions. Their absolute rate constants, which are determined quantitatively, are found to have a strong dependence on cluster size. Similar to the cases of reactions with many other reactants such as H2 and CH4, Co+4 and Co+5 display a higher reactivity toward the CO molecule than do clusters of neighboring size. The multiple-collision conditions employed in the present work have enabled a determination of the maximum coordination number of CO molecules bound onto each Co+n cluster. It is found that the tetramer tends to bond 12 CO molecules, the pentamer 14 CO, hexamer 16 CO, and so on. The results are interpreted in terms of Lauher's calculation and the polyhedral skeletal electron pair theory. All the measured maximum coordination numbers correlate extremely well with the predictions of these theories, except for the trimer where the measured number is one CO less than the predicted value. The good agreement between experiment and theory enables one to gain some insight into the geometric structure of the clusters. Based on the present findings, the cobalt tetramer cation is interpreted to have a tetrahedral structure, the pentamer a trigonal bipyramid, and the hexamer an octahedral structure. Other cluster structures are also discussed.

  9. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Neutral molecules in tokamak edge plasma - role of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadez, I.; Cercek, M.; Pelicon, P.; Razpet, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of neutral molecules in edge plasma is discussed with special emphasis on the vibrationally excited hydrogen. Neutral molecules are formed mostly by surface processes on the walls and then released to the edge plasma where they take part in volumetric reactions with other particles. Typically these molecules are formed in excited states and data are needed for their reactions on the wall and in the volume. Processes in edge plasma determine particle and energy flux what is especially critical issue in tokamak divertor region. Various cross sections and reaction rates are needed for modelling edge plasma and its interaction with walls. (author)

  11. Reaction mechanisms at 4H-SiC/SiO2 interface during wet SiC oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Toru; Hori, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Masashi; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    The reaction processes at the interface between SiC with 4H structure (4H-SiC) and SiO2 during wet oxidation are investigated by electronic structure calculations within the density functional theory. Our calculations for 4H-SiC/SiO2 interfaces with various orientations demonstrate characteristic features of the reaction depending on the crystal orientation of SiC: On the Si-face, the H2O molecule is stable in SiO2 and hardly reacts with the SiC substrate, while the O atom of H2O can form Si-O bonds at the C-face interface. Two OH groups are found to be at least necessary for forming new Si-O bonds at the Si-face interface, indicating that the oxidation rate on the Si-face is very low compared with that on the C-face. On the other hand, both the H2O molecule and the OH group are incorporated into the C-face interface, and the energy barrier for OH is similar to that for H2O. By comparing the calculated energy barriers for these reactants with the activation energies of oxide growth rate, we suggest the orientation-dependent rate-limiting processes during wet SiC oxidation.

  12. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence of tris(2,2' bipyridine)ruthenium(II) using common biological buffers as co-reactant, pH buffer and supporting electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Noah; Francis, Paul S; Barbante, Gregory J; Hogan, Conor F

    2015-11-07

    A series of aliphatic tertiary amines (HEPES, POPSO, EPPS and BIS-TRIS) commonly used to buffer the pH in biological experiments, were examined as alternative, non-toxic co-reactants for the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(ii) ([Ru(bpy)3](2+)). These were found to be very attractive as "multi-tasking" reagents, serving not only as co-reactants, but also fulfiling the roles of pH buffer and supporting electrolyte within an aqueous environment; thus significantly simplifying the overall ECL analysis. Sub-nanomolar detection limits were obtained for [Ru(bpy)3](2+) in the presence of BIS-TRIS, making this species an valuable option for co-reactant ECL-based bioanalytical applications.

  13. Single cyanide-bridged Mo(W)/S/Cu cluster-based coordination polymers: Reactant- and stoichiometry-dependent syntheses, effective photocatalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinfang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yinlin; Chen, Weitao; Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G.; Zhang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    The systematic study on the reaction variables affecting single cyanide-bridged Mo(W)/S/Cu cluster-based coordination polymers (CPs) is firstly demonstrated. Five anionic single cyanide-bridged Mo(W)/S/Cu cluster-based CPs {[Pr_4N][WS_4Cu_3(CN)_2]}_n (1), {[Pr_4N][WS_4Cu_4(CN)_3]}_n (2), {[Pr_4N][WOS_3Cu_3(CN)_2]}_n (3), {[Bu_4N][WOS_3Cu_3(CN)_2]}_n (4) and {[Bu_4N][MoOS_3Cu_3(CN)_2]}_n (5) were prepared by varying the molar ratios of the starting materials, and the specific cations, cluster building blocks and central metal atoms in the cluster building blocks. 1 possesses an anionic 3D diamondoid framework constructed from 4-connected T-shaped clusters [WS_4Cu_3]"+ and single CN"− bridges. 2 is fabricated from 6-connected planar ‘open’ clusters [WS_4Cu_4]"2"+ and single CN"− bridges, forming an anionic 3D architecture with an “ACS” topology. 3 and 4 exhibit novel anionic 2-D double-layer networks, both constructed from nest-shaped clusters [WOS_3Cu_3]"+ linked by single CN"− bridges, but containing the different cations [Pr_4N]"+ and [Bu_4N]"+, respectively. 5 is constructed from nest-shaped clusters [MoOS_3Cu_3]"+ and single CN"− bridges, with an anionic 3D diamondoid framework. The anionic frameworks of 1-5, all sustained by single CN"− bridges, are non-interpenetrating and exhibit huge potential void volumes. Employing differing molar ratios of the reactants and varying the cluster building blocks resulted in differing single cyanide-bridged Mo(W)/S/Cu cluster-based CPs, while replacing the cation ([Pr_4N]"+ vs. [Bu_4N]"+) was found to have negligible impact on the nature of the architecture. Unexpectedly, replacement of the central metal atom (W vs. Mo) in the cluster building blocks had a pronounced effect on the framework. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activities of heterothiometallic cluster-based CPs were firstly explored by monitoring the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation, which reveals that 2

  14. Calculation of the energetics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Harding, L.B.; Shepard, R.L.; Harrison, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    To calculate the energetics of chemical reactions we must solve the electronic Schroedinger equation for the molecular conformations of importance for the reactive encounter. Substantial changes occur in the electronic structure of a molecular system as the reaction progresses from reactants through the transition state to products. To describe these changes, our approach includes the following three elements: the use of multiconfiguration self-consistent field wave functions to provide a consistent zero-order description of the electronic structure of the reactants, transition state, and products; the use of configuration interaction techniques to describe electron correlation effects needed to provide quantitative predictions of the reaction energetics; and the use of large, optimized basis sets to provide the flexibility needed to describe the variations in the electronic distributions. With this approach we are able to study reactions involving as many as 5--6 atoms with errors of just a few kcal/mol in the predicted reaction energetics. Predictions to chemical accuracy, i.e., to 1 kcal/mol or less, are not yet feasible, although continuing improvements in both the theoretical methodology and computer technology suggest that this will soon be possible, at least for reactions involving small polyatomic species. 4 figs.

  15. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Daniel; Llebot, Josep Enric; Fort, Joaquim

    2004-01-01

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations

  16. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Daniel [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Llebot, Josep Enric [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Fort, Joaquim [Dept. de FIsica, Univ. de Girona, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2004-07-02

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations.

  17. The influence of the "cage" effect on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions proceeding from different sites in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorov, Alexander B

    2016-08-28

    Manifestations of the "cage" effect at the encounters of reactants have been theoretically treated on the example of multistage reactions (including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages) proceeding from different active sites in liquid solutions. It is shown that for reactions occurring near the contact of reactants, consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of such multistage reactions (possible in the framework of the encounter theory only) can be made on the basis of chemical concepts of the "cage complex," just as in the case of one-site model described in the literature. Exactly as in the one-site model, the presence of the "cage" effect gives rise to new channels of reactant transformation that cannot result from elementary event of chemical conversion for the given reaction mechanism. Besides, the multisite model demonstrates new (as compared to one-site model) features of multistage reaction course.

  18. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  19. Organic chemistry of graphene: the Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Pablo A

    2013-11-11

    Herein, by using dispersion-corrected density functional theory, we investigated the Diels-Alder chemistry of pristine and defective graphene. Three dienes were considered, namely 2,3-dimethoxy-1,3-butadiene (DMBD), 9-methylanthracene (9MA), and 9,10-dimethylanthracene (910DMA). The dienophiles that were assayed were tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and maleic anhydride (MA). When pristine graphene acted as the dienophile, we found that the cycloaddition products were 47-63 kcal mol(-1) less stable than the reactants, thus making the reaction very difficult. The presence of Stone-Wales translocations, 585 double vacancies, or 555-777 reconstructed double vacancies did not significantly improve the reactivity because the cycloaddition products were still located at higher energy than the reactants. However, for the addition of 910DMA to single vacancies, the product showed comparable stability to the separated reactants, whereas for unsaturated armchair edges the reaction was extremely favorable. With regards the reactions with dienophiles, for TCNE, the cycloaddition product was metastable. In the case of MA, we observed a reaction product that was less stable than the reactants by 50 kcal mol(-1) . For the reactions between graphene as a diene and the dienophiles, we found that the most-promising defects were single vacancies and unsaturated armchair edges, because the other three defects were much-less reactive. Thus, we conclude that the reactions with these above-mentioned dienes may proceed on pristine or defective sheets with heating, despite being endergonic. The same statement also applies to the dienophile maleic anhydride. However, for TCNE, the reaction is only likely to occur onto single vacancies or unsaturated armchair edges. We conclude that the dienophile character of graphene is slightly stronger than its behavior as a diene. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Changes in serum adhesion molecules, chemokines, cytokines, and tissue remodeling factors in euthyroid women without thyroid antibodies who are at risk for autoimmune thyroid disease: a hypothesis on the early phases of the endocrine autoimmune reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, Wouter; Effraimidis, Grigoris; Drexhage, Roosmarijn C.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2013-01-01

    The target glands in spontaneous animal models of endocrine autoimmune disease show, prior to the autoimmune reaction, growth and connective tissue abnormalities, whereas the autoimmune reaction is initiated by an early accumulation of macrophages and dendritic cells in the target glands. The aim of

  1. Atomic layer deposition of Ru thin film using N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma as a reactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tae Eun [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, 1275 Jisadong, Gangseogu, Busan, 618-230 (Korea, Republic of); Mun, Ki-Yeung; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Park, Ji-Yoon [School of Materials Science and Engineering Yeungnam University 214-1, Dae-dong, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do, 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo-Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@ynu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering Yeungnam University 214-1, Dae-dong, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do, 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Taehoon [Center for Core Research Facilities, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Sang-ri, Hyeonpung-myeon, Dalseong-gun, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Kyoung [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, 214-1, Dae-dong, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do, 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Byoung-Yong; Kim, Sunjung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ulsan, Mugeo-dong, Nam-go, Ulsan, 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-31

    Ruthenium (Ru) thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition using IMBCHRu [({eta}6-1-Isopropyl-4-MethylBenzene)({eta}4-CycloHexa-1,3-diene)Ruthenium(0)] as a precursor and a nitrogen-hydrogen mixture (N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}) plasma as a reactant, at the substrate temperature of 270 Degree-Sign C. In the wide range of the ratios of N{sub 2} and total gas flow rates (fN{sub 2}/N{sub 2} + H{sub 2}) from 0.12 to 0.70, pure Ru films with negligible nitrogen incorporation of 0.5 at.% were obtained, with resistivities ranging from {approx} 20 to {approx} 30 {mu} Ohm-Sign cm. A growth rate of 0.057 nm/cycle and negligible incubation cycle for the growth on SiO{sub 2} was observed, indicating the fast nucleation of Ru. The Ru films formed polycrystalline and columnar grain structures with a hexagonal-close-packed phase. Its resistivity was dependent on the crystallinity, which could be controlled by varying the deposition parameters such as plasma power and pulsing time. Cu was electroplated on a 10-nm-thick Ru film. Interestingly, it was found that the nitrogen could be incorporated into Ru at a higher reactant gas ratio of 0.86. The N-incorporated Ru film ({approx} 20 at.% of N) formed a nanocrystalline and non-columnar grain structure with the resistivity of {approx} 340 {mu} Ohm-Sign cm. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ru and N-incorporated Ru film using N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The growth rate of 0.057 nm/cycle and negligible incubation cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low resistivity of Ru ({approx} 16.5 {mu} Ohm-Sign cm) at the deposition temperature of 270 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electroplating of Cu on a 10-nm-thick ALD-Ru film.

  2. Variational Flooding Study of a SN2 Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; McCarty, James J; Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2017-02-02

    We have studied the reaction dynamics of a prototypical organic reaction using a variationally optimized truncated bias to accelerate transitions between educt and product reactant states. The asymmetric S N 2 nucleophilic substitution reaction of fluoromethane and chloromethane CH 3 F + Cl - ⇌ CH 3 Cl + F - is considered, and many independent biased molecular dynamics simulations have been performed at 600, 900, and 1200 K, collecting several hundred transitions at each temperature. The transition times and relative rate constants have been obtained for both reaction directions. The activation energies extracted from an Arrhenius plot compare well with standard static calculations.

  3. Understanding chemical reactions of CO2 and its isoelectronic molecules with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate by changing the nature of the cation: the case of CS2 in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium acetate studied by NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaço, M Isabel; Besnard, Marcel; Chávez, Fabián Vaca; Pinaud, Noël; Sebastião, Pedro J; Coutinho, João A P; Danten, Yann

    2014-06-28

    NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N) shows that carbon disulfide reacts spontaneously with 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium acetate ([BmPyrro][Ac]) in the liquid phase. It is found that the acetate anions play an important role in conditioning chemical reactions with CS2 leading, via coupled complex reactions, to the degradation of this molecule to form thioacetate anion (CH3COS(-)), CO2, OCS, and trithiocarbonate (CS3 (2-)). In marked contrast, the cation does not lead to the formation of any adducts allowing to conclude that, at most, its role consists in assisting indirectly these reactions. The choice of the [BmPyrro](+) cation in the present study allows disentangling the role of the anion and the cation in the reactions. As a consequence, the ensemble of results already reported on CS2-[Bmim][Ac] (1), OCS-[Bmim][Ac] (2), and CO2-[Bmim][Ac] (3) systems can be consistently rationalized. It is argued that in system (1) both anion and cation play a role. The CS2 reacts with the acetate anion leading to the formation of CH3COS(-), CO2, and OCS. After these reactions have proceeded the nascent CO2 and OCS interact with the cation to form imidazolium-carboxylate ([Bmim] CO2) and imidazolium-thiocarboxylate ([Bmim] COS). The same scenario also applies to system (2). In contrast, in the CO2-[Bmim] [Ac] system a concerted cooperative process between the cation, the anion, and the CO2 molecule takes place. A carbene issued from the cation reacts to form the [Bmim] CO2, whereas the proton released by the ring interacts with the anion to produce acetic acid. In all these systems, the formation of adduct resulting from the reaction between the solute molecule and the carbene species originating from the cation is expected. However, this species was only observed in systems (2) and (3). The absence of such an adduct in system (1) has been theoretically investigated using DFT calculations. The values of the energetic barrier of the reactions show that the formation of [Bmim

  4. Experimental advances and preliminary mathematical modeling of the Swiss-roll mixed-reactant direct borohydride fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziznia, Amin; Oloman, Colin W.; Gyenge, Előd L.

    2014-11-01

    The Swiss-roll single-cell mixed reactant (SR-MRFC) borohydride - oxygen fuel cell equipped with Pt/carbon cloth 3D anode and either MnO2 or Ag gas-diffusion cathodes is investigated by a combination of experimental studies and preliminary mathematical modeling of the polarization curve. We investigate the effects of four variables: cathode side metallic mesh fluid distributor, separator type (Nafion 112® vs. Viledon®), cathode catalyst (MnO2 vs. Ag), and the hydrophilic pore volume fraction of the gas-diffusion cathode. Using a two-phase feed of alkaline borohydride solution (1 M NaBH4 - 2 M NaOH) and O2 gas in an SR-MRFC equipped with Pt/C 3D anode, MnO2 gas diffusion cathode, Viledon® porous diaphragm, expanded mesh cathode-side fluid distributor, the maximum superficial power density is 2230 W m-2 at 323 K and 105 kPa(abs). The latter superficial power density is almost 3.5 times higher than our previously reported superficial power density for the same catalyst combinations. Furthermore, with a Pt anode and Ag cathode catalyst combination, a superficial power density of 2500 W m-2 is achieved with superior performance durability compared to the MnO2 cathode. The fuel cell results are substantiated by impedance spectroscopy analysis and preliminary mathematical model predictions based on mixed potential theory.

  5. Characterization of Cr-rich Cr-Sb multilayer films: Syntheses of a new metastable phase using modulated elemental reactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regus, Matthias; Mankovsky, Sergiy; Polesya, Svitlana; Kuhn, Gerhard; Ditto, Jeffrey; Schürmann, Ulrich; Jacquot, Alexandre; Bartholomé, Kilian; Näther, Christian; Winkler, Markus; König, Jan D.; Böttner, Harald; Kienle, Lorenz; Johnson, David C.; Ebert, Hubert; Bensch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The new metastable compound Cr 1+x Sb with x up to 0.6 has been prepared via a thin film approach using modulated elemental reactants and investigated by in-situ X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, energy dispersive X-ray analysis as well as transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The new Cr-rich antimonide crystallizes in a structure related to the Ni 2 In-type structure, where the crystallographic position (1/3, 2/3, 3/4) is partially occupied by excess Cr. The elemental layers of the pristine material interdiffused significantly before Cr 1+x Sb crystallized. A change in the activation energy was observed for the diffusion process when crystal growth starts. First-principles electronic structure calculations provide insight into the structural stability, magnetic properties and resistivity of Cr 1+x Sb. - Graphical abstract: 1 amorphous multilayered film 2 interdiffused amorphous film 3 metastable crystalline phase 4 thermodynamic stable phase (and by-product). - Highlights: • Interdiffusion of amorphous Cr and Sb occurs before crystallization. • Crystallization of a new metastable phase Cr 1.6 Sb in Ni 2 In-type structure. • The new Cr-rich phase shows half-metallic behavior

  6. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the electrical power generation/power reactant storage and distribution subsystem FMEA/CIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) is presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Electrical Power Generation/Power Reactant Storage and Distribution (EPG/PRSD) subsystem hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baselines with proposed Post 51-L updates included. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. The results of that comparison are documented for the Orbiter EPG/PRSD hardware. The comparison produced agreement on all but 27 FMEAs and 9 CIL items. The discrepancy between the number of IOA findings and NASA FMEAs can be partially explained by the different approaches used by IOA and NASA to group failure modes together to form one FMEA. Also, several IOA items represented inner tank components and ground operations failure modes which were not in the NASA baseline.

  7. Solar fuel production in a novel polymeric electrolyte membrane photoelectrochemical (PEM-PEC) cell with a web of titania nanotube arrays as photoanode and gaseous reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoll, T.; Zafeiropoulos, G.; Tsampas, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    A novel photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell design is proposed and investigated for H-2 production with gaseous reactants. The core of the cell is a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) that consists of a TiO2 nanotube arrays photoanode, a Pt/C cathode, a Pt/C reference electrode and a proton conducting

  8. I + (H2O)2 → HI + (H2O)OH Forward and Reverse Reactions. CCSD(T) Studies Including Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Guoliang; Li, Qian-Shu; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-03-03

    The potential energy profile for the atomic iodine plus water dimer reaction I + (H2O)2 → HI + (H2O)OH has been explored using the "Gold Standard" CCSD(T) method with quadruple-ζ correlation-consistent basis sets. The corresponding information for the reverse reaction HI + (H2O)OH → I + (H2O)2 is also derived. Both zero-point vibrational energies (ZPVEs) and spin-orbit (SO) coupling are considered, and these notably alter the classical energetics. On the basis of the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ-PP results, including ZPVE and SO coupling, the forward reaction is found to be endothermic by 47.4 kcal/mol, implying a significant exothermicity for the reverse reaction. The entrance complex I···(H2O)2 is bound by 1.8 kcal/mol, and this dissociation energy is significantly affected by SO coupling. The reaction barrier lies 45.1 kcal/mol higher than the reactants. The exit complex HI···(H2O)OH is bound by 3.0 kcal/mol relative to the asymptotic limit. At every level of theory, the reverse reaction HI + (H2O)OH → I + (H2O)2 proceeds without a barrier. Compared with the analogous water monomer reaction I + H2O → HI + OH, the additional water molecule reduces the relative energies of the entrance stationary point, transition state, and exit complex by 3-5 kcal/mol. The I + (H2O)2 reaction is related to the valence isoelectronic bromine and chlorine reactions but is distinctly different from the F + (H2O)2 system.

  9. Reaction Equilibrium of the ω-Transamination of (S)-Phenylethylamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voges, Matthias; Abu, Rohana; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on the thermodynamic equilibrium of the ω-transaminase-catalyzed reaction of (S)-phenylethylamine with cyclohexanone to acetophenone and cyclohexylamine in aqueous solution. For this purpose, the equilibrium concentrations of the reaction were experimentally investigated under...... varying reaction conditions. It was observed that the temperature (30 and 37 °C), the pH (between pH 7 and pH 9), as well as the initial reactant concentrations (between 5 and 50 mmol·kg-1) influenced the equilibrium position of the reaction. The position of the reaction equilibrium was moderately shifted...... position to the reactant side. In order to explain these effects, the activity coefficients of the reacting agents were calculated and the activity-based thermodynamic equilibrium constant Kth of the reaction was determined. For this purpose, the activity coefficients of the reacting agents were modeled...

  10. Formation of Nitriles in the Interstellar Medium via Reactions of Cyano Radicals, CN(X2Σ+), with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, N.; Asvany, O.; Huang, L. C. L.; Lee, Y. T.; Kaiser, R. I.; Osamura, Y.; Bettinger, H. F.

    2000-12-01

    Crossed molecular beam experiments of cyano radicals, CN(X2Σ+, ν=0), in their electronic and vibrational ground state reacting with unsaturated hydrocarbons acetylene, C2H2(X1Σ+g), ethylene, C2H4(X1Ag), methylacetylene, CH3CCH(X1A1), allene, H2CCCH2(X1A1), dimethylacetylene, CH3CCCH3(X1A1'), and benzene, C6H6 (X1A1g), were performed at relative collision energies between 13.3 and 36.4 kJ mol-1 to unravel the formation of unsaturated nitriles in the outflows of late-type AGB carbon stars and molecular clouds. In all reactions, the CN radical was found to attack the π electron density of the hydrocarbon molecule with the radical center located at the carbon atom; the formation of an initial addition complex is a prevalent pathway on all the involved potential energy surfaces. A subsequent carbon-hydrogen bond rupture yields the nitriles cyanoacetylene, HCCCN (X1Σ+), vinylcyanide, C2H3CN (X1A'), 1-methylcyanoacetylene, CH3CCCN (X1A1), cyanoallene, H2CCCH(CN) (X1A'), 3-methylcyanoacetylene, HCCCH2CN(X1A'), 1,1-cyanomethylallene, H2CCC(CN)(CH3) (X1A'), and cyanobenzene, C6H5CN (X1A1). In case of acetylene and ethylene, a second reaction channel involves a [1, 2]-H atom shift in the initial HCCHCN and H2CCH2CN collision complexes prior to a hydrogen atom release to form cyanoacetylene, HCCCN (X1Σ+), and vinylcyanide, C2H3CN (X1A'). Since all these radical-neutral reactions show no entrance barriers, have exit barriers well below the energy of the reactant molecules, and are exothermic, the explicit identification of this CN versus H atom exchange pathway under single collision conditions makes this reaction class a compelling candidate to synthesize unsaturated nitriles in interstellar environments holding temperatures as low as 10 K. This general concept makes it even feasible to predict the formation of nitriles once the corresponding unsaturated hydrocarbons are identified in the interstellar medium. Here HCCCN, C2H3CN, and CH3CCCN have been already observed

  11. The first organocatalytic, ortho-regioselective inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejmanowska, Joanna; Jasiński, Marcin; Wojciechowski, Jakub; Mlostoń, Grzegorz; Albrecht, Łukasz

    2017-10-17

    The development of the unprecedented ortho-regioselective inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder (IEDHDA) reaction is described. It has been demonstrated that by proper choice of reactants and reaction conditions the inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition can be realized with unprecedented regioselectivity arising from the reaction between the terminal carbon atom of the dienophile and the heteroatom of the heterodiene.

  12. Biological mechanisms, one molecule at a time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Ruben L.

    2011-01-01

    The last 15 years have witnessed the development of tools that allow the observation and manipulation of single molecules. The rapidly expanding application of these technologies for investigating biological systems of ever-increasing complexity is revolutionizing our ability to probe the mechanisms of biological reactions. Here, we compare the mechanistic information available from single-molecule experiments with the information typically obtained from ensemble studies and show how these two experimental approaches interface with each other. We next present a basic overview of the toolkit for observing and manipulating biology one molecule at a time. We close by presenting a case study demonstrating the impact that single-molecule approaches have had on our understanding of one of life's most fundamental biochemical reactions: the translation of a messenger RNA into its encoded protein by the ribosome. PMID:21685361

  13. Learning to Predict Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles respectively are not high-throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, or lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry dataset consisting of 1630 full multi-step reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval, problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of non-productive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  14. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  15. Spectroscopy and Chemistry of Cold Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Takamasa

    2012-06-01

    Molecules at low temperatures are expected to behave quite differently from those at high temperatures because pronounced quantum effects emerge from thermal averages. Even at 10 K, a significant enhancement of reaction cross section is expected due to tunneling and resonance effects. Chemistry at this temperature is very important in order to understand chemical reactions in interstellar molecular clouds. At temperatures lower than 1 K, collisions and intermolecular interactions become qualitatively different from those at high temperatures because of the large thermal de Broglie wavelength of molecules. Collisions at these temperatures must be treated as the interference of molecular matter waves, but not as hard sphere collisions. A Bose-Einstein condensate is a significant state of matter as a result of coherent matter wave interaction. Especially, dense para-H_2 molecules are predicted to become a condensate even around 1 K. A convenient method to investigate molecules around 1 K is to dope molecules in cold matrices. Among various matrices, quantum hosts such as solid para-H_2 and superfluid He nano-droplets have been proven to be an excellent host for high-resolution spectroscopy. Rovibrational motion of molecules in these quantum hosts is well quantized on account of the weak interactions and the softness of quantum environment. The linewidths of infrared spectra of molecules in the quantum hosts are extremely narrow compared with those in other matrices. The sharp linewidths allow us to resolve fine spectral structures originated in subtle interactions between guest and host molecules. In this talk, I will describe how the splitting and lineshape of high-resolution spectra of molecules in quantum hosts give us new information on the static and dynamical interactions of molecules in quantum medium. The topics include dynamical response of superfluid environment upon rotational excitation, and possible superfluid phase of para-H_2 clusters. I will also

  16. Effects of mercaptans and disulfides on photochemical and high energy radiation induced reactions. Progress report, November 1, 1974--October 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.G.

    1975-10-01

    A chain reaction may be formulated at alkaline pH in terms of e - /sub aq/ acting as a source of - OH as a reactant and H. regenerating e - /sub aq/. This may account for radiolytic conversion of CO to formate with high G. 60 Co γ-radiolysis of alkaline aqueous acetonitrile and acetamide gave no evidence of a chain; extensive hydrolysis of methyl acetate is now attributed to non-radiolytic, normal hydrolysis. Aromatic mercaptans are found to retard photoreduction of a benzophenone by aliphatic amines, largely by hydrogen atom-transfer repair reactions. Aliphatic mercaptans accelerate photoreduction, apparently by affecting the reduction to quenching ratio in the intermediate charge-transfer complex. In photoreduction of a benzophenone by 2,3-butylene glycol at pH 3, the glycol is converted, not to 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, but to 2-butanone, and about 4 molecules of this are formed per molecule of ketone reduced. A short chain appears to be established. Mercaptan appears to accelerate the reduction of the ketone and retard the formation of 2-butanone

  17. Structure-reactivity modeling using mixture-based representation of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Pavel; Madzhidov, Timur; Gimadiev, Timur; Bodrov, Andrey; Nugmanov, Ramil; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-09-01

    We describe a novel approach of reaction representation as a combination of two mixtures: a mixture of reactants and a mixture of products. In turn, each mixture can be encoded using an earlier reported approach involving simplex descriptors (SiRMS). The feature vector representing these two mixtures results from either concatenated product and reactant descriptors or the difference between descriptors of products and reactants. This reaction representation doesn't need an explicit labeling of a reaction center. The rigorous "product-out" cross-validation (CV) strategy has been suggested. Unlike the naïve "reaction-out" CV approach based on a random selection of items, the proposed one provides with more realistic estimation of prediction accuracy for reactions resulting in novel products. The new methodology has been applied to model rate constants of E2 reactions. It has been demonstrated that the use of the fragment control domain applicability approach significantly increases prediction accuracy of the models. The models obtained with new "mixture" approach performed better than those required either explicit (Condensed Graph of Reaction) or implicit (reaction fingerprints) reaction center labeling.

  18. Single cyanide-bridged Mo(W)/S/Cu cluster-based coordination polymers: Reactant- and stoichiometry-dependent syntheses, effective photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinfang, E-mail: zjf260@jiangnan.edu.cn [China-Australia Joint Research Center for Functional Molecular Materials, School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Wang, Chao [China-Australia Joint Research Center for Functional Molecular Materials, School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Wang, Yinlin; Chen, Weitao [China-Australia Joint Research Center for Functional Molecular Materials, Scientific Research Academy, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Zhang, Chi, E-mail: chizhang@jiangnan.edu.cn [China-Australia Joint Research Center for Functional Molecular Materials, School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2015-11-15

    The systematic study on the reaction variables affecting single cyanide-bridged Mo(W)/S/Cu cluster-based coordination polymers (CPs) is firstly demonstrated. Five anionic single cyanide-bridged Mo(W)/S/Cu cluster-based CPs {[Pr_4N][WS_4Cu_3(CN)_2]}{sub n} (1), {[Pr_4N][WS_4Cu_4(CN)_3]}{sub n} (2), {[Pr_4N][WOS_3Cu_3(CN)_2]}{sub n} (3), {[Bu_4N][WOS_3Cu_3(CN)_2]}{sub n} (4) and {[Bu_4N][MoOS_3Cu_3(CN)_2]}{sub n} (5) were prepared by varying the molar ratios of the starting materials, and the specific cations, cluster building blocks and central metal atoms in the cluster building blocks. 1 possesses an anionic 3D diamondoid framework constructed from 4-connected T-shaped clusters [WS{sub 4}Cu{sub 3}]{sup +} and single CN{sup −} bridges. 2 is fabricated from 6-connected planar ‘open’ clusters [WS{sub 4}Cu{sub 4}]{sup 2+} and single CN{sup −} bridges, forming an anionic 3D architecture with an “ACS” topology. 3 and 4 exhibit novel anionic 2-D double-layer networks, both constructed from nest-shaped clusters [WOS{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}]{sup +} linked by single CN{sup −} bridges, but containing the different cations [Pr{sub 4}N]{sup +} and [Bu{sub 4}N]{sup +}, respectively. 5 is constructed from nest-shaped clusters [MoOS{sub 3}Cu{sub 3}]{sup +} and single CN{sup −} bridges, with an anionic 3D diamondoid framework. The anionic frameworks of 1-5, all sustained by single CN{sup −} bridges, are non-interpenetrating and exhibit huge potential void volumes. Employing differing molar ratios of the reactants and varying the cluster building blocks resulted in differing single cyanide-bridged Mo(W)/S/Cu cluster-based CPs, while replacing the cation ([Pr{sub 4}N]{sup +} vs. [Bu{sub 4}N]{sup +}) was found to have negligible impact on the nature of the architecture. Unexpectedly, replacement of the central metal atom (W vs. Mo) in the cluster building blocks had a pronounced effect on the framework. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activities of heterothiometallic

  19. Theoretical study of the Wittig reaction of cyclic ketones with phosphorus ylide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarwal, Nisha; Thankachan, Pompozhi Protasis

    2015-04-01

    The Wittig reaction of cyclopropanone, cyclobutanone and cyclopentanone with phosphorus ylide (Me3P = CH2) in gas phase was investigated computationally at B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory. In the Wittig reaction of cyclic ketones, two transition states (TS1 and TS2), corresponding to formation and decomposition of oxaphosphetane (OP) were located and investigated. Two loosely bound intermediates, a reactant complex (RC) and a product complex (PC) were also found. In the reaction of cyclopropanone, cyclobutanone and cyclopentanone, two oxaphosphetanes (OP1 and OP2) were predicted. OP1 initially formed was converted into OP2 by pseudorotation. In contrast to the reactions with cyclobutanone and cyclopentanone, an early TS1 was found in the reaction of cyclopropanone. The order of first activation energy barrier relative to reactant total energy was found to be cyclopropanone (-4.97 kcal mol(-1)) < cyclobutanone (0.30 kcal mol(-1)) < cyclopentanone (3.60 kcal mol(-1)).

  20. Recent developments in biocatalysis in multiphasic ionic liquid reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Lars-Erik; von Langermann, Jan; Kragl, Udo

    2018-06-01

    Ionic liquids are well known and frequently used 'designer solvents' for biocatalytic reactions. This review highlights recent achievements in the field of multiphasic ionic liquid-based reaction concepts. It covers classical biphasic systems including supported ionic liquid phases, thermo-regulated multi-component solvent systems (TMS) and polymerized ionic liquids. These powerful concepts combine unique reaction conditions with a high potential for future applications on a laboratory and industrial scale. The presence of a multiphasic system simplifies downstream processing due to the distribution of the catalyst and reactants in different phases.

  1. Influence of power-law index on an unsteady exothermic reaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents the solution of an unsteady Arrhenius exothermic reaction where we reduced the exponential term to a power-law approximation. A numerical solution of the problem is obtained using shooting technique with second order Runge-Kuta scheme. It is shown that the temperature of the reactant depends on ...

  2. The Ammonia Synthesis Reaction: An Exception to the Le Chatelier Principle and Effects of Nonideality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uline, Mark J.; Corti, David S.

    2006-01-01

    Le Chatelier's principle states that the further addition of a particular component will cause the reaction to shift in the direction that reduces the total number of moles of the system. However, the addition of one reactant [N[subscript 2

  3. Microwave-Assisted Organic Synthesis Using Benign Reaction Medium and Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Account of chemical reactions expedited by microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants for the rapid one-pot assembly of heterocyclic compounds from in situ generated reactive intermediates via enamines or using hypervalent iodine reagents will be described that can be adapted for ...

  4. Toward a Kinetic Model for Acrylamide Formation in a Glucose-Asparagine Reaction System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.; Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Ruck, A.L.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide in a glucose-asparagine reaction system is pro-posed. Equimolar solutions (0.2 M) of glucose and asparagine were heated at different tempera-tures (120-200 C) at pH 6.8. Besides the reactants, acrylamide, fructose, and melanoidins were quantified after

  5. A kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction is proposed based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. Special attention was paid to reactants, intermediates and end products: -fructose, N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG), 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose and

  6. Redox flow batteries with serpentine flow fields: Distributions of electrolyte flow reactant penetration into the porous carbon electrodes and effects on performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xinyou; Prahl, Joseph M.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2018-04-01

    Redox flow batteries with flow field designs have been demonstrated to boost their capacities to deliver high current density and power density in medium and large-scale energy storage applications. Nevertheless, the fundamental mechanisms involved with improved current density in flow batteries with serpentine flow field designs have been not fully understood. Here we report a three-dimensional model of a serpentine flow field over a porous carbon electrode to examine the distributions of pressure driven electrolyte flow penetrations into the porous carbon electrodes. We also estimate the maximum current densities associated with stoichiometric availability of electrolyte reactant flow penetrations through the porous carbon electrodes. The results predict reasonably well observed experimental data without using any adjustable parameters. This fundamental work on electrolyte flow distributions of limiting reactant availability will contribute to a better understanding of limits on electrochemical performance in flow batteries with serpentine flow field designs and should be helpful to optimizing flow batteries.

  7. Ion chemistry at elevated ion–molecule interaction energies in a selected ion flow-drift tube: reactions of H3O+, NO+ and O2+ with saturated aliphatic ketones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 47 (2017), s. 31714-31723 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-13157Y EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 674911 - IMPACT Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : reactions of H3O+, NO+ and O2+ * SIFT-MS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  8. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10] Elsila et al. (2005) GCA 5, 1349. [11] Glavin and Dworkin (2009) PNAS 106, 5487. [12] Pizzarello et al. (2003) GCA 67, 1589. [13] Chan et al. (2012) MAPS. 47, 1502

  9. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D.; Tsori, Yoav, E-mail: tsori@bgu.ac.il [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  10. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D; Tsori, Yoav

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  11. Accurate Quantum Wave Packet Study of the Deep Well D+ + HD Reaction: Product Ro-vibrational State-Resolved Integral and Differential Cross Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haixiang; Zhu, Weimin; Su, Wenli; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin

    2018-03-08

    The H + + H 2 reaction and its isotopic variants as the simplest triatomic ion-molecule reactive system have been attracting much interests, however there are few studies on the titled reaction at state-to-state level until recent years. In this work, accurate state-to-state quantum dynamics studies of the titled reaction have been carried out by a reactant Jacobi coordinate-based time-dependent wave packet approach on diabatic potential energy surfaces constructed by Kamisaka et al. Product ro-vibrational state-resolved information has been calculated for collision energies up to 0.2 eV with maximal total angular momentum J = 40. The necessity of including all K-component for accounting the Coriolis coupling for the reaction has been illuminated. Competitions between the two product channels, (D + + HD' → D' + + HD and D + + HD' → H + + DD') were investigated. Total integral cross sections suggest that resonances enhance the reactivity of channel D + + HD'→ H + + DD', however, resonances depress the reactivity of the another channel D + + HD' → D' + + HD. The structures of the differential cross sections are complicated and depend strongly on collision energies of the two channels and also on the product rotational states. All of the product ro-vibrational state-resolved differential cross sections for this reaction do not exhibit rigorous backward-forward symmetry which may indicate that the lifetimes of the intermediate resonance complexes should not be that long. The dynamical observables of this deuterated isotopic reaction are quite different from the reaction of H + + H 2 → H 2 + H + reported previously.

  12. ReactionPredictor: prediction of complex chemical reactions at the mechanistic level using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-10-22

    Proposing reasonable mechanisms and predicting the course of chemical reactions is important to the practice of organic chemistry. Approaches to reaction prediction have historically used obfuscating representations and manually encoded patterns or rules. Here we present ReactionPredictor, a machine learning approach to reaction prediction that models elementary, mechanistic reactions as interactions between approximate molecular orbitals (MOs). A training data set of productive reactions known to occur at reasonable rates and yields and verified by inclusion in the literature or textbooks is derived from an existing rule-based system and expanded upon with manual curation from graduate level textbooks. Using this training data set of complex polar, hypervalent, radical, and pericyclic reactions, a two-stage machine learning prediction framework is trained and validated. In the first stage, filtering models trained at the level of individual MOs are used to reduce the space of possible reactions to consider. In the second stage, ranking models over the filtered space of possible reactions are used to order the reactions such that the productive reactions are the top ranked. The resulting model, ReactionPredictor, perfectly ranks polar reactions 78.1% of the time and recovers all productive reactions 95.7% of the time when allowing for small numbers of errors. Pericyclic and radical reactions are perfectly ranked 85.8% and 77.0% of the time, respectively, rising to >93% recovery for both reaction types with a small number of allowed errors. Decisions about which of the polar, pericyclic, or radical reaction type ranking models to use can be made with >99% accuracy. Finally, for multistep reaction pathways, we implement the first mechanistic pathway predictor using constrained tree-search to discover a set of reasonable mechanistic steps from given reactants to given products. Webserver implementations of both the single step and pathway versions of Reaction

  13. Quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setser, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The two-body, thermal quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms are reviewed using excited states of Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms as examples. State-specific interstate relaxation and excitation-transfer reactions with atomic colliders are discussed first. These results then are used to discuss quenching reactions of excited-state atoms with diatomic and polyatomic molecules, the latter have large cross sections, and the reactions can proceed by excitation transfer and by reactive quenching. Excited states of molecules are not considered; however, a table of quenching rate constants is given for six excited-state molecules in an appendix

  14. Synthesis of molecules in interstellar clouds and star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, K.K.; Ghosh, S.N.

    1981-01-01

    Study of the formation and destruction processes of interstellar molecules may throw certain light on interstellar medium. Formation and destruction processes of some interstellar molecules are proposed on the basis of laboratory data. The abundances of these molecules are calculated under steady-state condition. The calculated values are then compared with the observed values, obtained by different investigators. It appears that gas phase ion-neutral reactions are capable of synthesizing most interstellar molecules. The role of ion-neutral reactions to star formation has also been discussed. (author)

  15. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  16. Density functional theory studies on the solvent effects in Al(H2O)63+ water-exchange reactions: the number and arrangement of outer-sphere water molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Shaonan; Zhang, Fuping; Wang, Ye; Bi, Shuping

    2018-03-07

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with cluster models are performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level for investigating the solvent effects in Al(H 2 O) 6 3+ water-exchange reactions. A "One-by-one" method is proposed to obtain the most representative number and arrangement of explicit H 2 Os in the second hydration sphere. First, all the possible ways to locate one explicit H 2 O in second sphere (N m ' = 1) based on the gas phase structure (N m ' = 0) are examined, and the optimal pathway (with the lowest energy barrier) for N m ' = 1 is determined. Next, more explicit H 2 Os are added one by one until the inner-sphere is fully hydrogen bonded. Finally, the optimal pathways with N m ' = 0-7 are obtained. The structural and energetic parameters as well as the lifetimes of the transition states are compared with the results obtained with the "Independent-minimum" method and the "Independent-average" method, and all three methods show that the pathway with N m ' = 6 may be representative. Our results give a new idea for finding the representative pathway for water-exchange reactions in other hydrated metal ion systems.

  17. Competing irreversible cooperative reactions on polymer chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.W.; Hoffman, D.K.; Burgess, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    We analyze model processes involving competition between several irreversible reactions at the sites of a 1D, infinite, uniform polymer chain. These reactions can be cooperative, i.e., the corresponding rates depend on the state of the surrounding sites. An infinite hierarchy of rate equations is readily derived for the probabilities of various subconfigurations. By exploiting a shielding property of suitable blocks of unreacted sites, we show how exact hierarchy truncation and solution is sometimes possible. The behavior of solutions is illustrated in several cases by plotting families of ''reaction trajectories'' for varying ratios of reactant concentrations. As a specific application, we consider competition between coordination of ZnCl 2 to pairs of oxygen atoms and to single oxygen atoms in poly(propylene oxide). The observed glass transition temperature behavior is eludicated

  18. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    -molecular mechanics scheme, and tools to analyse statistical data and generate relative free energies and free energy surfaces. The methodology is applied to several charge transfer species and reactions in chemical environments - chemical in the sense that solvent, counter ions and substrate surfaces are taken...... in to account - which directly influence the reactants and resulting reaction through both physical and chemical interactions. All methods are though general and can be applied to different types of chemistry. First, the basis of the various theoretical tools is presented and applied to several test systems...... and asymmetric charge transfer reactions between several first-row transition metals in water. The results are compared to experiments and rationalised with classical analytic expressions. Shortcomings of the methods are accounted for with clear steps towards improved accuracy. Later the analysis is extended...

  19. Hybrid models for chemical reaction networks: Multiscale theory and application to gene regulatory systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Stefanie; Schütte, Christof

    2017-09-01

    Well-mixed stochastic chemical kinetics are properly modeled by the chemical master equation (CME) and associated Markov jump processes in molecule number space. If the reactants are present in large amounts, however, corresponding simulations of the stochastic dynamics become computationally expensive and model reductions are demanded. The classical model reduction approach uniformly rescales the overall dynamics to obtain deterministic systems characterized by ordinary differential equations, the well-known mass action reaction rate equations. For systems with multiple scales, there exist hybrid approaches that keep parts of the system discrete while another part is approximated either using Langevin dynamics or deterministically. This paper aims at giving a coherent overview of the different hybrid approaches, focusing on their basic concepts and the relation between them. We derive a novel general description of such hybrid models that allows expressing various forms by one type of equation. We also check in how far the approaches apply to model extensions of the CME for dynamics which do not comply with the central well-mixed condition and require some spatial resolution. A simple but meaningful gene expression system with negative self-regulation is analysed to illustrate the different approximation qualities of some of the hybrid approaches discussed. Especially, we reveal the cause of error in the case of small volume approximations.

  20. Hybrid models for chemical reaction networks: Multiscale theory and application to gene regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Stefanie; Schütte, Christof

    2017-09-21

    Well-mixed stochastic chemical kinetics are properly modeled by the chemical master equation (CME) and associated Markov jump processes in molecule number space. If the reactants are present in large amounts, however, corresponding simulations of the stochastic dynamics become computationally expensive and model reductions are demanded. The classical model reduction approach uniformly rescales the overall dynamics to obtain deterministic systems characterized by ordinary differential equations, the well-known mass action reaction rate equations. For systems with multiple scales, there exist hybrid approaches that keep parts of the system discrete while another part is approximated either using Langevin dynamics or deterministically. This paper aims at giving a coherent overview of the different hybrid approaches, focusing on their basic concepts and the relation between them. We derive a novel general description of such hybrid models that allows expressing various forms by one type of equation. We also check in how far the approaches apply to model extensions of the CME for dynamics which do not comply with the central well-mixed condition and require some spatial resolution. A simple but meaningful gene expression system with negative self-regulation is analysed to illustrate the different approximation qualities of some of the hybrid approaches discussed. Especially, we reveal the cause of error in the case of small volume approximations.

  1. Multiphoton dissociation and thermal unimolecular reactions induced by infrared lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, H.L.

    1981-04-01

    Multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of ethyl chloride was studied using a tunable 3.3 μm laser to excite CH stretches. The absorbed energy increases almost linearly with fluence, while for 10 μm excitation there is substantial saturation. Much higher dissociation yields were observed for 3.3 μm excitation than for 10 μm excitation, reflecting bottlenecking in the discrete region of 10 μm excitation. The resonant nature of the excitation allows the rate equations description for transitions in the quasicontinuum and continuum to be extended to the discrete levels. Absorption cross sections are estimated from ordinary ir spectra. A set of cross sections which is constant or slowly decreasing with increasing vibrational excitation gives good fits to both absorption and dissociation yield data. The rate equations model was also used to quantitatively calculate the pressure dependence of the MPD yield of SF 6 caused by vibrational self-quenching. Between 1000-3000 cm -1 of energy is removed from SF 6 excited to approx. > 60 kcal/mole by collision with a cold SF 6 molecule at gas kinetic rate. Calculation showed the fluence dependence of dissociation varies strongly with the gas pressure. Infrared multiphoton excitation was applied to study thermal unimolecular reactions. With SiF 4 as absorbing gas for the CO 2 laser pulse, transient high temperature pulses were generated in a gas mixture. IR fluorescence from the medium reflected the decay of the temperature. The activation energy and the preexponential factor of the reactant dissociation were obtained from a phenomenological model calculation. Results are presented in detail

  2. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    redox reactions of substrates like biological molecules,11,12 dyes,13,14 alcohols15,16 etc. Colloidal ... state which is characterised by a phenomenon of dual fluorescence. In the present ... The dried solid was transferred to quartz cell under vacuum ... Recently Grätzel et al34 have developed the dye-sensitized meso-.

  3. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  4. Laser Spectroscopy of Ruthenium Containing Diatomic Molecules: RuH/D and RuP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Allan G.; Konder, Ricarda M.; Nickerson, Nicole M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    In the last few years, the Cheung group in Hong Kong and the Steimle group in Arizona have successfully studied several ruthenium containing diatomic molecules, RuX (X =C, O, N, B, using the laser-ablation molecular jet technique. Based on this success, the UNB spectroscopy group decided to try and find the optical signatures of other RuX molecules. Using CH_3OH and PH_3 as reactant gases, the RuH and RuP diatomic molecules have been detected in surveys of the 420 - 675 nm spectral region. RuD has also been made using fully deuterated methanol as a reactant. Dispersed fluorescence experiments have been performed to determine ground state vibrational frequencies and the presence of any low-lying electronic states. Rotationally resolved spectra for these molecules have also been taken and the analysis is proceeding. The most recent results will be presented. F. Wang et al., Journal of Chemical Physics 139, 174318 (2013). N. Wang et al., Journal of Physical Chemistry A 117, 13279 (2013). T. Steimle et al., Journal of Chemical Physics 119, 12965 (2003). N. Wang et al., Chemical Physics Letters 547, 21 (2012).

  5. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Our research program is concerned with the kinetics of elementary gas phase reactions and energy transfer involving polyatomic molecules. We report here on three ongoing projects: The reaction of oxygen atoms with hydrogen molecules, the electronic relaxation of NH radicals, and the vibrational relaxation of highly excited SF 6 molecules. 10 refs., 5 figs

  6. The reaction of nitromethane with hydrogen and deuterium atoms in the gas phase. A mechanistic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Thomsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of the reaction between H and CH3NO2, has been studied in a discharge flow system using electron paramagnetic resonance and modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry for the detection of reactants and products. Deuterium atoms have, in addition to CD3NO2, been used to support...... the proposed reaction mechanism. The reaction was studied with the atomic reactant in slight excess at 298 K and a total pressure of 2 Torr. Two concurrent reaction channels: (1a) H+CH3NO2-->HONO+.CH3 and (1b) H+CH3NO2-->CH3NO+.OH were observed. The branching ratio, k1a/(k1a+k1b), is 0.7+/-0.2....

  7. Label-assisted mass spectrometry for the acceleration of reaction discovery and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pardo, Jaime R.; Chai, David I.; Liu, Song; Mrksich, Milan; Kozmin, Sergey A.

    2013-05-01

    The identification of new reactions expands our knowledge of chemical reactivity and enables new synthetic applications. Accelerating the pace of this discovery process remains challenging. We describe a highly effective and simple platform for screening a large number of potential chemical reactions in order to discover and optimize previously unknown catalytic transformations, thereby revealing new chemical reactivity. Our strategy is based on labelling one of the reactants with a polyaromatic chemical tag, which selectively undergoes a photoionization/desorption process upon laser irradiation, without the assistance of an external matrix, and enables rapid mass spectrometric detection of any products originating from such labelled reactants in complex reaction mixtures without any chromatographic separation. This method was successfully used for high-throughput discovery and subsequent optimization of two previously unknown benzannulation reactions.

  8. Computational study on the functionalization of BNNC with pyrrole molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payvand, Akram; Tavangar, Zahra

    2018-05-01

    The functionalization of the boron nitride nanocone (BNNC) by pyrrole molecule was studied using B3LYP/6-311+G(d) level of theory. The reaction was studied in three methods in different layers of the nanocone: Diels-Alder cycloaddition, quartet cycloaddition and the reaction of the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole molecule with the boron or nitrogen atom of the BNNC. Thermodynamic quantities, Chemical hardness and potential and electrophilicity index of the functionalized BNNC were studied. The results show that the tip of nanocone has a higher tendency for participation in the reaction and the most favorable product of the reaction between BNNC and pyrrole molecule is produced from the reaction of N atom of pyrrole with the B atom of BNNC. The reaction decreases the energy gap value which leads to increasing the reactivity and conductivity of functionalized nanocone. The calculated NICS values confirm the aromaticity in the pristine nanocone as well as in the functionalized nanocone.

  9. The pentadehydro-Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng; Naredla, Rajasekhar Reddy; Thompson, Severin K; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-04-28

    In the classic Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction, the overall degree of unsaturation (or oxidation state) of the 4π (diene) and 2π (dienophile) pairs of reactants dictates the oxidation state of the newly formed six-membered carbocycle. For example, in the classic Diels-Alder reaction, butadiene and ethylene combine to produce cyclohexene. More recent developments include variants in which the number of hydrogen atoms in the reactant pair and in the resulting product is reduced by, for example, four in the tetradehydro-Diels-Alder (TDDA) and by six in the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reactions. Any oxidation state higher than tetradehydro (that is, lacking more than four hydrogens) leads to the production of a reactive intermediate that is more highly oxidized than benzene. This increases the power of the overall process substantially, because trapping of the reactive intermediate can be used to increase the structural complexity of the final product in a controllable and versatile manner. Here we report an unprecedented overall 4π + 2π cycloaddition reaction that generates a different, highly reactive intermediate known as an α,3-dehydrotoluene. This species is in the same oxidation state as a benzyne. Like benzynes, α,3-dehydrotoluenes can be captured by various trapping agents to produce structurally diverse products that are complementary to those arising from the HDDA process. We call this new cycloisomerization process a pentadehydro-Diels-Alder (PDDA) reaction-a nomenclature chosen for chemical taxonomic reasons rather than mechanistic ones. In addition to alkynes, nitriles (RC≡N), although non-participants in aza-HDDA reactions, readily function as the 2π component in PDDA cyclizations to produce, via trapping of the α,3-(5-aza)dehydrotoluene intermediates, pyridine-containing products.

  10. Enrichment: CRISLA [chemical reaction by isotope selective activation] aims to reduce costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Every year, more than $3 billion is spent on enriching uranium. CRISLA (Chemical Reaction by Isotope Selective Activation) uses a laser-catalyzed chemical reaction which, its proponents claim, could substantially reduce these costs. In CRISLA, an infrared CO laser illuminates the intracavity reaction cell (IC) at a frequency tuned to excite primarily UF 6 . When UF 6 and co-reactant RX are passed through the IC, the tuned laser photons preferentially enhance the reaction of UF 6 with RX ten-thousand-fold over the thermal reaction rate. Thus the laser serves as an activator and the chemical energy for separation is largely chemical. (author)

  11. Time dependent quantum dynamics study of the O++H2(v=0,j=0)→OH++H ion-molecule reaction and isotopic variants (D2,HD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Rodrigo; Sierra, Jose Daniel; Gray, Stephen K.; Gonzalez, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    The time dependent real wave packet method using the helicity decoupling approximation was used to calculate the cross section evolution with collision energy (excitation function) of the O + +H 2 (v=0,j=0)→OH + +H reaction and its isotopic variants with D 2 and HD, using the best available ab initio analytical potential energy surface. The comparison of the calculated excitation functions with exact quantum results and experimental data showed that the present quantum dynamics approach is a very useful tool for the study of the selected and related systems, in a quite wide collision energy interval (approximately 0.0-1.1 eV), involving a much lower computational cost than the quantum exact methods and without a significant loss of accuracy in the cross sections

  12. Biodiesel forming reactions using heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yijun

    Biodiesel synthesis from biomass provides a means for utilizing effectively renewable resources, a way to convert waste vegetable oils and animal fats to a useful product, a way to recycle carbon dioxide for a combustion fuel, and production of a fuel that is biodegradable, non-toxic, and has a lower emission profile than petroleum-diesel. Free fatty acid (FFA) esterification and triglyceride (TG) transesterification with low molecular weight alcohols constitute the synthetic routes to prepare biodiesel from lipid feedstocks. This project was aimed at developing a better understanding of important fundamental issues involved in heterogeneous catalyzed biodiesel forming reactions using mainly model compounds, representing part of on-going efforts to build up a rational base for assay, design, and performance optimization of solid acids/bases in biodiesel synthesis. As FFA esterification proceeds, water is continuously formed as a byproduct and affects reaction rates in a negative manner. Using sulfuric acid (as a catalyst) and acetic acid (as a model compound for FFA), the impact of increasing concentrations of water on acid catalysis was investigated. The order of the water effect on reaction rate was determined to be -0.83. Sulfuric acid lost up to 90% activity as the amount of water present increased. The nature of the negative effect of water on esterification was found to go beyond the scope of reverse hydrolysis and was associated with the diminished acid strength of sulfuric acid as a result of the preferential solvation by water molecules of its catalytic protons. The results indicate that as esterification progresses and byproduct water is produced, deactivation of a Bronsted acid catalyst like H2SO4 occurs. Using a solid composite acid (SAC-13) as an example of heterogeneous catalysts and sulfuric acid as a homogeneous reference, similar reaction inhibition by water was demonstrated for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. This similarity together with

  13. Probing Intranuclear Environments at the Single-Molecule Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünwald, David; Martin, Robert M.; Buschmann, Volker; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2008-01-01

    Genome activity and nuclear metabolism clearly depend on accessibility, but it is not known whether and to what extent nuclear structures limit the mobility and access of individual molecules. We used fluorescently labeled streptavidin with a nuclear localization signal as an average-sized, inert protein to probe the nuclear environment. The protein was injected into the cytoplasm of mouse cells, and single molecules were tracked in the nucleus with high-speed fluorescence microscopy. We analyzed and compared the mobility of single streptavidin molecules in structurally and functionally distinct nuclear compartments of living cells. Our results indicated that all nuclear subcompartments were easily and similarly accessible for such an average-sized protein, and even condensed heterochromatin neither excluded single molecules nor impeded their passage. The only significant difference was a higher frequency of transient trappings in heterochromatin, which lasted only tens of milliseconds. The streptavidin molecules, however, did not accumulate in heterochromatin, suggesting comparatively less free volume. Interestingly, the nucleolus seemed to exclude streptavidin, as it did many other nuclear proteins, when visualized by conventional fluorescence microscopy. The tracking of single molecules, nonetheless, showed no evidence for repulsion at the border but relatively unimpeded passage through the nucleolus. These results clearly show that single-molecule tracking can provide novel insights into mobility of proteins in the nucleus that cannot be obtained by conventional fluorescence microscopy. Our results suggest that nuclear processes may not be regulated at the level of physical accessibility but rather by local concentration of reactants and availability of binding sites. PMID:18065482

  14. Computational Chemical Kinetics for the Reaction of Criegee Intermediate CH2OO with HNO3 and Its Catalytic Conversion to OH and HCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, P; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lin, M C

    2017-05-25

    The kinetics and mechanisms for the reaction of the Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with HNO 3 and the unimolecular decomposition of its reaction product CH 2 (O)NO 3 are important in atmospheric chemistry. The potential-energy profile of the reactions predicted with the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method shows that the initial association yields a prereaction complex that isomerizes by H migration to yield excited intermediate nitrooxymethyl hydroperoxide NO 3 CH 2 OOH* with internal energy ∼44 kcal mol -1 . A fragmentation of this excited intermediate produces CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH with its transition state located 5.0 kcal mol -1 below that of the reactants. Further decomposition of CH 2 (O)NO 3 produces HCO + HNO 3 , forming a catalytic cycle for destruction of CH 2 OO by HNO 3 . The rate coefficients and product-branching ratios were calculated in the temperature range 250-700 K at pressure 20-760 Torr (N 2 ) using the variational-transition-state and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theories. The predicted total rate coefficient for reaction CH 2 OO + HNO 3 at 295 K, 5.1 × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , agrees satisfactorily with the experimental value, (5.4 ± 1.0) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . The predicted branching ratios at 295 K are 0.21 for the formation of NO 3 CH 2 OOH and 0.79 for CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH at a pressure of 40 Torr (N 2 ), and 0.79 for the formation of NO 3 CH 2 OOH and 0.21 for CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH at 760 Torr (N 2 ). This new catalytic conversion of CH 2 OO to HCO + OH by HNO 3 might have significant impact on atmospheric chemistry.

  15. The instability of molecules in laser field and isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.

    1981-01-01

    In the present paper the nonlinear differential equation describing the selective decomposition of a molecule as an unimolecular reaction has be deduced from the usual time dependent semi-classical Schroedinger equation. The selective conditions for the instability of a molecule are discussed. The thresholds of the required laser intensities for ICl and HCl diatomic molecules are estimated respectively, where on type of isotope molecules ought to be decomposed for hundred per cent in a laser pulse for different pulse widths. And possibly selective decomposition of the molecule without permanent dipole moment by Raman process is also discussed briefly. (orig.)

  16. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  18. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Single molecule conductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis represents an excursion into the world of molecular electronics, i.e. the field of research trying to use individual (organic) molecules as electronic components; in this work various experimental methods have been explored to connect individual molecules to metallic contacts and

  20. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  1. Nuclear astrophysics with DRAGON at ISAC: the 21Na(p, γ)22Mg reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The DRAGON facility at the new intense radioactive beams facility, ISAC, is now operational. It was built to perform studies of radiative alpha and proton capture reactions involving radioactive reactants, and of interest to nuclear astrophysics. The rate of the 21 Na(p, γ) 22 Mg reaction has been measured using inverse kinematics. Resonance strengths have been measured for states of importance for novae explosions. This report will summarize aspects of this study and its impact. (orig.)

  2. Molecules in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, research related to molecules in stars has rapidly expanded because of progress in related fields. For this reason, it is almost impossible to cover all the topics related to molecules in stars. Thus, here the authors focus their attention on molecules in the atmospheres of cool stars and do not cover in any detail topics related to circumstellar molecules originating from expanding envelopes located far from the stellar surface. However, the authors do discuss molecules in quasi-static circumstellar envelopes (a recently discovered new component of circumstellar envelopes) located near the stellar surface, since molecular lines originating from such envelopes show little velocity shift relative to photospheric lines, and hence they directly affect the interpretation and analysis of stellar spectra

  3. Fast Hydrazone Reactants: Electronic and Acid/Base Effects Strongly Influence Rate at Biological pH

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, Eric T.; Park, Do-Hyoung; Crisalli, Pete

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics studies with structurally varied aldehydes and ketones in aqueous buffer at pH 7.4 reveal that carbonyl compounds with neighboring acid/base groups form hydrazones at accelerated rates. Similarly, tests of a hydrazine with a neighboring carboxylic acid group show that it also reacts at an accelerated rate. Rate constants for the fastest carbonyl/hydrazine combinations are 2–20 M−1sec−1, which is faster than recent strain-promoted cycloaddition reactions.

  4. Explore the reaction mechanism of the Maillard reaction: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ge-Rui; Zhao, Li-Jiang; Sun, Qiang; Xie, Hu-Jun; Lei, Qun-Fang; Fang, Wen-Jun

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of Maillard reaction has been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations in the gaseous phase and aqueous solution. The Maillard reaction is a cascade of consecutive and parallel reaction. In the present model system study, glucose and glycine were taken as the initial reactants. On the basis of previous experimental results, the mechanisms of Maillard reaction have been proposed, and the possibility for the formation of different compounds have been evaluated through calculating the relative energy changes for different steps of reaction under different pH conditions. Our calculations reveal that the TS3 in Amadori rearrangement reaction is the rate-determining step of Maillard reaction with the activation barriers of about 66.7 and 68.8 kcal mol(-1) in the gaseous phase and aqueous solution, respectively. The calculation results are in good agreement with previous studies and could provide insights into the reaction mechanism of Maillard reaction, since experimental evaluation of the role of intermediates in the Maillard reaction is quite complicated.

  5. Preparation of a poly(3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-co-propargyl methacrylate-co-pentaerythritol triacrylate) monolithic column by in situ polymerization and a click reaction for capillary liquid chromatography of small molecules and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zian; Yu, Ruifang; Hu, Wenli; Zheng, Jiangnan; Tong, Ping; Zhao, Hongzhi; Cai, Zongwei

    2015-07-07

    Combining free radical polymerization with click chemistry via a copper-mediated azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction in a "one-pot" process, a facile approach was developed for the preparation of a poly(3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-co-propargyl methacrylate-co-pentaerythritol triacrylate) (AZT-co-PMA-co-PETA) monolithic column. The resulting poly(AZT-co-PMA-co-PETA) monolith showed a relatively homogeneous monolithic structure, good permeability and mechanical stability. Different ratios of monomers and porogens were used for optimizing the properties of a monolithic column. A series of alkylbenzenes, amides, anilines, and benzoic acids were used to evaluate the chromatographic properties of the polymer monolith in terms of hydrophobic, hydrophilic and cation-exchange interactions, and the results showed that the poly(AZT-co-PMA-co-PETA) monolith exhibited more flexible adjustment in chromatographic selectivity than that of the parent poly(PMA-co-PETA) and AZT-modified poly(PMA-co-PETA) monoliths. Column efficiencies for toluene, DMF, and formamide with 35,000-48,000 theoretical plates per m could be obtained at a linear velocity of 0.17 mm s(-1). The run-to-run, column-to-column, and batch-to-batch repeatabilities of the retention factors were less than 4.2%. In addition, the proposed monolith was also applied to efficient separation of sulfonamides, nucleobases and nucleosides, anesthetics and proteins for demonstrating its potential.

  6. The Decomposition of Surrogate Fuel Molecules During Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsang, Wing; Manion, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    This project is aimed at developing a chemical kinetic database consisting of the rate constants of fundamental single step reactions that describe the pyrolytic decomposition of surrogate fuels molecules...

  7. Exohedral and skeletal rearrangements in the molecules of fullerene derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignat' eva, Daria V; Ioffe, I N; Troyanov, Sergey I; Sidorov, Lev N [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-31

    The data on the migration of monoatomic addends, perfluoroalkyl and more complex organic groups in the molecules of fullerene derivatives published mainly in the last decade are analyzed. Skeletal rearrangements of the carbon cage occurring during chemical reactions are considered.

  8. Effect of reactant concentration on the structural properties of hydrothermally-grown ZnO rods on seed-layer ZnO / polyethylene terephthalate substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Y. I.; Shin, C. M.; Heo, J. H.; Ryu, H. [Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. J. [Dong-Eui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Son, C. S. [Silla University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, H. [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The morphology and the structural properties were studied for zinc-oxide (ZnO) rods hydrothermally grown on seed-layer ZnO/polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates at various reactant concentrations. Dissolved solutions with de-ionized water, zinc nitrate hexahydrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O, ZNH) and hexamethylenetetramine (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}, HMT) were employed as reactants for hydrothermal growth of ZnO. The transparency of the mixtures (ZNH+HMT) with increasing reactant concentration from 0.025 to 0.25 M changed from transparent to translucent to opaque (white colors) due to Zn(OH){sub 2} precipitates. When the concentration was increased, the density of the ZnO rods increased, and the morphology of the ZnO rods changed from a hexagonal flat-end shape to a sharp-end or flake-like structure. The sharp-end rods with increasing concentration from 0.1 to 0.15 M resulted from the etching process at a lower pH condition (less than pH 6) after the ZnO rod growth, and the flake-like structure was due to a high growth rate. The ZnO seed layer might have improved the alignment of ZnO rods and made a high density of ZnO rods. In addition, the structural properties were improved at lower concentrations by inserting a seed layer.

  9. Rate constant and mechanism of the reaction Cl + CFCl₂H → CFCl₂ + HCl over the temperature range 298-670 K in N₂ or N₂/O₂ diluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, E W; Jawad, Khadija M

    2014-05-08

    The rate constant of the reaction Cl + CFCl2H (k1) has been measured relative to the established rate constant for the reaction Cl + CH4 (k2) at 760 Torr. The measurements were carried out in Pyrex reactors using a mixture of CFCl2H, CH4, and Cl2 in either N2 or N2/O2 diluent. Reactants and products were quantified by GC/FID analysis. Cl atoms were generated by irradiation of the mixture with 360 nm light to dissociate the Cl2 for temperatures up to ~550 K. At higher temperature, the Cl2 dissociated thermally, and no irradiation was used. Over the temperature range 298-670 K, k1 is consistently a factor of ~5 smaller than that of k2 with a nearly identical temperature dependence. The optimum non-Arrhenius rate constant is represented by the expression k1 = 1.14 × 10(-22) T(3.49) e(-241/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with an estimated uncertainty of ±15% including uncertainty in the reference reaction. CFCl3 formed from the reaction CFCl2 + Cl2 (k3) is the sole product in N2 diluent. In ~20% O2 at 298 K, the CFCl3 product is suppressed. The rate constant of reaction 3 was measured relative to that of reaction 4 [CFCl2 + O2 (k4)] giving the result k3/k4 = 0.0031 ± 0.0005 at 298 K. An earlier experiment by others observed C(O)FCl to be the major product of reaction channel 4 [formed via the sequence, CFCl2(O2) → CFCl2O → C(O)FCl + Cl]. Our current experiments verified that there is a Cl atom chain reaction in the presence of O2 as required by this mechanism.

  10. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water reaction phenomena in support of chemical reaction model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2011-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule to the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. The results are used as the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by JAEA toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  11. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  12. Semisynthetic protein nanoreactor for single-molecule chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joongoo; Bayley, Hagan

    2015-01-01

    The modulation of ionic current flowing through an individual protein pore provides information at the single-molecule level about chemical reactions occurring within the pore. However, chemistry investigated in this way has been largely confined to the reactions of thiolates, presented by the side chains of cysteine residues. The introduction of unnatural amino acids would provide a large variety of reactive side chains with which additional single-molecule chemistry could be investigated. H...

  13. Dissociation in small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The study of molecular dissociation processes is one of the most interesting areas of modern spectroscopy owing to the challenges presented bt even the simplest of diatomic molecules. This paper reviews the commonly used descriptions of molecular dissociation processes for diatomic molecules, the selection rules for predissociation, and a few of the principles to be remembered when one is forced to speculate about dissociation mechanisms in a new molecule. Some of these points will be illustrated by the example of dissociative ionization in O 2

  14. Reactions of PO(x)Cl(y)-ions with O(2)(a1-delta-g), H(2)O, and Cl(2) at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-10

    have also been studied to assess the chemistry that would occur if trace amounts of these species reached the flow tube. Most of the POxCly " ions...secondary ion-molecule chemistry [25]. P02~ and PO3" were generated from dimethyl phosphite (Ventron, 99%). The reactant ion of interest was selected

  15. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  16. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolved as a new line of thinking wherein a single molecule or perhaps a collection .... In photonic communication processes, laser light has to be modulated and .... The author wishes to thank G Rajaram for a critical reading of the manuscript.

  17. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    overall absorption spectrum of a molecule is a superposition of many such sharp lines .... dilute solution of the enzyme and the substrate over few drops of silicone oil placed ..... Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM): Development.

  18. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  19. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Keywords. Adamantane; diamondoid systems; plastic crystals. ... Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News. © 2017 Indian ...

  20. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives.

  1. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin, E-mail: franklin.tao.2011@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  2. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  3. The impact of reactants composition and temperature on the flow structure in a wake stabilized laminar lean premixed CH4/H2/air flames; mechanism and scaling

    KAUST Repository

    Michaels, D.

    2016-11-11

    In this paper we investigate the role of reactants composition and temperature in defining the steady flow structure in bluff body stabilized premixed flames. The study was motivated by experiments which showed that the flow structure and stability map for different fuels and inlet conditions collapse using the extinction strain rate as the chemical time scale. The investigation is conducted using a laminar lean premixed flame stabilized on a heat conducting bluff-body. Calculations are performed for a wide range of mixtures of CH4/H2/air (0.35 ≤ ϕ ≤ 0.75, 0 ≤ %H2 ≤ 40, 300 ≤ Tin [K] ≤ 500) in order to systematically vary the burning velocity (2.0–35.6 cm/s), dilatation ratio (2.7–6.4), and extinction strain rate (106–2924 1/s). The model is based on a fully resolved unsteady two-dimensional flow with detailed chemistry and species transport, and with no artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions. Calculations reveal that the recirculation zone length correlates with a chemical time scale based on the flame extinction strain rate corresponding to the inlet fuel composition, stoichiometry, pressure and temperature; and are consistent with experimental data in literature. It was found that in the wake region the flame is highly stretched and its location and interaction with the flow is governed by the reactants combustion characteristics under high strain.

  4. A three-dimensional numerical investigation of trapezoid baffles effect on non-isothermal reactant transport and cell net power in a PEMFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perng, Shiang-Wuu; Wu, Horng-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study how angle and height of trapezoid baffle affect PEMFC net power. • The jet-type, trapping, and blockage effects augment non-isothermal transport in flow channel. • Greater angles and heights of trapezoid baffles provide more reactant to the catalyst layer. • Baffles of 1.5 mm and 90° fully block flow channel to show bad heat transfer and large pressure drop. • Maximum enhancement of cell net power is 90% with baffles of 60° angle and 1.125 mm height. - Abstract: The present study performed a three-dimensional numerical simulation to observe how trapezoid baffles affect non-isothermal reactant transports and cell net power in the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) by the SIMPLE-C method. The geometric parameters of trapezoid baffles installed in the gas channel employed in this study include the angle and height with the same gas diffusion and catalyst layers to realize the cell net power considering the effect of liquid water formation on the fluid flow field. The cell net power is adopted to evaluate the real enhancement of cell performance due to the additional pumping power induced by the pressure loss through the PEMFC. The results illustrated that compared with traditional gas channel without baffles, the novel gas channel with trapezoid baffles, whose angle is 60° and height is 1.125 mm, enhances the cell net power best by approximately 90% among all trapezoid baffle designs

  5. The Dynamics of Large-Amplitude Motion in Energized Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, David S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-05-27

    Chemical reactions involve large-amplitude nuclear motion along the reaction coordinate that serves to distinguish reactants from products. Some reactions, such as roaming reactions and reactions proceeding through a loose transition state, involve more than one large-amplitude degree of freedom. Because of the limitation of exact quantum nuclear dynamics to small systems, one must, in general, define the active degrees of freedom and separate them in some way from the other degrees of freedom. In this project, we use large-amplitude motion in bound model systems to investigate the coupling of large-amplitude degrees of freedom to other nuclear degrees of freedom. This approach allows us to use the precision and power of high-resolution molecular spectroscopy to probe the specific coupling mechanisms involved, and to apply the associated theoretical tools. In addition to slit-jet spectra at the University of Akron, the current project period has involved collaboration with Michel Herman and Nathalie Vaeck of the Université Libre de Bruxelles, and with Brant Billinghurst at the Canadian Light Source (CLS).

  6. TRIMOLECULAR REACTIONS OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, M.; Becnel, J.; Garrison, S.

    2010-02-25

    The hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) is a key step in the synthesis of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder for nuclear fuels. Mechanisms for the hydrolysis reactions are studied here with density functional theory and the Stuttgart small-core scalar relativistic pseudopotential and associated basis set for uranium. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with a water molecule in the gas phase has been previously predicted to proceed over a relatively sizeable barrier of 78.2 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, indicating this reaction is only feasible at elevated temperatures. Given the observed formation of a second morphology for the UO{sub 2} product coupled with the observations of rapid, spontaneous hydrolysis at ambient conditions, an alternate reaction pathway must exist. In the present work, two trimolecular hydrolysis mechanisms are studied with density functional theory: (1) the reaction between two UF{sub 6} molecules and one water molecule, and (2) the reaction of two water molecules with a single UF{sub 6} molecule. The predicted reaction of two UF{sub 6} molecules with one water molecule displays an interesting 'fluorine-shuttle' mechanism, a significant energy barrier of 69.0 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} to the formation of UF{sub 5}OH, and an enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of +17.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with two water molecules displays a 'proton-shuttle' mechanism, and is more favorable, having a slightly lower computed energy barrier of 58.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and an exothermic enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of -13.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The exothermic nature of the overall UF{sub 6} + 2 {center_dot} H{sub 2}O trimolecular reaction and the lowering of the barrier height with respect to the bimolecular reaction are encouraging; however, the sizable energy barrier indicates further study of the UF{sub 6} hydrolysis reaction

  7. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  8. Formation of ultracold NaRb Feshbach molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fudong; He, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoke; Zhu, Bing; Chen, Jun; Wang, Dajun

    2015-01-01

    We report the creation of ultracold bosonic 23 Na 87 Rb Feshbach molecules via magneto-association. By ramping the magnetic field across an interspecies Feshbach resonance (FR), at least 4000 molecules can be produced out of the near degenerate ultracold mixture. Fast loss due to inelastic atom–molecule collisions is observed, which limits the pure molecule number, after residual atoms removal, to 1700. The pure molecule sample can live for 21.8(8) ms in the optical trap, long enough for future molecular spectroscopy studies toward coherently transferring to the singlet ro-vibrational ground state, where these molecules are stable against chemical reaction and have a permanent electric dipole moment of 3.3 Debye. We have also measured the Feshbach molecule’s binding energy near the FR by the oscillating magnetic field method and found these molecules have a large closed-channel fraction. (paper)

  9. Small Molecule Library Synthesis Using Segmented Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Thompson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Flow chemistry has gained considerable recognition as a simple, efficient, and safe technology for the synthesis of many types of organic and inorganic molecules ranging in scope from large complex natural products to silicon nanoparticles. In this paper we describe a method that adapts flow chemistry to the synthesis of libraries of compounds using a fluorous immiscible solvent as a spacer between reactions. The methodology was validated in the synthesis of two small heterocycle containing libraries. The reactions were performed on a 0.2 mmol scale, enabling tens of milligrams of material to be generated in a single 200 mL reaction plug. The methodology allowed library synthesis in half the time of conventional microwave synthesis while maintaining similar yields. The ability to perform multiple, potentially unrelated reactions in a single run is ideal for making small quantities of many different compounds quickly and efficiently.

  10. PhreeqcRM: A reaction module for transport simulators based on the geochemical model PHREEQC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Wissmeier, Laurin

    2015-01-01

    PhreeqcRM is a geochemical reaction module designed specifically to perform equilibrium and kinetic reaction calculations for reactive transport simulators that use an operator-splitting approach. The basic function of the reaction module is to take component concentrations from the model cells of the transport simulator, run geochemical reactions, and return updated component concentrations to the transport simulator. If multicomponent diffusion is modeled (e.g., Nernst–Planck equation), then aqueous species concentrations can be used instead of component concentrations. The reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of the reaction capabilities of PHREEQC. In each cell, the reaction module maintains the composition of all of the reactants, which may include minerals, exchangers, surface complexers, gas phases, solid solutions, and user-defined kinetic reactants.PhreeqcRM assigns initial and boundary conditions for model cells based on standard PHREEQC input definitions (files or strings) of chemical compositions of solutions and reactants. Additional PhreeqcRM capabilities include methods to eliminate reaction calculations for inactive parts of a model domain, transfer concentrations and other model properties, and retrieve selected results. The module demonstrates good scalability for parallel processing by using multiprocessing with MPI (message passing interface) on distributed memory systems, and limited scalability using multithreading with OpenMP on shared memory systems. PhreeqcRM is written in C++, but interfaces allow methods to be called from C or Fortran. By using the PhreeqcRM reaction module, an existing multicomponent transport simulator can be extended to simulate a wide range of geochemical reactions. Results of the implementation of PhreeqcRM as the reaction engine for transport simulators PHAST and FEFLOW are shown by using an analytical solution and the reactive transport benchmark of MoMaS.

  11. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single-molecule

  12. Isotope effects of reactions in quantum solids initiated by IR + UV lasers: quantum model simulations for Cl((2)P(3/2)) + X(2)(ν) → XCl + X in X(2) matrices (X = H, D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolkov, M V; Manz, J; Schild, A

    2010-09-16

    , compared to that for reaction 1 . (vi) For a given value of the UV frequency, the translational energy E(trans) increases with mass M(X). Again, this effect supports tunneling of the heavier isotopomer. The isotope effects (i)-(iii), (iv)-(v), and (vi) may be classified as energetic, translational amplitude, and kinematic, respectively. Specifically, the effects (iv)-(v) are due to a systematic decrease of the amplitudes of translational motions of the reactant molecules, from quasi infinite in the gas via still rather large values of para-H(2)(ν) and smaller values for ortho-D(2)(ν) to very small values in classical solids. These isotope effects are special phenomena in quantum solids, which do not occur, neither in the gas phase nor in classical solids. Quantitative predictions, e.g., for the effects of increasing UV frequency on the ratio of reactions probabilities for the UV only versus IR + UV experiments, must account for the interplay of various isotope effects, e.g., (vi) combined with the antagonistic effects (iii) versus (iv) and (v).

  13. Electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, I.; Takayanagi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of collision processes plays an important research role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made by means of collision experiments. Based on theoretical, experimental, and computational studies, this volume presents an overview detailing the basic processes of electron-molecule collisions. The editors have collected papers-written by a group of international experts-that consider a diverse range of phenomena occurring in electronmolecule collisions. The volume discusses first the basic formulation for scattering problems and then gives an outline of the physics of electron-molecule collisions. The main topics covered are rotational transitions, vibrational transitions, dissociation of molecules in slow collisions, the electron-molecule collision as a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular electronic structures, and experimental and computational techniques for determining the cross sections. These well-referenced chapters are self-contained and can be read independently or consecutively. Authoritative and up-to-date, Electron-Molecule Collisions is a useful addition to the libraries of students and researchers in the fields of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and physical chemistry

  14. Mass transport in a PEMFC fuel battery using combinations of monopolar plates and reaction-diffusion medium; Transporte de masa en una pila a combustible tipo PEMFC utilizando combinaciones de platos monopolares y medios de difusion de reactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas Paleta, M. G. Araceli [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Bautista Rodriguez, C. Moises [Alter-Energias Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)] email: celso.bautista@thyssenkrupp.com; Rivera Marquez, J. Antonio; Tepale Ochoa, Nancy [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The efficiency of a PEMFC fuel battery is limited due to a variety of mass transport-related phenomena that take place while it is operating. The electromotive force of the PEM fuel battery is related to the generation of concentration gradients resulting from the distribution of the reactants on the active sites of the electrode. The reactant gases supplied to the PEMFC are distributed over the diffusion layer of the electrodes through the channels of the polar plates. They then spread toward the active layer where the semi-reactions take place. Another important aspect is the presence of water molecules, a product of the reaction. When they accumulate, they cover the porosity of the electrodes, involving the reduction in the flow of reactants, even at high current density values and, combined with the diffusion phenomena involved, cause the PEMFC to complete cease functioning. The critical parameters for the transport phenomena are porosity, the diameter of the pore in the diffusion layer and the characteristics of the distribution of the reactants. The present works includes an experimental design of two distribution media and two diffusion media of the reactant gases in a PEMFC, involving three case studies. The results show significantly notable interactions between the diameter of the pore, the type of diffusion layer applied and the type of distributor applied. The combination in the second case significantly reduces the ohmic resistance and moderately reduces the diffusion resistances. While the combination in case three notably increases the ohmic resistance, diffusion resistance is significantly reduced. [Spanish] La eficiencia de una pila a combustible tipo PEMFC es limitada por diversos fenomenos de transporte de masa presentes durante su funcionamiento. La fuerza electromotriz de la pila a combustible tipo PEM esta relacionada con la generacion de gradientes de concentracion los cuales se dan como resultado de la distribucion de los reactivos sobre los

  15. Small organic molecule based flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskinson, Brian; Marshak, Michael; Aziz, Michael J.; Gordon, Roy G.; Betley, Theodore A.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Er, Suleyman; Suh, Changwon

    2018-05-08

    The invention provides an electrochemical cell based on a new chemistry for a flow battery for large scale, e.g., gridscale, electrical energy storage. Electrical energy is stored chemically at an electrochemical electrode by the protonation of small organic molecules called quinones to hydroquinones. The proton is provided by a complementary electrochemical reaction at the other electrode. These reactions are reversed to deliver electrical energy. A flow battery based on this concept can operate as a closed system. The flow battery architecture has scaling advantages over solid electrode batteries for large scale energy storage.

  16. Communication: State-to-state dynamics of the Cl + H2O → HCl + OH reaction: Energy flow into reaction coordinate and transition-state control of product energy disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Bin; Guo, Hua; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Quantum state-to-state dynamics of a prototypical four-atom reaction, namely, Cl + H 2 O → HCl + OH, is investigated for the first time in full dimensionality using a transition-state wave packet method. The state-to-state reactivity and its dependence on the reactant internal excitations are analyzed and found to share many similarities both energetically and dynamically with the H + H 2 O → H 2 + OH reaction. The strong enhancement of reactivity by the H 2 O stretching vibrational excitations in both reactions is attributed to the favorable energy flow into the reaction coordinate near the transition state. On the other hand, the insensitivity of the product state distributions with regard to reactant internal excitation stems apparently from the transition-state control of product energy disposal

  17. Communication: State-to-state dynamics of the Cl + H2O → HCl + OH reaction: Energy flow into reaction coordinate and transition-state control of product energy disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2015-06-28

    Quantum state-to-state dynamics of a prototypical four-atom reaction, namely, Cl + H2O → HCl + OH, is investigated for the first time in full dimensionality using a transition-state wave packet method. The state-to-state reactivity and its dependence on the reactant internal excitations are analyzed and found to share many similarities both energetically and dynamically with the H + H2O → H2 + OH reaction. The strong enhancement of reactivity by the H2O stretching vibrational excitations in both reactions is attributed to the favorable energy flow into the reaction coordinate near the transition state. On the other hand, the insensitivity of the product state distributions with regard to reactant internal excitation stems apparently from the transition-state control of product energy disposal.

  18. The influence of the “cage effect” on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doktorov, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    Manifestations of the “cage effect” at the encounters of reactants are theoretically treated by the example of multistage reactions in liquid solutions including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages. It is shown that consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of multistage reactions (possible only in the framework of the encounter theory) for reactions proceeding near reactants contact can be made on the basis of the concepts of a “cage complex.” Though mathematically such a consideration is more complicated, it is more clear from the standpoint of chemical notions. It is established that the presence of the “cage effect” leads to some important effects not inherent in reactions in gases or those in solutions proceeding in the kinetic regime, such as the appearance of new transition channels of reactant transformation that cannot be caused by elementary event of chemical conversion for the given mechanism of reaction. This results in that, for example, rate constant values of multistage reaction defined by standard kinetic equations of formal chemical kinetics from experimentally measured kinetics can differ essentially from real values of these constants

  19. The influence of the "cage effect" on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorov, Alexander B

    2015-08-21

    Manifestations of the "cage effect" at the encounters of reactants are theoretically treated by the example of multistage reactions in liquid solutions including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages. It is shown that consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of multistage reactions (possible only in the framework of the encounter theory) for reactions proceeding near reactants contact can be made on the basis of the concepts of a "cage complex." Though mathematically such a consideration is more complicated, it is more clear from the standpoint of chemical notions. It is established that the presence of the "cage effect" leads to some important effects not inherent in reactions in gases or those in solutions proceeding in the kinetic regime, such as the appearance of new transition channels of reactant transformation that cannot be caused by elementary event of chemical conversion for the given mechanism of reaction. This results in that, for example, rate constant values of multistage reaction defined by standard kinetic equations of formal chemical kinetics from experimentally measured kinetics can differ essentially from real values of these constants.

  20. The influence of the “cage effect” on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions in solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktorov, Alexander B., E-mail: doktorov@kinetics.nsc.ru [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics & Combustion, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-21

    Manifestations of the “cage effect” at the encounters of reactants are theoretically treated by the example of multistage reactions in liquid solutions including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages. It is shown that consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of multistage reactions (possible only in the framework of the encounter theory) for reactions proceeding near reactants contact can be made on the basis of the concepts of a “cage complex.” Though mathematically such a consideration is more complicated, it is more clear from the standpoint of chemical notions. It is established that the presence of the “cage effect” leads to some important effects not inherent in reactions in gases or those in solutions proceeding in the kinetic regime, such as the appearance of new transition channels of reactant transformation that cannot be caused by elementary event of chemical conversion for the given mechanism of reaction. This results in that, for example, rate constant values of multistage reaction defined by standard kinetic equations of formal chemical kinetics from experimentally measured kinetics can differ essentially from real values of these constants.